Science.gov

Sample records for system uniquely suited

  1. NASBA: A detection and amplification system uniquely suited for RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sooknanan, R.; Malek, L.T.

    1995-06-01

    The invention of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) has revolutionized our ability to amplify and manipulate a nucleic acid sequence in vitro. The commercial rewards of this revolution have driven the development of other nuclei acid amplification and detection methodologies. This has created an alphabet soup of technologies that use different amplification methods, including NASBA (nucleic acid sequence-based amplification), LCR (ligase chain reaction), SDA (strand displacement amplification), QBR (Q-beta replicase), CPR (cycling probe reaction), and bDNA (branched DNA). Despite the differences in their processes, these amplification systems can be separated into two broad categories based on how they achieve their goal:more » sequence-based amplification systems, such as PCR, NASBA, and SDA, amplify a target nucleic acid sequence. Signal-based amplification systems, such as LCR, QBR, CPR and bDNA, amplify or alter a signal from a detection reaction that is target-dependent. While the various methods have relative strengths and weaknesses, only NASBA offers the unique ability to homogeneously amplify an RNA analyte in the presence of homologous genomic DNA under isothermal conditions. Since the detection of RNA sequences almost invariably measures biological activity, it is an excellent prognostic indicator of activities as diverse as virus production, gene expression, and cell viability. The isothermal nature of the reaction makes NASBA especially suitable for large-scale manual screening. These features extend NASBA`s application range from research to commercial diagnostic applications. Field test kits are presently under development for human diagnostics as well as the burgeoning fields of food and environmental diagnostic testing. These developments suggest future integration of NASBA into robotic workstations for high-throughput screening as well. 17 refs., 1 tab.« less

  2. Nutrition systems for pressure suits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Nutrition systems were successfully developed in the Apollo Program for astronauts wearing pressure suits during emergency decompression situations and during lunar surface explorations. These nutrition systems consisted of unique dispensers, water, flavored beverages, nutrient-fortified beverages, and intermediate moisture food bars. The emergency decompression system dispensed the nutrition from outside the pressure suit by interfacing with a suit helmet penetration port. The lunar exploration system utilized dispensers stowed within the interior layers of the pressure suit. These systems could be adapted for provision of nutrients in other situations requiring the use of pressure suits.

  3. Orion ECLSS/Suit System - Ambient Pressure Integrated Suit Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barido, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The Ambient Pressure Integrated Suit Test (APIST) phase of the integrated system testing of the Orion Vehicle Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) technology was conducted for the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Crew and Thermal Systems Division performed this test in the eleven-foot human-rated vacuum chamber at the NASA Johnson Space Center. This testing is the first phase of suit loop testing to demonstrate the viability of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) being developed for Orion. APIST is the first in a series, which will consist of testing development hardware including the Carbon dioxide and Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS) and the air revitalization loop fan with human test subjects in pressure suits at varying suit pressures. Follow-on testing, to be conducted in 2013, will utilize the CAMRAS and a development regulator with human test subjects in pressure suits at varying cabin and suit pressures. This paper will discuss the results and findings of APIST and will also discuss future testing.

  4. Constellation Space Suit System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Daniel, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program has initiated the first new flight suit development project since the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed for the Space Shuttle Program in the 1970s. The Constellation suit system represents a significant challenge to designers in that the system is required to address all space suit functions needed through all missions and mission phases. This is in marked contrast to the EMU, which was designed specifically for micro-gravity space walks. The Constellation suit system must serve in all of the following scenarios: launch, entry and abort crew survival; micro-gravity extravehicular activity (EVA); and lunar (1/6th-gravity) surface EVA. This paper discusses technical efforts performed from May 2006 through February 2007 for the Constellation space suit system pressure garment.

  5. EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

    1995-01-01

    The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

  6. 'The Grange', Tasmania: survival of a unique suite of 1874 transit of Venus relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Buchanan, Alex

    2004-06-01

    One of the two US expeditions in Australia for the 1874 transit of Venus was based in Campbell Town, Tasmania. While the transit was observed from this site and some of the photographs were used in the subsequent investigation of the solar parallax, its main claim to fame is the physical vestiges of the transit programme that have survived there through to the present day. These comprise foundations for instruments, two piers associated with the photographic telescope, and one of the prefabricated observatory buildings. In addition, a copy of a photograph of the transit is preserved in the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery in nearby Launceston. Collectively these form a unique suite of 1874 transit of Venus relics, and are of international importance.

  7. Je, a versatile suite to handle multiplexed NGS libraries with unique molecular identifiers.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Charles; Scholtalbers, Jelle; Sauer, Sajoscha; Su, Shu-Yi; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2016-10-08

    The yield obtained from next generation sequencers has increased almost exponentially in recent years, making sample multiplexing common practice. While barcodes (known sequences of fixed length) primarily encode the sample identity of sequenced DNA fragments, barcodes made of random sequences (Unique Molecular Identifier or UMIs) are often used to distinguish between PCR duplicates and transcript abundance in, for example, single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq). In paired-end sequencing, different barcodes can be inserted at each fragment end to either increase the number of multiplexed samples in the library or to use one of the barcodes as UMI. Alternatively, UMIs can be combined with the sample barcodes into composite barcodes, or with standard Illumina® indexing. Subsequent analysis must take read duplicates and sample identity into account, by identifying UMIs. Existing tools do not support these complex barcoding configurations and custom code development is frequently required. Here, we present Je, a suite of tools that accommodates complex barcoding strategies, extracts UMIs and filters read duplicates taking UMIs into account. Using Je on publicly available scRNA-seq and iCLIP data containing UMIs, the number of unique reads increased by up to 36 %, compared to when UMIs are ignored. Je is implemented in JAVA and uses the Picard API. Code, executables and documentation are freely available at http://gbcs.embl.de/Je . Je can also be easily installed in Galaxy through the Galaxy toolshed.

  8. Unique Capabilities of the Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI) Mission Concept to Study the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Minow, J. I.; Gallagher, D. L.; Hoegy, W. R.; Coffey, V. N.; Willis, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present an overview of a mission concept named Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI) with a special focus here on low-latitude ionospheric plasma turbulence measurements relevant to equatorial spread-F. SASSI is a suite of sensors that improves Space Situational Awareness for the ISS local space environment, as well as unique ionospheric measurements and support active plasma experiments on the ISS. As such, the mission concept has both operational and basic research objectives. We will describe two compelling measurement techniques enabled by SASSI's unique mission architecture. That is, SASSI provides new abilities to 1) measure space plasma potentials in low Earth orbit over ~100 m relative to a common potential, and 2) to investigate multi-scale ionospheric plasma turbulence morphology simultaneously of both ~ 1 cm and ~ 10 m scale lengths. The first measurement technique will aid in the distinction of vertical drifts within equatorial plasma bubbles from the vertical motions of the bulk of the layer due to zonal electric fields. The second will aid in understanding ionospheric plasma turbulence cascading in scale sizes that affect over the horizon radar. During many years of ISS operation, we have conducted effective (but not perfect) human and robotic extravehicular activities within the space plasma environment surrounding the ISS structure. However, because of the complexity of the interaction between the ISS and the space environment, there remain important sources of unpredictable environmental situations that affect operations. Examples of affected systems include EVA safety, solar panel efficiency, and scientific instrument integrity. Models and heuristically-derived best practices are well-suited for routine operations, but when it comes to unusual or anomalous events or situations, there is no substitute for real-time monitoring. SASSI is being designed to deploy and operate a suite of low-cost, medium/high-TRL plasma sensors on

  9. Engineering Software Suite Validates System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    EDAptive Computing Inc.'s (ECI) EDAstar engineering software tool suite, created to capture and validate system design requirements, was significantly funded by NASA's Ames Research Center through five Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. These programs specifically developed Syscape, used to capture executable specifications of multi-disciplinary systems, and VectorGen, used to automatically generate tests to ensure system implementations meet specifications. According to the company, the VectorGen tests considerably reduce the time and effort required to validate implementation of components, thereby ensuring their safe and reliable operation. EDASHIELD, an additional product offering from ECI, can be used to diagnose, predict, and correct errors after a system has been deployed using EDASTAR -created models. Initial commercialization for EDASTAR included application by a large prime contractor in a military setting, and customers include various branches within the U.S. Department of Defense, industry giants like the Lockheed Martin Corporation, Science Applications International Corporation, and Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, as well as NASA's Langley and Glenn Research Centers

  10. Advanced EVA Suit Camera System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a new extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit known as the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit. All of the improvements to the EVA Suit provide the opportunity to update the technology of the video imagery. My summer internship project involved improving the video streaming capabilities of the cameras that will be used on the Z2 Suit for data acquisition. To accomplish this, I familiarized myself with the architecture of the camera that is currently being tested to be able to make improvements on the design. Because there is a lot of benefit to saving space, power, and weight on the EVA suit, my job was to use Altium Design to start designing a much smaller and simplified interface board for the camera's microprocessor and external components. This involved checking datasheets of various components and checking signal connections to ensure that this architecture could be used for both the Z2 suit and potentially other future projects. The Orion spacecraft is a specific project that may benefit from this condensed camera interface design. The camera's physical placement on the suit also needed to be determined and tested so that image resolution can be maximized. Many of the options of the camera placement may be tested along with other future suit testing. There are multiple teams that work on different parts of the suit, so the camera's placement could directly affect their research or design. For this reason, a big part of my project was initiating contact with other branches and setting up multiple meetings to learn more about the pros and cons of the potential camera placements we are analyzing. Collaboration with the multiple teams working on the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit is absolutely necessary and these comparisons will be used as further progress is made for the overall suit design. This prototype will not be finished in time for the scheduled Z2 Suit testing, so my time was

  11. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan T.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Watson, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected, for both functions, is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations have been completed in the NBL and interfacing options have been prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. For NBL EVA simulations, in 2013, components were procured to allow in-house build up for four new suits with mobility enhancements built into the arms. Boots outfitted with clips that fit into foot restraints have also been added to the suit and analyzed for possible loads. Major suit objectives accomplished this year in testing include: evaluation of mobility enhancements, ingress/egress of foot restraint, use of foot restraint for worksite stability, ingress/egress of Orion hatch with PLSS mockup, and testing with two crew members in the water at one time to evaluate the crew's ability to help one another. Major tool objectives accomplished this year include using various other methods for worksite stability, testing new methods for asteroid geologic sampling and improving the fidelity of the mockups and crew equipment. These tests were completed on a medium fidelity capsule mockup, asteroid vehicle mockup, and asteroid mockups that were more accurate for an asteroid type EVA than previous tests. Another focus was the

  12. Inertial motion capture system for biomechanical analysis in pressure suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Massimiliano

    A non-invasive system has been developed at the University of Maryland Space System Laboratory with the goal of providing a new capability for quantifying the motion of the human inside a space suit. Based on an array of six microprocessors and eighteen microelectromechanical (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs), the Body Pose Measurement System (BPMS) allows the monitoring of the kinematics of the suit occupant in an unobtrusive, self-contained, lightweight and compact fashion, without requiring any external equipment such as those necessary with modern optical motion capture systems. BPMS measures and stores the accelerations, angular rates and magnetic fields acting upon each IMU, which are mounted on the head, torso, and each segment of each limb. In order to convert the raw data into a more useful form, such as a set of body segment angles quantifying pose and motion, a series of geometrical models and a non-linear complimentary filter were implemented. The first portion of this works focuses on assessing system performance, which was measured by comparing the BPMS filtered data against rigid body angles measured through an external VICON optical motion capture system. This type of system is the industry standard, and is used here for independent measurement of body pose angles. By comparing the two sets of data, performance metrics such as BPMS system operational conditions, accuracy, and drift were evaluated and correlated against VICON data. After the system and models were verified and their capabilities and limitations assessed, a series of pressure suit evaluations were conducted. Three different pressure suits were used to identify the relationship between usable range of motion and internal suit pressure. In addition to addressing range of motion, a series of exploration tasks were also performed, recorded, and analysed in order to identify different motion patterns and trajectories as suit pressure is increased and overall suit mobility is reduced

  13. 15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE IS USED TO CONTROL AIR FLOW AND WATER FLOW TO THE UNDERWATER SPACE SUIT DURING THE TEST. THE SUIT SYSTEMS ENGINEER MONITORS AIR FLOW ON THE PANEL TO THE LEFT, AND SUIT DATA ON THE COMPUTER MONITOR JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS LEFT. WATER FLOW IS MONITORED ON THE PANEL JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS RIGHT AND TEST VIDEO TO HIS FAR RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF MONITORS THE DIVER'S DIVE TIMES ON THE COMPUTER IN THE UPPER RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF LOGS THEM IN AS THEY ENTER THE WATER, AND LOGS THEM OUT AS THEY EXIT THE WATER. THE COMPUTER CALCULATES TOTAL DIVE TIME. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. Surgical suite environmental control system. [using halothane absorbing filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, E. J.; Jacobs, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental work for a systems analysis approach to the problem of surgical suit exhaust systems centered on evaluation of halothane absorbing filters. An activated charcoal-alumina-charcoal combination proved to be the best filter for eliminating halothane through multilayer absorption of gas molecules.

  15. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan; Buffington, Jesse; Hood, Drew; Kelly, Cody; Naids, Adam; Watson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment selected for both functions is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development for Advanced Exploration Systems (AES). The proposed architecture meets the ARCM constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the tools and equipment necessary to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations were completed in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and interfacing options were prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. This paper discusses the work done over the last year on the MACES enhancements, the use of tools while using the suit, and the integration of the PLSS with the MACES.

  16. pcircle - A Suite of Scalable Parallel File System Tools

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, FEIYI

    2015-10-01

    Most of the software related to file system are written for conventional local file system, they are serialized and can't take advantage of the benefit of a large scale parallel file system. "pcircle" software builds on top of ubiquitous MPI in cluster computing environment and "work-stealing" pattern to provide a scalable, high-performance suite of file system tools. In particular - it implemented parallel data copy and parallel data checksumming, with advanced features such as async progress report, checkpoint and restart, as well as integrity checking.

  17. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  18. Spherical Coordinate Systems for Streamlining Suited Mobility Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Elizabeth; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu. Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: When describing human motion, biomechanists generally report joint angles in terms of Euler angle rotation sequences. However, there are known limitations in using this method to describe complex motions such as the shoulder joint during a baseball pitch. Euler angle notation uses a series of three rotations about an axis where each rotation is dependent upon the preceding rotation. As such, the Euler angles need to be regarded as a set to get accurate angle information. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to visualize and understand these complex motion representations. It has been shown that using a spherical coordinate system allows Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) personnel to increase their ability to transmit important human mobility data to engineers, in a format that is readily understandable and directly translatable to their design efforts. Objectives: The goal of this project was to use innovative analysis and visualization techniques to aid in the examination and comprehension of complex motions. Methods: This project consisted of a series of small sub-projects, meant to validate and verify a new method before it was implemented in the ABF's data analysis practices. A mechanical test rig was built and tracked in 3D using an optical motion capture system. Its position and orientation were reported in both Euler and spherical reference systems. In the second phase of the project, the ABF estimated the error inherent in a spherical coordinate system, and evaluated how this error would vary within the reference frame. This stage also involved expanding a kinematic model of the shoulder to include the rest of the joints of the body. The third stage of the project involved creating visualization methods to assist in interpreting motion in a spherical frame. These visualization methods will be incorporated in a tool to evaluate a database of suited mobility data, which is currently in development. Results: Initial results

  19. Spherical Coordinate Systems for Streamlining Suited Mobility Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Elizabeth; Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill. Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    When describing human motion, biomechanists generally report joint angles in terms of Euler angle rotation sequences. However, there are known limitations in using this method to describe complex motions such as the shoulder joint during a baseball pitch. Euler angle notation uses a series of three rotations about an axis where each rotation is dependent upon the preceding rotation. As such, the Euler angles need to be regarded as a set to get accurate angle information. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to visualize and understand these complex motion representations. One of our key functions is to help design engineers understand how a human will perform with new designs and all too often traditional use of Euler rotations becomes as much of a hindrance as a help. It is believed that using a spherical coordinate system will allow ABF personnel to more quickly and easily transmit important mobility data to engineers, in a format that is readily understandable and directly translatable to their design efforts. Objectives: The goal of this project is to establish new analysis and visualization techniques to aid in the examination and comprehension of complex motions. Methods: This project consisted of a series of small sub-projects, meant to validate and verify the method before it was implemented in the ABF's data analysis practices. The first stage was a proof of concept, where a mechanical test rig was built and instrumented with an inclinometer, so that its angle from horizontal was known. The test rig was tracked in 3D using an optical motion capture system, and its position and orientation were reported in both Euler and spherical reference systems. The rig was meant to simulate flexion/extension, transverse rotation and abduction/adduction of the human shoulder, but without the variability inherent in human motion. In the second phase of the project, the ABF estimated the error inherent in a spherical coordinate system, and evaluated how this error would

  20. A Freezable Heat Exchanger for Space Suit Radiator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabity, James A.; Mason, Georgia R.; Copeland, Robert J.; Trevino, Luis a.

    2008-01-01

    During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut s metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 1.58 kg (3.48 lbm), an additional 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water are loaded into the unit, most of which is sublimated and lost to space, thus becoming the single largest expendable during an eight-hour EVA. Using a radiator to reject heat from the astronaut during an EVA can reduce the amount of expendable water consumed in the sublimator. Radiators have no moving parts and are thus highly reliable. Past freezable radiators have been too heavy, but the weight can be greatly reduced by placing a small and freeze tolerant heat exchanger between the astronaut and radiator, instead of making the very large radiator freeze tolerant. Therefore, the key technological innovation to improve space suit radiator performance was the development of a lightweight and freezable heat exchanger that accommodates the variable heat load generated by the astronaut. Herein, we present the heat transfer performance of a newly designed heat exchanger that endured several freeze / thaw cycles without any apparent damage. The heat exchanger was also able to continuously turn down or turn up the heat rejection to follow the variable load.

  1. Inner Space and Outer Space: Pressure Suits & Life Support Systems for Space Workers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation presents an overview of work system requirements, extravehicular activity system evolution, key issues, future needs, and a summary. Key issues include pressure suits, life support systems, system integration, biomedical requirements, and work and mobility aids.

  2. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... to submitting a report. It will allow FDA, health care providers, and industry to more rapidly...-sustaining. Under the UDI system established by this rule, the health care community and the public will be... with any similar device which might lead to misuse of the device. Health care providers will no longer...

  3. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Identification System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and... Regulatory Action This rule is intended to substantially reduce existing obstacles to the adequate... appropriate, better-focused, corrective action. The rule will also require dates on medical device labels to...

  4. Unique aspects of the perinatal immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhivaki, Dania; Lo-Man, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The early stages of life are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, which is in part due to an ineffective immune system. In the context of infection, the immune system must be stimulated to provide efficient protection while avoiding insufficient or excessive activation. Yet, in early life, age-dependent immune regulation at molecular and cellular levels contributes to a reduced immunological fitness in terms of pathogen clearance and response to vaccines. To enable microbial colonization to be tolerated at birth, epigenetic immune cell programming and early life-specific immune regulatory and effector mechanisms ensure that vital functions and organ development are supported and that tissue damage is avoided. Advancement in our understanding of age-related remodelling of immune networks and the consequent tuning of immune responsiveness will open up new possibilities for immune intervention and vaccine strategies that are designed specifically for early life.

  5. Physiological and engineering study of advanced thermoregulatory systems for extravehicular space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Hertig, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations of thermal control for extravehicular space suits are reported. The characteristics of independent cooling of temperature and removal of excess heat from separate regions of the body, and the applications of heat pipes in protective suits are discussed along with modeling of the human thermal system.

  6. A suite of benchmark and challenge problems for enhanced geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark; Fu, Pengcheng; McClure, Mark

    A diverse suite of numerical simulators is currently being applied to predict or understand the performance of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). To build confidence and identify critical development needs for these analytical tools, the United States Department of Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office sponsored a Code Comparison Study (GTO-CCS), with participants from universities, industry, and national laboratories. A principal objective for the study was to create a community forum for improvement and verification of numerical simulators for EGS modeling. Teams participating in the study were those representing U.S. national laboratories, universities, and industries, and each team brought unique numerical simulation capabilitiesmore » to bear on the problems. Two classes of problems were developed during the study, benchmark problems and challenge problems. The benchmark problems were structured to test the ability of the collection of numerical simulators to solve various combinations of coupled thermal, hydrologic, geomechanical, and geochemical processes. This class of problems was strictly defined in terms of properties, driving forces, initial conditions, and boundary conditions. The challenge problems were based on the enhanced geothermal systems research conducted at Fenton Hill, near Los Alamos, New Mexico, between 1974 and 1995. The problems involved two phases of research, stimulation, development, and circulation in two separate reservoirs. The challenge problems had specific questions to be answered via numerical simulation in three topical areas: 1) reservoir creation/stimulation, 2) reactive and passive transport, and 3) thermal recovery. Whereas the benchmark class of problems were designed to test capabilities for modeling coupled processes under strictly specified conditions, the stated objective for the challenge class of problems was to demonstrate what new understanding of the Fenton Hill experiments could be realized via the application

  7. FRACTAL Systems & Project suite: engineering tools for improving development and operation of the systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calpena, A.; Mujica-Alvarez, E.; Osinde-Lopez, J.; García-Vargas, M.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the FRACTAL Systems & Projects suite. This suite is composed by several tools (GECO, DOCMA and SUMO) that provide the capabilities that all organizations need to store and manage the system information generated along the project's lifetime, from the design phase to the operation phase. The amount of information that is generated in a project keeps growing in size and complexity along the project's lifetime, to an extent that it becomes impossible to manage it without the aid of specific computer-based tools. The suite described in this paper is the solution developed by FRACTAL to assist the execution of different scientific projects, mainly related with telescopes and instruments, for astronomical research centres. These tools help the system and project engineers to maintain the technical control of the systems and to ensure an optimal use of the resources. GECO eases the control of the system configuration data; DOCMA provides the means to organise and manage the documents generated in the project; SUMO allows managing and scheduling the operation, the maintenance activities and the resources during the operational phase of a system. These tools improve the project communication making the information available to the authorized users (project team, customers, Consortium's members, etc). Finally and depending on the project needs, these three tools can be used integrated or in an independent manner.

  8. THE EPA MULTIMEDIA INTEGRATED MODELING SYSTEM SOFTWARE SUITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA is developing a Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) framework that will provide a software infrastructure or environment to support constructing, composing, executing, and evaluating complex modeling studies. The framework will include (1) common software ...

  9. Video Imaging System Particularly Suited for Dynamic Gear Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Howard (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A digital video imaging system that captures the image of a single tooth of interest of a rotating gear is disclosed. The video imaging system detects the complete rotation of the gear and divide that rotation into discrete time intervals so that each tooth of interest of the gear is precisely determined when it is at a desired location that is illuminated in unison with a digital video camera so as to record a single digital image for each tooth. The digital images are available to provide instantaneous analysis of the tooth of interest, or to be stored and later provide images that yield a history that may be used to predict gear failure, such as gear fatigue. The imaging system is completely automated by a controlling program so that it may run for several days acquiring images without supervision from the user.

  10. Requirements and Sizing Investigation for Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Waguespack, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), located within the ventilation loop of the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS), is responsible for removing hazardous trace contaminants from the space suit ventilation flow. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that evaluated if trace contaminant control could be accomplished without a TCCS, relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Trace contaminant generation rates were revisited to verify that values reflect the latest designs for Constellation Space Suit System (CSSS) pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. Additionally, TCCS sizing calculations were performed and a literature survey was conducted to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

  11. Magnetospheric Multiscale Instrument Suite Operations and Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Riesberg, L.; Pankratz, C. K.; Panneton, R. S.; Giles, B. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    The four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft will collect a combined volume of approximately 100 gigabits per day of particle and field data. On average, only 4 gigabits of that volume can be transmitted to the ground. To maximize the scientific value of each transmitted data segment, MMS has developed the Science Operations Center (SOC) to manage science operations, instrument operations, and selection, downlink, distribution, and archiving of MMS science data sets. The SOC is managed by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) in Boulder, Colorado and serves as the primary point of contact for community participation in the mission. MMS instrument teams conduct their operations through the SOC, and utilize the SOC's Science Data Center (SOC) for data management and distribution. The SOC provides a single mission data archive for the housekeeping and science data, calibration data, ephemerides, attitude and other ancillary data needed to support the scientific use and interpretation. All levels of data products will reside at and be publicly disseminated from the SDC. Documentation and metadata describing data products, algorithms, instrument calibrations, validation, and data quality will be provided. Arguably, the most important innovation developed by the SOC is the MMS burst data management and selection system. With nested automation and 'Scientist-in-the-Loop' (SITL) processes, these systems are designed to maximize the value of the burst data by prioritizing the data segments selected for transmission to the ground. This paper describes the MMS science operations approach, processes and data systems, including the burst system and the SITL concept.

  12. Journal Bearing Analysis Suite Released for Planetary Gear System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.; Clark, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary gear systems are an efficient means of achieving high reduction ratios with minimum space and weight. They are used in helicopter, aerospace, automobile, and many industrial applications. High-speed planetary gear systems will have significant dynamic loading and high heat generation. Hence, they need jet lubrication and associated cooling systems. For units operating in critical applications that necessitate high reliability and long life, that have very large torque loading, and that have downtime costs that are significantly greater than the initial cost, hydrodynamic journal bearings are a must. Computational and analytical tools are needed for sufficiently accurate modeling to facilitate optimal design of these systems. Sufficient physics is needed in the model to facilitate parametric studies of design conditions that enable optimal designs. The first transient journal bearing code to implement the Jacobsson-Floberg-Olsson boundary conditions, using a mass-conserving algorithm devised by Professor Emeritus Harold Elrod of Columbia University, was written by David E. Brewe of the U.S. Army at the NASA Lewis Research Center1 in 1983. Since then, new features and improved modifications have been built into the code by several contributors supported through Army and NASA funding via cooperative agreements with the University of Toledo (Professor Ted Keith, Jr., and Dr. Desikakary Vijayaraghavan) and National Research Council Programs (Dr. Vijayaraghavan). All this was conducted with the close consultation of Professor Elrod and the project management of David Brewe.

  13. Magnetospheric Multiscale Instrument Suite Operations and Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Riesberg, L.; Pankratz, C. K.; Panneton, R. S.; Giles, B. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft will collect a combined volume of ˜100 gigabits per day of particle and field data. On average, only 4 gigabits of that volume can be transmitted to the ground. To maximize the scientific value of each transmitted data segment, MMS has developed the Science Operations Center (SOC) to manage science operations, instrument operations, and selection, downlink, distribution, and archiving of MMS science data sets. The SOC is managed by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) in Boulder, Colorado and serves as the primary point of contact for community participation in the mission. MMS instrument teams conduct their operations through the SOC, and utilize the SOC's Science Data Center (SDC) for data management and distribution. The SOC provides a single mission data archive for the housekeeping and science data, calibration data, ephemerides, attitude and other ancillary data needed to support the scientific use and interpretation. All levels of data products will reside at and be publicly disseminated from the SDC. Documentation and metadata describing data products, algorithms, instrument calibrations, validation, and data quality will be provided. Arguably, the most important innovation developed by the SOC is the MMS burst data management and selection system. With nested automation and "Scientist-in-the-Loop" (SITL) processes, these systems are designed to maximize the value of the burst data by prioritizing the data segments selected for transmission to the ground. This paper describes the MMS science operations approach, processes and data systems, including the burst system and the SITL concept.

  14. EVA space suit Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    A new astronaut glove, the Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS), was designed and developed to allow the handling of objects between -200 F and +200 F. Active heating elements, positioned at each finger pad, provide additional heat to the finger pads from the rest of the finger. A water evaporative cooling system provides cooling by the injection of water to the finger areas and the subsequent direct evaporation to space. Thin, flexible insulation has been developed for the finger areas to limit thermal conductivity. Component and full glove tests have shown that the glove meets and exceeds the requirements to hold a 11/2 inch diameter bar at + or - 200 F for three minutes within comfort limits. The ECHGS is flexible, lightweight and comfortable. Tactility is reasonable and small objects can be identified especially by the fingertips beyond the one half width active elements.

  15. Revolutionary Design for Astronaut Exploration — Beyond the Bio-Suit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Dava J.; Canina, Marita; Trotti, Guillermo L.

    2007-01-01

    The Bio-Suit System is designed to revolutionize human space exploration by providing enhanced astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) locomotion and performance based on the concepts of a `second skin' capability. The novel Bio-Suit concept provides an overall exploration system realized through symbiotic relationships between a suite of advanced technologies, creative design, human modeling and analysis, and new mission operations techniques. By working at the intersection of engineering, design, life sciences and operations, new emergent capabilities and interrelationships result for applications to space missions, medical rehabilitation, and extreme sports activities. In many respects, the Bio-Suit System mimics Nature (biomimetics). For example, the second skin is capable of augmenting our biological skin by providing mechanical counter-pressure. We have designed and tested prototypes that prove mechanical counter-pressure feasibility. The `epidermis' of our second skin suit is patterned from 3D laser scans that incorporate human skin strain field maps for maximum mobility and natural movements, while requiring minimum energy expenditure for exploration tasks. We provide a technology roadmap for future design, pressure production and technology investments for the Bio-Suit System. Woven into the second skin are active materials to enhance human performance as well as to provide necessary performance metrics (i.e., energy expenditure). Wearable technologies will be embedded throughout the Bio-Suit System to place the explorer in an information-rich environment enabling real-time mission planning, prediction, and visualization. The Bio-Suit System concept augments human capabilities by coupling human and robotic abilities into a hybrid of the two, to the point where the explorer is hardly aware of the boundary between innate human performance and robotic activities.

  16. The Walkback Test: A Study to Evaluate Suit and Life Support System Performance Requirements for a 10 Kilometer Traverse in a Planetary Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, Jessica R.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Lee, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    As planetary suit and planetary life support systems develop, specific design inputs for each system relate to a presently unanswered question concerning operational concepts: What distance can be considered a safe walking distance for a suited EVA crew member exploring the surface of the Moon to "walk-back" to the habitat in the event of a rover breakdown, taking into consideration the planned EVA tasks as well as the possible traverse back to the habitat? It has been assumed, based on Apollo program experience, that 10 kilometers (6.2 mi) will be the maximum EVA excursion distance from the lander or habitat to ensure the crew member s safe return to the habitat in the event of a rover failure. To investigate the feasibility of performing a suited 10 km Walkback, NASA-JSC assembled a multi-disciplinary team to design and implement the Lunar Walkback Test . The test was designed not only to determine the feasibility of a 10 km excursion, but also to collect human performance, biomedical, and biomechanical data relevant to optimizing space suit design and life support system sizing. These data will also be used to develop follow-on studies to understand interrelationships of such key parameters as suit mass, inertia, suit pressure, and center of gravity (CG), and the respective influences of each on human performance.

  17. Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry; Taylor ,Brandon W.

    2012-01-01

    Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System. With the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet retired, the supply of extremely high-quality water "super-Q" - required for the EMU Space suit cooling on this ISS - will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. A proposed potential solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semi-permeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins. Aquaporins are a special class of trans-membrane proteins that facilitate passive transport of water and other substances across a membrane. The specificity of these proteins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and this novel property invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically usage on the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are found in many living systems and have been developed for commercial use today.

  18. Apollo/Skylab suit program-management systems study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniff, M.

    1974-01-01

    A management systems study for future spacesuit programs was conducted to assess past suit program requirements and management systems in addition to new and modified systems in order to identify the most cost effective methods for use during future spacesuit programs. The effort and its findings concerned the development and production of all hardware ranging from crew protective gear to total launch vehicles.

  19. [Research progress of thermal control system for extravehicular activity space suit].

    PubMed

    Wu, Z Q; Shen, L P; Yuan, X G

    1999-08-01

    New research progress of thermal control system for oversea Extravehicular Activity (EVA) space suit is presented. Characteristics of several thermal control systems are analyzed in detail. Some research tendencies and problems are discussed, which are worthwhile to be specially noted. Finally, author's opinion about thermal control system in the future is put forward.

  20. Helmet Exhalation Capture System (HECS) Sizing Evaluation for an Advanced Space Suit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Waguespack, Glenn M.; Paul, Thomas H.; Conger, Bruce C.

    2008-01-01

    As part of NASA s initiative to develop an advanced portable life support system (PLSS), a baseline schematic has been chosen that includes gaseous oxygen in a closed circuit ventilation configuration. Supply oxygen enters the suit at the back of the helmet and return gases pass over the astronaut s body to be extracted at the astronaut s wrists and ankles through the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG). The extracted gases are then treated using a rapid cycling amine (RCA) system for carbon dioxide and water removal and activated carbon for trace gas removal before being mixed with makeup oxygen and reintroduced into the helmet. Thermal control is provided by a suit water membrane evaporator (SWME). As an extension of the original schematic development, NASA evaluated several Helmet Exhalation Capture System (HECS) configurations as alternatives to the baseline. The HECS configurations incorporate the use of full contact masks or non-contact masks to reduce flow requirements within the PLSS ventilation subsystem. The primary scope of this study was to compare the alternatives based on mass and volume considerations; however other design issues were also briefly investigated. This paper summarizes the results of this sizing analysis task.

  1. Classical many-particle systems with unique disordered ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Stillinger, F. H.; Torquato, S.

    2017-10-01

    Classical ground states (global energy-minimizing configurations) of many-particle systems are typically unique crystalline structures, implying zero enumeration entropy of distinct patterns (aside from trivial symmetry operations). By contrast, the few previously known disordered classical ground states of many-particle systems are all high-entropy (highly degenerate) states. Here we show computationally that our recently proposed "perfect-glass" many-particle model [Sci. Rep. 6, 36963 (2016), 10.1038/srep36963] possesses disordered classical ground states with a zero entropy: a highly counterintuitive situation . For all of the system sizes, parameters, and space dimensions that we have numerically investigated, the disordered ground states are unique such that they can always be superposed onto each other or their mirror image. At low energies, the density of states obtained from simulations matches those calculated from the harmonic approximation near a single ground state, further confirming ground-state uniqueness. Our discovery provides singular examples in which entropy and disorder are at odds with one another. The zero-entropy ground states provide a unique perspective on the celebrated Kauzmann-entropy crisis in which the extrapolated entropy of a supercooled liquid drops below that of the crystal. We expect that our disordered unique patterns to be of value in fields beyond glass physics, including applications in cryptography as pseudorandom functions with tunable computational complexity.

  2. Ventilation Transport Trade Study for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempf, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    A new and advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for space suit surface exploration will require a durable, compact, and energy efficient system to transport the ventilation stream through the space suit. Current space suits used by NASA circulate the ventilation stream via a ball-bearing supported centrifugal fan. As NASA enters the design phase for the next generation PLSS, it is necessary to evaluate available technologies to determine what improvements can be made in mass, volume, power, and reliability for a ventilation transport system. Several air movement devices already designed for commercial, military, and space applications are optimized in these areas and could be adapted for EVA use. This paper summarizes the efforts to identify and compare the latest fan and bearing technologies to determine candidates for the next generation PLSS.

  3. Software Suite to Support In-Flight Characterization of Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Holekamp, Kara; Gasser, Gerald; Tabor, Wes; Vaughan, Ronald; Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Kenton, Ross

    2014-01-01

    A characterization software suite was developed to facilitate NASA's in-flight characterization of commercial remote sensing systems. Characterization of aerial and satellite systems requires knowledge of ground characteristics, or ground truth. This information is typically obtained with instruments taking measurements prior to or during a remote sensing system overpass. Acquired ground-truth data, which can consist of hundreds of measurements with different data formats, must be processed before it can be used in the characterization. Accurate in-flight characterization of remote sensing systems relies on multiple field data acquisitions that are efficiently processed, with minimal error. To address the need for timely, reproducible ground-truth data, a characterization software suite was developed to automate the data processing methods. The characterization software suite is engineering code, requiring some prior knowledge and expertise to run. The suite consists of component scripts for each of the three main in-flight characterization types: radiometric, geometric, and spatial. The component scripts for the radiometric characterization operate primarily by reading the raw data acquired by the field instruments, combining it with other applicable information, and then reducing it to a format that is appropriate for input into MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission), an Air Force Research Laboratory-developed radiative transport code used to predict at-sensor measurements. The geometric scripts operate by comparing identified target locations from the remote sensing image to known target locations, producing circular error statistics defined by the Federal Geographic Data Committee Standards. The spatial scripts analyze a target edge within the image, and produce estimates of Relative Edge Response and the value of the Modulation Transfer Function at the Nyquist frequency. The software suite enables rapid, efficient, automated processing of

  4. An experimental microcomputer controlled system for synchronized pulsating anti-gravity suit.

    PubMed

    Moore, T W; Foley, J; Reddy, B R; Kepics, F; Jaron, D

    1987-07-01

    An experimental system to deliver synchronized external pressure pulsations to the lower body is described in this technical note. The system is designed using a microcomputer with a real time interface and an electro-pneumatic subsystem capable of delivering pressure pulses to a modified anti-G suit at a fast rate. It is versatile, containing many options for synchronizing, phasing and sequencing of the pressure pulsations and controlling the pressure level in the suit bladders. Details of its software and hardware are described along with the results of initial testing in a Dynamic Flight Simulator on human volunteers.

  5. ORION Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Suit Loop and Pressure Control Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, Brad; Conger, Bruce; Stambaugh, Imelda C.

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA's ORION Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Project at Johnson Space Center's (JSC), the Crew and Thermal Systems Division has developed performance models of the air system using Thermal Desktop/FloCAD. The Thermal Desktop model includes an Air Revitalization System (ARS Loop), a Suit Loop, a Cabin Loop, and Pressure Control System (PCS) for supplying make-up gas (N2 and O2) to the Cabin and Suit Loop. The ARS and PCS are designed to maintain air quality at acceptable O2, CO2 and humidity levels as well as internal pressures in the vehicle Cabin and during suited operations. This effort required development of a suite of Thermal Desktop Orion ECLSS models to address the need for various simulation capabilities regarding ECLSS performance. An initial highly detailed model of the ARS Loop was developed in order to simulate rapid pressure transients (water hammer effects) within the ARS Loop caused by events such as cycling of the Pressurized Swing Adsorption (PSA) Beds and required high temporal resolution (small time steps) in the model during simulation. A second ECLSS model was developed to simulate events which occur over longer periods of time (over 30 minutes) where O2, CO2 and humidity levels, as well as internal pressures needed to be monitored in the cabin and for suited operations. Stand-alone models of the PCS and the Negative Pressure relief Valve (NPRV) were developed to study thermal effects within the PCS during emergency scenarios (Cabin Leak) and cabin pressurization during vehicle re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. Results from the Orion ECLSS models were used during Orion Delta-PDR (July, 2014) to address Key Design Requirements (KDR's) for Suit Loop operations for multiple mission scenarios.

  6. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Brauth, Steven E.; Durand, Sarah E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot “core” song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the “shell” song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities. PMID:26107173

  7. Development of Intelligent Suits for Disuse Atrophy of Musculoskeletal System Using Hybrid Exercise Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Naoto; Yoshimitsu, Kazuhiro; Matsugaki, Tohru; Narita, Arata; Maeda, Takashi; Inada, Tomohisa; Tagawa, Yoshihiko; Numada, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Tetsuya

    We developed ‘Hybrid exercise’ method that was designed to maintain the musculoskeletal system by using electrically stimulated antagonist muscles to resist volitional contraction of agonist muscles. This approach also produces a minimum of inertial reaction forces and has the advantage that it may minimize the need for external stabilization that is currently necessary during exercise in a weightlessness environment. The purpose of this study was to develop the intelligent suits with virtual reality (VR) system that had function of preventing disuse atrophy of musculoskeletal system using hybrid exercise system. Installing of the hybrid exercise system to the subject became easy by the intelligent suits. VR system realized the sense of sight by computer graphics animation synchronized with subjects' motion, and sense of force induced by electrical stimulation. By using VR system, the management of the exercise accomplishment degree was enabled easily because the device could record the exercise history. Intelligent suits with VR hybrid exercise system might become one of the useful countermeasures for the disuse musculoskeletal system in the space.

  8. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan; Buffington, Jesse; Hood, Drew; Kelly, Cody; Naids, Adam; Watson, Richard; Blanco, Raul; Sipila, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment selected for both functions is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development for Advanced Exploration Systems (AES). The proposed architecture meets the ARCM constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the tools and equipment necessary to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations were completed in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and interfacing options were prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. This paper discusses the work done over the last year on the MACES enhancements, the use of tools while using the suit, and the integration of the PLSS with the MACES.

  9. DDS-Suite - A Dynamic Data Acquisition, Processing, and Analysis System for Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Jathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Wind Tunnels have optimized their steady-state data systems for acquisition and analysis and even implemented large dynamic-data acquisition systems, however development of near real-time processing and analysis tools for dynamic-data have lagged. DDS-Suite is a set of tools used to acquire, process, and analyze large amounts of dynamic data. Each phase of the testing process: acquisition, processing, and analysis are handled by separate components so that bottlenecks in one phase of the process do not affect the other, leading to a robust system. DDS-Suite is capable of acquiring 672 channels of dynamic data at rate of 275 MB / s. More than 300 channels of the system use 24-bit analog-to-digital cards and are capable of producing data with less than 0.01 of phase difference at 1 kHz. System architecture, design philosophy, and examples of use during NASA Constellation and Fundamental Aerodynamic tests are discussed.

