Science.gov

Sample records for system heat stress

  1. A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury, and heat stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallings, Jonathan D.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-05-01

    Heat illness is a major source of injury for military populations in both deployed and training settings. Developing tools to help leaders enhance unit performance while reducing the risk of injury is of paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D) realistic thermoregulation model, identify the molecular basis and mediators of injury, and characterize associated biomarkers. We discuss the implications of our work, future directions, and the type of tools necessary to enhance force health protection in the future.

  2. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it`s inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  3. Heat stress monitoring system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program involves the need to decontaminate and decommission buildings expeditiously and cost-effectively. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. Often, D and D workers must perform duties in inclement weather, and because they also frequently work in contaminated areas, they must wear personal protective clothing and/or respirators. Monitoring the health status of workers under these conditions is an important component of ensuring their safety. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System`s heat stress monitoring system (HSMS) is designed to monitor the vital signs of individual workers as they perform work in conditions that might be conducive to heat exhaustion or heat stress. The HSMS provides real-time data on the physiological condition of workers which can be monitored to prevent heat stress or other adverse health situations. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their condition more difficult. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System can monitor up to four channels (e.g., heart rate, body activity, ear canal, and skin temperature) and ten workers from a single supervisory station. The monitors are interfaced with a portable computer that updates and records information on individual workers. This innovative technology, even though it costs more, is an attractive alternative to the traditional (baseline) technology, which measures environmental statistics and predicts the average worker`s reaction to those environmental conditions without taking the physical condition of the individual worker into consideration. Although use of the improved technology might be justified purely on the basis of improved safety, it has the potential to pay for itself by reducing worker time lost caused by heat

  4. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes time, and from a management perspective, it may require careful planning. NIOSH Science Blog: Extreme Heat – Are you prepared for summer ...

  5. Crop heat stress in the context of Earth System modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levis, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Siebert et al (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 044012) suggest that crop models do not represent the effect of heat stress on crop yield adequately unless they apply such effect to sensitive phases in a crop’s growth cycle. Siebert et al focus particularly on the phase considered most sensitive for wheat yield in Germany, the time of anthesis. Siebert et al find that observed canopy rather than 2 m or ground temperature better quantifies the effect of heat stress during anthesis on wheat yield in Germany when evaluated against data from pot experiments under controlled conditions.

  6. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori; Wada, Shuichi

    2010-03-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28 degrees C (10 degrees C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system.

  7. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  8. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  9. The relationship between yield and the antioxidant defense system in tomatoes grown under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, D T; Gossett, D R; Millhollon, E P; Hanna, H Y; Banks, S W; Lucas, M C

    1996-11-01

    Four putative heat-tolerant tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) cultivars (Tamasabro, Heat Wave, LHT-24, and Solar Set) and one putative heat-sensitive tomato cultivar (Floradade) were grown in the field under non-stress (average daily temperature of 26 degrees C) and heat-stress (average daily temperature of 34 degrees C) conditions. At anthesis, approximately five weeks after being transplanted to the field, leaf samples were collected for antioxidant analyses. Yield was determined by harvesting ripe fruit seven weeks after the collection of leaf samples. Heat stress resulted in a 79.1% decrease in yield for the heat-sensitive Floradade, while the fruit yield in the heat-tolerant cultivars Heat Wave, LHT-24, Solar Set, and Tamasabro was reduced 51.5%, 22.1%, 43.8%, and 34.8% respectively. When grown under heat stress, antioxidant activities were also greater in the heat-tolerant cultivars. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased up to 9-fold in the heat-tolerant cultivars but decreased 83.1% in the heat-sensitive Floradade. Catalase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase activity increased significantly in all cultivars. Only Heat Wave showed a significant increase in glutathione reductase in response to heat stress but all heat-tolerant cultivars exhibited significantly lower oxidized ascorbate/reduced ascorbate ratios, greater reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione rations, and greater alpha-tocopherol concentrations compared to the heat-sensitive cultivar Floridade. These data indicate that the more heat-tolerant cultivars had an enhanced capacity for scavenging active oxygen species and a more active ascorbate-glutathione cycle and suggest a strong correlation between the ability to up-regulate the antioxidant defense system and the ability of tomatoes to produce greater yields when grown under heat stress.

  10. Study of heat exchange in cooling systems of heat-stressed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing working parameters of the cycle of gas-turbine engines, complicating design of gas-turbine plants, as well as growing aerodynamic, thermal, static, and dynamic loads, necessitate the development of promising cooling systems for heat-stressed structures. This work is devoted to an experimental study of heat exchange in ducts equipped with systems of inclined and cross walls (fins). It has been found that an increase in the Reynolds number Re from 3000 to 20000 leads to a decrease in the heat exchange, which is characterized by the relative Nusselt number overline{Nu}, by 19-30% at the angle of inclination of the walls φ = 0, 40°, 50°, and 90° if the length of the walls x w is comparable to the spacing b s and by 12-15% at φ = 30° and 90° if x w ≫ b s. If cross walls are used in cooling ducts, the length of the walls x w plays the governing role; an increase in this characteristic from 1.22 × 10-3 to 3.14 × 10-3 m leads to an increase in the intensity of heat exchange by 30-40% and to a decrease in the capacity of the entire system of the walls. It has been shown that, on surfaces with wavy fins, the intensity of heat exchange is closest to that determined in the models under study. For example, values of the Colborne criterion StPr2/3 for ducts equipped with wavy fins and for the models under study differ only slightly (by 2-20% depending on the value of the angle φ). However, the difference for surfaces with short plate fins and ducts equipped with inclined walls is high (30-40%). This is due to the design features of these surfaces and to the severe effect of the inlet portion on heat exchange, since the surfaces are characterized by a higher ratio of the duct length to the hydraulic diameter L/d h at small fin thicknesses ((0.1-0.15) × 10-3 m). The experimental results can be used in developing designs of nozzle and rotor blades of high-temperature gas turbines in gas-turbine engines and plants.

  11. Stress response in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: transcriptional profiling of genes for the heat shock protein 70 chaperone system under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Munakata, Takeo; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Nori

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Ciona intestinalis contains eight genes for HSP70 superfamily proteins, 36 genes for J-proteins, a gene for a J-like protein, and three genes for BAG family proteins. To understand the stress responses of genes in the HSP70 chaperone system comprehensively, the transcriptional profiles of these 48 genes under heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were studied using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Heat stress treatment increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of six HSP70 superfamily genes, eight J-protein family genes, and two BAG family genes. In the cytoplasmic group of the DnaK subfamily of the HSP70 family, Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like was the only heat-inducible gene and Ci-HSPA2/8 was the only constitutively active gene which showed striking simplicity in comparison with other animals that have been examined genome-wide so far. Analyses of the time course and temperature dependency of the heat stress responses showed that the induction of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like expression rises to a peak after heat stress treatment at 28°C (10°C upshift from control temperature) for 1 h. ER stress treatment with Brefeldin A, a drug that is known to act as ER stress inducer, increased the mRNA levels of four HSP70 superfamily genes and four J-protein family genes. Most stress-inducible genes are conserved between Ciona and vertebrates, as expected from a close evolutionary relationship between them. The present study characterized the stress responses of HSP70 chaperone system genes in Ciona for the first time and provides essential data for comprehensive understanding of the functions of the HSP70 chaperone system. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12192-009-0133-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19629754

  12. Heat stress mortality and desired adaptation responses of healthcare system in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błażejczyk, Anna; Błażejczyk, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Jarosław; Kuchcik, Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    Heat stress is one of the environmental factors influencing the health of individuals and the wider population. There is a large body of research to document significant increases in mortality and morbidity during heat waves all over the world. This paper presents key results of research dealing with heat-related mortality (HRM) in various cities in Poland which cover about 25% of the country's population. Daily mortality and weather data reports for the years 1991-2000 were used. The intensity of heat stress was assessed by the universal thermal climate index (UTCI). The research considers also the projections of future bioclimate to the end of twenty-first century. Brain storming discussions were applied to find necessary adaptation strategies of healthcare system (HCS) in Poland, to minimise negative effects of heat stress. In general, in days with strong and very strong heat stress, ones must expect increase in mortality (in relation to no thermal stress days) of 12 and 47%, respectively. Because of projected rise in global temperature and heat stress frequency, we must expect significant increase in HRM to the end of twenty-first century of even 165% in comparison to present days. The results of research show necessity of urgent implementation of adaptation strategies to heat in HCS.

  13. Heat stress mortality and desired adaptation responses of healthcare system in Poland.

    PubMed

    Błażejczyk, Anna; Błażejczyk, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Jarosław; Kuchcik, Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    Heat stress is one of the environmental factors influencing the health of individuals and the wider population. There is a large body of research to document significant increases in mortality and morbidity during heat waves all over the world. This paper presents key results of research dealing with heat-related mortality (HRM) in various cities in Poland which cover about 25% of the country's population. Daily mortality and weather data reports for the years 1991-2000 were used. The intensity of heat stress was assessed by the universal thermal climate index (UTCI). The research considers also the projections of future bioclimate to the end of twenty-first century. Brain storming discussions were applied to find necessary adaptation strategies of healthcare system (HCS) in Poland, to minimise negative effects of heat stress. In general, in days with strong and very strong heat stress, ones must expect increase in mortality (in relation to no thermal stress days) of 12 and 47%, respectively. Because of projected rise in global temperature and heat stress frequency, we must expect significant increase in HRM to the end of twenty-first century of even 165% in comparison to present days. The results of research show necessity of urgent implementation of adaptation strategies to heat in HCS.

  14. [Study on real-time wearable monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuhong; Wang, Tianhao; Li, Chenming

    2013-02-01

    In order to study the way of evaluating human performance under heat and cold stresses, we developed a wearable physiological monitoring system-intelligent belt system, capable of providing real-time, continuous and dynamic monitoring of multiple physiological parameters. The system has following features: multiuser communication, high integration, strong environment adaptability, dynamic features and real time physiological monitoring ability. The system uses sensing belts and elastic belts to acquire physiological parameters, uses WIFI to build wireless network monitoring for multiuser, and uses Delphi to develop data processing software capable of real-time viewing, storagng, processing, and alerting. With four different intensity-activity trials on six subjects and compared with standard laboratory human physiological acquisition instruments, the system was proved to be able to acquire accu-rate physiological parameters such as ECG, respiration, multi-point body temperatures, and body movement. The system worked steadily and reliably. This wearable real-time monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses can solve the problem facing our country that human heat stress and cold stress monitoring technology is insufficient, provide new methods and new ways for monitoring and evaluation of human heat and cold stresses under real task or stress environment, and provide technical platform for the study on human ergonomics.

  15. Heat Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The heavy, cumbersome body protection suits worn by members of hazardous materials response teams cause marked elevation of body temperatures, which can reduce effectiveness and lead to heat stress and injury. The CorTemp System, marketed by Human Technologies, Inc., provides the basis for a body temperature monitoring alarm system. Encased in a three-quarter-inch ingestible capsule, the system includes a mini-thermometer, miniature telemetry system, a microbattery and temperature sensor. It makes its way through the digestive system, continuously monitoring temperature. Findings are sent to the recorder by telemetry, and then displayed and stored for transfer to a computer.

  16. A microfluidic cell culture system for monitoring of sequential changes in endothelial cells after heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Hidekatsu; Sato, Kenjiro; Tsutiya, Atsuhiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2015-08-01

    Endothelial damage induced by a highly elevated body temperature is crucial in some diseases including viral hemorrhagic fevers. Here, we report the heat-induced sequential changes of endothelial cells under shear stress, which were determined with a microfluidic culture system. Although live cell imaging showed only minor changes in the appearance of heat-treated cells, Hsp70 mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that the endothelial cells in channels of the system responded well to heat treatment. F-actin staining also revealed clear changes in the bundles of actin filaments after heat treatment. Well-organized bundles of actin filaments in control cells disappeared in heat-treated cells cultured in the channel. Furthermore, the system enabled detection of sequential changes in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) secretion from endothelial cells. PAI-1 concentration in the effluent solution was significantly elevated for the first 15min after initiation of heat treatment, and then decreased subsequently. This study provides fundamental information on heat-induced endothelial changes under shear stress and introduces a potent tool for analyzing endothelial secretions.

  17. Physiological tolerance to uncompensated heat stress in soldiers: effects of various types of body cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Dalibor; Karkalić, Radovan; Zeba, Snjezana; Pavlović, Miroslav; Radaković, Sonja S

    2014-03-01

    In military services, emergency situations when soldiers are exposed to a combination of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) contamination combined with heat stress, are frequent and complex. In these specific conditions, usage of personal body cooling systems may be effective in reducing heat stress. The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the efficiency of four various types of contemporary personal body cooling systems based on the "Phase Change Material" (PCM), and its effects on soldiers' subjective comfort and physiological performance during exertional heat stress in hot environments. Ten male soldiers were voluntarily subjected to exertional heat stress tests (EHSTs) consisted of walking on a treadmill (5.5 km/h) in hot conditions (40 degreesC) in climatic chamber, wearing NBC isolating impermeable protective suits. One of the tests was performed without any additional cooling solution (NOCOOL), and four tests were performed while using different types of cooling systems: three in a form of vests and one as underwear. Physiological strain was determined by the mean skin temperature (Tsk), tympanic temperature (Tty), and heart rate values (HR), while sweat rates (SwR) indicated changes in hydration status. In all the cases EHST induced physiological response manifested through increasing Tty, HR and SwR. Compared to NOCOOL tests, when using cooling vests, Tty and Tsk were significantly lower (on 35th min, for 0.44 +/- 0.03 and 0.49 +/- 0.05 degrees C, respectively; p < 0.05), as well as the average SwR (0.17 +/- 0.03 L/m2/h). When using underwear, the values of given parameters were not significantly different compared to NOCOOL tests. Using a body cooling system based on PCM in the form of vest under NBC protective clothes during physical activity in hot conditions, reduces sweating and alleviates heat stress manifested by increased core and skin temperatures and heart rate values. These effects directly improve heat tolerance, hydration

  18. Improved Heat-Stress Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Fehn, Steven

    2007-01-01

    NASA Dryden presents an improved and automated site-specific algorithm for heat-stress approximation using standard atmospheric measurements routinely obtained from the Edwards Air Force Base weather detachment. Heat stress, which is the net heat load a worker may be exposed to, is officially measured using a thermal-environment monitoring system to calculate the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). This instrument uses three independent thermometers to measure wet-bulb, dry-bulb, and the black-globe temperatures. By using these improvements, a more realistic WBGT estimation value can now be produced. This is extremely useful for researchers and other employees who are working on outdoor projects that are distant from the areas that the Web system monitors. Most importantly, the improved WBGT estimations will make outdoor work sites safer by reducing the likelihood of heat stress.

  19. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  20. Human cardiovascular responses to passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  1. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  2. Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperatures are high and the job involves physical work. Risk Factors for Heat Illness • High temperature and humidity, ... heat or those that have been away from work to adapt to working in the heat (acclimatization). • Routinely check workers who are at risk of heat stress due to protective clothing and ...

  3. Amelioration of Heat Stress Induced Disturbances of Antioxidant Defense System in Chicken by Brahma Rasayana

    PubMed Central

    Rekha, P. S.; Sujatha, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    Since the range of comfort zone or thermo neutral zone of domestic chickens is narrow, they become easily susceptible to heat and cold environmental stress. We evaluated Brahma Rasayana (BR) supplementation on concentrations of certain oxidative stress markers associated with heat stress. A total of 48 egg type male chickens of local strain were divided into six groups (n = 8) for the study. Three groups were fed with BR orally at the rate of 2 g/kg bw daily for 10 days prior to and during the period of experiment. Two of the four groups that were exposed to heat stress (HST i.e. to a temperature of 40 ± 1°C and relative humidity of 80 ± 5% in an environmental chamber) for 4 h daily for 5 or 10 days, received BR orally. The other two groups remained as BR treated and untreated non-heat stressed (NHST) controls. There was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in blood such as catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as liver CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) in NHST-BR treated and HST-BR treated (both 5 and 10 days) chickens when compared with untreated controls. A great deal of significant (P < 0.05) variations were seen in serum and liver reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in NHST-BR treated and HST-BR treated (both 5 and 10 days) chickens. Serum and liver lipid peroxidation levels were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher in HST-untreated (both 5 and 10 days) chickens when compared with other groups. Thus BR supplementation during HST brings about enhanced action of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, which nullified the undesired side effects of free radicals that are generated during HST. PMID:18317552

  4. Autonomic nervous system modulation during accidental syncope induced by heat and orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Andres E; Cheung, Stephen S; Flouris, Andreas D

    2013-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) indices (LF, HF, LF/HF, RMSSD, and pNN50) under combined heat and orthostatic stress leading up to and during accidental syncope (EXP group: one man, two women; age: 23.7 +/- 2.9 yr) were compared with data collected from subjects who did not experience syncope (CON group: one man, two women; age: 22.3 +/- 1.5 yr). Minute averages of HRV indices were collected during 5 min at baseline (Base), 5 min leading up to syncope (PRE), and 5 min during syncope (Syncope) (i.e., 2 min leading up to, 1 min during, and 2 min post-syncope). Data were individually analyzed as 1-min means during Syncope as well as 5-min means during Base, PRE, and Syncope. Between-group results revealed that LF and LF/HF were significantly higher and HF was significantly lower in EXP compared to CON subjects at minutes 1, 2, and 3 during Syncope. Further, RMSSD (CON: 161.1 +/- 37.0 ms; EXP: 17.5 +/- 13.3 ms) and pNN50 (CON: 26.4 +/- 36.3%; EXP: 1.3 +/- 1.2%) were significantly lower in EXP compared to CON subjects at minute 3 during Syncope. During Syncope, 5-min averages of LF (CON: 46.1 +/- 13.9 nu; EXP: 77.5 +/- 6.6 nu) and LF/HF (CON: 1.0 0.5; EXP: 3.8 +/- 1.7) were significantly higher, and HF (CON: 53.9 +/- 13.9 nu; EXP: 22.5 +/ 1 6.6 nu) was significantly lower in EXP subjects compared to CON. Our findings show that autonomic nervous system modulation leading up to and during accidental syncope induced by heat and orthostatic stress is characterized by an exaggerated suppression of parasympathetic and elevation of sympathetic activity. Thus, elevated LF and LF/HF, and lower HF, RMSSD, and pNN50 may represent risk factors for accidental syncope.

  5. Physiological Strain During Exercise-Heat Stress Experienced by Soldiers Wearing Candidate Chemical Protective Fabric Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    when no longer needed. Do not return to the originator. .S , TECHNICAL REPORT 0 - -. l . Physiological Strain During Exercise-Heat Stress Experienced by...fire protection. V % N2 i - ’ i . . . i . . . . . . . " l ’ " - i W% The views, opinions, and/or findings contained in this report are those of...8217 - ’-’ WI N I?’ - L -𔃾 TABLE OF CONTENTS 0i. List of Figures iv List of Tables v Abstract vii Introduction1 Methods1 Minimizing Risks to Subjects

  6. A laboratory comparison of portable cooling systems for workers exposed to two levels of heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrian, D. M.; Nunneley, S. A.

    1983-07-01

    Two commercially available liquid cooling systems (LCSs) were tested on subjects wearing the current USAF groundcrew chemical defense ensemble and working in the heat. Each cooling system consisted of an ice-water heat sink, a pump, and a vest or vest-and-cap through which cool water circulated. Subjects walked on a treadmill to produce a time-weighted metabolic rate of about 480 W. Environmental conditions were: hot = 45/31C and warm = 32/22C. Under the hot conditions neither LCS produced and difference from the uncooled control, and all subjects were forced to stop within 40-50 min because of high temperatures, excessive heat rates, or exhaustion. Under the warm condition the LCS did allow T sub re to equilibrate; one system which could be recharged with ice enabled subjects to continue work to the 160-min limit of the protocol. Discussion covers logistics problems and reliability of the two systems. The conclusion is the LCSs are a viable concept for USAF operations, but that better heat sinks must be found and field tested before acceptance.

  7. Opposite effects of moderate heat stress and hyperthermia on cholinergic system of soil nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae.

    PubMed

    Kalinnikova, Tatiana B; Kolsanova, Rufina R; Belova, Evgenia B; Shagidullin, Rifgat R; Gainutdinov, Marat Kh

    2016-12-01

    Cholinergic system plays important role in all functions of organisms of free-living soil nematodes C. elegans and C. briggsae. Using pharmacological analysis we showed the existence of two opposite responses of nematodes cholinergic system to moderate and extreme heat stress. Short-term (15min) noxious heat (31-32°C) caused activation of cholinergic synaptic transmission in C. elegans and C. briggsae organisms by sensitization of nicotinic ACh receptors. In contrast, hyperthermia blocked cholinergic synaptic transmission by inhibition of ACh secretion by neurons. The resistance of behavior to extreme high temperature (36-37°C) was significantly higher in C. briggsae than in C. elegans, and thermostability of cholinergic transmission correlated with resistance of behavior to hyperthermia. Activation of cholinergic transmission by moderate heat stress can be the reason of movement speed increase in such adaptive behavior as noxious heat escape. Inhibition of ACh release is one of reasons for behavior failure caused by extreme high temperature since partial inhibition of ACh-esterase by aldicarb protected C. elegans and C. briggsae behavior against hyperthermia. Antagonist of mAChRs atropine almost completely prevented the rise in behavior thermotolerance caused by aldicarb. Pilocarpine, agonist of mAChRs, protected nematodes behavior against hyperthermia similarly with aldicarb. Therefore it is evident that it is the deficiency of mAChRs activity that is the reason for nematodes' behavior failure by hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lycopene activates antioxidant enzymes and nuclear transcription factor systems in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A; Bilgili, S; Kucuk, O

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lycopene supplementation on growth performance, antioxidant status, and muscle nuclear transcription factor [Kelch like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) and (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] expressions in broiler chickens exposed to heat stress (HS). A total of 180 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were assigned randomly to one of 2×3 factorially arranged treatments: two housing temperatures (22°C for 24 h/d; thermoneutral, TN or 34°C for 8 h/d HS) and three dietary lycopene levels (0, 200, or 400 mg/kg). Each treatment consisted of three replicates of 10 birds. Birds were reared to 42 d of age. Heat stress caused reductions in feed intake and weight gain by 12.2 and 20.7% and increased feed efficiency by 10.8% (P<0.0001 for all). Increasing dietary lycopene level improved performance in both environments. Birds reared under the HS environment had lower serum and muscle lycopene concentration (0.34 vs. 0.50 μg/mL and 2.80 vs. 2.13 μg/g), activities of superoxide dismutase (151 vs. 126 U/mL and 131 vs. 155 U/mg protein), glutathione peroxidase (184 vs. 154 U/mL and 1.39 vs. 1.74 U/mg protein), and higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (0.53 vs. 0.83 μg/mL and 0.78 vs. 0.45 μg/ mg protein) than birds reared under the TN environment. Changes in levels of lycopene and MDA and activities of enzymes in serum and muscle varied by the environmental temperature as dietary lycopene level increased. Moreover, increasing dietary lycopene level suppressed muscle Keap1 expression and enhanced muscle Nrf2 expression, which had increased by 150% and decreased by 40%, respectively in response to HS. In conclusion, lycopene supplementation alleviates adverse effects of HS on performance through modulating expressions of stress-related nuclear transcription factors.

  9. A Physiological Systems Approach to Modeling and Resetting of Mouse Thermoregulation under Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    RL. A whole body thermal model of man during hyperthermia. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 34: 375–387, 1987. 3. Dematte JE, O’Mara K, Buescher J, Whitney CG...New York: Raven, 1992, p. 61–77. 4a.Fan L, Hsu F, and Hwang C. A review on mathematical models of the human thermal system. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 18...radiation on metabolic heat production in a small desert rodent, Spermophilus tereticaudus. J Exp Biol 203: 879–888, 2000. 945MODELING OF MAMMALIAN

  10. Effects of heat stress on antioxidant defense system, inflammatory injury, and heat shock proteins of Muscovy and Pekin ducks: evidence for differential thermal sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Jin-jun; Wang, De-qian; Li, Guo-qin; Wang, Gen-lin; Lu, Li-zhi

    2014-11-01

    Rising temperatures are severely affecting the mortality, laying performance, and meat quality of duck. Our aim was to investigate the effect of acute heat stress on the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs: HSP90, 70, 60, 40, and 10) and inflammatory factors (nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehybe (MDA), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)) in livers of ducks and to compare the thermal tolerance of Pekin and Muscovy ducks exposed to acute heat stress. Ducks were exposed to heat at 39 ± 0.5 °C for 1 h and then returned to 20 °C for 1 h followed by a 3-h recovery period. The liver and other tissues were collected from each individual for analysis. The mRNA levels of HSPs (70, 60, and 40) increased in both species, except for HSP10, which was upregulated in Muscovy ducks and had no difference in Pekin ducks after heat stress. Simultaneously, the mRNA level of HSP90 decreased in the stress group in both species. Morphological analysis indicated that heat stress induced tissue injury in both species, and the liver of Pekin ducks was severely damaged. The activities of several antioxidant enzymes increased in Muscovy duck liver, but decreased in Pekin duck. The mRNA levels of inflammatory factors were increased after heat stress in both duck species. These results suggested that heat stress could influence HSPs, inflammatory factors expression, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, the differential response to heat stress indicated that the Muscovy duck has a better thermal tolerance than does the Pekin duck.

  11. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  13. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  14. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  15. Effects of heat stress on mammalian reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Heat stress can have large effects on most aspects of reproductive function in mammals. These include disruptions in spermatogenesis and oocyte development, oocyte maturation, early embryonic development, foetal and placental growth and lactation. These deleterious effects of heat stress are the result of either the hyperthermia associated with heat stress or the physiological adjustments made by the heat-stressed animal to regulate body temperature. Many effects of elevated temperature on gametes and the early embryo involve increased production of reactive oxygen species. Genetic adaptation to heat stress is possible both with respect to regulation of body temperature and cellular resistance to elevated temperature. PMID:19833646

  16. Sex Pheromones of C. elegans Males Prime the Female Reproductive System and Ameliorate the Effects of Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Aprison, Erin Z.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Pheromones are secreted molecules that mediate animal communications. These olfactory signals can have substantial effects on physiology and likely play important roles in organismal survival in natural habitats. Here we show that a blend of two ascaroside pheromones produced by C. elegans males primes the female reproductive system in part by improving sperm guidance toward oocytes. Worms have different physiological responses to different ratios of the same two molecules, revealing an efficient mechanism for increasing coding potential of a limited repertoire of molecular signals. The endogenous function of the male sex pheromones has an important side benefit. It substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of prolonged heat stress on hermaphrodite reproduction because it increases the effectiveness with which surviving gametes are used following stress. Hermaphroditic species are expected to lose female-specific traits in the course of evolution. Our results suggest that some of these traits could have serendipitous utility due to their ability to counter the effects of stress. We propose that this is a general mechanism by which some mating-related functions could be retained in hermaphroditic species, despite their expected decay. PMID:26645097

  17. Sex Pheromones of C. elegans Males Prime the Female Reproductive System and Ameliorate the Effects of Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Aprison, Erin Z; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-12-01

    Pheromones are secreted molecules that mediate animal communications. These olfactory signals can have substantial effects on physiology and likely play important roles in organismal survival in natural habitats. Here we show that a blend of two ascaroside pheromones produced by C. elegans males primes the female reproductive system in part by improving sperm guidance toward oocytes. Worms have different physiological responses to different ratios of the same two molecules, revealing an efficient mechanism for increasing coding potential of a limited repertoire of molecular signals. The endogenous function of the male sex pheromones has an important side benefit. It substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of prolonged heat stress on hermaphrodite reproduction because it increases the effectiveness with which surviving gametes are used following stress. Hermaphroditic species are expected to lose female-specific traits in the course of evolution. Our results suggest that some of these traits could have serendipitous utility due to their ability to counter the effects of stress. We propose that this is a general mechanism by which some mating-related functions could be retained in hermaphroditic species, despite their expected decay.

  18. Role of heat shock protein Hsp25 in the response of the orofacial nuclei motor system to physiological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Talebian, S.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Although expression of the small heat shock protein family member Hsp25 has been previously observed in the central nervous system (CNS), both constitutively and upon induction, its function in the CNS remains far from clear. In the present study we have characterized the spatial pattern of expression of Hsp25 in the normal adult mouse brain as well as the changes in expression patterns induced by subjecting mice to experimental hyperthermia or hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a surprisingly restricted pattern of constitutive expression of Hsp25 in the brain, limited to the facial, trigeminal, ambiguus, hypoglossal and vagal motor nuclei of the brainstem. After hyperthermia or hypoxia treatment, significant increases in the levels of Hsp25 were observed in these same areas and also in fibers of the facial and trigeminal nerve tracts. Immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from brainstem also showed the same pattern of induction of Hsp25. Surprisingly, no other area in the brain showed expression of Hsp25, in either control or stressed animals. The highly restricted expression of Hsp25 implies that this protein may have a specific physiological role in the orofacial motor nuclei, which govern precise coordination between muscles of mastication and the pharynx, larynx, and face. Its rapid induction after stress further suggests that Hsp25 may serve as a specific molecular chaperone in the lower cholinergic motor neurons and along their fibers under conditions of stress or injury. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Role of heat shock protein Hsp25 in the response of the orofacial nuclei motor system to physiological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Talebian, S.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Although expression of the small heat shock protein family member Hsp25 has been previously observed in the central nervous system (CNS), both constitutively and upon induction, its function in the CNS remains far from clear. In the present study we have characterized the spatial pattern of expression of Hsp25 in the normal adult mouse brain as well as the changes in expression patterns induced by subjecting mice to experimental hyperthermia or hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a surprisingly restricted pattern of constitutive expression of Hsp25 in the brain, limited to the facial, trigeminal, ambiguus, hypoglossal and vagal motor nuclei of the brainstem. After hyperthermia or hypoxia treatment, significant increases in the levels of Hsp25 were observed in these same areas and also in fibers of the facial and trigeminal nerve tracts. Immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from brainstem also showed the same pattern of induction of Hsp25. Surprisingly, no other area in the brain showed expression of Hsp25, in either control or stressed animals. The highly restricted expression of Hsp25 implies that this protein may have a specific physiological role in the orofacial motor nuclei, which govern precise coordination between muscles of mastication and the pharynx, larynx, and face. Its rapid induction after stress further suggests that Hsp25 may serve as a specific molecular chaperone in the lower cholinergic motor neurons and along their fibers under conditions of stress or injury. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF), which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t), of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t) depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104). The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i) the response of the cell to two consecutive shocks (i.e., no

  1. A physiological systems approach to modeling and resetting of mouse thermoregulation under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Grosman, Benyamin; Shaik, Osman S; Helwig, Bryan G; Leon, Lisa R; Doyle, Francis J

    2011-09-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is a serious civilian and military health issue. Due to the limited amount of experimental data available in humans, this study was conducted on a mouse mathematical model fitted on experimental data collected from mice under HS conditions, with the assumption there is good agreement among mammals. Core temperature (T(c)) recovery responses in a mouse model consist of hypothermia and delayed fever during 24 h of recovery that represent potential biomarkers of HS severity. The objective of this study was to develop a simulation model of mouse T(c) responses and identify optimal treatment windows for HS recovery using a three-dimensional predictive heat transfer simulation model. Several bioenergetic simulation variables, including nonlinear metabolic heat production (W/m³), temperature-dependent convective heat transfer through blood mass perfusion (W/m³), and activity-related changes in circadian T(c) were used for model simulation. The simulation results predicted the experimental data with few disparities. Using this simulation model, we tested a series of ambient temperature treatment strategies to minimize hypothermia and delayed fever to accelerate HS recovery. Using a genetic algorithm, we identified eight time segments (ambient temperature = 27, 30, 31, 29, 28, 28, 27, 26°C) of 110 min total duration that optimized HS recovery in our model simulation.

  2. Heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, H.J.; Howell, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    This book was written as a reference and textbook on heat pumps. Economics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, design, selection, and operating practices are covered in detail. Specific methods, and solutions rather than broad generalizations are emphasized. Includes problems, bibliographies, and a subject index. For applied science collections in public, college and appropriate special libraries. Contents: Thermodynamics, Heat pump systems and applications. Heat pump components. Heating and cooling loads. Energy use determination. Reliability, maintenance, and service. Advances in heat pumps. Appendices. Index.

  3. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  4. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  5. Heat stress interaction with shade and cooling.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D V

    1994-07-01

    Hot weather causes heat stress in dairy cattle. Although effects are more severe in hot climates, dairy cattle in areas with relatively moderate climates also are exposed to periods of heat stress. The resultant decrease in milk production and reproductive efficiency can be offset by implementation of a program consisting of cooling through shades, ventilation and spray, and fans. The economic benefit should be determined before installation of equipment to reduce heat stress.

  6. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  7. Response of Urban Systems to Climate Change in Europe: Heat Stress Exposure and the Effect on Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Catherine; Thomas, Bart; Grommen, Mart

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is driven by global processes such as the global ocean circulation and its variability over time leading to changing weather patterns on regional scales as well as changes in the severity and occurrence of extreme events such as heavy rain- and windstorms, floods, drought, heat waves, etc. The summer 2003 European heat wave was the hottest summer on record in Europe over the past centuries leading to health crises in several countries like France and caused up to 70.000 excess deaths over four months in Central and Western Europe. The main risks induced by global climate change in urbanised areas are considered to be overheating and resulting health effects, increased exposure to flood events, increased damage losses from extreme weather conditions but also shortages in the provision of life-sustaining services. Moreover, the cities themselves create specific or inherent risks and urban adaptation is often very demanding. As most of Europe's inhabitants live in cities, it is of particular relevance to examine the impact of climate variability on urban areas and their populations. The present study focusses on the identification of heat stress variables related to human health and the extraction of this information by processing daily temperature statistics of local urban climate simulations over multiple timeframes of 20 years and three different European cities based on recent, near future and far future global climate predictions. The analyses have been conducted in the framework of the NACLIM FP7 project funded by the European Commission involving local stakeholders such as the cities of Antwerp (Belgium), Berlin (Germany) and Almada (Portugal) represented by different climate and urban characteristics. Apart from the urban-rural temperature increment (urban heat island effect), additional heat stress parameters such as the average number of heat wave days together with their duration and intensities have been covered during this research. In a

  8. Integrated heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, W.R.

    1988-03-01

    An integrated heat pump and hot water system is described that includes: a heat pump having an indoor heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger that are selectively connected to the suction line and the discharge line respectively of a compressor by a flow reversing means, and to each other by a liquid line having an expansion device mounted therein, whereby heating and cooling is provided to an indoor comfort zone by cycling the flow reversing means, a refrigerant to water heat exchanger having a hot water flow circuit in heat transfer relation with a first refrigerant condensing circuit and a second refrigerant evaporating circuit, a connection mounted in the liquid between the indoor heat exchanger and the expansion device, control means for regulating the flow of refrigerant through the refrigerant to water heat exchanger to selectively transfer heat into and out of the hot water flow circuit.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  10. Heat stress during in vitro fertilization decreases fertilization success by disrupting anti-polyspermy systems of the oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Miki; Yamanaka, Kenichi; Balboula, Ahmed Z; Takenouchi, Naoki; Takahashi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Low pregnancy rates during the summer are due, in part, to reduced fertilization. Given that elevated temperature is associated with this season, we investigated the effect of heat stress during fertilization using an in vitro model. Three experiments were performed to determine the mechanism by which exposure to elevated temperature disrupts fertilization. Oocytes were fertilized for 6 hr at 38.5°C or 41.0°C or 40.0°C with non-pre-incubated sperm, or for 6 hr at 38.5°C with sperm that had been pre-incubated at 38.5°C or 41.0°C for 4 hr. In each experiment, zygotes were cultured at 38.5°C in 5% CO(2) and 5% O(2). Rates of cleavage and blasocyst formation were reduced when fertilization occurs at elevated temperatures. The percent of sperm classified as alive, using fluorescein diacetate labeling, was decreased by pre-incubation and fertilization at 40.0°C. Although no difference was observed in sperm penetration rate, polyspermy tended to be increased by heat stress during fertilization. The zona pellucidae of zygotes formed following fertilization at 40.0°C for 6 hr were more sensitive to digestion with pronase. Furthermore, these zygotes exhibited higher hydrogen peroxide levels, measured by 2,7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate staining, and showed increased transcript abundance for HSPA1A, a gene involved in the heat-shock response, but decreased transcript abundance for UCHL1, a gene involved in preventing polyspermy. Results indicate that heat stress during fertilization is lethal to sperm, and causes oxidative stress, altered transcript abundance, and a defective block to polyspermy in the zygote. Thus, an increase in polyspermy is likely one cause of the reduced competency of zygotes fertilized under elevated temperatures to develop to the blastocyst stage.

  11. Investigating the Effect of Ocean Currents on the Surface Stress and Heat Fluxes over the Gulf of Mexico Using a Two-way Coupled Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Bourassa, M. A.; Velissariou, P.

    2015-12-01

    A two-way coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling system is used to investigate the effects associated with air-sea interaction through the use of wind-current shear in the bulk formula. This study focuses on changes in the mean and the variability of the wind stress magnitude, the heat fluxes, the near surface temperature and the precipitation on meso-scale. The atmospheric and the ocean components of the coupled modeling system are the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) respectively. The ocean and the atmospheric models exchange data fields using the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The ocean surface currents are passed to the atmospheric model for use in surface layer schemes to allow for the current to change the wind shear. The wind stress and heat fluxes computed by the WRF surface scheme are passed to the ocean model, which allows both models to use the same fluxes at the interface. The inclusion of the wind-current shear results in weaker surface stress over most of the Gulf of Mexico compared to the wind-alone estimate. Changes are also being found in the air-sea heat fluxes. The weekly averaged Latent Heat Flux (LHF) decreases by 1%~2% over most of the Gulf of Mexico by considering the currents effect, but localized LHF increases of ~10% are found in the Loop current. The sensible heat flux changes (> 5%) due to using the wind-current shear are found in the Loop Current as well as over the land. The air-sea heat fluxes associated with surface wind stress feedback onto the upper-ocean thermodynamics. The weekly mean SSTs increase over most of the Gulf of Mexico by using the wind-current shear, and significant increases (>0.2 K) are found next to the Loop Current and ocean eddies. However, the SSTs slightly decrease (~0.05 K) in the Loop Current.

  12. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  13. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  14. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  15. Heat Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  16. Quantifying Livestock Heat Stress Impacts in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, D.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hopson, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Livestock heat stress, especially in regions of the developing world with limited adaptive capacity, has a largely unquantified impact on food supply. Though dominated by ambient air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation all affect heat stress, which can decrease livestock growth, milk production, reproduction rates, and mortality. Indices like the thermal-humidity index (THI) are used to quantify the heat stress experienced from climate variables. Livestock experience differing impacts at different index critical thresholds that are empirically determined and specific to species and breed. This lack of understanding has been highlighted in several studies with a limited knowledge of the critical thresholds of heat stress in native livestock breeds, as well as the current and future impact of heat stress,. As adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change depend on a solid quantitative foundation, this knowledge gap has limited such efforts. To address the lack of study, we have investigated heat stress impacts in the pastoral system of Sub-Saharan West Africa. We used a stochastic weather generator to quantify both the historic and future variability of heat stress. This approach models temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation, the climate variables controlling heat stress. Incorporating large-scale climate as covariates into this framework provides a better historical fit and allows us to include future CMIP5 GCM projections to examine the climate change impacts on heat stress. Health and production data allow us to examine the influence of this variability on livestock directly, and are considered in conjunction with the confounding impacts of fodder and water access. This understanding provides useful information to decision makers looking to mitigate the impacts of climate change and can provide useful seasonal forecasts of heat stress risk. A comparison of the current and future heat stress conditions based on

  17. Impact of Heat Stress on Poultry Production.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lucas J; Rostagno, Marcos H

    2013-04-24

    Understanding and controlling environmental conditions is crucial to successful poultry production and welfare. Heat stress is one of the most important environmental stressors challenging poultry production worldwide. The detrimental effects of heat stress on broilers and laying hens range from reduced growth and egg production to decreased poultry and egg quality and safety. Moreover, the negative impact of heat stress on poultry welfare has recently attracted increasing public awareness and concern. Much information has been published on the effects of heat stress on productivity and immune response in poultry. However, our knowledge of basic mechanisms associated to the reported effects, as well as related to poultry behavior and welfare under heat stress conditions is in fact scarce. Intervention strategies to deal with heat stress conditions have been the focus of many published studies. Nevertheless, effectiveness of most of the interventions has been variable or inconsistent. This review focuses on the scientific evidence available on the importance and impact of heat stress in poultry production, with emphasis on broilers and laying hens.

  18. Mild Heat Stress Enhances Angiogenesis in a Co-culture System Consisting of Primary Human Osteoblasts and Outgrowth Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sabine; Böse, Thomas; Schmidt, Harald; Hofmann, Alexander; Tonak, Marcus; Unger, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    The repair and regeneration of large bone defects, including the formation of functional vasculature, represents a highly challenging task for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that vascularization and ossification can be stimulated by mild heat stress (MHS), which would offer the option to enhance the bone regeneration process by relatively simple means. However, the mechanisms of MHS-enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as potential risks for the treated cells are unclear. We have investigated the direct effect of MHS on angiogenesis and osteogenesis in a co-culture system of human outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) and primary osteoblasts (pOBs), and assessed cytotoxic effects, as well as the levels of various heat shock proteins (HSPs) synthesized under these conditions. Enhanced formation of microvessel-like structures was observed in co-cultures exposed to MHS (41°C, 1 h), twice per week, over a time period of 7–14 days. As shown by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was up-regulated in MHS-treated co-cultures 24 h post-treatment. At the protein level, significantly elevated VEGF and Ang-1 concentrations were observed in MHS-treated co-cultures and pOB mono-cultures compared with controls, indicating paracrine effects associated with MHS-induced angiogenesis. MHS-stimulated co-cultures and OEC mono-cultures released higher levels of Ang-2 than untreated cultures. On the other hand MHS treatment of co-cultures did not result in a clear effect regarding osteogenesis. Nevertheless, real-time PCR demonstrated that MHS increased the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase, interleukin-6, and bone morphogenetic protein 2, known as HSP-related molecules in angiogenic and osteogenic regulation pathways. In agreement with these observations, the expression of

  19. Mild heat stress enhances angiogenesis in a co-culture system consisting of primary human osteoblasts and outgrowth endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Fuchs, Sabine; Böse, Thomas; Schmidt, Harald; Hofmann, Alexander; Tonak, Marcus; Unger, Ronald; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2014-04-01

    The repair and regeneration of large bone defects, including the formation of functional vasculature, represents a highly challenging task for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that vascularization and ossification can be stimulated by mild heat stress (MHS), which would offer the option to enhance the bone regeneration process by relatively simple means. However, the mechanisms of MHS-enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as potential risks for the treated cells are unclear. We have investigated the direct effect of MHS on angiogenesis and osteogenesis in a co-culture system of human outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) and primary osteoblasts (pOBs), and assessed cytotoxic effects, as well as the levels of various heat shock proteins (HSPs) synthesized under these conditions. Enhanced formation of microvessel-like structures was observed in co-cultures exposed to MHS (41°C, 1 h), twice per week, over a time period of 7-14 days. As shown by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was up-regulated in MHS-treated co-cultures 24 h post-treatment. At the protein level, significantly elevated VEGF and Ang-1 concentrations were observed in MHS-treated co-cultures and pOB mono-cultures compared with controls, indicating paracrine effects associated with MHS-induced angiogenesis. MHS-stimulated co-cultures and OEC mono-cultures released higher levels of Ang-2 than untreated cultures. On the other hand MHS treatment of co-cultures did not result in a clear effect regarding osteogenesis. Nevertheless, real-time PCR demonstrated that MHS increased the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase, interleukin-6, and bone morphogenetic protein 2, known as HSP-related molecules in angiogenic and osteogenic regulation pathways. In agreement with these observations, the expression of some

  20. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  1. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Wilson, Thad E; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-04-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. PMID:26723547

  3. Drivers and barriers to heat stress resilience.

    PubMed

    Hatvani-Kovacs, Gertrud; Belusko, Martin; Skinner, Natalie; Pockett, John; Boland, John

    2016-11-15

    Heatwaves are the most dangerous natural hazard to health in Australia. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves will increase due to climate change and urban heat island effects in cities, aggravating the negative impacts of heatwaves. Two approaches exist to develop population heat stress resilience. Firstly, the most vulnerable social groups can be identified and public health services can prepare for the increased morbidity. Secondly, the population level of adaptation and the heat stress resistance of the built environment can be increased. The evaluation of these measures and their efficiencies has been fragmented across research disciplines. This study explored the relationships between the elements of heat stress resilience and their potential demographic and housing drivers and barriers. The responses of a representative online survey (N=393) about heat stress resilience at home and work from Adelaide, South Australia were analysed. The empirical findings demonstrate that heat stress resistant buildings increased adaptation capacity and decreased the number of health problems. Air-conditioning increased dependence upon it, limited passive adaptation and only people living in homes with whole-house air-conditioning had less health problems during heatwaves. Tenants and respondents with pre-existing health conditions were the most vulnerable, particularly as those with health conditions were not aware of their vulnerability. The introduction of an Energy Performance Certificate is proposed and discussed as an effective incentive to increase the heat stress resistance of and the general knowledge about the built environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved solar heating systems

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  5. Solar heating system

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, James M.; Dorsey, George F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  6. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  7. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1977-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  8. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  9. Biophysical aspects of human thermoregulation during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Matthew N; Jay, Ollie

    2016-04-01

    Humans maintain a relatively constant core temperature through the dynamic balance between endogenous heat production and heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. In response to metabolic or environmental disturbances to heat balance, the autonomic nervous system initiates cutaneous vasodilation and eccrine sweating to facilitate higher rates of dry (primarily convection and radiation) and evaporative transfer from the body surface; however, absolute heat losses are ultimately governed by the properties of the skin and the environment. Over the duration of a heat exposure, the cumulative imbalance between heat production and heat dissipation leads to body heat storage, but the consequent change in core temperature, which has implications for health and safety in occupational and athletic settings particularly among certain clinical populations, involves a complex interaction between changes in body heat content and the body's morphological characteristics (mass, surface area, and tissue composition) that collectively determine the body's thermal inertia. The aim of this review is to highlight the biophysical aspects of human core temperature regulation by outlining the principles of human energy exchange and examining the influence of body morphology during exercise and environmental heat stress. An understanding of the biophysical factors influencing core temperature will enable researchers and practitioners to better identify and treat individuals/populations most vulnerable to heat illness and injury during exercise and extreme heat events. Further, appropriate guidelines may be developed to optimize health, safety, and work performance during heat stress.

  10. Heat Stress in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Reentering Your Flooded Home Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials ...

  11. Telemetric heat stress monitor (THSM) spin-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Berkbigler, L.; Bradley, O.; Lopez, R.; Martinez, D.; Stampfer, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to investigate spin-offs of the telemetric heat stress monitoring system (THSM) developed at LANL. Hazardous-materials workers and firefighters wear clothing that protects them from external hazards, but the sealed environment of a protective suit makes its wearer susceptible to heat stress. Heat stress occurs when the body`s natural cooling mechanisms fail: it can cause collapse and death. The THSM warns both workers and remote monitoring personnel of incipient heat stress by monitoring and responding to elevations of workers` skin temperatures and heart rates. The technology won a 1994 R & D 100 award.

  12. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Solar Fundamentals, Inc.'s hot water system employs space-derived heat pipe technology. It is used by a meat packing plant to heat water for cleaning processing machinery. Unit is complete system with water heater, hot water storage, electrical controls and auxiliary components. Other than fans and a circulating pump, there are no moving parts. System's unique design eliminates problems of balancing, leaking, corroding, and freezing.

  13. Heat rejection system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  14. Invited review: Effects of heat stress on dairy cattle welfare.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Liam; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2017-09-13

    The effects of high ambient temperatures on production animals, once thought to be limited to tropical areas, has extended into northern latitudes in response to the increasing global temperature. The number of days where the temperature-humidity index (THI) exceeds the comfort threshold (>72) is increasing in the northern United States, Canada, and Europe. Compounded by the increasing number of dairy animals and the intensification of production, heat stress has become one of the most important challenges facing the dairy industry today. The objectives of this review were to present an overview of the effects of heat stress on dairy cattle welfare and highlight important research gaps in the literature. We will also briefly discuss current heat abatement strategies, as well as the sustainability of future heat stress management. Heat stress has negative effects on the health and biological functioning of dairy cows through depressed milk production and reduced reproductive performance. Heat stress can also compromise the affective state of dairy cows by inducing feelings of hunger and thirst, and we have highlighted the need for research efforts to examine the potential relationship between heat stress, frustration, aggression, and pain. Little work has examined how heat stress affects an animal's natural coping behaviors, as well as how the animal's evolutionary adaptations for thermoregulation are managed in modern dairy systems. More research is needed to identify improved comprehensive cow-side measurements that can indicate real-time responses to elevated ambient temperatures and that could be incorporated into heat abatement management decisions. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  15. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  16. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SHU; CHEN, HONGBO; CHENG, YANFEN; NASIR, MOHAMMAD ABDEL; KEMPER, NICOLE; BAO, ENDONG

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42°C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480-min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB. PMID:26719858

  17. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  18. Magnetic heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.E.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for pumping heat for heating or refrigeration, comprising the steps of: exposing a system comprising a magnetic fluid to a magnetic field; causing the magnetic fluid to absorb heat of magnetization; transferring heat from the system to a heat sink; causing the magnetic fluid to exit the magnetic field, undergoing the cooling effect therefrom; and transferring heat to the system from a heat source.

  19. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  20. Solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report describes solar modular domestic-hot-water and space-heating system intended for use in small single family dwelling where roof-mounted collectors are not feasible. Contents include design, performance, and hardware specifications for assembly, installation, operation, and maintenance of system.

  1. Heating Systems Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This instructional package is intended for use in training Air Force personnel enrolled in a program for apprentice heating systems specialists. Training includes instruction in fundamentals and pipefitting; basic electricity; controls, troubleshooting, and oil burners; solid and gas fuel burners and warm air distribution systems; hot water…

  2. Textile dryer heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. S.

    1985-08-06

    A textile dryer heat recovery system includes a textile dryer and a heat exchanger. A duct is provided for directing dryer exhaust gas to the heat exchanger for preheating dryer input air. A cleaning system within the heat exchanger removes dryer exhaust gas contaminants deposited in the heat exchanger.

  3. Heat Stress Effects on Growing-Finishing Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the factors that create heat stress, the response of the animals while under heat stress, and the signs of heat-stressed swine are essential to making rational decisions for the selection, design, and management of their environments. Heat stressors include combinations of environment...

  4. Occupational heat stress in Australian workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Ollie; Brotherhood, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this review was to summarize the current state of knowledge on heat stress risk within typical Australian occupational settings. We assessed identified occupations (mining, agriculture, construction, emergency services) for heat production and heat loss potential, and resultant levels of physiological heat strain. A total of 29 reports were identified that assessed in-situ work settings in Northern Territory, South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, that measured physiological responses and characterized the thermal environment. Despite workers across all industries being regularly exposed to high ambient temperatures (32–42°C) often coupled with high absolute humidity (max: 33 hPa), physiological strain is generally low in terms of core temperature (<38°C) and dehydration (<1 % reduction in mass) by virtue of the low energy demands of many tasks, and self-regulated pacing of work possible in most jobs. Heat stress risk is higher in specific jobs in agriculture (e.g. sheep shearing), deep underground mining, and emergency services (e.g., search/rescue and bushfire fighting). Heat strain was greatest in military-related activities, particularly externally-paced marching with carried loads which resulted in core temperatures often exceeding 39.5°C despite being carried out in cooler environments. The principal driver of core temperature elevations in most jobs is the rate of metabolic heat production. A standardized approach to evaluating the risk of occupational heat strain in Australian workplaces is recommended defining the individual parameters that alter human heat balance. Future research should also more closely examine female workers and occupational activities within the forestry and agriculture/horticulture sector. PMID:28349081

  5. Occupational heat stress in Australian workplaces.

    PubMed

    Jay, Ollie; Brotherhood, John R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the current state of knowledge on heat stress risk within typical Australian occupational settings. We assessed identified occupations (mining, agriculture, construction, emergency services) for heat production and heat loss potential, and resultant levels of physiological heat strain. A total of 29 reports were identified that assessed in-situ work settings in Northern Territory, South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, that measured physiological responses and characterized the thermal environment. Despite workers across all industries being regularly exposed to high ambient temperatures (32-42°C) often coupled with high absolute humidity (max: 33 hPa), physiological strain is generally low in terms of core temperature (<38°C) and dehydration (<1 % reduction in mass) by virtue of the low energy demands of many tasks, and self-regulated pacing of work possible in most jobs. Heat stress risk is higher in specific jobs in agriculture (e.g. sheep shearing), deep underground mining, and emergency services (e.g., search/rescue and bushfire fighting). Heat strain was greatest in military-related activities, particularly externally-paced marching with carried loads which resulted in core temperatures often exceeding 39.5°C despite being carried out in cooler environments. The principal driver of core temperature elevations in most jobs is the rate of metabolic heat production. A standardized approach to evaluating the risk of occupational heat strain in Australian workplaces is recommended defining the individual parameters that alter human heat balance. Future research should also more closely examine female workers and occupational activities within the forestry and agriculture/horticulture sector.

  6. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  7. Effect of heat stress on oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and some stress parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Altan, O; Pabuçcuoğlu, A; Altan, A; Konyalioğlu, S; Bayraktar, H

    2003-09-01

    1. This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat stress on fearfulness, leucocyte components, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in two commercial broiler strains, Cobb (C) and Ross (R). 2. At 36 and 37 d of age birds were exposed to 38 +/- 1 degree C for 3 h. Rectal temperatures, duration of tonic immobility (TI), haematocrit values, proportions of leucocyte components (heterophil, lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte), malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities (CAT, SOD, GPx) of all the birds were determined, before and after heat treatment. 3. Rectal temperatures increased and haematocrit values decreased in birds exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused a significant increase in heterophil/lymphocyte and in basophil ratios. 4. Exposing birds to heat stress increased duration of TI, suggesting heat-stressed birds tended to be more fearful. 5. Heat stress resulted in a significant Genotype x Treatment interaction for MDA concentration. CAT, SOD and GPx activities; MDA concentrations in heat-stressed R strain birds were greater than in heat-stressed C strain birds.

  8. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  9. Geothermal district heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  10. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  11. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  12. Development of a telemetric heat stress monitor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-21

    Hazardous-materials workers and firefighters wear clothing that protects them from external hazards, but the sealed environment of a protective suit makes its wearer susceptible to heat stress. A prototype of the Telemetric Heat Stress Monitor (THSM) was developed at LANL to warn workers, and personnel monitoring the workers, of incipient heat stress by detecting the workers` elevated temperatures and heart rates. The purpose of this CRADA was to transfer the information and technology from LANL to the industrial partner, and to assist in the further development of a commercial THSM product. The THSM is the first extensive telemetric physiological monitor to be developed; previous monitors used wires between the sensors and the recording and display equipment. Developing a reliable, small, battery-powered, inexpensive telemetry system to share the RF spectrum with today`s proliferating wireless devices was a significant technical accomplishment.

  13. Fireplace heat generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Emmendorfer, C.

    1981-03-10

    A fireplace heat generating system includes a plurality of conduits which cooperate to define a grate for seating logs or other combustible material there atop. The conduits are in communication with a heat deflector or shield at the base thereof. Discharge or heat issuing conduits or other suitable conveyances are disposed at the top of the shield and are in fluid communication with the shield. Intermediate discharge or heat issuing conduits are disposed between the upper discharge conduits and the grate conduits. The intermediate conduits are disposed in fluid communication with the deflector at one end thereof and are pivotal about the one end so as to be adapted to rest on and follow the top of the pile of combustible material seated on the grate downward as the combustible material is consumed. According to the present invention, cold air is transported through the device via the grate conduits whereat it is heated and transported through the deflector and exits out of the discharge conduits. A hollow container having an aperture therein in communication with an air duct is disposed within an ash dump in the fireplace. A retractable door is carried by the container for selectively blocking or opening the aperture in the container to prohibit or permit entry of air into the fireplace.

  14. Solar heat storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Thomason, H.E.; Thomason, H.J.

    1983-01-25

    In a solar heating system, using liquid for heat-transfer or heat-storage or both, the liquid may be lost slowly due to a leaky pipe connection, or a cracked or split absorber plate or collector pipes attached to the absorber of a closed type of collector, by evaporation through broken solar collector glazing of a trickle-flow collector, or such. A number of schemes have been proposed to provide makeup liquid. One is to allow makeup liquid, such as water, to flow backward from a large heat-storage vessel used during the winter to a smaller one which is the only one in use during the summer. That scheme was disclosed in a patent application filed by dr. Harry E. Thomason way back in 1961. However, the backflow-connecting pipe had no check valve in it and therefore was of limited value. The present invention resides in several features including placing a check valve in the connecting pipe, and/or placing a flow-restricting device in the interconnecting pipes, and/or using a hole semi-check valve or lightly-loaded pressure-relief valve in the piping, or such, to increase the value of the system as will become apparent hereinafter.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae illustrates the response patterns regulated by catecholaminergic system upon acute heat and bacterial stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Yu; Dong, Miren; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Mengqiang; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-07

    Bacterial infection and heat stress, as two major environmental threats of marine molluscs, could affect larval development and dramatically promote mortality of oysters. In the present study, next-generation sequencing, together with determinations of mRNA expression and measurements of enzyme activities, were employed to understand the response patterns of oyster larvae under acute heat and bacterial stress. After RNA-seq, a total of 9472 differentially expressed genes including 4895 significantly up-regulated ones and 4577 significantly down-regulated ones were obtained from 12 transcriptome libraries. GO overrepresentation analysis of the up-regulated genes revealed that the neuroendocrine immunomodulation pathway was activated after acute heat and bacterial stimulation, in which the catecholaminergic regulation played an important role. GO overrepresentation analysis of the down-regulated genes suggested that the immune capacity of Crassostrea gigas larvae was suppressed under stress, which was further validated since superoxide dismutase (SOD) and phenoloxidase (PO) activities in the total protein extract of larvae decreased dramatically after stress. Moreover, the shell formation of trochophore was inhibited and severe mortality was caused after acute heat and bacterial stress. These results collectively indicated that acute heat and bacterial stress could significantly inhibit larval development and suppress immune response of oyster C. gigas larvae. And the neuroendocrine immunomodulation, especially the catecholaminergic regulation, played an indispensable role in the stress response of molluscan larvae.

  16. Upper body cooling during exercise-heat stress wearing the improved toxicological agent protective system for HAZMAT operations.

    PubMed

    Cadarette, Bruce S; Levine, Leslie; Staab, Janet E; Kolka, Margaret A; Correa, Matthew M; Whipple, Matthew; Sawka, Michael N

    2003-01-01

    This study compared endurance in a U.S. Army developmental Occupational Safety and Health Administration Level B personal protective equipment (PPE) system against the toxicological agent protective (TAP) suit, the Army's former standard PPE for Level A and Level B toxic environments. The developmental system consisted of two variations: the improved toxicological agent protective (ITAP) suit with self-contained breathing apparatus (ITAP-SCBA), weight 32 kg, and the ITAP with blower (ITAP-B), weight 21 kg. Both ITAP suits included the personal ice cooling system (PICS). TAP (weight 9.5 kg) had no cooling. It was hypothesized that PICS would effectively cool both ITAP configurations, and endurance in TAP would be limited by heat strain. Eight subjects (six men, two women) attempted three 2-hour treadmill walks (0.89 m/sec, 0% grade, rest/exercise cycles of 10/20 min) at 38 degrees C, 30% relative humidity. Metabolic rate for TAP (222+/-35 W) was significantly less than either ITAP-SCBA (278+/-27 W) or ITAP-B (262+/-24 W) (p<0.05). Endurance time was longer in ITAP-SCBA (85+/-20 min) and ITAP-B (87+/-25 min) than in TAP (46+/-10 min) (p<0.05). Heat storage was greater in TAP (77+/-15 W.m(-2)) than in ITAP-SCBA (51+/-16 W.m(-2)) (p<0.05), which was not different from ITAP-B (59+/-14 W.m(-2)). Sweating rate was greater in TAP (23.5+/-11.7 g/min(1)) than in either ITAP-SCBA (11.1+/-2.9 g/min) or ITAP-B (12.8+/-3.5 g/min) (p<0.05). Endurance in ITAP was nearly twice as long as in PPE with no cooling, even though the PICS, SCBA tanks, and new uniform itself all served to increase metabolic cost over that in TAP. PICS could also be used with civilian Levels A and B PPE increasing work time and worker safety.

  17. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  18. Comparison of the heat stress induced variations in DNA methylation between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rapeseed seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guizhen; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Chen, Biyun; Qiao, Jiangwei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is responsive to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Heat stress is a serious threat to crop growth and development worldwide. Heat stress results in an array of morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in plants. The relationship between DNA methylation and heat stress in crops is relatively unknown. We investigated the differences in methylation levels and changes in the cytosine methylation patterns in seedlings of two rapeseed genotypes (heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant) under heat stress. Our results revealed that the methylation levels were different between a heat-tolerant genotype and a heat-sensitive one under control conditions. Under heat treatment, methylation increased more in the heat-sensitive genotype than in the heat-tolerant genotype. More DNA demethylation events occurred in the heat-tolerant genotype, while more DNA methylation occurred in the heat-sensitive genotype. A large and diverse set of genes were affected by heat stress via cytosine methylation changes, suggesting that these genes likely play important roles in the response and adaption to heat stress in Brassica napus L. This study indicated that the changes in DNA methylation differed between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive genotypes of B. napus in response to heat stress, which further illuminates the molecular mechanisms of the adaption to heat stress in B. napus. PMID:24987298

  19. Prompt protein glycosylation during acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Henle, K J; Kaushal, G P; Nagle, W A; Nolen, G T

    1993-08-01

    Constitutive patterns of protein synthesis and protein glycosylation are severely disrupted by acute heat stress. Stressed cells respond by preferential synthesis of specific proteins, e.g., the well-known family of heat shock proteins. We observed another response that rapidly occurs during heating periods as short as 10 min at 45 degrees C. During that period, CHO cells began to glycosylate specific proteins, designated as "prompt" stress glycoproteins (P-SG), while constitutive protein glycosylation ceased. Labeling of P-SGs showed a dose response with time and with temperature and appeared regardless of the label used (D-[3H]mannose or D-[3H]glucose). On SDS-PAGE, the major P-SG was characterized by M(r) approximately 67 kDa (P-SG67) and pI = 5.1. Other less prominent P-SGs appeared at M(r) 160, 100, 64, 60, and 47 kDa; incorporated label showed little turnover during 24 h at 37 degrees C. Prompt glycosylation was inhibited by tunicamycin, and label incorporated into P-SGs was sensitive to N-glycosidase F, but not to O-glycosidase. Analysis of enzymatically digested P-SG67 indicated that label had been incorporated into both high-mannose (Man9GlcNAc) and complex-type oligosaccharides. Brefeldin A did not eliminate P-SG67 labeling, but caused the further appearance of novel, Brefeldin-associated P-SGs. Labeling of P-SG67 oligosaccharides occurred without significant concomitant protein synthesis, suggesting that addition of labeled oligosaccharides largely occurred on mature, rather than nascent proteins. The functional significance of prompt glycosylation remains to be defined, but we propose that this novel phenomenon is an integral part of the cellular heat stress response.

  20. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julian

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process. PMID:28006008

  1. Susceptibility of members of the family Legionellaceae to thermal stress: implications for heat eradication methods in water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, J E; Best, M G; Yu, V L

    1986-01-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of heat inactivation as an eradication method applicable to all members of the family Legionellaceae, we tested the heat resistance of 75 isolates which represented 19 members of this family of organisms. The ranges of thermal death times at 60, 70, and 80 degrees C were 1.3 to 10.6, 0.7 to 2.6, and 0.3 to 0.7 min, respectively. These data suggest that the method of heat eradication will be effective against all members of the family Legionellaceae. PMID:3752999

  2. Evaluation of corn genotypes for drought and heat stress tolerance using physiological measurements and a microcontroller-based monitoring system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Moisture deficit accompanied by high temperature are major abiotic stress factors that affect corn production in the southern United States, particularly during the reproductive stage of the plant. In evaluating plants for environmental stress tolerance, it is important to monitor changes in their ...

  3. Investigation of Urban Heat Stress from Satellite Atmospheric Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Heat stress is the leading cause of weather-related human mortality in the United States and in many countries world-wide. Heat stress is usually enhanced by the urban heat island effect. Here, we investigate the ability to use remotely sensed atmospheric profiles to detect and monitor heat stress in the urban environment. MODIS atmospheric profiles at 5 km are used to quantify the spatial distribution of heat stress across Chicago during summer periods from 2003-2013. Four heat stress indices are investigated (Discomfort Index (DI), NWS Heat Index (HI), Humidex, and Simplified Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (SWBGT)) from the near-surface temperature and humidity observed at ground sites and retrieved from satellite atmospheric profiles. The heat stress climatology indicates that the urban effects are similar to the heat stress in top 5% hot days and 11 summers during the daytime. There is a lack of relationship between urban fraction and the heat stress on the warmest nights. The nighttime heat stress in the hottest 5% suggests a larger stress compared to the normal conditions during 11 summers. A case study of the heat wave in 2012 is assessed to identify the key pre-heat wave spatial patterns, which may potentially apply to predict future high heat-stress events. In addition, the role of the temporal persistence on the spatial dynamics of the heat wave is also examined. This research illustrates the spatial heat pattern under normal and heat wave conditions, which may help to make public heat health protection strategies. Also, the remotely sensed temperature and humidity information are invaluable to assess urban heat island impact spatially and temporally.

  4. Thermal Indices and Thermophysiological Modeling for Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan

    2015-12-15

    The assessment of the risk of human exposure to heat is a topic as relevant today as a century ago. The introduction and use of heat stress indices and models to predict and quantify heat stress and heat strain has helped to reduce morbidity and mortality in industrial, military, sports, and leisure activities dramatically. Models used range from simple instruments that attempt to mimic the human-environment heat exchange to complex thermophysiological models that simulate both internal and external heat and mass transfer, including related processes through (protective) clothing. This article discusses the most commonly used indices and models and looks at how these are deployed in the different contexts of industrial, military, and biometeorological applications, with focus on use to predict related thermal sensations, acute risk of heat illness, and epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality. A critical assessment is made of tendencies to use simple indices such as WBGT in more complex conditions (e.g., while wearing protective clothing), or when employed in conjunction with inappropriate sensors. Regarding the more complex thermophysiological models, the article discusses more recent developments including model individualization approaches and advanced systems that combine simulation models with (body worn) sensors to provide real-time risk assessment. The models discussed in the article range from historical indices to recent developments in using thermophysiological models in (bio) meteorological applications as an indicator of the combined effect of outdoor weather settings on humans.

  5. On thermal stress failure of the SNAP-19A RTG heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, W. C.; Anderson, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study on thermal stress problems in an amorphous graphite heat shield that is part of the launch-abort protect system for the SNAP-19A radio-isotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) that will be used on the Viking Mars Lander are presended. The first result is from a thermal stress analysis of a full-scale RTG heat source that failed to survive a suborbital entry flight test, possibly due to thermal stress failure. It was calculated that the maximum stress in the heat shield was only 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the material. To provide information on the stress failure criterion used for this calculation, some heat shield specimens were fractured under abort entry conditions in a plasma arc facility. It was found that in regions free of stress concentrations the POCO graphite heat shield material did fracture when the local stress reached the ultimate uniaxial stress of the material.

  6. Stress Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center and Stress Photonics developed an infrared-based stress measurement system for use in nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures. Stress Photonics commercialized the technology in the DeltaTherm 1000 system, used to compare designs and detect cracks in structures, especially for aging aircraft and bridges. The system combines digital signal processing technology with a special infrared camera to provide instantaneous thermal images and live differential images.

  7. Whole body heat stress increases motor cortical excitability and skill acquisition in humans.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Andrew E; Shields, Richard K

    2016-02-01

    Vigorous systemic exercise stimulates a cascade of molecular and cellular processes that enhance central nervous system (CNS) plasticity and performance. The influence of heat stress on CNS performance and learning is novel. We designed two experiments to determine whether passive heat stress (1) facilitated motor cortex excitability and (2) improved motor task acquisition compared to no heat stress. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) were collected before and after 30 min of heat stress at 73 °C. A second cohort of subjects performed a motor learning task using the FDI either following heat or the no heat condition. Heat stress increased heart rate to 65% of age-predicted maximum. After heat, mean resting MEP amplitude increased 48% (p<0.05). MEP stimulus-response amplitudes did not differ according to stimulus intensity. In the second experiment, heat stress caused a significant decrease in absolute and variable error (p<0.05) during a novel movement task using the FDI. Passive environmental heat stress (1) increases motor cortical excitability, and (2) enhances performance in a motor skill acquisition task. Controlled heat stress may prime the CNS to enhance motor skill acquisition during rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Whole body heat stress increases motor cortical excitability and skill acquisition in humans

    PubMed Central

    Littmann, Andrew E.; Shields, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vigorous systemic exercise stimulates a cascade of molecular and cellular processes that enhance central nervous system (CNS) plasticity and performance. The influence of heat stress on CNS performance and learning is novel. We designed two experiments to determine whether passive heat stress 1) facilitated motor cortex excitability and 2) improved motor task acquisition compared to no heat stress. Methods Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) were collected before and after 30 minutes of heat stress at 73° C. A second cohort of subjects performed a motor learning task using the FDI either following heat or the no heat condition. Results Heat stress increased heart rate to 65% of age-predicted maximum. After heat, mean resting MEP amplitude increased 48% (P < 0.05). MEP stimulus-response amplitudes did not differ according to stimulus intensity. In the second experiment, heat stress caused a significant decrease in absolute and variable error (p < 0.05) during a novel movement task using the FDI. Conclusions Passive environmental heat stress 1) increases motor cortical excitability, and 2) enhances performance in a motor skill acquisition task. Significance Controlled heat stress may prime the CNS to enhance motor skill acquisition during rehabilitation. PMID:26616546

  9. Systems-Wide Analysis of Acclimation Responses to Long-Term Heat Stress and Recovery in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hemme, Dorothea; Veyel, Daniel; Mühlhaus, Timo; Sommer, Frederik; Jüppner, Jessica; Unger, Ann-Katrin; Sandmann, Michael; Fehrle, Ines; Schönfelder, Stephanie; Steup, Martin; Geimer, Stefan; Kopka, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Schroda, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We applied a top-down systems biology approach to understand how Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to long-term heat stress (HS) and recovers from it. For this, we shifted cells from 25 to 42°C for 24 h and back to 25°C for ≥8 h and monitored abundances of 1856 proteins/protein groups, 99 polar and 185 lipophilic metabolites, and cytological and photosynthesis parameters. Our data indicate that acclimation of Chlamydomonas to long-term HS consists of a temporally ordered, orchestrated implementation of response elements at various system levels. These comprise (1) cell cycle arrest; (2) catabolism of larger molecules to generate compounds with roles in stress protection; (3) accumulation of molecular chaperones to restore protein homeostasis together with compatible solutes; (4) redirection of photosynthetic energy and reducing power from the Calvin cycle to the de novo synthesis of saturated fatty acids to replace polyunsaturated ones in membrane lipids, which are deposited in lipid bodies; and (5) when sinks for photosynthetic energy and reducing power are depleted, resumption of Calvin cycle activity associated with increased photorespiration, accumulation of reactive oxygen species scavengers, and throttling of linear electron flow by antenna uncoupling. During recovery from HS, cells appear to focus on processes allowing rapid resumption of growth rather than restoring pre-HS conditions. PMID:25415976

  10. Effect of a personal ambient ventilation system on physiological strain during heat stress wearing a ballistic vest.

    PubMed

    Hadid, A; Yanovich, R; Erlich, T; Khomenok, G; Moran, D S

    2008-09-01

    The present study was conducted in order to evaluate whether physiological strain is alleviated by a new personal cooling system (CS) consisting of a layered vest and integrated blower that generate a flow of air. Twelve male volunteers were exposed to climatic conditions of 40 degrees C, 40%RH (40/40), and 35 degrees C, 60%RH (35/60) during a 115 min exercise routine, followed by 70 min resting recovery, while wearing a battle dress uniform (BDU) and a ballistic vest, with (COOL) or without (NOCOOL) CS. The CS was able to attenuate the physiological strain levels during exercise, when compared to identical exposures without the CS. Temperature elevation, (DeltaT (re)) after 100 min of exercise, was lower by 0.26 +/- 0.20 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 degrees C in 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, (p < 0.05). Mean skin temperature (T(sk)) was lower by 0.9 +/- 0.4 and 0.6 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 40/40 and 35/60, respectively. Heart rate (HR) was not significantly different for COOL versus NOCOOL for 40/40. At 35/60, HR was lower by 10 beats per min (bpm) (p < 0.05). Physiological strain index (PSI) was 9 and 21% lower for the 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, for COOL versus NOCOOL (p < 0.05). Heat storage (S) rates were 19 and 24% lower and sweat rates were 21 and 25% lower for the 40/40 and 35/60, respectively, for COOL versus NOCOOL (p < 0.05). However, the CS was not effective in alleviating physiological strain during resting recovery with no difference in T (re) cooling rate, S, or HR drop rate between groups over resting recovery periods. The CS tested in this study was found to be an effective tool for lowering physiological strain while exercising but not during resting recovery. Therefore, the CS should be further developed in order to achieve greater attenuation of the thermal strain during exercise and improve effectiveness during rest. Overall, it has the potential to be useful for both military and sports personnel.

  11. Contrasting urban and rural heat stress responses to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. M.; Oleson, K. W.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2012-02-01

    Hot temperatures in combination with high humidity cause human discomfort and may increase morbidity and mortality. A global climate model with an embedded urban model is used to explore the urban-rural contrast in the wet-bulb globe temperature, a heat stress index accounting for temperature and humidity. Wet-bulb globe temperatures are calculated at each model time step to resolve the heat stress diurnal cycle. The model simulates substantially higher heat stress in urban areas compared to neighbouring rural areas. Urban humidity deficit only weakly offsets the enhanced heat stress due to the large night-time urban heat island. The urban-rural contrast in heat stress is most pronounced at night and over mid-latitudes and subtropics. During heatwaves, the urban heat stress amplification is particularly pronounced. Heat stress strongly increases with doubled CO2 concentrations over both urban and rural surfaces. The tropics experience the greatest increase in number of high-heat-stress nights, despite a relatively weak ˜2°C warming. Given the lack of a distinct annual cycle and high relative humidity, the modest tropical warming leads to exceedance of the present-day record levels during more than half of the year in tropical regions, where adaptive capacity is often low. While the absolute urban and rural heat stress response to 2 × CO2 is similar, the occurrence of nights with extremely high heat stress increases more in cities than surrounding rural areas.

  12. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation. Various cellular processes, including myogenesis, myofibrillogenesis, hypertrophy/atrophy, and mitochondrial biogenesis, were studied using systematic cellular, morphological, and pathway-focused high-throughput gene expression profiling analyses. We found that C2C12 myoblasts exhibited distinctive time and temperature-dependence in biosynthesis and regulatory events during myogenic differentiation. Specifically, we for the first time observed that moderate hyperthermia at 39°C favored the growth of sarcomere in myofibrils at the late stage of myogenesis, showing universal up-regulation of characteristic myofibril proteins. Characteristic myofibrillogenesis genes, including heavy polypeptide 1 myosin, heavy polypeptide 2 myosin, alpha 1 actin, nebulin and titin, were all significantly upregulated (p<0.01) after C2C12 cells differentiated at 39°C over 5 days compared with the control cells cultured at 37°C. Furthermore, moderate hyperthermia enhanced myogenic differentiation, with nucleus densities per myotube showing 2.2-fold, 1.9-fold and 1.6-fold increases when C2C12 cells underwent myogenic differentiation at 39°C over 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, respectively, as compared to the myotubes that were not exposed to heat stress. Yet, atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that

  13. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation. Various cellular processes, including myogenesis, myofibrillogenesis, hypertrophy/atrophy, and mitochondrial biogenesis, were studied using systematic cellular, morphological, and pathway-focused high-throughput gene expression profiling analyses. We found that C2C12 myoblasts exhibited distinctive time and temperature-dependence in biosynthesis and regulatory events during myogenic differentiation. Specifically, we for the first time observed that moderate hyperthermia at 39°C favored the growth of sarcomere in myofibrils at the late stage of myogenesis, showing universal up-regulation of characteristic myofibril proteins. Characteristic myofibrillogenesis genes, including heavy polypeptide 1 myosin, heavy polypeptide 2 myosin, alpha 1 actin, nebulin and titin, were all significantly upregulated (p<0.01) after C2C12 cells differentiated at 39°C over 5 days compared with the control cells cultured at 37°C. Furthermore, moderate hyperthermia enhanced myogenic differentiation, with nucleus densities per myotube showing 2.2-fold, 1.9-fold and 1.6-fold increases when C2C12 cells underwent myogenic differentiation at 39°C over 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, respectively, as compared to the myotubes that were not exposed to heat stress. Yet, atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that

  14. Human Adaptations to Heat and Cold Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Heat and Cold Stress Michael N. Sawka, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA John W...Castellani, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA Kent B. Pandolf, Ph.D. US Army...Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA Andrew J. Young, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental

  15. Residential solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Complete residential solar-heating and hot-water system, when installed in highly-insulated energy-saver home, can supply large percentage of total energy demand for space heating and domestic hot water. System which uses water-heating energy storage can be scaled to meet requirements of building in which it is installed.

  16. Acute heat stress brings down milk secretion in dairy cows by up-regulating the activity of the milk-borne negative feedback regulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Silanikove, Nissim; Shapiro, Fira; Shinder, Dima

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine if acute heat stress (HS) decreases milk secretion by activating the milk-borne negative feedback system, as an emergency physiological response to prevent a life-threatening situation. To induce HS, summer acclimatized dairy cows were exposed to full sun under mid-summer Mediterranean conditions, with and without conventional cooling procedures. Results Exposure to HS induced a rapid and acute (within 24 h) reduction in milk yield in proportion to the heat load. This decrease was moderated by cooler night-time ambient temperature. The reduction in milk yield was associated with corresponding responses in plasminogen activator/plasminogen-plasmin activities, and with increased activity (concentration) of the (1–28) N-terminal fragment peptide that is released by plasmin from β-casein (β-CN (1–28)). These metabolites constitute the regulatory negative feedback system. Previously, it has been shown that β-CN (1–28) down-regulated milk secretion by blocking potassium channels on the apical aspects of the mammary epithelial cells. Conclusion Here we demonstrate that the potassium channels in mammary tissue became more susceptible to β-CN (1–28) activity under HS. Thus, the present study highlighted two previously unreported features of this regulatory system: (i) that it modulates rapidly in response to stressor impact variations; and (ii) that the regulations of the mammary epithelial potassium channel sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of β-CN (1–28) is part of the regulatory system. PMID:19563620

  17. Heat stress results in loss of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and increased damage to Photosystem II in combined drought-heat stressed Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Martha; Díaz, Pedro; Monza, Jorge; Borsani, Omar

    2010-09-01

    Drought and heat stress have been studied extensively in plants, but most reports involve analysis of response to only one of these stresses. Studies in which both stresses were studied in combination have less commonly been reported. We report the combined effect of drought and heat stress on Photosystem II (PSII) of Lotus japonicus cv. Gifu plants. Photochemistry of PSII was not affected by drought or heat stress alone, but the two stresses together decreased PSII activity as determined by fluorescence emission. Heat stress alone resulted in degradation of D1 and CP47 proteins, and D2 protein was also degraded by combined drought-heat stress. None of these proteins were degraded by drought stress alone. Drought alone induced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide but the drought-heat combination led to an increase in superoxide levels and a decrease in hydrogen peroxide levels. Furthermore, combined drought-heat stress was correlated with an increase in oxidative damage as determined by increased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Heat also induced degradation of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD: EC 1.15.1.1) as shown by reduced protein levels and isozyme-specific SOD activity. Loss of Cu/Zn SOD and induction of catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) activity would explain the altered balance between hydrogen peroxide and superoxide in response to drought vs combined drought-heat stress. Degradation of PSII could thus be caused by the loss of components of chloroplast antioxidant defence systems and subsequent decreased function of PSII. A possible explanation for energy dissipation by L. japonicus under stress conditions is discussed.

  18. Humid heat exposure induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to humid heat stress leads to the initiation of serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases, including heat stroke, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and even death. Increasing evidences have shown that the humid heat stress-induced dysfunction of the cardiovascular system was accompanied with severe cardiomyocyte injury; however, the precise mechanism of heat stress-induced injury of cardiomyocyte remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that humid heat stress promoted oxidative stress through the activation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiomyocytes. To test our hypothesis, we established mouse models of humid heat stress. Using the animal models, we found that Ang II levels in serum were significantly up-regulated and that the Ang II receptor AT1 was increased in cardiomyocytes. The antioxidant ability in plasma and heart tissues which was detected by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay was also decreased with the increased ROS production under humid heat stress, as was the expression of antioxidant genes (SOD2, HO-1, GPx). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan, effectively relieved oxidative stress, blocked Ang II signaling pathway and suppressed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by humid heat stress. In addition, overexpression of antioxidant genes reversed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Overall, these results implied that humid heat stress increased oxidative stress and caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the Ang II signaling pathway. Thus, targeting the Ang II signaling pathway may provide a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases caused by humid heat stress.

  19. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  20. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  1. Sprint performance under heat stress: A review.

    PubMed

    Girard, O; Brocherie, F; Bishop, D J

    2015-06-01

    Training and competition in major track-and-field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot (>30 °C) ambient conditions. Enhanced short-term (<30 s) power output or single-sprint performance, resulting from transient heat exposure (muscle temperature rise), can be attributed to improved muscle contractility. Under heat stress, elevations in skin/core temperatures are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic loads in addition to decreasing voluntary muscle activation; there is also compelling evidence to suggest that large performance decrements occur when repeated-sprint exercise (consisting of brief recovery periods between sprints, usually <60 s) is performed in hot compared with cool conditions. Conversely, poorer intermittent-sprint performance (recovery periods long enough to allow near complete recovery, usually 60-300 s) in hotter conditions is solely observed when exercise induces marked hyperthermia (core temperature >39 °C). Here we also discuss strategies (heat acclimatization, precooling, hydration strategies) employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures.

  2. Early and efficient induction of antioxidant defense system in Mytilus galloprovincialis embryos exposed to metals and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Boukadida, Khouloud; Cachot, Jérôme; Clérandeaux, Christelle; Gourves, Pierre-Yves; Banni, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The present study aims to elucidate the stress response of early life stages of Mytilus galloprovincialis to the combine effects of selected metals and elevated temperature. For this purpose, we investigated the response of a large panel of oxidative stress markers such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates (TBARS) concentration) and metallothionein accumulation (MT) as well as selected gene transcription level and metal accumulation in mussels larvae exposed to a sub-lethal concentration of Cu (9.54µg/L), Ag (2.55µg/L) and mixture of the two metals (Cu (6.67µg/L)+Ag (1.47µg/L)) along with a temperature gradient (18, 20 and 22°C) for 48h. Cu and Ag applied as single or mixture were differentially accumulated in mussel larvae according to the exposure temperature. Sod, cat, gst and mt-10 gene transcription levels showed an important increase in larvae exposed to Cu, Ag or to the mix compared to the control condition at 18°C. The same pattern but with higher induction levels was recorded in larvae co-exposed to metals at 20°C. At 22°C, a significant decrease in mRNA abundance of cat, gst and sod and a significant up-regulation of mts targets (mt10 and mt20) were observed.

  3. Heat generating and recycling system for utilizing waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Yuji; Tanaka, Tadayoshi; Takashima, Takumi

    1999-07-01

    The authors proposed an efficient utilization system of low temperature waste heat. It converts the low temperature thermal energy below 573 K into electric energy by using chemical heat pump systems and thermoelectric devices. They named this system a heat regenerating and recycling system. In this system, low temperature heat is recovered and its temperature is raised by the heat pump systems. They conducted the system analysis to clarify its performance. Two kinds of thermoelectric devices and two kinds of chemical heat pump systems are arranged in their analytical model. The authors examined how the efficiency of the chemical heat pumps, that of the thermoelectric devices, and heat flow influenced the efficiency of the system. By using the chemical heat pump system, the efficiency of the system not only is improved but also it is possible to store thermal energy as chemical energy. The authors show that the heat regenerating and recycling system contributes to use low temperature waste heat effectively.

  4. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  5. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  6. Heat stress-induced life span extension in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shama, S; Lai, C Y; Antoniazzi, J M; Jiang, J C; Jazwinski, S M

    1998-12-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited life span that can be measured by the number of times individual cells divide. Several genetic manipulations have been shown to prolong the yeast life span. However, environmental effects that extend longevity have been largely ignored. We have found that mild, nonlethal heat stress extended yeast life span when it was administered transiently early in life. The increased longevity was due to a reduction in the mortality rate that persisted over many cell divisions (generations) but was not permanent. The genes RAS1 and RAS2 were necessary to observe this effect of heat stress. The RAS2 gene is consistently required for maintenance of life span when heat stress is chronic or in its extension when heat stress is transient or absent altogether. RAS1, on the other hand, appears to have a role in signaling life extension induced by transient, mild heat stress, which is distinct from its life-span-curtailing effect in the absence of stress and its lack of involvement in the response to chronic heat stress. This distinction between the RAS genes may be partially related to their different effects on growth-promoting genes and stress-responsive genes. The ras2 mutation clearly hindered resumption of growth and recovery from stress, while the ras1 mutation did not. The HSP104 gene, which is largely responsible for induced thermotolerance in yeast, was necessary for life extension induced by transient heat stress. An interaction between mitochondrial petite mutations and heat stress was found, suggesting that mitochondria may be necessary for life extension by transient heat stress. The results raise the possibility that the RAS genes and mitochondria may play a role in the epigenetic inheritance of reduced mortality rate afforded by transient, mild heat stress.

  7. Modular passive solar heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, B.D.

    1985-03-19

    A modular passive solar energy storage system comprises a plurality of heat tubes which are arranged to form a flat plate solar collector and are releasably connected to a water reservoir by, and are part of, double-walled heat exchangers which penetrate to the water reservoir and enhance the heat transfer characteristics between the collector and the reservoir. The flat plate collector-heat exchanger disassembly, the collector housing, and the reservoir are integrated into a relatively light weight, unitary structural system in which the reservoir is a primary structural element. In addition to light weight, the system features high efficiency and ease of assembly and maintenance.