  10. Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.; Taylor, Brandon W.

    2011-01-01

    With the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet retired, the supply of extremely high-quality water 'super-Q' - required for the EMU Space suit cooling on this ISS - will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. A proposed potential solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semi-permeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins. Aquaporins are a special class of trans-membrane proteins that facilitate passive transport of water and other substances across a membrane. The specificity of these proteins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and this novel property invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically usage on the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are found in many living systems and have been developed for commercial use today.

  11. A new hydrostatic anti-G suit vs. a pneumatic anti-G system: preliminary comparison.

    PubMed

    Eiken, O; Kölegård, R; Lindborg, B; Aldman, M; Karlmar, K E; Linder, J; Kölegoård, R

    2002-07-01

    A newly developed hydrostatic anti-G suit is now commercially available. The suit is said to offer a high level of protection against +Gz acceleration. However, past experience shows that it is difficult to produce a hydrostatic suit with effective high-G protection. Careful testing is, therefore, needed to verify its efficacy. The G-protective properties of the hydrostatic anti-G suit (Libelle; L) were compared with those of a pneumatic anti-G ensemble (AGE-39) used in the Swedish JAS 39 Cripen aircraft. Three pilots were studied during vertical (+Gz) acceleration in a centrifuge using the following: 1) the L-suit with varied straining maneuvers; 2) the AGE-39 in combination with full anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM) throughout each high-G exposure (full maneuver; FM); and 3) the AGE-39 in combination with AGSM during the initial part of each high-G exposure (reduced maneuver; RM). G-intensity tolerance was established during exposures to rapid onset rate (ROR) profiles with G-plateau levels ranging from +6.0 to +9.0 Gz. G-endurance was studied during simulated aerial combat maneuvers (SACM) consisting of 10 cycles of 5.5 to 7.5 G. All three pilots tolerated 9.0 G with the pneumatic system both in the RM and FM conditions; their tolerances averaged 6.3 G (range 6.0 to 7.0 G) for the L suit. Thus, during the ROR exposures only the 6.0 G profile was completed by all subjects in all three conditions. At this G-load both muscle straining (as indicated by electromyographic activity in thigh and abdomen) and heart rate were higher in the L than in the RM condition. Mean arterial pressure at eye level was higher in the FM than in the L and RM conditions. Only one subject was able to complete the SACM profile in the L condition. In the RM condition all subjects completed the SACM profile and in the FM condition two subjects completed the SACM. Whether the AGE-39 was used in combination with maximal AGSM throughout the duration of each high-G exposure or with AGSM only

  12. Carbon Dioxide Control System for a Mars Space Suit Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan; Copeland, Robert; Parker, Amanda; Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) control during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on Mars will be challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable metal oxide (MetOx) canisters weigh too much. Cycling bed systems and permeable membranes that are regenerable in space vacuum cannot vent on Mars due to the high partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere. Although sweep gas regeneration is under investigation, the feasibility, logistics penalties, and failure modes associated with this technique have not been fully determined. TDA Research, Inc. is developing a durable, high-capacity regenerable adsorbent that can remove CO2 from the space suit ventilation loop. The system design allows sorbent regeneration at or above 6 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the ventilation loop. Regeneration during EVA minimizes the amount of consumables to be brought from Earth and makes the mission more affordable, while providing great operational flexibility during EVA. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in a series of bench-scale experiments and a preliminary system analysis. This paper presents the latest results from these sorbent and system development efforts.

  13. Apparatus for controlling system state based on unique identifiers

    DOEpatents

    Drotning, William D.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus allows workers to assert and release control over the energization of a system. The apparatus does not require the workers to carry any additional paraphernalia, and is not be easily defeated by other workers. Users asserting and releasing control present tokens uniquely identifying each user to a reader, and the apparatus prevents transition of the system to an undesired state until an appropriate number of users are currently asserting control. For example, a dangerous manufacturing robot can be prevented from energizing until all the users that have asserted control when entering the robot's controlled space have subsequently released control when leaving the robot's controlled space.

  14. Development of a Compact Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanBoeyen, Roger W.; Reeh, Jonathan A.; Trevino, Luis

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demands placed on extravehicular activity (EVA) for the International Space Station (ISS) assembly and maintenance, along with planned lunar and Martian missions, the need for increased human productivity and capability becomes ever more critical. This is most readily achieved by reduction in space suit weight and volume, and increased hardware reliability, durability, and operating lifetime. Considerable progress has been made with each successive generation of space suit design; from the Apollo A7L suit, to the current Shuttle Extravehicular Mobile Unit (EMU) suit, and the next generation Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). However, one area of space suit design which has continued to lag is the fluid pump used to drive the water cooling loop of the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The two main types of fluid pumps typically used in space applications are rotodynamic pumps (pumping is achieved through a rotary vaned impeller) and displacement pumps (which includes rotary and diaphragm pumps). The rotating and moving parts found in the pumps and electric motor add significantly to the susceptibility to wear and friction, thermal mismatch, and complexity of the pumps. Electric motor-driven pumps capable of achieving high operational reliability are necessarily large, heavy, and energy inefficient. This report describes a development effort conducted for NASA by Lynntech, Inc., who recently demonstrated the feasibility of an electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, an electrochemically-driven pump is expected to be significantly smaller, lighter and achieve a longer life time than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. It was also demonstrated that these membranes possess the

  15. Carbon Dioxide Control System for a Mars Space Suit Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan; Copeland, Robert; Parker, amanda; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) control during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on Mars will be challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable metal oxide (MetOx) canisters weigh too much. Cycling bed systems and permeable membranes that are regenerable in space vacuum cannot vent on Mars due to the high partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere. Although sweep gas regeneration is under investigation, the feasibility, logistics penalties, and failure modes associated with this technique have not been fully determined. TDA Research, Inc. is developing a durable, high-capacity regenerable adsorbent that can remove CO2 from the space suit ventilation loop. The system design allows sorbent regeneration at or above 6 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the ventilation loop. Regeneration during EVA eliminates the consumable requirement related to the use of LiOH canisters and the mission duration limitations imposed by MetOx system. The concept minimizes the amount of consumable to be brought from Earth and makes the mission more affordable, while providing great operational flexibility during EVA. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in a series of bench-scale experiments and a preliminary system analysis. Results indicate that sorbent regeneration can be accomplished by applying a 14 C temperature swing, while regenerating at 13 torr (well above the Martian atmospheric pressure), withstanding over 1,000 adsorption/regeneration cycles. This paper presents the latest results from these sorbent and system development efforts.

  16. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanco, Raul A.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Watson, Richard D.; Sipila, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability for Orion. The EVAs will involve a two-person crew for approximately four hours. Currently, two EVAs are planned with one contingency EVA in reserve. Providing this EVA capability is very challenging due to system level constraints and a new and unknown environment. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is one that builds upon previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and that accomplishes the ARCM mission while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations. The primary system level constraints are to 1) minimize system mass and volume and 2) minimize the interfacing impacts to the baseline Orion design. In order to minimize the interfacing impacts and to not perturb the baseline Orion schedule, the concept of adding "kits" to the baseline system is proposed. These kits consist of: an EVA kit (converts LEA suit to EVA suit), EVA Servicing and Recharge Kit (provides suit consumables), the EVA Tools, Translation Aids & Sample Container Kit (the tools and mobility aids to complete the tasks), the EVA Communications Kit (interface between the EVA radio and the MPCV), and the Cabin Repress Kit (represses the MPCV between EVAs). This paper will focus on the trade space, analysis, and testing regarding the space suit (pressure garment and life support system). Historical approaches and lessons learned from all past EVA operations were researched. Previous and current, successfully operated EVA hardware and high technology readiness level (TRL) hardware were evaluated, and a trade study was conducted for all possible pressure garment and life support options. Testing and analysis was conducted and a recommended EVA system architecture was proposed. Pressure garment options that were considered for this mission include the currently in-use ISS EVA Mobility Unit (EMU), all variations of

  17. Requirements and Sizing Investigation for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Waguespack, Glenn M.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarized the results of a trade study that evaluated whether trace contaminant control within the Constellation Spacesuit PLSS could be achieved without a Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) by relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Mallory Jennings and Dr. Glenn Waguespack studied trace contaminant generation rates to verify that values reflected the latest designs for Constellation spacesuit system pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. They also calculated TCCS sizing and conducted a literature survey to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

  18. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Sensors for the Constellation Space Suit Life Support System for Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Paul, Heather L.; Conger, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of the trade study to evaluate carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing technologies for the Constellation (Cx) space suit life support system for surface exploration. The trade study found that nondispersive infrared absorption (NDIR) is the most appropriate high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) technology for the CO2 sensor for the Cx space suit. The maturity of the technology is high, as it is the basis for the CO2 sensor in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The study further determined that while there is a range of commercial sensors available, the Cx CO2 sensor should be a new design. Specifically, there are light sources (e.g., infrared light emitting diodes) and detectors (e.g., cooled detectors) that are not in typical commercial sensors due to cost. These advanced technology components offer significant advantages in performance (weight, volume, power, accuracy) to be implemented in the new sensor. The exact sensor design (light source, transmitting optics, path length, receiving optics and detector) will be specific for the Cx space suit and will be determined by the performance requirements of the Cx space suit. The paper further identifies specifications for some of the critical performance parameters as well as discussing the engineering aspects of implementing the sensor into the Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The paper then presents testing results from three CO2 sensors with respect to issues important to Extravehicular Activity (EVA) applications; stability, humidity dependence and low pressure compatibility. The three sensors include two NDIR sensors, one commercial and one custom-developed by NASA (for a different purpose), and one commercial electrochemical sensor. The results show that both NDIR sensors have excellent stability, no dependence on ambient humidity (when the ambient temperature is above the dew point) and operate in low pressure conditions and after being exposed to a full vacuum. The commercial

  19. Non-unique monopole oscillations of harmonically confined Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducatman, Samuel; Henning, Christian; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Recently it was shown that the Breathing Mode (BM), the mode of uniform radial expansion and contraction, which is well known from harmonically confined Coulomb systems [1], does not exist in general for other systems [2]. As a consequence the monopole oscillation (MO), the radial collective excitation, is not unique, but there are several MO with different frequencies. Within this work we show simulation results of those monopole oscillations of 2-dimensional harmonically confined Yukawa systems, which are known from, e.g., dusty plasma crystals [3,4]. We present the corresponding spectrum of the particle motion, including analysis of the frequencies found, and compare with theoretical investigations.[1] D.H.E. Dubin and J.P. Schiffer, Phys. Rev. E 53, 5249 (1996)[2] C. Henning at al., accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. Lett. (2008)[3] A. Melzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 115002 (2001)[4] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)

  20. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Rapid Cycle Amine Repackaging and Sub-Scale Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Rivera, Fatonia L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing technologies to meet requirements for an extravehicular activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for exploration. The PLSS Ventilation Subsystem transports clean, conditioned oxygen to the pressure garment for space suit pressurization and human consumption, and recycles the ventilation gas, removing carbon dioxide, humidity, and trace contaminants. This paper provides an overview of the development efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center to redesign the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) canister and valve assembly into a radial flow, cylindrical package for carbon dioxide and humidity control of the PLSS ventilation loop. Future work is also discussed.

  1. openSE: a Systems Engineering Framework Particularly Suited to Particle Accelerator Studies and Development Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnal, P.; Féral, B.; Kershaw, K.

    Particle accelerator projects share many characteristics with industrial projects. However, experience has shown that best practice of industrial project management is not always well suited to particle accelerator projects. Major differences include the number and complexity of technologies involved, the importance of collaborative work, development phases that can last more than a decade, and the importance of telerobotics and remote handling to address future preventive and corrective maintenance requirements due to induced radioactivity, to cite just a few. The openSE framework it is a systems engineering and project management framework specifically designed for scientific facilities’ systems and equipment studies andmore » development projects. Best practices in project management, in systems and requirements engineering, in telerobotics and remote handling and in radiation safety management were used as sources of inspiration, together with analysis of current practices surveyed at CERN, GSI and ESS.« less

  2. Design for robustness of unique, multi-component engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Kenneth A.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to advance the science of conceptual designing for robustness in unique, multi-component engineering systems. Robustness is herein defined as the ability of an engineering system to operate within a desired performance range even if the actual configuration has differences from specifications within specified tolerances. These differences are caused by three sources, namely manufacturing errors, system degradation (operational wear and tear), and parts availability. Unique, multi-component engineering systems are defined as systems produced in unique or very small production numbers. They typically have design and manufacturing costs on the order of billions of dollars, and have multiple, competing performance objectives. Design time for these systems must be minimized due to competition, high manpower costs, long manufacturing times, technology obsolescence, and limited available manpower expertise. Most importantly, design mistakes cannot be easily corrected after the systems are operational. For all these reasons, robustness of these systems is absolutely critical. This research examines the space satellite industry in particular. Although inherent robustness assurance is absolutely critical, it is difficult to achieve in practice. The current state of the art for robustness in the industry is to overdesign components and subsystems with redundancy and margin. The shortfall is that it is not known if the added margins were either necessary or sufficient given the risk management preferences of the designer or engineering system customer. To address this shortcoming, new assessment criteria to evaluate robustness in design concepts have been developed. The criteria are comprised of the "Value Distance", addressing manufacturing errors and system degradation, and "Component Distance", addressing parts availability. They are based on an evolutionary computation format that uses a string of alleles to describe the components in the

  3. Space Suit Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Anthony B.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.; Iovine, John V.; Lin, Chin H.

    1998-01-01

    The present NASA space suit (the Shuttle EMU) is a self-contained environmental control system, providing life support, environmental protection, earth-like mobility, and communications. This study considers the thermal dynamics of the space suit as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the present space suit is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the suit with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The observations from this study are being utilized in two future design efforts, automatic thermal comfort control design for the present space suit and design of future space suit systems for Space Station, Lunar, and Martian missions.

  4. BioPreDyn-bench: a suite of benchmark problems for dynamic modelling in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Henriques, David; Smallbone, Kieran; Bongard, Sophia; Schmid, Joachim; Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Crombach, Anton; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Mauch, Klaus; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Mendes, Pedro; Jaeger, Johannes; Banga, Julio R

    2015-02-20

    Dynamic modelling is one of the cornerstones of systems biology. Many research efforts are currently being invested in the development and exploitation of large-scale kinetic models. The associated problems of parameter estimation (model calibration) and optimal experimental design are particularly challenging. The community has already developed many methods and software packages which aim to facilitate these tasks. However, there is a lack of suitable benchmark problems which allow a fair and systematic evaluation and comparison of these contributions. Here we present BioPreDyn-bench, a set of challenging parameter estimation problems which aspire to serve as reference test cases in this area. This set comprises six problems including medium and large-scale kinetic models of the bacterium E. coli, baker's yeast S. cerevisiae, the vinegar fly D. melanogaster, Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and a generic signal transduction network. The level of description includes metabolism, transcription, signal transduction, and development. For each problem we provide (i) a basic description and formulation, (ii) implementations ready-to-run in several formats, (iii) computational results obtained with specific solvers, (iv) a basic analysis and interpretation. This suite of benchmark problems can be readily used to evaluate and compare parameter estimation methods. Further, it can also be used to build test problems for sensitivity and identifiability analysis, model reduction and optimal experimental design methods. The suite, including codes and documentation, can be freely downloaded from the BioPreDyn-bench website, https://sites.google.com/site/biopredynbenchmarks/ .

  5. The Earth System Prediction Suite: Toward a Coordinated U.S. Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Theurich, Gerhard; DeLuca, C.; Campbell, T.

    The Earth System Prediction Suite (ESPS) is a collection of flagship U.S. weather and climate models and model components that are being instrumented to conform to interoperability conventions, documented to follow metadata standards, and made available either under open-source terms or to credentialed users. Furthermore, the ESPS represents a culmination of efforts to create a common Earth system model architecture, and the advent of increasingly coordinated model development activities in the United States. ESPS component interfaces are based on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), community-developed software for building and coupling models, and the National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC)more » Layer, a set of ESMF-based component templates and interoperability conventions. Our shared infrastructure simplifies the process of model coupling by guaranteeing that components conform to a set of technical and semantic behaviors. The ESPS encourages distributed, multiagency development of coupled modeling systems; controlled experimentation and testing; and exploration of novel model configurations, such as those motivated by research involving managed and interactive ensembles. ESPS codes include the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM), the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS); the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) and the Modular Ocean Model (MOM); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); and the NASA ModelE climate model and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5), atmospheric general circulation model.« less

  6. The Earth System Prediction Suite: Toward a Coordinated U.S. Modeling Capability

    DOE PAGES

    Theurich, Gerhard; DeLuca, C.; Campbell, T.; ...

    2016-08-22

    The Earth System Prediction Suite (ESPS) is a collection of flagship U.S. weather and climate models and model components that are being instrumented to conform to interoperability conventions, documented to follow metadata standards, and made available either under open-source terms or to credentialed users. Furthermore, the ESPS represents a culmination of efforts to create a common Earth system model architecture, and the advent of increasingly coordinated model development activities in the United States. ESPS component interfaces are based on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), community-developed software for building and coupling models, and the National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC)more » Layer, a set of ESMF-based component templates and interoperability conventions. Our shared infrastructure simplifies the process of model coupling by guaranteeing that components conform to a set of technical and semantic behaviors. The ESPS encourages distributed, multiagency development of coupled modeling systems; controlled experimentation and testing; and exploration of novel model configurations, such as those motivated by research involving managed and interactive ensembles. ESPS codes include the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM), the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS); the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) and the Modular Ocean Model (MOM); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); and the NASA ModelE climate model and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5), atmospheric general circulation model.« less

  7. THE EARTH SYSTEM PREDICTION SUITE: Toward a Coordinated U.S. Modeling Capability.

    PubMed

    Theurich, Gerhard; DeLuca, C; Campbell, T; Liu, F; Saint, K; Vertenstein, M; Chen, J; Oehmke, R; Doyle, J; Whitcomb, T; Wallcraft, A; Iredell, M; Black, T; da Silva, A M; Clune, T; Ferraro, R; Li, P; Kelley, M; Aleinov, I; Balaji, V; Zadeh, N; Jacob, R; Kirtman, B; Giraldo, F; McCarren, D; Sandgathe, S; Peckham, S; Dunlap, R

    2016-07-01

    The Earth System Prediction Suite (ESPS) is a collection of flagship U.S. weather and climate models and model components that are being instrumented to conform to interoperability conventions, documented to follow metadata standards, and made available either under open source terms or to credentialed users. The ESPS represents a culmination of efforts to create a common Earth system model architecture, and the advent of increasingly coordinated model development activities in the U.S. ESPS component interfaces are based on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), community-developed software for building and coupling models, and the National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC) Layer, a set of ESMF-based component templates and interoperability conventions. This shared infrastructure simplifies the process of model coupling by guaranteeing that components conform to a set of technical and semantic behaviors. The ESPS encourages distributed, multi-agency development of coupled modeling systems, controlled experimentation and testing, and exploration of novel model configurations, such as those motivated by research involving managed and interactive ensembles. ESPS codes include the Navy Global Environmental Model (NavGEM), HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS ® ); the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) and the Modular Ocean Model (MOM); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); and the NASA ModelE climate model and GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model.

  8. THE EARTH SYSTEM PREDICTION SUITE: Toward a Coordinated U.S. Modeling Capability

    PubMed Central

    Theurich, Gerhard; DeLuca, C.; Campbell, T.; Liu, F.; Saint, K.; Vertenstein, M.; Chen, J.; Oehmke, R.; Doyle, J.; Whitcomb, T.; Wallcraft, A.; Iredell, M.; Black, T.; da Silva, AM; Clune, T.; Ferraro, R.; Li, P.; Kelley, M.; Aleinov, I.; Balaji, V.; Zadeh, N.; Jacob, R.; Kirtman, B.; Giraldo, F.; McCarren, D.; Sandgathe, S.; Peckham, S.; Dunlap, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Earth System Prediction Suite (ESPS) is a collection of flagship U.S. weather and climate models and model components that are being instrumented to conform to interoperability conventions, documented to follow metadata standards, and made available either under open source terms or to credentialed users. The ESPS represents a culmination of efforts to create a common Earth system model architecture, and the advent of increasingly coordinated model development activities in the U.S. ESPS component interfaces are based on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), community-developed software for building and coupling models, and the National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC) Layer, a set of ESMF-based component templates and interoperability conventions. This shared infrastructure simplifies the process of model coupling by guaranteeing that components conform to a set of technical and semantic behaviors. The ESPS encourages distributed, multi-agency development of coupled modeling systems, controlled experimentation and testing, and exploration of novel model configurations, such as those motivated by research involving managed and interactive ensembles. ESPS codes include the Navy Global Environmental Model (NavGEM), HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®); the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) and the Modular Ocean Model (MOM); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); and the NASA ModelE climate model and GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. PMID:29568125

  9. The Earth System Prediction Suite: Toward a Coordinated U.S. Modeling Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theurich, Gerhard; DeLuca, C.; Campbell, T.; Liu, F.; Saint, K.; Vertenstein, M.; Chen, J.; Oehmke, R.; Doyle, J.; Whitcomb, T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Earth System Prediction Suite (ESPS) is a collection of flagship U.S. weather and climate models and model components that are being instrumented to conform to interoperability conventions, documented to follow metadata standards, and made available either under open source terms or to credentialed users.The ESPS represents a culmination of efforts to create a common Earth system model architecture, and the advent of increasingly coordinated model development activities in the U.S. ESPS component interfaces are based on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), community-developed software for building and coupling models, and the National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC) Layer, a set of ESMF-based component templates and interoperability conventions. This shared infrastructure simplifies the process of model coupling by guaranteeing that components conform to a set of technical and semantic behaviors. The ESPS encourages distributed, multi-agency development of coupled modeling systems, controlled experimentation and testing, and exploration of novel model configurations, such as those motivated by research involving managed and interactive ensembles. ESPS codes include the Navy Global Environmental Model (NavGEM), HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS); the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) and the Modular Ocean Model (MOM); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); and the NASA ModelE climate model and GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model.

  10. Azaborines: Unique Isosteres of Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Geraint H. M.

    The azaborine motif provides a unique opportunity to develop core isosteres by inserting B-N units in place of C=C bonds within aromatic scaffolds. These boron/nitrogen-containing heteroaromatic systems provide molecular frameworks that have similar, but not identical, geometrical shapes and electronic distributions to the analogous all carbon systems. Synthetic routes to the 1,3,2-benzodiazaborole core have been developed utilizing entirely bench-stable starting materials, including organotrifluoroborates, enabling a wider array of substrate analogues under facile reaction conditions. The physical, structural, and electronic properties of these compounds were explored computationally to understand the influence of the B-N replacement on structure, aromaticity, and the isosteric viability of these analogues. The class of azaborininones could similarly be accessed from both organotrifluoroborates and boronic acids. An inexpensive, common reagent, SiO2, was found to serve as both a fluorophile and desiccant to facilitate the annulation process across three different azaborininone platforms. Computationally-derived pK a values, NICS aromaticity calculations, and electrostatic potential surfaces revealed a unique isoelectronic/isostructural relationship between these azaborines and their carbon isosteres that changed based on boron connectivity. The 2,1-borazaronaphthalene motif can be accessed through robust methods of synthesis and subsequent functionalization strategies, affording an ideal platform to use for a variety of applications. However, the initial scope of substructures for this archetype has been limited by the lack of nitrogen-containing heteroaryls that can be incorporated within them. Modified reaction conditions enabled greater tolerance to provide access to a wider range of substructures. Additionally, computational and experimental studies of solvent decomposition demonstrate that substitution off boron is important to stability. Post

  11. Development of a Compact, Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Boeyen, Roger; Reeh, Jonathan; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A compact, low-power electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump is currently being developed by Lynntech, Inc. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, the pump is significantly lighter than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. Reliability and robustness is achieved with the absence of rotating or moving components (apart from the bellows). By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. Lynntech also demonstrated that these membranes possess the necessary mechanical strength, durability, and temperature range for long life space operation. The preliminary design for a Phase II prototype pump compares very favorably to the fluid cooling pumps currently used in space suit primary life support systems (PLSSs). Characteristics of the electrochemically-driven pump are described and the benefits of the technology as a replacement for electric motor pumps in mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops is discussed.

  12. Ground System Architectures Workshop GMSEC SERVICES SUITE (GSS): an Agile Development Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Vuong

    2017-01-01

    The GMSEC (Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center) Services Suite (GSS) is a collection of tools and software services along with a robust customizable web-based portal that enables the user to capture, monitor, report, and analyze system-wide GMSEC data. Given our plug-and-play architecture and the needs for rapid system development, we opted to follow the Scrum Agile Methodology for software development. Being one of the first few projects to implement the Agile methodology at NASA GSFC, in this presentation we will present our approaches, tools, successes, and challenges in implementing this methodology. The GMSEC architecture provides a scalable, extensible ground and flight system for existing and future missions. GMSEC comes with a robust Application Programming Interface (GMSEC API) and a core set of Java-based GMSEC components that facilitate the development of a GMSEC-based ground system. Over the past few years, we have seen an upbeat in the number of customers who are moving from a native desktop application environment to a web based environment particularly for data monitoring and analysis. We also see a need to provide separation of the business logic from the GUI display for our Java-based components and also to consolidate all the GUI displays into one interface. This combination of separation and consolidation brings immediate value to a GMSEC-based ground system through increased ease of data access via a uniform interface, built-in security measures, centralized configuration management, and ease of feature extensibility.

  13. Unique Stellar System Gives Einstein a Thumbs-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Taking advantage of a unique cosmic coincidence, astronomers have measured an effect predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity in the extremely strong gravity of a pair of superdense neutron stars. The new data indicate that the famed physicist's 93-year-old theory has passed yet another test. Double Pulsar Graphic Artist's Conception of Double Pulsar System PSR J0737-3039A/B CREDIT: Daniel Cantin, DarwinDimensions, McGill University Click on image for more graphics. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to make a four-year study of a double-star system unlike any other known in the Universe. The system is a pair of neutron stars, both of which are seen as pulsars that emit lighthouse-like beams of radio waves. "Of about 1700 known pulsars, this is the only case where two pulsars are in orbit around each other," said Rene Breton, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. In addition, the stars' orbital plane is aligned nearly perfectly with their line of sight to the Earth, so that one passes behind a doughnut-shaped region of ionized gas surrounding the other, eclipsing the signal from the pulsar in back. "Those eclipses are the key to making a measurement that could never be done before," Breton said. Einstein's 1915 theory predicted that, in a close system of two very massive objects, such as neutron stars, one object's gravitational tug, along with an effect of its spinning around its axis, should cause the spin axis of the other to wobble, or precess. Studies of other pulsars in binary systems had indicated that such wobbling occurred, but could not produce precise measurements of the amount of wobbling. "Measuring the amount of wobbling is what tests the details of Einstein's theory and gives a benchmark that any alternative gravitational theories must meet," said Scott Ransom of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The eclipses allowed the astronomers to pin

  14. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s-1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.

  15. Evaluation of Personal Cooling Systems in Conjunction with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    of thermal comfort and perceived exertion. The results indicated that wearing the EOD suit produces significant increases in thermal physiological...indicated reduced perceived exertion levels and improved thermal comfort when wearing the liquid-cooling garment with a EOD suit. In contrast, the ribbed

  16. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  17. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level

  18. Unique, icy gathering system will serve Norman Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.

    One of the more unique communities on the Mackenzie River is Norman Wells, ca 90 miles south of the Arctic Circle and 450 air miles south of the Beaufort Sea. For over 50 yr, Norman Wells has been a major supplier of petroleum products to the Mackenzie Valley. The most unique aspect of Norman Wells is that it is underlain by a large reservoir of oil. Fifty wells in the area produce over 3000 bbl of light crude daily, which is refined locally. Esso Resources Canada Ltd. now is developing the field and expanding production. New facilities will include 151more » new wells for producing oil and injecting water, 6 artificial islands in the 3-mile wide river to accommodate gathering points, and a new central processing facility. The crude oil to be produced will be transported by Interprovincial Pipeline (NW) Ltd. from Norman Wells to Zama, Alta.« less

  19. A suite of phantom-based test methods for assessing image quality of photoacoustic tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2017-03-01

    As Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) matures and undergoes clinical translation, objective performance test methods are needed to facilitate device development, regulatory clearance and clinical quality assurance. For mature medical imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, and ultrasound, tissue-mimicking phantoms are frequently incorporated into consensus standards for performance testing. A well-validated set of phantom-based test methods is needed for evaluating performance characteristics of PAT systems. To this end, we have constructed phantoms using a custom tissue-mimicking material based on PVC plastisol with tunable, biologically-relevant optical and acoustic properties. Each phantom is designed to enable quantitative assessment of one or more image quality characteristics including 3D spatial resolution, spatial measurement accuracy, ultrasound/PAT co-registration, uniformity, penetration depth, geometric distortion, sensitivity, and linearity. Phantoms contained targets including high-intensity point source targets and dye-filled tubes. This suite of phantoms was used to measure the dependence of performance of a custom PAT system (equipped with four interchangeable linear array transducers of varying design) on design parameters (e.g., center frequency, bandwidth, element geometry). Phantoms also allowed comparison of image artifacts, including surface-generated clutter and bandlimited sensing artifacts. Results showed that transducer design parameters create strong variations in performance including a trade-off between resolution and penetration depth, which could be quantified with our method. This study demonstrates the utility of phantom-based image quality testing in device performance assessment, which may guide development of consensus standards for PAT systems.

  20. The Proposal of a BDS Syllabus Framework to Suit Choice Based Credit System (CBCS).

    PubMed

    Manivasakan, Shivasakthy; Sethuraman, K R; Narayan, K A

    2016-08-01

    Higher education takes a new dimension universally in the form of choice based Credit System (CBCS). In India, the University Grants Commission (UGC) has made CBCS mandatory in all fields except for Health Profession. Not much attempts were made in designing a BDS syllabus to suit CBCS. Aim of the study was to propose a model dental syllabus to fit into choice based credit system. A model BDS syllabus Prototype for CBCS was designed based on the UGC guidelines for terms as well as calculations for CBCS. Engineering curriculum models from IIT and Anna University were also referred to. Semester based BDS syllabus was designed without changing the norms of Dental Council of India (DCI). All the must know areas of the subjects were considered as "core" areas and the desirable and nice to know areas are left for "electives" by the students. By this method, none of the subject was left out at the same time students are provided with electives to learn deeper on their topics of choice. The existing BDS syllabus can be effectively modified by incorporating few changes based on the UGC regulations for Choice based credit system. The proposed framework gives an insight on the nature of modifications that are needed. By adopting this, BDS Course regulations can also follow CBCS without neglecting or reducing the weightage of any subject.

  1. The Proposal of a BDS Syllabus Framework to Suit Choice Based Credit System (CBCS)

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, KR; Narayan, KA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Higher education takes a new dimension universally in the form of choice based Credit System (CBCS). In India, the University Grants Commission (UGC) has made CBCS mandatory in all fields except for Health Profession. Not much attempts were made in designing a BDS syllabus to suit CBCS. Aim Aim of the study was to propose a model dental syllabus to fit into choice based credit system. Materials and Methods A model BDS syllabus Prototype for CBCS was designed based on the UGC guidelines for terms as well as calculations for CBCS. Engineering curriculum models from IIT and Anna University were also referred to. Results Semester based BDS syllabus was designed without changing the norms of Dental Council of India (DCI). All the must know areas of the subjects were considered as “core” areas and the desirable and nice to know areas are left for “electives” by the students. By this method, none of the subject was left out at the same time students are provided with electives to learn deeper on their topics of choice. Conclusion The existing BDS syllabus can be effectively modified by incorporating few changes based on the UGC regulations for Choice based credit system. The proposed framework gives an insight on the nature of modifications that are needed. By adopting this, BDS Course regulations can also follow CBCS without neglecting or reducing the weightage of any subject. PMID:27656467

  2. Space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, L. F.; Durney, G. P.; Case, M. C.; Kenneway, A. J., III; Wise, R. C.; Rinehart, D.; Bessette, R. J.; Pulling, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A pressure suit for high altitude flights, particularly space missions is reported. The suit is designed for astronauts in the Apollo space program and may be worn both inside and outside a space vehicle, as well as on the lunar surface. It comprises an integrated assembly of inner comfort liner, intermediate pressure garment, and outer thermal protective garment with removable helmet, and gloves. The pressure garment comprises an inner convoluted sealing bladder and outer fabric restraint to which are attached a plurality of cable restraint assemblies. It provides versitility in combination with improved sealing and increased mobility for internal pressures suitable for life support in the near vacuum of outer space.

  3. EMU Suit Performance Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Benson, Elizabeth; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must be built and tested with human subjects. However, numerous design iterations will occur before the hardware meets those requirements. Traditional draw-prototype-test paradigms for research and development are prohibitively expensive with today's shrinking Government budgets. Personnel at NASA are developing modern simulation techniques that focus on a human-centric design paradigm. These new techniques make use of virtual prototype simulations and fully adjustable physical prototypes of suit hardware. This is extremely advantageous and enables comprehensive design down-selections to be made early in the design process. Objectives: The primary objective was to test modern simulation techniques for evaluating the human performance component of two EMU suit concepts, pivoted and planar style hard upper torso (HUT). Methods: This project simulated variations in EVA suit shoulder joint design and subject anthropometry and then measured the differences in shoulder mobility caused by the modifications. These estimations were compared to human-in-the-loop test data gathered during past suited testing using four subjects (two large males, two small females). Results: Results demonstrated that EVA suit modeling and simulation are feasible design tools for evaluating and optimizing suit design based on simulated performance. The suit simulation model was found to be advantageous in its ability to visually represent complex motions and volumetric reach zones in three dimensions, giving designers a faster and deeper comprehension of suit component performance vs. human performance. Suit models were able to discern differing movement capabilities between EMU HUT configurations, generic suit fit concerns, and specific suit fit concerns for crewmembers based

  4. TFA Systems: A Unique Group Treatment of Spouse Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clow, Daniel R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a group treatment model using Thought-Feeling-Action (TFA) Systems, an offense- and offender-specific group treatment for abusers. Describes use of TFA Systems in group of court-referred male spouse-abusers. Reviews evolution of TFA Systems, then focuses on TFA Systems treatment of spouse abusers. Notes that system can be adapted to other…

  5. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-01

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s-1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical

  6. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium–heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    DOE PAGES

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-27

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium–heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient Amore » Redi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m 2 s −1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of A Redi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of A Redi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of A Redi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of A Redi below the thermocline than is seen in

  7. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  8. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  9. Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch Education and Public Outreach Support of NASA's Strategic Goals in Fiscal Year 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA plans to send people beyond low Earth orbit, it is important to educate and inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, scientist, and general public. This is so important to NASA future that it is one of the agencies strategic goals. The Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is actively involved in helping to achieve this goal by sharing our hardware and technical experts with students, educators, and the general public and educating them about the challenges of human space flight, with Education and Public Outreach (EPO). This paper summarizes the Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch EPO efforts throughout fiscal year 2012.

  10. Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch Education and Public Outreach Support of NASA's Strategic Goals in Fiscal Year 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.

    2013-01-01

    As NASA plans to send people beyond low Earth orbit, it is important to educate and inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, scientists, and the general public. This is so important to NASA s future that it is one of the agency s strategic goals. The Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is actively involved in achieving this goal by sharing our hardware and technical experts with students, educators, and the general public and educating them about the challenges of human space flight, with Education and Public Outreach (EPO). This paper summarizes the Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch EPO efforts throughout fiscal year 2012.

  11. A Unique Photon Bombardment System for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The innovative Electromagnetic Radiation Collection and Concentration System (EMRCCS) described is the foundation for the development of a multiplicity of space and terrestrial system formats. The system capability allows its use in the visual, infrared, and ultraviolet ranges of the spectrum for EM collection, concentration, source/receptor tracking, and targeting. The nonimaging modular optical system uses a physically static position aperture for EM radiation collection. Folded optics provide the concentration of the radiation and source autotracking. The collected and concentrated electromagnetic radiation is utilized in many applications, e.g., solar spectrum in thermal and associative photon bombardment applications for hazardous waste management, water purification, metal hardening, hydrogen generation, photovoltaics, etc., in both space and terrestrial segment utilization. Additionally, at the high end of the concentration capability range, i.e., 60,000+, a solar-pulsed laser system is possible.

  12. A unique modulation system for two channel data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    A simple low cost system is reported for the telemetry of information from meteorological rocket payloads including parachute borne systems. It uses S- or L-band microwave links with low cost oscillator type transmitters. An extension of this system to transmit two channels of data simultaneously by standard time and frequency multiplexing techniques as a sampled pulse is described. One channel is represented by the pulse repetition rate while the other channel is represented by the instantaneous duty cycle of the pulse train.

  13. The Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS): An Integrated Suite of Tools for Measuring Performance and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.; Connor, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    statistical evaluation of the performance of large groups of flights. This paper describes the integrated suite of tools that will assist analysts in evaluating the operational performance and safety of the national air transport system, the air carrier, and the aircrew.

  14. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 represents the second integrated prototype developed and tested to mature a design that uses advanced technologies to reduce consumables, improve robustness, and provide additional capabilities over the current state of the art. PLSS 2.0 was developed in 2012, with extensive functional evaluations and system performance testing through mid-2014. In late 2014, PLSS 2.0 was integrated with the Mark III space suit in an ambient laboratory environment to facilitate manned testing, designated PLSS 2.0 Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) testing, in which the PLSS prototype performed the primary life support functions, including suit pressure regulation, ventilation, carbon dioxide control, and cooling of the test subject and PLSS avionics. The intent of this testing was to obtain subjective test subject feedback regarding qualitative aspects of PLSS 2.0 performance such as thermal comfort, sounds, smells, and suit pressure fluctuations due to the cycling carbon dioxide removal system, as well as to collect PLSS performance data over a range of human metabolic rates from 500-3000 Btu/hr. Between October 27 and December 18, 2014, nineteen two-hour simulated EVA test points were conducted in which suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to achieve a target metabolic rate. Six test subjects simulated nominal and emergency EVA conditions with varied test parameters including metabolic rate profile, carbon dioxide removal control mode, cooling water temperature, and Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (state of the art or prototype). The nineteen test points achieved more than 60 hours of test time, with 36 hours accounting for simulated EVA time. The PLSS 2.0 test article performed nominally throughout the test series, confirming design intentions for the advanced PLSS. Test subjects' subjective feedback provided valuable insight into thermal comfort and perceptions of suit pressure fluctuations that will influence future

  15. Instrument Suite for Vertical Characterization of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico; Jones, Hollis; Finne, Theodore; Nicholas, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a suite that provides four simultaneous ion and neutral-atom measurements as a function of altitude, with variable sensitivity for neutral atmospheric species. The variable sensitivity makes it possible to extend the measurements over the altitude range of 100 to more than 700 km. The four instruments in the suite are (1) a neutral wind-temperature spectrometer (WTS), (2) an ion-drift ion-temperature spectrometer (IDTS), (3) a neutral mass spectrometer (NMS), and (4) an ion mass spectrometer (IMS).

  16. Apollo/Skylab suit program management systems study. Volume 2: Cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The business management methods employed in the performance of the Apollo-Skylab Suit Program are studied. The data accumulated over the span of the contract as well as the methods used to accumulate the data are examined. Management methods associated with the monitoring and control of resources applied towards the performance of the contract are also studied and recommended upon. The primary objective is the compilation, analysis, and presentation of historical cost performance criteria. Cost data are depicted for all phases of the Apollo-Skylab program in common, meaningful terms, whereby the data may be applicable to future suit program planning efforts.

  17. Design study LANDSAT follow-on mission unique communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Spacecraft subsystem design, performance evaluation, and system tradeoffs are presented for the LANDSAT follow-on mission (LF/O) spacecraft to TDRSS link for the transmission of thematic mapper (TM) and multispectral scanner (MSS) data and for the LF/O spacecraft to STDN and other direct users link for the transmission of TM data. Included are requirements definition, link analysis, subsystem and hardware tradeoffs, conceptual selection, hardware definition, and identification of required new technology. Cost estimates of the recommended communication system including both recurring and non recurring costs are discussed.

  18. A Unique Software System For Simulation-to-Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Victoria I.; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    "Simulation-to-Flight" is a research development concept to reduce costs and increase testing efficiency of future major aeronautical research efforts at NASA. The simulation-to-flight concept is achieved by using common software and hardware, procedures, and processes for both piloted-simulation and flight testing. This concept was applied to the design and development of two full-size transport simulators, a research system installed on a NASA B-757 airplane, and two supporting laboratories. This paper describes the software system that supports the simulation-to-flight facilities. Examples of various simulation-to-flight experimental applications were also provided.

  19. Unique Systems Analysis Task 7, Advanced Subsonic Technologies Evaluation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Bettner, J. L.; Stratton, S.

    2004-01-01

    To retain a preeminent U.S. position in the aircraft industry, aircraft passenger mile costs must be reduced while at the same time, meeting anticipated more stringent environmental regulations. A significant portion of these improvements will come from the propulsion system. A technology evaluation and system analysis was accomplished under this task, including areas such as aerodynamics and materials and improved methods for obtaining low noise and emissions. Previous subsonic evaluation analyses have identified key technologies in selected components for propulsion systems for year 2015 and beyond. Based on the current economic and competitive environment, it is clear that studies with nearer turn focus that have a direct impact on the propulsion industry s next generation product are required. This study will emphasize the year 2005 entry into service time period. The objective of this study was to determine which technologies and materials offer the greatest opportunities for improving propulsion systems. The goals are twofold. The first goal is to determine an acceptable compromise between the thermodynamic operating conditions for A) best performance, and B) acceptable noise and chemical emissions. The second goal is the evaluation of performance, weight and cost of advanced materials and concepts on the direct operating cost of an advanced regional transport of comparable technology level.