  8. Heat stress-induced response of the proteomes of leaves from Salvia splendens Vista and King

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salvia splendens Ker-Gawl, most commonly used in China to add a splash of brilliant color to the surroundings during the warm season, is subject to heat stress, which can greatly affect its growth and yield. Results To gain a comprehensive understanding of heat-tolerance mechanisms of S. splendens, we assessed the heat-stress responses and characterized the proteomes of leaves from two varieties, Vista (heat resistant) and King (heat sensitive). Denaturing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2–DE) and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify heat-responsive proteins. Heat stress induced the reversible inactivation of photosystem II reaction centers and increased the amounts of antioxidative enzymes, thereby decreasing oxidative damage. Vista leaves had a much greater ability than King leaves to develop light-protective and oxygen-scavenging systems in response to heat stress. More than 1213 leaf proteome spots were reproducibly detected in the gels, with a total of 33 proteins in each leaf type differentially regulated when Salvia splendens were heat stress treated. Of these proteins, 23 and 28 from Vista and King, respectively, were identified. Conclusions Most of the identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, protein processing, or stress response, indicating that many different processes work together to establish a new cellular homeostasis in response to heat stress. PMID:23773552

  9. Nutritional interventions to alleviate the negative consequences of heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Suagee, Jessica K; Sanders, Sara R

    2013-05-01

    Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed.

  10. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-07-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  11. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  12. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D.; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment. PMID:24409190

  13. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment.

  14. Thermoregulatory responses of Holstein and Brown Swiss Heat-Stressed dairy cows to two different cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa-Calderon, Abelardo; Armstrong, Dennis; Ray, Donald; DeNise, Sue; Enns, Mark; Howison, Christine

    . Thirty-seven Holstein and 26 Brown Swiss dairy cows were used to evaluate the effect of two different cooling systems on physiological and hormonal responses during the summer. A control group of cows had access only to shade (C). A second group was cooled with spray and fans (S/F) and the third group was under an evaporative cooling system called Korral Kool (KK). The maximum temperature humidity index during the trial was from 73 to 85. Rectal temperatures and respiration rates of the C group were higher (P < 0.05) than those of the S/F and KK groups in both Holstein and Brown Swiss cows. Triiodothyronine levels in milk were higher (P < 0.05) in the KK group than in the S/F and C groups, while cortisol levels were lower (P < 0.05) in the C group than in S/F and KK. There was no significant difference in the hormonal response of the two breeds. These results demonstrate that both cooling systems may be used increase the comfort of Holstein and Brown Swiss cows during summer in hot, dry climates.

  15. Thermoregulatory responses of Holstein and Brown Swiss heat-stressed dairy cows to two different cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Correa-Calderon, Abelardo; Armstrong, Dennis; Ray, Donald; DeNise, Sue; Enns, Mark; Howison, Christine

    2004-02-01

    Thirty-seven Holstein and 26 Brown Swiss dairy cows were used to evaluate the effect of two different cooling systems on physiological and hormonal responses during the summer. A control group of cows had access only to shade (C). A second group was cooled with spray and fans (S/F) and the third group was under an evaporative cooling system called Korral Kool (KK). The maximum temperature humidity index during the trial was from 73 to 85. Rectal temperatures and respiration rates of the C group were higher (P<0.05) than those of the S/F and KK groups in both Holstein and Brown Swiss cows. Triiodothyronine levels in milk were higher (P<0.05) in the KK group than in the S/F and C groups, while cortisol levels were lower (P<0.05) in the C group than in S/F and KK. There was no significant difference in the hormonal response of the two breeds. These results demonstrate that both cooling systems may be used increase the comfort of Holstein and Brown Swiss cows during summer in hot, dry climates.

  16. Screening of the two-component-system histidine kinases of Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e. LiaS is needed for growth under heat, acid, alkali, osmotic, ethanol and oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Pöntinen, Anna; Lindström, Miia; Skurnik, Mikael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-08-01

    To study the role of each two-component system (TCS) histidine kinase (HK) in stress tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e, we monitored the growth of individual HK deletion mutant strains under heat (42.5 °C), acid (pH 5.6), alkali (pH 9.4), osmotic (6% NaCl), ethanol (3.5 vol%), and oxidative (5 mM H2O2) stresses. The growth of ΔliaS (Δlmo1021) strain was impaired under each stress, with the most notable decrease under heat and osmotic stresses. The ΔvirS (Δlmo1741) strain showed nearly completely restricted growth at high temperature and impaired growth in ethanol. The growth of ΔagrC (Δlmo0050) strain was impaired under osmotic stress and slightly under oxidative stress. We successfully complemented the HK mutations using a novel allelic exchange based approach. This approach avoided the copy-number problems associated with in trans complementation from a plasmid. The mutant phenotypes were restored to the wild-type level in the complemented strains. This study reveals novel knowledge on the HKs needed for growth of L. monocytogenes EGD-e under abovementioned stress conditions, with LiaS playing multiple roles in stress tolerance of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wind stress and heat fluxes over a Brazilian Coastal Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourado, Marcelo; Candella, Rogério

    2017-04-01

    Coastal upwelling zones have been intensively studied in the last decades especially due to their importance to the biological cycle. The coastal upwelling system of the Cabo Frio region (east coast of the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil) keeps the surface water cold during most part of the year, what induces a stable atmospheric boundary layer associated to northeast winds. The main goal of this study is to investigate the wind stress and heat fluxes exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere in that area. For this purpose, a set of hourly data meteorological and oceanographic data collected by a Wavescan metocean buoy anchored at 23o59S; 42oW, were used, as well as solar radiation and relative humidity from a terrestrial meteorological station from the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (InMet). COARE 3.0 algorithm was used to calculate the latent and sensible heat fluxes. In this discussion, positive values represent fluxes towards the ocean. The average net heat flux over our study period is 88 W m-2. The reduction of the net heat flux is due to the increase of the ocean latent heat loss, although a reduction in incoming shortwave radiation and an increase in ocean long wave cooling also contributes. The latent heat is 20 times larger than the sensible heat flux, but the mean value of the latent heat flux, 62 W m-2, is half the typical value found in open ocean. The temporal variability of both sensible and latent heat fluxes reflects their dependence on wind speed and air-sea temperature differences. When upwelling events, here periods when diurnal SST is lower than 18oC, are compared with undisturbed (without upwelling) events, it can be noted the sensible heat fluxes are positives and 10 times greater in magnitude. This is related to an increment, during these upwelling events, of the air-sea temperature difference and an increasing of the wind speed. The cold waters of the upwelling increase the air-sea temperature gradient and, also, the horizontal land

  18. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  19. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  20. Management of climatic heat stress risk in construction: a review of practices, methodologies, and future research.

    PubMed

    Rowlinson, Steve; Yunyanjia, Andrea; Li, Baizhan; Chuanjingju, Carrie

    2014-05-01

    Climatic heat stress leads to accidents on construction sites brought about by a range of human factors emanating from heat induced illness, and fatigue leading to impaired capability, physical and mental. It is an occupational characteristic of construction work in many climates and the authors take the approach of re-engineering the whole safety management system rather than focusing on incremental improvement, which is current management practice in the construction industry. From a scientific viewpoint, climatic heat stress is determined by six key factors: (1) air temperature, (2) humidity, (3) radiant heat, and (4) wind speed indicating the environment, (5) metabolic heat generated by physical activities, and (6) "clothing effect" that moderates the heat exchange between the body and the environment. By making use of existing heat stress indices and heat stress management processes, heat stress risk on construction sites can be managed in three ways: (1) control of environmental heat stress exposure through use of an action-triggering threshold system, (2) control of continuous work time (CWT, referred by maximum allowable exposure duration) with mandatory work-rest regimens, and (3) enabling self-paced working through empowerment of employees. Existing heat stress practices and methodologies are critically reviewed and the authors propose a three-level methodology for an action-triggering, localized, simplified threshold system to facilitate effective decisions by frontline supervisors. The authors point out the need for "regional based" heat stress management practices that reflect unique climatic conditions, working practices and acclimatization propensity by local workers indifferent geographic regions. The authors set out the case for regional, rather than international, standards that account for this uniqueness and which are derived from site-based rather than laboratory-based research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of heat stress in the livestock industry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress costs the animal industry over $1.7 billion annually. Annual losses average $369 million in the beef cattle industry and $299 million in the swine industry. The impacts of a single heat stress event on individual animals are quite varied. Brief events often cause little or no effect. ...

  2. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  3. Re-evaluating Occupational Heat Stress in a Changing Climate

    PubMed Central

    Spector, June T.; Sheffield, Perry E.

    2014-01-01

    The potential consequences of occupational heat stress in a changing climate on workers, workplaces, and global economies are substantial. Occupational heat stress risk is projected to become particularly high in middle- and low-income tropical and subtropical regions, where optimal controls may not be readily available. This commentary presents occupational heat stress in the context of climate change, reviews its impacts, and reflects on implications for heat stress assessment and control. Future efforts should address limitations of existing heat stress assessment methods and generate economical, practical, and universal approaches that can incorporate data of varying levels of detail, depending on resources. Validation of these methods should be performed in a wider variety of environments, and data should be collected and analyzed centrally for both local and large-scale hazard assessments and to guide heat stress adaptation planning. Heat stress standards should take into account variability in worker acclimatization, other vulnerabilities, and workplace resources. The effectiveness of controls that are feasible and acceptable should be evaluated. Exposure scientists are needed, in collaboration with experts in other areas, to effectively prevent and control occupational heat stress in a changing climate. PMID:25261455

  4. Re-evaluating occupational heat stress in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Spector, June T; Sheffield, Perry E

    2014-10-01

    The potential consequences of occupational heat stress in a changing climate on workers, workplaces, and global economies are substantial. Occupational heat stress risk is projected to become particularly high in middle- and low-income tropical and subtropical regions, where optimal controls may not be readily available. This commentary presents occupational heat stress in the context of climate change, reviews its impacts, and reflects on implications for heat stress assessment and control. Future efforts should address limitations of existing heat stress assessment methods and generate economical, practical, and universal approaches that can incorporate data of varying levels of detail, depending on resources. Validation of these methods should be performed in a wider variety of environments, and data should be collected and analyzed centrally for both local and large-scale hazard assessments and to guide heat stress adaptation planning. Heat stress standards should take into account variability in worker acclimatization, other vulnerabilities, and workplace resources. The effectiveness of controls that are feasible and acceptable should be evaluated. Exposure scientists are needed, in collaboration with experts in other areas, to effectively prevent and control occupational heat stress in a changing climate. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  5. Effects of heat stress on day-old broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R A; Weathers, W W; Smith, J

    1984-09-01

    Short-term heat stress can occur when chicks are transported from the hatchery to growing facilities. Two experiments were conducted to determine the possible effects of short-term heat stress on growth and feed conversion of broiler (Hubbard X Hubbard) chicks. The heat stress was accomplished by placing chicks in Jamesway 252 incubators at dry bulb temperatures ranging from 40 to 45 C for variable times. Growth, feed consumption, and mortality were measured for 16 days following the heat stress. Short sublethal heat stress significantly reduced growth rate to 16 days in these experiments without any effect on feed conversion ratio. The results indicate that the hatchery industry should avoid overheating chicks even for periods as short as 1 hr.

  6. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  7. Sodium heat transfer system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. F.; Fewell, M. E.

    1983-11-01

    The sodium heat transfer system of the international energy agency (IEA) small solar power systems (SSPS) central receiver system (CRS), which includes the heliostat field, receiver, hot and cold storage vessels, and sodium/water steam generator was modeled. The computer code SOLTES (simulator of large thermal energy systems), was used to model this system. The results from SOLTES are compared to measured data.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong; Zhu, Cheng

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ► It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ► The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ► Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  9. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers’ perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  10. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-12-29

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers' perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses.

  11. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. Results: The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. Conclusion: This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure

  12. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure.

  13. Root proteomic responses to heat stress in two Agrostis grass species contrasting in heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenping; Huang, Bingru

    2008-01-01

    Protein metabolism plays an important role in plant adaptation to heat stress. This study was designed to identify heat-responsive proteins in roots associated with thermotolerance for two C3 grass species contrasting in heat tolerance, thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera L. Plants were exposed to 20 degrees C (control), 30 C (moderate heat stress), or 40 degrees C (severe heat stress) in growth chambers. Roots were harvested at 2 d and 10 d after temperature treatment. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventy protein spots were regulated by heat stress in at least one species. Under both moderate and severe heat stress, more proteins were down-regulated than were up-regulated, and thermal A. scabra roots had more up-regulated proteins than A. stolonifera roots. The sequences of 66 differentially expressed protein spots were identified using mass spectrometry. The results suggested that the up-regulation of sucrose synthase, glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, and heat shock protein Sti (stress-inducible protein) may contribute to the superior root thermotolerance of A. scabra. In addition, phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two isoforms of fructose-biphosphate aldolase were highly phosphorylated under heat stress, and thermal A. scabra had greater phosphorylation than A. stolonifera, suggesting that the aldolase phosphorylation might be involved in root thermotolerance.

  14. Active cutaneous vasodilation in resting humans during mild heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshi-Ichiro; Lee, Kichang; Mack, Gary W

    2005-03-01

    The role of skin temperature in reflex control of the active cutaneous vasodilator system was examined in six subjects during mild graded heat stress imposed by perfusing water at 34, 36, 38, and 40 degrees C through a tube-lined garment. Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) was recorded from the peroneal nerve with microneurography. While monitoring esophageal, mean skin, and local skin temperatures, we recorded skin blood flow at bretylium-treated and untreated skin sites by using laser-Doppler velocimetry and local sweat rate by using capacitance hygrometry on the dorsal foot. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated by dividing skin blood flow by mean arterial pressure. Mild heat stress increased mean skin temperature by 0.2 or 0.3 degrees C every stage, but esophageal and local skin temperature did not change during the first three stages. CVC at the bretylium tosylate-treated site (CVC(BT)) and sweat expulsion number increased at 38 and 40 degrees C compared with 34 degrees C (P < 0.05); however, CVC at the untreated site did not change. SSNA increased at 40 degrees C (P < 0.05, different from 34 degrees C). However, SSNA burst amplitude increased (P < 0.05), whereas SSNA burst duration decreased (P < 0.05), at the same time as we observed the increase in CVC(BT) and sweat expulsion number. These data support the hypothesis that the active vasodilator system is activated by changes in mean skin temperature, even at normal core temperature, and illustrate the intricate competition between active vasodilator and the vasoconstrictor system for control of skin blood flow during mild heat stress.

  15. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  16. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  17. Stirling Engine External Heat System Design with Heat Pipe Heater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    STIRLING ENGINE EXTERNAL HEAT SYSTEM DESIGN WITH HEAT PIPE HEATER Benjamin Ziph Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc. 2841 Boardwalk Ann Arbor, MI 48104...ffleat System Design with * 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Tfed M. Godett and Benjamin Zinh1 * 13& TYPE OF REPORT 13b.* TIME COVERED 14.DT7FRPR Y. o.Dy 5...antd identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB. GR. E!yternal heating system , Stirling engine, Stirling cycle, heat pipes, ~ 10 1 hea-t ex.changers

  18. Passive solar heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingenbach, W.

    1981-08-01

    The Toas State Office Building is a single-story office building in New Mexico which incorporates passive collection and storage of solar energy along with natural lighting for general illumination. The building is oriented to take advantage of early morning sunlight and is designed to supply 70% of the heating load by solar heat. The site is equipped with clerestory windows, totaling 2695 square feet, 296 square feet of south facing windows, and east and west window scoops totaling 218 square feet. The collected solar energy is stored in 14,080 gallons of water contained in drums located in the clerestory area, as well as in the masonry construction mass. Auxiliary heat is provided via electric strips in the supply ducts. Movable, insulated shutters are provided to reduce the loss from the clerestory window area at night. The project is described with pictures and diagrams of the final installation provided. An updated performance data report is included, and functional problems, general comments, maintenance and refurbishment recommendations are discussed.

  19. Boise geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Thermoregulatory disorders and illness related to heat and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2016-04-01

    Thermoregulation is a vital function of the autonomic nervous system in response to cold and heat stress. Thermoregulatory physiology sustains health by keeping body core temperature within a degree or two of 37°C, which enables normal cellular function. Heat production and dissipation are dependent on a coordinated set of autonomic responses. The clinical detection of thermoregulatory impairment provides important diagnostic and localizing information in the evaluation of disorders that impair thermoregulatory pathways, including autonomic neuropathies and ganglionopathies. Failure of neural thermoregulatory mechanisms or exposure to extreme or sustained temperatures that overwhelm the body's thermoregulatory capacity can also result in potentially life-threatening departures from normothermia. Hypothermia, defined as a core temperature of <35.0°C, may present with shivering, respiratory depression, cardiac dysrhythmias, impaired mental function, mydriasis, hypotension, and muscle dysfunction, which can progress to cardiac arrest or coma. Management includes warming measures, hydration, and cardiovascular support. Deaths from hypothermia are twice as frequent as deaths from hyperthermia. Hyperthermia, defined as a core temperature of >40.5°C, may present with sweating, flushing, tachycardia, fatigue, lightheadedness, headache, and paresthesia, progressing to weakness, muscle cramps, oliguria, nausea, agitation, hypotension, syncope, confusion, delirium, seizures, and coma. Mental status changes and core temperature distinguish potentially fatal heat stroke from heat exhaustion. Management requires the immediate reduction of core temperature. Ice water immersion has been shown to be superior to alternative cooling measures. Avoidance of thermal risk and early recognition of cold or heat stress are the cornerstones of preventive therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Temperature and blood flow distribution in the human leg during passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the hemodynamic adjustments to direct passive heat stress within the leg's major arterial and venous vessels and compartments remains unclear. Fifteen healthy young males were tested during exposure to either passive whole body heat stress to levels approaching thermal tolerance [core temperature (Tc) + 2°C; study 1; n = 8] or single leg heat stress (Tc + 0°C; study 2; n = 7). Whole body heat stress increased perfusion and decreased oscillatory shear index in relation to the rise in leg temperature (Tleg) in all three major arteries supplying the leg, plateauing in the common and superficial femoral arteries before reaching severe heat stress levels. Isolated leg heat stress increased arterial blood flows and shear patterns to a level similar to that obtained during moderate core hyperthermia (Tc + 1°C). Despite modest increases in great saphenous venous (GSV) blood flow (0.2 l/min), the deep venous system accounted for the majority of returning flow (common femoral vein 0.7 l/min) during intense to severe levels of heat stress. Rapid cooling of a single leg during severe whole body heat stress resulted in an equivalent blood flow reduction in the major artery supplying the thigh deep tissues only, suggesting central temperature-sensitive mechanisms contribute to skin blood flow alone. These findings further our knowledge of leg hemodynamic responses during direct heat stress and provide evidence of potentially beneficial vascular alterations during isolated limb heat stress that are equivalent to those experienced during exposure to moderate levels of whole body hyperthermia. PMID:26823344

  2. Tolerence for work-induced heat stress in men wearing liquidcooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blockley, W. V.; Roth, H. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of the heat tolerance in men unable to dispose of metabolic heat as fast as it is produced within the body is discussed. Examinations were made of (a) the effect of work rate (metabolic rate) on tolerance time when body heat storage rate is a fixed quantity, and (b) tolerance time as a function of metabolic rate when heat loss is terminated after a thermal quasi-equilibrium was attained under comfortable conditions of heat transfer. The nature of the physiological mechanisms involved in such heat stress situations, and the possibility of using prediction techniques to establish standard procedures in emergencies involving cooling system failures are also discussed.

  3. Heat stress and societal impacts in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R. M.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat is the number-one weather related killer in the US and around the world. As a result of rising temperatures and steady or slightly rising levels of specific humidity, heat stress is projected to become increasingly severe. Here we show that heat stress as measured by two common indices -- the heat index and the wet-bulb temperature -- is projected to rapidly and dramatically increase, and that by mid-century crippling summertime conditions are possible across some of the most densely populated regions of the planet. Many of these regions are places where cooling infrastructure is scarce, adaptive capacity is low, and populations are rapidly rising. We find that by the end of the 21st century, the habitability of some regions of the planet may be questionable due to heat stress alone, and in many other regions severe impacts to human health, infrastructure, agriculture, and economic performance will create significant societal stress and necessitate rapid adaptation.

  4. Climate change and occupational heat stress: methods for assessment

    PubMed Central

    Holmér, Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    Background Presumed effects of global warming on occupational heat stress aggravate conditions in many parts of the world, in particular in developing countries. In order to assess and evaluate conditions, heat stress must be described and measured correctly. Objective Assessment of heat stress using internationally recognized methods. Design Two such methods are wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT; ISO 7243) and predicted heat strain (PHS; ISO 7933). Both methods measure relevant climatic factors and provide recommendations for limit values in terms of time when heat stress becomes imminent. The WBGT as a heat stress index is empirical and widely recognized. It requires, however, special sensors for the climatic factors that can introduce significant measurement errors if prescriptions in ISO 7243 are not followed. The PHS (ISO 7933) is based on climatic factors that can easily be measured with traditional instruments. It evaluates the conditions for heat balance in a more rational way and it applies equally to all combinations of climates. Results Analyzing similar climatic conditions with WBGT and PHS indicates that WBGT provides a more conservative assessment philosophy that allows much shorter working time than predicted with PHS. Conclusions PHS prediction of physiological strain appears to fit better with published data from warm countries. Both methods should be used and validated more extensively worldwide in order to give reliable and accurate information about the actual heat stress. PMID:21139697

  5. Heat stress intervention research in construction: gaps and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chan, Albert Ping-Chuen

    2017-06-08

    Developing heat stress interventions for construction workers has received mounting concerns in recent years. However, limited efforts have been exerted to elaborate the rationale, methodology, and practicality of heat stress intervention in the construction industry. This study aims to review previous heat stress intervention research in construction, to identify the major research gaps in methodological issues, and to offer detailed recommendations for future studies. A total of 35 peer-reviewed journal papers have been identified to develop administrative, environmental or personal engineering interventions to safeguard construction workers. It was found that methodological limitations, such as arbitrary sampling methods and unreliable instruments, could be the major obstacle in undertaking heat stress intervention research. To bridge the identified research gaps, this study then refined a research framework for conducting heat stress intervention studies in the construction industry. The proposed research strategy provides researchers and practitioners with fresh insights into expanding multidisciplinary research areas and solving practical problems in the management of heat stress. The proposed research framework may foster the development of heat stress intervention research in construction, which further aids researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in formulating proper intervention strategies.

  6. Heat stress intervention research in construction: gaps and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Yang; CHAN, Albert Ping-chuen

    2017-01-01

    Developing heat stress interventions for construction workers has received mounting concerns in recent years. However, limited efforts have been exerted to elaborate the rationale, methodology, and practicality of heat stress intervention in the construction industry. This study aims to review previous heat stress intervention research in construction, to identify the major research gaps in methodological issues, and to offer detailed recommendations for future studies. A total of 35 peer-reviewed journal papers have been identified to develop administrative, environmental or personal engineering interventions to safeguard construction workers. It was found that methodological limitations, such as arbitrary sampling methods and unreliable instruments, could be the major obstacle in undertaking heat stress intervention research. To bridge the identified research gaps, this study then refined a research framework for conducting heat stress intervention studies in the construction industry. The proposed research strategy provides researchers and practitioners with fresh insights into expanding multidisciplinary research areas and solving practical problems in the management of heat stress. The proposed research framework may foster the development of heat stress intervention research in construction, which further aids researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in formulating proper intervention strategies. PMID:28111405

  7. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    System analysis activities were directed toward refining the heating system parameters. Trade studies were performed to support hardware selections for all systems and for the heating only operational test sites in particular. The heating system qualification tests were supported by predicting qualification test component performance prior to conducting the test.

  8. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Zoran; Momcilovic, Ivana; Bukovnik, Urska; Prasad, P V Vara; Fu, Jianming; Deridder, Benjamin P; Elthon, Thomas E; Mladenov, Novica

    2009-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperatures (heat stress). Endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat-stress conditions. Thus, in this study, the possible relationship between expression levels of RCA and plant yield in 11 European cultivars of winter wheat following prolonged exposure to heat stress was investigated. In addition, the effect of a short-term heat stress on RCA expression in four genotypes of wheat, five genotypes of maize, and one genotype of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined. Immunoblots prepared from leaf protein extracts from control plants showed three RCA cross-reacting bands in wheat and two RCA cross-reacting bands in maize and Arabidopsis. The molecular mass of the observed bands was in the range between 40 kDa and 46 kDa. Heat stress affected RCA expression in a few genotypes of wheat and maize but not in Arabidopsis. In wheat, heat stress slightly modulated the relative amounts of RCA in some cultivars. In maize, heat stress did not seem to affect the existing RCA isoforms (40 kDa and 43 kDa) but induced the accumulation of a new putative RCA of 45-46 kDa. The new putative 45-46 kDa RCA was not seen in a genotype of maize (ZPL 389) that has been shown to display an exceptional sensitivity to heat stress. A significant, positive, linear correlation was found between the expression of wheat 45-46 kDa RCA and plant productivity under heat-stress conditions. Results support the hypothesis that endogenous levels of RCA could play an important role in plant productivity under supraoptimal temperature conditions.

  9. Heat stress and protection from permanent acoustic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, N; Kristiansen, A; Liberman, M C

    1999-11-15

    The inner ear can be permanently damaged by overexposure to high-level noise; however, damage can be decreased by previous exposure to moderate level, nontraumatic noise (). The mechanism of this "protective" effect is unclear, but a role for heat shock proteins has been suggested. The aim of the present study was to directly test protective effects of heat stress in the ear. For physiological experiments, CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to an intense octave band of noise (8-16 kHz) at 100 dB SPL for 2 hr, either with or without previous whole-body heat stress (rectal temperature to 41. 5 degrees C for 15 min). The interval between heat stress and sound exposure varied in different groups from 6 to 96 hr. One week later, inner ear function was assessed in each animal via comparison of compound action potential thresholds to mean values from unexposed controls. Permanent threshold shifts (PTSs) were approximately 40 dB in the group sound-exposed without previous heat stress. Heat-stressed animals were protected from acoustic injury: mean PTS in the group with 6 hr heat-stress-trauma interval was reduced to approximately 10 dB. This heat stress protection disappeared when the treatment-trauma interval surpassed 24 hr. A parallel set of quantitative PCR experiments measured heat-shock protein mRNA in the cochlea and showed 100- to 200-fold increase over control 30 min after heat treatment, with levels returning to baseline at 6 hr after treatment. Results are consistent with the idea that upregulation of heat shock proteins protects the ear from acoustic injury.

  10. Prototype solar heating and combined heating cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is discussed. The program management and systems engineering are reported, and operational test sites are identified.

  11. Heat Transfer Parametric System Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Transfer Parametric System Identification 6. AUTHOR(S Parker, Gregory K. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AOORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...distribution is unlimited. Heat Transfer Parametric System Identification by Gregory K. Parker Lieutenant, United States Navy BS., DeVry Institute of...Modeling Concept ........ ........... 3 2. Lumped Parameter Approach ...... ......... 4 3. Parametric System Identification ....... 4 B. BASIC MODELING

  12. Heat shock protein response in phosphorus-deficient heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Edens, F W; Hill, C H; Wang, S

    1992-12-01

    1. During acute in vivo heat stress, a normal heat shock protein (HSP) response was not inducible in chickens deficient in inorganic phosphorus (P(i)-deficient). 2. Small quantities of HSP 70 and HSP 90 were induced, but little or no HSP 23 was induced in P(i)-deficient chickens compared to P(i)-adequate chickens. 3. Increased susceptibility of P(i)-deficient chickens to acute heat stress was attributed to their inability to produce an adequate HSP response.

  13. The efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers' heat stress around the blast furnace of a steel industry.

    PubMed

    Giahi, Omid; Darvishi, Ebrahim; Aliabadi, Mohsen; Khoubi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Workers' exposure to excessive heat in molten industries is mainly due to radiant heat from hot sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers heat stress around a typical blast furnace. Two main interventions were applied for reducing radiant heat around the blast furnace of a steel industry located in western Iran. These included using a heat absorbing system in the furnace body and installing reflective aluminum barrier in the main workstation. Heat stress indexes were measured before and after each intervention using the digital WBGT-meter. The results showed MRT and WBGT indexes decreased by 20 °C and 3.9 °C, respectively after using heat absorbing system and also decreased by 18.6 °C and 2.5 °C, respectively after installing a reflective barrier. These indexes decrease by 26.5 °C and 5.2 °C, respectively due to the simultaneous application of the two interventions which were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The core body temperature of workers decreased by 2.6 °C after the application of interventions which was also significant (p < 0.05). The results confirmed heat control at source can be considered as a first solution for reducing radiant heat of blast furnaces. However, the simultaneous application of interventions could noticeably reduce worker heat stress. The results provide reliable information in order to implement the effective heat controls in typical hot steel industries.

  14. Heat stress protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Kakigi, Ryo; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients who are incapable of maintaining adequate pulmonary gas exchange due to respiratory failure or other disorders. However, prolonged MV is associated with the development of respiratory muscle weakness. We hypothesized that a single exposure to whole body heat stress would increase diaphragm expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) and that this treatment would protect against MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 38) were randomly assigned to one of four groups: an acutely anesthetized control group (CON) with no MV; 12-h controlled MV group (CMV); 1-h whole body heat stress (HS); or 1-h whole body heat stress 24 h prior to 12-h controlled MV (HSMV). Compared with CON animals, diaphragmatic HSP72 expression increased significantly in the HS and HSMV groups (P < 0.05). Prolonged MV resulted in significant atrophy of type I, type IIa, and type IIx fibers in the costal diaphragm (P < 0.05). Whole body heat stress attenuated this effect. In contrast, heat stress did not protect against MV-induced diaphragm contractile dysfunction. The mechanisms responsible for this heat stress-induced protection remain unclear but may be linked to increased expression of HSP72 in the diaphragm. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  16. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Christina Bak; Schmidt, Stinne P; Gregersen, Niels; Banner, Jytte

    2013-10-10

    The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress responsive genes, HSPA1B, HSPD1, HMOX1, and SOD2, was studied by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA purified from cells cultured under standard or various thermal stress conditions. The expression of all 4 genes was highly influenced by thermal stress in both SIDS and control cells. High interpersonal variance found in the SIDS group indicated that they represented a more heterogeneous group than controls. The SIDS group responded to thermal stress with a higher expression of the HSPA1B and HSPD1 genes compared to the control group, whereas no significant difference was observed in the expression of SOD2 and HMOX1 between the two groups. The differences were related to the heat shock treatment as none of the genes were expressed significantly different in SIDS at base levels at 37 °C. SOD2 and HMOX1 were up regulated in both groups, for SOD2 though the expression was lower in SIDS at all time points measured, and may be less related to heat stress. Being found dead in the prone position (a known risk factor for SIDS) was related to a lower HSPA1B up-regulation in SIDS compared to SIDS found on their side or back. The study demonstrates the potential usefulness of gene expression studies using cultured fibroblasts established from deceased individuals as a tool for molecular and pathological investigations in forensic and biomedical sciences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Camelid heat stress: 15 cases (2003–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Piper L.; Gold, Jenifer R.; Russell, Karen E.; Schulz, Kara L.; Porter, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    This case series describes novel findings associated with heat stress in 15 cases in South American camelids that had no pre-existing illnesses and which had clinical signs of illness after exposure to a warm environment. Novel findings include decreased packed cell volume and albumin concentration and mild spinal axonal degeneration. Heat stress should be considered in weak camelids with a history of hyperthermia. PMID:25320390

  18. Effect of exercise, heat stress and dehydration on myocardial performance.

    PubMed

    Fehling, P C; Haller, J M; Lefferts, W K; Hultquist, E M; Wharton, M; Rowland, T W; Smith, D L

    2015-06-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is a well-documented outcome of extended periods of high cardiac output. Whether similar effects occur during firefighting, an occupation characterized by repeated periods of work compounded by dehydration and heat stress, is uncertain. To investigate the independent and combined effects of moderate heat stress and dehydration on indicators of myocardial performance following intermittent, submaximal treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). Twelve aerobically fit young men (age 21.5±2.6 years; maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max] 60.3±4.4ml kg(-1) min(-1)) performed intermittent treadmill walking exercise consisting of three 20min bouts at an intensity of ~40% VO2max separated by two periods of rest in four different conditions in random order: (i) no heat stress-euhydrated, (ii) heat stress-euhydrated (heat stress created by wearing PPE, (iii) no heat stress-dehydrated and (iv) heat stress-dehydrated. We measured core temperature by a telemetric gastrointestinal pill. We determined cardiac variables by standard echocardiographic techniques immediately before and ~30min after exercise. We recorded no significant changes in markers of systolic (ejection fraction, shortening fraction, tissue Doppler-S) or diastolic (mitral peak E velocity, tissue Doppler-E' and E/E') function following exercise in any of the four conditions. In this model of exercise designed to mimic the work, heat stress and dehydration associated with firefighting activities, we observed no negative effects on myocardial inotropic or lusitropic function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Regulation of Heat Stress by HSF1 and GR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    thermogenesis and mitochondria -derived reactive oxygen species, which likely play a role in heat stress response. Both HSF1 and GR may directly or indirectly...control, n = 3 per group. Furthermore, we examined GR and HSF1 contents in the cytosol, mitochondria , and nucleus of the skeletal muscles. We...are indeed sensitive to heat stress as well as HA. Mitochondria in skeletal muscles are likely the target organelle of acute severe and repeated

  20. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  1. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.; Murphy, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  2. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

    1998-12-08

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

  3. Differential proteomic response to heat stress in thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenping; Huang, Bingru

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of heat-responsive proteins is critical for further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of heat tolerance. The objective of this study was to compare proteins differentially expressed in two C(3) grass species contrasting in heat tolerance, heat-tolerant thermal Agrostis scabra and heat-sensitive Agrostis stolonifera L., and to identify heat-responsive proteins for short- and long-term responses. Plants were exposed to 20/15 degrees C (day/night, control) or 40/35 degrees C (day/night, heat stress) in growth chambers. Leaves were harvested at 2 and 10 days after temperature treatment. Proteins were extracted and separated by fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Thermal A. scabra had superior heat tolerance than A. stolonifera, as indicated by the maintenance of higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency under heat stress. The two-dimensional difference electrophoresis detected 68 heat-responsive proteins in the two species. Thermal A. scabra had more protein spots either down- or up-regulated at 2 days of heat stress, but fewer protein spots were altered at 10 days of heat stress compared with A. stolonifera. Many protein spots exhibited transient down-regulation in thermal A. scabra (only at 2 days of heat treatment), whereas down-regulation of many proteins was also found at 10 days of heat treatment in A. stolonifera, which suggested that protein metabolism in thermal A. scabra might acclimate to heat stress more rapidly than those in A. stolonifera. The sequences of 56 differentially expressed protein spots were identified using mass spectrometry. The results suggest that the maintenance or less severe down-regulation of proteins during long-term (10 days) heat stress may contribute to the superior heat tolerance in thermal A. scabra, including those involved in photosynthesis [RuBisCo, RuBisCo activase, chloroplastic glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), chloroplastic aldolase, oxygen-evolving complex

  4. Integrated physiological mechanisms of exercise performance, adaptation, and maladaptation to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Leon, Lisa R; Montain, Scott J; Sonna, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    This article emphasizes significant recent advances regarding heat stress and its impact on exercise performance, adaptations, fluid electrolyte imbalances, and pathophysiology. During exercise-heat stress, the physiological burden of supporting high skin blood flow and high sweating rates can impose considerable cardiovascular strain and initiate a cascade of pathophysiological events leading to heat stroke. We examine the association between heat stress, particularly high skin temperature, on diminishing cardiovascular/aerobic reserves as well as increasing relative intensity and perceptual cues that degrade aerobic exercise performance. We discuss novel systemic (heat acclimation) and cellular (acquired thermal tolerance) adaptations that improve performance in hot and temperate environments and protect organs from heat stroke as well as other dissimilar stresses. We delineate how heat stroke evolves from gut underperfusion/ischemia causing endotoxin release or the release of mitochondrial DNA fragments in response to cell necrosis, to mediate a systemic inflammatory syndrome inducing coagulopathies, immune dysfunction, cytokine modulation, and multiorgan damage and failure. We discuss how an inflammatory response that induces simultaneous fever and/or prior exposure to a pathogen (e.g., viral infection) that deactivates molecular protective mechanisms interacts synergistically with the hyperthermia of exercise to perhaps explain heat stroke cases reported in low-risk populations performing routine activities. Importantly, we question the "traditional" notion that high core temperature is the critical mediator of exercise performance degradation and heat stroke. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents lipid peroxidation and enhances antioxidant defense system via modulating hepatic nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quails.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Ali, S; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A

    2010-10-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol derived from green tea, exerts antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is one of the consequences of heat stress (HS), which also depresses performance in poultry. This experiment was conducted to elucidate the action mode of EGCG in alleviation of oxidative stress in heat-stressed quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A total of 180 five-week-old female Japanese quails were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34°C for 8 h/d (HS) for 12 wk. Birds in both environments were randomly fed 1 of 3 diets: basal diet and basal diet added with 200 or 400 mg of EGCG/kg of diet. Each of the 2×3 factorially arranged groups was replicated in 10 cages, each containing 3 quails. Performance variables [feed intake (FI) and egg production (EP)], oxidative stress biomarkers [malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)] and hepatic transcription factors [nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA. Exposure to HS caused reductions in FI by 9.7% and EP by 14.4%, increased hepatic MDA level by 84.8%, and decreased hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities by 25.8, 52.3, and 45.5%, respectively (P<0.0001 for all). The hepatic NF-κB expression was greater (156 vs. 82%) and Nrf2 expression was lower (84 vs. 118%) for quails reared under the HS environment than for those reared under the TN environment (P<0.0001 for both). In response to increasing supplemental EGCG level, there were linear increases in FI from 29.6 to 30.9 g/d and EP from 84.3 to 90.1%/d, linear decreases in hepatic MDA level from 2.82 to 1.72 nmol/g and Nrf2 expression from 77.5 to 123.3%, and linear increases in hepatic SOD (146.4 to 182.2), CAT (36.2 to 47.1), and GSH-Px (13.5 to 18.5) activities (U/mg of protein) and NF-κB expression (149.7 to 87.3%) (P<0.0001 for all). Two

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the heat stress response in Zebu (Sahiwal) cattle.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Kusum; Magotra, Ankit; Choudhary, Jyoti; Singh, A K; Mohanty, A K; Upadhyay, R C; Srinivasan, Surendran; Gupta, Pankaj; Choudhary, Neelam; Antony, Bristo; Khan, Farheen

    2014-01-10

    Environmental-induced hyperthermia compromises animal production with drastic economic consequences to global animal agriculture and jeopardizes animal welfare. Heat stress is a major stressor that occurs as a result of an imbalance between heat production within the body and its dissipation and it affects animals at cellular, molecular and ecological levels. The molecular mechanism underlying the physiology of heat stress in the cattle remains undefined. The present study sought to evaluate mRNA expression profiles in the cattle blood in response to heat stress. In this study we report the genes that were differentially expressed in response to heat stress using global scale genome expression technology (Microarray). Four Sahiwal heifers were exposed to 42°C with 90% humidity for 4h followed by normothermia. Gene expression changes include activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), increased expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) and decreased expression and synthesis of other proteins, immune system activation via extracellular secretion of HSP. A cDNA microarray analysis found 140 transcripts to be up-regulated and 77 down-regulated in the cattle blood after heat treatment (P<0.05). But still a comprehensive explanation for the direction of fold change and the specific genes involved in response to acute heat stress still remains to be explored. These findings may provide insights into the underlying mechanism of physiology of heat stress in cattle. Understanding the biology and mechanisms of heat stress is critical to developing approaches to ameliorate current production issues for improving animal performance and agriculture economics. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular drift during heat stress: implications for exercise prescription.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Ganio, Matthew S; Cureton, Kirk J

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular drift, the progressive increase in heart rate and decrease in stroke volume that begins after approximately 10 min of prolonged moderate-intensity exercise, is associated with decreased maximal oxygen uptake, particularly during heat stress. Consequently, the increased heart rate reflects an increased relative metabolic intensity during prolonged exercise in the heat when cardiovascular drift occurs, which has implications for exercise prescription.

  8. Estimates of heat stress relief needs for Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2005-06-01

    Estimates of environmental heat stress are required for heat stress relief measures in cattle. Heat stress is commonly assessed by the temperature-humidity index (THI), the sum of dry and wet bulb temperatures. The THI does not include an interaction between temperature and humidity, although evaporative heat loss increases with rising air temperature. Coat, air velocity, and radiation effects also are not accounted for in the THI. The Holstein dairy cow is the primary target of heat stress relief, followed by feedlot cattle. Heat stress may be estimated for a variety of conditions by thermal balance models. The models consist of animal-specific data (BW, metabolic heat production, tissue and coat insulation, skin water loss, coat depth, and minimal and maximal tidal volumes) and of general heat exchange equations. A thermal balance simulation model was modified to adapt it for Holstein cows by using Holstein data for the animal characteristics in the model, and was validated by comparing its outputs to experimental data. Model outputs include radiant, convective, skin evaporative, respiratory heat loss and rate of change of body temperature. Effects of milk production (35 and 45 kg/d), hair coat depth (3 and 6 mm), air temperature (20 to 45 degrees C), air velocity (0.2 to 2.0 m/s), air humidity (0.8 to 3.9 kPa), and exposed body surface (100, 75, and 50%) on thermal balance outputs were examined. Environmental conditions at which respiratory heat loss attained approximately 50% of its maximal value were defined as thresholds for intermediate heat stress. Air velocity increased and humidity significantly decreased threshold temperatures, particularly at higher coat depth. The effect of air velocity was amplified at high humidity. Increasing milk production from 35 to 45 kg/d decreased threshold temperature by 5 degrees C. In the lying cow, the lower air velocity in the proximity of body surface and the smaller exposed surface markedly decrease threshold

  9. A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-12-01

    Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ∼0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75 and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies.

  10. Feedlot cattle susceptibility to heat stress: an animal specific model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  11. Association between heat stress and oxidative stress in poultry; mitochondrial dysfunction and dietary interventions with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Abdollah; Michiels, Joris; Degroote, Jeroen; Majdeddin, Maryam; Golian, Abolghasem; De Smet, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Heat as a stressor of poultry has been studied extensively for many decades; it affects poultry production on a worldwide basis and has significant impact on well-being and production. More recently, the involvement of heat stress in inducing oxidative stress has received much interest. Oxidative stress is defined as the presence of reactive species in excess of the available antioxidant capacity of animal cells. Reactive species can modify several biologically cellular macromolecules and can interfere with cell signaling pathways. Furthermore, during the last decade, there has been an ever-increasing interest in the use of a wide array of natural feed-delivered phytochemicals that have potential antioxidant properties for poultry. In light of this, the current review aims to (1) summarize the mechanisms through which heat stress triggers excessive superoxide radical production in the mitochondrion and progresses into oxidative stress, (2) illustrate that this pathophysiology is dependent on the intensity and duration of heat stress, (3) present different nutritional strategies for mitigation of mitochondrial dysfunction, with particular focus on antioxidant phytochemicals. Oxidative stress that occurs with heat exposure can be manifest in all parts of the body; however, mitochondrial dysfunction underlies oxidative stress. In the initial phase of acute heat stress, mitochondrial substrate oxidation and electron transport chain activity are increased resulting in excessive superoxide production. During the later stage of acute heat stress, down-regulation of avian uncoupling protein worsens the oxidative stress situation causing mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue damage. Typically, antioxidant enzyme activities are upregulated. Chronic heat stress, however, leads to downsizing of mitochondrial metabolic oxidative capacity, up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein, a clear alteration in the pattern of antioxidant enzyme activities, and depletion of antioxidant

  12. Drought stress had a predominant effect over heat stress on three tomato cultivars subjected to combined stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong; Yu, Xiaqing; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Rosenqvist, Eva; Zhao, Liping; Wang, Yinlei; Yu, Wengui; Zhao, Tongmin; Wu, Zhen

    2017-01-25

    Abiotic stresses due to environmental factors could adversely affect the growth and development of crops. Among the abiotic stresses, drought and heat stress are two critical threats to crop growth and sustainable agriculture worldwide. Considering global climate change, incidence of combined drought and heat stress is likely to increase. The aim of this study was to shed light on plant growth performance and leaf physiology of three tomatoes cultivars ('Arvento', 'LA1994' and 'LA2093') under control, drought, heat and combined stress. Shoot fresh and dry weight, leaf area and relative water content of all cultivars significantly decreased under drought and combined stress as compared to control. The net photosynthesis and starch content were significantly lower under drought and combined stress than control in the three cultivars. Stomata and pore length of the three cultivars significantly decreased under drought and combined stress as compared to control. The tomato 'Arvento' was more affected by heat stress than 'LA1994' and 'LA2093' due to significant decreases in shoot dry weight, chlorophyll a and carotenoid content, starch content and NPQ (non-photochemical quenching) only in 'Arvento' under heat treatment. By comparison, the two heat-tolerant tomatoes were more affected by drought stress compared to 'Arvento' as shown by small stomatal and pore area, decreased sucrose content, ΦPSII (quantum yield of photosystem II), ETR (electron transport rate) and qL (fraction of open PSII centers) in 'LA1994' and 'LA2093'. The three cultivars showed similar response when subjected to the combination of drought and heat stress as shown by most physiological parameters, even though only 'LA1994' and 'LA2093' showed decreased Fv/Fm (maximum potential quantum efficiency of photosystem II), ΦPSII, ETR and qL under combined stress. The cultivars differing in heat sensitivity did not show difference in the combined stress sensitivity, indicating that selection for tomatoes

  13. Selenium as a feed supplement for heat-stressed poultry: a review.

    PubMed

    Habibian, Mahmood; Sadeghi, Ghorbanali; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress is associated with compromised performance and productivity in poultry due to declines in feed intake, nutrient utilization, growth rate, egg production and quality, and feed efficiency. Emerging evidences have shown that acute heat exposure results in increased production of free radicals and causes oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. Additionally, heat stress can influence immune response by changing the expression of cytokines and by making the immune cells more susceptible to oxidative stress. Selenium, as a part of specific selenoproteins, can help to maintain antioxidant defenses, thereby preventing damages to tissues. An optimum response with supplementation of selenium in diet has been found to improve feed intake, body weight gain, feed efficiency, egg production and quality, and antioxidant status in heat-stressed poultry. Selenium compounds are also known to improve immune responses by altering the production of certain cytokines secreted by cells of the immune system and by enhancing the resistance of the immune cells to oxidative stress. It was reported that selenium supplementation had inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in heat-stressed broiler chicks, but the details are not completely elucidated. In the present review, the effect of selenium on production performance, nutrient utilization, antioxidative status, and immune responses of heat-stressed poultry is summarized.

  14. Heat loss through the glabrous skin surfaces of heavily insulated, heat-stressed individuals.

    PubMed

    Grahn, D A; Dillon, J L; Heller, H C

    2009-07-01

    Insulation reduces heat exchange between a body and the environment. Glabrous (nonhairy) skin surfaces (palms of the hands, soles of the feet, face, and ears) constitute a small percentage of total body surface area but contain specialized vascular structures that facilitate heat loss. We have previously reported that cooling the glabrous skin surfaces is effective in alleviating heat stress and that the application of local subatmospheric pressure enhances the effect. In this paper, we compare the effects of cooling multiple glabrous skin surfaces with and without vacuum on thermal recovery in heavily insulated heat-stressed individuals. Esophageal temperatures (T(es)) and heart rates were monitored throughout the trials. Water loss was determined from pre- and post-trial nude weights. Treadmill exercise (5.6 km/h, 9-16% slope, and 25-45 min duration) in a hot environment (41.5 degrees C, 20-30% relative humidity) while wearing insulating pants and jackets was used to induce heat stress (T(es)>or=39 degrees C). For postexercise recovery, the subjects donned additional insulation (a balaclava, winter gloves, and impermeable boot covers) and rested in the hot environment for 60 min. Postexercise cooling treatments included control (no cooling) or the application of a 10 degrees C closed water circulating system to (a) the hand(s) with or without application of a local subatmospheric pressure, (b) the face, (c) the feet, or (d) multiple glabrous skin regions. Following exercise induction of heat stress in heavily insulated subjects, the rate of recovery of T(es) was 0.4+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12), but with application of cooling to one hand, the rate was 0.8+/-0.3 degrees C/h(n=12), and with one hand cooling with subatmospheric pressure, the rate was 1.0+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12). Cooling alone yielded two responses, one resembling that of cooling with subatmospheric pressure (n=8) and one resembling that of no cooling (n=4). The effect of treating multiple surfaces was

  15. Low, medium, and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Jangam, Priyanka M; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Wes; Silva, Juan L

    2014-08-01

    A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with an initial cell density of 10(7) CFU/ml were analyzed for their heat tolerance at 60°C for 10 min. These L. monocytogenes strains were categorized into three heat tolerance groups: low (<2 log CFU/ml survival), medium (2 to 4 log CFU/ml survival), and high (4 to 6 log CFU/ml survival). Serotype 1/2a strains had relatively low heat tolerance; seven of the eight tested strains were classified as low heat tolerant. Of the two serotype 1/2b strains tested, one was very heat sensitive (not detectable) and the other was very heat resistant (5.4 log CFU/ml survival). Among the 16 serotype 4b strains, survival ranged from not detectable to 4 log CFU/ml. When one L. monocytogenes strain from each heat tolerance group was subjected to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 30 or 60 min, the survival of heat-stressed cells at 60°C for 10 min increased by 5 log CFU/ml (D60°C-values nearly doubled) compared with the nonstressed control cells. Sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 or 90 min increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at room temperature by 3 to 5 h compared with nonstressed control cells. The heat stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was reversed after 2 h at room temperature but was maintained for up to 24 h at 4°C. Our results indicate a high diversity in heat tolerance among strains of L. monocytogenes, and once acquired this heat stress adaptation persists after cooling, which should be taken into account while conducting risk analyses for this pathogen.

  16. Heat Stress and Cardiovascular, Hormonal, and Heat Shock Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Littmann, Andrew E.; Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Wester, Lydia A.; Knipper, Jane S.; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Conditions such as osteoarthritis, obesity, and spinal cord injury limit the ability of patients to exercise, preventing them from experiencing many well-documented physiologic stressors. Recent evidence indicates that some of these stressors might derive from exercise-induced body temperature increases. Objective: To determine whether whole-body heat stress without exercise triggers cardiovascular, hormonal, and extra-cellular protein responses of exercise. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five young, healthy adults (13 men, 12 women; age = 22.1 ± 2.4 years, height = 175.2 ± 11.6 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 14.8 kg, body mass index = 22.6 ± 4.0) volunteered. Intervention(s): Participants sat in a heat stress chamber with heat (73°C) and without heat (26°C) stress for 30 minutes on separate days. We obtained blood samples from a subset of 13 participants (7 men, 6 women) before and after exposure to heat stress. Main Outcome Measure(s): Extracellular heat shock protein (HSP72) and catecholamine plasma concentration, heart rate, blood pressure, and heat perception. Results: After 30 minutes of heat stress, body temperature measured via rectal sensor increased by 0.8°C. Heart rate increased linearly to 131.4 ± 22.4 beats per minute (F6,24 = 186, P < .001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 16 mm Hg (F6,24 = 10.1, P < .001) and 5 mm Hg (F6,24 = 5.4, P < .001), respectively. Norepinephrine (F1,12 = 12.1, P = .004) and prolactin (F1,12 = 30.2, P < .001) increased in the plasma (58% and 285%, respectively) (P < .05). The HSP72 (F1,12 = 44.7, P < .001) level increased with heat stress by 48.7% ± 53.9%. No cardiovascular or blood variables showed changes during the control trials (quiet sitting in the heat chamber with no heat stress), resulting in differences between heat and control trials. Conclusions: We found that whole-body heat stress triggers some of the

  17. Heat stress and cardiovascular, hormonal, and heat shock proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Masaki; Littmann, Andrew E; Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Wester, Lydia A; Knipper, Jane S; Shields, Richard K

    2012-01-01

    Conditions such as osteoarthritis, obesity, and spinal cord injury limit the ability of patients to exercise, preventing them from experiencing many well-documented physiologic stressors. Recent evidence indicates that some of these stressors might derive from exercise-induced body temperature increases. To determine whether whole-body heat stress without exercise triggers cardiovascular, hormonal, and extracellular protein responses of exercise. Randomized controlled trial. University research laboratory. Twenty-five young, healthy adults (13 men, 12 women; age = 22.1 ± 2.4 years, height = 175.2 ± 11.6 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 14.8 kg, body mass index = 22.6 ± 4.0) volunteered. Participants sat in a heat stress chamber with heat (73°C) and without heat (26°C) stress for 30 minutes on separate days. We obtained blood samples from a subset of 13 participants (7 men, 6 women) before and after exposure to heat stress. Extracellular heat shock protein (HSP72) and catecholamine plasma concentration, heart rate, blood pressure, and heat perception. After 30 minutes of heat stress, body temperature measured via rectal sensor increased by 0.8°C. Heart rate increased linearly to 131.4 ± 22.4 beats per minute (F₆,₂₄ = 186, P < .001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 16 mm Hg (F₆,₂₄ = 10.1, P < .001) and 5 mm Hg (F₆,₂₄ = 5.4, P < .001), respectively. Norepinephrine (F₁,₁₂ = 12.1, P = .004) and prolactin (F₁,₁₂ = 30.2, P < .001) increased in the plasma (58% and 285%, respectively) (P < .05). The HSP72 (F₁,₁₂ = 44.7, P < .001) level increased with heat stress by 48.7% ± 53.9%. No cardiovascular or blood variables showed changes during the control trials (quiet sitting in the heat chamber with no heat stress), resulting in differences between heat and control trials. We found that whole-body heat stress triggers some of the physiologic responses observed with exercise. Future studies are necessary to investigate whether

  18. Heat stress in grapevine: the pros and cons of acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Coito, João L; Colaço, Silvana; Sangiogo, Maurício; Amâncio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Heat stress is a major limiting factor of grapevine production and quality. Acclimation and recovery are essential to ensure plant survival, and the recovery mechanisms can be independent of the heat response mechanisms. An experimental set up with and without acclimation to heat followed by recovery [stepwise acclimation and recovery (SAR) and stepwise recovery (SR), respectively] was applied to two grapevine varieties, Touriga Nacional (TN), and Trincadeira (TR), with different tolerance to abiotic stress. Major differences were found between leaves of SAR and SR, especially after recovery; in SAR, almost all parameters returned to basal levels while in SR they remained altered. Acclimation led to a swifter and short-term antioxidative response, affecting the plant to a lesser extent than SR. Significant differences were found among varieties: upon stress, TN significantly increased ascorbate and glutathione reduction levels, boosting the cell's redox-buffering capacity, while TR needed to synthesize both metabolites, its response being insufficient to keep the redox state at working levels. TR was affected by stress for a longer period and the up-regulation pattern of antioxidative stress genes was more obvious. In TN, heat shock proteins were significantly induced, but the canonical heat-stress gene signature was not evident probably because no shutdown of the housekeeping metabolism was needed.

  19. Heat Stress and Baroreflex Regulation of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    CRANDALL, CRAIG G.

    2010-01-01

    In healthy, noninjured, individuals, passive (i.e., nonexercising) whole-body heating has the potential to cause significant cardiovascular stress that may be second only to the cardiovascular stress associated with exercise. For example, such a heat stress can increase heart rate to well over 100 beats·min−1 with cardiac output increasing upward to 13 L·min−1. This increase in cardiac output is necessary to maintain blood pressure due to profound reductions in total vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. These responses are accompanied with elevations in sympathetic activity and reductions in vascular conductance (i.e., increased vascular resistance) from noncutaneous beds. While heat-stressed, blood pressure control is compromised resulting in orthostatic intolerance. A plausible explanation for such an event is that heat stress impairs baroreflex responsiveness perhaps due to the reduced range by which baroreflexes can increase heart rate, cardiac output, sympathetic activity, and vascular resistance during a hypotensive challenge. Given that dynamic exercise has the potential to cause large increases in internal temperature, possibly a component of the response to exercise, with respect to baroreflex control of blood pressure, may be affected by the thermal load during the exercise bout. Within this context, the purpose of this review was to summarize findings investigating the effects of heat stress on baroreflex regulation of blood pressure. PMID:18981943

  20. Heat stress and baroreflex regulation of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Craig G

    2008-12-01

    In healthy, noninjured, individuals, passive (i.e., nonexercising) whole-body heating has the potential to cause significant cardiovascular stress that may be second only to the cardiovascular stress associated with exercise. For example, such a heat stress can increase heart rate to well over 100 beats min(-1) with cardiac output increasing upward to 13 L min(-1). This increase in cardiac output is necessary to maintain blood pressure due to profound reductions in total vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. These responses are accompanied with elevations in sympathetic activity and reductions in vascular conductance (i.e., increased vascular resistance) from noncutaneous beds. While heat-stressed, blood pressure control is compromised resulting in orthostatic intolerance. A plausible explanation for such an event is that heat stress impairs baroreflex responsiveness perhaps due to the reduced range by which baroreflexes can increase heart rate, cardiac output, sympathetic activity, and vascular resistance during a hypotensive challenge. Given that dynamic exercise has the potential to cause large increases in internal temperature, possibly a component of the response to exercise, with respect to baroreflex control of blood pressure, may be affected by the thermal load during the exercise bout. Within this context, the purpose of this review was to summarize findings investigating the effects of heat stress on baroreflex regulation of blood pressure.

  1. Residual micro-stress distributions in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia and porcelain-fused to metal systems: Analysis by FIB-DIC ring-core method and correlation with fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, M; Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Bemporad, E

    2015-11-01

    The production of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) induces complex residual stress profiles, due to both the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the veneering ceramic and the framework and to the thermal gradients occurring during the final cooling. Detailed knowledge of residual stress distributions in the veneering ceramics is important to understand the interface phenomena with the framework and the consequences of the different firing systems. The first objective of this study was to analyse the residual stress distribution in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia core with micrometer spatial resolution, with also a focus on the stress at the interface versus porcelain-fused-to-metal samples. The second purpose was to correlate the residual stress with the fracture toughness. The micron-scale focused ion beam (FIB) ring-core method was used to map the residual stress over the cross-sections of the veneering ceramics. The methodology is based on FIB micro-milling of annular trenches, combined with high-resolution in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, a full field strain analysis by digital image correlation (DIC) and numerical models for residual stress calculation. Fracture toughness was evaluated by using high load Vickers indentation and hardness/modulus were measured by nanoindentation testing also across the interfaces. Both prosthetic systems showed a compressive stress at the ceramic surface on a micron-scale. The stress profile for porcelain fused to metal (PFM) showed a transition to tensile stress at the half of the layer, whilst the stress in proximity of the interface was more compressive in both the cases. Residual stress on a micron scale are higher in magnitude than the corresponding macro-scale values reported in the literature, due to the stress relaxation given, at larger scales, by micro-voids and cracks. The stress field was directly correlated with the indentation fracture toughness, which was higher in those areas where the

  2. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  3. Ideas and perspectives: Heat stress: more than hot air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Van De Velde, Helena; De Groote, Toon; Nijs, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Climate models project an important increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves. In gauging the impact on plant responses, much of the focus has been on air temperatures, while a critical analysis of leaf temperatures during heat extremes has not been conducted. Nevertheless, direct physiological consequences from heat depend primarily on leaf rather than on air temperatures. We discuss how the interplay between various environmental variables and the plants' stomatal response affects leaf temperatures and the potential for heat stress by making use of both an energy balance model and field data. The results demonstrate that this interplay between plants and environment can cause leaf temperature to vary substantially at the same air temperature. In general, leaves tended to heat up when radiation was high and when stomates were closed, as expected. But perhaps counterintuitively, high air humidity also raised leaf temperatures, while humid conditions are typically regarded as benign with respect to plant survival since they limit water loss. High wind speeds brought the leaf temperature closer to the air temperature, which can imply either cooling or warming (i.e. abating or reinforcing heat stress) depending on other prevailing conditions. The results thus indicate that heat waves characterized by similar extreme air temperatures may pose little danger under some atmospheric conditions but could be lethal in other cases. The trends illustrated here should give ecologists and agronomists a more informed indication about which circumstances are most conducive to the occurrence of heat stress.

  4. Dynamics of urban heat stress events in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, David

    2016-04-01

    Extreme heat stress events as measured by the wet-bulb temperature require extraordinarily high air temperatures coupled with high humidity. These conditions are rare, as relative humidity rapidly falls with rising air temperature, and this effect often results in decreasing heat stress as temperature rises. However, in certain coastal locations in the Middle East recent heat waves have resulted in wet-bulb temperatures of 33-35 degrees C, which approach the theoretical limits of human tolerance. These conditions result from the combination of extreme desert heat and humid winds off of the warm ocean waters. It is unclear if climate models properly simulate these dynamics. This study will analyse the ability of the CMIP5 model suite to replicate observed dynamics during extreme heat events in major urban areas.

  5. Heat Pumping in Nanomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Arrachea, Liliana; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2011-04-01

    We propose using a phonon pumping mechanism to transfer heat from a cold to a hot body using a propagating modulation of the medium connecting the two bodies. This phonon pump can cool nanomechanical systems without the need for active feedback. We compute the lowest temperature that this refrigerator can achieve.

  6. Stress Prediction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA wanted to know how astronauts' bodies would react under various gravitational pulls and space suit weights. Under contract to NASA, the University of Michigan's Center for Ergonomics developed a model capable of predicting what type of stress and what degree of load a body could stand. The algorithm generated was commercialized with the ISTU (Isometric Strength Testing Unit) Functional Capacity Evaluation System, which simulates tasks such as lifting a heavy box or pushing a cart and evaluates the exertion expended. It also identifies the muscle group that limits the subject's performance. It is an effective tool of personnel evaluation, selection and job redesign.

  7. Cardiovascular responses to heat stress in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical reports have suggested that patients with heart diseases may be particularly vulnerable to heat injury. This review examines the effects of heat stress on cardiovascular and autonomic functions in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Laboratory investigations have shown that cutaneous vasodilator responses to heating are impaired in patients, whereas activation of skin sympathetic nerve activation is not attenuated in CHF as compared to controls. Attenuated cutaneous vasodilation may increase the risk of a heat related illness when CHF subjects are exposed to hyperthermic conditions. PMID:24599558

  8. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.; Neeper, D. A.

    1985-09-01

    Progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating is described, which could also be applied to service water heating. The refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compared the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  9. Stress and disorders of the stress system.

    PubMed

    Chrousos, George P

    2009-07-01

    All organisms must maintain a complex dynamic equilibrium, or homeostasis, which is constantly challenged by internal or external adverse forces termed stressors. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened or perceived to be so; homeostasis is re-established by various physiological and behavioral adaptive responses. Neuroendocrine hormones have major roles in the regulation of both basal homeostasis and responses to threats, and are involved in the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by dyshomeostasis or cacostasis. The stress response is mediated by the stress system, partly located in the central nervous system and partly in peripheral organs. The central, greatly interconnected effectors of this system include the hypothalamic hormones arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone and pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides, and the locus ceruleus and autonomic norepinephrine centers in the brainstem. Targets of these effectors include the executive and/or cognitive, reward and fear systems, the wake-sleep centers of the brain, the growth, reproductive and thyroid hormone axes, and the gastrointestinal, cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and immune systems. Optimal basal activity and responsiveness of the stress system is essential for a sense of well-being, successful performance of tasks, and appropriate social interactions. By contrast, excessive or inadequate basal activity and responsiveness of this system might impair development, growth and body composition, and lead to a host of behavioral and somatic pathological conditions.

  10. TPX heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Kungl, D.J.; Knutson, D.S.; Costello, J.; Stoenescu, S.; Yemin, L.

    1995-12-31

    TPX, while having primarily super-conducting coils that do not require water cooling, still has very significant water cooling requirements for the plasma heating systems, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, diagnostics, and ancillary equipment. This is accentuated by the 1000-second pulse requirement. Two major design changes, which have significantly affected the TPX Heating and Cooling System, have been made since the conceptual design review in March of 1993. This paper will discuss these changes and review the current status of the conceptual design. The first change involves replacing the vacuum vessel neutron shielding configuration of lead/glass composite tile by a much simpler and more reliable borated water shield. The second change reduces the operating temperature of the vacuum vessel from 150 C to {ge}50 C. With this temperature reduction, all in-vessel components and the vessel will be supplied by coolant at a common {ge}50 C inlet temperature. In all, six different heating and cooling supply requirements (temperature, pressure, water quality) for the various TPX components must be met. This paper will detail these requirements and provide an overview of the Heating and Cooling System design while focusing on the ramifications of the TPX changes described above.

  11. Calibration of Heat Stress Monitor and its Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, Can

    2017-07-01

    Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) equation is a heat stress index that gives information for the workers in the industrial areas. WBGT equation is described in ISO Standard 7243 (ISO 7243 in Hot environments—estimation of the heat stress on working man, based on the WBGT index, ISO, Geneva, 1982). WBGT is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the natural wet-bulb temperature, dry-bulb temperature, and air temperature. WBGT is a calculated parameter. WBGT uses input estimates, and heat stress monitor measures these quantities. In this study, the calibration method of a heat stress monitor is described, and the model function for measurement uncertainty is given. Sensitivity coefficients were derived according to GUM. Two-pressure humidity generators were used to generate a controlled environment. Heat stress monitor was calibrated inside of the generator. Two-pressure humidity generator, which is located in Turkish Standard Institution, was used as the reference device. This device is traceable to national standards. Two-pressure humidity generator includes reference temperature Pt-100 sensors. The reference sensor was sheltered with a wet wick for the calibration of natural wet-bulb thermometer. The reference sensor was centred into a black globe that has got 150 mm diameter for the calibration of the black globe thermometer.

  12. Identification of workers exposed concomitantly to heat stress and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bourbonnais, Robert; Zayed, Joseph; Lévesque, Martine; Busque, Marc-Antoine; Duguay, Patrice; Truchon, Ginette

    2013-01-01

    In the context of climate change, concomitant exposure to heat stress and chemicals takes on great importance. However, little information is available in this regard. The purpose of this research, therefore, was to develop an approach aimed at identifying worker groups that would be potentially most at risk. The approach comprises 5 consecutive steps: - Establishment of a list of occupations for all industry sectors - Determination of heat stress parameters - Identification of occupations at risk of heat stress - Determination of exposure to chemicals - Identification of occupations potentially most at risk. Overall, 1,010 occupations were selected due to their representativeness of employment sectors in Québec. Using a rating matrix, the risk stemming from exposure to heat stress was judged "critical" or "significant" for 257 occupations. Among these, 136 occupations were identified as showing a high potential of simultaneous exposure to heat stress and chemicals. Lastly, a consultation with thirteen experts made it possible to establish a list of 22 priority occupations, that is, 20 occupations in the metal manufacturing sector, as well as roofers and firefighters. These occupations would merit special attention for an investigation and evaluation of the potential effects on workers' health.

  13. Effect of whole body heat stress on peripheral vasoconstriction during leg dependency

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, R. Matthew; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Hubing, Kimberly A.; Del Coso, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The venoarteriolar response (VAR) increases vascular resistance upon increases in venous transmural pressure in cutaneous, subcutaneous, and muscle vascular beds. During orthostasis, it has been proposed that up to 45% of the increase in systemic vascular tone is due to VAR-related local mechanism(s). The objective of this project was to test the hypothesis that heat stress attenuates VAR-mediated cutaneous and whole leg vasoconstriction. During normothermic conditions, measurements of cutaneous blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and femoral artery blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) were obtained from both legs during supine and leg-dependent conditions. These measurements were repeated following a whole body heat stress (increase in internal temperature of 1.4 ± 0.2°C). Before leg dependency, cutaneous (CVC) and femoral vascular conductances (FVC) were significantly elevated in both legs during heat stress relative to normothermia (P < 0.001). During leg dependency the absolute decrease in CVC was attenuated during heat stress (P < 0.01) while the absolute decrease in FVC was unaffected (P = 0.90). When CVC and FVC data were analyzed as a relative change from their respective baseline values, heat stress significantly attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction due to leg dependency in the cutaneous and femoral circulations (P < 0.001 for both variables). These data suggest that an attenuated local vasoconstriction, evoked via the venoarteriolar response, may contribute to reduced blood pressure control and thus reduced orthostatic tolerance that occurs in heat-stressed individuals. PMID:19815719

  14. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  15. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  16. Developmental and heat stress-regulated expression of HsfA2 and small heat shock proteins in tomato anthers

    PubMed Central

    Giorno, Filomena; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grillo, Stefania; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Vriezen, Wim H.; Mariani, Celestina

    2010-01-01

    The high sensitivity of male reproductive cells to high temperatures may be due to an inadequate heat stress response. The results of a comprehensive expression analysis of HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII, two important members of the heat stress system, in the developing anthers of a heat-tolerant tomato genotype are reported here. A transcriptional analysis at different developmental anther/pollen stages was performed using semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. The messengers were localized using in situ RNA hybridization, and protein accumulation was monitored using immunoblot analysis. Based on the analysis of the gene and protein expression profiles, HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII are finely regulated during anther development and are further induced under both short and prolonged heat stress conditions. These data suggest that HsfA2 may be directly involved in the activation of protection mechanisms in the tomato anther during heat stress and, thereby, may contribute to tomato fruit set under adverse temperatures. PMID:19854799

  17. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  18. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  19. Survival of heat stress with and without heat hardening in Drosophila melanogaster: interactions with larval density.

    PubMed

    Arias, Leticia N; Sambucetti, Pablo; Scannapieco, Alejandra C; Loeschcke, Volker; Norry, Fabian M

    2012-07-01

    Survival of a potentially lethal high temperature stress is a genetically variable thermal adaptation trait in many organisms. Organisms cope with heat stress by basal or induced thermoresistance. Here, we tested quantitative trait loci (QTL) for heat stress survival (HSS) in Drosophila melanogaster, with and without a cyclic heat-hardening pre-treatment, for flies that were reared at low (LD) or high (HD) density. Mapping populations were two panels of recombinant inbred lines (RIL), which were previously constructed from heat stress-selected stocks: RIL-D48 and RIL-SH2, derived from backcrosses to stocks of low and high heat resistance, respectively. HSS increased with heat hardening in both LD and HD flies. In addition, HSS increased consistently with density in non-hardened flies. There was a significant interaction between heat hardening and density effects in RIL-D48. Several QTL were significant for both density and hardening treatments. Many QTL overlapped with thermotolerance QTL identified for other traits in previous studies based on LD cultures only. However, three new QTL were found in HD only (cytological ranges: 12E-16F6; 30A3-34C2; 49C-50C). Previously found thermotolerance QTL were also significant for flies from HD cultures.

  20. Influence of heat stress to matrix on bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keiko; Uoshima, Katsumi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2009-08-01

    It is important to know the etiology of implant failure. It has been reported that heat stress during drilling was one of the causes for failure and the threshold was 47 degrees C. However, clinically, we encounter cases in which overheating does not seem to affect osseointegration eventually. The purpose of this study was to assess histologically the spatio-temporal effect of heat stress on bone formation after overheating the bone matrix. Rat calvarial bone was heated to 37 degrees C, 43 degrees C, 45 degrees C and 48 degrees C for 15 min by a temperature stimulator. Paraffin sections were prepared 1, 3 and 5 weeks after heating and investigated histologically under light microscopy. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) immunohistochemistry and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme histochemistry were carried out. The area of dead osteocytes was calculated and statistically analyzed. Apoptotic osteocytes were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Along with the temperature increase, the area of dead osteocytes increased and regeneration of the periosteal membrane was delayed. Hsps- and TUNEL-positive cells were only seen in the 48 degrees C group. Spatio-temporal changes of TRAP- and ALP-positive cell numbers were observed, while OPN expression was mostly absent. Even after 48 degrees C stimulation, bone formation on the calvarial surface was observed after 5 weeks. Although there was a temperature-dependent delay in bone formation after heat stress, the 48 degrees C heat stress did not obstruct bone formation eventually. This delay was probably caused by slow periosteal membrane regeneration.

  1. Sequence determinants of prokaryotic gene expression level under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Heng; Yang, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Pan; He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Prokaryotic gene expression is environment-dependent and temperature plays an important role in shaping the gene expression profile. Revealing the regulation mechanisms of gene expression pertaining to temperature has attracted tremendous efforts in recent years particularly owning to the yielding of transcriptome and proteome data by high-throughput techniques. However, most of the previous works concentrated on the characterization of the gene expression profile of individual organism and little effort has been made to disclose the commonality among organisms, especially for the gene sequence features. In this report, we collected the transcriptome and proteome data measured under heat stress condition from recently published literature and studied the sequence determinants for the expression level of heat-responsive genes on multiple layers. Our results showed that there indeed exist commonness and consistent patterns of the sequence features among organisms for the differentially expressed genes under heat stress condition. Some features are attributed to the requirement of thermostability while some are dominated by gene function. The revealed sequence determinants of bacterial gene expression level under heat stress complement the knowledge about the regulation factors of prokaryotic gene expression responding to the change of environmental conditions. Furthermore, comparisons to thermophilic adaption have been performed to reveal the similarity and dissimilarity of the sequence determinants for the response to heat stress and for the adaption to high habitat temperature, which elucidates the complex landscape of gene expression related to the same physical factor of temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-08-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation.

  3. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation. PMID:27506855

  4. Heat exchanger expert system logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction is described of the operation and fault diagnostics of a Deep Space Network heat exchanger to a rule base by the application of propositional calculus to a set of logic statements. The value of this approach lies in the ease of converting the logic and subsequently implementing it on a computer as an expert system. The rule base was written in Process Intelligent Control software.

  5. Temporal characteristics of thermal satellite images for urban heat stress and heat island mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Janet E.; To, Pui Hang

    2012-11-01

    The reconstruction of urban climate is still challenging to climatologists in spite of over five decades of research including direct data measurement and model building. Methods for measuring and monitoring urban climate have strengths and weaknesses depending on the application. The mapping of patterns of urban heat stress over a city is not useful if the patterns depicted apply only to the time of data acquisition. Since thermal satellite sensors can now provide detailed temperature data covering whole cities and beyond, their adoption in urban planning depends on demonstrating their relevance to commonly prevailing conditions. This research investigates and presents a methodology based on four summertime ASTER thermal satellite images of Hong Kong for urban heat stress mapping at detailed level. It demonstrates that satellite images obtained under certain climatic conditions, and accompanied by adequate 'in situ' ground data, can provide a basis for an operational heat stress mapping system. The temporal limitation of thermal satellite images is examined for both day and nighttime images by comparison of image-derived air temperatures with ground data representing extended periods and other hot days and nights outside the image acquisition times. The nighttime images were found to be more representative of air temperature at other times than the daytime images, due to a more stable boundary layer, with lower wind speeds and temperature inversion at night. The nighttime images showed high and significant correlations with ground level air temperatures for an average 13-h period surrounding the image time 10.42pm, from 6 pm to 4-8 am the next day. Additionally they were highly and significantly correlated with ground air temperature distributions on 93% of all hot summer nights in the same years. Therefore the nighttime images can be considered representative of a commonly occurring summer nighttime situation in Hong Kong, and can be used to determine the

  6. Yield-stress fluid drop impact on heated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Brendan; Wu, Alex; Ewoldt, Randy

    2015-11-01

    Yield-stress fluids, including gels and pastes, are effectively fluid at high stress and solid at low stress. In liquid-solid impacts, these fluids can stick and accumulate where they impact, motivating several applications of these rheologically-complex materials. Here we use high-speed imaging to experimentally study liquid-solid impact of yield-stress fluids on heated surfaces. At low temperatures yield-stress fluids tend to stick to surfaces and leave a coating layer. At sufficiently high temperatures the Leidenfrost effect can be observed, wherein a layer of vapor is created between the material and the surface due to rapid boiling, which can prevent a droplet of yield-stress fluid from sticking to the surface. In this study rheological material properties, drop size, drop velocity, and surface temperature are varied to characterize behavioral regimes. Material sticking to and releasing from the surface is observed as a function of the input parameters.

  7. Research in occupational heat stress in India: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Krishnan; Maruthy, K. N.; Venugopal, Vidhya; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi

    2016-01-01

    Occupational heat stress is a major health burden with several potential negative health and well-being outcomes. It is only in the recent years medical research has addressed this risk factor. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of studies in the area of occupational heat stress and its health impacts. Research in occupational heat stress in developing countries like India is limited because of several challenges and constraints. Few challenges are permission from industries to publish the data, resistance for change from employers and workers, improper record of heat/any occupational disease by the employer or worker, study design, and paucity in number of studies. Proper education and guidelines can help to overcome some of the constraints. Proper and correct guidelines will help in mitigating the effects of excessive heat exposure on the health of workers. The studies in this area are limited, and the association between occupational heat exposure and health impacts is not clearly established. Hence, carefully designed studies are required to examine this association and thereby provide valuable information to protect worker's health. PMID:28194079

  8. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  9. Prospects of engineering thermotolerance in crops through modulation of heat stress transcription factor and heat shock protein networks.

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Röth, Sascha; Schleiff, Enrico; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Cell survival under high temperature conditions involves the activation of heat stress response (HSR), which in principle is highly conserved among different organisms, but shows remarkable complexity and unique features in plant systems. The transcriptional reprogramming at higher temperatures is controlled by the activity of the heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs). Hsfs allow the transcriptional activation of HSR genes, among which heat shock proteins (Hsps) are best characterized. Hsps belong to multigene families encoding for molecular chaperones involved in various processes including maintenance of protein homeostasis as a requisite for optimal development and survival under stress conditions. Hsfs form complex networks to activate downstream responses, but are concomitantly subjected to cell-type-dependent feedback regulation through factor-specific physical and functional interactions with chaperones belonging to Hsp90, Hsp70 and small Hsp families. There is increasing evidence that the originally assumed specialized function of Hsf/chaperone networks in the HSR turns out to be a complex central stress response system that is involved in the regulation of a broad variety of other stress responses and may also have substantial impact on various developmental processes. Understanding in detail the function of such regulatory networks is prerequisite for sustained improvement of thermotolerance in important agricultural crops. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-11-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  11. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, D K; Bartzanas, T; Panagakis, P; Zhang, G; Kittas, C

    2016-11-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  12. Resveratrol protects quail hepatocytes against heat stress: modulation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Akdemir, F; Tuzcu, M; Iben, C; Sahin, N

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the effects of dietary resveratrol on the induction of heat shock proteins, transcription factors and antioxidative enzyme system in liver of quails under heat stress were investigated. A total of 180 (55-day-old) female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were reared either at 22 °C for 24 h/day (thermoneutral, TN) or 34 °C for 8 h/day (heat stress, HS; 09:00-17:00 hours) for 12 weeks. Birds in both environments were randomly fed one of three diets: basal diet and basal diet added with either 200 or 400 mg of resveratrol per kg of diet. The results showed that exposure to high ambient temperature induced decreases in feed intake, egg production, and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities but increases in hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations (p < 0.001). Liver Hsp70, Hsp90 and NF-κB expression was greater while Nrf2 expression was lower for quails reared under the heat stress than for those reared under the TN environment (p < 0.0001). There were linear increases in feed intake, egg production, hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities as well as Nrf2 expression, but linear decreases in hepatic MDA concentrations and Hsp70, Hsp90, and NF-κB expressions with increasing supplemental resveratrol level (p < 0.0001). Two-way treatment interactions revealed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the high ambient temperature than that of the TN environment as dietary resveratrol concentration was increased. The results of the present study suggest that supplemental resveratrol reduces oxidative stress in heat-stressed quails through modulating the hepatic heat shock proteins and nuclear transcription factors.

  13. Climate Change and the Emergent Epidemic of CKD from Heat Stress in Rural Communities: The Case for Heat Stress Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Jason; Lemery, Jay; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Diaz, Henry F.; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Taduri, Gangadhar; Madero, Magdalena; Amarasinghe, Mala; Abraham, Georgi; Anutrakulchai, Sirirat; Jha, Vivekanand; Stenvinkel, Peter; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Milagres, Tamara; Weiss, Ilana; Kanbay, Mehmet; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has led to significant rise of 0.8°C–0.9°C in global mean temperature over the last century and has been linked with significant increases in the frequency and severity of heat waves (extreme heat events). Climate change has also been increasingly connected to detrimental human health. One of the consequences of climate-related extreme heat exposure is dehydration and volume loss, leading to acute mortality from exacerbations of pre-existing chronic disease, as well as from outright heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Recent studies have also shown that recurrent heat exposure with physical exertion and inadequate hydration can lead to CKD that is distinct from that caused by diabetes, hypertension, or GN. Epidemics of CKD consistent with heat stress nephropathy are now occurring across the world. Here, we describe this disease, discuss the locations where it appears to be manifesting, link it with increasing temperatures, and discuss ongoing attempts to prevent the disease. Heat stress nephropathy may represent one of the first epidemics due to global warming. Government, industry, and health policy makers in the impacted regions should place greater emphasis on occupational and community interventions. PMID:27151892

  14. Climate Change and the Emergent Epidemic of CKD from Heat Stress in Rural Communities: The Case for Heat Stress Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Jason; Lemery, Jay; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Diaz, Henry F; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Taduri, Gangadhar; Madero, Magdalena; Amarasinghe, Mala; Abraham, Georgi; Anutrakulchai, Sirirat; Jha, Vivekanand; Stenvinkel, Peter; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Milagres, Tamara; Weiss, Ilana; Kanbay, Mehmet; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-08-08

    Climate change has led to significant rise of 0.8°C-0.9°C in global mean temperature over the last century and has been linked with significant increases in the frequency and severity of heat waves (extreme heat events). Climate change has also been increasingly connected to detrimental human health. One of the consequences of climate-related extreme heat exposure is dehydration and volume loss, leading to acute mortality from exacerbations of pre-existing chronic disease, as well as from outright heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Recent studies have also shown that recurrent heat exposure with physical exertion and inadequate hydration can lead to CKD that is distinct from that caused by diabetes, hypertension, or GN. Epidemics of CKD consistent with heat stress nephropathy are now occurring across the world. Here, we describe this disease, discuss the locations where it appears to be manifesting, link it with increasing temperatures, and discuss ongoing attempts to prevent the disease. Heat stress nephropathy may represent one of the first epidemics due to global warming. Government, industry, and health policy makers in the impacted regions should place greater emphasis on occupational and community interventions. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))−1, P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01; burst incidence: Y: 48 ± 8 vs. A: 67 ± 9 bursts (100 CC)−1, P ≤ 0.01); however, the increase in both variables was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.1). The CPT and LBNP further increased MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence, although the magnitude of increase was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.07). These results suggest that increases in sympathetic activity during heat stress are not attenuated in healthy aged humans. Key points Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding

  16. Transcriptome analysis provides insights into hepatic responses to moderate heat stress in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjuan; Huang, Jinqiang; Liu, Zhe; Zhou, Yanjing; Xia, Binpeng; Wang, Yongjie; Kang, Yujun; Wang, Jianfu

    2017-07-01

    The rainbow trout is an economically important fish in the world. The limited stress tolerance of this species to high summer-like temperatures usually leads to mass mortality and great economic loss. However, there is limited information on the mechanisms underlying moderate heat responses in the liver of the rainbow trout. Here, we performed transcriptome profiling of rainbow trout liver under moderate heat stress by using the Hiseq™ 4000 sequencing platform. More than 277 million clean reads were obtained from 6 libraries and aligned against the rainbow trout genome. A total of 128 unique transcripts were differentially expressed in the liver under heat-stress and control conditions, many heat shock protein genes for thermoregulation and some novel genes involved in heat stress were identified. Nine of the differently expressed genes were further validated by qRT-PCR. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that several pathways, including those for protein metabolism, energy metabolism, and immune system, were influenced by heat stress. Moreover, an important protein-processing pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was identified, and the key role of ER-associated degradation and function of calpain as an upstream regulator of apoptosis were confirmed under heat stress. The results of this study provide a comprehensive overview of heat stress-induced transcriptional patterns in rainbow trout liver and would be particularly useful for further studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying responses to heat stress in this species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Managing heat and immune stress in athletes with evidence-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Pyne, David B; Guy, Joshua H; Edwards, Andrew M

    2014-09-01

    Heat and immune stress can affect athletes in a wide range of sports and environmental conditions. The classical thermoregulatory model of heat stress has been well characterized, as has a wide range of practical strategies largely centered on cooling and heat-acclimation training. In the last decade evidence has emerged of an inflammatory pathway that can also contribute to heat stress. Studies are now addressing the complex and dynamic interplay between hyperthermia, the coagulation cascade, and a systemic inflammatory response occurring after transient damage to the gastrointestinal tract. Damage to the intestinal mucosal membrane increases permeability, resulting in leakage of endotoxins into the circulation. Practical strategies that target both thermoregulatory and inflammatory causes of heat stress include precooling; short-term heat-acclimation training; nutritional countermeasures including hydration, energy replacement, and probiotic supplementation; pacing strategies during events; and postevent cooling measures. Cooperation between international, national, and local sporting organizations is required to ensure that heat-management policies and strategies are implemented effectively to promote athletes' well-being and performance.

  18. Expression of Rice Mature Carbonic Anhydrase Gene Increase E. coli Tolerance to Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Tianpei, Xiuzi; Mao, Zhinang; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2015-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrate is a zinc-containing metalloenzyme and involved in plant abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, we found that heat stress could induce rice mature carbonic anhydrate gene over-expression in rice plants. An Escherichia coli heterologous expression system was performed to identify the function of rice mature carbonic anhydrate in vitro. By sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), mature OsCA fusion protein was identified and proved to be soluble. The results of spot, survival rate, and growth curve assay demonstrated that the expression of the mature OsCA could enhance the thermo-tolerance of the induced mature OsCA recombinants in comparison with controls under heat stress. Meanwhile, compared with controls, the levels of reactive oxygen species in induced mature OsCA recombinants were apparently low under heat stress, and correspondingly, activities of the critical antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase in the induced mature OsCA recombinants were significantly increased. Additionally, relative to controls, the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase decreased in the induced mature OsCA recombinants under heat stress. Based on these results, we suggest that mature OsCA protein could confer the E. coli recombinants' tolerance to heat stress by a synergistic fashion of increasing the antioxidant enzymes' activities to reduce the oxidative damage and maintaining the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of E. coli.