  20. Suited for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the basic functions of space suits for EVA astronauts. Space suits are also described from the past, present and future space missions. The contents include: 1) Why Do You Need A Space Suit?; 2) Generic EVA System Requirements; 3) Apollo Lunar Surface Cycling Certification; 4) EVA Operating Cycles for Mars Surface Missions; 5) Mars Surface EVA Mission Cycle Requirements; 6) Robustness Durability Requirements Comparison; 7) Carry-Weight Capabilities; 8) EVA System Challenges (Mars); 9) Human Planetary Surface Exploration Experience; 10) NASA Johnson Space Center Planetary Analog Activities; 11) Why Perform Remote Field Tests; and 12) Other Reasons Why We Perform Remote Field Tests.

  1. Development of a Nutritional Delivery System to Feed Crew in a Pressurized Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. W.; Leonig, M. L.; Douglas, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    The contingency scenario for an emergency cabin depressurization event may require crewmembers to subsist in a pressurized suit for up to 144 hours. This scenario requires the capability for safe nutrition delivery through a helmet feed port against a 4 psi pressure differential to enable crewmembers to maintain strength and cognition to perform critical tasks. Two nutritional delivery prototypes were developed and analyzed for compatibility with the helmet feed port interface and for operational effectiveness against the pressure differential. The bag-in-bag (BiB) prototype, designed to equalize the suit pressure with the beverage pouch and enable a crewmember to drink normally, delivered water successfully to three different subjects in suits pressurized to 4 psi. The Boa restrainer pouch, designed to provide mechanical leverage to overcome the pressure differential, did not operate sufficiently. Guidelines were developed and compiled for contingency beverages that provide macro-nutritional requirements, a minimum one-year shelf life, and compatibility with the delivery hardware. Evaluation results and food product parameters have the potential to be used to improve future prototype designs and develop complete nutritional beverages for contingency events. These feeding capabilities would have additional use on extended surface mission EVAs, where the current in-suit drinking device may be insufficient.

  2. Response of the skeletal system to helicopter-unique vibration.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, J R

    1978-01-01

    An 18-month prospective skeletal system study was conducted on flying and nonflying personnel relative to chronic low-frequency vibration as experienced in helicopter flight. The aviators were initial entry students in rotary-wing training while the non-flying participants were beginning basic military training. Comparisons were made on the basis of anthropometric measurements, radiological studies, and bone mineral density changes as measured by photon absorption. The bone mineral densitometry showed no significant variation in the aviator group. A short-term 10% demineralization of the distal ulna in the non-flying group was noted immediately following the physical training. The final bone mineral density of basic training subjects returned to the initial level 18 months after the physical training. It was concluded that the helicopter aircrew members under study were exposed to levels of vibration below the threshold of vibration required to produce a measurable change in the skeletal system.

  3. Onboard Systems Record Unique Videos of Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Ecliptic Enterprises Corporation, headquartered in Pasadena, California, provided onboard video systems for rocket and space shuttle launches before it was tasked by Ames Research Center to craft the Data Handling Unit that would control sensor instruments onboard the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) spacecraft. The technological capabilities the company acquired on this project, as well as those gained developing a high-speed video system for monitoring the parachute deployments for the Orion Pad Abort Test Program at Dryden Flight Research Center, have enabled the company to offer high-speed and high-definition video for geosynchronous satellites and commercial space missions, providing remarkable footage that both informs engineers and inspires the imagination of the general public.

  4. Anthropometric data from launch and entry suited test subjects for the design of a recumbent seating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoycos, Lara E.; Klute, Glen K.

    1993-01-01

    Returning space crews to Earth in a recumbent position requires the design of a new seating system. Current anthropometric data are based on measurements taken while the subjects were unsuited and sitting. To be most accurate, it is necessary to design by measurements of subjects in the launch and entry suit in a recumbent position. Since the design of the recumbent seating system must meet the requirements of both 5th percentile Japanese female and 95th percentile American male crew members, a delta is reported rather than absolute measurements of the test subjects. This delta is the difference in the measurements taken with the subjects unsuited and sitting and those taken with the subjects suited and recumbent. This delta, representative of the change due to the suit, can be added to the existing Man-Systems Integration Standards (NASA-STD-3000) anthropometric data to project the measurements for 5th percentile Japanese female and 95th percentile American male crew members. A delta accounting for the spinal elongation caused by prolonged exposures to microgravity is added as well. Both unpressurized and pressurized suit conditions are considered. Background information, the test protocol and procedure, analysis of the data, and recommendations are reported.

  5. A unique multi-access laser communications transceiver system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Monte

    1990-01-01

    A 'many points in one point' multiaccess laser system has been examined, and results are reported which indicating the feasibility of optical communications multiaccess communications is feasible and that the resultant terminal size and with savings are very substantial compared to the dedicated optical terminals or RF multiaccess approaches. A preliminary design has been accomplished of a package that can weigh less than 150 pounds and which uses a 10-in. effective diameter fixed telescope and requires less than 100 W of regulated power and less than 8 cu ft of space.

  6. Unique system of photoreceptors in sea urchin tube feet

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich-Lüter, Esther M; Dupont, Sam; Arboleda, Enrique; Hausen, Harald; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2011-01-01

    Different sea urchin species show a vast variety of responses to variations in light intensity; however, despite this behavioral evidence for photosensitivity, light sensing in these animals has remained an enigma. Genome information of the recently sequenced purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) allowed us to address this question from a previously unexplored molecular perspective by localizing expression of the rhabdomeric opsin Sp-opsin4 and Sp-pax6, two genes essential for photoreceptor function and development, respectively. Using a specifically designed antibody against Sp-Opsin4 and in situ hybridization for both genes, we detected expression in two distinct groups of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) located in the animal's numerous tube feet. Specific reactivity of the Sp-Opsin4 antibody with sea star optic cushions, which regulate phototaxis, suggests a similar visual function in sea urchins. Ultrastructural characterization of the sea urchin PRCs revealed them to be of a microvillar receptor type. Our data suggest that echinoderms, in contrast to chordates, deploy a microvillar, r-opsin–expressing PRC type for vision, a feature that has been so far documented only in protostome animals. Surprisingly, sea urchin PRCs lack any associated screening pigment. Indeed, one of the tube foot PRC clusters may account for directional vision by being shaded through the opaque calcite skeleton. The PRC axons connect to the animal internal nervous system, suggesting an integrative function beyond local short circuits. Because juveniles display no phototaxis until skeleton completion, we suggest a model in which the entire sea urchin, deploying its skeleton as PRC screening device, functions as a huge compound eye. PMID:21536888

  7. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  8. Orbit Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, Cathy; Williams, Kevin; Gentry, Philip; Brownfield, Dana; Hallstrom, John; Stuit, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Orbit Software Suite is used to support a variety of NASA/DM (Dependable Multiprocessor) mission planning and analysis activities on the IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) platform. The suite of Orbit software tools (Orbit Design and Orbit Dynamics) resides on IPS/Linux workstations, and is used to perform mission design and analysis tasks corresponding to trajectory/ launch window, rendezvous, and proximity operations flight segments. A list of tools in Orbit Software Suite represents tool versions established during/after the Equipment Rehost-3 Project.

  9. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan T.; Blanco, Raul A.; Watson, Richard D.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Sipila, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) space suit and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) architecture trade study and the current state of the work to mature the requirements and products to the mission concept review level. The mission requirements and the resulting concept of operations will be discussed. A historical context will be presented as to present the similarities and differences from previous NASA missions. That will set the stage for the trade study where all options for both pressure garment and life support were considered. The rationale for the architecture decisions will then be presented. Since the trade study did identity risks, the subsequent tests and analyses that mitigated the risks will be discussed. Lastly, the current state of the effort will be provided.

  10. Legal suits: pharmaceutical industry strategies to introduce new drugs in the Brazilian public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Chieffi, Ana Luiza; Barata, Rita de Cássia Barradas

    2010-06-01

    To assess the distribution rate of legal suits according to drug (manufacturer), prescribing physician, and attorney filing the lawsuit. A descriptive study was carried out to assess the lawsuits in the São Paulo State (Southeastern Brazil) courts registry in 2006, and amounts spent in complying with these lawsuits, and total costs with medication thus resulting. In 2006, the São Paulo State Administration spent 65 million Brazilian reais in compliance with court decisions to provide medication to approximately 3,600 individuals. The total cost of the medication was 1.2 billion Brazilian reais. In the period studied, 2,927 lawsuits were examined. These lawsuits were filed by 565 legal professionals, among which 549 were attorneys engaged by private individuals (97.17% of the total legal professionals). The drugs scope of the lawsuits had been prescribed by 878 different physicians. By assessing the number of lawsuits filed per attorney, it was found that 35% of them were brought before the courts by 1% of them. The data related to the lawsuits and to the medication classified according to manufacturer, show that a small number of attorneys is responsible for the largest number of lawsuits filed to obtain these drugs. The finding that more than 70% of the lawsuits filed for certain drugs are the responsibility of one single attorney, may suggest a close connection between this professional and the manufacturer.

  11. Pulsed magnetic field generation suited for low-field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunkar, Neelam Prabhu; Selvaraj, Jayaprakash; Theh, Wei-Shen; Weber, Robert; Mina, Mani

    2018-05-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields can be used to provide instantaneous localized magnetic field variations. In presence of static fields, pulsed field variations are often used to apply torques and in-effect to measure behavior of magnetic moments in different states. In this work, the design and experimental performance of a pulsed magnetic field generator suited for low static field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications is presented. One of the challenges of low bias field NMR measurements is low signal to noise ratio due to the comparable nature of the bias field and the pulsed field. Therefore, a circuit is designed to apply pulsed currents through an inductive load, leading to generation of pulsed magnetic fields which can temporarily overpower the effect of the bias field on magnetic moments. The designed circuit will be tuned to operate at the precession frequency of 1H (protons) placed in a bias field produced by permanent magnets. The designed circuit parameters may be tuned to operate under different bias conditions. Therefore, low field NMR measurements can be performed for different bias fields. Circuit simulations were used to determine design parameters, corresponding experimental measurements will be presented in this work.

  12. Taxiway Navigation and Situation Awareness (T-NASA) System : problem, design philosophy, and description of an integrated display suite for low-visibility airport surface operations

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-01-01

    An integrated cockpit display suite, the T-NASA (Taxiway Navigation and : Situation Awareness) system, is under development for NASA's Terminal Area : Productivity (TAP) Low-Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) : program. This system ha...

  13. Compact survey and inspection day/night image sensor suite for small unmanned aircraft systems (EyePod)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Alan; Anderson, Scott A.; Linne von Berg, Dale; Davidson, Morgan; Holt, Niel; Kruer, Melvin; Wilson, Michael L.

    2010-04-01

    EyePod is a compact survey and inspection day/night imaging sensor suite for small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). EyePod generates georeferenced image products in real-time from visible near infrared (VNIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) imaging sensors and was developed under the ONR funded FEATHAR (Fusion, Exploitation, Algorithms, and Targeting for High-Altitude Reconnaissance) program. FEATHAR is being directed and executed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in conjunction with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) and FEATHAR's goal is to develop and test new tactical sensor systems specifically designed for small manned and unmanned platforms (payload weight < 50 lbs). The EyePod suite consists of two VNIR/LWIR (day/night) gimbaled sensors that, combined, provide broad area survey and focused inspection capabilities. Each EyePod sensor pairs an HD visible EO sensor with a LWIR bolometric imager providing precision geo-referenced and fully digital EO/IR NITFS output imagery. The LWIR sensor is mounted to a patent-pending jitter-reduction stage to correct for the high-frequency motion typically found on small aircraft and unmanned systems. Details will be presented on both the wide-area and inspection EyePod sensor systems, their modes of operation, and results from recent flight demonstrations.

  14. Meta II: Multi-Model Language Suite for Cyber Physical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    AVM META) projects have developed tools for designing cyber physical (or Mechatronic ) Systems . These systems are increasingly complex, take much...projects have developed tools for designing cyber physical (CPS) (or Mechatronic ) systems . Exemplified by modern amphibious and ground military...and parametric interface of Simulink models and defines associations with CyPhy components and component interfaces. 2. Embedded Systems Modeling

  15. SolCalc: A Suite for the Calculation and the Display of Magnetic Fields Generated by Solenoid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.

    2014-07-01

    SolCalc is a software suite that computes and displays magnetic fields generated by a three dimensional (3D) solenoid system. Examples of such systems are the Mu2e magnet system and Helical Solenoids for muon cooling systems. SolCalc was originally coded in Matlab, and later upgraded to a compiled version (called MEX) to improve solving speed. Matlab was chosen because its graphical capabilities represent an attractive feature over other computer languages. Solenoid geometries can be created using any text editor or spread sheets and can be displayed dynamically in 3D. Fields are computed from any given list of coordinates. The field distributionmore » on the surfaces of the coils can be displayed as well. SolCalc was benchmarked against a well-known commercial software for speed and accuracy and the results compared favorably.« less

  16. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    NASA has a strategic knowledge gap (B5-3) about what life signatures leak/vent from our Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems. This will impact how we search for evidence of life on Mars. Characterizing contamination leaks from our suits will help us comply with planetary protection guidelines, and better plan human exploration missions.

  17. Enhancing Autonomy of Aerial Systems Via Integration of Visual Sensors into Their Avionics Suite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    aerial platform for subsequent visual sensor integration. 14. SUBJECT TERMS autonomous system, quadrotors, direct method, inverse ...CONTROLLER ARCHITECTURE .....................................................43 B. INVERSE DYNAMICS IN THE VIRTUAL DOMAIN ......................45 1...control station GPS Global-Positioning System IDVD inverse dynamics in the virtual domain ILP integer linear program INS inertial-navigation system

  18. A freely available real-time operating system well suited for astronomy and the physical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, Ettore; Monnier, John D.; Thureau, Nathalie D.; Berger, David H.

    2006-06-01

    This paper wants to be a practical example in building a real-time data-acquisition and control system from scratch using relatively non-expensive PC hardware and open-source software. The practical example of building the control system for the Michigan Infrared Combiner (MIRC) at the CHARA interferometer will be used to give the reader a 'hands-on' experience in installing and configuring the RTAI-Fusion real-time operating system and developing a complete control system with it.

  19. Advantages and difficulties of implementation of flat-panel multimedia monitoring system in a surgical MRI suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckard, Michael; Ratib, Osman M.; Rubino, Gregory

    2002-05-01

    Our project was to design and implement a ceiling-mounted multi monitor display unit for use in a high-field MRI surgical suite. The system is designed to simultaneously display images/data from four different digital and/or analog sources with: minimal interference from the adjacent high magnetic field, minimal signal-to-noise/artifact contribution to the MRI images and compliance with codes and regulations for the sterile neuro-surgical environment. Provisions were also made to accommodate the importing and exporting of video information via PACS and remote processing/display for clinical and education uses. Commercial fiber optic receivers/transmitters were implemented along with supporting video processing and distribution equipment to solve the video communication problem. A new generation of high-resolution color flat panel displays was selected for the project. A custom-made monitor mount and in-suite electronics enclosure was designed and constructed at UCLA. Difficulties with implementing an isolated AC power system are discussed and a work-around solution presented.

  20. Uniqueness of solutions for Keller-Segel system of porous medium type coupled to fluid equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hantaek; Kang, Kyungkeun; Kim, Seick

    2018-04-01

    We prove the uniqueness of Hölder continuous weak solutions via duality argument and vanishing viscosity method for the Keller-Segel system of porous medium type equations coupled to the Stokes system in dimensions three. An important step is the estimate of the Green function of parabolic equations with lower order terms of variable coefficients, which seems to be of independent interest.

  1. Assessment of Suited Reach Envelope in an Underwater Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Han; Benson, Elizabeth; Bernal, Yaritza; Jarvis, Sarah; Meginnis, Ian; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the performance of a crewmember in an extravehicular activity (EVA) space suit presents unique challenges. The kinematic patterns of suited motions are difficult to reproduce in gravity. Additionally, 3-D suited kinematics have been practically and technically difficult to quantify in an underwater environment, in which crewmembers are commonly trained and assessed for performance. The goal of this study is to develop a hardware and software system to predictively evaluate the kinematic mobility of suited crewmembers, by measuring the 3-D reach envelope of the suit in an underwater environment. This work is ultimately aimed at developing quantitative metrics to compare the mobility of the existing Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) to newly developed space suit, such as the Z-2. The EMU has been extensively used at NASA since 1981 for EVA outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. The Z-2 suit is NASA's newest prototype space suit. The suit is comprised of new upper torso and lower torso architectures, which were designed to improve test subject mobility.

  2. Potential of a suite of robot/computer-assisted motivating systems for personalized, home-based, stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle J; Feng, Xin; Johnson, Laura M; Winters, Jack M

    2007-03-01

    There is a need to improve semi-autonomous stroke therapy in home environments often characterized by low supervision of clinical experts and low extrinsic motivation. Our distributed device approach to this problem consists of an integrated suite of low-cost robotic/computer-assistive technologies driven by a novel universal access software framework called UniTherapy. Our design strategy for personalizing the therapy, providing extrinsic motivation and outcome assessment is presented and evaluated. Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential of the suite. A conventional force-reflecting joystick, a modified joystick therapy platform (TheraJoy), and a steering wheel platform (TheraDrive) were tested separately with the UniTherapy software. Stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects completed tracking activities with the devices in different positions. We quantify motor performance across subject groups and across device platforms and muscle activation across devices at two positions in the arm workspace. Trends in the assessment metrics were consistent across devices with able-bodied and high functioning strokes subjects being significantly more accurate and quicker in their motor performance than low functioning subjects. Muscle activation patterns were different for shoulder and elbow across different devices and locations. The Robot/CAMR suite has potential for stroke rehabilitation. By manipulating hardware and software variables, we can create personalized therapy environments that engage patients, address their therapy need, and track their progress. A larger longitudinal study is still needed to evaluate these systems in under-supervised environments such as the home.

  3. Potential of a suite of robot/computer-assisted motivating systems for personalized, home-based, stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle J; Feng, Xin; Johnson, Laura M; Winters, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a need to improve semi-autonomous stroke therapy in home environments often characterized by low supervision of clinical experts and low extrinsic motivation. Our distributed device approach to this problem consists of an integrated suite of low-cost robotic/computer-assistive technologies driven by a novel universal access software framework called UniTherapy. Our design strategy for personalizing the therapy, providing extrinsic motivation and outcome assessment is presented and evaluated. Methods Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential of the suite. A conventional force-reflecting joystick, a modified joystick therapy platform (TheraJoy), and a steering wheel platform (TheraDrive) were tested separately with the UniTherapy software. Stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects completed tracking activities with the devices in different positions. We quantify motor performance across subject groups and across device platforms and muscle activation across devices at two positions in the arm workspace. Results Trends in the assessment metrics were consistent across devices with able-bodied and high functioning strokes subjects being significantly more accurate and quicker in their motor performance than low functioning subjects. Muscle activation patterns were different for shoulder and elbow across different devices and locations. Conclusion The Robot/CAMR suite has potential for stroke rehabilitation. By manipulating hardware and software variables, we can create personalized therapy environments that engage patients, address their therapy need, and track their progress. A larger longitudinal study is still needed to evaluate these systems in under-supervised environments such as the home. PMID:17331243

  4. Heat Exchanger/Humidifier Trade Study and Conceptual Design for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Ventilation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Sompayrac, Robert; Conger, Bruce; Chamberlain, Mateo

    2009-01-01

    As development of the Constellation Space Suit Element progresses, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is critical. The baseline schematic analysis for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) indicates that the ventilation loop will need some method of heat exchange and humidification prior to entering the helmet. A trade study was initiated to identify the challenges associated with conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream for temperature and water vapor control, to survey technological literature and resources on heat exchanger and humidifiers to provide solutions to the problems of conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream, and to propose potential candidate technologies to perform the heat exchanger and humidifier functions. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study and also describes the conceptual designs that NASA developed to address these issues.

  5. Heat Exchanger/Humidifier Trade Study and Conceptual Design for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Ventilation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Conger, Bruce; Sompyrac, Robert; Chamberlain, Mateo

    2008-01-01

    As development of the Constellation Space Suit Element progresses, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is critical. The baseline schematic analysis for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) indicates that the ventilation loop will need some method of heat exchange and humidification prior to entering the helmet. A trade study was initiated to identify the challenges associated with conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream for temperature and water vapor control, to survey technological literature and resources on heat exchanger and humidifiers to provide solutions to the problems of conditioning the spacesuit breathing gas stream, and to propose potential candidate technologies to perform the heat exchanger and humidifier functions. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study and also describes the conceptual designs that NASA developed to address these issues.

  6. Advanced Crew Escape Suit.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Design of the S1032 Launch Entry Suit (LES) began following the Challenger loss and NASA's decision to incorporate a Shuttle crew escape system. The LES (see Figure 1) has successfully supported Shuttle missions since NASA's Return to Flight with STS-26 in September 1988. In 1990, engineers began developing the S1035 Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) to serve as a replacement for the LES. The ACES was designed to be a simplified, lightweight, low-bulk pressure suit which aided self donning/doffing, provided improved comfort, and enhanced overall performance to reduce crew member stress and fatigue. Favorable crew member evaluations of a prototype led to full-scale development and qualification of the S1035 ACES between 1990 and 1992. Production of the S1035 ACES began in February 1993, with the first unit delivered to NASA in May 1994. The S1035 ACES first flew aboard STS-68 in August 1994 and will become the primary crew escape suit when the S1032 LES ends its service life in late 1995. The primary goal of the S1035 development program was to provide improved performance over that of the S1032 to minimize the stress and fatigue typically experienced by crew members. To achieve this, five fundamental design objectives were established, resulting in various material/configuration changes.

  7. Intraoperative computed tomography with integrated navigation system in a multidisciplinary operating suite.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eberhard; Zausinger, Stefan; Morhard, Dominik; Heigl, Thomas; Scheder, Benjamin; Rachinger, Walter; Schichor, Christian; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2009-05-01

    We report our preliminary experience in a prospective series of patients with regard to feasibility, work flow, and image quality using a multislice computed tomographic (CT) scanner combined with a frameless neuronavigation system (NNS). A sliding gantry 40-slice CT scanner was installed in a preexisting operating room. The scanner was connected to a frameless infrared-based NNS. Image data was transferred directly from the scanner into the navigation system. This allowed updating of the NNS during surgery by automated image registration based on the position of the gantry. Intraoperative CT angiography was possible. The patient was positioned on a radiolucent operating table that fits within the bore of the gantry. During image acquisition, the gantry moved over the patient. This table allowed all positions and movements like any normal operating table without compromising the positioning of the patient. For cranial surgery, a carbon-made radiolucent head clamp was fixed to the table. Experience with the first 230 patients confirms the feasibility of intraoperative CT scanning (136 patients with intracranial pathology, 94 patients with spinal lesions). After a specific work flow, interruption of surgery for intraoperative scanning can be limited to 10 to 15 minutes in cranial surgery and to 9 minutes in spinal surgery. Intraoperative imaging changed the course of surgery in 16 of the 230 cases either because control CT scans showed suboptimal screw position (17 of 307 screws, with 9 in 7 patients requiring correction) or that tumor resection was insufficient (9 cases). Intraoperative CT angiography has been performed in 7 cases so far with good image quality to determine residual flow in an aneurysm. Image quality was excellent in spinal and cranial base surgery. The system can be installed in a preexisting operating environment without the need for special surgical instruments. It increases the safety of the patient and the surgeon without necessitating a change

  8. ELAPSE - NASA AMES LISP AND ADA BENCHMARK SUITE: EFFICIENCY OF LISP AND ADA PROCESSING - A SYSTEM EVALUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    One area of research of the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center is devoted to the analysis and enhancement of processors and advanced computer architectures, specifically in support of automation and robotic systems. To compare systems' abilities to efficiently process Lisp and Ada, scientists at Ames Research Center have developed a suite of non-parallel benchmarks called ELAPSE. The benchmark suite was designed to test a single computer's efficiency as well as alternate machine comparisons on Lisp, and/or Ada languages. ELAPSE tests the efficiency with which a machine can execute the various routines in each environment. The sample routines are based on numeric and symbolic manipulations and include two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations, Cholesky decomposition and substitution, Gaussian elimination, high-level data processing, and symbol-list references. Also included is a routine based on a Bayesian classification program sorting data into optimized groups. The ELAPSE benchmarks are available for any computer with a validated Ada compiler and/or Common Lisp system. Of the 18 routines that comprise ELAPSE, provided within this package are 14 developed or translated at Ames. The others are readily available through literature. The benchmark that requires the most memory is CHOLESKY.ADA. Under VAX/VMS, CHOLESKY.ADA requires 760K of main memory. ELAPSE is available on either two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes (standard distribution) or a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. The contents of the diskettes are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The ELAPSE benchmarks were written in 1990. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  9. Emergence of multiple ocean ecosystem drivers in a large ensemble suite with an Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, K. B.; Lin, J.; Frölicher, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes. Marine ecosystem drivers that contribute to stressing ecosystems - including warming, acidification, deoxygenation and perturbations to biological productivity - can co-occur in space and time, but detecting their trends is complicated by the presence of noise associated with natural variability in the climate system. Here we use large initial-condition ensemble simulations with an Earth system model under a historical/RCP8.5 (representative concentration pathway 8.5) scenario over 1950-2100 to consider emergence characteristics for the four individual and combined drivers. Using a 1-standard-deviation (67% confidence) threshold of signal to noise to define emergence with a 30-year trend window, we show that ocean acidification emerges much earlier than other drivers, namely during the 20th century over most of the global ocean. For biological productivity, the anthropogenic signal does not emerge from the noise over most of the global ocean before the end of the 21st century. The early emergence pattern for sea surface temperature in low latitudes is reversed from that of subsurface oxygen inventories, where emergence occurs earlier in the Southern Ocean. For the combined multiple-driver field, 41% of the global ocean exhibits emergence for the 2005-2014 period, and 63% for the 2075-2084 period. The combined multiple-driver field reveals emergence patterns by the end of this century that are relatively high over much of the Southern Ocean, North Pacific, and Atlantic, but relatively low over the tropics and the South Pacific. For the case of two drivers, the tropics including habitats of coral reefs emerges earliest, with this driven by the joint effects of acidification and warming. It is precisely in the regions with pronounced emergence characteristics where marine ecosystems may be expected to be pushed outside of their comfort zone determined by the degree of natural background variability

  10. A Unique Delivery System to Rural Schools: The NMSU-Space Center Microcomputer Van Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amodeo, Luiza B.; And Others

    Collaboration between New Mexico State University's College of Education and three other entities has led to the computer experience microvan program, implemented in 1983, a unique system for bringing microcomputers into rural New Mexico K-12 classrooms. The International Space Hall of Fame Foundation provides the van, International Space Center…

  11. Automated integration of lidar into the LANDFIRE product suite

    Treesearch

    Birgit Peterson; Kurtis J. Nelson; Carl Seielstad; Jason Stoker; W. Matt Jolly; Russell Parsons

    2015-01-01

    Accurate information about three-dimensional canopy structure and wildland fuel across the landscape is necessary for fire behaviour modelling system predictions. Remotely sensed data are invaluable for assessing these canopy characteristics over large areas; lidar data, in particular, are uniquely suited for quantifying three-dimensional canopy structure. Although...

  12. A unique control system simulator for the evaluation of pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlgren, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Because of the low thrust characteristics of solid-propellant pulsed plasma thrusters and their operational requirement to operate in a vacuum environment, unique and sensitive test techniques are required. A technique evolved for testing and evaluating pulsed plasma thrusters in an open- or closed-loop system mode employs a unique air bearing platform as a single-axis simulator on which the thruster is mounted. The simulator described was developed to evaluate pulsed plasma thrusters in the low micropound range; however, the simulator can be extended to cover the operational range of currently developed millipound thrusters.

  13. Emergency Medical Considerations in a Space-Suited Patient.

    PubMed

    Garbino, Alejandro; Nusbaum, Derek M; Buckland, Daniel M; Menon, Anil S; Clark, Jonathan B; Antonsen, Erik L

    The Stratex Project is a high altitude balloon flight that culminated in a freefall from 41,422 m (135,890 ft), breaking the record for the highest freefall to date. Crew recovery operations required an innovative approach due to the unique nature of the event as well as the equipment involved. The parachutist donned a custom space suit similar to a NASA Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), with life support system mounted to the front and a parachute on the back. This space suit had a metal structure around the torso, which, in conjunction with the parachute and life support assembly, created a significant barrier to extraction from the suit in the event of a medical emergency. For this reason the Medical Support Team coordinated with the pressure suit assembly engineer team for integration, training in suit removal, definition of a priori contingency leadership on site, creation of color-coded extraction scenarios, and extraction drills with a suit mock-up that provided insight into limitations to immediate access. This paper discusses novel extraction processes and contrasts the required medical preparation for this type of equipment with the needs of the prior record-holding jump that used a different space suit with easier immediate access. Garbino A, Nusbaum DM, Buckland DM, Menon AS, Clark JB, Antonsen EL. Emergency medical considerations in a space-suited patient. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(11):958-962.

  14. The Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT): A unique facility for propulsion system and adverse weather testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.

    1985-01-01

    A need has arisen for a new wind tunnel facility with unique capabilities for testing propulsion systems and for conducting research in adverse weather conditions. New propulsion system concepts, new aircraft configurations with an unprecedented degree of propulsion system/aircraft integration, and requirements for aircraft operation in adverse weather dictate the need for a new test facility. Required capabilities include simulation of both altitude pressure and temperature, large size, full subsonic speed range, propulsion system operation, and weather simulation (i.e., icing, heavy rain). A cost effective rehabilitation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT) will provide a facility with all these capabilities.

  15. Existence and uniqueness, attraction for stochastic age-structured population systems with diffusion and Poisson jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huabin

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, the problems about the existence and uniqueness, attraction for strong solution of stochastic age-structured population systems with diffusion and Poisson jump are considered. Under the non-Lipschitz condition with the Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case, the existence and uniqueness for such systems is firstly proved by using the Burkholder-Davis-Gundy inequality (B-D-G inequality) and Itô's formula. And then by using a novel inequality technique, some sufficient conditions ensuring the existence for the domain of attraction are established. As another by-product, the exponential stability in mean square moment of strong solution for such systems can be also discussed.

  16. Air conditioned suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, G. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An environmentally controlled suit is described consisting of an airtight outergarment attached by an airtight bellows to the wall of a sterile chamber, an undergarment providing for circulation of air near the skin of the wearer, and a circulation system comprised of air supply and distribution to the extremities of the undegarment and central collection and exhaust of air from the midsection of the undergarment. A workman wearing the undergarment and attached circulation system enters the outer garment through a tunnel in the chamber wall and the attached bellows to work in the chamber without any danger of spreading bacteria.

  17. Validation and Demonstration of the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) in Support of User Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalli, N. R.; Gambacorta, A.; Tan, C.; Iturbide, F.; Barnet, C. D.; Reale, A.; Sun, B.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation overviews the performance of the operational SNPP NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) environmental data record (EDR) products. The SNPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (CrIS/ATMS) suite, the first of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program, is one of NOAA's major investments in our nation's future operational environmental observation capability. The NUCAPS algorithm is a world-class NOAA-operational IR/MW retrieval algorithm based upon the well-established AIRS science team algorithm for deriving temperature, moisture, ozone and carbon trace gas to provide users with state-of-the-art EDR products. Operational use of the products includes the NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS), along with numerous science-user applications. NUCAPS EDR product assessments are made with reference to JPSS Level 1 global requirements, which provide the definitive metrics for assessing that the products have minimally met predefined global performance specifications. The NESDIS/STAR NUCAPS development and validation team recently delivered the Phase 4 algorithm which incorporated critical updates necessary for compatibility with full spectral-resolution (FSR) CrIS sensor data records (SDRs). Based on comprehensive analyses, the NUCAPS Phase 4 CrIS-FSR temperature, moisture and ozone profile EDRs, as well as the carbon trace gas EDRs (CO, CH4 and CO2), are shown o be meeting or close to meeting the JPSS program global requirements. Regional and temporal assessments of interest to EDR users (e.g., AWIPS) will also be presented.

  18. Uniqueness of family therapists as family business systems consultants: a cross-disciplinary investigation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinhee; Danes, Sharon M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to address how the consulting approaches of family therapists working with family businesses differ from those of business consultants. The logic of analytic induction was used to analyze qualitative data from family business consultants with and without training in family therapy. Consultants were asked to respond to two vignettes: one emphasized primarily family system problems, whereas the other emphasized business problems with influencing issues at the family/business intersection. Both similarities and differences were found in reference to problem assessment, consulting goal orientation, intervention strategy focus, consultant role and function, and consulting setting preference between consultants with and without family therapy training. Results indicate that consultants of each discipline provide a unique perspective and expertise that allow them to successfully address the spectrum of issues that family firms face. Further, findings highlight the unique contribution of family therapists to an interdisciplinary consulting team. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  19. A Unique Power System For The ISS Fluids And Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, David A.; Poljak, Mark D.

    2001-01-01

    Unique power control technology has been incorporated into an electrical power control unit (EPCU) for the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The objective is to maximize science throughput by providing a flexible power system that is easily reconfigured by the science payload. Electrical power is at a premium on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU utilizes advanced power management techniques to maximize the power available to the FCF experiments. The EPCU architecture enables dynamic allocation of power from two ISS power channels for experiments. Because of the unique flexible remote power controller (FRPC) design, power channels can be paralleled while maintaining balanced load sharing between the channels. With an integrated and redundant architecture, the EPCU can tolerate multiple faults and still maintain FCF operation. It is important to take full advantage of the EPCU functionality. The EPCU acts as a buffer between the experimenter and the ISS power system with all its complex requirements. However, FCF science payload developers will still need to follow guidelines when designing the FCF payload power system. This is necessary to ensure power system stability, fault coordination, electromagnetic compatibility, and maximum use of available power for gathering scientific data.

  20. Music Education Suites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This publication describes options for designing and equipping middle and high school music education suites, and suggests ways of gaining community support for including full service music suites in new and renovated school facilities. In addition to basic music suites, and practice rooms, other options detailed include: (1) small ensemble…

  1. Music Education Suites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Wayne

    This publication describes options for designing and equipping middle and high school music education suites and suggests means of gaining community support for including full service music suites in new and renovated facilities. It covers the basic music suite, practice rooms, small ensemble rehearsal rooms, recording/MIDI (musical instrument…

  2. Humans vs Hardware: The Unique World of NASA Human System Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, W.; Havenhill, M.; Overton, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spaceflight risks to crew health and performance is a crucial aspect of preparing for exploration missions in the future. The research activities of the Human Research Program (HRP) provide substantial evidence to support most risk reduction work. The Human System Risk Board (HSRB), acting on behalf of the Office of Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO), assesses these risks and assigns likelihood and consequence ratings to track progress. Unfortunately, many traditional approaches in risk assessment such as those used in the engineering aspects of spaceflight are difficult to apply to human system risks. This presentation discusses the unique aspects of risk assessment from the human system risk perspective and how these limitations are accommodated and addressed in order to ensure that reasonable inputs are provided to support the OCHMO's overall risk posture for manned exploration missions.

  3. Generalised solutions for fully nonlinear PDE systems and existence-uniqueness theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzourakis, Nikos

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a new theory of generalised solutions which applies to fully nonlinear PDE systems of any order and allows for merely measurable maps as solutions. This approach bypasses the standard problems arising by the application of Distributions to PDEs and is not based on either integration by parts or on the maximum principle. Instead, our starting point builds on the probabilistic representation of derivatives via limits of difference quotients in the Young measures over a toric compactification of the space of jets. After developing some basic theory, as a first application we consider the Dirichlet problem and we prove existence-uniqueness-partial regularity of solutions to fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic 2nd order systems and also existence of solutions to the ∞-Laplace system of vectorial Calculus of Variations in L∞.

  4. Overview of NASA's MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) snow-cover Earth System Data Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, George A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Roman, Miguel O.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution, extent, duration and timing of snowmelt is critical for characterizing the Earth's climate system and its changes. As a result, snow cover is one of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) essential climate variables (ECVs). Consistent, long-term datasets of snow cover are needed to study interannual variability and snow climatology. The NASA snow-cover datasets generated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua spacecraft and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are NASA Earth System Data Records (ESDR). The objective of the snow-cover detection algorithms is to optimize the accuracy of mapping snow-cover extent (SCE) and to minimize snow-cover detection errors of omission and commission using automated, globally applied algorithms to produce SCE data products. Advancements in snow-cover mapping have been made with each of the four major reprocessings of the MODIS data record, which extends from 2000 to the present. MODIS Collection 6 (C6) and VIIRS Collection 1 (C1) represent the state-of-the-art global snow cover mapping algorithms and products for NASA Earth science. There were many revisions made in the C6 algorithms which improved snow-cover detection accuracy and information content of the data products. These improvements have also been incorporated into the NASA VIIRS snow cover algorithms for C1. Both information content and usability were improved by including the Normalized Snow Difference Index (NDSI) and a quality assurance (QA) data array of algorithm processing flags in the data product, along with the SCE map.The increased data content allows flexibility in using the datasets for specific regions and end-user applications.Though there are important differences between the MODIS and VIIRS instruments (e.g., the VIIRS 375m native resolution compared to MODIS 500 m), the snow detection algorithms and data

  5. Overview of NASA's MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) snow-cover Earth System Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, George A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Román, Miguel O.

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the distribution, extent, duration and timing of snowmelt is critical for characterizing the Earth's climate system and its changes. As a result, snow cover is one of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) essential climate variables (ECVs). Consistent, long-term datasets of snow cover are needed to study interannual variability and snow climatology. The NASA snow-cover datasets generated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua spacecraft and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are NASA Earth System Data Records (ESDR). The objective of the snow-cover detection algorithms is to optimize the accuracy of mapping snow-cover extent (SCE) and to minimize snow-cover detection errors of omission and commission using automated, globally applied algorithms to produce SCE data products. Advancements in snow-cover mapping have been made with each of the four major reprocessings of the MODIS data record, which extends from 2000 to the present. MODIS Collection 6 (C6; https://nsidc.org/data/modis/data_summaries) and VIIRS Collection 1 (C1; https://doi.org/10.5067/VIIRS/VNP10.001) represent the state-of-the-art global snow-cover mapping algorithms and products for NASA Earth science. There were many revisions made in the C6 algorithms which improved snow-cover detection accuracy and information content of the data products. These improvements have also been incorporated into the NASA VIIRS snow-cover algorithms for C1. Both information content and usability were improved by including the Normalized Snow Difference Index (NDSI) and a quality assurance (QA) data array of algorithm processing flags in the data product, along with the SCE map. The increased data content allows flexibility in using the datasets for

  6. Extravehicular Space Suit Bearing Technology Development Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yan; Liu, Xiangyang; Guanghui, Xie

    2017-03-01

    Pressure bearing has been acting an important role in the EVA (extravehicular activity) suit as a main mobility component. EVA suit bearing has its unique traits on the material, dustproof design, seal, interface, lubrication, load and performance. This paper states the peculiarity and development of the pressure bearing on the construction design element, load and failure mode, and performance and test from the point view of structure design. The status and effect of EVA suit pressure bearing is introduced in the paper. This analysis method can provide reference value for our country’s EVA suit pressure bearing design and development.

  7. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at sub-atmospheric pressures that simulate a PLSS ventilation loop environment. Head/flow performance and maximum efficiency point data were used to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment, and produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSE ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm, consuming only 9 W of electric power using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power regenerative blower can meet the performance requirements for future space suit life support systems.

  8. Describing different brain computer interface systems through a unique model: a UML implementation.

    PubMed

    Quitadamo, Lucia Rita; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Cardarilli, Gian Carlo; Bianchi, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    All the protocols currently implemented in brain computer interface (BCI) experiments are characterized by different structural and temporal entities. Moreover, due to the lack of a unique descriptive model for BCI systems, there is not a standard way to define the structure and the timing of a BCI experimental session among different research groups and there is also great discordance on the meaning of the most common terms dealing with BCI, such as trial, run and session. The aim of this paper is to provide a unified modeling language (UML) implementation of BCI systems through a unique dynamic model which is able to describe the main protocols defined in the literature (P300, mu-rhythms, SCP, SSVEP, fMRI) and demonstrates to be reasonable and adjustable according to different requirements. This model includes a set of definitions of the typical entities encountered in a BCI, diagrams which explain the structural correlations among them and a detailed description of the timing of a trial. This last represents an innovation with respect to the models already proposed in the literature. The UML documentation and the possibility of adapting this model to the different BCI systems built to date, make it a basis for the implementation of new systems and a mean for the unification and dissemination of resources. The model with all the diagrams and definitions reported in the paper are the core of the body language framework, a free set of routines and tools for the implementation, optimization and delivery of cross-platform BCI systems.