  19. Heat stress assessment among workers in a Nicaraguan sugarcane farm

    PubMed Central

    Delgado Cortez, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    Background Heat illness is a major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide. Workers exposed to intense heat can become unable to activate compensation mechanisms, putting their health at risk. Heat stress also has a direct impact on production by causing poor task performance and it increases the possibility of work-related morbidity and injuries. During the sugarcane harvest period, workers are exposed to excessive sunlight and heat from approximately 6 am to 3 pm. A first assessment of heat stress during the 2006/2007 harvesting season served to redesign the existing rehydration measures. In this project, sugarcane workers were provided with more rehydration solutions and water during their work schedule. Objective To assess heat stress preventive measures in order to improve existing rehydration strategies as a means of increasing productivity. Methods A small group of 22 workers were followed up for 15 days during working hours, from 6 am to 3 pm. Selection criteria were defined: to have worked more than 50% of the day's working schedule and to have worked for at least 10 days of the follow-up period. A simple data recollection sheet was used. Information regarding the amount of liquid intake was registered. Production output data was also registered. Temperature measurements were recorded by using a portable temperature monitoring device (‘EasyLog’, model EL-USB-2). Results The average temperature measurements were above the Nicaraguan Ministry of Labour thresholds. Seven workers drank 7–8 L of liquid, improving their production. Output production increased significantly (p=0.005) among those best hydrated, from 5.5 to 8 tons of cut sugarcane per worker per day. Conclusions Productivity improved with the new rehydration measures. Awareness among workers concerning heat stress prevention was increased. PMID:20052378

  20. The development of anti-heat stress clothing for construction workers in hot and humid weather.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert P C; Guo, Y P; Wong, Francis K W; Li, Y; Sun, S; Han, X

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop anti-heat stress clothing for construction workers in hot and humid weather. Following DeJonge's functional clothing design process, the design situation was explored, including clothing fabric heat/moisture transporting properties and UV protection and the aspects of clothing ergonomic design (mobility, convenience, and safety). The problem structure was derived from the results of the surveys in three local construction sites, which agreed well with the task requirements and observations. Specifications were consequently described and 30 commercially available fabrics were identified and tested. Fabric testing data and design considerations were inputted in S-smart system to predict the thermal functional performance of the clothing. A new uniform prototype was developed and evaluated. The results of all measurements suggest that the new uniform which incorporated fabrics with superior heat/moisture transporting properties and loose-fitting design could reduce the workers' heat stress and improve their comfort and work performance. Practitioner Summary: The construction workers' uniform currently used in Hong Kong during summer was unsatisfactory. Following DeJonge's functional clothing design process, an anti-heat stress uniform was developed by testing 30 fabrics and predicting clothing thermal functional performance using S-smart system. The new uniform could reduce the workers' heat stress and improve their comfort and work performance.

  1. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  2. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  3. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  4. Body Temperature Versus Microclimate Selection in Heat Stressed Dairy Cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the thermoregulatory responses of unrestrained heat-stressed dairy cows within a freestall environment using fan and spray configurations for cooling cows while lying or standing. An experimental treatment sprayed individual cows lying in freestalls from ...

  5. Mechanisms of Aerobic Performance Impairment With Heat Stress and Dehydration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Jones (65) demonstrated that a menthol mouth rinse reduced RPE (com- pared with placebo) by 15% and improved TTE by 9% during exercise-heat stress...potentials. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 35: 456–463, 2010. 65. Mundel T, Jones DA. The effects of swilling an l()- menthol solution during exercise in the

  6. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  7. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  8. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  9. Body Temperature Versus Microclimate Selection in Heat Stressed Dairy Cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the thermoregulatory responses of unrestrained heat-stressed dairy cows within a freestall environment using fan and spray configurations for cooling cows while lying or standing. An experimental treatment sprayed individual cows lying in freestalls from ...

  10. Simulating canopy temperature for modelling heat stress in cereals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop models must be improved to account for the large effects of heat stress effects on crop yields. To date, most approaches in crop models use air temperature despite evidence that crop canopy temperature better explains yield reductions associated with high temperature events. This study presents...

  11. Causes, effects and molecular mechanisms of testicular heat stress.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe

    2015-01-01

    The process of spermatogenesis is temperature-dependent and occurs optimally at temperatures slightly lower than that of the body. Adequate thermoregulation is imperative to maintain testicular temperatures at levels lower than that of the body core. Raised testicular temperature has a detrimental effect on mammalian spermatogenesis and the resultant spermatozoa. Therefore, thermoregulatory failure leading to heat stress can compromise sperm quality and increase the risk of infertility. In this paper, several different types of external and internal factors that may contribute towards testicular heat stress are reviewed. The effects of heat stress on the process of spermatogenesis, the resultant epididymal spermatozoa and on germ cells, and the consequent changes in the testis are elaborated upon. We also discuss the molecular response of germ cells to heat exposure and the possible mechanisms involved in heat-induced germ cell damage, including apoptosis, DNA damage and autophagy. Further, the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways that are involved in the intricate mechanism of germ cell apoptosis are explained. Ultimately, these complex mechanisms of apoptosis lead to germ cell death. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heat stress and carbon monoxide exposure during C-130 vehicle transportation.

    PubMed

    Dor, Alex; Pokroy, Russell; Goldstein, Liav; Barenboim, Erez; Zilberberg, Michal

    2005-04-01

    Running gasoline engines in a confined space causes heat stress and carbon monoxide (CO) buildup. Loading the C-130 aircraft by driving the vehicles onto the platform may expose the C-130 cabin crew to these environmental hazards. This study was aimed at investigating heat stress and CO exposure in the C-130 cabin during vehicle airlift. There were four summer flights (two two-vehicle, two three-vehicle; 2 d, 2 nights) studied. The cabin heat stress index (wet bulb globe temperature, WBGT) and CO levels before vehicle loading (control) were compared with those after vehicle loading. Furthermore, two- and three-vehicle transportations, as well as day and night transportations, were compared. Ground temperature ranged from 18.2 to 33.4 degrees C. Mean heat stress index was higher in vehicle transportation than control flights, the greatest difference being 5.9 degrees C (p < 0.001). The WBGT levels exceeded the recommended exposure limit in 28 of 38 measurements during day flights. The cabin heat stress increased sharply with vehicle loading, and continued to increase for a range of 60-140 min after loading. Elevated cabin CO levels were found in three-vehicle flights as compared with two, and in night flights as compared with day. In hot climates, C-130 vehicle transportation may exacerbate heat stress. The in-flight heat stress can be predicted by the ambient temperature, duration of the vehicle transportation, and number of transported vehicles. The cabin CO level is related to the number of transported vehicles. We recommend the use of effective environmental control systems during C-130 vehicle transportation in hot climates.

  13. Practices for Alleviating Heat Stress of Dairy Cows in Humid Continental Climates: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fournel, Sébastien; Ouellet, Véronique; Charbonneau, Édith

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The severity of heat stress issues on dairy cows will increase as global warming progresses. Fortunately, major advances in environmental management, including fans, misters, sprinklers, and cooled waterbeds, can attenuate the effects of thermal stress on cow health, production, and reproduction. These cooling systems were, however, tested in subtropical areas and their efficiency in northern regions is uncertain. This article assesses the potential of existing technologies to cool cows in humid continental climates through calculation of heat stress indices. Abstract Heat stress negatively affects the health and performance of dairy cows, resulting in considerable economic losses for the industry. In future years, climate change will exacerbate these losses by making the climate warmer. Physical modification of the environment is considered to be the primary means of reducing adverse effects of hot weather conditions. At present, to reduce stressful heat exposure and to cool cows, dairy farms rely on shade screens and various forms of forced convection and evaporative cooling that may include fans and misters, feed-line sprinklers, and tunnel- or cross-ventilated buildings. However, these systems have been mainly tested in subtropical areas and thus their efficiency in humid continental climates, such as in the province of Québec, Canada, is unclear. Therefore, this study reviewed the available cooling applications and assessed their potential for northern regions. Thermal stress indices such as the temperature-humidity index (THI) were used to evaluate the different cooling strategies. PMID:28468329

  14. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  15. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  16. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  17. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the exhaust...

  18. A Chrysanthemum Heat Shock Protein Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Zhu, Xirong; Chen, Fadi; Gao, Haishun; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are associated with protection against various abiotic stresses. Here, the isolation of a chrysanthemum cDNA belonging to the HSP70 family is reported. The cDNA, designated CgHSP70, encodes a 647-residue polypeptide, of estimated molecular mass 70.90 kDa and pI 5.12. A sub-cellular localization assay indicated that the cDNA product is deposited in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants constitutively expressing CgHSP70 demonstrated that the gene enhances tolerance to heat, drought and salinity. When CgHSP70 was stably over-expressed in chrysanthemum, the plants showed an increased peroxidase (POD) activity, higher proline content and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content. After heat stress, drought or salinity the transgenic plants were better able to recover, demonstrating CgHSP70 positive effect. PMID:24663057

  19. Outdoor occupational environments and heat stress in IRAN.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Hamidreza; Golbabaei, Farideh; Shamsipour, Aliakbar; Rahimi Forushani, Abbas; Gaeini, Abbasali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at demonstrating the heat stress situation (distribution and intensity) based on a standard and common heat stress index, Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT), during hot seasons and interpret the obtained results considering global warming and rising temperature in different parts of the country based on climate changes studied in Iran. Heat stress assessment was done using WBGT index. Environmental parameters were measured simultaneously in the early, middle and end of shift work. The personal parameters including cloth thermal insulation and metabolic rate of 242 participants from 9 climatic categories were recorded for estimating effective WBGT (measured WBGT plus cloth adjustment factor as well as metabolic rate effect). The values of the indicator were categorized in the statistical software media and then linked to the climatic zoning of the data in the GIS information layers, in which, WBGT values relating to selected stations were given generalization to similar climatic regionalization. The obtained results showed that in the summer about 60 % and more than 75 % of the measurements relating to 12 pm and 3 pm, respectively, were in heat stress situations (i.e. the average amount of heat stress index was higher than 28 °C). These values were found to be about 20-25 % in the spring. Moreover, only in the early hours of shift work in spring could safe conditions be seen throughout the country. This situation gradually decreased in the middle of the day hours and was replaced by the warning status and stress. And finally, in the final hours of shift work thermal stresses reached their peaks. These conditions for the summer were worse. Regarding several studies related to climate change in Iran and the results of present study, heat stress, especially in the central and southern parts of Iran, can be exacerbated in the decades to come if climate change and rising temperature occurs. Therefore, paying attention to this critical issue

  20. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline ( Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly ( P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  1. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-Ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T Sridhar; Chauhan, M S; Upadhyay, R C

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  2. Metabolic Effects of Acibenzolar-S-Methyl for Improving Heat or Drought Stress in Creeping Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, David; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) is a synthetic functional analog of salicylic acid which can induce systemic acquired resistance in plants, but its effects on abiotic stress tolerance is not well known. The objectives of this study were to examine effects of acibenzolar-S-methyl on heat or drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) and to determine major ASM-responsive metabolites and proteins associated with enhanced abiotic stress tolerance. Creeping bentgrass plants (cv. ‘Penncross’) were foliarly sprayed with ASM and were exposed to non-stress (20/15°C day/night), heat stress (35/30°C), or drought conditions (by withholding irrigation) in controlled-environment growth chambers. Exogenous ASM treatment resulted in improved heat or drought tolerance, as demonstrated by higher overall turf quality, relative water content, and chlorophyll content compared to the untreated control. Western blotting revealed that ASM application resulted in up-regulation of ATP synthase, HSP-20, PR-3, and Rubisco in plants exposed to heat stress, and greater accumulation of dehydrin in plants exposed to drought stress. Metabolite profiling identified a number of amino acids, organic acids, and sugars which were differentially accumulated between ASM treated and untreated plants under heat or drought stress, including aspartic acid, glycine, citric acid, malic acid, and the sugars glucose, and fructose. Our results suggested that ASM was effective in improving heat or drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass, mainly through enhancing protein synthesis and metabolite accumulation involved in osmotic adjustment, energy metabolism, and stress signaling. PMID:28744300

  3. Pathway to a Phenocopy: Heat Stress Effects in Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat shocks applied at the onset of gastrulation in early Drosophila embryos frequently lead to phenocopies of U-shaped mutants – having characteristic failures in the late morphogenetic processes of germband retraction and dorsal closure. The pathway from non-specific heat stress to phenocopied abnormalities is unknown. Results Drosophila embryos subjected to 30-min, 38-°C heat shocks at gastrulation appear to recover and restart morphogenesis. Post-heat-shock development appears normal, albeit slower, until a large fraction of embryos develop amnioserosa holes (diameters > 100 μm). These holes are positively correlated with terminal U-shaped phenocopies. They initiate between amnioserosa cells and open over tens of minutes by evading normal wound healing responses. They are not caused by tissue-wide increases in mechanical stress or decreases in cell-cell adhesion, but instead appear to initiate from isolated apoptosis of amnioserosa cells. Conclusions The pathway from heat shock to U-shaped phenocopies involves the opening of one or more large holes in the amnioserosa that compromise its structural integrity and lead to failures in morphogenetic processes that rely on amnioserosa-generated tensile forces. The proposed mechanism by which heat shock leads to hole initiation and expansion is heterochonicity – i.e., disruption of morphogenetic coordination between embryonic and extra-embryonic cell types. PMID:26498920

  4. Heat stress and thermal strain challenges in running.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2014-10-01

    Running well and safely in the heat is challenging for all runners, from recreational to elite. As environmental heat stress (heat stress modulated or augmented by air temperature, humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation) and the intensity and duration of a training run or race increase, so are metabolic heat production, the parallel need for heat transfer from the body to maintain thermal equilibrium, the consequent increase in blood flow to the skin, and the concomitant sweating response progressively and proportionally amplified. An accumulating total body-water deficit from extensive sweating and escalating level of cardiovascular and thermal strain will, in due course, considerably challenge a runner's physiology, perception of effort, and on-course well-being and performance. However, with the appropriate preparation and modifications to planned running intensity and distance, runners can safely tolerate and effectively train and compete in a wide range of challenging environmental conditions. Clinicians play a key role in this regard as an effective resource for providing the most effective guidelines and making the best overall individual recommendations regarding training and competing in the heat.

  5. Pathway to a phenocopy: Heat stress effects in early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crews, Sarah M; McCleery, W Tyler; Hutson, M Shane

    2016-03-01

    Heat shocks applied at the onset of gastrulation in early Drosophila embryos frequently lead to phenocopies of U-shaped mutants-having characteristic failures in the late morphogenetic processes of germband retraction and dorsal closure. The pathway from nonspecific heat stress to phenocopied abnormalities is unknown. Drosophila embryos subjected to 30-min, 38 °C heat shocks at gastrulation appear to recover and restart morphogenesis. Post-heat-shock development appears normal, albeit slower, until a large fraction of embryos develop amnioserosa holes (diameters > 100 µm). These holes are positively correlated with terminal U-shaped phenocopies. They initiate between amnioserosa cells and open over tens of minutes by evading normal wound healing responses. They are not caused by tissue-wide increases in mechanical stress or decreases in cell-cell adhesion, but instead appear to initiate from isolated apoptosis of amnioserosa cells. The pathway from heat shock to U-shaped phenocopies involves the opening of one or more large holes in the amnioserosa that compromise its structural integrity and lead to failures in morphogenetic processes that rely on amnioserosa-generated tensile forces. The proposed mechanism by which heat shock leads to hole initiation and expansion is heterochonicity, i.e., disruption of morphogenetic coordination between embryonic and extra-embryonic cell types. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The effect of heat stress on skeletal muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Locke, Marius; Celotti, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    An elevated heat-shock protein (HSP) content protects cells and tissues, including skeletal muscles, from certain stressors. We determined if heat stress and the elevated HSP content that results is correlated with protection of contractile characteristics of isolated fast and slow skeletal muscles when contracting at elevated temperatures. To elevate muscle HSP content, one hindlimb of Sprague-Dawley rats (21-28 days old, 70-90 g) was subjected to a 15 min 42 °C heat-stress. Twenty-four hours later, both extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles were removed, mounted in either 20 °C or 42 °C Krebs-Ringer solution, and electrically stimulated. Controls consisted of the same muscles from the contra-lateral (non-stressed) hindlimbs as well as muscles from other (unstressed) animals. Isolated muscles were twitched and brought to tetanus every 5 min for 30 min. As expected, HSP content was elevated in muscles from the heat-stressed limbs when compared with controls. Regardless of prior treatment, both EDL and soleus twitch tensions were lower at 42 °C when compared with 20 °C. In addition, when incubated at 42 °C, both muscles showed a drop in twitch tension between 5 and 30 min. For tetanic tension, both muscles also showed an increase in tension between 5 and 30 min when stimulated at 20 °C regardless of treatment but when stimulated at 42 °C no change was observed. No protective effect of an elevated HSP content was observed for either muscle. In conclusion, although heat stress caused an elevation in HSP content, no protective effects were conferred to isolated contracting muscles.

  7. Water availability as dominant control of heat stress responses in two contrasting tree species.

    PubMed

    Ruehr, Nadine K; Gast, Andreas; Weber, Christina; Daub, Baerbel; Arneth, Almut

    2016-02-01

    Heat waves that trigger severe droughts are predicted to increase globally; however, we lack an understanding of how trees respond to the combined change of extreme temperatures and water availability. Here, we studied the impacts of two consecutive heat waves as well as post-stress recovery in young Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Douglas-fir) and Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) growing under controlled conditions. Responses were compared under water supply close to the long-term average and under reduced irrigation to represent drought. Exposure to high temperatures (+10 °C above ambient) and vapour pressure deficit strongly affected the trees in terms of water relations, photosynthesis and growth. Douglas-fir used water resources conservatively, and transpiration decreased in response to mild soil water limitation. In black locust, heat stress led to pronounced tree water deficits (stem diameter shrinkage), accompanied by leaf shedding to alleviate stress on the hydraulic system. The importance of water availability during the heat waves became further apparent by a concurrent decline in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance with increasing leaf temperatures in both species, reaching the lowest rates in the heat-drought treatments. Stress severity determined both the speed and the amount of recovery. Upon release of stress, photosynthesis recovered rapidly in drought-treated black locust, while it remained below control rates in heat (t = -2.4, P < 0.05) and heat-drought stressed trees (t = 2.96, P < 0.05). In Douglas-fir, photosynthesis recovered quickly, while water-use efficiency increased in heat-drought trees because stomatal conductance remained reduced (t = -2.92, P < 0.05). Moreover, Douglas-fir was able to compensate for stem-growth reductions following heat (-40%) and heat-drought stress (-68%), but most likely at the expense of storage and other growth processes. Our results highlight the importance of studying heat waves alongside

  8. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins in Relation to Heat Stress Tolerance of Creeping Bentgrass at Different N Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on ‘Penn-A4’ creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha−1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  10. Heating system for regenerative coke oven batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.; Morgenstern, M.; Stalherm, D.; Urbye, K.

    1984-02-14

    A heating system for regenerative coke oven batteries having a plurality of coke oven chambers separated by heating walls and a plurality of regenerators extending the length of the coke oven for preheating air and cooling hot waste gases comprises a plurality of spaced heating ducts extending upwardly in the heating walls which are grouped into two adjacent pairs of heating ducts. The ducts in each group of four heating ducts are separated by first and second binder walls with the first binder walls carrying one binder duct for supplying air and discharging hot waste to and from adjacent heat ducts in one of the pairs in the group. The second wall is either provided with no heating ducts or a pair of heating ducts. A horizontal channel connects the tops of all four heating ducts in each group and the lower end of each heating duct is provided with a rich gas supply nozzle.

  11. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Schedules and technical progress in the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined solar heating and cooling systems are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis and preliminary design for the cooling subsystem, and the setup and testing of a horizontal thermal energy storage tank configuration and collector shroud evaluation.

  12. The effects of heat stress on physical functioning in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Anders; Ikonen, Anna; Ruutiainen, Juhani; Virtanen, Arja; Hämäläinen, Päivi

    2012-08-15

    Heat sensitivity is a well-recognised feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, little is known about how heat affects physical performance in persons with MS. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of short-term heat stress on physical functioning in persons with MS. Twenty-three heat-sensitive MS subjects and 19 healthy controls participated. Moderate heat exposure took place in a dry Finnish sauna. Measures of upper and lower extremity function, static and dynamic balance, and walking capacity were applied. Core body temperature was measured by a telemetric physiological monitoring system. Assessments were conducted before, immediately, 1 hour, and 1 day after the heat exposure. Subjects with MS showed a significantly (P=0.002) higher core body temperature than the controls following the heat stress. Performances in walking (P<0.001), chair rise (P=0.005) and functional reach (P=0.04) were poorer in MS subjects than in controls immediately after the heat. No prolonged heat effects were observed. An increase in ambient temperature causes a higher core body temperature rise in MS subjects than in healthy controls. This rise in temperature is associated with acute, but not prolonged detrimental effects on physical functioning.

  13. Comparison of heat stress metrics with modern, future, and past greenhouse climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J.; Goldner, A.; Huber, M.

    2012-04-01

    Heat stress is a function of temperature and humidity, and is subject to the covariance of the two quantities. One of the robust predictions from climate change is an increase in temperatures across the planet, and therefore heat stress is projected to increase. It has been proposed that in future climate, significant portions of the land surface become subject to life threatening heat stress levels to humans and mammals. We will use past greenhouse worlds and future contexts to show the evolution of these parameters in a suite of greenhouse climates. We map the correlation between relative humidity and heat stress metrics, such as the indoor Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT), utilizing the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model (CESM). These metrics will be explored using a variety of different boundary conditions: pCO2 levels at 280, 560, 1120, 2240, and 4480 in conjunction with appropriate modern, Eocene, and Miocene continental configurations. Results will be used for an intercomparison with previous work on heat stress.

  14. Modelling of the District Heating System's Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigants, Girts; Blumberga, Dagnija; Vīgants, Ģirts; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2011-01-01

    The development of a district heating systems calculation model means improvement in the energy efficiency of a district heating system, which makes it possible to reduce the heat losses, thus positively affecting the tariffs on thermal energy. In this paper, a universal approach is considered, based on which the optimal flow and temperature conditions in a district heating system network could be calculated. The optimality is determined by the least operational costs. The developed calculation model has been tested on the Ludza district heating system based on the technical parameters of this system.

  15. Transient analysis of heat transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phetteplace, G. E.

    1981-12-01

    This report develops a method of analysis for heat transmission systems operating under district heating load conditions. The method accounts for the effects of heat source and load characteristics. The use of thermal energy storage systems is outlined and advantages are given. The transmission model itself considers the following technical aspects: (1) frictional pressure losses in piping system, (2) pump characteristics, (3) pump driver characteristics, and (4) heat losses from the buried piping. The capital costs considered are the piping system and necessary pumps. Operation and maintenance costs include cost of heat loss and cost of pumping energy input. Allowances are also made for system maintenance and repair over the assumed lifetime.

  16. Earth-type heat exchanger for heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, G.A.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a heat pump heating and/or cooling system containing freon-type fluid. The system includes above-ground components and an earth-type heat exchanger unit disposed during use of the system entirely below ground level. The improvement described includes a cylindrical coil assembly having cylindrical fluid-conducting coils extending in substantially concentric relationship to each other about the central axis of the assembly. Each of the coils is formed of heat conductive and corrosion resistant tubing. The tubing of each coil is of different diameter than the tubing of each other coil; a conduit interconnects the coil assembly and the above-ground system components, during operation of the system, conducting the fluid to and from fluid-conducting coils of the assembly.

  17. Effects of heat-stress on production in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    West, J W

    2003-06-01

    The southeastern United States is characterized as humid subtropical and is subject to extended periods of high ambient temperature and relative humidity. Because the primary nonevaporative means of cooling for the cow (radiation, conduction, convection) become less effective with rising ambient temperature, the cow becomes increasingly reliant upon evaporative cooling in the form of sweating and panting. High relative humidity compromises evaporative cooling, so that under hot, humid conditions common to the Southeast in summer the dairy cow cannot dissipate sufficient body heat to prevent a rise in body temperature. Increasing air temperature, temperature-humidity index and rising rectal temperature above critical thresholds are related to decreased dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield and to reduced efficiency of milk yield. Modifications including shade, barns which enhance passive ventilation, and the addition of fans and sprinklers increase body heat loss, lowering body temperature and improving DMI. New technologies including tunnel ventilation are being investigated to determine if they offer cooling advantages. Genetic selection for heat tolerance may be possible, but continued selection for greater performance in the absence of consideration for heat tolerance will result in greater susceptibility to heat stress. The nutritional needs of the cow change during heat stress, and ration reformulation to account for decreased DMI, the need to increase nutrient density, changing nutrient requirements, avoiding nutrient excesses and maintenance of normal rumen function is necessary. Maintaining cow performance in hot, humid climatic conditions in the future will likely require improved cooling capability, continued advances in nutritional formulation, and the need for genetic advancement which includes selection for heat tolerance or the identification of genetic traits which enhance heat tolerance.

  18. When defense pathways collide. The response of Arabidopsis to a combination of drought and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rizhsky, Ludmila; Liang, Hongjian; Shuman, Joel; Shulaev, Vladimir; Davletova, Sholpan; Mittler, Ron

    2004-04-01

    Within their natural habitat, plants are subjected to a combination of abiotic conditions that include stresses such as drought and heat. Drought and heat stress have been extensively studied; however, little is known about how their combination impacts plants. The response of Arabidopsis plants to a combination of drought and heat stress was found to be distinct from that of plants subjected to drought or heat stress. Transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis plants subjected to a combination of drought and heat stress revealed a new pattern of defense response in plants that includes a partial combination of two multigene defense pathways (i.e. drought and heat stress), as well as 454 transcripts that are specifically expressed in plants during a combination of drought and heat stress. Metabolic profiling of plants subjected to drought, heat stress, or a combination of drought and heat stress revealed that plants subject to a combination of drought and heat stress accumulated sucrose and other sugars such as maltose and glucose. In contrast, Pro that accumulated in plants subjected to drought did not accumulate in plants during a combination of drought and heat stress. Heat stress was found to ameliorate the toxicity of Pro to cells, suggesting that during a combination of drought and heat stress sucrose replaces Pro in plants as the major osmoprotectant. Our results highlight the plasticity of the plant genome and demonstrate its ability to respond to complex environmental conditions that occur in the field.

  19. Muscle-damaging exercise increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Matthew Benjamin; Di Felice, Umberto; Dolci, Alberto; Junglee, Naushad A; Crockford, Michael J; West, Liam; Hillier-Smith, Ryan; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo; Walsh, Neil Peter

    2013-10-01

    It remains unclear whether exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress, which in turn may increase the risk of exertional heat illness. We examined heat strain during exercise heat stress 30 min after EIMD to coincide with increases in circulating pyrogens (e.g., interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and 24 h after EIMD to coincide with the delayed muscle inflammatory response when a higher rate of metabolic energy expenditure (M˙) and thus decreased economy might also increase heat strain. Thirteen non-heat-acclimated males (mean ± SD, age = 20 ± 2 yr) performed exercise heat stress tests (running for 40 min at 65% V˙O2max in 33°C, 50% humidity) 30 min (HS1) and 24 h (HS2) after treatment, involving running for 60 min at 65% V˙O2max on either -10% gradient (EIMD) or +1% gradient (CON) in a crossover design. Rectal (Tre) and skin (Tsk) temperature, local sweating rate, and M˙ were measured throughout HS tests. Compared with CON, EIMD evoked higher circulating IL-6 pre-HS1 (P < 0.01) and greater plasma creatine kinase and muscle soreness pre-HS2 (P < 0.01). The ΔTre was greater after EIMD than CON during HS1 (0.35°C, 95% confidence interval = 0.11°C-0.58°C, P < 0.01) and HS2 (0.17°C, 95% confidence interval = 0.07°C-0.28°C, P < 0.01). M˙ was higher on EIMD throughout HS1 and HS2 (P < 0.001). Thermoeffector responses (Tsk, sweating rate) were not altered by EIMD. Thermal sensation and RPE were higher on EIMD after 25 min during HS1 (P < 0.05). The final Tre during HS1 correlated with the pre-HS1 circulating IL-6 concentration (r = 0.67). Heat strain was increased during endurance exercise in the heat conducted 30 min after and, to a much lesser extent, 24 h after muscle-damaging exercise. These data indicate that EIMD is a likely risk factor for exertional heat illness particularly during exercise heat stress when behavioral thermoregulation cues are ignored.

  20. Drivers of self-reported heat stress in the Australian labour force.

    PubMed

    Zander, Kerstin K; Moss, Simon A; Garnett, Stephen T

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress causes reductions in well-being and health. As average annual temperatures increase, heat stress is expected to affect more people. While most research on heat stress has explored how exposure to heat affects functioning of the human organism, stress from heat can be manifest long before clinical symptoms are evident, with profound effects on behavior. Here we add to the little research conducted on these subclinical effects of environmental heat using results from an Australian-wide cross-sectional study of nearly 2000 respondents on their self-reported level of heat stress. Slightly less than half (47%) of the respondents perceived themselves as at least sometimes, often or very often stressed by heat during the previous 12 months. Health status and smoking behavior had the expected impact on self-reported perceived heat stress. There were also regional differences with people living in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales most likely to have reported to have felt heat stressed. People generally worried about climate change, who had been influenced by recent heat waves and who thought there was a relationship between climate change and health were also more likely to have been heat stressed. Surprisingly average maximum temperatures did not significantly explain heat stress but stress was greater among people who perceived the day of the survey as hotter than usual. Currently heat stress indices are largely based on monitoring the environment and physical limitations to people coping with heat. Our results suggest that psychological perceptions of heat need to be considered when predicting how people will be affected by heat under climate change and when developing heat relief and climate change adaptation plans, at work, at home or in public spaces. We further conclude that the perception of temperature and heat stress complements measures that assess heat exposure and heat strain.

  1. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Huber, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature TW, is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. TW never exceeds 31 °C. Any exceedence of 35 °C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 °C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11–12 °C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 °C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  2. Modelling the heat stress and the recovery of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Mafart, P; Leguérinel, I

    1997-07-22

    After heat treatment, the temperature incubation and the medium composition, (pH and sodium chloride content) influence the capacity of injured spores to repair heat damage. The concept of heat resistance D- (decimal reduction time) and z-values (temperature increase which results in a ten fold reduction of the D value) is not sufficient and the ratio of spore recovery after incubation should be considered in calculations used in thermal processing of food. This paper aims to derive a model describing the recovery of injured spores as a function of both the heat treatment intensity and the environmental conditions. According to data from numerous investigators, when spores are incubated in unfavorable conditions, the ratio of cell recovery and the apparent D-value are reduced. Moreover the ratio of the apparent D-value and the estimated in optimal incubation D-value is constant and independent of the heat treatment conditions. Beyond these observations it is shown that the ratio of cell recovery with respect to the heat treatment F-value (exposure time, in minutes, at 121.1 degrees C which results in the same destruction ratio that the considered heat treatment does) is linear and can be quantified by using two factors independent of the heat treatment: the gamma-factor reflects the degree of precariousness due to the heat stress while the epsilon-factor reflects more intrinsically the incubation conditions without previous heat treatment. The gamma-factor varies as a function of the incubation temperature according to an Arrhenius law.

  3. Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.

    2013-03-05

    A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

  4. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  5. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  7. Inhomogeneous vasodilatory responses of rat tail arteries to heat stress: evaluation by synchrotron radiation microangiography.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Eriko; Furuyama, Fujiya; Ito, Kunihisa; Tanaka, Etsuro; Hattan, Naoichiro; Fujikura, Hisanori; Kimura, Koji; Goto, Takako; Hayashi, Takashi; Taira, Hiroyuki; Shinozaki, Yoshiro; Umetani, Keiji; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Mochizuki, Ryo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Koide, Shirosaku; Mori, Hidezo

    2002-10-01

    Tail blood flow is crucial for dissipating body heat in rats. Angiographies are convenient tools to evaluate tail circulation. However, conventional angiographies do not have sufficient sensitivity or spatial resolution for small vessels. Recently, we developed a novel microangiographic system using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a high-definition video camera system. Here, we report an evaluation of rat tail circulation under heat stress using the synchrotron radiation microangiographic system. We performed an experiment using the microangiography of the caudal artery before and after heating up WKAH/HkmSlc rats to rectal temperature of 39 degrees C. The images were digitized and temporal subtraction was performed, and the diameters of caudal arteries were evaluated. After heating, the medial caudal artery was markedly dilated (320 +/- 53 to 853 +/- 243 micro m in diameter, p<0.001), while no significant change was observed in the lateral caudal arteries (139 +/- 42 to 167 +/- 73 micro m) and segmental anastomosing vessels. The heat stress allowed for visualization of the superficial caudal arteries with a diameter of approximately 60 micro m, not visible prior to heating. Thus, synchrotron radiation microangiography demonstrated that the rat tail possessed dual sets of arteries; one set was highly sensitive to heat-induced vasodilation (medial caudal artery and superficial caudal arteries) and the other set was less sensitive (lateral caudal arteries and segmental anastomosing vessels).

  8. The shifting influence of drought and heat stress for crops in northeast Australia.

    PubMed

    Lobell, David B; Hammer, Graeme L; Chenu, Karine; Zheng, Bangyou; McLean, Greg; Chapman, Scott C

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of drought environment types (ETs) has proven useful for breeding crops for drought-prone regions. Here, we consider how changes in climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) concentrations will affect drought ET frequencies in sorghum and wheat systems of northeast Australia. We also modify APSIM (the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator) to incorporate extreme heat effects on grain number and weight, and then evaluate changes in the occurrence of heat-induced yield losses of more than 10%, as well as the co-occurrence of drought and heat. More than six million simulations spanning representative locations, soil types, management systems, and 33 climate projections led to three key findings. First, the projected frequency of drought decreased slightly for most climate projections for both sorghum and wheat, but for different reasons. In sorghum, warming exacerbated drought stresses by raising the atmospheric vapor pressure deficit and reducing transpiration efficiency (TE), but an increase in TE due to elevated CO2 more than offset these effects. In wheat, warming reduced drought stress during spring by hastening development through winter and reducing exposure to terminal drought. Elevated CO2 increased TE but also raised radiation-use efficiency and overall growth rates and water use, thereby offsetting much of the drought reduction from warming. Second, adding explicit effects of heat on grain number and grain size often switched projected yield impacts from positive to negative. Finally, although average yield losses associated with drought will remain generally higher than that for heat stress for the next half century, the relative importance of heat is steadily growing. This trend, as well as the likely high degree of genetic variability in heat tolerance, suggests that more emphasis on heat tolerance is warranted in breeding programs. At the same time, work on drought tolerance should continue with an emphasis on drought that co

  9. Gastric emptying during exercise: effects of heat stress and hypohydration.

    PubMed

    Neufer, P D; Young, A J; Sawka, M N

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effects of acute heat stress, heat acclimation and hypohydration on the gastric emptying rate of water (W) during treadmill exercise, ten physically fit men ingested 400 ml of W before each of three 15 min bouts of exercise (treadmill, approximately 50% VO2max) on five separate occasions. Stomach contents were aspirated after each exercise bout. Before heat acclimation (ACC), experiments were performed in a neutral (18 degrees C), hot (49 degrees C) and warm (35 degrees C) environment. Subjects were euhydrated for all experiments before ACC. After ACC, the subjects completed two more experiments in the warm (35 degrees C) environment; one while euhydrated and a final one while hypohydrated (-5% of body weight). The volume of ingested water emptied into the intestines at the completion of each exercise bout was inversely correlated (P less than 0.01) with the rectal temperature (r = -0.76). The following new observations were made: 1) exercise in a hot (49 degrees C) environment impairs gastric emptying rate as compared with a neutral (18 degrees C) environment, 2) exercise in a warm (35 degrees C) environment does not significantly reduce gastric emptying before or after heat acclimation, but 3) exercise in a warm environment (35 degrees C) when hypohydrated reduces gastric emptying rate and stomach secretions. Reductions in gastric emptying appear to be related to the severity of the thermal strain induced by an exercise/heat stress.

  10. Deficiency of heat shock transcription factor 1 suppresses heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Y; Egawa, T; Yokoyama, S; Nakai, A; Sugiura, T; Ohira, Y; Yoshioka, T; Goto, K

    2015-12-01

    Effects of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) deficiency on heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice were investigated. Both HSF1-null and wild-type mice were randomly assigned to control and heat-stressed groups. Mice in heat-stressed group were exposed to heat stress (41 °C for 60 min) in an incubator without anaesthesia. Significant increase in wet and dry weights, and protein content of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was observed seven days after the application of the heat stress. However, heat stress had no impact on soleus muscle mass in HSF1-null mice. Neither type of mice exhibited much effect of heat stress on HSF mRNA expression (HSF1, HSF2 and HSF4). On the other hand, heat stress upregulated heat shock proteins (HSPs) at the mRNA (HSP72) and protein (HSP72 and HSP110) levels in wild-type mice, but not in HSF1-null mice. The population of Pax7-positive nuclei relative to total myonuclei of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was significantly increased by heat stress, but not in HSF1-null mice. Furthermore, the absence of HSF1 gene suppressed heat stress-associated phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase (p-p70S6K) in soleus muscle. Heat stress-associated increase in skeletal muscle mass may be induced by HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response that activates muscle satellite cells and Akt/p70S6K signalling pathway. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Implementation and model to model intercomparison of 12 heat stress metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, Jonathan R.

    Earth system models simulate the dynamics of the most complex systems on our planet with some success. Despite the overwhelming sophistication of these models, which include dynamical interactions of ocean, atmosphere, vegetation, ice, and land-surface properties, they fail to include the most important element. People. Humans are also a complex physical-biological system and coupling of human physiology within an Earth Systems Modeling framework is challenging. This thesis presents results that tackle one particular component of human physiological climate interaction--a representation of heat stress on human physiology. Twelve different metrics were implemented and analyzed. These metrics represent a variety of philosophical approaches to characterizing heat stress: thermal comfort, physiological responses, and first principle physics. We implemented these 12 metrics into the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). All of the metrics implemented measure the covariance of near surface atmospheric variables: temperature, pressure, and humidity. Results show that heat stress may be broken into two regimes; arid and non-arid regions (i.e. the rest of the land surface). Additionally, results show that the highest heat stress zones are a robust feature with low variability. Temperatures vary by +/-3°C as compared to +/-1°C wet bulb temperatures, and is consistent over a vast area of Earth.

  12. Acute brief heat stress in late gestation alters neonatal calf innate immune functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress (HS), as one of the environmental stressors affecting the dairy industry, compromises the cow's milk production, immune function, and reproductive system. However, few studies have looked at how prenatal HS affects the offspring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ...

  13. Association of heat shock protein 70 expression with rat myocardial cell damage during heat stress in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, H B; Zhang, X C; Cheng, Y F; Abdelnasir, A; Tang, S; Kemper, N; Hartung, J; Bao, E D

    2015-03-20

    To investigate the mechanism of sudden death as a result of stress-induced damage to heart tissue and myocardial cells and to investigate the cardioprotective role of Hsp70 during heat stress, the distribution and expression of Hsp70 was evaluated in the heart cells of heat-stressed rats in vivo and heat-stressed H9c2 cells in vitro. After exposure to heat stress at 42°C for different durations, we observed a significant induction of CK, CK-MB, and LDH as well as pathologic lesions characterized by acute degeneration, suggesting that cell damage occurs from the onset of heat stress. Immunocytochemistry showed that Hsp70 was distributed mainly in the cytoplasm of myocardial cells in vivo and in vitro. Hsp70-positive signals in the cytoplasm were more prominent in intact areas than in degenerated areas after 60 min of heat stress. Hsp70 protein levels in myocardial cells in vitro decreased from the beginning to the end of heat stress. Hsp70 protein levels in rat heart tissues in vivo decreased gradually with prolonged heat stress, with a slight increase at the beginning of heat stress. These results indicate that Hsp70 plays a role in the response of cardiac cells to heat stress and that decreased Hsp70 levels are associated with damage to rat myocardial cells in vitro and in vivo. Significant differences were found in hsp70 mRNA, which began to increase after 20 min of heat stress in vitro and after 40 min in vivo. This indicates that hysteresis is involved in mRNA expression after heat stress in vivo.

  14. Heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for Felix Spa, Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Marcel; Maghiar, Teodor

    1996-01-24

    The paper presents a pre-feasibility type study of a proposed heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for an average hotel in Felix Spa, Romania. After a brief presentation of the geothermal reservoir, the paper gives the methodology and the results of the technical and economical calculations. The technical and economical viability of the proposed system is discussed in detail in the final part of the paper.

  15. Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric P.

    2012-07-15

    For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

  16. Heat pipe heat rejection system. [for electrical batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroliczek, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype of a battery heat rejection system was developed which uses heat pipes for more efficient heat removal and for temperature control of the cells. The package consists of five thermal mock-ups of 100 amp-hr prismatic cells. Highly conductive spacers fabricated from honeycomb panels into which heat pipes are embedded transport the heat generated by the cells to the edge of the battery. From there it can be either rejected directly to a cold plate or the heat flow can be controlled by means of two variable conductance heat pipes. The thermal resistance between the interior of the cells and the directly attached cold plate was measured to be 0.08 F/Watt for the 5-cell battery. Compared to a conductive aluminum spacer of equal weight the honeycomb/heat pipe spacer has approximately one-fifth of the thermal resistance. In addition, the honeycomb/heat pipe spacer virtually eliminates temperature gradients along the cells.

  17. Quantifying livestock responses for heat stress management: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienaber, J. A.; Hahn, G. L.; Eigenberg, R. A.

    Hot weather challenges livestock production but technology exists to offset the challenge if producers have made appropriate strategic decisions. Key issues include understanding the hazards of heat stress, being prepared to offer relief from the heat, recognizing when an animal is in danger, and taking appropriate action. This paper describes our efforts to develop biological response functions; assesses climatic probabilities and performs associated risk analyses; provides inputs for computer models used to make environmental management decisions; and evaluates threshold temperatures as estimates of critical temperature limits for swine, cattle and sheep.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Heat-Shock Responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris by Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Hogan, Mike; Vitiritti, Luigi; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-05-30

    Abstract Sulfate-reducing bacteria, like Desulfovibrio vulgaris have developed a set of reactions allowing them to survive in environments. To obtain further knowledge of the protecting mechanisms employed in D. vulgaris against the oxidative stress and heat shock, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to determine the cellular responses to both stimuli. The results showed that 130 genes were responsive to oxidative stress, while 427 genes responsive to heat-shock, respectively. Functional analyses suggested that the genes regulated were involved in a variety of cellular functions. Metabolic analysis showed that amino acid biosynthetic pathways were induced by both oxidative stress and heat shock treatments, while fatty acid metabolism, purine and cofactor biosynthesis were induced by heat shock only. Rubrerythrin gene (rbR) were upregulated by the oxidative stress, suggesting its important role in the oxidative resistance, whereas the expression of rubredoxin oxidoreductase (rbO), superoxide ismutase (sodB) and catalase (katA) genes were not subjected to regulation by oxidative stress in D. vulgaris. In addition, the results showed that thioredoxin reductase (trxB) was responsive to oxidative stress, suggesting the thiol-specific redox system might be involved in oxidative protection in D. vulgaris. Comparison of cellular responses to oxidative stress and heat-shock allowed the identification of 66 genes that showed a similar drastic response to both environmental stimuli, implying that they might be part of the general stress response (GSR) network in D. vulgaris, which was further supported by the finding of a conserved motif upstream these common-responsive genes.

  19. Stirling engine external heat system design with heat pipe heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godett, Ted M.; Ziph, Benjamin

    1986-01-01

    This final report presents the conceptual design of a liquid fueled external heating system (EHS) and the preliminary design of a heat pipe heater for the STM-4120 Stirling cycle engine, to meet the Air Force mobile electric power (MEP) requirement for units in the range of 20 to 60 kW. The EHS design had the following constraints: (1) Packaging requirements limited the overall system dimensions to about 330 mm x 250 mm x 100 mm; (2) Heat flux to the sodium heat pipe evaporator was limited to an average of 100 kW/m and a maximum of 550 kW/m based on previous experience; and (3) The heat pipe operating temperature was specified to be 800 C based on heat input requirements of the STM4-120. An analysis code was developed to optimize the EHS performance parameters and an analytical development of the sodium heat pipe heater was performed; both are presented and discussed. In addition, construction techniques were evaluated and scale model heat pipe testing performed.