  9. A spectroscopic and photometric study of the unique pre- main sequence system KH 15D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Catrina Marie

    2004-09-01

    As a class, T Tauri stars are YSOs, some which are surrounded by circumstellar disks, and are recognized as the final stage of low-mass star formation. They also represent the earliest stage of stellar evolution that is optically visible, and, therefore, can be easily studied in detail. Understanding the processes through which these young stars interact with and eventually disperse their circumstellar disks is critical for understanding how they evolve from the T Tauri phase to the zero age main sequence (ZAMS), and how this affects the formation of planets, as well as their rotational evolution. KH 15D is a unique eclipsing system that could provide invaluable insight into the evolution of circumstellar disk material, as well as clues to the close stellar environment. Discovered in 1997, this star system has been observed to undergo an eclipse every 48 days in which the star's light is diminished by 3.5 magnitudes. What is so unusual about the eclipse is that the length of the eclipse has evolved over time, growing in length from 16 days initially, to ˜25 days in 2002/2003. Evolution of disk material on these timescales has never been observed before, and therefore provides us with a unique opportunity to refine our theories about remnant disks around young stars, how they transition, possibly into planets, and what role they play as the star matures and arrives on the zero age main sequence. Additionally, high resolution spectra obtained at specific phases during the December 2001 eclipse showed that as the obscuring matter cut across the star, dramatic spectral changes in the Hα and Hβ lines were seen. Its unique eclipse produces a “natural coronographic” effect in which the stellar photosphere is occulted, revealing details of its magnetosphere and surroundings during eclipse. There is evidence that the weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS) central to the system is actively accreting gas, although probably not at the rate of a typical classical T Tauri star

  10. Unique organization and unprecedented diversity of the Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens cellulosome system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhivin, Olga; Dassa, Bareket; Moraïs, Sarah

    The organization of the B. cellulosolvens cellulosome is unique compared to previously described cellulosome systems. In contrast to all other known cellulosomes, the cohesin types are reversed for all scaffoldins i.e., the type II cohesins are located on the enzyme-integrating primary scaffoldin, whereas the type I cohesins are located on the anchoring scaffoldins. Many of the type II dockerin-bearing ORFs include X60 modules, which are known to stabilize type II cohesin–dockerin interactions. In the present work, we focused on revealing the architectural arrangement of cellulosome structure in this bacterium by examining numerous interactions between the various cohesin and dockerin modules.more » In total, we cloned and expressed 43 representative cohesins and 27 dockerins. The results revealed various possible architectures of cell-anchored and cell-free cellulosomes, which serve to assemble distinctive cellulosome types via three distinct cohesin–dockerin specificities: type I, type II, and a novel-type designated R (distinct from type III interactions, predominant in ruminococcal cellulosomes). The results of this study provide novel insight into the architecture and function of the most intricate and extensive cellulosomal system known today, thereby extending significantly our overall knowledge base of cellulosome systems and their components. The robust cellulosome system of B. cellulosolvens, with its unique binding specificities and reversal of cohesin–dockerin types, has served to amend our view of the cellulosome paradigm. Revealing new cellulosomal interactions and arrangements is critical for designing high-efficiency artificial cellulosomes for conversion of plant-derived cellulosic biomass towards improved production of biofuels.« less

  11. Unique organization and unprecedented diversity of the Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens cellulosome system

    DOE PAGES

    Zhivin, Olga; Dassa, Bareket; Moraïs, Sarah; ...

    2017-09-07

    The organization of the B. cellulosolvens cellulosome is unique compared to previously described cellulosome systems. In contrast to all other known cellulosomes, the cohesin types are reversed for all scaffoldins i.e., the type II cohesins are located on the enzyme-integrating primary scaffoldin, whereas the type I cohesins are located on the anchoring scaffoldins. Many of the type II dockerin-bearing ORFs include X60 modules, which are known to stabilize type II cohesin–dockerin interactions. In the present work, we focused on revealing the architectural arrangement of cellulosome structure in this bacterium by examining numerous interactions between the various cohesin and dockerin modules.more » In total, we cloned and expressed 43 representative cohesins and 27 dockerins. The results revealed various possible architectures of cell-anchored and cell-free cellulosomes, which serve to assemble distinctive cellulosome types via three distinct cohesin–dockerin specificities: type I, type II, and a novel-type designated R (distinct from type III interactions, predominant in ruminococcal cellulosomes). The results of this study provide novel insight into the architecture and function of the most intricate and extensive cellulosomal system known today, thereby extending significantly our overall knowledge base of cellulosome systems and their components. The robust cellulosome system of B. cellulosolvens, with its unique binding specificities and reversal of cohesin–dockerin types, has served to amend our view of the cellulosome paradigm. Revealing new cellulosomal interactions and arrangements is critical for designing high-efficiency artificial cellulosomes for conversion of plant-derived cellulosic biomass towards improved production of biofuels.« less

  12. The focus of attention is similar to other memory systems rather than uniquely different

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Olivia; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M.; Tehan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    According to some current theories, the focus of attention (FOA), part of working memory, represents items in a privileged state that is more accessible than items stored in other memory systems. One line of evidence supporting the distinction between the FOA and other memory systems is the finding that items in the FOA are immune to proactive interference (when something learned earlier impairs the ability to remember something learned more recently). The FOA, then, is held to be unique: it is the only memory system that is not susceptible to proactive interference. We review the literature used to support this claim, and although there are many studies in which proactive interference was not observed, we found more studies in which it was observed. We conclude that the FOA is not immune to proactive interference: items in the FOA are susceptible to proactive interference just like items in every other memory system. And, just as in all other memory systems, it is how the items are represented and processed that plays a critical role in determining whether proactive interference will be observed. PMID:24574996

  13. Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity on the International Space Station for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Space Suit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.; Taylor, Brandon W.

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet, the supply of extremely high quality water required for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit cooling on the International Space Station (ISS) will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. One proposed solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semipermeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins, a special class of transmembrane proteins that facilitate passive, selective transport of water in vivo. The specificity of aquaporins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and it is this novel property that invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically those onboard the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are also currently being developed for use in terrestrial filtration systems.

  14. Unique dielectric dipole and hopping ion dipole relaxation in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraj, G.

    2018-04-01

    Dielectric or ac conductivity measurements of dielectric and ion conducting glass and crystalline systems provide considerable insight into the nature of the dipolar and ionic motions in disordered solids. However, interpreting the dielectric or ac conductivity has been a matter of considerable debate based on the existing models and empirical formalism, particularly in regards to how best to represent the relaxation process that is the result of a transition from correlated to uncorrelated dipolar and ionic motions. A unique dipole interaction process has been proposed for the (a) dielectric dipole process (b) the hopping ion conducting dipole process and the (c) combination (a) and (b) for the description of dielectric spectra and ac conductivityspectra and results are reported.

  15. Characterization of dynamic thermal control schemes and heat transfer pathways for incorporating variable emissivity electrochromic materials into a space suit heat rejection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massina, Christopher James

    The feasibility of conducting long duration human spaceflight missions is largely dependent on the provision of consumables such as oxygen, water, and food. In addition to meeting crew metabolic needs, water sublimation has long served as the primary heat rejection mechanism in space suits during extravehicular activity (EVA). During a single eight hour EVA, approximately 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water is lost from the current suit. Reducing the amount of expended water during EVA is a long standing goal of space suit life support systems designers; but to date, no alternate thermal control mechanism has demonstrated the ability to completely eliminate the loss. One proposed concept is to convert the majority of a space suit's surface area into a radiator such that the local environment can be used as a radiative thermal sink for rejecting heat without mass loss. Due to natural variations in both internal (metabolic) loads and external (environmental) sink temperatures, radiative transport must be actively modulated in order to maintain an acceptable thermal balance. Here, variable emissivity electrochromic devices are examined as the primary mechanism for enabling variable heat rejection. This dissertation focuses on theoretical and empirical evaluations performed to determine the feasibility of using a full suit, variable emissivity radiator architecture for space suit thermal control. Operational envelopes are described that show where a given environment and/or metabolic load combination may or may not be supported by the evaluated thermal architecture. Key integration considerations and guidelines include determining allowable thermal environments, defining skin-to-radiator heat transfer properties, and evaluating required electrochromic performance properties. Analysis also considered the impacts of dynamic environmental changes and the architecture's extensibility to EVA on the Martian surface. At the conclusion of this work, the full suit, variable emissivity

  16. Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test was performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design meets the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future space suits. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis and a variance in torque values for some of the tested joints was apparent. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and re-testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate these variables. The results of the retest will be used to determine if further testing and modification is necessary before the method can be validated.

  17. The James Webb Telescope Instrument Suite Layout: Optical System Engineering Considerations for a Large, Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Davila, Pam; Jurotich, Matthew; Hobbs, Gurnie; Lightsey, Paul; Contreras, Jim; Whitman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space-based, infrared observatory designed to study the early stages of galaxy formation in the Universe. The telescope will be launched into an elliptical orbit about the second Lagrange point and passively cooled to 30-50 K to enable astronomical observations from 0.6 to 28 microns. A group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Northrop Grumman Space Technology prime contractor team has developed an optical and mechanical layout for the science instruments within the JWST field of view that satisfies the telescope s high-level performance requirements. Four instruments required accommodation within the telescope's field of view: a Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) provided by the University of Arizona; a Near-Mared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) provided by the European Space Agency; a Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a European consortium; and a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) with a tunable filter module provided by the Canadian Space Agency. The size and position of each instrument's field of view allocation were developed through an iterative, concurrent engineering process involving the key observatory stakeholders. While some of the system design considerations were those typically encountered during the development of an infrared observatory, others were unique to the deployable and controllable nature of JWST. This paper describes the optical and mechanical issues considered during the field of view layout development, as well as the supporting modeling and analysis activities.

  18. Extravehicular activity space suit interoperability.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I; McBarron JW 2nd; Severin, G I

    1995-10-01

    The European Agency (ESA) and the Russian Space Agency (RKA) are jointly developing a new space suit system for improved extravehicular activity (EVA) capabilities in support of the MIR Space Station Programme, the EVA Suit 2000. Recent national policy agreements between the U.S. and Russia on planned cooperations in manned space also include joint extravehicular activity (EVA). With an increased number of space suit systems and a higher operational frequency towards the end of this century an improved interoperability for both routine and emergency operations is of eminent importance. It is thus timely to report the current status of ongoing work on international EVA interoperability being conducted by the Committee on EVA Protocols and Operations of the International Academy of Astronauts initiated in 1991. This paper summarises the current EVA interoperability issues to be harmonised and presents quantified vehicle interface requirements for the current U.S. Shuttle EMU and Russian MIR Orlan DMA and the new European/Russian EVA Suit 2000 extravehicular systems. Major critical/incompatible interfaces for suits/mother-craft of different combinations are discussed, and recommendations for standardisations given.

  19. Global Unique Identification of Geoscience Samples: The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Vinayagamoorthy, S.; Lenhardt, W. C.

    2005-12-01

    Data on samples represent a primary foundation of Geoscience research across disciplines, ranging from the study of climate change, to biogeochemical cycles, to mantle and continental dynamics and are key to our knowledge of the Earth's dynamical systems and evolution. Different data types are generated for individual samples by different research groups, published in different papers, and stored in different databases on a global scale. The utility of these data is critically dependent on their integration. Such integration can be achieved within a Geoscience Cyberinfrastructure, but requires unambiguous identification of samples. Currently, naming of samples is arbitrary and inconsistent and therefore severely limits our ability to share, link, and integrate sample-based data. Major problems include name duplication, and changing of names as a sample is passed along over many years to different investigators. SESAR, the System for Earth Sample Registration (http://www.geosamples.org), addresses this problem by building a registry that generates and administers globally unique identifiers for Geoscience samples: the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN). Implementation of the IGSN in data publication and digital data management will dramatically advance interoperability among information systems for sample-based data, opening an extensive range of new opportunities for discovery and for interdisciplinary approaches in research. The IGSN will also facilitate the ability of investigators to build on previously collected data on samples as new measurements are made or new techniques are developed. With potentially broad application to all types of Geoscience samples, SESAR is global in scope. It is a web-based system that can be easily accessed by individual users through an interactive web interface and by distributed client systems via standard web services. Samples can be registered individually or in batches and at various levels of granularity from entire cores

  20. Unique Observations in Hurricane Maria (2017) using the Coyote Uncrewed Aircraft System (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, G. H.; Cione, J.; Aksoy, A.; Baker, B.; Dahl, B. A.; de Boer, G.; Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Fairall, C. W.; Farber, A. M.; Halliwell, G. R., Jr.; Kalina, E. A.; Kent, B.; Klotz, B.; Lee, T.; Marks, F.; Ryan, K. E.; Troudt, C.; Wiggins, R.; Zawislak, J.; Zhang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) collected valuable and highly unique data from six Coyote Uncrewed Aircraft Systems (UAS) deployed into Hurricane Maria on 22-24 September 2017. Using NOAA's crewed P-3 reconnaissance aircraft as a deployment vehicle, low-level observations of wind speed, wind direction, atmospheric pressure, temperature, moisture and sea surface temperature were measured and transmitted by the UAS. In all cases, high-definition observations collected by the Coyote were transmitted to NOAA's National Hurricane Center and made available to forecasters in near-real time. A brief synopsis of the data collected will be given. Highlights include: 1) the highest (to our knowledge) UAS-measured wind speed in a hurricane (64 m/s at 340 m above sea level); 2) record endurance for a Coyote UAS mission in a hurricane (42 minutes); and 3) high-frequency (>2 Hz) measurements in the hurricane boundary layer, which allow for calculations of turbulence intensity. Plans for data analysis and future UAS deployments in hurricanes will also be discussed.

  1. Astronomical Video Suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco Salgado, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Astronomer and visual artist Jose Francisco Salgado has directed two astronomical video suites to accompany live performances of classical music works. The suites feature awe-inspiring images, historical illustrations, and visualizations produced by NASA, ESA, and the Adler Planetarium. By the end of 2009, his video suites Gustav Holst's The Planets and Astronomical Pictures at an Exhibition will have been presented more than 40 times in over 10 countries. Lately Salgado, an avid photographer, has been experimenting with high dynamic range imaging, time-lapse, infrared, and fisheye photography, as well as with stereoscopic photography and video to enhance his multimedia works.

  2. Suited crewmember productivity.

    PubMed

    Barer, A S; Filipenkov, S N

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the extravehicular activity (EVA) sortie experience gained in the former Soviet Union and physiologic hygienic aspect of space suit design and development shows that crewmember productivity is related to the following main factors: -space suit microclimate (gas composition, pressure and temperature); -limitation of motion activity and perception, imposed by the space suit; -good crewmember training in the ground training program; -level of crewmember general physical performance capabilities in connection with mission duration and intervals between sorties; -individual EVA experience (with accumulation) at which workmanship improves, while metabolism, physical and emotional stress decreases; -concrete EVA duration and work rate; -EVA bioengineering, including selection of tools, work station, EVA technology and mechanization.

  3. Space Suit (Mobil Biological Isolation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Houston five-year-old known as David is getting a "space suit," a vitally important gift that will give him mobility he has never known. David suffers from a rare malady called severe combined immune deficiency, which means that be was born without natural body defenses against disease; germs that would have little or no effect on most people could cause his death. As a result, he has spent his entire life in germ-free isolation rooms, one at Houston's Texas Children's hospital, another at his home. The "space suit" David is getting will allow him to spend four hours ata a time in a mobile sterile environment outside his isolation rooms. Built by NASA's Johnson Space Center, it is a specially-designed by product of Space Suit technology known as the mobile biological isolation system.

  4. NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) Environmental Data Record and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Nalli, N. R.; Gambacorta, A.; Iturbide, F.; Tan, C.; Zhang, K.; Wilson, M.; Reale, A.; Sun, B.; Mollner, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation introduces the NOAA sounding products to AGU community. The NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally generates vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature (AVTP), moisture (AVMP), carbonate products (CO, CO2, and CH4) and other trace gases as well as outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR). These products have been publicly released through NOAA CLASS from April 8, 2014 to present. This paper presents the validation of these products. For AVTP and AVMP are validated by comparing against ECMWF analysis data and dedicated radiosondes. The dedicated radiosondes achieve higher quality and reach higher altitudes than conventional radiosondes. In addition, the launch times of dedicated radiosondes specifically fit Suomi NPP overpass times within 1 hour generally. We also use ground based lidar data provided by collaborators (The Aerospace Corporation) to validate the retrieved temperature profiles above 100 hPa up to 1 hPa. Both NOAA VALAR and NPROVS validation systems are applied. The Suomi NPP FM5-Ed1A OLR from CERES prior to the end of May 2012 is available now for us to validate real-time CrIS OLR environmental data records (EDRs) for NOAA/CPC operational precipitation verification. However, the quality of CrIS sensor data records (SDRs) for this time frame on CLASS is suboptimal and many granules (more than three-quarters) are invalid. Using the current offline ADL reprocessed CrIS SDR data from NOAA/STAR AIT, which includes all CrIS SDR improvements to date, we have subsequently obtained a well-distributed OLR EDR. This paper will also discuss the validation of the CrIS infrared ozone profile.

  5. The SAM Suite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-08

    This illustration shows the instruments and subsystems of the Sample Analysis at Mars SAM suite on the Curiosity Rover of NASA Mars Science Laboratory Project. SAM analyzes the gases in the Martian atmosphere.

  6. EVA Suits Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits packed inside containers arrive at the Space Station Processing Facility from Johnson Space Center in Texas. The suits will be used by STS-117 crew members to perform several spacewalks during the mission. The mission payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is the S3/S4 integrated truss structure, along with a third set of solar arrays and batteries. The crew of six astronauts will install the truss to continue assembly of the International Space Station.

  7. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies.

    PubMed

    Šíchová, Jindra; Voleníková, Anna; Dincă, Vlad; Nguyen, Petr; Vila, Roger; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František

    2015-05-19

    Chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to limit the rate and pattern of gene flow within and between species and thus play a direct role in promoting and maintaining speciation. Wood white butterflies of the genus Leptidea are excellent models to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in speciation because they show karyotype variability not only among but also within species. In this work, we investigated genome architecture of three cryptic Leptidea species (L. juvernica, L. sinapis and L. reali) by standard and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reveal causes of the karyotype variability. Chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 85 to 91 in L. juvernica and 2n = 69 to 73 in L. sinapis (both from Czech populations) to 2n = 51 to 55 in L. reali (Spanish population). We observed significant differences in chromosome numbers and localization of cytogenetic markers (rDNA and H3 histone genes) within the offspring of individual females. Using FISH with the (TTAGG) n telomeric probe we also documented the presence of multiple chromosome fusions and/or fissions and other complex rearrangements. Thus, the intraspecific karyotype variability is likely due to irregular chromosome segregation of multivalent meiotic configurations. The analysis of female meiotic chromosomes by GISH and CGH revealed multiple sex chromosomes: W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. juvernica, W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3 in L. sinapis and W1W2W3W4Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. reali. Our results suggest a dynamic karyotype evolution and point to the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation of Leptidea butterflies. Moreover, our study revealed a curious sex determination system with 3-4 W and 3-4 Z chromosomes, which is unique in the Lepidoptera and which could also have played a role in the speciation process of the three Leptidea species.

  8. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  9. Ecological drought in the Hawaiian Islands: unique tropical systems are vulnerable to drought

    Treesearch

    Dave Helweg; Christian Giardina

    2017-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are among the most isolated and recently inhabited places on Earth. Discovered by Polynesian voyagers some 1000 years ago, people arrived to find unique wildlife and plants arrayed across a remarkable range of ecosystems. Polynesian settlers relied on traditional methods to cultivate canoe crops across the wide range of climate and soils. Early...

  10. The application of a unique flow modeling technique to complex combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waslo, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hilt, M. B.

    1986-06-01

    This paper describes the application of a unique three-dimensional water flow modeling technique to the study of complex fluid flow patterns within an advanced gas turbine combustor. The visualization technique uses light scattering, coupled with real-time image processing, to determine flow fields. Additional image processing is used to make concentration measurements within the combustor.

  11. Suited crewmember productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A. S.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Analysis of the extravehicular activity (EVA) sortie experience gained in the former Soviet Union and physiologic hygienic aspect of space suit design and development shows that crewmember productivity is related to the following main factors: —space suit microclimate (gas composition, pressure and temperature); —limitation of motion activity and perception, imposed by the space suit; —good crewmember training in the ground training program; —level of crewmember general physical performance capabilities in connection with mission duration and intervals between sorties; —individual EVA experience (with accumulation) at which workmanship improves, while metabolism, physical and emotional stress decreases; —concrete EVA duration and work rate; —EVA bioengineering, including selection of tools, work station, EVA technology and mechanization.

  12. Initial design and performance of the near surface unmanned aircraft system sensor suite in support of the GOES-R field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Shao, Xi; Cao, Changyong; Goodman, Steven J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main objectives of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) field campaign is to validate the SI traceability of the Advanced Baseline Imager. The campaign plans include a feasibility demonstration study for new near surface unmanned aircraft system (UAS) measurement capability that is being developed to meet the challenges of validating geostationary sensors. We report our progress in developing our initial systems by presenting the design and preliminary characterization results of the sensor suite. The design takes advantage of off-the-shelf technologies and fiber-based optical components to make hemispheric directional measurements from a UAS. The characterization results - including laboratory measurements of temperature effects and polarization sensitivity - are used to refine the radiometric uncertainty budget towards meeting the validation objectives for the campaign. These systems will foster improved validation capabilities for the GOES-R field campaign and other next generation satellite systems.

  13. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  14. The unique stem cell system of the immortal larva of the human parasite Echinococcus multilocularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is believed that in tapeworms a separate population of undifferentiated cells, the germinative cells, is the only source of cell proliferation throughout the life cycle (similar to the neoblasts of free living flatworms). In Echinococcus multilocularis, the metacestode larval stage has a unique development, growing continuously like a mass of vesicles that infiltrate the tissues of the intermediate host, generating multiple protoscoleces by asexual budding. This unique proliferation potential indicates the existence of stem cells that are totipotent and have the ability for extensive self-renewal. Results We show that only the germinative cells proliferate in the larval vesicles and in primary cell cultures that undergo complete vesicle regeneration, by using a combination of morphological criteria and by developing molecular markers of differentiated cell types. The germinative cells are homogeneous in morphology but heterogeneous at the molecular level, since only sub-populations express homologs of the post-transcriptional regulators nanos and argonaute. Important differences are observed between the expression patterns of selected neoblast marker genes of other flatworms and the E. multilocularis germinative cells, including widespread expression in E. multilocularis of some genes that are neoblast-specific in planarians. Hydroxyurea treatment results in the depletion of germinative cells in larval vesicles, and after recovery following hydroxyurea treatment, surviving proliferating cells grow as patches that suggest extensive self-renewal potential for individual germinative cells. Conclusions In E. multilocularis metacestodes, the germinative cells are the only proliferating cells, presumably driving the continuous growth of the larval vesicles. However, the existence of sub-populations of the germinative cells is strongly supported by our data. Although the germinative cells are very similar to the neoblasts of other flatworms in function and

  15. The unique stem cell system of the immortal larva of the human parasite Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Uriel; Rauschendorfer, Theresa; Zanon Rodríguez, Luis; Krohne, Georg; Brehm, Klaus

    2014-03-06

    It is believed that in tapeworms a separate population of undifferentiated cells, the germinative cells, is the only source of cell proliferation throughout the life cycle (similar to the neoblasts of free living flatworms). In Echinococcus multilocularis, the metacestode larval stage has a unique development, growing continuously like a mass of vesicles that infiltrate the tissues of the intermediate host, generating multiple protoscoleces by asexual budding. This unique proliferation potential indicates the existence of stem cells that are totipotent and have the ability for extensive self-renewal. We show that only the germinative cells proliferate in the larval vesicles and in primary cell cultures that undergo complete vesicle regeneration, by using a combination of morphological criteria and by developing molecular markers of differentiated cell types. The germinative cells are homogeneous in morphology but heterogeneous at the molecular level, since only sub-populations express homologs of the post-transcriptional regulators nanos and argonaute. Important differences are observed between the expression patterns of selected neoblast marker genes of other flatworms and the E. multilocularis germinative cells, including widespread expression in E. multilocularis of some genes that are neoblast-specific in planarians. Hydroxyurea treatment results in the depletion of germinative cells in larval vesicles, and after recovery following hydroxyurea treatment, surviving proliferating cells grow as patches that suggest extensive self-renewal potential for individual germinative cells. In E. multilocularis metacestodes, the germinative cells are the only proliferating cells, presumably driving the continuous growth of the larval vesicles. However, the existence of sub-populations of the germinative cells is strongly supported by our data. Although the germinative cells are very similar to the neoblasts of other flatworms in function and in undifferentiated morphology

  16. A unique dosing system for the production of OH under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew A; Johánek, Viktor; Hemminger, John C

    2008-02-01

    A unique dosing system for the production of hydroxyl radicals under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions is described. Hydroxyl radicals are produced by the photodissociation of a hydrogen peroxide aqueous gas mixture with 254 nm radiation according to the reaction H2O2+hnu (254 nm)-->OH+OH. Under the conditions of the current design, 0.6% conversion of hydrogen peroxide is expected yielding a hydroxyl number density on the order of 10(10) molecules/cm3. The flux distribution of the dosing system is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation method and compared with the experimentally determined results. The performance of this unique hydroxyl dosing system is demonstrated for the heterogeneous reaction with a solid surface of potassium iodide. Coupling of the hydroxyl radical dosing system to a quantitative surface analysis system should help provide molecular level insight into detailed reaction mechanisms.

  17. A unique dosing system for the production of OH under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew A.; Johánek, Viktor; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-02-01

    A unique dosing system for the production of hydroxyl radicals under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions is described. Hydroxyl radicals are produced by the photodissociation of a hydrogen peroxide aqueous gas mixture with 254nm radiation according to the reaction H2O2+hν (254nm)→OH+OH. Under the conditions of the current design, 0.6% conversion of hydrogen peroxide is expected yielding a hydroxyl number density on the order of 1010molecules/cm3. The flux distribution of the dosing system is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation method and compared with the experimentally determined results. The performance of this unique hydroxyl dosing system is demonstrated for the heterogeneous reaction with a solid surface of potassium iodide. Coupling of the hydroxyl radical dosing system to a quantitative surface analysis system should help provide molecular level insight into detailed reaction mechanisms.

  18. A model for choosing an automated ultraviolet-C disinfection system and building a case for the C-suite: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Maureen; Vignari, Michelle; Bryce, Elizabeth; Johnson, Helen Boehm; Fauerbach, Loretta; Graham, Denise

    2017-03-01

    Environmental disinfection has become the new frontier in the ongoing battle to reduce the risk of health care-associated infections. Evidence demonstrating the persistent contamination of environmental surfaces despite traditional cleaning and disinfection methods has led to the widespread acceptance that there is both a need for reassessing traditional cleaning protocols and for using secondary disinfection technologies. Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) disinfection is one type of no-touch technology shown to be a successful adjunct to manual cleaning in reducing environmental bioburden. The dilemma for the infection preventionist, however, is how to choose the system best suited for their facility among the many UV-C surface disinfection delivery systems available and how to build a case for acquisition to present to the hospital administration/C-suite. This article proposes an approach to these dilemmas based in part on the experience of 2 health care networks. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Specificity of Nitroxyl Chemistry Is Unique Among Nitrogen Oxides in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Santana, Wilmarie; Salmon, Debra J.; Donzelli, Sonia; Switzer, Christopher H.; Basudhar, Debashree; Ridnour, Lisa; Cheng, Robert; Glynn, Sharon A.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Fukuto, Jon M.; Miranda, Katrina M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The importance of nitric oxide in mammalian physiology has been known for nearly 30 years. Similar attention for other nitrogen oxides such as nitroxyl (HNO) has been more recent. While there has been speculation as to the biosynthesis of HNO, its pharmacological benefits have been demonstrated in several pathophysiological settings such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer, and alcoholism. The chemical biology of HNO has been identified as related to, but unique from, that of its redox congener nitric oxide. A summary of these findings as well as a discussion of possible endogenous sources of HNO is presented in this review. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1659–1674. PMID:21235346

  20. Space Suit Spins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Space is a hostile environment where astronauts combat extreme temperatures, dangerous radiation, and a near-breathless vacuum. Life support in these unforgiving circumstances is crucial and complex, and failure is not an option for the devices meant to keep astronauts safe in an environment that presents constant opposition. A space suit must meet stringent requirements for life support. The suit has to be made of durable material to withstand the impact of space debris and protect against radiation. It must provide essential oxygen, pressure, heating, and cooling while retaining mobility and dexterity. It is not a simple article of clothing but rather a complex modern armor that the space explorers must don if they are to continue exploring the heavens

  1. Experiments with a New, Unique Large-Scale Rig Investigating the Effects of Background System Rotation on Vortex Rings in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brend, Mark A.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2005-11-01

    We introduce our unique, new large-scale experimental facility [1] designed for our long-term research program investigating the effects of background system rotation on the stability and the dynamics of vortex rings. The new rig constitutes a large water-filled tank positioned on a rotating turntable and its overall height and diameter are 5.7m and 1.4 m, respectively. First experimental and computational results of our program are summarized. We will show various videos of flow visualizations that illustrate some major, qualitative differences between rings propagating in rotating and non-rotating flows. Some of the investigated characteristics of the vortex rings include their translation velocity, the velocity field inside and surrounding the rings, and, in particular, their stability. We will briefly outline experiments employing the relatively new Ultrasonic-Velocity-Profiler technique (UVP). This technique appears to be particularly suited for some of our measurements and it was, as far as we are aware, not previously used in the context of vortex-ring studies. [1] http://www.eng.warwick.ac.uk/staff/pjt/turntabpics/voriskt.html

  2. MEIGO: an open-source software suite based on metaheuristics for global optimization in systems biology and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Egea, Jose A; Henriques, David; Cokelaer, Thomas; Villaverde, Alejandro F; MacNamara, Aidan; Danciu, Diana-Patricia; Banga, Julio R; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2014-05-10

    Optimization is the key to solving many problems in computational biology. Global optimization methods, which provide a robust methodology, and metaheuristics in particular have proven to be the most efficient methods for many applications. Despite their utility, there is a limited availability of metaheuristic tools. We present MEIGO, an R and Matlab optimization toolbox (also available in Python via a wrapper of the R version), that implements metaheuristics capable of solving diverse problems arising in systems biology and bioinformatics. The toolbox includes the enhanced scatter search method (eSS) for continuous nonlinear programming (cNLP) and mixed-integer programming (MINLP) problems, and variable neighborhood search (VNS) for Integer Programming (IP) problems. Additionally, the R version includes BayesFit for parameter estimation by Bayesian inference. The eSS and VNS methods can be run on a single-thread or in parallel using a cooperative strategy. The code is supplied under GPLv3 and is available at http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/meigo.html. Documentation and examples are included. The R package has been submitted to BioConductor. We evaluate MEIGO against optimization benchmarks, and illustrate its applicability to a series of case studies in bioinformatics and systems biology where it outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. MEIGO provides a free, open-source platform for optimization that can be applied to multiple domains of systems biology and bioinformatics. It includes efficient state of the art metaheuristics, and its open and modular structure allows the addition of further methods.

  3. MEIGO: an open-source software suite based on metaheuristics for global optimization in systems biology and bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Optimization is the key to solving many problems in computational biology. Global optimization methods, which provide a robust methodology, and metaheuristics in particular have proven to be the most efficient methods for many applications. Despite their utility, there is a limited availability of metaheuristic tools. Results We present MEIGO, an R and Matlab optimization toolbox (also available in Python via a wrapper of the R version), that implements metaheuristics capable of solving diverse problems arising in systems biology and bioinformatics. The toolbox includes the enhanced scatter search method (eSS) for continuous nonlinear programming (cNLP) and mixed-integer programming (MINLP) problems, and variable neighborhood search (VNS) for Integer Programming (IP) problems. Additionally, the R version includes BayesFit for parameter estimation by Bayesian inference. The eSS and VNS methods can be run on a single-thread or in parallel using a cooperative strategy. The code is supplied under GPLv3 and is available at http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/meigo.html. Documentation and examples are included. The R package has been submitted to BioConductor. We evaluate MEIGO against optimization benchmarks, and illustrate its applicability to a series of case studies in bioinformatics and systems biology where it outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. Conclusions MEIGO provides a free, open-source platform for optimization that can be applied to multiple domains of systems biology and bioinformatics. It includes efficient state of the art metaheuristics, and its open and modular structure allows the addition of further methods. PMID:24885957

  4. cuSwift --- a suite of numerical integration methods for modelling planetary systems implemented in C/CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmich, S.; Mottola, S.; Hahn, G.; Kührt, E.; Hlawitschka, M.

    2014-07-01

    Simulations of dynamical processes in planetary systems represent an important tool for studying the orbital evolution of the systems [1--3]. Using modern numerical integration methods, it is possible to model systems containing many thousands of objects over timescales of several hundred million years. However, in general, supercomputers are needed to get reasonable simulation results in acceptable execution times [3]. To exploit the ever-growing computation power of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in modern desktop computers, we implemented cuSwift, a library of numerical integration methods for studying long-term dynamical processes in planetary systems. cuSwift can be seen as a re-implementation of the famous SWIFT integrator package written by Hal Levison and Martin Duncan. cuSwift is written in C/CUDA and contains different integration methods for various purposes. So far, we have implemented three algorithms: a 15th-order Radau integrator [4], the Wisdom-Holman Mapping (WHM) integrator [5], and the Regularized Mixed Variable Symplectic (RMVS) Method [6]. These algorithms treat only the planets as mutually gravitationally interacting bodies whereas asteroids and comets (or other minor bodies of interest) are treated as massless test particles which are gravitationally influenced by the massive bodies but do not affect each other or the massive bodies. The main focus of this work is on the symplectic methods (WHM and RMVS) which use a larger time step and thus are capable of integrating many particles over a large time span. As an additional feature, we implemented the non-gravitational Yarkovsky effect as described by M. Brož [7]. With cuSwift, we show that the use of modern GPUs makes it possible to speed up these methods by more than one order of magnitude compared to the single-core CPU implementation, thereby enabling modest workstation computers to perform long-term dynamical simulations. We use these methods to study the influence of the Yarkovsky

  5. Changes in Occupational Radiation Exposures after Incorporation of a Real-time Dosimetry System in the Interventional Radiology Suite.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Sashi; Weir, Lori; Dowling, Dawn; Medich, David C

    2016-08-01

    A statistical pilot study was retrospectively performed to analyze potential changes in occupational radiation exposures to Interventional Radiology (IR) staff at Lawrence General Hospital after implementation of the i2 Active Radiation Dosimetry System (Unfors RaySafe Inc, 6045 Cochran Road Cleveland, OH 44139-3302). In this study, the monthly OSL dosimetry records obtained during the eight-month period prior to i2 implementation were normalized to the number of procedures performed during each month and statistically compared to the normalized dosimetry records obtained for the 8-mo period after i2 implementation. The resulting statistics included calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the dose equivalences per procedure and included appropriate hypothesis tests to assess for statistically valid differences between the pre and post i2 study periods. Hypothesis testing was performed on three groups of staff present during an IR procedure: The first group included all members of the IR staff, the second group consisted of the IR radiologists, and the third group consisted of the IR technician staff. After implementing the i2 active dosimetry system, participating members of the Lawrence General IR staff had a reduction in the average dose equivalence per procedure of 43.1% ± 16.7% (p = 0.04). Similarly, Lawrence General IR radiologists had a 65.8% ± 33.6% (p=0.01) reduction while the technologists had a 45.0% ± 14.4% (p=0.03) reduction.

  6. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    The Mark III planetary technology demonstrator space suit can be tailored to an individual by swapping the modular components of the suit, such as the arms, legs, and gloves, as well as adding or removing sizing inserts in key areas. A method was sought to identify the transition from an ideal suit fit to a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using a metric of mobility-based human performance data. To this end, the degradation of the range of motion of the elbow and wrist of the suit as a function of suit sizing modifications was investigated to attempt to improve suit fit. The sizing range tested spanned optimal and poor fit and was adjusted incrementally in order to compare each joint angle across five different sizing configurations. Suited range of motion data were collected using a motion capture system for nine isolated and functional tasks utilizing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm by itself. Findings indicated that no single joint drives the performance of the arm as a function of suit size; instead it is based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb. To determine a size adjustment range where an individual can operate the suit at an acceptable level, a performance detriment limit was set. This user-selected limit reveals the task-dependent tolerance of the suit fit around optimal size. For example, the isolated joint motion indicated that the suit can deviate from optimal by as little as -0.6 in to -2.6 in before experiencing a 10% performance drop in the wrist or elbow joint. The study identified a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and developed a new way to gauge tolerances around optimal size.

  7. Existence, Uniqueness and Asymptotic Stability of Time Periodic Traveling Waves for a Periodic Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Ruan, Shigui

    2011-01-01

    We study the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic stability of time periodic traveling wave solutions to a periodic diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition system. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exists a maximal wave speed c* such that for each wave speed c ≤ c*, there is a time periodic traveling wave connecting two semi-trivial periodic solutions of the corresponding kinetic system. It is shown that such a traveling wave is unique modulo translation and is monotone with respect to its co-moving frame coordinate. We also show that the traveling wave solutions with wave speed c < c* are asymptotically stable in certain sense. In addition, we establish the nonexistence of time periodic traveling waves for nonzero speed c > c*. PMID:21572575

  8. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Young-Jin; Trocha, Peter; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM), using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA). Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement. PMID:27376303

  9. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young-Jin; Trocha, Peter; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2016-07-01

    Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM), using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA). Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement.

  10. Expression of Chicken DEC205 Reflects the Unique Structure and Function of the Avian Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Karen; Young, John R.; Butter, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The generation of appropriate adaptive immune responses relies critically on dendritic cells, about which relatively little is known in chickens, a vital livestock species, in comparison with man and mouse. We cloned and sequenced chicken DEC205 cDNA and used this knowledge to produce quantitative PCR assays and monoclonal antibodies to study expression of DEC205 as well as CD83. The gene structure of DEC205 was identical to those of other species. Transcripts of both genes were found at higher levels in lymphoid tissues and the expression of DEC205 in normal birds had a characteristic distribution in the primary lymphoid organs. In spleen, DEC205 was seen on cells ideally located to trap antigen. In thymus it was found on cells thought to participate in the education of T cells, and in the bursa on cells that may be involved in presentation of antigen to B cells and regulation of B cell migration. The expression of DEC205 on cells other than antigen presenting cells (APC) is also described. Isolated splenocytes strongly expressing DEC205 but not the KUL01 antigen have morphology similar to mammalian dendritic cells and the distinct expression of DEC205 within the avian-specific Bursa of Fabricius alludes to a unique function in this organ of B cell diversification. PMID:23326318

  11. Evaporation-Cooled Protective Suits for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard Murray

    2007-01-01

    Suits cooled by evaporation of water have been proposed as improved means of temporary protection against high temperatures near fires. When air temperature exceeds 600 F (316 C) or in the presence of radiative heating from nearby sources at temperatures of 1,200 F (649 C) or more, outer suits now used by firefighters afford protection for only a few seconds. The proposed suits would exploit the high latent heat of vaporization of water to satisfy a need to protect against higher air temperatures and against radiant heating for significantly longer times. These suits would be fabricated and operated in conjunction with breathing and cooling systems like those with which firefighting suits are now equipped

  12. Set Theory Applied to Uniquely Define the Inputs to Territorial Systems in Emergy Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    The language of set theory can be utilized to represent the emergy involved in all processes. In this paper we use set theory in an emergy evaluation to ensure an accurate representation of the inputs to territorial systems. We consider a generic territorial system and we describ...

  13. A Unique Fungal Two-Component System Regulates Stress Responses, Drug Sensitivity, Sexual Development, and Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Kojima, Kaihei; Cox, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    The stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is widely used by eukaryotic organisms as a central conduit via which cellular responses to the environment effect growth and differentiation. The basidiomycetous human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans uniquely uses the stress-activated Pbs2-Hog1 MAPK system to govern a plethora of cellular events, including stress responses, drug sensitivity, sexual reproduction, and virulence. Here, we characterized a fungal “two-component” system that controls these fundamental cellular functions via the Pbs2-Hog1 MAPK cascade. A typical response regulator, Ssk1, modulated all Hog1-dependent phenotypes by controlling Hog1 phosphorylation, indicating that Ssk1 is the major upstream signaling component of the Pbs2-Hog1 pathway. A second response regulator, Skn7, governs sensitivity to Na+ ions and the antifungal agent fludioxonil, negatively controls melanin production, and functions independently of Hog1 regulation. To control these response regulators, C. neoformans uses multiple sensor kinases, including two-component–like (Tco) 1 and Tco2. Tco1 and Tco2 play shared and distinct roles in stress responses and drug sensitivity through the Hog1 MAPK system. Furthermore, each sensor kinase mediates unique cellular functions for virulence and morphological differentiation. Our findings highlight unique adaptations of this global two-component MAPK signaling cascade in a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. PMID:16672377

  14. Characterization and reactions of a Salix extractive with a unique ring system

    Treesearch

    Lawrence Landucci; Sally Ralph; Kolby Hirth

    2003-01-01

    An extractive compound with a novel ring system was isolated from the wood of Salix alba and was given the name Salucci. The compound was primarily identified from the 1D NMR, 2D NMR and LC-MSMS data and the structure investigated through reactions and derivatizations.