  20. Scenario-neutral Food Security Risk Assessment: A livestock Heat Stress Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, D.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hopson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Food security risk assessments can provide decision-makers with actionable information to identify critical system limitations, and alternatives to mitigate the impacts of future conditions. The majority of current risk assessments have been scenario-led and results are limited by the scenarios - selected future states of the world's climate system and socioeconomic factors. A generic scenario-neutral framework for food security risk assessments is presented here that uses plausible states of the world without initially assigning likelihoods. Measures of system vulnerabilities are identified and system risk is assessed for these states. This framework has benefited greatly by research in the water and natural resource fields to adapt their planning to provide better risk assessments. To illustrate the utility of this framework we develop a case study using livestock heat stress risk within the pastoral system of West Africa. Heat stress can have a major impact not only on livestock owners, but on the greater food production system, decreasing livestock growth, milk production, and reproduction, and in severe cases, death. A heat stress index calculated from daily weather is used as a vulnerability measure and is computed from historic daily weather data at several locations in the study region. To generate plausible states, a stochastic weather generator is developed to generate synthetic weather sequences at each location, consistent with the seasonal climate. A spatial model of monthly and seasonal heat stress provide projections of current and future livestock heat stress measures across the study region, and can incorporate in seasonal climate and other external covariates. These models, when linked with empirical thresholds of heat stress risk for specific breeds offer decision-makers with actionable information for use in near-term warning systems as well as for future planning. Future assessment can indicate under which states livestock are at greatest risk

  1. Clostridium thermocellum Transcriptomic Profiles after Exposure to Furfural or Heat Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Charlotte M; Yang, Shihui; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Ma, Qin; Johnson, Courtney M; Dice, Lezlee T; Xu, Ying; Brown, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Background The thermophilic anaerobe Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing (CBP)biocatalyst for cellulosic ethanol production. It is capable of both cellulose solubilization and its fermentation to produce lignocellulosic ethanol. Intolerance to stresses routinely encountered during industrial fermentations may hinder the commercial development of this organism. A previous C. thermocellum ethanol stress study showed that largest transcriptomic response was in genes and proteins related to nitrogen uptake and metabolism. Results In this study, C. thermocellum was grown to mid-exponential phase and treated with furfural or heat to a final concentration of 3 g.L-1 or 68 C respectively to investigate general and specific physiological and regulatory stress responses. Samples were taken at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min post-shock, and from untreated control fermentations, for transcriptomic analyses and fermentation product determinations and compared to a published dataset from an ethanol stress study. Urea uptake genes were induced following furfural stress, but not to the same extent as ethanol stress and transcription from these genes was largely unaffected by heat stress. The largest transcriptomic response to furfural stress was genes for sulfate transporter subunits and enzymes in the sulfate assimilatory pathway, although these genes were also affected late in the heat and ethanol stress responses. Lactate production was higher in furfural treated culture, although the lactate dehydrogenase gene was not differentially expressed under this condition. Other redox related genes such as a copy of the rex gene, a bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase and adjacent genes did show lower expression after furfural stress compared to the control, heat and ethanol fermentation profiles. Heat stress induced expression from chaperone related genes and overlap was observed with the responses to the other stresses. This study suggests the

  2. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  3. Detecting early signs of heat and drought stress in Phoenix dactylifera (date palm).

    PubMed

    Safronov, Omid; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Haberer, Georg; Alyousif, Mohamed S; Schulze, Waltraud; Al-Harbi, Naif; Arab, Leila; Ache, Peter; Stempfl, Thomas; Kruse, Joerg; Mayer, Klaus X; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2017-01-01

    Plants adapt to the environment by either long-term genome evolution or by acclimatization processes where the cellular processes and metabolism of the plant are adjusted within the existing potential in the genome. Here we studied the adaptation strategies in date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, under mild heat, drought and combined heat and drought by transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling. In transcriptomics data, combined heat and drought resembled heat response, whereas in metabolomics data it was more similar to drought. In both conditions, soluble carbohydrates, such as fucose, and glucose derivatives, were increased, suggesting a switch to carbohydrate metabolism and cell wall biogenesis. This result is consistent with the evidence from transcriptomics and cis-motif analysis. In addition, transcriptomics data showed transcriptional activation of genes related to reactive oxygen species in all three conditions (drought, heat, and combined heat and drought), suggesting increased activity of enzymatic antioxidant systems in cytosol, chloroplast and peroxisome. Finally, the genes that were differentially expressed in heat and combined heat and drought stresses were significantly enriched for circadian and diurnal rhythm motifs, suggesting new stress avoidance strategies.

  4. Shiftwork and heat stress in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Liu, L W; Costa, G; Schallenberg, G; Trinco, R

    1994-01-01

    This paper reported the results of investigation on shiftwork and heat stress in an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to analyse the physiological strain of nurses during the three shifts (Morning, Afternoon, Night) in relation to the specific microclimatic conditions and job activities. 8 professional nurses (6 female and 2 male), aged between 21 and 38 years (mean 29.8 +/- 5.6 years), having from 3 to 18 years service, were monitored throughout a complete working cycle of 4 days. They worked on a three shift system at fast rotation. Their working environment was an independent unit for intensive care and expert surgical treatment which was entirely air conditioned. The observation indexes included: twenty-five blood parameters, ten urine parameters, net cardiac cost and relation cardiac cost, etc. The results of the investigation have not evidenced serious alterations of the psycho-physical conditions of the nurses, but do pointed out some problems pertaining both to the environmental and physiological conditions.

  5. Determination of moisture deficit and heat stress tolerance in corn using physiological measurements and a low-cost microcontroller-based monitoring system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the southern United States, corn production encounters moisture deficit coupled with high temperature stress, particularly during the reproductive stage of the plant. In evaluating plants for environmental stress tolerance, it is important to monitor changes in their physical environment under na...

  6. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  7. Solar heating system installed at Stamford, Connecticut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar heating system installed at the Lutz-Sotire Partnership Executive East Office Building, Stamford, Connecticut is described. The Executive East Office Building is of moderate size with 25,000 sq ft of heated space in 2 1/2 stories. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the heating requirements. The system components are described. Appended data includes: the system design acceptance test, the operation and maintenance manual, and as-built drawings and photographs.

  8. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  9. Pulmonary Artery and Intestinal Temperatures during Heat Stress and Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James; Ganio, Matthew S; Seifert, Thomas; Overgaard, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2011-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose In humans, whole body heating and cooling are used to address physiological questions where core temperature is central to the investigated hypotheses. Core temperature can be measured in various locations throughout the human body. The measurement of intestinal temperature is increasingly used in laboratory settings as well as in athletics. However, it is unknown whether intestinal temperature accurately tracks pulmonary artery blood temperature, the gold standard, during thermal stimuli in resting humans, which is the investigated hypothesis. Methods This study compared pulmonary artery blood temperature (via thermistor in a pulmonary artery catheter) with intestinal temperature (telemetry pill) during whole-body heat stress (n=8), followed by whole-body cooling in healthy humans (mean ± SD age 24 ± 3 yrs; height 183 ± 8 cm; mass 78.1 ± 8.2 kg). Heat stress and subsequent cooling were performed by perfusing warm followed by cold water through a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. Results Prior to heat stress blood temperature (36.69 ± 0.25°C) was less than intestinal temperature (36.96 ± 0.21°C, P = 0.004). The increase in blood temperature after 20 min of heat stress was greater than intestinal temperature (0.70 ± 0.24 vs. 0.47 ± 0.18; P = 0.001). However, the increase in temperatures at the end of heat stress were similar between sites (blood Δ = 1.32 ± 0.20°C vs. intestinal Δ = 1.21 ± 0.36°C; P = 0.30). Subsequent cooling decreased blood temperature (Δ = −1.03 ± 0.34°C) to a greater extent than intestinal temperature (Δ = −0.41 ± 0.30°C, P = 0.04). Conclusion In response to the applied thermal provocations, early temperature changes in the intestine are less than the temperature changes in pulmonary artery blood. PMID:22015711

  10. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  11. Heat stress of helicopter aircrew wearing immersion suit.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Michel B

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to define the lowest ambient air and cabin temperatures at which aircrews wearing immersion protection are starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress during flight operations, and to characterize during a flight simulation in laboratory, the severity of the heat stress during exposure to a typical northern summer ambient condition (25 degrees C, 40% RH). Twenty male helicopter aircrews wearing immersion suits (insulation of 2.2 Clo in air) performed 26 flights within an 8-month period at ambient temperatures ranging between -15 and 25 degrees C, and cabin temperatures ranging between 3 and 28 degrees C. It was observed based on thermal comfort ratings that the aircrews were starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient and cabin air conditions above 18 degrees C and at a WBGT index of 16 degrees C. In a subsequent study, seven aircrews dressed with the same clothing were exposed for 140 min to 25 degrees C and 40% RH in a climatic chamber. During the exposure, the aircrews simulated pilot flight maneuvers for 80 min followed with backender/flight engineer activities for 60 min. By the end of the 140 min exposure, the skin temperature, rectal temperature and heart rate had increased significantly to 35.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C, 38.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C and between 110 and 160 beats/min depending on the level of physical activity. The body sweat rate averaged 0.58 kg/h and the relative humidity inside the clothing was at saturation by the end of the exposure. It was concluded that aircrews wearing immersion suits during the summer months in northern climates might experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient or cabin air temperature as low as 18 degrees C.

  12. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie J; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h(-1) and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h(-1) to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  13. Protective effects of ectoine on heat-stressed Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Adam, Bownik; Zofia, Stępniewska; Tadeusz, Skowroński

    2014-12-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is an amino acid produced and accumulated by halophilic bacteria in stressful conditions in order to prevent the loss of water from the cell. There is a lack of knowledge on the effects of ECT in heat-stressed aquatic animals. The purpose of our study was to determine the influence of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress with two temperature gradients: 1 and 0.1 °C/min in the range of 23-42 °C. Time to immobilisation, survival during recovery, swimming performance, heart rate, thoracic limb movement and the levels of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A (HSP70 1A), catalase (CAT) and nitric oxide species (NOx) were determined in ECT-exposed and unexposed daphnids; we showed protective effects of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress. Time to immobilisation of daphnids exposed to ECT was longer when compared to the unexposed animals. Also, survival rate during the recovery of daphnids previously treated with ECT was higher. ECT significantly attenuated a rapid increase of mean swimming velocity which was elevated in the unexposed daphnids. Moreover, we observed elevation of thoracic limb movement and modulation of heart rate in ECT-exposed animals. HSP70 1A and CAT levels were reduced in the presence of ECT. On the other hand, NOx level was slightly elevated in both ECT-treated and unexposed daphnids, however slightly higher NOx level was found in ECT-treated animals. We conclude that the exposure to ectoine has thermoprotective effects on Daphnia magna, however their mechanisms are not associated with the induction of HSP70 1A.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thermoregulation in lactating dairy cows exposed to heat stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy cows with increased rectal temperature during heat stress experience lower milk yield and fertility. Given that rectal temperature during heat stress is heritable in dairy cattle, genetic selection for regulation of body temperature should reduce effects of heat stress on production. One goal...

  15. The impact of ENSO on coral heat stress in the western equatorial Pacific.

    PubMed

    Kleypas, Joan A; Castruccio, Frederic S; Curchitser, Enrique N; Mcleod, Elizabeth

    2015-01-28

    The Coral Triangle encompasses an extensive region of coral reefs in the western tropical Pacific with marine resources that support millions of people. As in all other reef regions, coral reefs in the Coral Triangle have been impacted by anomalously high ocean temperature. The vast majority of bleaching observations to date have been associated with the 1998 La Niña phase of ENSO. To understand the significance of ENSO and other climatic oscillations to heat stress in the Coral Triangle, we use a 5-km resolution Regional Ocean Model System for the Coral Triangle (CT-ROMS) to study ocean temperature thresholds and variability for the 1960-2007 historical period. Heat-stress events are more frequent during La Niña events, but occur under all climatic conditions, reflecting an overall warming trend since the 1970s. Mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the region increased an average of ~ 0.1 °C per decade over the time period, but with considerable spatial variability. The spatial patterns of SST and heat stress across the Coral Triangle reflect the complex bathymetry and oceanography. The patterns did not change significantly over time or with shifts in ENSO. Several regions experienced little to no heat stress over the entire period. Of particular interest to marine conservation are regions where there are few records of coral bleaching despite the presence of significant heat stress, such as in the Banda Sea. Although this may be due to under-reporting of bleaching events, it may also be due to physical factors such as mixing and cloudiness, or biological factors that reduce sensitivity to heat stress.

  16. Mitochondrial Respiratory Electron Carriers Are Involved in Oxidative Stress during Heat Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, John F.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we sought to determine the source of heat-induced oxidative stress. We investigated the involvement of mitochondrial respiratory electron transport in post-diauxic-phase cells under conditions of lethal heat shock. Petite cells were thermosensitive, had increased nuclear mutation frequencies, and experienced elevated levels of oxidation of an intracellular probe following exposure to a temperature of 50°C. Cells with a deletion in COQ7 leading to a deficiency in coenzyme Q had a much more severe thermosensitivity phenotype for these oxidative endpoints following heat stress compared to that of petite cells. In contrast, deletion of the external NADH dehydrogenases NDE1 and NDE2, which feed electrons from NADH into the electron transport chain, abrogated the levels of heat-induced intracellular fluorescence and nuclear mutation frequency. Mitochondria isolated from COQ7-deficient cells secreted more than 30 times as much H2O2 at 42 as at 30°C, while mitochondria isolated from cells simultaneously deficient in NDE1 and NDE2 secreted no H2O2. We conclude that heat stress causes nuclear mutations via oxidative stress originating from the respiratory electron transport chains of mitochondria. PMID:11713283

  17. Adaptation to hot climate and strategies to alleviate heat stress in livestock production.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Collin, A; Yahav, S; de Basilio, V; Gourdine, J L; Collier, R J

    2012-05-01

    Despite many challenges faced by animal producers, including environmental problems, diseases, economic pressure, and feed availability, it is still predicted that animal production in developing countries will continue to sustain the future growth of the world's meat production. In these areas, livestock performance is generally lower than those obtained in Western Europe and North America. Although many factors can be involved, climatic factors are among the first and crucial limiting factors of the development of animal production in warm regions. In addition, global warming will further accentuate heat stress-related problems. The objective of this paper was to review the effective strategies to alleviate heat stress in the context of tropical livestock production systems. These strategies can be classified into three groups: those increasing feed intake or decreasing metabolic heat production, those enhancing heat-loss capacities, and those involving genetic selection for heat tolerance. Under heat stress, improved production should be possible through modifications of diet composition that either promotes a higher intake or compensates the low feed consumption. In addition, altering feeding management such as a change in feeding time and/or frequency, are efficient tools to avoid excessive heat load and improve survival rate, especially in poultry. Methods to enhance heat exchange between the environment and the animal and those changing the environment to prevent or limit heat stress can be used to improve performance under hot climatic conditions. Although differences in thermal tolerance exist between livestock species (ruminants > monogastrics), there are also large differences between breeds of a species and within each breed. Consequently, the opportunity may exist to improve thermal tolerance of the animals using genetic tools. However, further research is required to quantify the genetic antagonism between adaptation and production traits to evaluate

  18. l-Arginine Enhances Resistance against Oxidative Stress and Heat Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Ma, Yudan; Zhang, Zhixian; Zhao, Ziyuan; Lin, Ran; Zhu, Jinming; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of l-arginine (l-Arg) in vivo, and its effect on enhancing resistance to oxidative stress and heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated. C. elegans, a worm model popularly used in molecular and developmental biology, was used in the present study. Here, we report that l-Arg, at a concentration of 1 mM, prolonged C. elegans life by 26.98% and 37.02% under oxidative and heat stress, respectively. Further experiments indicated that the longevity-extending effects of l-Arg may be exerted by its free radical scavenging capacity and the upregulation of aging-associated gene expression in worms. This work is important in the context of numerous recent studies that concluded that environment stresses are associated with an increased population death rate. PMID:27690079

  19. Resveratrol induces antioxidant and heat shock protein mRNA expression in response to heat stress in black-boned chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; He, J H; Xie, H B; Yang, Y S; Li, J C; Zou, Y

    2014-01-01

    and reduces oxidative stress in heat-stressed black-boned chickens by increasing serum growth hormone concentrations and modulating the expression of heat shock genes in organs of the immune system.

  20. Model of heat losses from underground heat distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čarnogurská, Mária; Příhoda, Miroslav; Dobáková, Romana; Brestovič, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the linear density of the heat flow using dimensional analysis in the case of underground, pre-insulated piping. The methodology makes it possible to determine the heat loss based on a simple criterial relationship. Heat losses in the piping system were also calculated using numerical simulation. The difference between the experimentally detected losses and the values obtained from the model is -3.6% to 6.4%. The results of the numerical simulation at an ambient temperature of 25°C differ from the experiment by -1.7%. At an ambient temperature of -10°C the difference is -4.0%.

  1. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  2. Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, Brian A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

  3. Umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells improve heat tolerance and hypothalamic damage in heat stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ling-Shu; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Lin, Ying-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Heatstroke is characterized by excessive hyperthermia associated with systemic inflammatory responses, which leads to multiple organ failure, in which brain disorders predominate. This definition can be almost fulfilled by a mouse model of heatstroke used in the present study. Unanesthetized mice were exposed to whole body heating (41.2°C for 1 hour) and then returned to room temperature (26°C) for recovery. Immediately after termination of whole body heating, heated mice displayed excessive hyperthermia (body core temperature ~42.5°C). Four hours after termination of heat stress, heated mice displayed (i) systemic inflammation; (ii) ischemic, hypoxic, and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus; (iii) hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment (reflected by plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone and corticosterone); (iv) decreased fractional survival; and (v) thermoregulatory deficits (e.g., they became hypothermia when they were exposed to room temperature). These heatstroke reactions can be significantly attenuated by human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells therapy. Our data suggest that human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells therapy may improve outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing systemic inflammation as well as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment.

  4. Solar heated fluidized bed gasification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar-powered fluidized bed gasification system for gasifying carbonaceous material is presented. The system includes a solar gasifier which is heated by fluidizing gas and steam. Energy to heat the gas and steam is supplied by a high heat capacity refractory honeycomb which surrounds the fluid bed reactor zone. The high heat capacity refractory honeycomb is heated by solar energy focused on the honeycomb by solar concentrator through solar window. The fluid bed reaction zone is also heated directly and uniformly by thermal contact of the high heat capacity ceramic honeycomb with the walls of the fluidized bed reactor. Provisions are also made for recovering and recycling catalysts used in the gasification process. Back-up furnace is provided for start-up procedures and for supplying heat to the fluid bed reaction zone when adequate supplies of solar energy are not available.

  5. Plastic and evolutionary responses to heat stress in a temperate dung fly: negative correlation between basal and induced heat tolerance?

    PubMed

    Esperk, T; Kjaersgaard, A; Walters, R J; Berger, D; Blanckenhorn, W U

    2016-05-01

    Extreme weather events such as heat waves are becoming more frequent and intense. Populations can cope with elevated heat stress by evolving higher basal heat tolerance (evolutionary response) and/or stronger induced heat tolerance (plastic response). However, there is ongoing debate about whether basal and induced heat tolerance are negatively correlated and whether adaptive potential in heat tolerance is sufficient under ongoing climate warming. To evaluate the evolutionary potential of basal and induced heat tolerance, we performed experimental evolution on a temperate source population of the dung fly Sepsis punctum. Offspring of flies adapted to three thermal selection regimes (Hot, Cold and Reference) were subjected to acute heat stress after having been exposed to either a hot-acclimation or non-acclimation pretreatment. As different traits may respond differently to temperature stress, several physiological and life history traits were assessed. Condition dependence of the response was evaluated by exposing juveniles to different levels of developmental (food restriction/rearing density) stress. Heat knockdown times were highest, whereas acclimation effects were lowest in the Hot selection regime, indicating a negative association between basal and induced heat tolerance. However, survival, adult longevity, fecundity and fertility did not show such a pattern. Acclimation had positive effects in heat-shocked flies, but in the absence of heat stress hot-acclimated flies had reduced life spans relative to non-acclimated ones, thereby revealing a potential cost of acclimation. Moreover, body size positively affected heat tolerance and unstressed individuals were less prone to heat stress than stressed flies, offering support for energetic costs associated with heat tolerance. Overall, our results indicate that heat tolerance of temperate insects can evolve under rising temperatures, but this response could be limited by a negative relationship between basal and

  6. Heating systems to maximise efficiency.

    PubMed

    House, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    Jeff House, marketing and applications manager, Baxi Commercial, identifies some of the heating options available to the operators of healthcare facilities, and highlights practical examples of successful applications.

  7. Installation package for a solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Installation information is given for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings.

  8. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  9. Prototype solar-heating system design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design package for complete residential solar-heating system is given. Includes documents and drawings describing performance design, verification standards, and analysis of system with sufficient information to assemble working system.

  10. Improving Process Heating System Performance v3

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-11

    Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry is a development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) and the Industrial Heating Equipment Association (IHEA). The AMO and IHEA undertook this project as part of an series of sourcebook publications developed by AMO on energy-consuming industrial systems, and opportunities to improve performance. Other topics in this series include compressed air systems, pumping systems, fan systems, steam systems, and motors and drives

  11. Heat stress, gastrointestinal permeability and interleukin-6 signaling — Implications for exercise performance and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Nicole; Marino, Frank

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise in heat stress exacerbates performance decrements compared to normothermic environments. It has been documented that the performance decrements are associated with reduced efferent drive from the central nervous system (CNS), however, specific factors that contribute to the decrements are not completely understood. During exertional heat stress, blood flow is preferentially distributed away from the intestinal area to supply the muscles and brain with oxygen. Consequently, the gastrointestinal barrier becomes increasingly permeable, resulting in the release of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) into the circulation. LPS leakage stimulates an acute-phase inflammatory response, including the release of interleukin (IL)-6 in response to an increasingly endotoxic environment. If LPS translocation is too great, heat shock, neurological dysfunction, or death may ensue. IL-6 acts initially in a pro-inflammatory manner during endotoxemia, but can attenuate the response through signaling the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA)-axis. Likewise, IL-6 is believed to be a thermoregulatory sensor in the gut during the febrile response, hence highlighting its role in periphery – to – brain communication. Recently, IL-6 has been implicated in signaling the CNS and influencing perceptions of fatigue and performance during exercise. Therefore, due to the cascade of events that occur during exertional heat stress, it is possible that the release of LPS and exacerbated response of IL-6 contributes to CNS modulation during exertional heat stress. The purpose of this review is to evaluate previous literature and discuss the potential role for IL-6 during exertional heat stress to modulate performance in favor of whole body preservation. PMID:27857954

  12. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    systemic vascular resistance), while elderly patients are hypodynamic (increased heart rate, decreased cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular...resistance). By the time elderly patients are seen, massive volume deficits may exist, requiring hemodynamic monitoring to differentiate pump...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress 6. AUTHOR(S) Patricia A Skelton S 7

  13. Carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zeferino, C P; Komiyama, C M; Fernandes, S; Sartori, J R; Teixeira, P S S; Moura, A S A M T

    2013-03-01

    Rabbits are very sensitive to heat stress because they have difficulty eliminating excess body heat. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress on slaughter weight, dressing percentage and carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits from two genetic groups. Ninety-six weaned rabbits were used: half were from the Botucatu genetic group and half were crossbreds between New Zealand White sires and Botucatu does. They were assigned to a completely randomized design in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (two genetic groups and three ambient temperatures: 18°C, 25°C and 30°C) and kept under controlled conditions in three environmental chambers from 5 to 10 weeks of age. Slaughter took place at 10 weeks, on 2 consecutive days. Meat quality measurements were made in the longissimus muscle. Actual average ambient temperature and relative humidity in the three chambers were 18.4°C and 63.9%, 24.4°C and 80.2% and 29.6°C and 75.9%, respectively. Purebred rabbits were heavier at slaughter and had heavier commercial and reference carcasses than crossbreds at 30°C; however, no differences between genetic groups for these traits were found at lower temperatures. No genetic group × ambient temperature interaction was detected for any other carcass or meat quality traits. The percentages of distal parts of legs, skin and carcass forepart were higher in crossbred rabbits, indicating a lower degree of maturity at slaughter in this group. The percentage of thoracic viscera was higher in the purebreds. Lightness of the longissimus muscle was higher in the purebreds, whereas redness was higher in the crossbreds. Slaughter, commercial and reference carcass weights and the percentages of thoracic viscera, liver and kidneys were negatively related with ambient temperature. Commercial and reference carcass yields, and the percentage of distal parts of legs, on the other hand, had a positive linear relationship with ambient temperature. Meat redness and

  14. Increased heat shock protein expression after stress in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, K A; Iwama, G K; Nichols, C R; Godin, D V; Cheng, K M

    1998-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been shown to provide information on the biological impact of environmental stress to organisms, yet none have investigated the HSP response to stress in birds. Japanese quail were exposed to seven different stressors (mild restraint, loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, isolation in darkness, and two stressful social situations) and expression of HSP30, 60, 70, and 90 in heart, liver, lung, kidney and gonads was examined. Tonic Immobility (TI) tests were also conducted to assess whether the stressors increased fear response. Increased expression of HSP70 was found in the myocardial tissue of birds exposed to loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, and isolation in darkness. Increased expression of other HSPs was not apparent in the heart or any of the other all tissues examined. Longer TI was observed only in birds exposed to the noise stress. Evidence is presented that a fairly wide range of stressors caused increased expression of HSP70 in the Japanese quail myocardial tissue and that HSPs may provide useful biomarkers for the study of environmental stress in birds.

  15. Heat stress standard for hot work environments in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Threshold limit values (TLVs) are intended to protect workers from the severest effects of thermal stress and to establish the exposures to heat in working conditions. Earlier, acute heat strokes often occurred as a result of working in hot environments in Japan. However, acute heat strokes recently sometimes occurred in outdoor work environments such as industrial constructions and agriculture. Seasonal variations in weather are significant and the climatic conditions vary. The criteria are mainly set for working in mines, factories, and so on. WBGT is a useful evaluation index for hot environments; however, it is not commonly used for work practices. WBGT could be calculated and should be commonly used as a standard during summer. Japan mainly has a very hot and humid climate during summer. With regard to the thermal standard for offices, humidity also creates a problem in the indoor thermal conditions. Therefore, it is better to decide the TLVs of the thermal conditions according to seasons and activity levels. Inadequate thermal stress may cause discomfort and adversely affect the performance, safety, and harm to health. Further, thermal factors in the work environment must be measured and evaluated under light workload conditions like desk work for safety and work efficiency.

  16. Short term post-partum heat stress in dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuquay, J. W.; Chapin, L. T.; Brown, W. H.

    1980-06-01

    Since many dairy cows calve during late summer, the objective was to determine if heat stress immediately post-partum would (1) alter metabolism, thus, increasing susceptibility to metabolic disorders, (2) affect lactation and/or (3) affect reproduction. Forty four cows, calving during late summer, were paired with one member of each pair stressed (HS) for the first 10 post-partum days in a hot barn. Controls (CC) were kept in a cooled section of the barn. Plasma drawn weekly for 7 weeks was analyzed in an autoanalyzer for calcium, inor. phosphorus, protein, glucose and cholesterol and by radioimmunoassay for cortisol and progesterone. Ovaries and uteri were palpated weekly. Rectal temperatures were significant higher for HS during the first 10 post-partum days. No significant effects on plasma constituents were observed during the 10-day treatment period. For the 7-week period, glucose and cholesterol were lower in HS, as were cyclic peaks of progesterone and cortisol. Both calcium and inorganic phosphorus remained clinically low for the 7 weeks, but no treatment effects were seen. Uteri of HS involuted more rapidly than the CC. Treatment did not affect reproductive efficiency. Lactation milk yields did not differ, but milk fat percent was lower in HS. Heat stress immediately post-partum altered lipid metabolism, but the animal's compensatory mechanisms prevented reduction in milk production or reproductive efficiency.

  17. Expression of heat stress proteins by human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sauk, J J; Norris, K; Foster, R; Moehring, J; Somerman, M J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of the present report was to document the stress response produced by physical and chemical abuses to human periodontal ligament cells, and to review some of the known functions of stress response proteins produced as a result of such treatments. For these studies human PDL cells were exposed to sublethal challenges of 43 degrees C heat, sodium arsenite and the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC). The cells were labelled with [35S]-methionine and the proteins produced were examined by autofluorography of SDS-PAGE gels. Heat challenges were shown to induce hsps with an apparent mol. wts. of 90K, 68-72K, 41-47K, and 36 K. Arsenite-treated cells produced similar hsps including a 30k protein not produced by other forms of stress. AZC treatment resulted in the production of apparent functionless hsps with apparent molecular weights of 90,000, 72,000, 68,000 and 36,000. The function of these proteins and their possible role in periodontal disease is discussed.

  18. Practices for Alleviating Heat Stress of Dairy Cows in Humid Continental Climates: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Sébastien; Ouellet, Véronique; Charbonneau, Édith

    2017-05-02

    Heat stress negatively affects the health and performance of dairy cows, resulting in considerable economic losses for the industry. In future years, climate change will exacerbate these losses by making the climate warmer. Physical modification of the environment is considered to be the primary means of reducing adverse effects of hot weather conditions. At present, to reduce stressful heat exposure and to cool cows, dairy farms rely on shade screens and various forms of forced convection and evaporative cooling that may include fans and misters, feed-line sprinklers, and tunnel- or cross-ventilated buildings. However, these systems have been mainly tested in subtropical areas and thus their efficiency in humid continental climates, such as in the province of Québec, Canada, is unclear. Therefore, this study reviewed the available cooling applications and assessed their potential for northern regions. Thermal stress indices such as the temperature-humidity index (THI) were used to evaluate the different cooling strategies.

  19. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  20. Patterns of Gene Expression Associated with Recovery and Injury in Heat-stressed Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-03

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Patterns of gene expression associated with recovery and injury in heat-stressed rats Jonathan D Stallings1*, Danielle L...characterization of the gene response to heat stress using an in vivo conscious rat model. Results: We heated rats until implanted thermal probes indicated a maximal...all four organs at Tc,Max. Self-organizing maps identified gene-specific signatures corresponding to protein-folding disorders in heat-stressed rats

  1. Thermomechanical Stress in Cryopreservation Via Vitrification With Nanoparticle Heating as a Stress-Moderating Effect.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, David P; Bischof, John C; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on thermomechanical effects in cryopreservation associated with a novel approach of volumetric heating by means on nanoparticles in an alternating electromagnetic field. This approach is studied for the application of cryopreservation by vitrification, where the crystalline phase is completely avoided-the cornerstone of cryoinjury. Vitrification can be achieved by quickly cooling the material to cryogenic storage, where ice cannot form. Vitrification can be maintained at the end of the cryogenic protocol by quickly rewarming the material back to room temperature. The magnitude of the rewarming rates necessary to maintain vitrification is much higher than the magnitude of the cooling rates that are required to achieve it in the first place. The most common approach to achieve the required cooling and rewarming rates is by exposing the specimen's surface to a temperature-controlled environment. Due to the underlying principles of heat transfer, there is a size limit in the case of surface heating beyond which crystallization cannot be prevented at the center of the specimen. Furthermore, due to the underlying principles of solid mechanics, there is a size limit beyond which thermal expansion in the specimen can lead to structural damage and fractures. Volumetric heating during the rewarming phase of the cryogenic protocol can alleviate these size limitations. This study suggests that volumetric heating can reduce thermomechanical stress, when combined with an appropriate design of the thermal protocol. Without such design, this study suggests that the level of stress may still lead to structural damage even when volumetric heating is applied. This study proposes strategies to harness nanoparticles heating in order to reduce thermomechanical stress in cryopreservation by vitrification.

  2. Towards a Multi-Model Subseasonal Excessive Heat Outlook System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintzileos, A.

    2015-12-01

    We developed an experimental realtime subseasonal excessive heat outlook and monitoring system (SEHOMS) based on the detection of heat events in dynamical forecasts and reanalyses. Our definition of a heat event takes into account both the challenges of subseasonal forecasting and the effects of heat stress on human physiology e.g., the dependence of heat impacts on duration, geographical location and timing of the heat event. The prototype outlook system focuses on forecast lead time week-2 and uses the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) reforecast conducted at ESRL and the NCEP-GEFS operational realtime ensemble forecasts. The prototype monitoring system, on which we base forecast verification, provides a dual output. The first product uses the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis; the second monitoring product is based on the day-1 forecast from the GEFS reforecast and from the operational GEFS realtime forecast. In this presentation we first show results from the prototype forecasting and monitoring system. We then compare these results with forecasts from the SEHOMS in which we gradually add reforecasts obtained from the S2S database (NCEP - Climate forecast System and ECMWF models). Finally we discuss the possibility of expanding the SEHOMS to week-3 and week-4 based on results from the CFS, ECMWF model, and the North American Multi-Model Ensemble system (NMME).

  3. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  4. Heat shock factor 1 promotes TERRA transcription and telomere protection upon heat stress.

    PubMed

    Koskas, Sivan; Decottignies, Anabelle; Dufour, Solenne; Pezet, Mylène; Verdel, André; Vourc'h, Claire; Faure, Virginie

    2017-03-27

    In response to metabolic or environmental stress, cells activate powerful defense mechanisms to prevent the formation and accumulation of toxic protein aggregates. The main orchestrator of this cellular response is HSF1 (heat shock factor 1), a transcription factor involved in the up-regulation of protein-coding genes with protective roles. It has become very clear that HSF1 has a broader function than initially expected. Indeed, our previous work demonstrated that, upon stress, HSF1 activates the transcription of a non-coding RNA, named Satellite III, at pericentromeric heterochromatin. Here, we observe that the function of HSF1 extends to telomeres and identify subtelomeric DNA as a new genomic target of HSF1. We show that the binding of HSF1 to subtelomeric regions plays an essential role in the upregulation of non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNA (TERRA) transcription upon heat shock. Importantly, our data show that telomere integrity is impacted by heat shock and that telomeric DNA damages are markedly enhanced in HSF1 deficient cells. Altogether, our findings reveal a new direct and essential function of HSF1 in the transcriptional activation of TERRA and in telomere protection upon stress.

  5. Does heat stress alter the pig's response to dietary fat?

    PubMed

    Kellner, T A; Baumgard, L H; Prusa, K J; Gabler, N K; Patience, J F

    2016-11-01

    Heat stress (HS) results in major losses to the pork industry via reduced growth performance and, possibly, carcass fat quality. The experimental objective was to measure the effects of HS on the pig's response to dietary fat in terms of lipid digestion, metabolism, and deposition over a 35-d finishing period. A total of 96 PIC 337 × C22/C29 (PIC, Inc., Hendersonville, TN) barrows (initial BW of 100.4 ± 1.2 kg) were randomly allotted to 1 of 9 treatments arranged as a 3 × 3 factorial: thermoneutral (TN; constant 24°C; ad libitum access to feed), pair-fed thermoneutral (PFTN; constant 24°C; limit fed based on previous HS daily feed intake), or HS (cyclical 28°C nighttime, 33°C from d 0 to 7, 33.5°C from d 7 to 14, 34°C from d 14 to 21, 34.5°C from d 21 to 28, and 35°C from d 28 to 35 daytime; ab libitum access to feed) and diet (a corn-soybean meal-based diet with 0% added fat [CNTR], CNTR with 3% added tallow [TAL; iodine value {IV} = 41.8], or CNTR with 3% added corn oil [CO; IV = 123.0]). No interactions between environment and diet were evident for any major response criteria ( ≥ 0.063). Rectal temperature increased due to HS (39.0°C for HS, 38.1°C for TN, and 38.2°C for PFTN; < 0.001). Heat stress decreased ADFI (27.8%; < 0.001), ADG (0.72 kg/d for HS, 1.03 kg/d for TN, and 0.78 kg/d for PFTN; < 0.001), and G:F (0.290 for HS, 0.301 for TN, and 0.319 for PFTN; = 0.006). Heat stress barrows required 1.2 Mcal of ME intake more per kilogram of BW gain than PFTN ( < 0.001). Heat stress tended to result in the lowest apparent total tract digestibility of acid hydrolyzed ether extract (AEE; 59.0% for HS, 60.2% for TN, and 61.4% for PFTN; = 0.055). True total tract digestibility (TTTD) of AEE of CO-based diets (99.3%) was greater than that of CNTR (97.3%) and TAL-based diets (96.3%; = 0.012). Environment had no impact on TTTD of AEE ( = 0.118). Environment had no impact on jowl IV at market (69.2 g/100 g for HS, 69.3 g/100 g for TN, and 69.8 g/100 g for

  6. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  7. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  8. Heat pipe systems using new working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F. (Inventor); Zhang, Nengli (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a heat pipe system is greatly improved by the use of a dilute aqueous solution of about 0.0005 and about 0.005 moles per liter of a long chain alcohol as the working fluid. The surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value, for example about 40.degree. C. for n-heptanol solutions. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. Thus, the bubble size at departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies and, therefore, increases the boiling limit of heat pipes. This feature is useful in microgravity conditions. In addition to microgravity applications, the heat pipe system may be used for commercial, residential and vehicular air conditioning systems, micro heat pipes for electronic devices, refrigeration and heat exchangers, and chemistry and cryogenics.

  9. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2015-09-22

    A waste heat recovery (WHR) system connects a working fluid to fluid passages formed in an engine block and/or a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine, forming an engine heat exchanger. The fluid passages are formed near high temperature areas of the engine, subjecting the working fluid to sufficient heat energy to vaporize the working fluid while the working fluid advantageously cools the engine block and/or cylinder head, improving fuel efficiency. The location of the engine heat exchanger downstream from an EGR boiler and upstream from an exhaust heat exchanger provides an optimal position of the engine heat exchanger with respect to the thermodynamic cycle of the WHR system, giving priority to cooling of EGR gas. The configuration of valves in the WHR system provides the ability to select a plurality of parallel flow paths for optimal operation.

  10. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, Sora; PARK, Joonhee; LEE, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100–130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers’ hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses. PMID:26165361

  11. Does the hair influence heat extraction from the head during head cooling under heat stress?

    PubMed

    Shin, Sora; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of head hair on thermoregulatory responses when cooling the head under heat stress. Eight young males participated in six experimental conditions: normal hair (100-130 mm length) and cropped hair (5 mm length) with three water inlet temperatures of 10, 15, and 20°C. The head and neck of subjects were cooled by a liquid perfused hood while immersing legs at 42°C water for 60 min in a sitting position at the air temperature of 28°C with 30% RH. The results showed that heat removal from the normal hair condition was not significantly different from the cropped hair condition. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, and sweat rate showed no significant differences between the normal and cropped hair conditions. Heat extraction from the head was significantly greater in 10°C than in 15 or 20°C cooling (p<0.05) for both normal and cropped hair, whereas subjects preferred the 15°C more than the 10 or 20°C cooling regimen. These results indicate that the selection of effective cooling temperature is more crucial than the length of workers' hair during head cooling under heat stress, and such selection should be under the consideration of subjective perceptions with physiological responses.

  12. Heat stress abatement during the dry period influences prolactin signaling in lymphocytes Heat stress abatement during the dry period influences prolactin signaling in lymphocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress perturbs PRL release and affects dairy cow lactational performance and immune cell function. We hypothesized that greater PRL concentration in plasma of heat-stressed cows would decrease expression of PRL-R mRNA and increase mRNA expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in ...

  13. Expression of translationally controlled tumor protein in heat-stressed human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Jirachotikoon, Canussanun; Tannukit, Sissada; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heat stress on cell viability, translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) expression, and the effects of recombinant TCTP on heat-stressed human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). HDPCs were isolated from human teeth and cultured at 37°C. For heat stress, HPDCs were incubated at 43°C for 45min. After heat stress, recombinant TCTP were added to HDPCs and cultured for various periods of time at 37°C. Heat-treated cells were then analyzed by DNA staining with Hoechst 33258, MTT, and caspase 3 activity assays. TCTP expression level was assessed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Heat-treated cells displayed lower cell density and nuclear morphology resembling apoptotic body. Heat stress significantly decreased cell viability and induced activity of caspase 3. The effect of recombinant TCTP on pulp cell death from heat stress varied depending on each subject and TCTP concentration. Heat stress up-regulated TCTP mRNA expression level. In contrast, TCTP protein level remained unchanged. Recombinant TCTP did not affect TCTP mRNA expression but down-regulated TCTP protein in heat-treated cells. Heat stress induces caspase 3 activation and up-regulates TCTP mRNA expression in HDPCs. TCTP did not play a key role on pulp cell recovery from heat stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  15. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  16. Factors of subjective heat stress of urban citizens in contexts of everyday life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Hackenbruch, Julia; Schipper, Janus Willem

    2016-04-01

    Heat waves and the consequent heat stress of urban populations have a growing relevance in urban risk management and strategies of urban adaptation to climate change. In this context, social science studies on subjective experiencing of heat as stress by urban citizens are a new emerging field. To contribute to the understanding of self-reported subjective heat stress and its major determinants in a daily life perspective, we conducted a questionnaire survey with 323 respondents in Karlsruhe, Germany, after heat waves in July and August 2013. Statistical data analysis showed that subjective heat stress is an issue permeating everyday activities. Subjective heat stress at home was lower than at work and in general. Subjective heat stress in general, at home, and at work was determined by the health impairments experienced during the heat and the feeling of being helplessly exposed to the heat. For subjective heat stress at home, characteristics of the residential building and the built environment additionally played a role. Although the rate of implemented coping measures was rather high, coping measures showed no uniform effect for the subjective heat stress. We conclude that in terms of urban adaptation strategies, further research is needed to understand how various processes of daily social (work) life enable or limit individual coping and that communication strategies are important for building capacities to better cope with future heat waves.

  17. Role of the Red Ginseng in Defense against the Environmental Heat Stress in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kui-Jin; Yoon, Kye-Yoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-11-10

    Global temperature change causes heat stress related disorders in humans. A constituent of red ginseng has been known the beneficial effect on the resistance to many diseases. However, the mechanism of red ginseng (RG) against heat stress still remains unclear. To determine the effect of RG on heat stress, we examined the effect of the RG on the gene expression profiles in rats subjected to environmental heat stress. We evaluated the transcripts associated with hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats subjected to heat stress. We also analyzed the reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents. Our results suggested RG inhibited heat stress mediated altering mRNA expressions include HSPA1, DEAF1, HMGCR, and FMO1. We also determined RG attenuated fat accumulation in the liver by altering C/EBPβ expression. RG promoted to repress the heat stress mediated hepatic cell death by inhibiting of Bcl-2 expression in rats subjected to heat stress. Moreover, RG administered group during heat stress dramatically decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and ROS associated genes compared with the control group. Thus, we suggest that RG might influence inhibitory effect on environmental heat stress induced abnormal conditions in humans.

  18. Plasma Volume during Heat Stress and Exercise in Women,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    AD-A174 W16 PLASMA VOLUME DURING HEAT STRESS AND EXERCISE IN o t ( U ) ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MA L A STEPHENSON ET AL NOV...86 USARIER-M-i-87 U NLLASSIFE F/G 614 II 11110 2 2 IlUll Im .. : llILIII.a ILO 1ffl.2.5 au* iICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF...NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army Res Inst of Env Med (if aplicable) U.S. Army Research Institute of GRD- U - Environmental Medicine 6c

  19. Self organizing maps in urban heat stress projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    A self organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised machine learning algorithm well suited for identifying patterns in large datasets. It has been used successfully to classify atmospheric states in climate data and as part of statistical downscaling procedures. This study aims to use SOMs to produce downscaled CMIP5-based projections of wet-bulb temperature in urban areas, taking into account the regional atmospheric state and learned local dynamics. These downscaled projections will be compared to the CMIP5 models as well as to observations and then used to project local extreme heat stress events in the future.