  15. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    The Mark III suit has multiple sizes of suit components (arm, leg, and gloves) as well as sizing inserts to tailor the fit of the suit to an individual. This study sought to determine a way to identify the point an ideal suit fit transforms into a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using mobility-based physical performance data. This study examined the changes in human physical performance via degradation of the elbow and wrist range of motion of the planetary suit prototype (Mark III) with respect to changes in sizing and as well as how to apply that knowledge to suit sizing options and improvements in suit fit. The methods implemented in this study focused on changes in elbow and wrist mobility due to incremental suit sizing modifications. This incremental sizing was within a range that included both optimum and poor fit. Suited range of motion data was collected using a motion analysis system for nine isolated and functional tasks encompassing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm only. The results were then compared across sizing configurations. The results of this study indicate that range of motion may be used as a viable parameter to quantify at what stage suit sizing causes a detriment in performance; however the human performance decrement appeared to be based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb, not a single joint angle. The study was able to identify a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and to develop a means to gauge tolerances around optimal size. More work is needed to improve the assessment of optimal fit and to compensate for multiple joint interactions.

  16. Suited Occupant Injury Potential During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dub, Mark O.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Constellation Space Suit Element [CSSE], a new space-suit architecture will be created for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Microgravity Extra- Vehicular Activity [EVA], and post-landing crew operations, safety and, under emergency conditions, survival. The space suit is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort [LEA] suit architectures in that it utilizes rigid mobility elements in the scye (i.e., shoulder) and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also utilizes rigid thigh disconnect elements to create a quick disconnect approximately located above the knee. This feature allows commonality of the lower portion of the suit (from the thigh disconnect down), making the lower legs common across two suit configurations. This suit must interface with the Orion vehicle seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to the unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic vehicle events, risks have been identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series has been developed in coordination with the Injury Biomechanics Research Laboratory [IBRL] to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing includes use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices [ATDs; vernacularly referred to as "crash test dummies"], Post Mortem Human Subjects [PMHS], and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on test purpose and objectives; test hardware, facility, and setup; and preliminary results.

  17. STATS: a unique high speed, multiple channel, real-time data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, F.A.; O'Connell, L.; Trellue, R.

    1980-01-01

    A Stand Alone Test System, called STATS, was developd to acquire and analyze data from as many as 120 analog channels. STATS is used in testing weapon systems under simulated environments at a laboratory in Texas. Some analog channels are sampled every 10 microseconds, but most are digitized every 100 microseconds. STATS features hardware data compression and a first-in-first-out buffer for each channel. It has also provided a way for the test configuration to be controlled by the diskette files that contain the test specifications. The analysis specifications are also predefined in diskette files keyed to the particular test type.more » The techniques used are applicable when many channels must be monitored simultaneously, channel activity comes in spurts separated by long quiet periods, and more than a few channels experience nearly simultaneous bursts of activity.« less

  18. Early growth response 2 and Egr3 are unique regulators in immune system.

    PubMed

    Taefehshokr, Sina; Key, Yashar Azari; Khakpour, Mansour; Dadebighlu, Pourya; Oveisi, Amin

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is evolved to defend the body against pathogens and is composed of thousands of complicated and intertwined pathways, which are highly controlled by processes such as transcription and repression of cellular genes. Sometimes the immune system malfunctions and a break down in self-tolerance occurs. This lead to the inability to distinguish between self and non-self and cause attacks on host tissues, a condition also known as autoimmunity, which can result in chronic debilitating diseases. Early growth response genes are family of transcription factors comprising of four members, Egr1, Egr2, Egr3 and Egr4. All of which contain three cyc2-His2 zinc fingers. Initially, Egr2 function was identified in the regulation of peripheral nerve myelination, hindbrain segmentation. Egr3, on the other hand, is highly expressed in muscle spindle development. Egr2 and Egr3 are induced due to the antigen stimulation and this signaling is implemented through the B and T cell receptors in the adaptive immunity. T cell receptor signaling plays a key role in Egr 2 and 3 expressions via their interaction with NFAT molecules. Egr 2 and 3 play a crucial role in regulation of the immune system and their involvement in B and T cell activation, anergy induction and preventing the autoimmune disease has been investigated. The deficiency of these transcription factors has been associated to deficient Cbl-b expression, a resistant to anergy phenotype, and expression of effector and activated T cells.

  19. A unique basaltic micrometeorite expands the inventory of solar system planetary crusts

    PubMed Central

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Engrand, Cécile; Zolensky, Michael E.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometeorites with diameter ≈100–200 μm dominate the flux of extraterrestrial matter on Earth. The vast majority of micrometeorites are chemically, mineralogically, and isotopically related to carbonaceous chondrites, which amount to only 2.5% of meteorite falls. Here, we report the discovery of the first basaltic micrometeorite (MM40). This micrometeorite is unlike any other basalt known in the solar system as revealed by isotopic data, mineral chemistry, and trace element abundances. The discovery of a new basaltic asteroidal surface expands the solar system inventory of planetary crusts and underlines the importance of micrometeorites for sampling the asteroids' surfaces in a way complementary to meteorites, mainly because they do not suffer dynamical biases as meteorites do. The parent asteroid of MM40 has undergone extensive metamorphism, which ended no earlier than 7.9 Myr after solar system formation. Numerical simulations of dust transport dynamics suggest that MM40 might originate from one of the recently discovered basaltic asteroids that are not members of the Vesta family. The ability to retrieve such a wealth of information from this tiny (a few micrograms) sample is auspicious some years before the launch of a Mars sample return mission. PMID:19366660

  20. 20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND TERRY WEST, A SPACE SUIT ASSEMBLY TECHNICIAN LOGGING SUIT PART DATA. PARTS ON THE TABLE ARE A HARD UPPER TORSO (HUT) (REAR LEFT), FULL HELMET (FRONT LEFT), TWO HELMETS WITHOUT PROTECTIVE VISORS, A PAIR OF GLOVES, AND A BACKPACK WITHOUT VOLUMETRIC COVER (REAR RIGHT). THE BACKPACK ATTACHES TO THE HUT TO MAKE-UP THE UPPER TORSO COMPONENTS OF THE SUIT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Bidirectional interactions between the circadian and reward systems: is restricted food access a unique zeitgeber?

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian C; Baltazar, Ricardo M; Lehman, Michael N; Coolen, Lique M

    2009-11-01

    Reward is mediated by a distributed series of midbrain and basal forebrain structures collectively referred to as the brain reward system. Recent evidence indicates that an additional regulatory system, the circadian system, can modulate reward-related learning. Diurnal or circadian changes in drug self-administration, responsiveness to drugs of abuse and reward to natural stimuli have been reported. These variations are associated with daily rhythms in mesolimbic electrical activity, dopamine synthesis and metabolism, and local clock gene oscillations. Conversely, the presentation of rewards appears capable of influencing circadian timing. Rodents can anticipate a daily mealtime by the entrainment of a series of oscillators that are anatomically distinct from the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Other work has indicated that restricted access to non-nutritive reinforcers (e.g. drugs of abuse, sex) or to palatable food in the absence of an energy deficit is capable of inducing relatively weak anticipatory activity, suggesting that reward alone is sufficient to induce anticipation. Recent attempts to elucidate the neural correlates of anticipation have revealed that both restricted feeding and restricted palatable food access can entrain clock gene expression in many reward-related corticolimbic structures. By contrast, restricted feeding alone can induce or entrain clock gene expression in hypothalamic nuclei involved in energy homeostasis. Thus, under ad libitum feeding conditions, the weak anticipatory activity induced by restricted reward presentation may result from the entrainment of reward-associated corticolimbic structures. The additional induction or entrainment of oscillators in hypothalamic regulatory areas may contribute to the more robust anticipatory activity associated with restricted feeding schedules.

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A unique form of disease flare.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Bian, S; Xu, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, X

    2017-09-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the clinical features of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods SLE patients with AAC hospitalized in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) from January 2001 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Their medical records were systematically reviewed. The diagnosis of AAC was based on clinical manifestations and confirmed by radiologic findings including a distended gallbladder with thickened wall, pericholecystic fluid and absence of gallstones. Results Among the 8411 hospitalized SLE patients in PUMCH, 13 (0.15%) were identified to have SLE-AAC. Eleven (84.6%) of them were female, with a mean age of 30.1 ± 8.6 years. AAC was the initial manifestation of SLE in four (30.8%) cases. Eleven (84.6%) patients complained of fever and abdominal pain, four (30.8%) had positive Murphy's sign and six (46.2%) had elevated liver enzymes. The median SLE Disease Activity Index was 8.0 (range 0-20.0) at the time of AAC. Other affected organs in SLE-AAC included kidney (11, 84.6%) and hematologic system (11, 84.6%), followed by mucocutaneous (seven, 53.8%), musculoskeletal (seven, 53.8%) and neuropsychiatric (two, 15.4%) systems. All patients received treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants but none underwent surgical intervention. During a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 2-320 months), 12 cases (92.4%) responded to treatment with no relapse and one patient (7.6%) died of septic shock. Conclusion Our study suggests that AAC is a relatively uncommon and underestimated gastrointestinal involvement of SLE that is often associated with active disease. For patients with AAC in SLE, treatment with aggressive glucocorticoids could result in a good prognosis.

  3. Dragon pulse information management system (DPIMS): A unique model-based approach to implementing domain agnostic system of systems and behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2016-05-01

    The Global Information Network Architecture is an information technology based on Vector Relational Data Modeling, a unique computational paradigm, DoD network certified by USARMY as the Dragon Pulse Informa- tion Management System. This network available modeling environment for modeling models, where models are configured using domain relevant semantics and use network available systems, sensors, databases and services as loosely coupled component objects and are executable applications. Solutions are based on mission tactics, techniques, and procedures and subject matter input. Three recent ARMY use cases are discussed a) ISR SoS. b) Modeling and simulation behavior validation. c) Networked digital library with behaviors.

  4. [How to implement a unique triage system in the emergency departments of Latium, Italy].

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Francia, C; Gabriele, S; Guasticchi, G

    2008-01-01

    Triage is an efficient system that emergency departments (EDs) use to sort out presenting patients on the basis of the speed with which they need treatment. Because triage is not used consistently in the EDs of Latium, a region in central Italy, the regional Public Health Agency (PHA) planned and implemented a regional model of triage in all EDs. This manuscript describe the regional implementation strategy. The PHA activated the "Regional Triage Program--RTP" including: development and testing of a "triage section" in the computerized EDs clinical chart; production of an operational handbook for the RTP for triage health professionals (HPs); implementation of an continuum educational program on the "RTP" in all EDs of Latium. The computerized triage section was tested and implemented in all EDs in the region. The handbook for triage HPs was produced. The educational program, has been ongoing since 2008 in all regional EDs. Selected HPs, identified as "facilitators", were trained on how to implement the RTP. They will organize, in their own EDs, small groups of nurses to conduct on-site training of the RTP. The RTP was received with enthusiasm by most HPs, however its introduction into current practice could be hampered by organizational/structural problems and conflicts between nurses and doctors. Next actions of the regional program will be to overcome the possible above mentioned troubles.

  5. Genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus: a review of the unique genetic contributions in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Harley, John B; Kelly, Jennifer A

    2002-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease involving critical genetic and environmental risk factors. SLE is a relatively common disease among African American women, affecting as many as one in 250. A collection of more than 250 African American and European American pedigrees multiplex for SLE have been collected in Oklahoma over the past decade for the purpose of identifying the genetic risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. A genome scan has been performed, and interestingly, the linkage results usually dominate in families from one or the other of these ethnicities. For example, the linkage effect at 1q21-22 near FcgammaRIIA is much stronger in the African American pedigrees than in the European American pedigrees. On the other hand, a gene near the top of chromosome4 (at 4p l6-15) contributes to SLE in the European American pedigrees, but not in the African American pedigrees. The racially-specific results lead to the tentative conclusion of genetic differences associated with SLE in African Americans and European Americans. The identification of the genes responsible for the observed linkage effects will provide fundamental knowledge concerning SLE and may even provide new targets for therapy and strategies to defeat this enigmatic and difficult disease.

  6. Development of a wearable motion capture suit and virtual reality biofeedback system for the instruction and analysis of sports rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Diarmaid; Foody, John; Kelly, Dan; Ward, Tomas; Markham, Charles; McDonald, John; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a computer game for instructing an athlete through a series of prescribed rehabilitation exercises. In an attempt to prevent or treat musculoskeletal type injuries along with trying to improve physical performance, athletes are prescribed exercise programmes by appropriately trained specialists. Typically athletes are shown how to perform each exercise in the clinic following examination but they often have no way of knowing if their technique is correct while they are performing their home exercise programme. We describe a system that allows an automatic audit of this activity. Our system utilises ten inertial motion tracking sensors incorporated in a wearable body suit which allows a bluetooth connection from a root hub to a laptop/computer. Using our specifically designed software programme, the athlete can be instructed and analysed as he/she performs the individually tailored exercise programme and a log is recorded of the time and performance level of each exercise completed. We describe a case study that illustrates how a clinician can at a later date review the athletes progress and subsequently alter the exercise programme as they see fit.

  7. Unique Abnormalities in Right Ventricular Longitudinal Strain in Systemic Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Monica; Chung, Shang-En; Ton, Von Khue; Tedford, Ryan J; Hummers, Laura K; Wigley, Fredrick M; Abraham, Theodore P; Shah, Ami A

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma [SSc]) adversely affects long-term prognosis, often remaining undetectable despite close clinical examination and 2-dimensional echocardiographic monitoring. Speckle-derived strain of the right ventricle (RV) was utilized to detect occult abnormalities in regional and global contractility in SSc patients. A total of 138 SSc patients with technically adequate echocardiograms was studied and compared with 40 age- and sex-matched healthy non-SSc controls. Standard assessment of RV chamber function included tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and fractional area change. RV longitudinal systolic speckle-derived strain was assessed in the basal, mid, and apical free wall. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was not different between groups (P=0.307). Although fractional area change was lower in SSc patients than in controls (mean, 48.9 versus 55; P=0.002), the mean fractional area change was still within the normal range (>35). In contrast, RV longitudinal systolic speckle-derived strain measures were significantly different between groups, both globally (-20.4% versus -17.7%; P=0.005) and regionally: they were decreased in the apex (-8.5% versus -17.1%; P<0.0001) and mid segments (-12.4% versus -20.9%; P<0.0001), and increased in the base (-32.2% versus -23.3%; P=0.0001) for the SSc group. The regional difference in the base compared with the apex was significantly greater for SSc than for controls (P<0.0001 for interaction). The differences observed in regional strain between SSc and control were unchanged after adjusting for RV systolic pressure. Speckle-derived strain reveals a heterogenous pattern of regional heart strain in SSc that is not detected by conventional measures of function, suggestive of occult RV myocardial disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit Intravehicular Activity Suit for Extravehicular Activity Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an intravehicular activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) environment at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit was modified to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will not have mass available to carry an EVA-specific suit; therefore, any EVA required will have to be performed by the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES). Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or whether a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects, including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, tool carrying, body stabilization, equipment handling, and tool usage. Hardware configurations included with and without Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on International Space Station mock-ups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstrating the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determining critical sizing factors, and need for adjusting suit work envelope. Early testing demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight-like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission-specific modifications for umbilical management or Primary Life Support System integration

  9. Adapting the SpaceCube v2.0 Data Processing System for Mission-Unique Application Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, David

    2015-01-01

    The SpaceCubeTM v2.0 system is a superior high performance, reconfigurable, hybrid data processing system that can be used in a multitude of applications including those that require a radiation hardened and reliable solution. This paper provides an overview of the design architecture, flexibility, and the advantages of the modular SpaceCube v2.0 high performance data processing system for space applications. The current state of the proven SpaceCube technology is based on nine years of engineering and operations. Five systems have been successfully operated in space starting in 2008 with four more to be delivered for launch vehicle integration in 2015. The SpaceCube v2.0 system is also baselined as the avionics solution for five additional flight projects and is always a top consideration as the core avionics for new instruments or spacecraft control. This paper will highlight how this multipurpose system is currently being used to solve design challenges of three independent applications. The SpaceCube hardware adapts to new system requirements by allowing for application-unique interface cards that are utilized by reconfiguring the underlying programmable elements on the core processor card. We will show how this system is being used to improve on a heritage NASA GPS technology, enable a cutting-edge LiDAR instrument, and serve as a typical command and data handling (CDH) computer for a space robotics technology demonstration.

  10. Adapting the SpaceCube v2.0 Data Processing System for Mission-Unique Application Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, David; Gill, Nat; Hasouneh, Munther; Stone, Robert; Winternitz, Luke; Thomas, Luke; Davis, Milton; Sparacino, Pietro; Flatley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The SpaceCube (sup TM) v2.0 system is a superior high performance, reconfigurable, hybrid data processing system that can be used in a multitude of applications including those that require a radiation hardened and reliable solution. This paper provides an overview of the design architecture, flexibility, and the advantages of the modular SpaceCube v2.0 high performance data processing system for space applications. The current state of the proven SpaceCube technology is based on nine years of engineering and operations. Five systems have been successfully operated in space starting in 2008 with four more to be delivered for launch vehicle integration in 2015. The SpaceCube v2.0 system is also baselined as the avionics solution for five additional flight projects and is always a top consideration as the core avionics for new instruments or spacecraft control. This paper will highlight how this multipurpose system is currently being used to solve design challenges of three independent applications. The SpaceCube hardware adapts to new system requirements by allowing for application-unique interface cards that are utilized by reconfiguring the underlying programmable elements on the core processor card. We will show how this system is being used to improve on a heritage NASA GPS technology, enable a cutting-edge LiDAR instrument, and serve as a typical command and data handling (C&DH) computer for a space robotics technology demonstration.

  11. The Wasp-Waist Nebula: VLA Ammonia Observations of the Molecular Core Envelope In a Unique Class 0 Protostellar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Wasp-Waist Nebula was discovered in the IRAC c2d survey of the Ophiuchus starforming clouds. It is powered by a well-isolated, low-luminosity, low-mass Class 0 object. Its weak outflow has been mapped in the CO (3-2) transition with the JCMT, in 2.12 micron H2 emission with WIRC (the Wide-Field Infrared Camera) on the Hale 5-meter, and, most recently, in six H2 mid-infrared lines with the IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope; possible jet twisting structure may be evidence of unique core dynamics. Here, we report results of recent VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core protostellar system. We describe the morphology, kinematics, and angular momentum characteristics of this unique system. The results are compared with the envelope structure deduced from IRAC 8-micron absorption of the PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) background emission from the cloud.

  12. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  13. Unique Blasting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The Sun blasted out five coronal mass ejections (CMEs) over about two days (Feb. 26-28, 2013) and each one had quite a different shape and structure, seen here in a video bit.ly/Za8Aso. The most interesting one (seen above) blew out to the right with a bright, elongated center, likely part of a solar filament, that maintained its curly-Q shape as it expanded out of view. The images were taken by SOHO LASCO C2 coronagraph. The Sun is represented by the white circle and the red disk blocks out the Sun and part of the corona. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SOHO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. N-S crustal shear system in the Bundelkhand massif: A unique crustal evolution signature in the northern Indian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Bhattacharya, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Bundelkhand massif, located in the northern part of the Indian shield, is a poly-deformed and poly-metamorphic terrain. This paper reports a new shear system developed throughout the massif in the form of N-S trending quartz veins that are sometimes quartzo-feldspathic and rarely granitic in composition. The veins are vertical and commonly occur in conjugate sets. This tectono-magmatic event appears to represent the youngest shear system of the massif as it cross-cuts all the earlier shear systems (E-W, NE-SE and NW-SE). Emplacement of this N-S vein system may have taken place due to extensional processes that developed some cracks along which siliceous magma was vertically emplaced. The complete absence of signature of the N-S event from the surrounding sedimentary cover of Vindhyan Supergroup, Bijawar and Gwalior Groups suggests that this shear system is pre-tectonic to the nearly E-W trending passive basins developed at the margins of the Bundelkhand craton. Further, several workers have considered the Bundelkhand massif as a part of the Aravalli craton. However, due to the absence of N-S, as well as the other (i.e., E-W, NW-SE and NW-SE), tectonic fabrics of the Bundelkhand massif in other cratons of the Peninsular India, and vice versa, makes the Bundelkhand block a separate and unique craton of its own and is not part of the Aravalli craton.

  15. Space Suit Joint Torque Measurement Method Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana; Eversley, Karina

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test method was developed and performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits. This was done in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design met the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future development programs. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis; the results indicated a significant variance in values reported for a subset of the re-tested joints. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and a third round of testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate and/or quantify the effects of these variables. The results of the third test effort will be used to determine whether or not the proposed joint torque methodology can be applied to future space suit development contracts.

  16. The avian respiratory system: a unique model for studies of respiratory toxicosis and for monitoring air quality.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R E; Brain, J D; Wang, N

    1997-01-01

    There are many distinct differences (morphologic, physiologic, and mechanical) between the bird's lung-air-sac respiratory system and the mammalian bronchoalveolar lung. In this paper, we review the physiology of the avian respiratory system with attention to those mechanisms that may lead to significantly different results, relative to those in mammals, following exposure to toxic gases and airborne particulates. We suggest that these differences can be productively exploited to further our understanding of the basic mechanisms of inhalant toxicology (gases and particulates). The large mass-specific gas uptake by the avian respiratory system, at rest and especially during exercise, could be exploited as a sensitive monitor of air quality. Birds have much to offer in our understanding of respiratory toxicology, but that expectation can only be realized by investigating, in a wide variety of avian taxa, the pathophysiologic interactions of a broad range of inhaled toxicants on the bird's unique respiratory system. Images p188-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9105794

  17. The Role of KREEP in the Production of Mg-Suite Magmas and Its Influence on the Extent of Mg-Suite Magmatism in the Lunar Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elardo, S. M.; Shearer, C. K.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The lunar magnesian-suite, or Mg-suite, is a series of ancient plutonic rocks from the lunar crust. They have received a considerable amount of attention from lunar scientists since their discovery for three primary reasons: 1) their ages and geochemistry indicate they represent pristine magmatic samples that crystallized very soon after the formation of the Moon; 2) their ages often overlap with ages of the ferroan anorthosite (FAN) crust; and 3) planetary-scale processes are needed in formation models to account for their unique geochemical features. Taken as a whole, the Mg-suite samples, as magmatic cumulate rocks, approximate a fractional crystallization sequence in the low-pressure forsterite-anorthite-silica system, and thus these samples are generally thought to be derived from layered mafic intrusions which crystallized very slowly from magmas that intruded the anorthositic crust. However, no direct linkages have been established between different Mg-suite samples based either on field relationships or geochemistry.The model for the origin of the Mg-suite, which best fits the limited available data, is one where Mg-suite magmas form from melting of a hybrid cumulate package consisting of deep mantle dunite, crustal anorthosite, and KREEP (potassium-rare earth elements-phosphorus) at the base of the crust under the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT). In this model, these three LMO (Lunar Magma Ocean) cumulate components are brought into close proximity by the cumulate overturn process. Deep mantle dunitic cumulates with an Mg number of approximately 90 rise to the base of the anorthositic crust due to their buoyancy relative to colder, more dense Fe- and Ti-rich cumulates. This hybridized source rock melts to form Mg-suite magmas, saturated in Mg-rich olivine and anorthitic plagioclase, that have a substantial KREEP component.

  18. Complexity of Fit, with Application to Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Although fitting a garment is often considered more of an art than a science, experts suggest that a subjectively poor fit is a symptom of inappropriate ease, the space between the wearer and the garment. The condition of poor suit fit is a unique problem for the space program and it can be attributed primarily to: a) NASA s policy to accommodate a wide variety of people (males and females from 1st to 99th percentile range and with various shapes and sizes) and b) its requirement to deploy a minimum number of suit sizes for logistical reasons. These factors make the space suit fit difficult to assess, where a wide range of people must be fit by the minimum possible number of suits, and yet, fit is crucial for operability and safety. Existing simplistic sizing scheme do not account for wide variations in shape within a diverse population with very limited sizing options. The complex issue of fit has been addressed by a variety of methods, many of which have been developed by the military, which has always had a keen interest in fitting its diverse population but with a multitude of sizing options. The space program has significantly less sizing options, so a combination of these advanced methods should be used to optimize space suit size and assess space suit fit. Multivariate methods can be used to develop sizing schemes that better reflect the wearer population, and integrated sizing systems can form a compromise between fitting men and women. Range of motion and operability testing can be combined with subjective feedback to provide a comprehensive evaluation of fit. The amount of ease can be tailored using these methods, to provide enough extra room where it is needed, without compromising mobility and comfort. This paper discusses the problem of fit in one of its most challenging applications: providing a safe and comfortable spacesuit that will protect its wearer from the extreme environment of space. It will discuss the challenges and necessity of closely

  19. New insights into the reduction systems of plastidial thioredoxins point out the unique properties of thioredoxin z from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Anne-Sophie; Massot, Vincent; Innocenti, Gilles; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Vanacker, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    In plants, thioredoxins (TRX) constitute a large protein disulphide oxidoreductase family comprising 10 plastidial members in Arabidopsis thaliana and subdivided in five types. The f- and m-types regulate enzymes involved mainly in carbon metabolism whereas the x, y, and z types have an antioxidant function. The reduction of TRXm and f in chloroplasts is performed in the light by ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) that uses photosynthetically reduced ferredoxin (Fd) as a reductant. The reduction system of Arabidopsis TRXx, y, and z has never been demonstrated. Recently, a gene encoding an atypical plastidial NADPH-dependent TRX reductase (NTRC) was found. In the present study, gene expression analysis revealed that both reductases are expressed in all organs of Arabidopsis and could potentially serve as electron donors to plastidial TRX. This ability was tested in vitro either with purified NTRC in presence of NADPH or with a light-driven reconstituted system comprising thylakoids and purified Fd and FTR. The results demonstrate that FTR reduces the x and y TRX isoforms but not the recently identified TRXz. Moreover, the results show that NTRC cannot be an efficient alternative reducing system, neither for TRXz nor for the other plastidial TRX. The data reveal that TRXf, m, x, and y, known as redox regulators in the chloroplast, have also the ability to reduce TRXz in vitro. Overall, the present study points out the unique properties of TRXz among plastidial TRX.

  20. Thermal Analysis and Design of an Advanced Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin H.; Campbell, Anthony B.; French, Jonathan D.; French, D.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal dynamics and design of an Advanced Space Suit are considered. A transient model of the Advanced Space Suit has been developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink to help with sizing, with design evaluation, and with the development of an automatic thermal comfort control strategy. The model is described and the thermal characteristics of the Advanced Space suit are investigated including various parametric design studies. The steady state performance envelope for the Advanced Space Suit is defined in terms of the thermal environment and human metabolic rate and the transient response of the human-suit-MPLSS system is analyzed.

  1. A Module for Assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation System for Unique Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounder radiance data are assimilated into operational modeling systems however the process is computationally expensive and only approximately 1% of available data are assimilated due to data thinning as well as the fact that radiances are restricted to cloud-free fields of view. In contrast, the number of hyperspectral infrared profiles assimilated is much higher since the retrieved profiles can be assimilated in some partly cloudy scenes due to profile coupling other data, such as microwave or neural networks, as first guesses to the retrieval process. As the operational data assimilation community attempts to assimilate cloud-affected radiances, it is possible that the use of retrieved profiles might offer an alternative methodology that is less complex and more computationally efficient to solve this problem. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has assimilated hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System. Early research at SPoRT demonstrated improved initial conditions when assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) thermodynamic profiles into WRF (using WRF-Var and assigning more appropriate error weighting to the profiles) to improve regional analysis and heavy precipitation forecasts. Successful early work has led to more recent research utilizing WRF and GSI for applications including the assimilation of AIRS profiles to improve WRF forecasts of atmospheric rivers and assimilation of AIRS, Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) profiles to improve model representation of tropopause folds and associated non-convective wind events. Although more hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles can be assimilated into model forecasts, one disadvantage is the retrieved profiles have traditionally been assigned the

  2. Orion ECLSS/Suit System - Ambient Pressure Integrated Suit Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barido, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Crew Quarters (CQ) is a permanent personal space for crewmembers to sleep, perform personal recreation and communication, as well as provide on-orbit stowage of personal belongings. The CQs provide visual, light, and acoustic isolation for the crewmember. Over a two year period, four CQs were launched to the ISS and currently reside in Node 2. Since their deployment, all CQs have been occupied and continue to be utilized. After four years on-orbit, this paper will review failures that have occurred and the investigations that have resulted in successful on-orbit operations. This paper documents the on-orbit performance and sustaining activities that have been performed to maintain the integrity and utilization of the CQs.

  3. Open architecture of smart sensor suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wilmuth; Kuwertz, Achim; Grönwall, Christina; Petersson, Henrik; Dekker, Rob; Reinert, Frank; Ditzel, Maarten

    2017-10-01

    Experiences from recent conflicts show the strong need for smart sensor suites comprising different multi-spectral imaging sensors as core elements as well as additional non-imaging sensors. Smart sensor suites should be part of a smart sensor network - a network of sensors, databases, evaluation stations and user terminals. Its goal is to optimize the use of various information sources for military operations such as situation assessment, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, target recognition and tracking. Such a smart sensor network will enable commanders to achieve higher levels of situational awareness. Within the study at hand, an open system architecture was developed in order to increase the efficiency of sensor suites. The open system architecture for smart sensor suites, based on a system-of-systems approach, enables combining different sensors in multiple physical configurations, such as distributed sensors, co-located sensors combined in a single package, tower-mounted sensors, sensors integrated in a mobile platform, and trigger sensors. The architecture was derived from a set of system requirements and relevant scenarios. Its mode of operation is adaptable to a series of scenarios with respect to relevant objects of interest, activities to be observed, available transmission bandwidth, etc. The presented open architecture is designed in accordance with the NATO Architecture Framework (NAF). The architecture allows smart sensor suites to be part of a surveillance network, linked e.g. to a sensor planning system and a C4ISR center, and to be used in combination with future RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) for supporting a more flexible dynamic configuration of RPAS payloads.

  4. The Geomorphology, Hydrology and Evolution of a Chain of Ponds River System: A Poorly Recognised and Unique River Planform Type.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R.; Fryirs, K.

    2016-12-01

    conditions, and surface water dependent systems during high flow. Understanding the unique hydro-geomorphic structure and evolution of this discontinuous watercourse is important as it provides a framework for its ecological function and increases our knowledge of river geodiversity.

  5. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, Jay; Baker, Christopher; Clayton, Ronald; Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during simulated planetary exploration activities. Data will be released to the planetary protection and science communities, and advanced EVA system designers. In the best case scenario, we will discover that very little microbial contamination leaks from our current or prototype suit designs, in the worst case scenario, we will identify leak paths, learn more about what affects leakage--and we'll have a new, flight-certified swab tool for our EVA toolbox.

  6. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' humanrated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

  7. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion the Z-2 will be tested in the 11 foot human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' that the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model.

  8. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

  9. Clean room technology in surgery suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The principles of clean room technology and the criteria for their application to surgery are discussed. The basic types of surgical clean rooms are presented along with their advantages and disadvantages. Topics discussed include: microbiology of surgery suites; principles of laminar airflow systems, and their use in surgery; and asepsis and the operating room.

  10. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Gianluca; Duca, Angelica Lo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead. PMID:23202204

  11. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 10-2-022A Chemical Vapor and Aerosol System-Level Testing of Chemical/Biological Protective Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-16

    p. Pretest and posttest physiological data on the TPs. q. Logbooks from test chamber and laboratory operators and laboratory QA chemist. TOP...shown on the videotape of the actual exercises performed. TPs will be identified by the TIIN of the suit worn. g. Pretest and posttest ...information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for information on

  12. Erdheim-Chester Disease Involving the Central Nervous System with the Unique Appearance of a Coated Vertebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hime; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Komatsu, Katsuya; Akiyama, Yukinori; Mikami, Takeshi; Sugita, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Kaya, Mitsunori; Takada, Kohichi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is characterized by multiple xanthogranulomatous masses throughout the body, predominantly in the tibia. One of the characteristic radiological findings of the lesions associated with ECD is a "coated artery," which is often observed in the aorta. Although approximately one-fourth of ECD cases involve the central nervous system (CNS), an intracranial-coated artery has only been reported in four cases. We report a case of ECD that involves the CNS and has the unique appearance of a coated vertebral artery (VA). These tumors entirely encase the bilateral VAs without stenosis and are attached to the dura. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging also showed multiple extra-axial tumors in the cavernous sinus, the frontal convexity, and the orbital cavity. Further investigation revealed additional extracranial lesions around the cervical carotid artery, at the bilateral tibia, and at the elbow joint. A biopsy of the cervical and tibial lesions confirmed ECD. Steroid therapy resulted in a month-long improvement of preoperative symptoms. However, the patient's condition gradually progressed and he died of pneumonia 1 year after ECD diagnosis. The encasement of the intracranial artery by the tumor without stenosis and the dural attachment suggest ECD, which requires whole body investigation.

  13. Erdheim-Chester Disease Involving the Central Nervous System with the Unique Appearance of a Coated Vertebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hime; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Komatsu, Katsuya; Akiyama, Yukinori; Mikami, Takeshi; Sugita, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Kaya, Mitsunori; Takada, Kohichi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is characterized by multiple xanthogranulomatous masses throughout the body, predominantly in the tibia. One of the characteristic radiological findings of the lesions associated with ECD is a “coated artery,” which is often observed in the aorta. Although approximately one-fourth of ECD cases involve the central nervous system (CNS), an intracranial-coated artery has only been reported in four cases. We report a case of ECD that involves the CNS and has the unique appearance of a coated vertebral artery (VA). These tumors entirely encase the bilateral VAs without stenosis and are attached to the dura. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging also showed multiple extra-axial tumors in the cavernous sinus, the frontal convexity, and the orbital cavity. Further investigation revealed additional extracranial lesions around the cervical carotid artery, at the bilateral tibia, and at the elbow joint. A biopsy of the cervical and tibial lesions confirmed ECD. Steroid therapy resulted in a month-long improvement of preoperative symptoms. However, the patient’s condition gradually progressed and he died of pneumonia 1 year after ECD diagnosis. The encasement of the intracranial artery by the tumor without stenosis and the dural attachment suggest ECD, which requires whole body investigation. PMID:28664013

  14. Effect of field view size and lighting on unique-hue selection using Natural Color System object colors.

    PubMed

    Shamey, Renzo; Zubair, Muhammad; Cheema, Hammad

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was twofold, first to determine the effect of field view size and second of illumination conditions on the selection of unique hue samples (UHs: R, Y, G and B) from two rotatable trays, each containing forty highly chromatic Natural Color System (NCS) samples, on one tray corresponding to 1.4° and on the other to 5.7° field of view size. UH selections were made by 25 color-normal observers who repeated assessments three times with a gap of at least 24h between trials. Observers separately assessed UHs under four illumination conditions simulating illuminants D65, A, F2 and F11. An apparent hue shift (statistically significant for UR) was noted for UH selections at 5.7° field of view compared to those at 1.4°. Observers' overall variability was found to be higher for UH stimuli selections at the larger field of view. Intra-observer variability was found to be approximately 18.7% of inter-observer variability in selection of samples for both sample sizes. The highest intra-observer variability was under simulated illuminant D65, followed by A, F11, and F2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  16. RNA-seq Analysis Reveals Unique Transcriptome Signatures in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Distinct Autoantibody Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Richa; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibit immense heterogeneity which is challenging from the diagnostic perspective. Emerging high throughput sequencing technologies have been proved to be a useful platform to understand the complex and dynamic disease processes. SLE patients categorised based on autoantibody specificities are reported to have differential immuno-regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, we performed RNA-seq analysis to identify transcriptomics of SLE patients with distinguished autoantibody specificities. The SLE patients were segregated into three subsets based on the type of autoantibodies present in their sera (anti-dsDNA+ group with anti-dsDNA autoantibody alone; anti-ENA+ group having autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) only, and anti-dsDNA+ENA+ group having autoantibodies to both dsDNA and ENA). Global transcriptome profiling for each SLE patients subsets was performed using Illumina® Hiseq-2000 platform. The biological relevance of dysregulated transcripts in each SLE subsets was assessed by ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software. We observed that dysregulation in the transcriptome expression pattern was clearly distinct in each SLE patients subsets. IPA analysis of transcripts uniquely expressed in different SLE groups revealed specific biological pathways to be affected in each SLE subsets. Multiple cytokine signaling pathways were specifically dysregulated in anti-dsDNA+ patients whereas Interferon signaling was predominantly dysregulated in anti-ENA+ patients. In anti-dsDNA+ENA+ patients regulation of actin based motility by Rho pathway was significantly affected. The granulocyte gene signature was a common feature to all SLE subsets; however, anti-dsDNA+ group showed relatively predominant expression of these genes. Dysregulation of Plasma cell related transcripts were higher in anti-dsDNA+ and anti-ENA+ patients as compared to anti-dsDNA+ ENA+. Association of specific canonical pathways with the uniquely

  17. Advanced Space Suit Insulation Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.

    2000-01-01

    For planetary applications, the space suit insulation has unique requirements because it must perform in a dynamic mode to protect humans in the harsh dust, pressure and temperature environments. Since the presence of a gaseous planetary atmosphere adds significant thermal conductance to the suit insulation, the current multi-layer flexible insulation designed for vacuum applications is not suitable in reduced pressure planetary environments such as that of Mars. Therefore a feasibility study has been conducted at NASA to identify the most promising insulation concepts that can be developed to provide an acceptable suit insulation. Insulation concepts surveyed include foams, microspheres, microfibers, and vacuum jackets. The feasibility study includes a literature survey of potential concepts, an evaluation of test results for initial insulation concepts, and a development philosophy to be pursued as a result of the initial testing and conceptual surveys. The recommended focus is on microfibers due to the versatility of fiber structure configurations, the wide choice of fiber materials available, the maturity of the fiber processing industry, and past experience with fibers in insulation applications

  18. Heat exchanges in wet suits.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A H; Coleshaw, S R; Newstead, C G; Keatinge, W R

    1985-03-01

    Flow of water under foam neoprene wet suits could halve insulation that the suits provided, even at rest in cold water. On the trunk conductance of this flow was approximately 6.6 at rest and 11.4 W . m-2 . C-1 exercising; on the limbs, it was only 3.4 at rest and 5.8 W . m-2 . degrees C-1 exercising; but during vasoconstriction in the cold, skin temperatures on distal parts of limbs were lower than were those of the trunk, allowing adequate metabolic responses. In warm water, minor postural changes and movement made flow under suits much higher, approximately 60 on trunk and 30 W . m-2 . degrees C-1 on limbs, both at rest and at work. These changes in flow allowed for a wide range of water temperatures at which people could stabilize body temperature in any given suit, neither overheating when exercising nor cooling below 35 degrees C when still. Even thin people with 4- or 7- mm suits covering the whole body could stabilize their body temperatures in water near 10 degrees C in spite of cold vasodilatation. Equations to predict limits of water temperature for stability with various suits and fat thicknesses are given.

  19. Cycle life machine for AX-5 space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenberger, Deborah S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to accurately test the AX-5 space suit, a complex series of motions needed to be performed which provided a unique opportunity for mechanism design. The cycle life machine design showed how 3-D computer images can enhance mechanical design as well as help in visualizing mechanisms before manufacturing them. In the early stages of the design, potential problems in the motion of the joint and in the four bar linkage system were resolved using CAD. Since these problems would have been very difficult and tedious to solve on a drawing board, they would probably not have been addressed prior to fabrication, thus limiting the final design or requiring design modification after fabrication.

  20. Development of a space activity suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.; Webb, P.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a series of prototype space activity suit (SAS) assemblies is discussed. The SAS is a new type of pressure suit designed especially for extravehicular activity. It consists of a set of carefully tailored elastic fabric garments which have been engineered to supply sufficient counterpressure to the body to permit subjects to breath O2 at pressures up to 200 mm Hg without circulatory difficulty. A closed, positive pressure breathing system (PPBS) and a full bubble helmet were also developed to complete the system. The ultimate goal of the SAS is to improve the range of activity and decrease the energy cost of work associated with wearing conventional gas filled pressure suits. Results are presented from both laboratory (1 atmosphere) and altitude chamber tests with subjects wearing various SAS assemblies. In laboratory tests lasting up to three hours, the SAS was worn while subjects breathed O2 at pressures up to 170 mm Hg without developing physiological problems. The only physiological symptoms apparent were a moderate tachycardia related to breathing pressures above 130 mm Hg, and a small collection of edema fluid in the hands. Both problems were considered to be related to areas of under-pressurization by the garments. These problems, it is suggested, can ultimately be corrected by the development of new elastic fabrics and tailoring techniques. Energy cost of activity, and mobility and dexterity of subjects in the SAS, were found to be superior to those in comparable tests on subjects in full pressure suits.