  20. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout. We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences in the thermal tolerance of HR and LR fish. Our results support the hypothesis that responsiveness to environmental change underpins the physiological differences in stress-coping styles. Here, we demonstrate that the heat shock response is a distinguishing feature of the HR and LR lines and suggest that it may have been coselected with the hormonal responses to stress.

  1. Solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, D. E.; Humphries, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    System has been placed in operation to verify technical feasibility of using solar energy to provide residential heating and cooling. Complete system analysis was performed to provide design information.

  2. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    PubMed

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  3. The hypophagic response to heat stress is not mediated by GPR109A or peripheral β-OH butyrate.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Chelsea; Foy, Caroline E; Higgins, Mark R; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-05-15

    Rising temperatures resulting from climate change will increase the incidence of heat stress, negatively impacting the labor force and food animal production. Heat stress elevates circulating β-OH butyrate, which induces vasodilation through GPR109a. Interestingly, both heat stress and intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate administration induce hypophagia. Thus, we aimed to investigate the role of β-OH butyrate in heat stress hypophagia in mice. We found that niacin, a β-OH butyrate mimetic that cannot be oxidized to generate ATP, also reduces food intake. Interestingly, the depression in food intake as a result of 8-h intraperitoneal niacin or 48-h heat exposure did not result from changes in hypothalamic expression of orexigenic or anorexigenic signals (AgRP, NPY, or POMC). Genetically eliminating GPR109a expression did not prevent the hypophagic response to heat exposure, intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate (5.7 mmol/kg), or niacin (0.8 mmol/kg). Hepatic vagotomy eliminated the hypophagic response to β-OH butyrate and niacin but did not affect the hypophagic response to heat exposure. We subsequently hypothesized that the hypophagic response to heat stress may depend on direct effects of β-OH butyrate at the central nervous system: β-OH butyrate induced hormonal changes (hyperinsulinemia, hypercorticosteronemia, and hyperleptinemia), or gene expression changes. To test these possibilities, we blocked expression of hepatic hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA synthase II (HMGCS2) to prevent hepatic β-OH butyrate synthesis. Mice that lack HMGCS2 maintain a hypophagic response to heat stress. Herein, we establish that the hypophagia of heat stress is independent of GPR109a, the hepatic vagus afferent nerve, and hepatic ketone body synthesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Do maize models capture the impacts of heat and drought stresses on yield? Using algorithm ensembles to identify successful approaches.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenong; Zhuang, Qianlai; Tan, Zeli; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Bangyou; Melillo, Jerry M

    2016-09-01

    Stresses from heat and drought are expected to increasingly suppress crop yields, but the degree to which current models can represent these effects is uncertain. Here we evaluate the algorithms that determine impacts of heat and drought stress on maize in 16 major maize models by incorporating these algorithms into a standard model, the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM), and running an ensemble of simulations. Although both daily mean temperature and daylight temperature are common choice of forcing heat stress algorithms, current parameterizations in most models favor the use of daylight temperature even though the algorithm was designed for daily mean temperature. Different drought algorithms (i.e., a function of soil water content, of soil water supply to demand ratio, and of actual to potential transpiration ratio) simulated considerably different patterns of water shortage over the growing season, but nonetheless predicted similar decreases in annual yield. Using the selected combination of algorithms, our simulations show that maize yield reduction was more sensitive to drought stress than to heat stress for the US Midwest since the 1980s, and this pattern will continue under future scenarios; the influence of excessive heat will become increasingly prominent by the late 21st century. Our review of algorithms in 16 crop models suggests that the impacts of heat and drought stress on plant yield can be best described by crop models that: (i) incorporate event-based descriptions of heat and drought stress, (ii) consider the effects of nighttime warming, and (iii) coordinate the interactions among multiple stresses. Our study identifies the proficiency with which different model formulations capture the impacts of heat and drought stress on maize biomass and yield production. The framework presented here can be applied to other modeled processes and used to improve yield predictions of other crops with a wide variety of crop models. © 2016 John

  5. Use of heat stress responsive gene expression levels for early selection of heat tolerant cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ji; Jung, Won Yong; Lee, Sang Sook; Song, Jun Ho; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Chulwook; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2013-06-04

    Cabbage is a relatively robust vegetable at low temperatures. However, at high temperatures, cabbage has disadvantages, such as reduced disease tolerance and lower yields. Thus, selection of heat-tolerant cabbage is an important goal in cabbage breeding. Easier or faster selection of superior varieties of cabbage, which are tolerant to heat and disease and have improved taste and quality, can be achieved with molecular and biological methods. We compared heat-responsive gene expression between a heat-tolerant cabbage line (HTCL), "HO", and a heat-sensitive cabbage line (HSCL), "JK", by Genechip assay. Expression levels of specific heat stress-related genes were increased in response to high-temperature stress, according to Genechip assays. We performed quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to compare expression levels of these heat stress-related genes in four HTCLs and four HSCLs. Transcript levels for heat shock protein BoHsp70 and transcription factor BoGRAS (SCL13) were more strongly expressed only in all HTCLs compared to all HSCLs, showing much lower level expressions at the young plant stage under heat stress (HS). Thus, we suggest that expression levels of these genes may be early selection markers for HTCLs in cabbage breeding. In addition, several genes that are involved in the secondary metabolite pathway were differentially regulated in HTCL and HSCL exposed to heat stress.

  6. Use of Heat Stress Responsive Gene Expression Levels for Early Selection of Heat Tolerant Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ji; Jung, Won Yong; Lee, Sang Sook; Song, Jun Ho; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, HyeRan; Kim, ChulWook; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2013-01-01

    Cabbage is a relatively robust vegetable at low temperatures. However, at high temperatures, cabbage has disadvantages, such as reduced disease tolerance and lower yields. Thus, selection of heat-tolerant cabbage is an important goal in cabbage breeding. Easier or faster selection of superior varieties of cabbage, which are tolerant to heat and disease and have improved taste and quality, can be achieved with molecular and biological methods. We compared heat-responsive gene expression between a heat-tolerant cabbage line (HTCL), “HO”, and a heat-sensitive cabbage line (HSCL), “JK”, by Genechip assay. Expression levels of specific heat stress-related genes were increased in response to high-temperature stress, according to Genechip assays. We performed quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to compare expression levels of these heat stress-related genes in four HTCLs and four HSCLs. Transcript levels for heat shock protein BoHsp70 and transcription factor BoGRAS (SCL13) were more strongly expressed only in all HTCLs compared to all HSCLs, showing much lower level expressions at the young plant stage under heat stress (HS). Thus, we suggest that expression levels of these genes may be early selection markers for HTCLs in cabbage breeding. In addition, several genes that are involved in the secondary metabolite pathway were differentially regulated in HTCL and HSCL exposed to heat stress. PMID:23736694

  7. Cornwall combined heat and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.; Andersson, B.; Eriksson, L.; Doyle, R.

    1995-09-01

    The production of a small amount of locally generated electric energy in order to stabilize future costs was an attractive idea to Cornwall Electric. A combined heat and power project would enable Cornwall Electric to reduce fuel sensitivity risk and generally provide a balanced portfolio. Based on this, FVB & Cornwall Electric developed a smaller co-generation and district heating proposal. This system was installed during the summer and autumn of 1994 and the district heating portion was commissioned just before Christmas 1994. There are 11 buildings connected to the system of which two are hospitals that were converted from steam to hot water heating. The co-generation portion of the project was commissioned during February 1995 and consists of 2 x 2.5 MW{sub el} spark ignited reciprocating engines running on natural gas. Waste heat, in the form of hot water, will be recovered off the two engines to be utilized by the district heating system. The heat from the engines will provide 90% of the yearly heating energy that the connected buildings require. The paper will describe how the original project was re-conceived and how barriers, that appeared during the development and marketing of the new service, were overcome. It will also describe, in detail, the design of the co-generation plant and the district heating system. In addition, this paper will discuss problems that were encountered during construction and how they were dealt with including the experience gained during the construction and commissioning of the project.

  8. Effects of genistein and hesperidin on biomarkers of heat stress in broilers under persistent summer stress.

    PubMed

    Kamboh, A A; Hang, S Q; Bakhetgul, M; Zhu, W-Y

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the supplemental effects of the flavonoids genistein and hesperidin for biomarkers of heat stress in broilers reared under persistent summer stress. A total of 360 one-day-old, mixed-sex broiler chickens were divided into 6 treatment groups: control or supplemented with 5 mg of genistein•kg of feed(-1), 20 mg of hesperidin•kg of feed(-1), or a mixture of genistein and hesperidin (1:4) at a dosage of 5 mg•kg(-1), 10 mg•kg(-1), and 20 mg•kg(-1) of feed. Broilers were slaughtered at 42 d and samples were analyzed for hematological profile, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and heat shock protein 70 mRNA levels. Results showed that dietary genistein and hesperidin improved (P < 0.05) the weekly performance of broilers particularly during the finisher period. The circulating heterophils and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios were found to decrease (P < 0.01) in the treated groups. Moreover, biomarkers of heat stress including the level of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and heat shock protein 70 mRNA of breast muscle was also changed (P < 0.01) positively by the dietary compounds with pronounced effects of combined treatments. These findings suggested that genistein and hesperidin could be a prime strategy to ameliorate summer stress effects in broilers; and a combination of both compounds may lead to mutual synergistic effects. It could be suggested that dietary use of both genistein and hesperidin as a feed supplement may offer a potential nutritional strategy in tropical and subtropical regions to overcome the deleterious effects of persistent summer stress in broiler production.

  9. Air leakage in residential solar heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingleton, J. G.; Cassel, D. E.; Overton, R. L.

    1981-02-01

    A series of computer simulations was performed to evaluate the effects of component air leakage on system thermal performance for a typical residential solar heating system, located in Madison, Wisconsin. Auxiliary energy required to supplement solar energy for space heating was determined using the TRNSYS computer program, for a range of air leakage rates at the solar collector and pebble bed storage unit. The effects of heat transfer and mass transfer between the solar equipment room and the heated building were investigated. The effect of reduced air infiltration into the building due to pressurized by the solar air heating system were determined. A simple method of estimating the effect of collector array air leakage on system thermal performance was evaluated, using the f CHART method.

  10. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Michael A; Kimball, Amy L; McHenry, Colleen L; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative rehabilitation interventions to improve muscle cell

  11. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  12. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  13. Repeated muscle damage blunts the increase in heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dolci, A; Fortes, M B; Walker, F S; Haq, A; Riddle, T; Walsh, N P

    2015-07-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has recently been shown to increase heat strain during exercise heat stress (HS), and represents a risk factor for exertional heat illness (EHI). We hypothesised that a repeated bout of EIMD blunts the increase in rectal temperature (T re) during subsequent endurance exercise in the heat. Sixteen non-heat-acclimated males were randomly allocated to EIMD (n = 9) or control (CON, n = 7). EIMD performed a downhill running treatment at -10 % gradient for 60 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 20 °C, 40 % RH. CON participants performed the same treatment but at +1 % gradient. Following treatment, participants rested for 30 min, then performed HS (+1 % gradient running for 40 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 33 °C, 50 % RH) during which thermoregulatory measures were assessed. Both groups repeated the treatment and subsequent HS 14 days later. Isometric quadriceps strength was assessed at baseline, and 48 h post-treatment. The decrease in leg strength 48 h post-EIMD trial 1 (-7.5 %) was absent 48 h post-EIMD trial 2 (+2.9 %) demonstrating a repeated bout effect. Final T re during HS was lower following EIMD trial 2 (39.25 ± 0.47 °C) compared with EIMD trial 1 (39.59 ± 0.49 °C, P < 0.01), with CON showing no difference. Thermal sensation and the T re threshold for sweating onset were also lower during HS on EIMD trial 2. The repeated bout effect blunted the increase in heat strain during HS conducted after EIMD. Incorporating a muscle-damaging bout into training could be a strategy to reduce the risk of EHI and improve endurance performance in individuals undertaking heavy exercise with an eccentric component in the heat.

  14. Effects of heat stress on the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Toshitada; Goto, Katsumasa; Kojima, Atsushi; Akema, Tatsuo; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of heat stress on the regeneration of injured mammalian skeletal muscles. To activate a necrosis-regeneration cycle, cardiotoxin (CTX) was injected into the left tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, except for the normal control group. Rats in the heat-stressed group were exposed to heat in a heat chamber 24 hours before or immediately after CTX injection. The muscle protein contents in the heat-stressed group were significantly higher than the non-heated group 28 days after CTX injection (p<0.05). The CTX-injection-related increment of Pax7-positive nuclei in the heated group was greater than that in the non-heated group. Evidences suggest that heat-stress could activate satellite cells, promote the proliferation and the differentiation of satellite cells, and facilitate the regeneration of muscle.

  15. Heat pump systems for Spring Creek, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Engen, I.A.

    1982-03-01

    The use of ground water heat pump systems for space heating in the new town of Spring Creek, Montana, is reviewed in this report. The available information, together with a review of manufacturers' specifications and guidelines, indicates ground water heat pump systems can be competitive with comparable electric space conditioning systems, if electricity cost approaches $0.02/kWh. Due to the low water temperature, large volumes of water will be required to carry the peak heat load and district-type supply systems may not be feasible for single-family residential developments. Due to the large water production rates, shallow depth of the reservoir, and proximity of a large surface reservoir, additional reservoir evaluation seems appropriate; obtaining competent hydrological consultation is recommended. If ground water heat pump systems are used in the development care must be exercised in equipment selection; the requirement for cooling capacity at the site is negligible compared to heating load. Some heat pumps designed for southern climates may not provide adequate heating performance on water below 60/sup 0/F.

  16. Automatic flue gas heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.A.

    1983-02-22

    An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

  17. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  18. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. © 2017 Distéfano et al.

  19. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants

    PubMed Central

    D’Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Fiol, Diego Fernando

    2017-01-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)–induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. PMID:28100685

  20. Heat stress and a countermeasure in the Shuttle rescueman's suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, D. F.; Reed, H.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Rescue of the astronaut flight crew from a contingency landing may risk exposure of the rescue crew to toxic propellants spilling from potentially ruptured tanks in the crew module area. An Aquala dry diver's suit has been in service by the rescue team to preclude exposure, especially in the water rescue scenario. Heat stress has become a factor of concern in recent years when older and less physically-fit team members work in this suit. Methods: Field testing was initiated using fully instrumented rescue men in a simulated scenario to determine the extent of heat stress. Two tests were accomplished, one in the normal (N) configuration and one with a proposed cooling countermeasure, the Steele vest (S). Results: Heat stress was high as indicated by average rectal temperatures (Tre) of 38.28 degrees C(100.9 degrees F) after the 45 minute protocol. Slopes of the regression equations describing the increase in Tre with time were greater (P less than 0.05) with N (0.073 plus or minus .008) compared to S (0.060 plus or minus .007). Projection of time to the 38.89 degree C (102 degree F) limit was increased by 15.3 percent with the vest. Mean skin temperature (Tsk) was higher (P less than 0.05) in N (38.33 plus or minus .11 degrees C) compared to S (34.33 plus or minus .39 degrees C). Average heart rate was higher (P less than 0.05 in N than S. Sweat loss, as measured by weight loss, was more (P less than 0.05) for N (1.09 plus or minus .09 kg versus 0.77 plus or minus .06 kg). Air usage, while slightly less for S, was not statistically different. Conclusion: The use of the cool vest provided significant relief from thermal stress in spite of the addition of 3.4 kg (7.5 pounds) weight and some loss in mobility.

  1. Stirling heat pump external heat systems: An appliance perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, A. D.; Thomas, J. F.

    1992-08-01

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600 C to 700 C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO(x) emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS system was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO(x) emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  2. District Heating Systems Performance Analyses. Heat Energy Tariff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Vigants, Girts; Vitolins, Valdis; Blumberga, Dagnija; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2014-12-01

    The paper addresses an important element of the European energy sector: the evaluation of district heating (DH) system operations from the standpoint of increasing energy efficiency and increasing the use of renewable energy resources. This has been done by developing a new methodology for the evaluation of the heat tariff. The paper presents an algorithm of this methodology, which includes not only a data base and calculation equation systems, but also an integrated multi-criteria analysis module using MADM/MCDM (Multi-Attribute Decision Making / Multi-Criteria Decision Making) based on TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The results of the multi-criteria analysis are used to set the tariff benchmarks. The evaluation methodology has been tested for Latvian heat tariffs, and the obtained results show that only half of heating companies reach a benchmark value equal to 0.5 for the efficiency closeness to the ideal solution indicator. This means that the proposed evaluation methodology would not only allow companies to determine how they perform with regard to the proposed benchmark, but also to identify their need to restructure so that they may reach the level of a low-carbon business.

  3. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section. (1) All heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service within the heat exchange system that...., the heat exchange system does not contain any heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service as... exchange system in organic HAP service or from each heat exchanger exit line for each heat exchanger...

  4. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C) in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS) alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In the heat-tolerant genotype

  5. Effects of cold stress and heat stress on coral fluorescence in reef-building corals

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Melissa S.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread temperature stress has caused catastrophic coral bleaching events that have been devastating for coral reefs. Here, we evaluate whether coral fluorescence could be utilized as a noninvasive assessment for coral health. We conducted cold and heat stress treatments on the branching coral Acropora yongei, and found that green fluorescent protein (GFP) concentration and fluorescence decreased with declining coral health, prior to initiation of bleaching. Ultimately, cold-treated corals acclimated and GFP concentration and fluorescence recovered. In contrast, heat-treated corals eventually bleached but showed strong fluorescence despite reduced GFP concentration, likely resulting from the large reduction in shading from decreased dinoflagellate density. Consequently, GFP concentration and fluorescence showed distinct correlations in non-bleached and bleached corals. Green fluorescence was positively correlated with dinoflagellate photobiology, but its closest correlation was with coral growth suggesting that green fluorescence could be used as a physiological proxy for health in some corals. PMID:23478289

  6. Effects of cold stress and heat stress on coral fluorescence in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Roth, Melissa S; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2013-01-01

    Widespread temperature stress has caused catastrophic coral bleaching events that have been devastating for coral reefs. Here, we evaluate whether coral fluorescence could be utilized as a noninvasive assessment for coral health. We conducted cold and heat stress treatments on the branching coral Acropora yongei, and found that green fluorescent protein (GFP) concentration and fluorescence decreased with declining coral health, prior to initiation of bleaching. Ultimately, cold-treated corals acclimated and GFP concentration and fluorescence recovered. In contrast, heat-treated corals eventually bleached but showed strong fluorescence despite reduced GFP concentration, likely resulting from the large reduction in shading from decreased dinoflagellate density. Consequently, GFP concentration and fluorescence showed distinct correlations in non-bleached and bleached corals. Green fluorescence was positively correlated with dinoflagellate photobiology, but its closest correlation was with coral growth suggesting that green fluorescence could be used as a physiological proxy for health in some corals.

  7. Prototype solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of a solar heating and hot water system which uses a pyramidal optics solar concentrator for heating, and consists of the following subsystems: collector, control, transport, and site data acquisition. Improvements made in the components and subsystems are discussed.

  8. Philip, South Dakota geothermal district heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1997-12-01

    The geothermal heating project in Philip, South Dakota which uses the waste water from the Haakon School has now been in operation for 15 years. This project was one of the 23 cost shared by the U.S. DOE starting in 1978, of which 15 became operational. This article describes the geothermal heating system for eight buildings in downtown Philip.

  9. Solar heating system installed at Troy, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The completed system was composed of three basic subsystems: the collector system consisting of 3,264 square feet of Owens Illinois evacuated glass tube collectors; the storage system which included a 5,000 gallon insulated steel tank; and the distribution and control system which included piping, pumping and heat transfer components as well as the solemoid activated valves and control logic for the efficient and safe operation of the entire system. This solar heating system was installed in an existing facility and was, therefore, a retrofit system. Extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  11. Testing the responses of four wheat crop models to heat stress at anthesis and grain filling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Liu, Leilei; Tang, Liang; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Higher temperatures caused by future climate change will bring more frequent heat stress events and pose an increasing risk to global wheat production. Crop models have been widely used to simulate future crop productivity but are rarely tested with observed heat stress experimental datasets. Four wheat models (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat, DSSAT-Nwheat, APSIM-Wheat, and WheatGrow) were evaluated with 4 years of environment-controlled phytotron experimental datasets with two wheat cultivars under heat stress at anthesis and grain filling stages. Heat stress at anthesis reduced observed grain numbers per unit area and individual grain size, while heat stress during grain filling mainly decreased the size of the individual grains. The observed impact of heat stress on grain filling duration, total aboveground biomass, grain yield, and grain protein concentration (GPC) varied depending on cultivar and accumulated heat stress. For every unit increase of heat degree days (HDD, degree days over 30 °C), grain filling duration was reduced by 0.30-0.60%, total aboveground biomass was reduced by 0.37-0.43%, and grain yield was reduced by 1.0-1.6%, but GPC was increased by 0.50% for cv Yangmai16 and 0.80% for cv Xumai30. The tested crop simulation models could reproduce some of the observed reductions in grain filling duration, final total aboveground biomass, and grain yield, as well as the observed increase in GPC due to heat stress. Most of the crop models tended to reproduce heat stress impacts better during grain filling than at anthesis. Some of the tested models require improvements in the response to heat stress during grain filling, but all models need improvements in simulating heat stress effects on grain set during anthesis. The observed significant genetic variability in the response of wheat to heat stress needs to be considered through cultivar parameters in future simulation studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. ICR Heating in Ion Separation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A.V.

    2005-12-15

    A systematic procedure for analyzing the physical processes that govern ICR heating in systems for ion separation is developed. The procedure is based on an analytic model of an rf antenna generating rf fields within a plasma column in a magnetic field and includes such issues as the calculation of rf fields, examination of the ICR interaction of ions with these fields, and determination of the distribution function of the ion flow at the exit from the ICR heating system. It is shown that, even in ICR heating systems with easily achievable parameter values, ions with appreciably different masses can be efficiently separated by energy.

  13. Impact of heat stress on health and performance of dairy animals: A review.

    PubMed

    Das, Ramendra; Sailo, Lalrengpuii; Verma, Nishant; Bharti, Pranay; Saikia, Jnyanashree; Imtiwati; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Sustainability in livestock production system is largely affected by climate change. An imbalance between metabolic heat production inside the animal body and its dissipation to the surroundings results to heat stress (HS) under high air temperature and humid climates. The foremost reaction of animals under thermal weather is increases in respiration rate, rectal temperature and heart rate. It directly affect feed intake thereby, reduces growth rate, milk yield, reproductive performance, and even death in extreme cases. Dairy breeds are typically more sensitive to HS than meat breeds, and higher producing animals are, furthermore, susceptible since they generates more metabolic heat. HS suppresses the immune and endocrine system thereby enhances susceptibility of an animal to various diseases. Hence, sustainable dairy farming remains a vast challenge in these changing climatic conditions globally.

  14. Impact of heat stress on health and performance of dairy animals: A review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ramendra; Sailo, Lalrengpuii; Verma, Nishant; Bharti, Pranay; Saikia, Jnyanashree; Imtiwati; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability in livestock production system is largely affected by climate change. An imbalance between metabolic heat production inside the animal body and its dissipation to the surroundings results to heat stress (HS) under high air temperature and humid climates. The foremost reaction of animals under thermal weather is increases in respiration rate, rectal temperature and heart rate. It directly affect feed intake thereby, reduces growth rate, milk yield, reproductive performance, and even death in extreme cases. Dairy breeds are typically more sensitive to HS than meat breeds, and higher producing animals are, furthermore, susceptible since they generates more metabolic heat. HS suppresses the immune and endocrine system thereby enhances susceptibility of an animal to various diseases. Hence, sustainable dairy farming remains a vast challenge in these changing climatic conditions globally. PMID:27057109

  15. Down-regulation of miR-181a can reduce heat stress damage in PBMCs of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Lin; Fu, Yuan-Yuan; Shi, Min-Yan; Li, Hui-Xia

    2016-09-01

    Heat stress can weaken the immune system and even increase livestock's susceptibility to disease. MicroRNA (miR) is short non-coding RNA that functions in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and some phenotypes. Our recent study found that miR-181a is highly expressed in the serum of heat-stressed Holstein cows, but the potential function of miR-181a is still not clarified. In this study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from Holstein cows' peripheral blood, were used to investigate the effects of miR-181a inhibitor on heat stress damage. Our results showed that significant apoptosis and oxidative damage were induced by heat stress in PBMCs. However, with apoptosis, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) were reduced, while the content of glutathione (GSH) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were increased even under heat stress conditions after transfecting miR-181a inhibitors to PBMCs. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of bax and caspase-3 was significantly decreased, but mRNA expression of bcl-2 was increased in transfected PBMCs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-181a can reduce heat stress damage in PBMCs of Holstein cows.

  16. Heat stress and dehydration in adapting for performance: Good, bad, both, or neither?

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Ashley Paul; Tipton, Michael; Minson, Christopher T.; Cotter, James David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Physiological systems respond acutely to stress to minimize homeostatic disturbance, and typically adapt to chronic stress to enhance tolerance to that or a related stressor. It is legitimate to ask whether dehydration is a valuable stressor in stimulating adaptation per se. While hypoxia has had long-standing interest by athletes and researchers as an ergogenic aid, heat and nutritional stressors have had little interest until the past decade. Heat and dehydration are highly interlinked in their causation and the physiological strain they induce, so their individual roles in adaptation are difficult to delineate. The effectiveness of heat acclimation as an ergogenic aid remains unclear for team sport and endurance athletes despite several recent studies on this topic. Very few studies have examined the potential ergogenic (or ergolytic) adaptations to ecologically-valid dehydration as a stressor in its own right, despite longstanding evidence of relevant fluid-regulatory adaptations from short-term hypohydration. Transient and self-limiting dehydration (e.g., as constrained by thirst), as with most forms of stress, might have a time and a place in physiological or behavioral adaptations independently or by exacerbating other stressors (esp. heat); it cannot be dismissed without the appropriate evidence. The present review did not identify such evidence. Future research should identify how the magnitude and timing of dehydration might augment or interfere with the adaptive processes in behaviorally constrained versus unconstrained humans. PMID:28349082

  17. Biochemical analysis of 'kerosene tree' Hymenaea courbaril L. under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dinesh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Rohila, Jai S; Basu, Chhandak

    2014-01-01

    Hymenaea courbaril or jatoba is a tropical tree known for its medically important secondary metabolites production. Considering climate change, the goal of this study was to investigate differential expression of proteins and lipids produced by this tree under heat stress conditions. Total lipid was extracted from heat stressed plant leaves and various sesquiterpenes produced by the tree under heat stress were identified. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis were used to study lipid and volatile compounds produced by the plant. Several volatiles, isoprene, 2-methyl butanenitrile, β ocimene and a numbers of sesquiterpenes differentially produced by the plant under heat stress were identified. We propose these compounds were produced by the tree to cope up with heat stress. A protein gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) was performed to study differential expression of proteins in heat stressed plants. Several proteins were found to be expressed many folds different in heat stressed plants compared to the control. These proteins included heat shock proteins, histone proteins, oxygen evolving complex, and photosynthetic proteins, which, we believe, played key roles in imparting thermotolerance in Hymenaea tree. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of extensive molecular physiological study of Hymenaea trees under heat stress. This work will open avenues of further research on effects of heat stress in Hymenaea and the findings can be applied to understand how global warming can affect physiology of other plants.

  18. Biochemical analysis of ‘kerosene tree’ Hymenaea courbaril L. under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dinesh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Rohila, Jai S; Basu, Chhandak

    2014-01-01

    Hymenaea courbaril or jatoba is a tropical tree known for its medically important secondary metabolites production. Considering climate change, the goal of this study was to investigate differential expression of proteins and lipids produced by this tree under heat stress conditions. Total lipid was extracted from heat stressed plant leaves and various sesquiterpenes produced by the tree under heat stress were identified. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis were used to study lipid and volatile compounds produced by the plant. Several volatiles, isoprene, 2-methyl butanenitrile, β ocimene and a numbers of sesquiterpenes differentially produced by the plant under heat stress were identified. We propose these compounds were produced by the tree to cope up with heat stress. A protein gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) was performed to study differential expression of proteins in heat stressed plants. Several proteins were found to be expressed many folds different in heat stressed plants compared to the control. These proteins included heat shock proteins, histone proteins, oxygen evolving complex, and photosynthetic proteins, which, we believe, played key roles in imparting thermotolerance in Hymenaea tree. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of extensive molecular physiological study of Hymenaea trees under heat stress. This work will open avenues of further research on effects of heat stress in Hymenaea and the findings can be applied to understand how global warming can affect physiology of other plants. PMID:25482765

  19. Solar heated fluidized bed gasification system

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; Qader, S.A.

    1981-09-22

    This solar-heated gasification system avoids the problems inherent in other solar processes (such as blackened solar-input windows and overheated zones on the reactor walls) by heating the fluidizing gas and steam in a solar-heat absorption zone before they enter the reactor. Energy to heat the gas and steam concentrates in high-heat-capacity refractory honeycomb that surrounds the fluidized-bed reactor zone. Solar concentrators focus the solar energy on the honeycomb through a solar window. The reaction zone is also heated directly and uniformly by thermal contact of the ceramic honeycomb with the walls of the reactor. The reactor handles such solids as coal and biomass.

  20. Lowering heat losses in heating systems by using effective forms of heat insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikov, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    The reduction of heat losses in power systems is necessary if fuel economy is to be achieved. The use of thermal insulation to reduce heat losses in power plant equipment is discussed. The types of thermal insulation considered in this study include reinforced foam concrete, bituminous perlite, mineral wool, and cellular plastics. The insulating properties of each of these materials are discussed.

  1. Heat Stress and Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation of Chicken Macrophage-Like Cell Line Activates Expression of Distinct Sets of Genes.

    PubMed

    Slawinska, Anna; Hsieh, John C; Schmidt, Carl J; Lamont, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat stress requires immediate adjustment of the stressed individual to sudden changes of ambient temperatures. Chickens are particularly sensitive to heat stress due to development of insufficient physiological mechanisms to mitigate its effects. One of the symptoms of heat stress is endotoxemia that results from release of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the guts. Heat-related cytotoxicity is mitigated by the innate immune system, which is comprised mostly of phagocytic cells such as monocytes and macrophages. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular responses of the chicken macrophage-like HD11 cell line to combined heat stress and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro. The cells were heat-stressed and then allowed a temperature-recovery period, during which the gene expression was investigated. LPS was added to the cells to mimic the heat-stress-related endotoxemia. Semi high-throughput gene expression analysis was used to study a gene panel comprised of heat shock proteins, stress-related genes, signaling molecules and immune response genes. HD11 cell line responded to heat stress with increased mRNA abundance of the HSP25, HSPA2 and HSPH1 chaperones as well as DNAJA4 and DNAJB6 co-chaperones. The anti-apoptotic gene BAG3 was also highly up-regulated, providing evidence that the cells expressed pro-survival processes. The immune response of the HD11 cell line to LPS in the heat stress environment (up-regulation of CCL4, CCL5, IL1B, IL8 and iNOS) was higher than in thermoneutral conditions. However, the peak in the transcriptional regulation of the immune genes was after two hours of temperature-recovery. Therefore, we propose the potential influence of the extracellular heat shock proteins not only in mitigating effects of abiotic stress but also in triggering the higher level of the immune responses. Finally, use of correlation networks for the data analysis aided in discovering subtle differences in the gene expression (i.e. the role

  2. Implementation and comparison of a suite of heat stress metrics within the Community Land Model version 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Oleson, K.; Huber, M.

    2014-08-01

    We implement and analyze 13 different metrics (4 moist thermodynamic quantities and 9 heat stress metrics) in the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), the land surface component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We call these routines the HumanIndexMod. These heat stress metrics embody three philosophical approaches: comfort, physiology, and empirically based algorithms. The metrics are directly connected to CLM4.5 BareGroundFuxesMod, CanopyFluxesMod, SlakeFluxesMod, and UrbanMod modules in order to differentiate between the distinct regimes even within one gridcell. This allows CLM4.5 to calculate the instantaneous heat stress at every model time step, for every land surface type, capturing all aspects of non-linearity in moisture-temperature covariance. Secondary modules for initialization and archiving are modified to generate the metrics as standard output. All of the metrics implemented depend on the covariance of near surface atmospheric variables: temperature, pressure, and humidity. Accurate wet bulb temperatures are critical for quantifying heat stress (used by 5 of the 9 heat stress metrics). Unfortunately, moist thermodynamic calculations for calculating accurate wet bulb temperatures are not in CLM4.5. To remedy this, we incorporated comprehensive water vapor calculations into CLM4.5. The three advantages of adding these metrics to CLM4.5 are (1) improved thermodynamic calculations within climate models, (2) quantifying human heat stress, and (3) that these metrics may be applied to other animals as well as industrial applications. Additionally, an offline version of the HumanIndexMod is available for applications with weather and climate datasets. Examples of such applications are the high temporal resolution CMIP5 archived data, weather and research forecasting models, CLM4.5 flux tower simulations (or other land surface model validation studies), and local weather station data analysis. To demonstrate the capabilities of the HumanIndexMod, we

  3. Heat Stress and Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation of Chicken Macrophage-Like Cell Line Activates Expression of Distinct Sets of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Slawinska, Anna; Hsieh, John C.; Schmidt, Carl J.; Lamont, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat stress requires immediate adjustment of the stressed individual to sudden changes of ambient temperatures. Chickens are particularly sensitive to heat stress due to development of insufficient physiological mechanisms to mitigate its effects. One of the symptoms of heat stress is endotoxemia that results from release of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the guts. Heat-related cytotoxicity is mitigated by the innate immune system, which is comprised mostly of phagocytic cells such as monocytes and macrophages. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular responses of the chicken macrophage-like HD11 cell line to combined heat stress and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro. The cells were heat-stressed and then allowed a temperature-recovery period, during which the gene expression was investigated. LPS was added to the cells to mimic the heat-stress-related endotoxemia. Semi high-throughput gene expression analysis was used to study a gene panel comprised of heat shock proteins, stress-related genes, signaling molecules and immune response genes. HD11 cell line responded to heat stress with increased mRNA abundance of the HSP25, HSPA2 and HSPH1 chaperones as well as DNAJA4 and DNAJB6 co-chaperones. The anti-apoptotic gene BAG3 was also highly up-regulated, providing evidence that the cells expressed pro-survival processes. The immune response of the HD11 cell line to LPS in the heat stress environment (up-regulation of CCL4, CCL5, IL1B, IL8 and iNOS) was higher than in thermoneutral conditions. However, the peak in the transcriptional regulation of the immune genes was after two hours of temperature-recovery. Therefore, we propose the potential influence of the extracellular heat shock proteins not only in mitigating effects of abiotic stress but also in triggering the higher level of the immune responses. Finally, use of correlation networks for the data analysis aided in discovering subtle differences in the gene expression (i.e. the role

  4. The combined effect of salt stress and heat shock on proteome profiling in Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Chunyan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2011-10-15

    Under natural conditions or in the field, plants are often subjected to a combination of different stresses such as salt stress and heat shock. Although salt stress and heat shock have been extensively studied, little is known about how their combination affects plants. We used proteomics, coupled with physiological measurements, to investigate the effect of salt stress, heat shock, and their combination on Suaeda salsa plants. A combination of salt stress and heat shock resulted in suppression of CO(2) assimilation and the photosystem II efficiency. Approximately 440 protein spots changed their expression levels upon salt stress, heat shock and their combination, and 57 proteins were identified by MS. These proteins were classified into several categories including disease/defense, photosynthesis, energy production, material transport, and signal transduction. Some proteins induced during salt stress, e.g. choline monooxygenase, chloroplastic ATP synthase subunit beta, and V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A, and some proteins induced during heat shock, e.g. heat shock 70kDa protein, probable ion channel DMI1, and two component sensor histidine kinase, were either unchanged or suppressed during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. In contrast, the expression of some proteins, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1, chlorophyll a/b binding protein, and ABC transporter I family member 1, was specifically induced during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. The potential roles of the stress-responsive proteins are discussed.

  5. Stirling heat pump external heat systems - An appliance perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, Andrew D.; Thomas, John F.

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600 C to 700 C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO(x) emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO(x) emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  6. Involvement of the Leishmania donovani virulence factor A2 in protection against heat and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Matlashewski, Greg

    2012-10-01

    Leishmania is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Host defences against Leishmania include fever and oxidant production, and the parasite has developed a number of defence mechanisms to neutralize the host response. The Leishmania donovani A2 family of proteins has been shown to be essential for survival in mammalian visceral organs. Here we provide evidence that A2 proteins protect the parasite against host defences, namely heat stress (fever) and oxidative stress. A2 is however unable to protect the cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by dithiothreitol. To downregulate A2 protein expression, L. donovani was transfected with an A2 antisense RNA expressing-vector, resulting in significant reduction of A2 levels. The resulting A2-deficient cells were more sensitive to heat shock and this was associated with increased production of internal oxidants during heat shock. Moreover, axenic amastigotes with downregulated A2 expression had increased internal oxidants and decreased viability following treatment with hydrogen peroxide or a nitric oxide donor when compared to control cells. Overall, these results suggest that A2 protects L. donovani from a variety of stresses, thereby allowing it to survive in the internal organs of the mammalian host and to cause visceral disease.

  7. Prediction of residual stress and distortion from residual stress in heat treated and machined aluminum parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    Parts machined from relatively large thickness cross sections can experience significant deformations from high residual stresses that develop in the part during the heat treatment used to form the aluminum alloy. Uphill quenching is a process that can create a part with low residual stress and stable dimensions when the process is controlled properly. The uphill quenching process involves a solution heat treat, quench, cool to liquid nitrogen, steam blast, and then age to final temper. In this thesis two parts were modeled using ANSYS. The first part underwent the uphill quench process in the rough machined state. The second part was modeled in the stock material shape and only underwent a solution heat treat, quench, and age to final temper. After the residual stress in the second part was predicted the excess material was removed by killing the associated elements and the deformation of the final machined part was predicted. For both parts analyzed measurements were made and compared against predictions with fairly good results.

  8. Influence of temperature stress on in vitro fertilization and heat shock protein synthesis in maize (Zea mays L. ) reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, I.; Dumas, C. )

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40{degree}C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36{degree}C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4{degree}C) or heat stress (40{degree}C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen.

  9. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  10. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  11. Fed-batch cultivation of bakers' yeast: effect of nutrient depletion and heat stress on cell composition.

    PubMed

    Ertugay, N; Hamamci, H; Bayindirli, A

    1997-01-01

    The physiology of a commercial strain of bakers' yeast was studied in terms of the cell composition under different growth conditions and of its response to stress. The study comprised fed-batch experiments since this is the system used in bakers' yeast industry. The classical fed-batch fermentation procedure was modified in that the yeast cells were continuously grown to a steady-state at a dilution rate of 0.1/h in order to achieve more or less the same initial starting point in terms of cell composition. This steady-state culture was then switched to fed-batch concomitantly with exposure to stress. The highest amount of trehalose accumulation was achieved when nutrient depletion and heat stress were applied concomitantly. The highest amount of trehalose, 12%, was attained in cells stressed by both nitrogen depletion and heat stress. The protein content remained constant, although with some oscillations, at a value of 30% throughout this dual stress experiment.

  12. Comparison of heat dissipation response between Malaysian and Japanese males during exercise in humid heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Lee, Joo-Young; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the differences in heat dissipation response to intense heat stress during exercise in hot and humid environments between tropical and temperate indigenes with matched physical characteristics. Ten Japanese (JP) and ten Malaysian (MY) males participated in this study. Subjects performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake in 32°C air with 70% relative humidity, followed by 30 min recovery. The increase in rectal temperature (T(re)) was smaller in MY during exercise compared to JP. The local sweat rate and total body mass loss were similar in both groups. Both skin blood flow and mean skin temperature was lower in MY compared to JP. A significantly greater increase in hand skin temperature was observed in MY during exercise, which is attributable to heat loss due to the greater surface area to mass ratio and large number of arteriovenous anastomoses. Also, the smaller increase in T(re) in MY may be explained by the presence of a significantly greater core-skin temperature gradient in MY than JP. The thermal gradient is also a major factor in increasing the convective heat transfer from core to skin as well as skin blood flow. It is concluded that the greater core-skin temperature gradient observed in MY is responsible for the smaller increase in T(re).

  13. Comparison of heat dissipation response between Malaysian and Japanese males during exercise in humid heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Lee, Joo-Young; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the differences in heat dissipation response to intense heat stress during exercise in hot and humid environments between tropical and temperate indigenes with matched physical characteristics. Ten Japanese (JP) and ten Malaysian (MY) males participated in this study. Subjects performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake in 32°C air with 70% relative humidity, followed by 30 min recovery. The increase in rectal temperature ( T re) was smaller in MY during exercise compared to JP. The local sweat rate and total body mass loss were similar in both groups. Both skin blood flow and mean skin temperature was lower in MY compared to JP. A significantly greater increase in hand skin temperature was observed in MY during exercise, which is attributable to heat loss due to the greater surface area to mass ratio and large number of arteriovenous anastomoses. Also, the smaller increase in T re in MY may be explained by the presence of a significantly greater core-skin temperature gradient in MY than JP. The thermal gradient is also a major factor in increasing the convective heat transfer from core to skin as well as skin blood flow. It is concluded that the greater core-skin temperature gradient observed in MY is responsible for the smaller increase in T re.

  14. Space shuttle heat pipe thermal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1973-01-01

    Heat pipe (HP) thermal control systems designed for possible space shuttle applications were built and tested under this program. They are: (1) a HP augmented cold rail, (2) a HP/phase change material (PCM) modular heat sink and (3) a HP radiating panel for compartment temperature control. The HP augmented cold rail is similar to a standard two-passage fluid cold rail except that it contains an integral, centrally located HP throughout its length. The central HP core helps to increase the local power density capability by spreading concentrated heat inputs over the entire rail. The HP/PCM modular heat sink system consists of a diode HP connected in series to a standard HP that has a PCM canister attached to its mid-section. It is designed to connect a heat source to a structural heat sink during normal operation, and to automatically decouple from it and sink to the PCM whenever structural temperatures are too high. The HP radiating panel is designed to conductively couple the panel feeder HPs directly to a fluid line that serves as a source of waste heat. It is a simple strap-on type of system that requires no internal or external line modifications to distribute the heat to a large radiating area.

  15. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Nguyen, Scott Vinh

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. Results We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. Conclusion The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Tian; Wang, Jun-Fang; Cramer, Grant; Dai, Zhan-Wu; Duan, Wei; Xu, Hong-Guo; Wu, Ben-Hong; Fan, Pei-Ge; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Shao-Hua

    2012-09-28

    Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated HSPs, especially small HSPs

  18. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  19. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis heat shock proteins and transcription factors reveals extensive overlap between heat and non-heat stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R; Huebner, Marianne; Weber, Andreas P

    2007-01-01

    Background The heat shock response of Arabidopsis thaliana is dependent upon a complex regulatory network involving twenty-one known transcription factors and four heat shock protein families. It is known that heat shock proteins (Hsps) and transcription factors (Hsfs) are involved in cellular response to various forms of stress besides heat. However, the role of Hsps and Hsfs under cold and non-thermal stress conditions is not well understood, and it is unclear which types of stress interact least and most strongly with Hsp and Hsf response pathways. To address this issue, we have analyzed transcriptional response profiles of Arabidopsis Hsfs and Hsps to a range of abiotic and biotic stress treatments (heat, cold, osmotic stress, salt, drought, genotoxic stress, ultraviolet light, oxidative stress, wounding, and pathogen infection) in both above and below-ground plant tissues. Results All stress treatments interact with Hsf and Hsp response pathways to varying extents, suggesting considerable cross-talk between heat and non-heat stress regulatory networks. In general, Hsf and Hsp expression was strongly induced by heat, cold, salt, and osmotic stress, while other types of stress exhibited family or tissue-specific response patterns. With respect to the Hsp20 protein family, for instance, large expression responses occurred under all types of stress, with striking similarity among expression response profiles. Several genes belonging to the Hsp20, Hsp70 and Hsp100 families were specifically upregulated twelve hours after wounding in root tissue, and exhibited a parallel expression response pattern during recovery from heat stress. Among all Hsf and Hsp families, large expression responses occurred under ultraviolet-B light stress in aerial tissue (shoots) but not subterranean tissue (roots). Conclusion Our findings show that Hsf and Hsp family member genes represent an interaction point between multiple stress response pathways, and therefore warrant functional

  1. Stress and Heat Transfer Analyses for Different Channel Arrangements of PCHE

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Robert G. Shrake; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh

    2008-11-01

    Stress and heat transfer analyses are being performed on the different channel arrangements of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) proposed for application of VHTRs using ABAQUS [ABAQUS, 2007] and COMSOL [COMSOL, 2007], respectively. The work is being done to determine the configuration that would result in minimum stress for the same heat performance. This paper discusses the effects of shifting the coolant channels in every other row to reduce stress.