  1. Nonaggressive systemic mastocytosis (SM) without skin lesions associated with insect-induced anaphylaxis shows unique features versus other indolent SM.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Twose, Iván; Zanotti, Roberta; González-de-Olano, David; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Vega, Arantza; Matito, Almudena; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura; Morgado, José Mário; Perbellini, Omar; García-Montero, Andrés; De Matteis, Giovanna; Teodósio, Cristina; Rossini, Maurizio; Jara-Acevedo, María; Schena, Donatella; Mayado, Andrea; Zamò, Alberto; Mollejo, Manuela; Sánchez-López, Paula; Cabañes, Nieves; Orfao, Alberto; Escribano, Luis

    2014-02-01

    Indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM) without skin lesions (ISMs(-)) shows a higher prevalence in males, lower serum baseline tryptase levels, and KIT mutation more frequently restricted to bone marrow (BM) mast cells (MCs) than ISM with skin lesions (ISMs(+)). Interestingly, in almost one-half of ISMs(-) patients, MC-mediator release episodes are triggered exclusively by insects. We aimed to determine the clinical and laboratory features of ISMs(-) associated with insect-induced anaphylaxis (insectISMs(-)) versus other patients with ISM. A total of 335 patients presenting with MC activation syndrome, including 143 insectISMs(-), 72 ISMs(-) triggered by other factors (otherISMs(-)), 56 ISMs(+), and 64 nonclonal MC activation syndrome, were studied. Compared with otherISMs(-) and ISMs(+) patients, insectISMs(-) cases showed marked male predominance (78% vs 53% and 46%; P < .001), a distinct pattern of MC-related symptoms, and significantly lower median serum baseline tryptase levels (22.4 vs 28.7 and 45.8 μg/L; P ≤ .009). Moreover, insectISMs(-) less frequently presented BM MC aggregates (46% vs 70% and 81%; P ≤ .001), and they systematically showed MC-restricted KIT mutation. ISMs(-) patients with anaphylaxis triggered exclusively by insects display clinical and laboratory features that are significantly different from other ISM cases, including other ISMs(-) and ISMs(+) patients, suggesting that they represent a unique subgroup of ISM with a particularly low BM MC burden in the absence of adverse prognostic factors. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Newly designed launch and entry suit (LES) modeled by technician

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1988-11-14

    Space shuttle orange launch and entry suit (LES), a partial pressure suit, is modeled by a technician. LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions. Included in the crew escape system (CES) package are launch and entry helmet (LEH) with communications carrier (COMM CAP), parachute pack and harness, life raft, life preserver unit (LPU), LES gloves, suit oxygen manifold and valves, boots, and survival gear.

  3. XTCE GOVSAT Tool Suite 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The XTCE GOVSAT software suite contains three tools: validation, search, and reporting. The Extensible Markup Language (XML) Telemetric and Command Exchange (XTCE) GOVSAT Tool Suite is written in Java for manipulating XTCE XML files. XTCE is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and Object Management Group (OMG) specification for describing the format and information in telemetry and command packet streams. These descriptions are files that are used to configure real-time telemetry and command systems for mission operations. XTCE s purpose is to exchange database information between different systems. XTCE GOVSAT consists of rules for narrowing the use of XTCE for missions. The Validation Tool is used to syntax check GOVSAT XML files. The Search Tool is used to search (i.e. command and telemetry mnemonics) the GOVSAT XML files and view the results. Finally, the Reporting Tool is used to create command and telemetry reports. These reports can be displayed or printed for use by the operations team.

  4. Comparison of air exhausts for surgical body suits (space suits) and the potential for periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Ling, F; Halabi, S; Jones, C

    2018-07-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a major complication of total joint replacement surgery and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and financial burden. Surgical body suits (space suits), originally designed to reduce the incidence of infection, have paradoxically been implicated in increased periprosthetic joint infection rates recently. Air exhausted from space suits may contribute to this increased rate of periprosthetic joint infection. To investigate the flow of air exhausted from space suits commonly used in modern operating theatres. The exhaust airflow patterns of four commercially available space suit systems were compared using a fog machine and serial still photographs. The space suit systems tested all air exhausted into the operating room. The single fan systems with a standard surgical gown exhausted air laterally from the posterior gown fold at approximately the level of the surgical field. The single fan system with a dedicated zippered suit exhausted air at a level below the surgical field. The dual fan system exhausted air out of the top of the helmet at a level above the surgical field. Space suit systems currently in use in joint replacement surgery differ significantly from traditional body exhaust systems; rather than removing contaminated air from the operating environment, modern systems exhaust this air into the operating room, in some cases potentially towards the sterile instrument tray and the surgical field. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The EVA space suit development in Europe.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I

    1994-01-01

    The progress of the European EVA space suit predevelopment activities has resulted in an improved technical reference concept, which will form the basis for a start of the Phase C/D development work in 1992. Technology development work over the last 2 years has resulted in a considerable amount of test data and a better understanding of the characteristics and behaviour of individual parts of the space suit system, in particular in the areas of suits' mobility and life support functions. This information has enabled a consolidation of certain design features on the one hand, but also led to the challenging of some of the design solutions on the other hand. While working towards an improved situation with respect to the main design drivers mass and cost, the technical concept has been improved with respect to functional safety and ease of handling, taking the evolving Hermes spaceplane requirements into consideration. Necessary hardware and functional redundancies have been implemented taking the operational scenario with Hermes and Columbus servicing into consideration. This paper presents the latest design status of the European EVA space suit concept, with particular emphasis on crew safety, comfort and productivity, in the frame of the predevelopment work for the European Space Agency.

  6. Navigation/Prop Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruchmiller, Tomas; Tran, Sanh; Lee, Mathew; Bucker, Scott; Bupane, Catherine; Bennett, Charles; Cantu, Sergio; Kwong, Ping; Propst, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Navigation (Nav)/Prop software is used to support shuttle mission analysis, production, and some operations tasks. The Nav/Prop suite containing configuration items (CIs) resides on IPS/Linux workstations. It features lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle navigation and propellant analysis for all flight segments. This suite also includes trajectory server, archive server, and RAT software residing on MCC/Linux workstations. Navigation/Prop represents tool versions established during or after IPS Equipment Rehost-3 or after the MCC Rehost.

  7. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    A Russian Sokol suit technician prepares to help American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott don his flight suit prior to the Soyuz TMA-13 launch with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Systems-Level Annotation of a Metabolomics Data Set Reduces 25 000 Features to Fewer than 1000 Unique Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Patti, Gary J

    2017-10-03

    When using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to perform untargeted metabolomics, it is now routine to detect tens of thousands of features from biological samples. Poor understanding of the data, however, has complicated interpretation and masked the number of unique metabolites actually being measured in an experiment. Here we place an upper bound on the number of unique metabolites detected in Escherichia coli samples analyzed with one untargeted metabolomics method. We first group multiple features arising from the same analyte, which we call "degenerate features", using a context-driven annotation approach. Surprisingly, this analysis revealed thousands of previously unreported degeneracies that reduced the number of unique analytes to ∼2961. We then applied an orthogonal approach to remove nonbiological features from the data using the 13 C-based credentialing technology. This further reduced the number of unique analytes to less than 1000. Our 90% reduction in data is 5-fold greater than previously published studies. On the basis of the results, we propose an alternative approach to untargeted metabolomics that relies on thoroughly annotated reference data sets. To this end, we introduce the creDBle database ( http://creDBle.wustl.edu ), which contains accurate mass, retention time, and MS/MS fragmentation data as well as annotations of all credentialed features.

  9. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermoremore » Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  10. Suited Contingency Ops Food - 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. W.; Leong, M. L.; Douglas, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    The contingency scenario for an emergency cabin depressurization event may require crewmembers to subsist in a pressurized suit for up to 144 hours. This scenario requires the capability for safe nutrition delivery through a helmet feed port against a 4 psi pressure differential to enable crewmembers to maintain strength and cognition to perform critical tasks. Two nutritional delivery prototypes were developed and analyzed for compatibility with the helmet feed port interface and for operational effectiveness against the pressure differential. The bag-in-bag (BiB) prototype, designed to equalize the suit pressure with the beverage pouch and enable a crewmember to drink normally, delivered water successfully to three different subjects in suits pressurized to 4 psi. The Boa restrainer pouch, designed to provide mechanical leverage to overcome the pressure differential, did not operate sufficiently. Guidelines were developed and compiled for contingency beverages that provide macro-nutritional requirements, a minimum one-year shelf life, and compatibility with the delivery hardware. Evaluation results and food product parameters have the potential to be used to improve future prototype designs and develop complete nutritional beverages for contingency events. These feeding capabilities would have additional use on extended surface mission EVAs, where the current in-suit drinking device may be insufficient.

  11. Trends in Personal Injury Suits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Smissen, Betty

    1985-01-01

    Professional competence becomes more important as personal injury suits against recreation enterprises and parks focus increasingly on the professional responsible for facility safety. All professionals should be aware of and educated in risk management. Trends in liability awards and providers' legal responsibilities in various situations are…

  12. SUIT - ASTRONAUT S. CARPENTER - PA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-08-01

    S61-03510 (1961) --- Project Mercury astronaut M. Scott Carpenter smiles, in his pressure suit, prior to participating in a simulated mission run at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Astronaut Carpenter has been selected as the prime pilot on the United States second attempt to put a man into orbit around Earth. Photo credit: NASA

  13. The ZPIC educational code suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, R.; Pardal, M.; Ninhos, P.; Helm, A.; Mori, W. B.; Decyk, V. K.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) codes are used in almost all areas of plasma physics, such as fusion energy research, plasma accelerators, space physics, ion propulsion, and plasma processing, and many other areas. In this work, we present the ZPIC educational code suite, a new initiative to foster training in plasma physics using computer simulations. Leveraging on our expertise and experience from the development and use of the OSIRIS PIC code, we have developed a suite of 1D/2D fully relativistic electromagnetic PIC codes, as well as 1D electrostatic. These codes are self-contained and require only a standard laptop/desktop computer with a C compiler to be run. The output files are written in a new file format called ZDF that can be easily read using the supplied routines in a number of languages, such as Python, and IDL. The code suite also includes a number of example problems that can be used to illustrate several textbook and advanced plasma mechanisms, including instructions for parameter space exploration. We also invite contributions to this repository of test problems that will be made freely available to the community provided the input files comply with the format defined by the ZPIC team. The code suite is freely available and hosted on GitHub at https://github.com/zambzamb/zpic. Work partially supported by PICKSC.

  14. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation

  15. Automated integration of lidar into the LANDFIRE product suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Birgit; Nelson, Kurtis; Seielstad, Carl; Stoker, Jason M.; Jolly, W. Matt; Parsons, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Accurate information about three-dimensional canopy structure and wildland fuel across the landscape is necessary for fire behaviour modelling system predictions. Remotely sensed data are invaluable for assessing these canopy characteristics over large areas; lidar data, in particular, are uniquely suited for quantifying three-dimensional canopy structure. Although lidar data are increasingly available, they have rarely been applied to wildland fuels mapping efforts, mostly due to two issues. First, the Landscape Fire and Resource Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) program, which has become the default source of large-scale fire behaviour modelling inputs for the US, does not currently incorporate lidar data into the vegetation and fuel mapping process because spatially continuous lidar data are not available at the national scale. Second, while lidar data are available for many land management units across the US, these data are underutilized for fire behaviour applications. This is partly due to a lack of local personnel trained to process and analyse lidar data. This investigation addresses these issues by developing the Creating Hybrid Structure from LANDFIRE/lidar Combinations (CHISLIC) tool. CHISLIC allows individuals to automatically generate a suite of vegetation structure and wildland fuel parameters from lidar data and infuse them into existing LANDFIRE data sets. CHISLIC will become available for wider distribution to the public through a partnership with the U.S. Forest Service’s Wildland Fire Assessment System (WFAS) and may be incorporated into the Wildland Fire Decision Support System (WFDSS) with additional design and testing. WFAS and WFDSS are the primary systems used to support tactical and strategic wildland fire management decisions.

  16. An MBSE Approach to Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Lauren; Kovich, Christine; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The EVA/Space Suit Development Office (ESSD) Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) team has utilized MBSE in multiple programs. After developing operational and architectural models, the MBSE framework was expanded to link the requirements space to the system models through functional analysis and interfaces definitions. By documenting all the connections within the technical baseline, ESSD experienced significant efficiency improvements in analysis and identification of change impacts. One of the biggest challenges presented to the MBSE structure was a program transition and restructuring effort, which was completed successfully in 4 months culminating in the approval of a new EVA Technical Baseline. During this time three requirements sets spanning multiple DRMs were streamlined into one NASA-owned Systems Requirement Document (SRD) that successfully identified requirements relevant to the current hardware development effort while remaining extensible to support future hardware developments. A capability-based hierarchy was established to provide a more flexible framework for future space suit development that can support multiple programs with minimal rework of basic EVA/Space Suit requirements. This MBSE approach was most recently applied for generation of an EMU Demonstrator technical baseline being developed for an ISS DTO. The relatively quick turnaround of operational concepts, architecture definition, and requirements for this new suit development has allowed us to test and evolve the MBSE process and framework in an extremely different setting while still offering extensibility and traceability throughout ESSD projects. The ESSD MBSE framework continues to be evolved in order to support integration of all products associated with the SE&I engine.

  17. [EC5-Space Suit Assembly Team- Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maicke, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    There were three main projects in this internship. The first pertained to the Bearing Dust Cycle Test, in particular automating the test to allow for easier administration. The second concerned modifying the communication system setup in the Z2 suit, where speakers and mics were adjusted to allow for more space in the helmet. And finally, the last project concerned the tensile strength testing of fabrics deemed as candidates for space suit materials and desired to be sent off for radiation testing. The major duties here are split up between the major projects detailed above. For the Bearing Dust Cycle Test, the first objective was to find a way to automate administration of the test, as the previous version was long and tedious to perform. In order to do this, it was necessary to introduce additional electronics and perform programming to control the automation. Once this was done, it would be necessary to update documents concerning the test setup, procedure, and potential hazards. Finally, I was tasked with running tests using the new system to confirm system performance. For the Z2 communication system modifications, it was necessary to investigate alternative speakers and microphones which may have better performance than those currently used in the suit. Further, new speaker and microphone positions needed to be identified to keep them out of the way of the suit user. Once this was done, appropriate hardware (such as speaker or microphone cases and holders) could be prototyped and fabricated. For the suit material strength testing, the first task was to gather and document various test fabrics to identify the best suit material candidates. Then, it was needed to prepare samples for testing to establish baseline measurements and specify a testing procedure. Once the data was fully collected, additional test samples would be prepared and sent off-site to undergo irradiation before being tested again to observe changes in strength performance. For the Bearing

  18. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  19. Spinoff From a Moon Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Al Gross transferred expertise obtained as an ILC engineer for NASA's Apollo program to the manufacture of athletic shoes. Gross substituted DuPont's Hytrel plastic for foam materials in the shoe's midsole, eliminating cushioning loss caused by body weight. An external pressurized shell applied from space suit technology was incorporated into the shoe. Stiffness and cushioning properties of the midsole were "tuned" by varying material thickness and styling lines. A stress free "blow molding" process adapted from NASA space suit design was also utilized. The resulting compression chamber midsole performed well in tests. It allows AVIA to re-configure for specific sports and is a "first step" toward a durable, foamless, non-fatiguing midsole.

  20. Design of Test Support Hardware for Advanced Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Jeffrey A.; Rhodes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    As a member of the Space Suit Assembly Development Engineering Team, I designed and built test equipment systems to support the development of the next generation of advanced space suits. During space suit testing it is critical to supply the subject with two functions: (1) cooling to remove metabolic heat, and (2) breathing air to pressurize the space suit. The objective of my first project was to design, build, and certify an improved Space Suit Cooling System for manned testing in a 1-G environment. This design had to be portable and supply a minimum cooling rate of 2500 BTU/hr. The Space Suit Cooling System is a robust, portable system that supports very high metabolic rates. It has a highly adjustable cool rate and is equipped with digital instrumentation to monitor the flowrate and critical temperatures. It can supply a variable water temperature down to 34 deg., and it can generate a maximum water flowrate of 2.5 LPM. My next project was to design and build a Breathing Air System that was capable of supply facility air to subjects wearing the Z-2 space suit. The system intakes 150 PSIG breathing air and regulates it to two operating pressures: 4.3 and 8.3 PSIG. It can also provide structural capabilities at 1.5x operating pressure: 6.6 and 13.2 PSIG, respectively. It has instrumentation to monitor flowrate, as well as inlet and outlet pressures. The system has a series of relief valves to fully protect itself in case of regulator failure. Both projects followed a similar design methodology. The first task was to perform research on existing concepts to develop a sufficient background knowledge. Then mathematical models were developed to size components and simulate system performance. Next, mechanical and electrical schematics were generated and presented at Design Reviews. After the systems were approved by the suit team, all the hardware components were specified and procured. The systems were then packaged, fabricated, and thoroughly tested. The next step

  1. Is Life Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Abel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Is life physicochemically unique? No. Is life unique? Yes. Life manifests innumerable formalisms that cannot be generated or explained by physicodynamics alone. Life pursues thousands of biofunctional goals, not the least of which is staying alive. Neither physicodynamics, nor evolution, pursue goals. Life is largely directed by linear digital programming and by the Prescriptive Information (PI) instantiated particularly into physicodynamically indeterminate nucleotide sequencing. Epigenomic controls only compound the sophistication of these formalisms. Life employs representationalism through the use of symbol systems. Life manifests autonomy, homeostasis far from equilibrium in the harshest of environments, positive and negative feedback mechanisms, prevention and correction of its own errors, and organization of its components into Sustained Functional Systems (SFS). Chance and necessity—heat agitation and the cause-and-effect determinism of nature’s orderliness—cannot spawn formalisms such as mathematics, language, symbol systems, coding, decoding, logic, organization (not to be confused with mere self-ordering), integration of circuits, computational success, and the pursuit of functionality. All of these characteristics of life are formal, not physical. PMID:25382119

  2. Uniqueness Results for Weak Leray-Hopf Solutions of the Navier-Stokes System with Initial Values in Critical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, T.

    2018-03-01

    The main subject of this paper concerns the establishment of certain classes of initial data, which grant short time uniqueness of the associated weak Leray-Hopf solutions of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In particular, our main theorem that this holds for any solenodial initial data, with finite L_2(R^3) norm, that also belongs to certain subsets of {it{VMO}}^{-1}(R^3). As a corollary of this, we obtain the same conclusion for any solenodial u0 belonging to L2(R^3)\\cap \\dot{B}^{-1+3/p}_{p,∞}(R^3), for any 3unique on R^3 × ]0,T[ amongst all other weak Leray-Hopf solutions with the same initial value. In particular, we show this is the case if u\\in L^{q,s}(0,T; L^{p,s}(R^3)) or if it's L^{q,∞}(0,T; L^{p,∞}(R^3)) norm is sufficiently small, where 3

  3. Expedition 18 Suit Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke waves hello to his family as he and Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott have their Russian Sokol suits pressure checked prior to launching in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke pose for a photograph after they don their Russian Sokol suits prior to the launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke dons his Russian Sokol suit hours before he and Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, dons his Russian Sokol suit hours before he and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, second from left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov dons his Russian Sokol suit hours before he and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Expedition 18 Suit Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked prior to launching in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft with Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 18 Suit Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, foreground, has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked prior to launching in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft with American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott and Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, right, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke don their Russian Sokol suits hours before they and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 18 Suit Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    American Spaceflight Participant Richard Garriott has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked prior to launching in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and Flight Engineer Yury V. Lonchakov, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24, 2008 with two of the Expedition 17 crewmembers currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, right, smile for the camera after they had their Russian Sokol suits pressure checked in preparation for launch onboard the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 18 Suit-up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke smiles for the camera after he and Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott had their Russian Sokol suits pressure checked prior to launching in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for space habitation and exploration

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Kevin R.; Vasquez, Rebecca A.; Middleton, Akil J.; Hansberry, Mitchell L.; Newman, Dava J.; Jacobs, Shane E.; West, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The “Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration” is a novel system concept that provides a platform for integrating sensors and actuators with daily astronaut intravehicular activities to improve health and performance, while reducing the mass and volume of the physiologic adaptation countermeasure systems, as well as the required exercise time during long-duration space exploration missions. The V2Suit system leverages wearable kinematic monitoring technology and uses inertial measurement units (IMUs) and control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) within miniaturized modules placed on body segments to provide a “viscous resistance” during movements against a specified direction of “down”—initially as a countermeasure to the sensorimotor adaptation performance decrements that manifest themselves while living and working in microgravity and during gravitational transitions during long-duration spaceflight, including post-flight recovery and rehabilitation. Several aspects of the V2Suit system concept were explored and simulated prior to developing a brassboard prototype for technology demonstration. This included a system architecture for identifying the key components and their interconnects, initial identification of key human-system integration challenges, development of a simulation architecture for CMG selection and parameter sizing, and the detailed mechanical design and fabrication of a module. The brassboard prototype demonstrates closed-loop control from “down” initialization through CMG actuation, and provides a research platform for human performance evaluations to mitigate sensorimotor adaptation, as well as a tool for determining the performance requirements when used as a musculoskeletal deconditioning countermeasure. This type of countermeasure system also has Earth benefits, particularly in gait or movement stabilization and rehabilitation. PMID:25914631

  15. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for space habitation and exploration.

    PubMed

    Duda, Kevin R; Vasquez, Rebecca A; Middleton, Akil J; Hansberry, Mitchell L; Newman, Dava J; Jacobs, Shane E; West, John J

    2015-01-01

    The "Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration" is a novel system concept that provides a platform for integrating sensors and actuators with daily astronaut intravehicular activities to improve health and performance, while reducing the mass and volume of the physiologic adaptation countermeasure systems, as well as the required exercise time during long-duration space exploration missions. The V2Suit system leverages wearable kinematic monitoring technology and uses inertial measurement units (IMUs) and control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) within miniaturized modules placed on body segments to provide a "viscous resistance" during movements against a specified direction of "down"-initially as a countermeasure to the sensorimotor adaptation performance decrements that manifest themselves while living and working in microgravity and during gravitational transitions during long-duration spaceflight, including post-flight recovery and rehabilitation. Several aspects of the V2Suit system concept were explored and simulated prior to developing a brassboard prototype for technology demonstration. This included a system architecture for identifying the key components and their interconnects, initial identification of key human-system integration challenges, development of a simulation architecture for CMG selection and parameter sizing, and the detailed mechanical design and fabrication of a module. The brassboard prototype demonstrates closed-loop control from "down" initialization through CMG actuation, and provides a research platform for human performance evaluations to mitigate sensorimotor adaptation, as well as a tool for determining the performance requirements when used as a musculoskeletal deconditioning countermeasure. This type of countermeasure system also has Earth benefits, particularly in gait or movement stabilization and rehabilitation.

  16. Coupling scanning tunneling microscope and supersonic molecular beams: a unique tool for in situ investigation of the morphology of activated systems.

    PubMed

    Smerieri, M; Reichelt, R; Savio, L; Vattuone, L; Rocca, M

    2012-09-01

    We report here on a new experimental apparatus combining a commercial low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with a supersonic molecular beam. This setup provides a unique tool for the in situ investigation of the topography of activated adsorption systems and opens thus new interesting perspectives. It has been tested towards the formation of the O/Ag(110) added rows reconstruction and of their hydroxylation, comparing data recorded upon O(2) exposure at thermal and hyperthermal energies.

  17. A Unique Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience in Molecular Systems Biology for Non-Mathematics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappler, Ulrike; Rowland, Susan L.; Pedwell, Rhianna K.

    2017-01-01

    Systems biology is frequently taught with an emphasis on mathematical modeling approaches. This focus effectively excludes most biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology students, who are not mathematics majors. The mathematical focus can also present a misleading picture of systems biology, which is a multi-disciplinary pursuit requiring…

  18. Autonomous biological system-an unique method of conducting long duration space flight experiments for pharmaceutical and gravitational biology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. A.; MacCallum, T. K.; Poynter, J. E.; Klaus, D., Dr.

    1998-01-01

    Paragon Space Development Corporation (SDC) has developed an Autonomous Biological System (ABS) that can be flown in space to provide for long term growth and breeding of aquatic plants, animals, microbes and algae. The system functions autonomously and in isolation from the spacecraft life support systems and with no mandatory crew time required for function or observation. The ABS can also be used for long term plant and animal life support and breeding on a free flyer space craft. The ABS units are a research tool for both pharmaceutical and basic space biological sciences. Development flights in May of 1996 and September, 1996 through January, 1997 were largely successful, showing both that the hardware and life systems are performing with beneficial results, though some surprises were still found. The two space flights, plus the current flight now on Mir, are expected to result in both a scientific and commercially usable system for breeding and propagation of animals and plants in space.

  19. Defining Operational Space Suit Requirements for Commercial Orbital Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    As the commercial spaceflight industry transitions from suborbital brevity to orbital outposts, spacewalking will become a major consideration for tourists, scientists, and hardware providers. The challenge exists to develop a space suit designed for the orbital commercial spaceflight industry. The unique needs and requirements of this industry will drive space suit designs and costs that are unlike any existing product. Commercial space tourists will pay for the experience of a lifetime, while scientists may not be able to rely on robotics for all operations and external hardware repairs. This study was aimed at defining space suit operational and functional needs across the spectrum of spacewalk elements, identifying technical design drivers and establishing appropriate options. Recommendations from the analysis are offered for consideration

  20. Utilizing a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus and Space Suit Ventilation Loop to Evaluate Carbon Dioxide Washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce; Korona, Adam; Kanne, Bryan; McMillin, Summer; Paul, Thomas; Norcross, Jason; Alonso, Jesus Delgado; Swickrath, Mike

    2015-01-01

    NASA is pursuing technology development of an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) which is an integrated assembly made up of primarily a pressure garment system and a portable life support subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is further composed of an oxygen subsystem, a ventilation subsystem, and a thermal subsystem. One of the key functions of the ventilation system is to remove and control the carbon dioxide (CO2) delivered to the crewmember. Carbon dioxide washout is the mechanism by which CO2 levels are controlled within the space suit helmet to limit the concentration of CO2 inhaled by the crew member. CO2 washout performance is a critical parameter needed to ensure proper and robust designs that are insensitive to human variabilities in a space suit. A suited manikin test apparatus (SMTA) was developed to augment testing of the PLSS ventilation loop in order to provide a lower cost and more controlled alternative to human testing. The CO2 removal function is performed by the regenerative Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) within the PLSS ventilation loop and its performance is evaluated within the integrated SMTA and Ventilation Loop test system. This paper will provide a detailed description of the schematics, test configurations, and hardware components of this integrated system. Results and analysis of testing performed with this integrated system will be presented within this paper.

  1. Planetary Suit Hip Bearing Model for Predicting Design vs. Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Margerum, Sarah; Harvil, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. In order to verifying that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must eventually be built and tested with human subjects. Using computer models early in the design phase of new hardware development can be advantageous, allowing virtual prototyping to take place. Having easily modifiable models of the suit hard sections may reduce the time it takes to make changes to the hardware designs and then to understand their impact on suit and human performance. A virtual design environment gives designers the ability to think outside the box and exhaust design possibilities before building and testing physical prototypes with human subjects. Reductions in prototyping and testing may eventually reduce development costs. This study is an attempt to develop computer models of the hard components of the suit with known physical characteristics, supplemented with human subject performance data. Objectives: The primary objective was to develop an articulating solid model of the Mark III hip bearings to be used for evaluating suit design performance of the hip joint. Methods: Solid models of a planetary prototype (Mark III) suit s hip bearings and brief section were reverse-engineered from the prototype. The performance of the models was then compared by evaluating the mobility performance differences between the nominal hardware configuration and hardware modifications. This was accomplished by gathering data from specific suited tasks. Subjects performed maximum flexion and abduction tasks while in a nominal suit bearing configuration and in three off-nominal configurations. Performance data for the hip were recorded using state-of-the-art motion capture technology. Results: The results demonstrate that solid models of planetary suit hard segments for use as a performance design tool is feasible. From a general trend perspective

  2. Comparison of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suited and unsuited isolated joint strength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Demel, Kenneth J.; Morgan, David A.; Wilmington, Robert P.; Pandya, Abhilash K.

    1996-01-01

    In this study the strength of subjects suited in extravehicular mobility units (EMU's) - or Space Shuttle suits - was compared to the strength of unsuited subjects. The authors devised a systematic and complete data set that characterizes isolated joint torques for all major joints of EMU-suited subjects. Six joint motions were included in the data set. The joint conditions of six subjects were compared to increase our understanding of the strength capabilities of suited subjects. Data were gathered on suited and unsuited subjects. Suited subjects wore Class 3 or Class 1 suits, with and without thermal micrometeoroid garments (TMG's). Suited and unsuited conditions for each joint motion were compared. From this the authors found, for example, that shoulder abduction suited conditions differ from each other and from the unsuited condition. A second-order polynomial regression model was also provided. This model, which allows the prediction of suited strength when given unsuited strength information, relates the torques of unsuited conditions to the torques of all suited conditions. Data obtained will enable computer modeling of EMU strength, conversion from unsuited to suited data, and isolated joint strength comparisons between suited and unsuited conditions at any measured angle. From these data mission planners and human factors engineers may gain a better understanding of crew posture, and mobility and strength capabilities. This study also may help suit designers optimize suit strength, and provide a foundation for EMU strength modeling systems.

  3. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through themore » shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.« less

  4. EV space suit gloves (passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, E. G.; Dodson, J. D.; Elkins, W.; Tickner, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A pair of pressure and thermal insulating overgloves to be used with an Extravehicular (EV) suit assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested. The design features extensive use of Nomex felt materials in lieu of the multiple layer insulation formerly used with the Apollo thermal glove. The glove theoretically satisfies all of the thermal requirements. The presence of the thermal glove does not degrade pressure glove tactility by more than the acceptable 10% value. On the other hand, the thermal glove generally degrades pressure glove mobility by more than the acceptable 10% value, primarily in the area of the fingers. Life cycling tests were completed with minimal problems. The thermal glove/pressure glove ensemble was also tested for comfort; the test subjects found no problems with the thermal glove although they did report difficulties with pressure points on the pressure glove which were independent of the thermal glove.

  5. Refinement of the Hybrid Neuroendovascular Operating Suite: Current and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Ramsey; See, Alfred P; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Khandelwal, Priyank; Patel, Nirav J; Belcher, Bianca; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali

    2016-07-01

    In early-generation hybrid biplane endovascular operating rooms, switching from surgical to angiographic position is cumbersome. In this report, we highlight the unique design of a new hybrid neuroendovascular operating suite that allows surgical access to the head while keeping the biplane system over the lower body of the patient. Current and future hybrid neuroendovascular operating suite applications are discussed. We collaborated with engineers to implement the following modifications to the design of the angiographic system: translation of the bed toward the feet to allow biplane cerebral imaging in the head-side position and the biplane left-side position; translation of the base of the A-plane C-arm away from the feet to allow increased operator space at the head of the bed and to allow cerebral imaging in both the head-side and left-side positions; use of a specialized boom mount for the display panel to increase mobility; and use of a radiolucent tabletop with attachments for the headrest or radiolucent head clamp system. The modified hybrid neuroendovascular operating suite allows for seamless transition between surgical and angiographic positions within seconds, improving workflow efficiency and decreasing procedure time as compared with early-generation hybrid rooms. Combined endovascular and surgical applications are facilitated by co-locating their respective technologies and refining the ergonomics of the system to ease transition between both sets of technologies. In so doing, hybrid neuroendovascular operating suites can be anticipated to improve patient outcomes, generate novel treatment paradigms, and improve time and cost efficiency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. ξTauri: a unique laboratory to study the dynamic interaction in a compact hierarchical quadruple system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemravová, J. A.; Harmanec, P.; Brož, M.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Mourard, D.; Hummel, C. A.; Cameron, C.; Matthews, J. M.; Bolton, C. T.; Božić, H.; Chini, R.; Dembsky, T.; Engle, S.; Farrington, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Guenther, D. B.; Guinan, E. F.; Korčáková, D.; Koubský, P.; Kříček, R.; Kuschnig, R.; Mayer, P.; McCook, G. P.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Nardetto, N.; Prša, A.; Ribeiro, J.; Rowe, J.; Rucinski, S.; Škoda, P.; Šlechta, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Votruba, V.; Weiss, W. W.; Wolf, M.; Zasche, P.; Zavala, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Compact hierarchical systems are important because the effects caused by the dynamical interaction among its members occur ona human timescale. These interactions play a role in the formation of close binaries through Kozai cycles with tides. One such system is ξ Tauri: it has three hierarchical orbits: 7.14 d (eclipsing components Aa, Ab), 145 d (components Aa+Ab, B), and 51 yr (components Aa+Ab+B, C). Aims: We aim to obtain physical properties of the system and to study the dynamical interaction between its components. Methods: Our analysis is based on a large series of spectroscopic photometric (including space-borne) observations and long-baseline optical and infrared spectro-interferometric observations. We used two approaches to infer the system properties: a set of observation-specific models, where all components have elliptical trajectories, and an N-body model, which computes the trajectory of each component by integrating Newton's equations of motion. Results: The triple subsystem exhibits clear signs of dynamical interaction. The most pronounced are the advance of the apsidal line and eclipse-timing variations. We determined the geometry of all three orbits using both observation-specific and N-body models. The latter correctly accounted for observed effects of the dynamical interaction, predicted cyclic variations of orbital inclinations, and determined the sense of motion of all orbits. Using perturbation theory, we demonstrate that prominent secular and periodic dynamical effects are explainable with a quadrupole interaction. We constrained the basic properties of all components, especially of members of the inner triple subsystem and detected rapid low-amplitude light variations that we attribute to co-rotating surface structures of component B. We also estimated the radius of component B. Properties of component C remain uncertain because of its low relative luminosity. We provide an independent estimate of the distance to the system

  7. A unique large-scale undergraduate research experience in molecular systems biology for non-mathematics majors.

    PubMed

    Kappler, Ulrike; Rowland, Susan L; Pedwell, Rhianna K

    2017-05-01

    Systems biology is frequently taught with an emphasis on mathematical modeling approaches. This focus effectively excludes most biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology students, who are not mathematics majors. The mathematical focus can also present a misleading picture of systems biology, which is a multi-disciplinary pursuit requiring collaboration between biochemists, bioinformaticians, and mathematicians. This article describes an authentic large-scale undergraduate research experience (ALURE) in systems biology that incorporates proteomics, bacterial genomics, and bioinformatics in the one exercise. This project is designed to engage students who have a basic grounding in protein chemistry and metabolism and no mathematical modeling skills. The pedagogy around the research experience is designed to help students attack complex datasets and use their emergent metabolic knowledge to make meaning from large amounts of raw data. On completing the ALURE, participants reported a significant increase in their confidence around analyzing large datasets, while the majority of the cohort reported good or great gains in a variety of skills including "analysing data for patterns" and "conducting database or internet searches." An environmental scan shows that this ALURE is the only undergraduate-level system-biology research project offered on a large-scale in Australia; this speaks to the perceived difficulty of implementing such an opportunity for students. We argue however, that based on the student feedback, allowing undergraduate students to complete a systems-biology project is both feasible and desirable, even if the students are not maths and computing majors. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):235-248, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This "EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit" presentation covers several topics related to the medical implications and physiological effects of suited operations in space from the perspective of a physician with considerable first-hand Extravehicular Activity (EVA) experience. Key themes include EVA physiology working in a pressure suit in the vacuum of space, basic EVA life support and work support, Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspections and repairs, and discussions of the physical challenges of an EVA. Parazynski covers the common injuries and significant risks during EVAs, as well as physical training required to prepare for EVAs. He also shares overall suit physiological and medical knowledge with the next generation of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) system designers.

  9. Integrated Instrument Simulator Suites for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan; Butler, Carolyn; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Niamsuwan, Noppasin; Johnson, Michael P.; Jacob, Joseph C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System Simulators Suite (NEOS3) is a modular framework of forward simulations tools for remote sensing of Earth's Atmosphere from space. It was initiated as the Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) under the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program of the Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) to enable science users to perform simulations based on advanced atmospheric and simple land surface models, and to rapidly integrate in a broad framework any experimental or innovative tools that they may have developed in this context. The name was changed to NEOS3 when the project was expanded to include more advanced modeling tools for the surface contributions, accounting for scattering and emission properties of layered surface (e.g., soil moisture, vegetation, snow and ice, subsurface layers). NEOS3 relies on a web-based graphic user interface, and a three-stage processing strategy to generate simulated measurements. The user has full control over a wide range of customizations both in terms of a priori assumptions and in terms of specific solvers or models used to calculate the measured signals.This presentation will demonstrate the general architecture, the configuration procedures and illustrate some sample products and the fundamental interface requirements for modules candidate for integration.

  10. Hybrid Enhanced Epidermal SpaceSuit Design Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Joseph M.

    A Space suit that does not rely on gas pressurization is a multi-faceted problem that requires major stability controls to be incorporated during design and construction. The concept of Hybrid Epidermal Enhancement space suit integrates evolved human anthropomorphic and physiological adaptations into its functionality, using commercially available bio-medical technologies to address shortcomings of conventional gas pressure suits, and the impracticalities of MCP suits. The prototype HEE Space Suit explored integumentary homeostasis, thermal control and mobility using advanced bio-medical materials technology and construction concepts. The goal was a space suit that functions as an enhanced, multi-functional bio-mimic of the human epidermal layer that works in attunement with the wearer rather than as a separate system. In addressing human physiological requirements for design and construction of the HEE suit, testing regimes were devised and integrated into the prototype which was then subject to a series of detailed tests using both anatomical reproduction methods and human subject.

  11. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This joint mobility KC lecture included information from two papers, "A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements" and "Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing," as presented for the International Conference on Environmental Systems in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The first paper discusses historical joint torque testing methodologies and approaches that were tested in 2008 and 2009. The second paper discusses the testing that was completed in 2009 and 2010.

  12. LiverAtlas: a unique integrated knowledge database for systems-level research of liver and hepatic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Yang, Chunyuan; Wang, Shaochuang; Chen, Tao; Li, Mansheng; Wang, Xue; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Kang; Ma, Jie; Wu, Songfeng; Zhang, Xueli; Zhu, Yunping; Wu, Jinsheng; He, Fuchu

    2013-09-01

    A large amount of liver-related physiological and pathological data exist in publicly available biological and bibliographic databases, which are usually far from comprehensive or integrated. Data collection, integration and mining processes pose a great challenge to scientific researchers and clinicians interested in the liver. To address these problems, we constructed LiverAtlas (http://liveratlas.hupo.org.cn), a comprehensive resource of biomedical knowledge related to the liver and various hepatic diseases by incorporating 53 databases. In the present version, LiverAtlas covers data on liver-related genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and hepatic diseases. Additionally, LiverAtlas provides a wealth of manually curated information, relevant literature citations and cross-references to other databases. Importantly, an expert-confirmed Human Liver Disease Ontology, including relevant information for 227 types of hepatic disease, has been constructed and is used to annotate LiverAtlas data. Furthermore, we have demonstrated two examples of applying LiverAtlas data to identify candidate markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the systems level and to develop a systems biology-based classifier by combining the differential gene expression with topological features of human protein interaction networks to enhance the ability of HCC differential diagnosis. LiverAtlas is the most comprehensive liver and hepatic disease resource, which helps biologists and clinicians to analyse their data at the systems level and will contribute much to the biomarker discovery and diagnostic performance enhancement for liver diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms controlling the dependence of surface warming on cumulative carbon emissions over the next century in a suite of Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard; Roussenov, Vassil; Goodwin, Philip; Resplandy, Laure; Bopp, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Insight into how to avoid dangerous climate may be obtained from Earth system model projections, which reveal a near-linear dependence of global-mean surface warming on cumulative carbon emissions. This dependence of surface warming on carbon emissions is interpreted in terms of a product of three terms: the dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing, the fractional radiative forcing contribution from atmospheric CO2 and the dependence of radiative forcing from atmospheric CO2 on cumulative carbon emissions. Mechanistically each of these dependences varies, respectively, with ocean heat uptake, the CO2 and non-CO2 radiative forcing, and the ocean and terrestrial uptake of carbon. An ensemble of 9 Earth System models forced by up to 4 Representative Concentration Pathways are diagnosed. In all cases, the dependence of surface warming on carbon emissions evolves primarily due to competing effects of heat and carbon uptake over the upper ocean: there is a reduced effect of radiative forcing from CO2 due to ocean carbon uptake, which is partly compensated by enhanced surface warming due to a reduced effect of ocean heat uptake. There is a wide spread in the dependence of surface warming on carbon emissions, undermining the ability to identify the maximum permitted carbon emission to avoid dangerous climate. Our framework reveals how uncertainty in the future warming trend is high over the next few decades due to relatively high uncertainties in ocean heat uptake, non-CO2 radiative forcing and the undersaturation of carbon in the ocean.

  14. Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

  15. The Redesigned Hazard Mapping System (HMS) for Fire and Smoke Analysis and the Impact of Including Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruminski, M.; Cheng, Z.; Salemi, T.

    2016-12-01

    The HMS incorporates a wide variety of satellite data for use in fire and smoke detection, including 30 minute interval GOES-East and GOES-West, five AVHRR satellites (NOAA and METOP) and MODIS Aqua/Terra. NESDIS' Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) analysts utilize the HMS to analyze and quality control the automated fire detections from each of the sensors and create the fire/smoke products to enable the users to mitigate disasters and environmental hazards. The new HMS design eliminates the inefficiencies and increases the accuracy of the fire/smoke analysis. The new system has the capability to display higher resolution data available from VIIRS while maintaining individual pixel integrity which improves the representation of fire size. This will benefit the input to smoke forecast models and may possibly be useful as input for fire spread models. An analysis of all VIIRS Active Fire (AF) locations compared to the operational HMS fire analysis for all of 2015 over North America will be presented that will provide an estimate of the impact of this new data set. Results will be presented for regional and seasonal impact. The new system also provides greater analysis control of layers and display properties and will allow for the display of all GOES images, even when in Rapid Scan Operations (RSO) mode. To enhance the efficiency and improve the accuracy of the fire and smoke product, the display of the new HMS eliminates the sector boundaries to display full analysis domain (North and Central America, Caribbean and Hawaii) and has functionality to edit plumes on a finer scale. In the presentation we will highlight the new features of the updated HMS.

  16. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two -fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z -2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z -1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  17. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    PubMed

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-07-18

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis.

  18. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis. PMID:27425629

  19. Breaking the Silos: The art Documentation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-01

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that the training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work; too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.

  20. Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses o detailed results of the testing that has ben conducted under this test series thus far.

  1. Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the NASA Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on detailed results of the testing that has been conducted under this test series thus far.

  2. Modification of NASA Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  3. Enabling interoperability in Geoscience with GI-suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    GI-suite is a brokering framework targeting interoperability of heterogeneous systems in the Geoscience domain. The framework is composed by different brokers each one focusing on a specific functionality: discovery, access and semantics (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem). The brokering takes place between a set of heterogeneous publishing services and a set of heterogeneous consumer applications: the brokering target is represented by resources (e.g. coverages, features, or metadata information) required to seamlessly flow from the providers to the consumers. Different international and community standards are now supported by GI-suite, making possible the successful deployment of GI-suite in many international projects and initiatives (such as GEOSS, NSF BCube and several EU funded projects). As for the publisher side more than 40 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. Dublin Core, OAI-PMH, OGC W*S, Geonetwork, THREDDS Data Server, Hyrax Server, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific GI-suite components, called accessors. As for the consumer applications side more than 15 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. ESRI ArcGIS, Openlayers, OGC W*S, OAI-PMH clients, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific profiler components. The GI-suite can be used in different scenarios by different actors: - A data provider having a pre-existent data repository can deploy and configure GI-suite to broker it and making thus available its data resources through different protocols to many different users (e.g. for data discovery and/or data access) - A data consumer can use GI-suite to discover and/or access resources from a variety of publishing services that are already publishing data according to well-known standards. - A community can deploy and configure GI-suite to build a community (or project-specific) broker: GI-suite can broker a set of community related repositories and

  4. Elastic-Tether Suits for Artificial Gravity and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrance, Paul; Biesinger, Paul; Rybicki, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    Body suits harnessed to systems of elastic tethers have been proposed as means of approximating the effects of normal Earth gravitation on crewmembers of spacecraft in flight to help preserve the crewmembers physical fitness. The suits could also be used on Earth to increase effective gravitational loads for purposes of athletic training. The suit according to the proposal would include numerous small tether-attachment fixtures distributed over its outer surface so as to distribute the artificial gravitational force as nearly evenly as possible over the wearer s body. Elastic tethers would be connected between these fixtures and a single attachment fixture on a main elastic tether that would be anchored to a fixture on or under a floor. This fixture might include multiple pulleys to make the effective length of the main tether great enough that normal motions of the wearer cause no more than acceptably small variations in the total artificial gravitational force. Among the problems in designing the suit would be equalizing the load in the shoulder area and keeping tethers out of the way below the knees to prevent tripping. The solution would likely include running tethers through rings on the sides. Body suits with a weight or water ballast system are also proposed for very slight spinning space-station scenarios, in which cases the proposed body suits will easily be able to provide the equivalency of a 1-G or even greater load.

  5. Unique Biofilm Signature, Drug Susceptibility and Decreased Virulence in Drosophila through the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Two-Component System PprAB

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S.; Calderon, Virginie; Ewald, Friederike; Plésiat, Patrick; Nguyen, Cathy; Grunwald, Didier; Attree, Ina; Jeannot, Katy; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm is considered as a particular lifestyle helping cells to survive hostile environments triggered by a variety of signals sensed and integrated through adequate regulatory pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium causing severe infections in humans, forms biofilms and is a fantastic example for fine-tuning of the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles through two-component systems (TCS). Here we decipher the regulon of the P. aeruginosa response regulator PprB of the TCS PprAB. We identified genes under the control of this TCS and once this pathway is activated, analyzed and dissected at the molecular level the PprB-dependent phenotypes in various models. The TCS PprAB triggers a hyper-biofilm phenotype with a unique adhesive signature made of BapA adhesin, a Type 1 secretion system (T1SS) substrate, CupE CU fimbriae, Flp Type IVb pili and eDNA without EPS involvement. This unique signature is associated with drug hyper-susceptibility, decreased virulence in acutely infected flies and cytotoxicity toward various cell types linked to decreased Type III secretion (T3SS). Moreover, once the PprB pathway is activated, decreased virulence in orally infected flies associated with enhanced biofilm formation and dissemination defect from the intestinal lumen toward the hemolymph compartment is reported. PprB may thus represent a key bacterial adaptation checkpoint of multicellular and aggregative behavior triggering the production of a unique matrix associated with peculiar antibiotic susceptibility and attenuated virulence, a particular interesting breach for therapeutic intervention to consider in view of possible eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm-associated infections. PMID:23209420

  6. Vadose zone flow convergence test suite

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B. T.

    Performance Assessment (PA) simulations for engineered disposal systems at the Savannah River Site involve highly contrasting materials and moisture conditions at and near saturation. These conditions cause severe convergence difficulties that typically result in unacceptable convergence or long simulation times or excessive analyst effort. Adequate convergence is usually achieved in a trial-anderror manner by applying under-relaxation to the Saturation or Pressure variable, in a series of everdecreasing RELAxation values. SRNL would like a more efficient scheme implemented inside PORFLOW to achieve flow convergence in a more reliable and efficient manner. To this end, a suite of test problems that illustratemore » these convergence problems is provided to facilitate diagnosis and development of an improved convergence strategy. The attached files are being transmitted to you describing the test problem and proposed resolution.« less

  7. EVA Suit R and D for Performance Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must be built and tested with human subjects. However, numerous design iterations will occur before the hardware meets those requirements. Traditional draw-prototype-test paradigms for R&D are prohibitively expensive with today's shrinking Government budgets. Personnel at NASA are developing modern simulation techniques which focus on human-centric designs by creating virtual prototype simulations and fully adjustable physical prototypes of suit hardware. During the R&D design phase, these easily modifiable representations of an EVA suit's hard components will allow designers to think creatively and exhaust design possibilities before they build and test working prototypes with human subjects. It allows scientists to comprehensively benchmark current suit capabilities and limitations for existing suit sizes and sizes that do not exist. This is extremely advantageous and enables comprehensive design down-selections to be made early in the design process, enables the use of human performance as design criteria, and enables designs to target specific populations

  8. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    A space suit s mobility is critical to an astronaut s ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. The term mobility, with respect to space suits, is defined in terms of two key components: joint range of motion and joint torque. Individually these measures describe the path which in which a joint travels and the force required to move it through that path. Previous space suits mobility requirements were defined as the collective result of these two measures and verified by the completion of discrete functional tasks. While a valid way to impose mobility requirements, such a method does necessitate a solid understanding of the operational scenarios in which the final suit will be performing. Because the Constellation space suit system requirements are being finalized with a relatively immature concept of operations, the Space Suit Element team elected to define mobility in terms of its constituent parts to increase the likelihood that the future pressure garment will be mobile enough to enable a broad scope of undefined exploration activities. The range of motion requirements were defined by measuring the ranges of motion test subjects achieved while performing a series of joint maximizing tasks in a variety of flight and prototype space suits. The definition of joint torque requirements has proved more elusive. NASA evaluated several different approaches to the problem before deciding to generate requirements based on unmanned joint torque evaluations of six different space suit configurations being articulated through 16 separate joint movements. This paper discusses the experiment design, data analysis and results, and the process used to determine the final values for the Constellation pressure garment joint torque requirements.

  9. Constructing the informatics and information technology foundations of a medical device evaluation system: a report from the FDA unique device identifier demonstration.

    PubMed

    Drozda, Joseph P; Roach, James; Forsyth, Thomas; Helmering, Paul; Dummitt, Benjamin; Tcheng, James E

    2018-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recognized the need to improve the tracking of medical device safety and performance, with implementation of Unique Device Identifiers (UDIs) in electronic health information as a key strategy. The FDA funded a demonstration by Mercy Health wherein prototype UDIs were incorporated into its electronic information systems. This report describes the demonstration's informatics architecture. Prototype UDIs for coronary stents were created and implemented across a series of information systems, resulting in UDI-associated data flow from manufacture through point of use to long-term follow-up, with barcode scanning linking clinical data with UDI-associated device attributes. A reference database containing device attributes and the UDI Research and Surveillance Database (UDIR) containing the linked clinical and device information were created, enabling longitudinal assessment of device performance. The demonstration included many stakeholders: multiple Mercy departments, manufacturers, health system partners, the FDA, professional societies, the National Cardiovascular Data Registry, and information system vendors. The resulting system of systems is described in detail, including entities, functions, linkage between the UDIR and proprietary systems using UDIs as the index key, data flow, roles and responsibilities of actors, and the UDIR data model. The demonstration provided proof of concept that UDIs can be incorporated into provider and enterprise electronic information systems and used as the index key to combine device and clinical data in a database useful for device evaluation. Keys to success and challenges to achieving this goal were identified. Fundamental informatics principles were central to accomplishing the system of systems model. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in our approach to EVA suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete 50 EVAs in the dirt under intense UV exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising its mobility. We conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials to determine performance degradation after exposure to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. This testing will help mature the material technologies and provide performance data that can be used by not only the space suit development teams but for all Mars inflatable and soft goods derived structures from airlocks to habitats.

  11. Accurate read-based metagenome characterization using a hierarchical suite of unique signatures

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Tracey Allen K.; Li, Po-E; Scholz, Matthew B.; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of organisms present within a microbial community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though existing microbial community profiling methods have attempted to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from modern sequencers, the combination of incomplete databases, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, errors and biases in sequencing technologies, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discovery rates (FDR). Here, we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling method with significantly and consistently smaller FDR than any other available method. Our algorithm circumvents false positives using a series of non-redundant signature databases and examines Genomic Origins Through Taxonomic CHAllenge (GOTTCHA). GOTTCHA was tested and validated on 20 synthetic and mock datasets ranging in community composition and complexity, was applied successfully to data generated from spiked environmental and clinical samples, and robustly demonstrates superior performance compared with other available tools. PMID:25765641

  12. Results from Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus with a Space Suit Ventilation Test Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer; Vonau, Walt; Kanne, Bryan; Korona, Adam; Swickrath, Mike

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing an advanced portable life support system (PLSS) to meet the needs of a new NASA advanced space suit. The PLSS is one of the most critical aspects of the space suit providing the necessary oxygen, ventilation, and thermal protection for an astronaut performing a spacewalk. The ventilation subsystem in the PLSS must provide sufficient carbon dioxide (CO2) removal and ensure that the CO2 is washed away from the oronasal region of the astronaut. CO2 washout is a term used to describe the mechanism by which CO2 levels are controlled within the helmet to limit the concentration of CO2 inhaled by the astronaut. Accumulation of CO2 in the helmet or throughout the ventilation loop could cause the suited astronaut to experience hypercapnia (excessive carbon dioxide in the blood). A suited manikin test apparatus (SMTA) integrated with a space suit ventilation test loop was designed, developed, and assembled at NASA in order to experimentally validate adequate CO2 removal throughout the PLSS ventilation subsystem and to quantify CO2 washout performance under various conditions. The test results from this integrated system will be used to validate analytical models and augment human testing. This paper presents the system integration of the PLSS ventilation test loop with the SMTA including the newly developed regenerative Rapid Cycle Amine component used for CO2 removal and tidal breathing capability to emulate the human. The testing and analytical results of the integrated system are presented along with future work.

  13. Multifunctional Cooling Garment for Space Suit Environmental Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Ferl, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Future manned space exploration missions will require space suits with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. Portable Life Support Systems for these future space suits face daunting challenges, since they must maintain healthy and comfortable conditions inside the suit for longduration missions while minimizing weight and water venting. We have demonstrated the feasibility of an innovative, multipurpose garment for thermal and humidity control inside a space suit pressure garment that is simple, rugged, compact, and lightweight. The garment is a based on a conventional liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) that has been modified to directly absorb latent heat as well as sensible heat. This hybrid garment will prevent buildup of condensation inside the pressure garment, prevent loss of water by absorption in regenerable CO2 removal beds, and conserve water through use of advanced lithium chloride absorber/radiator (LCAR) technology for nonventing heat rejection. We have shown the feasibility of this approach by sizing the critical components for the hybrid garment, developing fabrication methods, building and testing a proof-of-concept system, and demonstrating by test that its performance is suitable for use in space suit life support systems.

  14. Multifunctional Cooling Garment for Space Suit Environmental Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Ferl, Janet; Cencer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Future manned space exploration missions will require space suits with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. Portable Life Support Systems for these future space suits face daunting challenges, since they must maintain healthy and comfortable conditions inside the suit for long-duration missions while minimizing weight and water venting. We have demonstrated the feasibility of an innovative, multipurpose garment for thermal and humidity control inside a space suit pressure garment that is simple, rugged, compact, and lightweight. The garment is a based on a conventional liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) that has been modified to directly absorb latent heat as well as sensible heat. This hybrid garment will prevent buildup of condensation inside the pressure garment, prevent loss of water by absorption in regenerable CO2 removal beds, and conserve water through use of advanced lithium chloride absorber/radiator (LCAR) technology for nonventing heat rejection. We have shown the feasibility of this approach by sizing the critical components for the hybrid garment, developing fabrication methods, building and testing a proof-of-concept system, and demonstrating by test that its performance is suitable for use in space suit life support systems.

  15. NASA's Black Marble Nighttime Lights Product Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Sun, Qingsong; Seto, Karen C.; Oda, Tomohiro; Wolfe, Robert E.; Sarkar, Sudipta; Stevens, Joshua; Ramos Gonzalez, Olga M.; Detres, Yasmin; Esch, Thomas; hide

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Black Marble nighttime lights product suite (VNP46) is available at 500 meters resolution since January 2012 with data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Platform (SNPP). The retrieval algorithm, developed and implemented for routine global processing at NASA's Land Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS), utilizes all high-quality, cloud-free, atmospheric-, terrain-, vegetation-, snow-, lunar-, and stray light-corrected radiances to estimate daily nighttime lights (NTL) and other intrinsic surface optical properties. Key algorithm enhancements include: (1) lunar irradiance modeling to resolve non-linear changes in phase and libration; (2) vector radiative transfer and lunar bidirectional surface anisotropic reflectance modeling to correct for atmospheric and BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) effects; (3) geometric-optical and canopy radiative transfer modeling to account for seasonal variations in NTL; and (4) temporal gap-filling to reduce persistent data gaps. Extensive benchmark tests at representative spatial and temporal scales were conducted on the VNP46 time series record to characterize the uncertainties stemming from upstream data sources. Initial validation results are presented together with example case studies illustrating the scientific utility of the products. This includes an evaluation of temporal patterns of NTL dynamics associated with urbanization, socioeconomic variability, cultural characteristics, and displaced populations affected by conflict. Current and planned activities under the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Human Planet Initiative are aimed at evaluating the products at different geographic locations and time periods representing the full range of retrieval conditions.

  16. Breaking the silos: The art documentation suite

    DOE PAGES

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-23

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that themore » training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work, too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.« less

  17. Electrostatic Evaluation: SCAPE Suit Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The surface resistivity tests are performed per the requirements of the ESD Association Standard Test Method ESD STM11.11*. These measurements are taken using a PRS-801 resistance system with an Electro Tech System (ETS) PRF-911 concentric ring resistance probe. The tests require a five pound weight on top of cylindrical electrodes and were conducted at both ambient and low humidity conditions. In order for materials to "pass" resistivity tests the surface of the materials must either be conductive or statically dissipative otherwise the materials "fail" ESD. Volume resistivity tests are also conducted to measure conductivity through the material as opposed to conductivity along the surface. These tests are conducted using the same PRS-801 resistance system with the Electro Tech System PRF-911 concentric ring resistance probe but are performed in accordance with ESD Association Standard Test Method ESD STM11.l2**.

  18. Autonomous Operations Mission Development Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation related to the development of Autonomous Operations Systems at NASA Kennedy Space Center. It covers a high level description of the work of FY14, FY15, FY16 for the AES IGODU and APL projects.

  19. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  20. Class Action Suits against Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Laurie

    1984-01-01

    If a suit is brought as a class action, either plaintiff or defendant may move to uphold or challenge class certification. If neither does so, the court decides whether the action may be maintained as a class suit. Prerequisites for class certification from Rule 23 (Federal Rules of Civil Procedure) are explained. (TE)

  1. Status of the NPP and J1 NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS): recent algorithm enhancements geared toward validation and near real time users applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacorta, A.; Nalli, N. R.; Tan, C.; Iturbide-Sanchez, F.; Wilson, M.; Zhang, K.; Xiong, X.; Barnet, C. D.; Sun, B.; Zhou, L.; Wheeler, A.; Reale, A.; Goldberg, M.

    2017-12-01

    The NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) is the NOAA operational algorithm to retrieve thermodynamic and composition variables from hyper spectral thermal sounders such as CrIS, IASI and AIRS. The combined use of microwave sounders, such as ATMS, AMSU and MHS, enables full atmospheric sounding of the atmospheric column under all-sky conditions. NUCAPS retrieval products are accessible in near real time (about 1.5 hour delay) through the NOAA Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). Since February 2015, NUCAPS retrievals have been also accessible via Direct Broadcast, with unprecedented low latency of less than 0.5 hours. NUCAPS builds on a long-term, multi-agency investment on algorithm research and development. The uniqueness of this algorithm consists in a number of features that are key in providing highly accurate and stable atmospheric retrievals, suitable for real time weather and air quality applications. Firstly, maximizing the use of the information content present in hyper spectral thermal measurements forms the foundation of the NUCAPS retrieval algorithm. Secondly, NUCAPS is a modular, name-list driven design. It can process multiple hyper spectral infrared sounders (on Aqua, NPP, MetOp and JPSS series) by mean of the same exact retrieval software executable and underlying spectroscopy. Finally, a cloud-clearing algorithm and a synergetic use of microwave radiance measurements enable full vertical sounding of the atmosphere, under all-sky regimes. As we transition toward improved hyper spectral missions, assessing retrieval skill and consistency across multiple platforms becomes a priority for real time users applications. Focus of this presentation is a general introduction on the recent improvements in the delivery of the NUCAPS full spectral resolution upgrade and an overview of the lessons learned from the 2017 Hazardous Weather Test bed Spring Experiment. Test cases will be shown on the use of NPP and Met

  2. A unique charge-coupled device/xenon arc lamp based imaging system for the accurate detection and quantitation of multicolour fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Spibey, C A; Jackson, P; Herick, K

    2001-03-01

    In recent years the use of fluorescent dyes in biological applications has dramatically increased. The continual improvement in the capabilities of these fluorescent dyes demands increasingly sensitive detection systems that provide accurate quantitation over a wide linear dynamic range. In the field of proteomics, the detection, quantitation and identification of very low abundance proteins are of extreme importance in understanding cellular processes. Therefore, the instrumentation used to acquire an image of such samples, for spot picking and identification by mass spectrometry, must be sensitive enough to be able, not only, to maximise the sensitivity and dynamic range of the staining dyes but, as importantly, adapt to the ever changing portfolio of fluorescent dyes as they become available. Just as the available fluorescent probes are improving and evolving so are the users application requirements. Therefore, the instrumentation chosen must be flexible to address and adapt to those changing needs. As a result, a highly competitive market for the supply and production of such dyes and the instrumentation for their detection and quantitation have emerged. The instrumentation currently available is based on either laser/photomultiplier tube (PMT) scanning or lamp/charge-coupled device (CCD) based mechanisms. This review briefly discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both System types for fluorescence imaging, gives a technical overview of CCD technology and describes in detail a unique xenon/are lamp CCD based instrument, from PerkinElmer Life Sciences. The Wallac-1442 ARTHUR is unique in its ability to scan both large areas at high resolution and give accurate selectable excitation over the whole of the UV/visible range. It operates by filtering both the excitation and emission wavelengths, providing optimal and accurate measurement and quantitation of virtually any available dye and allows excellent spectral resolution between different fluorophores

  3. Transcriptome analysis of the digestive system of a wood-feeding termite (Coptotermes formosanus) revealed a unique mechanism for effective biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Alei; Cheng, Yanbing; Wang, Yongli; Zhu, Daochen; Le, Yilin; Wu, Jian; Xie, Rongrong; Yuan, Joshua S; Sun, Jianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Wood-feeding termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, represents a highly efficient system for biomass deconstruction and utilization. However, the detailed mechanisms of lignin modification and carbohydrate degradation in this system are still largely elusive. In order to reveal the inherent mechanisms for efficient biomass degradation, four different organs (salivary glands, foregut, midgut, and hindgut) within a complete digestive system of a lower termite, C. formosanus , were dissected and collected. Comparative transcriptomics was carried out to analyze these organs using high-throughput RNA sequencing. A total of 71,117 unigenes were successfully assembled, and the comparative transcriptome analyses revealed significant differential distributions of GH (glycosyl hydrolase) genes and auxiliary redox enzyme genes in different digestive organs. Among the GH genes in the salivary glands, the most abundant were GH9, GH22, and GH1 genes. The corresponding enzymes may have secreted into the foregut and midgut to initiate the hydrolysis of biomass and to achieve a lignin-carbohydrate co-deconstruction system. As the most diverse GH families, GH7 and GH5 were primarily identified from the symbiotic protists in the hindgut. These enzymes could play a synergistic role with the endogenous enzymes from the host termite for biomass degradation. Moreover, twelve out of fourteen genes coding auxiliary redox enzymes from the host termite origin were induced by the feeding of lignin-rich diets. This indicated that these genes may be involved in lignin component deconstruction with its redox network during biomass pretreatment. These findings demonstrate that the termite digestive system synergized the hydrolysis and redox reactions in a programmatic process, through different parts of its gut system, to achieve a maximized utilization of carbohydrates. The detailed unique mechanisms identified from the termite digestive system may provide new insights for advanced design of

  4. Designing a Secondary Music Suite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedstad, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Discusses four factors in designing a school music room that satisfies student, teacher, and school needs. Explores acoustics in terms of cubic volume, room shape, sound isolation, acoustical treatment, and mechanical systems. Also examines the floorplan for space, traffic control, and access to related areas. Concluding comments address equipment…

  5. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  6. Space Suit CO2 Washout During Intravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustine, Phillip M.; Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2010-01-01

    Space suit carbon dioxide (CO2) washout refers to the removal of CO2 gas from the oral-nasal area of a suited astronaut's (or crewmember's) helmet using the suit's ventilation system. Inadequate washout of gases can result in diminished mental/cognitive abilities as well as headaches and light headedness. In addition to general discomfort, these ailments can impair an astronaut s ability to perform mission-critical tasks ranging from flying the space vehicle to performing lunar extravehicular activities (EVAs). During design development for NASA s Constellation Program (CxP), conflicting requirements arose between the volume of air flow that the new Orion manned space vehicle is allocated to provide to the suited crewmember and the amount of air required to achieve CO2 washout in a space suit. Historically, space suits receive 6.0 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm) of air flow, which has adequately washed out CO2 for EVAs. For CxP, the Orion vehicle will provide 4.5 acfm of air flow to the suit. A group of subject matter experts (SM Es) among the EVA Systems community came to an early consensus that 4.5 acfm may be acceptable for low metabolic rate activities. However, this value appears very risky for high metabolic rates, hence the need for further analysis and testing. An analysis was performed to validate the 4.5 acfm value and to determine if adequate CO2 washout can be achieved with the new suit helmet design concepts. The analysis included computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling cases, which modeled the air flow and breathing characteristics of a human wearing suit helmets. Helmet testing was performed at the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to provide a gross-level validation of the CFD models. Although there was not a direct data correlation between the helmet testing and the CFD modeling, the testing data showed trends that are very similar to the CFD modeling. Overall, the analysis yielded

  7. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two-fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z-2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z-1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  8. Latex allergy: the perspective from the surgical suite.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Beth A

    2002-08-01

    Latex allergy in the perioperative setting presents unique challenges to the health care system. Specific needs of the latex-sensitive patient are paramount, but consideration must also include the impact on health care workers vis-a-vis latex sensitization, environmental allergen control, and barrier protection against blood-borne pathogens. It has been well documented that the greatest source of latex aeroallergen in the surgical setting is latex gloves (both sterile and nonsterile). Levels of latex aeroallergen correlate strongly with use of high-allergen and powdered gloves, total number of gloves used, and the hours of activity in a given environment. A significant reduction in aeroallergen (>10-fold) can be achieved by switching to low-allergen gloves. Ready availability of and encouragement to use nonlatex alternatives when appropriate can further reduce exposure to latex allergens. Since 1998, the Food and Drug Administration has required all medical devices (or their packaging) that contain natural rubber latex to be so labeled. In addition, industry has responded with a host of latex-free products for use in patient care. This has helped eliminate a great deal of confusion about which products are safe for use with latex-sensitive individuals. However, despite significant efforts to educate the public and the health care industry regarding latex allergies, considerable misinformation persists. Provision of a completely latex-free environment in most surgical suites may be unrealistic, but every effort should be made to minimize the unnecessary exposure of patients and health care workers to latex allergens in this high-risk arena.

  9. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  10. Testing of Alternative Materials for Advanced Suit Bladders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Makinen, Janice; Tang, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Several candidate advanced pressure bladder membrane materials have been developed for NASA Johnson Space Center by DSM Biomedical for selective permeability of carbon dioxide and water vapor. These materials were elasthane and two other formulations of thermoplastic polyether polyurethane. Each material was tested in two thicknesses for permeability to carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor. Although oxygen leaks through the suit bladder would amount to only about 60 cc/hr in a full size suit, significant amounts of carbon dioxide would not be rejected by the system to justify its use. While the ratio of carbon dioxide to oxygen permeability is about 48 to 1, this is offset by the small partial pressure of carbon dioxide in acceptable breathing atmospheres of the suit. Humidity management remains a possible use of the membranes depending on the degree to which the water permeability is inhibited by cations in the sweat. Tests are underway to explore cation fouling from sweat.

  11. Philosophies Applied in the Selection of Space Suit Joint Range of Motion Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsway; Ross, Amy; Matty, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Space suits are the most important tool for astronauts working in harsh space and planetary environments; suits keep crewmembers alive and allow them to perform exploration, construction, and scientific tasks on a routine basis over a period of several months. The efficiency with which the tasks are performed is largely dictated by the mobility features of the space suit. For previous space suit development programs, the mobility requirements were written as pure functional mobility requirements that did not separate joint ranges of motion from the joint torques. The Constellation Space Suit Element has the goal to make more quantitative mobility requirements that focused on the individual components of mobility to enable future suit designers to build and test systems more effectively. This paper details the test planning and selection process for the Constellation space suit pressure garment range of motion requirements.

  12. Complexity of Sizing for Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The `fit? of a garment is often considered to be a subjective measure of garment quality. However, some experts attest that a complaint of poor garment fit is a symptom of inadequate or excessive ease, the space between the garment and the wearer. Fit has traditionally been hard to quantify, and space suits are an extreme example, where fit is difficult to measure but crucial for safety and operability. A proper space suit fit is particularly challenging because of NASA?s need to fit an incredibly diverse population (males and females from the 1st to 99th percentile) while developing a minimum number of space suit sizes. Because so few sizes are available, the available space suits must be optimized so that each fits a large segment of the population without compromising the fit of any one wearer.

  13. Wakata wearing Penguin-3 suit in JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-12

    ISS020-E-019078 (12 July 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, is pictured wearing the Penguin-3 antigravity pressure/stress suit in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  14. Interoperative efficiency in minimally invasive surgery suites.

    PubMed

    van Det, M J; Meijerink, W J H J; Hoff, C; Pierie, J P E N

    2009-10-01

    Performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in a conventional operating room (OR) requires additional specialized equipment otherwise stored outside the OR. Before the procedure, the OR team must collect, prepare, and connect the equipment, then take it away afterward. These extra tasks pose a thread to OR efficiency and may lengthen turnover times. The dedicated MIS suite has permanently installed laparoscopic equipment that is operational on demand. This study presents two experiments that quantify the superior efficiency of the MIS suite in the interoperative period. Preoperative setup and postoperative breakdown times in the conventional OR and the MIS suite in an experimental setting and in daily practice were analyzed. In the experimental setting, randomly chosen OR teams simulated the setup and breakdown for a standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and a complex laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LS). In the clinical setting, the interoperative period for 66 LCs randomly assigned to the conventional OR or the MIS suite were analyzed. In the experimental setting, the setup and breakdown times were significantly shorter in the MIS suite. The difference between the two types of OR increased for the complex procedure: 2:41 min for the LC (p < 0.001) and 10:47 min for the LS (p < 0.001). In the clinical setting, the setup and breakdown times as a whole were not reduced in the MIS suite. Laparoscopic setup and breakdown times were significantly shorter in the MIS suite (mean difference, 5:39 min; p < 0.001). Efficiency during the interoperative period is significantly improved in the MIS suite. The OR nurses' tasks are relieved, which may reduce mental and physical workload and improve job satisfaction and patient safety. Due to simultaneous tasks of other disciplines, an overall turnover time reduction could not be achieved.

  15. Astronaut Fred Haise - Suiting Room - Prelaunch - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-11

    S70-34851 (11 April 1970) --- A space suit technician talks with astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot for NASA's Apollo 13 mission, during suiting up procedures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Other members of the crew are astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander, and John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot. Swigert replaced astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II as a member of the crew when it was learned he had been exposed to measles.

  16. Total centralisation and optimisation of an oncology management suite via Citrix®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, C.; Frantzis, J.; Ripps, L.; Fenton, P.

    2014-03-01

    The management of patient information and treatment planning is traditionally an intra-departmental requirement of a radiation oncology service. Epworth Radiation Oncology systems must support the transient nature of Visiting Medical Officers (VMOs). This unique work practice created challenges when implementing the vision of a completely paperless solution that allows for a responsive and efficient service delivery. ARIA® and EclipseTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) have been deployed across four dedicated Citrix® (Citrix Systems, Santa Clara, CA, USA) servers allowing VMOs to access these applications remotely. A range of paperless solutions were developed within ARIA® to facilitate clinical and organisational management whilst optimising efficient work practices. The IT infrastructure and paperless workflow has enabled VMOs to securely access the VarianTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) oncology software and experience full functionality from any location on multiple devices. This has enhanced access to patient information and improved the responsiveness of the service. Epworth HealthCare has developed a unique solution to enable remote access to a centralised oncology management suite, while maintaining a secure and paperless working environment.

  17. Anthropometric Accommodation in Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Thaxton, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Design requirements for next generation hardware are in process at NASA. Anthropometry requirements are given in terms of minimum and maximum sizes for critical dimensions that hardware must accommodate. These dimensions drive vehicle design and suit design, and implicitly have an effect on crew selection and participation. At this stage in the process, stakeholders such as cockpit and suit designers were asked to provide lists of dimensions that will be critical for their design. In addition, they were asked to provide technically feasible minimum and maximum ranges for these dimensions. Using an adjusted 1988 Anthropometric Survey of U.S. Army (ANSUR) database to represent a future astronaut population, the accommodation ranges provided by the suit critical dimensions were calculated. This project involved participation from the Anthropometry and Biomechanics facility (ABF) as well as suit designers, with suit designers providing expertise about feasible hardware dimensions and the ABF providing accommodation analysis. The initial analysis provided the suit design team with the accommodation levels associated with the critical dimensions provided early in the study. Additional outcomes will include a comparison of principal components analysis as an alternate method for anthropometric analysis.

  18. Suit study - The impact of VMS in subsystem integration

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.; Watts, R.

    1992-02-01

    One of the thrusts of the Wright Laboratory/FIVE-sponsored Subsystem Integration Technology (SUIT) study is to investigate the impact of emerging vehicle management system (VMS) concepts on subsystem integration. This paper summarizes the issues relating to VMS/subsystem integration as examined during the Northrop SUIT study. Projected future weapon system requirements are identified and their impact on VMS and subsystem design interpreted. Integrated VMS/subsystem control and management functions are proposed. A candidate system VMS architecture satisfying the aforementioned weapon system requirements and providing the identified control and management functions is proposed. This architecture is used, together with the environmental control system, asmore » an illustrative subsystem example, to address the risks associated with the design, development, procurement, integration and testing of integrated VMS/subsystem concepts. The conclusion is that the development process requires an airframer to adopt the role of subsystem integrator, the consequences of which are discussed. 2 refs.« less

  19. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung with unique histological pattern and association with Sjögren's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Shlopov, Boris V; French, Samuel W

    2011-10-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the lung is a rare condition. Radiological properties and clinical presentation of this disease can mimic malignant process. We present a case of IMT of the lung in a 58 year old female patient with a single lung nodule. Tumor was unencapsulated, firm, and well circumscribed. Microscopically tumor had multinodular structure with single or multiple small blood vessels in the center of each nodule surrounded in circular pattern by connective tissue containing spindle cells embedded into the thick layers of extracellular matrix. Extracellular matrix was identified as type I and type III collagen fibrils embedded into type IV collagen and laminin. The tumor was surrounded by T-, B-lymphocytes and polyclonal plasma cells. Histological organization of this lesion's stromal component was unique, but cell composition was similar to inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. In addition, tumor tissue sections exhibited strong positivity for IgG, weak positivity for IgA, 1Cq, but were negative for IgM, and C3. Mutational analysis of the EGFR, KRAS genes and ALK locus rearrangement were performed and did not reveal any mutations. This is the first report of an IMT associated with Sjögren's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma developing in the lungs. Patient was clinically followed up for 18 months and no recurrence of the tumor observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Space Suit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Ray, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 pounds per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing designs without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race: 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approximately 2 years), bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination around a maximum contact stress that will allow the bearing to survive the life of an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an exploration mission.

  2. Northwest Africa 1401: A Polymict Cumulate Eucrite with a Unique Ferroan Heteradcumulate Mafic Clast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Killgore, Marvin

    2003-01-01

    The howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) clan is the largest suite of achondrites available for study. The suite gives us a unique view of the magmatism that affected some asteroids early in solar system history. One problem with mining the HED clan for petrogenetic information is that there is only limited petrologic diversity among the rock types. Thus, discovering unusual HED materials holds the potential for revealing new insights into the petrologic evolution of the HED parent asteroid. Here we report on petrologic study of an unusual, 27 gram polymict eucrite, Northwest Africa (NWA) 1401. The thin section studied (approx. 20 x 10 mm) contains one large, ferroan clast described separately. The remainder of the rock, including mineral fragments and other, smaller lithic clasts, forms the host breccia.

  3. Interaction of Space Suits with Windblown Soil: Preliminary Mars Wind Tunnel Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Bratton, C.; Kosmo, J.; Trevino, R.

    1999-09-01

    Experiments in the Mars Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center show that under Mars conditions, spacesuit materials are highly susceptible to dust contamination when exposed to windblown soil. This effect was suspected from knowledge of the interaction of electrostatically adhesive dust with solid surfaces in general. However, it is important to evaluate the respective roles of materials, meteorological and radiation effects, and the character of the soil. The tunnel permits evaluation of dust contamination and sand abrasion of space suits by simulating both pressure and wind conditions on Mars. The long-term function of space suits on Mars will be primarily threatened by dust contamination. Lunar EVA activities caused heavy contamination of space suits, but the problem was never seriously manifest because of the brief utilization of the suits, and the suits were never reused. Electrostatically adhering dust grains have various detrimental effects: (1) penetration and subsequent wear of suit fabrics, (2) viewing obscuration through visors and scratching/pitting of visor surfaces, (3) penetration, wear, and subsequent seizing-up of mechanical suit joints, (4) changes in albedo and therefore of radiation properties of external heat-exchanger systems, (5) changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces which may affect tribocharging of suits and create spurious discharge effects detrimental to suit electronics/radio systems. Additional information is contained in the original.

  4. A quantitative reconstruction software suite for SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namías, Mauro; Jeraj, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Quantitative Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) imaging allows for measurement of activity concentrations of a given radiotracer in vivo. Although SPECT has usually been perceived as non-quantitative by the medical community, the introduction of accurate CT based attenuation correction and scatter correction from hybrid SPECT/CT scanners has enabled SPECT systems to be as quantitative as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems. We implemented a software suite to reconstruct quantitative SPECT images from hybrid or dedicated SPECT systems with a separate CT scanner. Attenuation, scatter and collimator response corrections were included in an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithm. A novel scatter fraction estimation technique was introduced. The SPECT/CT system was calibrated with a cylindrical phantom and quantitative accuracy was assessed with an anthropomorphic phantom and a NEMA/IEC image quality phantom. Accurate activity measurements were achieved at an organ level. This software suite helps increasing quantitative accuracy of SPECT scanners.

  5. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  6. Suites of dwarfs around Nearby giant galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I., E-mail: ikar@sao.ru, E-mail: kei@sao.ru, E-mail: dim@sao.ru

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ∼1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index Θ{sub 1}, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their Θ{sub 1}. Allmore » suite members with positive Θ{sub 1} are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ∼ n {sup –2}. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M{sub B} = –18{sup m}. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting

  7. Analytical Tools for Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    As indicated by the implementation of multiple small project teams within the agency, NASA is adopting a lean approach to hardware development that emphasizes quick product realization and rapid response to shifting program and agency goals. Over the past two decades, space suit design has been evolutionary in approach with emphasis on building prototypes then testing with the largest practical range of subjects possible. The results of these efforts show continuous improvement but make scaled design and performance predictions almost impossible with limited budgets and little time. Thus, in an effort to start changing the way NASA approaches space suit design and analysis, the Advanced Space Suit group has initiated the development of an integrated design and analysis tool. It is a multi-year-if not decadal-development effort that, when fully implemented, is envisioned to generate analysis of any given space suit architecture or, conversely, predictions of ideal space suit architectures given specific mission parameters. The master tool will exchange information to and from a set of five sub-tool groups in order to generate the desired output. The basic functions of each sub-tool group, the initial relationships between the sub-tools, and a comparison to state of the art software and tools are discussed.

  8. The physician's reaction to a malpractice suit.

    PubMed

    Lavery, J P

    1988-01-01

    A malpractice suit can have a devastating impact on a practitioner's professional and personal life. The physician's reaction to this event is profound, affecting his own life-style and that of family, colleagues, and patients. This commentary presents an analogy between the physician's reaction to a malpractice suit and the stages of grief described by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: the sequence of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Understanding the psychodynamics of this reaction can help physicians to cope with the problems inherent in a malpractice suit and to maintain a greater stability in their personal lives. Adverse effects on medical practice and private life-style, and on the legal proceedings, can be minimized.

  9. The ESA's Space Trajectory Analysis software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    The European Space Agency (ESA) initiated in 2005 an internal activity to develop an open source software suite involving university science departments and research institutions all over the world. This project is called the "Space Trajectory Analysis" or STA. This article describes the birth of STA and its present configuration. One of the STA aims is to promote the exchange of technical ideas, and raise knowledge and competence in the areas of applied mathematics, space engineering, and informatics at University level. Conceived as a research and education tool to support the analysis phase of a space mission, STA is able to visualize a wide range of space trajectories. These include among others ascent, re-entry, descent and landing trajectories, orbits around planets and moons, interplanetary trajectories, rendezvous trajectories, etc. The article explains that STA project is an original idea of the Technical Directorate of ESA. It was born in August 2005 to provide a framework in astrodynamics research at University level. As research and education software applicable to Academia, a number of Universities support this development by joining ESA in leading the development. ESA and Universities partnership are expressed in the STA Steering Board. Together with ESA, each University has a chair in the board whose tasks are develop, control, promote, maintain, and expand the software suite. The article describes that STA provides calculations in the fields of spacecraft tracking, attitude analysis, coverage and visibility analysis, orbit determination, position and velocity of solar system bodies, etc. STA implements the concept of "space scenario" composed of Solar system bodies, spacecraft, ground stations, pads, etc. It is able to propagate the orbit of a spacecraft where orbital propagators are included. STA is able to compute communication links between objects of a scenario (coverage, line of sight), and to represent the trajectory computations and

  10. Membrane-Based Water Evaporator for a Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; McCann, Charles J.; O'Connell, Mary K.; Andrea, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A membrane-based water evaporator has been developed that is intended to serve as a heat-rejection device for a space suit. This evaporator would replace the current sublimator that is sensitive to contamination of its feedwater. The design of the membrane-based evaporator takes advantage of recent advances in hydrophobic micropore membranes to provide robust heat rejection with much less sensitivity to contamination. The low contamination sensitivity allows use of the heat transport loop as feedwater, eliminating the need for the separate feedwater system used for the sublimator. A cross section of the evaporator is shown in the accompanying figure. The space-suit cooling loop water flows into a distribution plenum, through a narrow annulus lined on both sides with a hydrophobic membrane, into an exit plenum, and returns to the space suit. Two perforated metal tubes encase the membranes and provide structural strength. Evaporation at the membrane inner surface dissipates the waste heat from the space suit. The water vapor passes through the membrane, into a steam duct and is vented to the vacuum environment through a back-pressure valve. The back-pressure setting can be adjusted to regulate the heat-rejection rate and the water outlet temperature.