  2. Metabolic adaptations to heat stress in growing cattle.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M D; Rhoads, R P; Sanders, S R; Duff, G C; Baumgard, L H

    2010-02-01

    To differentiate between the effects of heat stress (HS) and decreased dry matter intake (DMI) on physiological and metabolic variables in growing beef cattle, we conducted an experiment in which a thermoneutral (TN) control group (n=6) was pair fed (PF) to match nutrient intake with heat-stressed Holstein bull calves (n=6). Bulls (4 to 5 mo old, 135 kg body weight [BW]) housed in climate-controlled chambers were subjected to 2 experimental periods (P): (1) TN (18 degrees C to 20 degrees C) and ad libitum intake for 9 d, and (2) HS (cyclical daily temperatures ranging from 29.4 degrees C to 40.0 degrees C) and ad libitum intake or PF (in TN conditions) for 9 d. During each period, blood was collected daily and all calves were subjected to an intravenous insulin tolerance test (ITT) on day 7 and a glucose tolerance test (GTT) on day 8. Heat stress reduced (12%) DMI and by design, PF calves had similar nutrient intake reductions. During P1, BW gain was similar between environments and averaged 1.25 kg/d, and both HS and PF reduced (P<0.01) average daily gain (-0.09 kg/d) during P2. Compared to PF, HS decreased (P<0.05) basal circulating glucose concentrations (7%) and tended (P<0.07) to increase (30%) plasma insulin concentrations, but neither HS nor PF altered plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. Although there were no treatment differences in P2, both HS and PF increased (P<0.05) plasma urea nitrogen concentrations (75%) compared with P1. In contrast to P1, both HS and PF had increased (16%) glucose disposal, but compared with PF, HS calves had a greater (67%; P<0.05) insulin response to the GTT. Neither period nor environment acutely affected insulin action, but during P2, calves in both environments tended (P=0.11) to have a blunted overall glucose response to the ITT. Independent of reduced nutrient intake, HS alters post-absorptive carbohydrate (basal and stimulated) metabolism, characterized primarily by increased basal insulin concentrations and

  3. SIMS prototype system 1: Design data brochure. [solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A prototype solar heating and hot water system using air as the collector fluid and a pebble bed for heat storage was designed for installation into a single family dwelling. The system, subsystem, and installation requirements are described. System operation and performance are discussed, and procedures for sizing the system to a specific site are presented.

  4. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress made in the development of a solar hot water and space heating system is described in four quarterly reports. The program schedules, technical status and other program activities from 6 October 1976 through 30 September 1977 are provided.

  5. Modular solar-heating system - design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinton, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    Compilation contains design, performance, and hardware specifications in sufficient detail to fabricate or procure materials and install, operate, and maintain complete modular solar heating and hot water system for single family size dwellings.

  6. Heat stress-induced hepatotoxicity and its prevention by resveratrol in rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Asima

    2011-06-01

    The high ambient temperature beyond the range of comfort zone or thermoneutral zone causes environmental heat stress (HST). It causes serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases and even death. The underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of hepatic dysfunction following hyperthermic challenge and the possible involvement of oxidative stress to induce oxidative deterioration of liver functions in adult rats are investigated in this study. Cellular damage was assessed in terms of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and histology of liver. The effect of hyperthermia in altering the oxidative stress was evaluated on the basis of its influence on hepatic lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The current study demonstrated that HST is associated with a complex set of integrated alterations in liver, time-dependent rise in oxidative stress followed by distinct pattern of liver injury in animals. Heat-induced hepatotoxicity was assessed by increased lipid peroxidation, depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities such as SOD, CAT, GPx and tissue damages revealed by hepatic vacuolization, and widespread necrosis. The study also revealed that pretreatment with resveratrol resulted in normalizing these parameters appreciably, emphasizing the therapeutic potentials of this polyphenol. Taken together, the results suggest that an increase in free radical formation relative to loss of the antioxidant defense system during heat stress may render liver more susceptible to oxidative damage, leading to their functional inactivation. However, resveratrol supplementation can be an effective antidote in the treatment of HST-induced malfunction.

  7. Hsp70-Hsp40 Chaperone Complex Functions in Controlling Polarized Growth by Repressing Hsf1-Driven Heat Stress-Associated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianhua; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    How the molecular mechanisms of stress response are integrated at the cellular level remains obscure. Here we show that the cellular polarity machinery in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes dynamic adaptation to thermal stress resulting in a period of decreased Cdc42 activity and altered, monopolar growth. Cells where the heat stress-associated transcription was genetically upregulated exhibit similar growth patterning in the absence of temperature insults. We identify the Ssa2-Mas5/Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex as repressor of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Cells lacking this chaperone activity constitutively activate the heat-stress-associated transcriptional program. Interestingly, they also exhibit intermittent monopolar growth within a physiological temperature range and are unable to adapt to heat stress. We propose that by negatively regulating the heat stress-associated transcription, the Ssa2-Mas5 chaperone system could optimize cellular growth under different temperature regiments. PMID:24146635

  8. A solar heating system with annual storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, F.; Raffellini, G.

    1981-07-01

    A solar heated house with long term storage capability, built in Trento, Italy, is described. The one story house was built from modular components and has a total heated volume of 1130 cu m. Flat plate solar collectors with a water-antifreeze medium are located beneath the lawn, and six cylindrical underground tanks holding 130 cu m of water heated by thermal energy from the collectors are situated under the garden. The house walls have an 8 cm cavity filled with 5 cm of formaldehyde foam, yielding a heat transmission (U) of 0.37 W/sq m/deg C. The roof and ceilings are insulated with fiberglass and concrete, producing U-values of 0.46 W/sq m/deg C and 0.57 W/sq m/deg C, respectively. Heat pumps using 6 kW move thermal energy between the house and the tanks. Direct hot water heating occurs in the summer, and direct home heating when the stored water temperature exceeds 32 C. A computer model was developed which traces the annual heat flow and it is shown that the system supplies all heating requirements for the house, with electrical requirements equal to 20 percent of the annual house needs.

  9. Aspirin upregulates αB-Crystallin to protect the myocardium against heat stress in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shu; Yin, Bin; Song, Erbao; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhang, Xiaohui; Bao, Endong; Hartung, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    We established in vivo and in vitro models to investigate the role of αB-Crystallin (CryAB) and assess the ability of aspirin (ASA) to protect the myocardium during prolonged heat stress. Thirty-day-old chickens were divided into three groups (n = 90): heat stress (HS, 40±1 °C); ASA(−)HS(+), 1 mg/kg ASA orally 2 h before heat stress; and ASA(+)HS(−), pretreated with aspirin, no heat stress (25 °C). Hearts were excised after 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 24 h. Heat stress increased body temperature, though the ASA(−)HS(+) group had significantly higher temperatures than the ASA(+)HS(+) group at all time points. Compared to ASA(+)HS(+), the ASA(−)HS(+) group displayed increased sensitivity to heat stress. Pathological analysis revealed the ASA (+)HS(+) myocardium showed less severe changes (narrowed, chaotic fibers; fewer necrotic cells) than the ASA(−)HS(+) group (bleeding and extensive cell death). In vitro, ASA-pretreatment significantly increased primary chicken myocardial cell survival during heat stress. ELISAs indicated ASA induced CryAB in vivo to protect against heat stress-induced myocardial damage, but ASA did not induce CryAB in primary chicken myocardial cells. The mechanisms by which ASA induces the expression of CryAB in vivo and protects the myocardium during heat stress merit further research. PMID:27857180

  10. Regulation of Non-coding RNAs in Heat Stress Responses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; He, Qingsong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Li; Jin, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor limiting plant growth, development, and productivity; thus, plants have evolved special adaptive mechanisms to cope with high-temperature stress. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that play an important role in many biological processes. Recently developed advanced technologies, such as genome-wide transcriptomic analysis, have revealed that abundant ncRNAs are expressed under heat stress. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, an increasing number of several classes of regulatory ncRNA (i.e., miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA) related to heat stress responses have been reported. In this mini-review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of ncRNAs in heat stress responses in plants, especially miRNAs, siRNAs, and their targets. For example, the miR398-CSD/CCS-HSF, miR396-WRKY6, miR159-GAMYB, and TAS1-HTT-HSF pathways regulate plant heat tolerance. We highlight the hormone/development-related miRNAs involved in heat stress, and discuss the regulatory networks of miRNA-targets. We also note that DNA methylation and alternative splicing could affect miRNA expression under heat stress, and some lncRNAs could respond to heat stress. Finally, we briefly discuss future prospects concerning the ncRNA-related mechanisms of heat stress responses in plants. PMID:27588021

  11. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEAT AND COLD STRESS ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO ORGANOPHOSPHATES AND OTHER TOXICANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicological and pharmacological studies are performed in laboratory rodents maintained under comfortable environmental conditions. However, exposure to toxicants as well as some drugs can occur under stressful conditions during rest or while exercising. Heat stress can exa...

  12. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEAT AND COLD STRESS ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO ORGANOPHOSPHATES AND OTHER TOXICANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicological and pharmacological studies are performed in laboratory rodents maintained under comfortable environmental conditions. However, exposure to toxicants as well as some drugs can occur under stressful conditions during rest or while exercising. Heat stress can exa...

  13. Technology profile: Residential greywater heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Proskiw, G.

    1998-12-31

    This report profiles residential greywater heat recovery (GWHR) systems, beginning with a background review of residential hot water consumption patterns, usage characteristics, and the technology currently used for residential water heating systems. This is followed by a generic description of the various types of residential GWHR systems and the benefits they produce, a summary of the technical obstacles which GWHR technology faces and the barriers to widespread GWHR commercialization, and a description of commercially available GWHR systems. The types of applications for which the technology is best suited are discussed, and the potential markets for GWHR systems are assessed. An action plan concludes the report, suggesting how those markets might be successfully developed.

  14. Enhanced economic connectivity to foster heat stress-related losses.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Leonie; Levermann, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Assessing global impacts of unexpected meteorological events in an increasingly connected world economy is important for estimating the costs of climate change. We show that since the beginning of the 21st century, the structural evolution of the global supply network has been such as to foster an increase of climate-related production losses. We compute first- and higher-order losses from heat stress-induced reductions in productivity under changing economic and climatic conditions between 1991 and 2011. Since 2001, the economic connectivity has augmented in such a way as to facilitate the cascading of production loss. The influence of this structural change has dominated over the effect of the comparably weak climate warming during this decade. Thus, particularly under future warming, the intensification of international trade has the potential to amplify climate losses if no adaptation measures are taken.

  15. 21st Century Heat Stress Projections and their Effects on US Livestock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, E.; Buzan, J. R.; Krishnan, S.; Huber, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we aim to determine future yield changes in the United States for livestock caused by heat stress, under the high greenhouse gas emissions scenario, representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). We use CMIP5 output and the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM LENS), produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We apply the HumanIndexMod, a diagnostic heat stress package, to calculate Temperature Humidity Index for Comfort (THIC) and wet bulb temperature (Buzan et al., 2015). THIC is used to assess an animal's behavioral changes as it is subjected to discomfort. Using output from our simulations with the HumanIndexMod, we utilized the agricultural livestock model of St. Pierre et al. (2003). THIC and wet bulb temperatures are all projected by climate models to increase by the end of the century. We found that increases in THIC and heat stress are caused by both temperature and humidity increases. We show the differences for dry matter intake loss and milk loss for the Dairy Cow Model as well as other yield related variables. These variables are estimated to decrease overall production for dairy cattle, finishing hogs, poultry and various livestock. By the end of the 21st century (2071-2100), dairy cow milk production decreases by 14%, and food intake decreases by 11% compared to the beginning of the century (2005-2034). 35% less weight is gained and 19% less food is consumed by hogs the end of the century compared to the beginning of the century. We estimate and discuss resulting yield losses for the livestock industries and the implications of these losses in the United States. These results indicate that the effect of heat stress on livestock production will be highest for dairy cows, finishing hogs, and poultry.References:Buzan, J.R., K. Oleson, and M. Huber. 2015. Implementation and comparison of a suite of heat stress metrics within the Community Land Model version 4.5. Geoscien. Model Devel. 8(2): 151-170. St

  16. Heat stress dictates microbial lipid composition in hydrothermal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollich, M.; Yoshinaga, M. Y.; Häusler, S.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Bühring, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    Abundant and diverse microbial communities inhabit hydrothermal marine sediments. Since ion permeability of membranes increases with temperature archaea and bacteria that use proton/sodium as coupling ions for bioenergetics must constantly adjust their cytoplasmic membrane permeability, which in turn is mostly controlled by the lipid composition. Here, we investigated a thermal gradient across a marine sediment field (ranging from 18 to over 100°C) and tested the concept that membrane lipids provide a major biochemical basis for cellular bioenergetics of archaea and bacteria under stressful conditions. Reflecting the lower ion permeability of the ether-linked isoprenoidal lipids, we found that archaea dominate over bacteria in sediments of >50 °C. Moreover, a detailed examination of the molecular lipid species revealed a quandary: low membrane permeability concomitantly with increased fluidity is required for energy conservation of both archaea and bacteria under heat stress. For instance, bacterial fatty acids were found to increase chain length in concert with a higher degree of unsaturation at elevated sediment temperatures while archaeal tetraethers were observed to show a higher degree of bulking (e.g. methylation and H-shaped) and fluidity (i.e. cyclization) under elevated temperatures. In addition, our data indicate that strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding at the headgroup level of archaeal glycolipids and bacterial sphingolipids may provide ideal membrane stability to attain the required balance between low permeability and a more fluidized configuration. For example, sphingolipids may stabilize bacterial phospholipids into lipid domains, enabling bacteria to thrive in heated sediments under unfavorable thermodynamic conditions. The scientific marriage of lipidomics and bioenergetics described here provides a new dimension for understanding microbial life in natural environments.

  17. Climate Change Impact on Evapotranspiration, Heat Stress and Chill Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Marras, S.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide concentration scenarios project an increase in CO2 from 372 ppm to between 500 and 950 ppm by the year 2100, and the potential effect on temperature, humidity, and plant responses to environmental factors are complex and concerning. For 2100, mean daily temperature increase projections range from 1.2oC to 6.8oC depending on greenhouse gas emissions. On the bad side, higher temperatures are often associated with increases in evapotranspiration (ET), heat stress, and pest infestations. On the good side, increased temperature is commonly related to less frost damage, faster growth, and higher production in some cases. One misconception is that global warming will increase evapotranspiration and, hence, agricultural water demand. As the oceans and other water bodies warm, evaporation and humidity are likely to increase globally, but higher humidity tends to reduce plant transpiration and hence ET. Higher CO2 concentrations also tend to reduce ET, and, in the end, the increase in ET due to higher temperature is likely to be offset by a decrease in ET due to higher humidity and CO2. With a decrease in daytime evapotranspiration, the canopy temperature is likely to rise relative to the air temperature, and this implies that heat stress could be worse than predicted by increased air temperature. Daily minimum temperatures are generally increasing about twice as fast as maximum temperatures presumably because of the increasing dew point temperatures as more water vapor is added to the atmosphere. This could present a serious problem to meet the chill requirement for fruit and nut crops. Growing seasons, i.e., from the last spring to the first fall frost, are likely to increase, but the crop growth period is likely to shorten due to higher temperature. Thus, spring frost damage is unlikely to change but there should be fewer damaging fall frost events. In this paper, we will present some ideas on the possible impact of climate change on evapotranspiration and

  18. Overview of waste heat utilization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy truck diesel engine rejects a significant fraction of its fuel energy in the form of waste heat. Historically, the Department of Energy has supported technology efforts for utilization of the diesel exhaust heat. Specifically, the Turbocompound and the Organic Rankine Cycle System (ORCS) have demonstrated that meaningful improvements in highway fuel economy can be realized through waste heat utilization. For heat recovery from the high temperature exhaust of future adiabatic diesel engines, the DOE/NASA are investigating a variety of alternatives based on the Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling power cycles. Initial screening results indicate that systems of this type offer a fuel savings advantage over the turbocompound system. Capital and maintenance cost projections, however, indicate that the alternative power cycles are not competitive on an economic payback basis. Plans call for continued analysis in an attempt to identify a cost effective configuration with adequate fuel savings potential.

  19. Heat pump system for residential use

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsell, R.C.; Noe, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    An air conditioning system of the air cycle heat pump type is disclosed for selectively heating and cooling a residence or similar space environment. In one embodiment, a combustor and associated Brayton cycle turbine provide the primary drive to a compessor constituting the heat pump. In a second embodiment, the Brayton turbine is replaced by an electric motor coupled to drive the compressor shaft. An auxiliary turbine is also coupled to the drive shaft to provide auxiliary drive derived from the operation of a portion of the system at sub-atmospheric pressure. In this portion, during the cooling mode, water is evaporated into the system to further assist in cooling by removing the latent heat of vaporization.

  20. Heat pump systems for residential use

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsell, R.C.; Noe, J.C.

    1984-04-24

    An air conditioning system of the air cycle heat pump type for selectively heating and cooling a residence or similar space environment. In one embodiment, a combustor and associated Brayton cycle turbine provide the primary drive to a compressor constituting the heat pump. In a second embodiment, the Brayton turbine is replaced by an electric motor coupled to drive the compressor shaft. An auxiliary turbine is also coupled to the drive shaft to provide auxiliary drive derived from the operation of a portion of the system at sub-atmospheric pressure. In this portion, during the cooling mode, water is evaporated into the system to further assist in cooling by removing the latent heat of vaporization.

  1. Optimal control studies of solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, C B

    1980-01-01

    In the past few years fuel prices have seen steady increases. Also, the supply of fuel has been on the decline. Because of these two problems there has been an increase in the number of solar heated buildings. Since conventional fuel prices are increasing and as a solar heating system represents a high capital cost it is desirable to obtain the maximum performance from a solar heating system. The control scheme that is used in a solar heated building has an effect on the performance of the solar system. The best control scheme possible would, of course, be desired. This report deals with the control problems of a solar heated building. The first of these problems is to control the inside temperature of the building and to minimize the fuel consumption. This problem applies to both solar and conventionally heated buildings. The second problem considered is to control the collector fluid flow to maximize the difference between the useful energy collected and the energy required to pump the fluid. The third problem is to control the enclosure temperature of a building which has two sources of heat, one solar and the other conventional.

  2. Cardiovascular disease-induced thermal responses during passive heat stress: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiancheng; Noda, Shigeho; Himeno, Ryutaro; Liu, Hao

    2016-11-01

    The cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in human thermoregulation; cardiovascular diseases may lead to significantly degrading the thermoregulation ability for patients during exposure to heat stress. To evaluate the thermal responses of patients with common chronic cardiovascular diseases, we here propose an integrated computational model by coupling a two-node thermoregulation model with a closed-loop, multi-compartment, lumped-parameter cardiovascular model. This bioheat transfer model is validated, capable to predict cardiovascular functions and thermal responses under varying environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate that the cardiovascular disease-induced reduction in cardiac output and skin blood flow causes extra elevation in core temperature during hyperthermic challenges. In addition, a combination of aging, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases shows a pronounced increase in core temperature during heat exposure, which implies that such combined effect may increase the risk of heat-related morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Age, splanchnic vasoconstriction, and heat stress during tilting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    During upright tilting, blood is translocated to the dependent veins of the legs and compensatory circulatory adjustments are necessary to maintain arterial pressure. For examination of the effect of age on these responses, seven young (23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (70 +/- 3 yr) men were head-up tilted to 60 degrees in a thermoneutral condition and during passive heating with water-perfused suits. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Qc; acetylene rebreathing technique), central venous pressure (CVP), blood pressures, forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic and renal blood flows (indocyanine green and p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. In response to tilting in the thermoneutral condition, CVP and stroke volume decreased to a greater extent in the young men, but HR increased more, such that the fall in Qc was similar between the two groups in the upright posture. The rise in splanchnic vascular resistance (SVR) was greater in the older men, but the young men increased forearm vascular resistance (FVR) to a greater extent than the older men. The fall in Qc during combined heat stress and tilting was greater in the young compared with older men. Only four of the young men versus six of the older men were able to finish the second tilt without becoming presyncopal. In summary, the older men relied on a greater increase in SVR to compensate for a reduced ability to constrict the skin and muscle circulations (as determined by changes in FVR) during head-up tilting.

  4. Age, splanchnic vasoconstriction, and heat stress during tilting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    During upright tilting, blood is translocated to the dependent veins of the legs and compensatory circulatory adjustments are necessary to maintain arterial pressure. For examination of the effect of age on these responses, seven young (23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (70 +/- 3 yr) men were head-up tilted to 60 degrees in a thermoneutral condition and during passive heating with water-perfused suits. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Qc; acetylene rebreathing technique), central venous pressure (CVP), blood pressures, forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic and renal blood flows (indocyanine green and p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. In response to tilting in the thermoneutral condition, CVP and stroke volume decreased to a greater extent in the young men, but HR increased more, such that the fall in Qc was similar between the two groups in the upright posture. The rise in splanchnic vascular resistance (SVR) was greater in the older men, but the young men increased forearm vascular resistance (FVR) to a greater extent than the older men. The fall in Qc during combined heat stress and tilting was greater in the young compared with older men. Only four of the young men versus six of the older men were able to finish the second tilt without becoming presyncopal. In summary, the older men relied on a greater increase in SVR to compensate for a reduced ability to constrict the skin and muscle circulations (as determined by changes in FVR) during head-up tilting.

  5. Residential solar-heating system - design brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design brochure for commercially-available solar-heating system is valuable to architects, engineers, and designers. It contains information on system configuration, system sizing, and mechanical layout. Drawings and specifications of all components and typical installation details are included in appendix.

  6. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports are given on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacturing, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  7. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  8. Proteomic analysis to unravel the effect of heat stress on gene expression and milk synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Wang, Yiru; Li, Chengmin; Wang, Genlin

    2017-08-14

    Heat stress can play a negative effect on milk yield and composition of dairy cattle, leading to immeasurable economic loss. The basic components of the mammary gland are the alveoli; these alveolar mammary epithelial cells reflect the milk producing ability of dairy cows. In this study, we exposed bovine mammary epithelial cells to heat stress and compared them to a control group using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with a control group, 104 differentially elevated proteins (>1.3-fold) and 167 decreased proteins (<0.77-fold) were identified in the heat treatment group. Gene Ontology analysis identified a majority of the differentially expressed proteins are associated in cell-substrate junction assembly, catabolic processes and metabolic processes. Some of these significantly regulated proteins were related to the synthesis and secretion of milk, such as milk protein and fat. This finding was further supported by the results obtained from the reduced β-casein expression through the system of plasminogen activator - plasminogen - plasmin and decreased fatty acid synthase could partly explain why milk fat synthesis ability of dairy cows decreased under heat stress. Our results highlight the effects of heat stress on synthesis of milk protein and fat, thus providing additional clues for further studies of heat stress on dairy milk production. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  9. Heat shock and prolonged heat stress attenuate neurotoxin and sporulation gene expression in group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Selby, Katja; Mascher, Gerald; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria are exposed to a number of environmental stresses during food processing, storage, and preparation, and in the human body. In order to improve the safety of food, the understanding of molecular stress response mechanisms foodborne pathogens employ is essential. Many response mechanisms that are activated during heat shock may cross-protect bacteria against other environmental stresses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms Clostridium botulinum, the causative agent of botulism, utilizes during acute heat stress and during adaptation to stressfully high temperature, the C. botulinum Group I strain ATCC 3502 was grown in continuous culture at 39°C and exposed to heat shock at 45°C, followed by prolonged heat stress at 45°C to allow adaptation of the culture to the high temperature. Growth in continuous culture was performed to exclude secondary growth phase effects or other environmental impacts on bacterial gene transcription. Changes in global gene expression profiles were studied using DNA microarray hybridization. During acute heat stress, Class I and III heat shock genes as well as members of the SOS regulon were activated. The neurotoxin gene botA and genes encoding the neurotoxin-associated proteins were suppressed throughout the study. Prolonged heat stress led to suppression of the sporulation machinery whereas genes related to chemotaxis and motility were activated. Induced expression of a large proportion of prophage genes was detected, suggesting an important role of acquired genes in the stress resistance of C. botulinum. Finally, changes in the expression of a large number of genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism indicated remodeling of the cellular metabolism.

  10. Heat shock and prolonged heat stress attenuate neurotoxin and sporulation gene expression in group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Katja; Mascher, Gerald; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria are exposed to a number of environmental stresses during food processing, storage, and preparation, and in the human body. In order to improve the safety of food, the understanding of molecular stress response mechanisms foodborne pathogens employ is essential. Many response mechanisms that are activated during heat shock may cross-protect bacteria against other environmental stresses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms Clostridium botulinum, the causative agent of botulism, utilizes during acute heat stress and during adaptation to stressfully high temperature, the C. botulinum Group I strain ATCC 3502 was grown in continuous culture at 39°C and exposed to heat shock at 45°C, followed by prolonged heat stress at 45°C to allow adaptation of the culture to the high temperature. Growth in continuous culture was performed to exclude secondary growth phase effects or other environmental impacts on bacterial gene transcription. Changes in global gene expression profiles were studied using DNA microarray hybridization. During acute heat stress, Class I and III heat shock genes as well as members of the SOS regulon were activated. The neurotoxin gene botA and genes encoding the neurotoxin-associated proteins were suppressed throughout the study. Prolonged heat stress led to suppression of the sporulation machinery whereas genes related to chemotaxis and motility were activated. Induced expression of a large proportion of prophage genes was detected, suggesting an important role of acquired genes in the stress resistance of C. botulinum. Finally, changes in the expression of a large number of genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism indicated remodeling of the cellular metabolism. PMID:28464023

  11. Heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants: key regulators and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Anwar; Li, Zhong-Guang; Hoque, Tahsina Sharmin; Burritt, David J; Fujita, Masayuki; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-08-04

    Plants growing under field conditions are constantly exposed, either simultaneously or sequentially, to more than one abiotic stress factor. Plants have evolved sophisticated sensory systems to perceive a number of stress signals that allow them to activate the most adequate response to grow and survive in a given environment. Recently, cross-stress tolerance (i.e. tolerance to a second, strong stress after a different type of mild primary stress) has gained attention as a potential means of producing stress-resistant crops to aid with global food security. Heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance is very common in plants and often results from the synergistic co-activation of multiple stress signalling pathways, which involve reactive nitrogen species (RNS), reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive carbonyl species (RCS), plant hormones and transcription factors. Recent studies have shown that the signalling functions of ROS, RNS and RCS, most particularly hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide (NO) and methylglyoxal (MG), provide resistance to abiotic stresses and underpin cross-stress tolerance in plants by modulating the expression of genes as well as the post-translational modification of proteins. The current review highlights the key regulators and mechanisms underlying heat or cold priming-induced cross-stress tolerance in plants, with a focus on ROS, MG and NO signalling, as well as on the role of antioxidant and glyoxalase systems, osmolytes, heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and hormones. Our aim is also to provide a comprehensive idea on the topic for researchers using heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance as a mechanism to improve crop yields under multiple abiotic stresses.

  12. Golgi/plastid-type manganese superoxide dismutase involved in heat-stress tolerance during grain filling of rice.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Maiko; Takamatsu, Takeshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Itoh, Kimiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is widely assumed to play a role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species caused by environmental stresses. We found a characteristic expression of manganese SOD 1 (MSD1) in a heat-stress-tolerant cultivar of rice (Oryza sativa). The deduced amino acid sequence contains a signal sequence and an N-glycosylation site. Confocal imaging analysis of rice and onion cells transiently expressing MSD1-YFP showed MSD1-YFP in the Golgi apparatus and plastids, indicating that MSD1 is a unique Golgi/plastid-type SOD. To evaluate the involvement of MSD1 in heat-stress tolerance, we generated transgenic rice plants with either constitutive high expression or suppression of MSD1. The grain quality of rice with constitutive high expression of MSD1 grown at 33/28 °C, 12/12 h, was significantly better than that of the wild type. In contrast, MSD1-knock-down rice was markedly susceptible to heat stress. Quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis indicated that the overexpression of MSD1 up-regulated reactive oxygen scavenging, chaperone and quality control systems in rice grains under heat stress. We propose that the Golgi/plastid MSD1 plays an important role in adaptation to heat stress. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Insect pollination reduces yield loss following heat stress in faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jacob; Jones, Hannah Elizabeth; Lukac, Martin; Potts, Simon Geoffrey

    2016-03-15

    Global food security, particularly crop fertilization and yield production, is threatened by heat waves that are projected to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change. Effects of heat stress on the fertilization of insect-pollinated plants are not well understood, but experiments conducted primarily in self-pollinated crops, such as wheat, show that transfer of fertile pollen may recover yield following stress. We hypothesized that in the partially pollinator-dependent crop, faba bean (Vicia faba L.), insect pollination would elicit similar yield recovery following heat stress. We exposed potted faba bean plants to heat stress for 5 days during floral development and anthesis. Temperature treatments were representative of heat waves projected in the UK for the period 2021-2050 and onwards. Following temperature treatments, plants were distributed in flight cages and either pollinated by domesticated Bombus terrestris colonies or received no insect pollination. Yield loss due to heat stress at 30 °C was greater in plants excluded from pollinators (15%) compared to those with bumblebee pollination (2.5%). Thus, the pollinator dependency of faba bean yield was 16% at control temperatures (18-26 °C) and extreme stress (34 °C), but was 53% following intermediate heat stress at 30 °C. These findings provide the first evidence that the pollinator dependency of crops can be modified by heat stress, and suggest that insect pollination may become more important in crop production as the probability of heat waves increases.

  14. Heat stress proteins and myocardial protection: experimental model or potential clinical tool?

    PubMed

    Gray, C C; Amrani, M; Yacoub, M H

    1999-05-01

    Heat stress proteins (hsp) are induced by a variety of stimuli including elevated temperature, ischaemia, hypoxia, pressure overload and some chemicals. They help to maintain the metabolic and structural integrity of the cell, as a protective response to external stresses. They are known to protect the myocardium from the damaging effects of ischaemia and reperfusion. The heat stress response results in accumulation of heat stress proteins. The beneficial effects associated with their expression include improved endothelial and mechanical recovery of the ischaemic heart. In addition, preservation of high energy phosphates and reduction in infarct size. It has also been shown that critical amounts of hsp70 are necessary to ensure protection of the myocardium. However, questions remain regarding the biochemical mechanisms underlying this protective effect. Alterations in the cell metabolism and chaperone function of cells expressing heat shock proteins, are thought to be responsible. Despite the obvious clinical benefits related to the heat stress response in a clinical setting, the application of this phenomena remains limited. Heat, both quantitatively and qualitatively is one of the best inducers of heat stress proteins. However, the effects of heat stress are nonspecific and intracellular damage is a common occurrence. The search for alternative stimuli, particularly within the fields of pharmacotherapy or genetic manipulation may offer more viable options, if the heat stress response is take its place as an established strategy for myocardial protection.

  15. Nutritional Interventions to Alleviate the Negative Consequences of Heat Stress12

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Suagee, Jessica K.; Sanders, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed. PMID:23674792

  16. Akranes and Borgarfjordur district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnarsson, A.; Hrolfsson, I.

    1998-12-01

    Akranes and Borgarnes are two towns in the western part of Iceland, about 100 km north of Reykjavik. Geothermal investigations for Akranes started as early as around 1950; but in spite of several attempts, a geothermal field, which could be utilized economically, was not found for a long period. After the increase in oil prices in the early 1970s, further studies were carried out. On the basis of the results of those studies, it was decided to build a combined district heating system for Akranes, Borgarnes, Hvanneyri (agricultural school) and some farms in the Borgarfjordur region. The water is piped from the hot spring Deildartunga, which is one of the largest hot springs in the world. Besides that, the system utilizes two wells at the farm Baer. The utilization of the hot spring makes the system different from most other district heating systems in Iceland, which are based on water from wells. Akranes and Borgarfjordur District Heating System was established in 1979. Before that time, space heating in this area was both by oil (93%) and electricity (7%). The system has now been split into three companies: one that is responsible for all the hot water production and transmission, and one district heating system for each of the two communities.

  17. Sm-Like Protein-Mediated RNA Metabolism Is Required for Heat Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masanori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Sm-like proteins play multiple functions in RNA metabolism, which is essential for biological processes such as stress responses in eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana sad1 mutant has a mutation of sm-like protein 5 (LSM5) and shows impaired drought and salt stress tolerances. The lsm5/sad1 mutant also showed hypersensitivity to heat stress. GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 was localized in the nucleus under optimal growth conditions. After heat stress treatment, GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 fluorescence was also observed as small cytoplasmic dots, in addition to nuclear localization. Whole genome transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes in Arabidopsis were drastically changed in response to heat stress. More heat-responsive genes were highly expressed in lsm5/sad1 mutant at both 2 and 6 h after heat stress treatment. Additionally, intron-retained and capped transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant after heat stress treatment. In this study, we also identified non-Arabidopsis Genome Initiative transcripts that were expressed from unannotated regions. Most of these transcripts were antisense transcripts, and many capped non-AGI transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant during heat stress treatment. These results indicated that LSM5/SAD1 functions to degrade aberrant transcripts through appropriate mRNA splicing and decapping, and precise RNA metabolic machinery is required for heat stress tolerance. PMID:27493656

  18. Expression and interaction of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in rice in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhai; Lin, Shoukai; Liu, Qiulin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Wenfeng; Lin, Jun; Wang, Yongfei; Ke, Yuqin; He, Huaqin

    2014-04-01

    The inherent immobility of rice (Oryza sativa L.) limited their abilities to avoid heat stress and required them to contend with heat stress through innate defense abilities in which heat shock proteins played important roles. In this study, Hsp26.7, Hsp23.2, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.4 and Hsp16.9A were up-regulated in Nipponbare during seedling and anthesis stages in response to heat stress. Subsequently, the expressing levels of these five sHsps in the heat-tolerant rice cultivar, Co39, were all significantly higher than that in the heat-susceptible rice cultivar, Azucena. This indicated that the expressive level of these five sHsps was positively related to the ability of rice plants to avoid heat stress. Thus, the expression level of these five sHsps can be regarded as bio-markers for screening rice cultivars with different abilities to avoid heat stress. Hsp18.1, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A, in the three rice cultivars under heat stress were found to be involved in one protein complex by Native-PAGE, and the interactions of Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.7, Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.9A, and Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A were further validated by yeast 2-hybridization. Pull down assay also confirmed the interaction between Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A in rice under heat stress. In conclusion, the up-regulation of the 5 sHsps is a key step for rice to tolerate heat stress, after that some sHsps assembled into a large hetero-oligomeric complex. In addition, through protein-protein interaction, Hsp101 regulated thiamine biosynthesis, and Hsp82 homology affected nitrogen metabolism, while Hsp81-1 were involved in the maintenance of sugar or starch synthesis in rice plants under heat stress. These results provide new insight into the regulatory mechanism of sHsps in rice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of countermeasure for unloading-related muscle plasticity: role of heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, A.; Akema, T.; Sugiura, T.; Yamada, S.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    We have been studying the mechanisms responsible for unloading- or loading-related muscle plasticity. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of heat stress on the growth of mammalian skeletal muscles in vivo. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were divided into two groups: control (n = 24) and heat stress (n = 24). Rats of heat stressed group were exposed to environmental heat stress (41°C for 60 min) in a heat chamber without anesthesia. The soleus muscles were dissected 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after the heat exposure. The wet weights of muscle relative to body weights in heat stressed group were significantly higher than control group 7 days after the exposure (p<0.05). The relative proportion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the cell proliferation, were increased 1 day after heating (p<0.05). Pax7-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the muscle satellite cells, were also increased 3 day after heat exposure. The expression of phosphorylated p70 S6 kinase was increased 1 day following heat exposure. These results suggest that heat stress could promote cell proliferation, activate satellite cells, and induce muscular hypertrophy.

  20. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's heat...

  1. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's heat...

  2. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's heat...

  3. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Alternative approaches to solar heating and hot water system configurations were studied, parametrizing the number and location of the dampers, the number and location of the fans, the interface locations with the furnace, the size and type of subsystems, and operating modes. A two-pass air-heating collector was selected based on efficiency and ease of installation. Also, an energy transport module was designed to compactly contain all the mechanical and electrical control components. System performance calculations were carried out over a heating season for the tentative site location at Tunkhnana, Pa. Results illustrate the effect of collector size, storage capacity, and use of a reflector. Factors which affected system performance include site location, insulative quality of the house, and of the system components. A preliminary system performance specification is given.

  4. Future Changes in Heat Stress over East Asia Resulting from Different Target Temperature Increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Min, Seung-Ki

    2017-04-01

    In assessing the impact of global warming, it is very important to understand the change in comprehensive heat stress as a function of several variables, rather than only temperature. Furthermore, in order to assess and implement the target temperature goals of the 2015 Paris Agreement, it is essential to have effective and scientifically valid information to predict and measure regional impact. In this study, the future changes in summer heat stress over East Asia were examined based on the Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using CMIP5 multimodel simulations (historical and RCP scenario simulations), and differences in heat stress changes were assessed between 1.5-degree and 2-degree warmer worlds. Future boreal summer heat stress of land regions over East Asia, in excess of the 50-year return value, shows a rapid and nonlinear increase from the 2000s, and it is expected that severe heat stress will occur in the overall East Asia region by the 2040s. In particular, extreme heat stress events were found to occur much more frequently than summer mean intensity of heat stress. Comparisons of the increase in heat stress between 1.5-degree and 2-degree warmer worlds indicated a 20% decrease in the area experiencing severe heat stress over East Asia, and relatively large benefits (i.e. less frequent and less severe heat stress) were found in the southeastern China, the Korean Peninsula and Japan compared to other regions. Further, the equilibrium scenarios showed a larger increase in heat stress over East Asia than the transient scenarios, particularly in case of the 1.5-degree warmer world, which was found due to warmer water in the northwestern North Pacific in the equilibrium scenarios.

  5. Characterization of genes and pathways that respond to heat stress in Holstein calves through transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Krishnamoorthy; Kwon, Anam; Lee, Eunjin; Chung, Hoyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the genes and pathways that respond to heat stress in Holstein bull calves exposed to severe ranges of temperature and humidity. A total of ten animals from 4 to 6 months of age were subjected to heat stress at 37 °C and 90 % humidity for 12 h. Skin and rectal temperatures were measured before and after heat stress; while no correlation was found between them before heat stress, a moderate correlation was detected after heat stress, confirming rectal temperature to be a better barometer for monitoring heat stress. RNAseq analysis identified 8567 genes to be differentially regulated, out of which 465 genes were significantly upregulated (≥2-fold, P < 0.05) and 49 genes were significantly downregulated (≤2-fold, P < 0.05) in response to heat stress. Significant terms and pathways enriched in response to heat stress included chaperones, cochaperones, cellular response to heat stress, phosphorylation, kinase activation, immune response, apoptosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Pi3K/AKT activation, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, interferon signaling, pathways in cancer, estrogen signaling pathway, and MAPK signaling pathway. The differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, which confirmed the tendency of the expression. The genes and pathways identified in this analysis extend our understanding of transcriptional response to heat stress and their likely functioning in adapting the animal to hyperthermic stress. The identified genes could be used as candidate genes for association studies to select and breed animals with improved heat tolerance.

  6. An assessment of heat stress in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasilla Álvarez, D.; Fernandez García, F.

    2010-09-01

    of heat extremes (PET > 35 °C) was compared with the occurrence of several circulation patterns, in other to validate the circulation pattern catalogue and obtain a regional signal. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the sources and thermodynamic characteristics of the air masses involved in those events, the atmospheric circulation prior selected episodes of heat stress was analyzed using a sequential classification procedure (up to three days) and compared with the backward trajectories supplied by the HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model; http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php). The dependence of the PET on some geographical controls (e.g. topography, latitude, distance to sea) results on marked variation between the values calculated for different stations. Low/middle-altitude continental stations (eg. Madrid, Seville) show much higher thermal stress than coastal stations (Barcelona, Málaga) or stations in elevated areas (e.g. Burgos, Navacerrada). Besides, coastal stations display an asymmetric monthly distribution, with larger probability in August, while July is the most typical month in the interior of Iberia. 5 regions resulted from the analysis of daily PET fields: Northern, Atlantic North, Atlantic South, Mediterranean North and Mediterranean South. The extreme heat events occurrence on each region showed strong links with the atmospheric circulation, but two basic mechanisms are involved in most of them. Coastal stations experience such events when the regional atmospheric circulation overrules local circulations, replacing the cooler and moist air masses by continental downslope flows. In continental Iberia the advection of hot air masses from a diverse precedence and embedded into a weak atmospheric circulation (radiative processes) trigger most of the situations of heat stress.

  7. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  8. Impact of Heat Stress on Cellular and Transcriptional Adaptation of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, Neha; Sharma, Ankita; Kishore, Amit; Sodhi, Monika; Tripathi, Pawan K.; Mohanty, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to identify the heat responsive genes and biological pathways in heat stressed buffalo mammary epithelial cells (MECs). The primary mammary epithelial cells of riverine buffalo were exposed to thermal stress at 42°C for one hour. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover at 37°C and harvested at different time intervals (30 min to 48 h) along with control samples (un-stressed). In order to assess the impact of heat stress in buffalo MECs, several in-vitro cellular parameters (lactate dehydrogenase activity, cell proliferation assay, cellular viability, cell death and apoptosis) and transcriptional studies were conducted. The heat stress resulted in overall decrease in cell viability and cell proliferation of MECs while induction of cellular apoptosis and necrosis. The transcriptomic profile of heat stressed MECs was generated using Agilent 44 K bovine oligonucleotide array and at cutoff criteria of ≥3-or ≤3 fold change, a total of 153 genes were observed to be upregulated while 8 genes were down regulated across all time points post heat stress. The genes that were specifically up-regulated or down-regulated were identified as heat responsive genes. The upregulated genes in heat stressed MECs belonged to heat shock family viz., HSPA6, HSPB8, DNAJB2, HSPA1A. Along with HSPs, genes like BOLA, MRPL55, PFKFB3, PSMC2, ENDODD1, ARID5A, and SENP3 were also upregulated. Microarray data revealed that the heat responsive genes belonged to different functional classes viz., chaperons; immune responsive; cell proliferation and metabolism related. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment of several biological processes like; cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, biological regulation, immune system processes and signaling. The transcriptome analysis data was further validated by RT-qPCR studies. Several HSP (HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and HSPB1), apoptotic (Bax and Bcl2), immune (IL6, TNFα and NF-kβ) and oxidative

  9. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  10. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  11. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  12. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  13. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  14. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and