  11. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Cox, Marlon R.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology. That testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment with both simulated and real human metabolic loads, and in both open and closed-loop configurations. The Orion ARS is designed to also support space-suited operations in a depressurized cabin, so the next step in developmental testing at JSC was to test the ARS technology in a typical closed space suit-loop environment with low-pressure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure, high-oxygen, closed-loop testing of the Orion ARS technology, and it was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in March 2009. The test investigated pressure drops and flow balancing through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors. General swing-bed performance was tested with both umbilical configurations, as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable suit atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  12. OCAMS: The OSIRIS-REx Camera Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, B.; Drouet d'Aubigny, C.; Golish, D.; Fellows, C.; Merrill, C.; Smith, P.; Walker, M. S.; Hendershot, J. E.; Hancock, J.; Bailey, S. H.; DellaGiustina, D. N.; Lauretta, D. S.; Tanner, R.; Williams, M.; Harshman, K.; Fitzgibbon, M.; Verts, W.; Chen, J.; Connors, T.; Hamara, D.; Dowd, A.; Lowman, A.; Dubin, M.; Burt, R.; Whiteley, M.; Watson, M.; McMahon, T.; Ward, M.; Booher, D.; Read, M.; Williams, B.; Hunten, M.; Little, E.; Saltzman, T.; Alfred, D.; O'Dougherty, S.; Walthall, M.; Kenagy, K.; Peterson, S.; Crowther, B.; Perry, M. L.; See, C.; Selznick, S.; Sauve, C.; Beiser, M.; Black, W.; Pfisterer, R. N.; Lancaster, A.; Oliver, S.; Oquest, C.; Crowley, D.; Morgan, C.; Castle, C.; Dominguez, R.; Sullivan, M.

    2018-02-01

    The OSIRIS-REx Camera Suite (OCAMS) will acquire images essential to collecting a sample from the surface of Bennu. During proximity operations, these images will document the presence of satellites and plumes, record spin state, enable an accurate model of the asteroid's shape, and identify any surface hazards. They will confirm the presence of sampleable regolith on the surface, observe the sampling event itself, and image the sample head in order to verify its readiness to be stowed. They will document Bennu's history as an example of early solar system material, as a microgravity body with a planetesimal size-scale, and as a carbonaceous object. OCAMS is fitted with three cameras. The MapCam will record color images of Bennu as a point source on approach to the asteroid in order to connect Bennu's ground-based point-source observational record to later higher-resolution surface spectral imaging. The SamCam will document the sample site before, during, and after it is disturbed by the sample mechanism. The PolyCam, using its focus mechanism, will observe the sample site at sub-centimeter resolutions, revealing surface texture and morphology. While their imaging requirements divide naturally between the three cameras, they preserve a strong degree of functional overlap. OCAMS and the other spacecraft instruments will allow the OSIRIS-REx mission to collect a sample from a microgravity body on the same visit during which it was first optically acquired from long range, a useful capability as humanity reaches out to explore near-Earth, Main-Belt and Jupiter Trojan asteroids.

  13. Vehicle-network defensive aids suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapanotti, John

    2005-05-01

    Defensive Aids Suites (DAS) developed for vehicles can be extended to the vehicle network level. The vehicle network, typically comprising four platoon vehicles, will benefit from improved communications and automation based on low latency response to threats from a flexible, dynamic, self-healing network environment. Improved DAS performance and reliability relies on four complementary sensor technologies including: acoustics, visible and infrared optics, laser detection and radar. Long-range passive threat detection and avoidance is based on dual-purpose optics, primarily designed for manoeuvring, targeting and surveillance, combined with dazzling, obscuration and countermanoeuvres. Short-range active armour is based on search and track radar and intercepting grenades to defeat the threat. Acoustic threat detection increases the overall robustness of the DAS and extends the detection range to include small calibers. Finally, detection of active targeting systems is carried out with laser and radar warning receivers. Synthetic scene generation will provide the integrated environment needed to investigate, develop and validate these new capabilities. Computer generated imagery, based on validated models and an acceptable set of benchmark vignettes, can be used to investigate and develop fieldable sensors driven by real-time algorithms and countermeasure strategies. The synthetic scene environment will be suitable for sensor and countermeasure development in hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The research effort focuses on two key technical areas: a) computing aspects of the synthetic scene generation and b) and development of adapted models and databases. OneSAF is being developed for research and development, in addition to the original requirement of Simulation and Modelling for Acquisition, Rehearsal, Requirements and Training (SMARRT), and is becoming useful as a means for transferring technology to other users, researchers and contractors. This procedure

  14. Exploration Space Suit Architecture: Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper picks up where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars (Hill, Johnson, IEEEAC paper #1209) left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and interfaces and could be reconfigured to meet the mission or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper will walk though the continued development of a space suit system architecture, and how it should evolve to meeting the future exploration EVA needs of the United States space program. In looking forward to future US space exploration and determining how the work performed to date in the CxP and how this would map to a future space suit architecture with maximum re-use of technology and functionality, a series of thought exercises and analysis have provided a strong indication that the CxP space suit architecture is well postured to provide a viable solution for future exploration missions. Through the destination environmental analysis that is presented in this paper, the modular architecture approach provides the lowest mass, lowest mission cost for the protection of the crew given any human mission outside of low Earth orbit. Some of the studies presented here provide a look and validation of the non-environmental design drivers that will become every-increasingly important the further away from Earth humans venture and the longer they are away. Additionally, the analysis demonstrates a logical clustering of design environments that allows a very focused approach to technology prioritization, development and design that will maximize the return on investment independent of any particular program and provide architecture and design solutions for space suit systems in time or ahead of being required for any particular manned flight program in the future. The new approach to space suit design and interface definition the discussion will show how the architecture is very adaptable to programmatic and funding changes with

  15. Immersion Suit Usage Within the RAAF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    IMMERSION SUIT USED UVIC QDIS HOLDINGS 202. in 12 Sizes, held by ALSS 492SQN REQUIREMENTS No comment USAGE POLICY REFERENCE DIRAF) AAP 7215.004-1 (P3C...held by ALSS 492SQN. REQUIREMENTS No comment ISACE POLICY REFERENCE DIIAF) AAP 7215.004-1 (P3C Flight Manual) RAAF Supplement No 92 USAGE POUICY UVIC...TYPE P3C REFERENCE Telecon FLTLT Toft I I SQNfRESO AVMED Dated 22 Mar 91 IMMERSION SUIT USED UVIC QDIS HOLDINGS No comment REQUIREMENTS No comment USAGE

  16. STS-77 MS Andrew Thomas suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 Mission Specialist Andrew S. W. Thomas finishes donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. A native of South Australia, the rookie astronaut joins a crew of five veterans on the fourth Shuttle flight of 1996. They will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 6:30 a.m. EDT, May 19.

  17. Terrestrial EVA Suit = Fire Fighter's Protective Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Tico; Brown, Robert G.; Burrell, Eddie; DelRosso, Dominic; Krishen, Kumar; Moffitt, Harold; Orndoff, Evelyne; Santos, Beatrice; Butzer, Melissa; Dasgupta, Rajib

    1999-01-01

    Firefighters want to go to work, do their job well, and go home alive and uninjured. For their most important job, saving lives, firefighters want protective equipment that will allow more extended and effective time at fire scenes in order to perform victim search and rescue. A team, including engineers at NASA JSC and firefighters from Houston, has developed a list of problem areas for which NASA technology and know-how can recommend improvements for firefighter suits and gear. Prototypes for solutions have been developed and are being evaluated. This effort will spin back to NASA as improvements for lunar and planetary suits.

  18. Unique Features of Halophilic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Proteins from moderate and extreme halophiles have unique characteristics. They are highly acidic and hydrophilic, similar to intrinsically disordered proteins. These characteristics make the halophilic proteins soluble in water and fold reversibly. In addition to reversible folding, the rate of refolding of halophilic proteins from denatured structure is generally slow, often taking several days, for example, for extremely halophilic proteins. This slow folding rate makes the halophilic proteins a novel model system for folding mechanism analysis. High solubility and reversible folding also make the halophilic proteins excellent fusion partners for soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

  19. Model for Predicting the Performance of Planetary Suit Hip Bearing Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Margerum, Sarah; Hharvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    Designing a space suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. During the development period of the suit numerous design iterations need to occur before the hardware meets human performance requirements. Using computer models early in the design phase of hardware development is advantageous, by allowing virtual prototyping to take place. A virtual design environment allows designers to think creatively, exhaust design possibilities, and study design impacts on suit and human performance. A model of the rigid components of the Mark III Technology Demonstrator Suit (planetary-type space suit) and a human manikin were created and tested in a virtual environment. The performance of the Mark III hip bearing model was first developed and evaluated virtually by comparing the differences in mobility performance between the nominal bearing configurations and modified bearing configurations. Suited human performance was then simulated with the model and compared to actual suited human performance data using the same bearing configurations. The Mark III hip bearing model was able to visually represent complex bearing rotations and the theoretical volumetric ranges of motion in three dimensions. The model was also able to predict suited human hip flexion and abduction maximums to within 10% of the actual suited human subject data, except for one modified bearing condition in hip flexion which was off by 24%. Differences between the model predictions and the human subject performance data were attributed to the lack of joint moment limits in the model, human subject fitting issues, and the limited suit experience of some of the subjects. The results demonstrate that modeling space suit rigid segments is a feasible design tool for evaluating and optimizing suited human performance. Keywords: space suit, design, modeling, performance

  20. TypingSuite: Integrated Software for Presenting Stimuli, and Collecting and Analyzing Typing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Erin L.; Marchand, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Research into typing patterns has broad applications in both psycholinguistics and biometrics (i.e., improving security of computer access via each user's unique typing patterns). We present a new software package, TypingSuite, which can be used for presenting visual and auditory stimuli, collecting typing data, and summarizing and analyzing the…

  1. EVA Roadmap: New Space Suit for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Robert

    1998-01-01

    New spacesuit design considerations for the extra vehicular activity (EVA) of a manned Martian exploration mission are discussed. Considerations of the design includes:(1) regenerable CO2 removal, (2) a portable life support system (PLSS) which would include cryogenic oxygen produced from in-situ manufacture, (3) a power supply for the EVA, (4) the thermal control systems, (5) systems engineering, (5) space suit systems (materials, and mobility), (6) human considerations, such as improved biomedical sensors and astronaut comfort, (7) displays and controls, and robotic interfaces, such as rovers, and telerobotic commands.

  2. ASTRONAUT GLENN, JOHN - MERCURY SPACE SUIT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    S62-00965 (20 Feb. 1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., finishes suiting up, and prepares for the launch of his Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) spacecraft. The MA-6 ?Friendship 7? mission marks America's first manned Earth-orbiting spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  3. What's New with MS Office Suites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2012-01-01

    If one buys a new PC, laptop, or netbook computer today, it probably comes preloaded with Microsoft Office 2010 Starter Edition. This is a significantly limited, advertising-laden version of Microsoft's suite of productivity programs, Microsoft Office. This continues the trend of PC makers providing ever more crippled versions of Microsoft's…

  4. 28 CFR 36.501 - Private suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES Enforcement § 36.501 Private suits. (a) General. Any person who is... general public importance. Upon application by the complainant and in such circumstances as the court may....402, 36.403, and 36.405 of this part, injunctive relief shall include an order to alter facilities to...

  5. Antigravity Suits For Studies Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravik, Stein E.; Greenleaf, John

    1992-01-01

    Report presents results of research on use of "antigravity" suit, one applying positive pressure to lower body to simulate some effects of microgravity. Research suggests lower-body positive pressure is alternative to bed rest or immersion in water in terrestrial studies of cardioregulatory, renal, electrolyte, and hormonal changes induced in humans by microgravity.

  6. The One in the Purple Suit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Hope

    2003-01-01

    In this article, a parent of a gifted child muses on the challenges of raising her daughter, coping with her daughter's frustrations, her decision to stay home, and her brief envy of a doppelganger, a professional in a purple suit. (CR)

  7. A Suite of Tools for Technology Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Saden, Povinelli & Rosen, 1989). • This was a significant change in emphasis on the part of NASA, where technology had previously viewed as merely...Cost Analysis Symposium, April 13, 2005. A Suite of Tools for Technology Assessment 24 Bibliography - continued: • Sadin, Stanley T.; Povinelli

  8. Center for Efficient Exascale Discretizations Software Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio; Dobrev, Veselin; Tomov, Vladimir

    The CEED Software suite is a collection of generally applicable software tools focusing on the following computational motives: PDE discretizations on unstructured meshes, high-order finite element and spectral element methods and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement. All of this software is being developed as part of CEED, a co-design Center for Efficient Exascale Discretizations, within DOE's Exascale Computing Project (ECP) program.

  9. CASS—CFEL-ASG software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucar, Lutz; Barty, Anton; Coppola, Nicola; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Hoppe, Uwe; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Küpper, Jochen; Scholz, Mirko; Techert, Simone; White, Thomas A.; Strüder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim

    2012-10-01

    The Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has created the CFEL-ASG Software Suite CASS to view, process and analyse multi-parameter experimental data acquired at Free Electron Lasers (FELs) using the CFEL-ASG Multi Purpose (CAMP) instrument Strüder et al. (2010) [6]. The software is based on a modular design so that it can be adjusted to accommodate the needs of all the various experiments that are conducted with the CAMP instrument. In fact, this allows the use of the software in all experiments where multiple detectors are involved. One of the key aspects of CASS is that it can be used either 'on-line', using a live data stream from the free-electron laser facility's data acquisition system to guide the experiment, and 'off-line', on data acquired from a previous experiment which has been saved to file. Program summary Program title: CASS Catalogue identifier: AEMP_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167073 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1065056 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel x86-64. Operating system: GNU/Linux (for information about restrictions see outlook). RAM: >8 GB Classification: 2.3, 3, 15, 16.4. External routines: Qt-Framework[1], SOAP[2], (optional HDF5[3], VIGRA[4], ROOT[5], QWT[6]) Nature of problem: Analysis and visualisation of scientific data acquired at Free-Electron-Lasers Solution method: Generalise data access and storage so that a variety of small programming pieces can be linked to form a complex analysis chain. Unusual features: Complex analysis chains can be built without recompiling the program Additional comments: An updated extensive documentation of CASS is available

  10. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  11. Gemini-Titan (GT)-8 - Lightweight Suit - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-06

    S65-60035 (6 Dec. 1965) --- The new light-weight spacesuit planned for possible use during the Gemini-7 mission is modeled by Fred R. Spross, Gemini Support Office, Crew Systems Division. The spacesuit weighs 16 pounds, including the aviator's crash helmet. The suit is designed so that it may be partially or completely removed during flight. It has two layers of material while the previously used Gemini spacesuit has four layers. Photo credit: NASA

  12. The Probabilities of Unique Events

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  13. Anesthesia and the pediatric cardiac catheterization suite: a review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer E; Lin, Erica P; Alexy, Ryan; Aronson, Lori A

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technology over the last couple of decades have caused a shift in pediatric cardiac catheterization from a primary focus on diagnostics to innovative therapeutic interventions. These improvements allow patients a wider range of nonsurgical options for treatment of congenital heart disease. However, these therapeutic modalities can entail higher risk in an already complex patient population, compounded by the added challenges inherent to the environment of the cardiac catheterization suite. Anesthesiologists caring for children with congenital heart disease must understand not only the pathophysiology of the disease but also the effects the anesthetics and interventions have on the patient in order to provide a safe perioperative course. It is the aim of this article to review the latest catheterization modalities offered to patients with congenital heart disease, describe the unique challenges presented in the cardiac catheterization suite, list the most common complications encountered during catheterization and finally, to review the literature regarding different anesthetic drugs used in the catheterization lab. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The body's tailored suit: Skin as a mechanical interface.

    PubMed

    Tissot, Floriane S; Boulter, Etienne; Estrach, Soline; Féral, Chloé C

    2016-11-01

    Skin, by nature, is very similar to the Rouquayrol-Denayrouze suit mentioned by Jules Verne in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea: it allows "to risk (…) new physiological conditions without suffering any organic disorder". Mechanical cues, to the same extent as other environmental parameters, are such "new physiological conditions". Indeed, skin's primary function is to form a protective barrier to shield inner tissues from the external environment. This requires unique mechanical properties as well as the ability to sense mechanical cues from the environment in order to prevent or repair mechanical damages as well as to function as the primary mechanosensory interface of the whole body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction to the history and current status of evidence-based korean medicine: a unique integrated system of allopathic and holistic medicine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang Shik; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Korean medicine, an integrated allopathic and traditional medicine, has developed unique characteristics and has been active in contributing to evidence-based medicine. Recent developments in Korean medicine have not been as well disseminated as traditional Chinese medicine. This introduction to recent developments in Korean medicine will draw attention to, and facilitate, the advancement of evidence-based complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Methods and Results. The history of and recent developments in Korean medicine as evidence-based medicine are explored through discussions on the development of a national standard classification of diseases and study reports, ranging from basic research to newly developed clinical therapies. A national standard classification of diseases has been developed and revised serially into an integrated classification of Western allopathic and traditional holistic medicine disease entities. Standard disease classifications offer a starting point for the reliable gathering of evidence and provide a representative example of the unique status of evidence-based Korean medicine as an integration of Western allopathic medicine and traditional holistic medicine. Conclusions. Recent developments in evidence-based Korean medicine show a unique development in evidence-based medicine, adopting both Western allopathic and holistic traditional medicine. It is expected that Korean medicine will continue to be an important contributor to evidence-based medicine, encompassing conventional and complementary approaches.

  16. Organizational Systems Questionnaire (OSQ) Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, James C.; Kimball, Thomas G.; Shumway, Sterling T.; Korinek, Alan W.

    2007-01-01

    Marriage and family therapists (MFTs), who are trained in systems theory and consult with complex and difficult systems (e.g., couples and families), are uniquely suited to both assess and intervene in broader organizational systems. However, MFTs are in need of more systemically designed assessment tools to guide and inform their interventions…

  17. Feasibility of Suited 10-km Ambulation "Walkback" on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason; Lee, Lesley; DeWitt, John K.; Klein, Jill; Wessell, James; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a study that examined the feasibility of having astronauts walk about 10 kilometers to the base in the event of a breakdown of the lunar rover. This was done in part to examine the possibility of having a single rover on the lunar exploration missions. Other objectives of the study are to: (1) Understand specific biomedical and human performance limitations of the suit compared to matched shirt-sleeve controls; (2) Collect metabolic and ground-reaction force data to develop an EVA simulator for use on future prebr eathe protocol verification tests (3) Provide data to estimate consum ables usage for input to suit and portable life support system (PLSS) design (4) Assess the cardiovascular and resistance exercise associa ted with partialgravity EVA for planning appropriate exploration exer cise countermeasures

  18. STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency, is helped with his flight suit by suit tech Tommy McDonald in the Operations and Checkout Building. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  19. STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson gives a thumbs up as he dons his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with the help of suit tech George Brittingham (lower right). The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  20. STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson smiles as he is assisted with his ascent/reentry flight suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He has been a NASA employee since 1975 and has worked at Ames and Langley Research Centers. Robinson holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering and is a licensed pilot. He will assist Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. with the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA- SPAS-2) free-flyer and conduct Comet Hale-Bopp observations with the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System. Robinson will also coordinate photo and television data operations during the mission. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the CRISTA-SPAS- 2. Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments.

  1. Boeing Unveils New Suit for Commercial Crew Astronauts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-23

    Boeing unveiled its spacesuit design Wednesday as the company continues to move toward flight tests and crew rotation missions of its Starliner spacecraft and launch systems that will fly astronauts to the International Space Station. Astronauts heading into orbit for the station aboard the Starliner will wear Boeing’s new spacesuits. The suits are custom-designed to fit each astronaut, lighter and more comfortable than earlier versions and meet NASA requirements for safety and functionality. NASA's commercial crew astronauts Eric Boe and Suni Williams tried on the suits at Boeing’s Commercial Crew and Cargo Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Boe, Williams, Bob Behnken, and Doug Hurley were selected by NASA in July 2015 to train for commercial crew test flights aboard the Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft. The flight assignments have not been set, so all four of the astronauts are rehearsingheavily for flights aboard both vehicles.

  2. The Characterization of Biosignatures in Caves Using an Instrument Suite.

    PubMed

    Uckert, Kyle; Chanover, Nancy J; Getty, Stephanie; Voelz, David G; Brinckerhoff, William B; McMillan, Nancy; Xiao, Xifeng; Boston, Penelope J; Li, Xiang; McAdam, Amy; Glenar, David A; Chavez, Arriana

    2017-12-01

    The search for life and habitable environments on other Solar System bodies is a major motivator for planetary exploration. Due to the difficulty and significance of detecting extant or extinct extraterrestrial life in situ, several independent measurements from multiple instrument techniques will bolster the community's confidence in making any such claim. We demonstrate the detection of subsurface biosignatures using a suite of instrument techniques including IR reflectance spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We focus our measurements on subterranean calcium carbonate field samples, whose biosignatures are analogous to those that might be expected on some high-interest astrobiology targets. In this work, we discuss the feasibility and advantages of using each of the aforementioned instrument techniques for the in situ search for biosignatures and present results on the autonomous characterization of biosignatures using multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Key Words: Biosignature suites-Caves-Mars-Life detection. Astrobiology 17, 1203-1218.

  3. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Cabane, M.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coll, Patrice; Atreya, Sushil K.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Benna, Mehdi; Bleacher, L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory(MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatilesextracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantiallyto the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essentialstep in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite locatedin the interior of MSLs Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole massspectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupledthrough solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on thesame samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyzevolatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In additionto measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conducta sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction fromsieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rovers roboticarm.

  4. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Christopher R.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Arvey, Robert; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantially to the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essential step in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupled through solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on the same samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In addition to measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conduct a sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction from sieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm,

  5. Defensive aids suite prototype for light armored vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Andre; Fortin, Jean; Venter, Johan; Philip, Brian G.; Hagen, Russell; Krieger, Dietmar; Greenley, Mike

    2001-09-01

    The Defence Research Establishment Valcartier has initiated in 1998 R&D work to investigate and to demonstrate key technologies required for future Defensive Aid Suite to protect Light Armoured Vehicles. A basic Defensive Aid Suite demonstrator (Phase I) was built and integrated into the LAV vetronics by Litton Systems Canada and his consortium. The Defensive Aid Suite consisted of a 2-band HARLIDTM-based laser detection head, a processor capable to control and deploy countermeasures and a DAS touch-screen display all integrated in a Light Armored Vehicle. The crew was able to select the operation mode for direct fire or smoke deployment by pushing one of the pair of buttons available at the bottom of the display. This system was successfully demonstrated in October 1999 during an international trial. This article gives an overview of the results obtained in the field as well as some of the lessons learnt. It also describes laboratory and field measurements made on the Laser Warning Receiver unit itself. The results of the DAS tactical use and of Human factor evaluation will illustrate its performance within typical laser threat scenarios. This work will serve as the basis for the recommendation of a future DAS demonstrator (Phase II) integrating more sensors and countermeasures.

  6. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  7. A Smartphone Application Suite for Assessing Mobility.

    PubMed

    Madhushri, Priyanka; Dzhagaryan, Armen A; Jovanov, Emil; Milenkovic, Aleksandar

    2016-08-01

    Modern smartphones integrate a growing number of inertial and environmental sensors that can enable the development of new mobile health applications. In this paper we introduce a suite of smartphone applications for assessing mobility in elderly population. The suite currently includes applications that automate and quantify the following standardized medical tests for assessing mobility: Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG), 30 Seconds Chair Stand Test (30SCS), and a 4-stage Balance Test (4SBT). For each smartphone application we describe its functionality and a list of parameters extracted by processing signals from smartphone's inertial sensors. The paper shows the results from studies conducted on geriatric patients for TUG tests and from studies conducted in the laboratory on healthy subjects for 30SCS and 4SBT tests.

  8. Designing Test Suites for Software Interactions Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    the annual cost of insufficient software testing methods and tools in the United States is between 22.2 to 59.5 billion US dollars [13, 14]. This study...10 (2004), 1–29. [21] Cheng, C., Dumitrescu, A., and Schroeder , P. Generating small com- binatorial test suites to cover input-output relationships... Proceedings of the Conference on the Future of Software Engineering (May 2000), pp. 61 – 72. [51] Hartman, A. Software and hardware testing using

  9. DaCHS: Data Center Helper Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, Markus

    2018-04-01

    DaCHS, the Data Center Helper Suite, is an integrated package for publishing astronomical data sets to the Virtual Observatory. Network-facing, it speaks the major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, Datalink, etc). Operator-facing, many input formats, including FITS/WCS, ASCII files, and VOTable, can be processed to publication-ready data. DaCHS puts particular emphasis on integrated metadata handling, which facilitates a tight integration with the VO's Registry

  10. Evaluation of sensors for use inside chemical protective suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Derrick A.; Duncan, E. J. S.; Hunt, Stephen; Gudgin Dickson, Eva F.; Weagle, Glenn E.

    1999-11-01

    Organizations such as the military, hazardous materials units, first responders and industries involved in the processing and manufacture of chemicals all have requirements for specialized whole body protection for those people in their organizations whose job it is to work with toxic chemicals on a day to day basis or in emergency situations. Currently, excluding chemical biological (CB) challenge scenarios, there is no routine monitoring of the possible ingress of toxic chemicals within chemical protective suits. Under existing national standards, swatches of the protective suit fabric are usually tested for chemical breakthrough and if they meet certain criteria, the suit is considered to provide adequate protection to the individual. Despite advances in protection level research provided by full system protective clothing tests, inexpensive, real-time, sensitive and robust chemical monitoring systems for use both under protective clothing and within a challenge environment, remains a technologically deficient area. This paper presents the results of a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of miniature detectors for monitoring real-time volatile organic chemical (VOC) challenges under chemical protective clothing and in closed environments where such suits are used. Nine gas sensors of n-type semiconductor design (Figaro Engineering Inc) were assessed for their response to a dichloromethane concentration of 560 ppm at a temperature of 23 degrees Celsius and relative humidity of 20%. Absolute voltage output, speed of response to dichloromethane exposure, and time required to return to zero, were considered. The top ranked sensor was further evaluated for its calibration response to a range of dichloromethane concentrations up to 560 ppm. Variables that were considered include effect of temperature and relative humidity, hysteresis and repeatability. Increasing RH causes an increase in the zero output of the sensor with an approximate linear relationship. The

  11. A new device for the inflation of the antigravity suit.

    PubMed

    Brodrick, P M

    1986-02-01

    The 'Schuco' orthopaedic tourniquet inflator can be simply converted into a suitable device for inflating an antigravity suit (G-suit). The antigravity suit may be used on neurosurgical patients undergoing procedures in the sitting position to help prevent hypotension and air embolism. The availability of this device may encourage the more widespread use of an antigravity suit in neuro-anaesthetic practice.

  12. Space suit bioenergetics: framework and analysis of unsuited and suited activity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Newman, Dava J

    2007-11-01

    Metabolic costs limit the duration and intensity of extravehicular activity (EVA), an essential component of future human missions to the Moon and Mars. Energetics Framework: We present a framework for comparison of energetics data across and between studies. This framework, applied to locomotion, differentiates between muscle efficiency and energy recovery, two concepts often confused in the literature. The human run-walk transition in Earth gravity occurs at the point for which energy recovery is approximately the same for walking and running, suggesting a possible role for recovery in gait transitions. Muscular Energetics: Muscle physiology limits the overall efficiency by which chemical energy is converted through metabolism to useful work. Unsuited Locomotion: Walking and running use different methods of energy storage and release. These differences contribute to the relative changes in the metabolic cost of walking and running as gravity is varied, with the metabolic cost of locomoting at a given velocity changing in proportion to gravity for running and less than in proportion for walking. Space Suits: Major factors affecting the energetic cost of suited movement include suit pressurization, gravity, velocity, surface slope, and space suit configuration. Apollo lunar surface EVA traverse metabolic rates, while unexpectedly low, were higher than other activity categories. The Lunar Roving Vehicle facilitated even lower metabolic rates, thus longer duration EVAs. Muscles and tendons act like springs during running; similarly, longitudinal pressure forces in gas pressure space suits allow spring-like storage and release of energy when suits are self-supporting.

  13. An overview of the formulation, existence and uniqueness issues for the initial value problem raised by the dynamics of discrete systems with unilateral contact and dry friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Patrick; Charles, Alexandre

    2018-03-01

    In the end of the seventies, Schatzman and Moreau undertook to revisit the venerable dynamics of rigid bodies with contact and dry friction in the light of more recent mathematics. One claimed objective was to reach, for the first time, a mathematically consistent formulation of an initial value problem associated with the dynamics. The purpose of this article is to make a review of the today state-of-art concerning not only the formulation, but also the issues of existence and uniqueness of solution. xml:lang="fr"

  14. The recovery and utilization of space suit range-of-motion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL; Walton, James S.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for recovering data for the range of motion of a subject wearing a space suit is described along with the validation of this technique on an EVA space suit. Digitized data are automatically acquired from video images of the subject; three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using three-dimensional computer graphics. Target locations are recovered using a unique video processor and close-range photogrammetry. It is concluded that such data can be used in such applications as the animation of anthropometric computer models.

  15. Audit method suited for DSS in clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents a novel online method to audit predictive models using a Bayesian perspective. The auditing model has been specifically designed for Decision Support Systems (DSSs) suited for clinical or research environments. Taking as starting point the working diagnosis supplied by the clinician, this method compares and evaluates the predictive skills of those models able to answer to that diagnosis. The approach consists in calculating the posterior odds of a model through the composition of a prior odds, a static odds, and a dynamic odds. To do so, this method estimates the posterior odds from the cases that the comparing models had in common during the design stage and from the cases already viewed by the DSS after deployment in the clinical site. In addition, if an ontology of the classes is available, this method can audit models answering related questions, which offers a reinforcement to the decisions the user already took and gives orientation on further diagnostic steps.The main technical novelty of this approach lies in the design of an audit model adapted to suit the decision workflow of a clinical environment. The audit model allows deciding what is the classifier that best suits each particular case under evaluation and allows the detection of possible misbehaviours due to population differences or data shifts in the clinical site. We show the efficacy of our method for the problem of brain tumor diagnosis with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

  16. Patterns Unique, Yet Familiar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    This close-up image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter gives the impression of looking like bacterial cells and their internal structures which travel and split in the process of life. These features are fractal in nature: the same image is preserved through different scales, with the pattern repeating eternally. The reality is, we are looking at one of Mars' polar regions; the South Polar residual cap to be precise, and, as with many things in Martian planetary science, there is a precise reasoning behind the name. With the coming and going of the seasons, this is an area on Mars where ice remains even after the peak of summer arrives. The texture is very alien, bearing more of a resemblance to the universe of the very small, rather than the universe far, far away. But if this is a polar cap, then why does it not look like the polar caps on Earth? Indeed, there is no equivalent terrain observed here on Earth. The so-called "Swiss cheese terrain, referencing the numerous holes of the region, is a product of seasonal exchange between the surface and the Martian atmosphere. With a predominantly carbon dioxide content at 98 percent, the colder temperatures condense the gas out of the atmosphere to produce dry ice. The prevalence of water is more concentrated in the north, leaving the South polar region more carbon dioxide rich, and it's this difference in composition that generates the unusual texture of the Swiss cheese terrain. The Red Planet is one of the chief candidates in the search for life elsewhere in the Solar System; however, a quick glance at this image virtually gives the impression we have already found it. NB: The cutout image has been rotated so that north is approximately up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21880

  17. Checkout and Standard Use Procedures for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana J.

    2012-01-01

    The operational pressure range is the range to which the suit can be nominally operated for manned testing. The top end of the nominal operational pressure range is equivalent to 1/2 the proof pressure. Structural pressure is 1.5 times the specified test pressure for any given test. Proof pressure is the maximum unmanned pressure to which the suit was tested by the vendor prior to delivery. The maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) is 90% of the proof pressure. The pressure systems RVs are set to keep components below their MAWPs. If the suit is pressurized over its MAWP, the suit will be taken out of service and an in-depth inspection/review of the suit will be performed before the suit is put back in service. The procedures outlined in this document should be followed as written. However, the suit test engineer (STE) may make redline changes real-time, provided those changes are recorded in the anomaly section of the test data sheet. If technicians supporting suit build-up, check-out, and/or test execution believe that a procedure can be improved, they should notify their lead. If procedures are incorrect to the point of potentially causing hardware damage or affecting safety, bring the problem to the technician lead and/or STE s attention and stop work until a solution (temporary or permanent) is authorized. Certain steps in the procedure are marked with a DV , for Designated Verifier. The Designated Verifier for this procedure is an Advanced Space Suit Technology Development Laboratory technician, not directly involved in performing the procedural steps, who will verify that the step was performed as stated. The steps to be verified by the DV were selected based on one or more of the following criteria: the step was deemed significant in ensuring the safe performance of the test, the data recorded in the step is of specific interest in monitoring the suit system operation, or the step has a strong influence on the successful completion of test objectives

  18. Space Suit Performance: Methods for Changing the Quality of Quantitative Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suits will enable astronauts to perform to their maximum capacity, prototype suits must be built and tested with human subjects. However, engineers and flight surgeons often have difficulty understanding and applying traditional representations of human data without training. To overcome these challenges, NASA is developing modern simulation and analysis techniques that focus on 3D visualization. Early understanding of actual performance early on in the design cycle is extremely advantageous to increase performance capabilities, reduce the risk of injury, and reduce costs. The primary objective of this project was to test modern simulation and analysis techniques for evaluating the performance of a human operating in extra-vehicular space suits.

  19. STS-84 Commander Charles Precourt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt adjusts the helmet of his launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Precourts third space flight, but his first as commander. Precourt and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during an approximate 7-minute launch window which opens at about 4:08 a.m. This will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The exact liftoff time will be determined about 90 minutes prior to launch, based on the most current location of Mir.

  20. STS-82 Suit-up for Post Insertion Training in Crew Compartment Trainer 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-30

    S96-18553 (30 Oct. 1996) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, pilot, gets help with his launch and entry suit prior to a training session in JSC's systems integration facility. Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry escape suit, Horowitz and his crewmates went on to simulate an emergency ejection, using the escape pole system on the mid deck, as well as other phases of their scheduled February mission.

  1. The Suite for Embedded Applications and Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-10

    Many applications of high performance embedded computing are limited by performance or power bottlenecks. We havedesigned SEAK, a new benchmark suite, (a) to capture these bottlenecks in a way that encourages creative solutions to these bottlenecks? and (b) to facilitate rigorous, objective, end-user evaluation for their solutions. To avoid biasing solutions toward existing algorithms, SEAK benchmarks use a mission-centric (abstracted from a particular algorithm) andgoal-oriented (functional) specification. To encourage solutions that are any combination of software or hardware, we use an end-user blackbox evaluation that can capture tradeoffs between performance, power, accuracy, size, and weight. The tradeoffs are especially informativemore » for procurement decisions. We call our benchmarks future proof because each mission-centric interface and evaluation remains useful despite shifting algorithmic preferences. It is challenging to create both concise and precise goal-oriented specifications for mission-centric problems. This paper describes the SEAK benchmark suite and presents an evaluation of sample solutions that highlights power and performance tradeoffs.« less

  2. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  3. The suite of small-angle neutron scattering instruments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Heller, William T.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; ...

    2018-02-21

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is home to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), a high-flux research reactor, and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the world's most intense source of pulsed neutron beams. The unique co-localization of these two sources provided an opportunity to develop a suite of complementary small-angle neutron scattering instruments for studies of large-scale structures: the GP-SANS and Bio-SANS instruments at the HFIR and the EQ-SANS and TOF-USANS instruments at the SNS. This article provides an overview of the capabilities of the suite of instruments, with specific emphasis on how they complement each other. As a result, amore » description of the plans for future developments including greater integration of the suite into a single point of entry for neutron scattering studies of large-scale structures is also provided.« less

  4. The suite of small-angle neutron scattering instruments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, William T.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is home to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), a high-flux research reactor, and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the world's most intense source of pulsed neutron beams. The unique co-localization of these two sources provided an opportunity to develop a suite of complementary small-angle neutron scattering instruments for studies of large-scale structures: the GP-SANS and Bio-SANS instruments at the HFIR and the EQ-SANS and TOF-USANS instruments at the SNS. This article provides an overview of the capabilities of the suite of instruments, with specific emphasis on how they complement each other. As a result, amore » description of the plans for future developments including greater integration of the suite into a single point of entry for neutron scattering studies of large-scale structures is also provided.« less

  5. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmets, and in particular space suits, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view will be required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited field of view, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was employed to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables while sacrificing minimal fidelity.

  6. Results of the Particulate Contamination Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Conger, Bruce; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon and eventually to Mars, designing the most effective, efficient, and robust space suit life support system that will operate successfully in these dusty environments is vital. There is some knowledge of the contaminants and level of infiltration expected from the Lunar and Mars dust, however risk mitigation strategies and filtration designs to prevent contamination within the space suit life support system are still undefined. A trade study was initiated to identify and address these concerns, and to develop new requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). This trade study investigates historical methods of particulate contamination control in space suits and vehicles, and evaluated the possibility of using commercial technologies for this application. In addition, the trade study examined potential filtration designs. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study.

  7. On the Meaning of Uniqueness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes four questions on the meaning of uniqueness that have contrasting answers in common language versus mathematical language. The investigations stem from a scenario in which students interpreted uniqueness according to a definition from standard English, that is, different from the mathematical meaning, in defining an injective…

  8. Exploring Unique Roles for Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mohiuddin; Boisvert, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on "Psychological Treatments" by D. H. Barlow. Barlow highlighted unique roles that psychologists can play in mental health service delivery by providing psychological treatments--treatments that psychologists would be uniquely qualified to design and deliver. In support of Barlow's position, the authors draw from…

  9. Two new phases in the ternary RE-Ga-S systems with the unique interlinkage of GaS4 building units: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Shen, Jin-Ni; Zhu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Yi; Wu, Xin-Tao; Zhu, Qi-Long; Wu, Li-Ming

    2017-10-17

    Two novel ternary rare-earth chalcogenides, Yb 6 Ga 4 S 15 and Lu 5 GaS 9 , have been prepared by solid-state reactions of an elemental mixture at high temperatures. Their structures were determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Yb 6 Ga 4 S 15 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/m (no.12) [a = 23.557(2) Å, b = 3.7664(4) Å, c = 12.466(1) Å, β = 90.915(9)°, V = 1105.9(2) Å 3 and Z = 2], whereas Lu 5 GaS 9 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron] (no.2) [a = 7.735(3) Å, b = 10.033(4) Å, c = 10.120(4) Å, α = 106.296(4)°, β = 100.178(5)°, γ = 101.946(3)°, V = 714.1(5) Å 3 and Z = 2]. Both the structures feature complicated three dimensional frameworks with the unique interlinkages of GaS 4 as basic building units. Significantly, photo-electrochemical measurements indicated that title compounds were photoresponsive under visible-light illumination. Furthermore, the UV-visible-near IR diffuse reflectance spectra, thermal stabilities, electronic structures, physical properties as well as a structure change trend of the ternary rare-earth/gallium/sulfur compounds have been evaluated.

  10. A review of medicolegal malpractice suits involving cervical spine: what can we learn or change?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2011-02-01

    Utilizing Verdict Search (East Islip, New York), a medicolegal research service for civil and criminal court cases, 78 cervical spine surgical malpractice suits were identified (10-year period). Factors leading to cervical spine surgical litigation may represent an untapped source of risks/complications associated with these operations. Data with fewer adverse events are submitted to and/or published in spine journals, as they are discoverable in a court of law. Cervical spine surgery in 68 patients included 48 anterior operations (1 to 4 level anterior diskectomy/fusions, 1-level corpectomy/fusion). Twenty patients had posterior surgery (7 fusions, 13 laminectomies with/without fusions). Two patients had other operations/procedures, whereas 8 had no surgery. Four major questions were asked; (1) What were the operations/neurologic deficits that led to the suits?, (2) Who was sued?, (3) What purported and/or alleged "malpractice" events prompted the suits?, and (4) What were the outcomes of these suits? Postoperative neurologic deficits that led to suits included quadriplegia in 41 patients (21 anterior, 20 posterior operations). Other injuries/lesser postoperative deficits were observed in 15 patients, whereas 22 had pain alone. Malpractice suits involved 63 spine surgeons, whereas 15 did not. The 3 most common malpractice events prompting cervical suits, and typical for most surgery-related suits, included negligent surgery, lack of informed consent, and failure to diagnose/treat; the fourth unanticipated factor was failure to brace. Outcomes for these suits included 30 defense verdicts (10 quadriplegic patients), 22 plaintiffs' verdicts (average payout $4.0 million dollars), and 26 settlements (average $2.4 million dollars). Data gleaned from medicolegal suits may provide additional information regarding the morbidity associated with cervical surgery. These data may lessen patients' expectations, and limit spine surgeons' liability. In the future, consideration

  11. High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Christopher; Munoz, Bruno; Gundersen, Cynthia; Thomas, Walter, III; Stephenson, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    In support of the GPS for the SAM instrument suite built by NASA/GSFC, a life test facility was developed to test the suitability of 80Ni-20Cr alloy wire, 0.0142 cm diameter, for use as a heater element for the carbon dioxide scrubber. The element would be required to operate at 1000 C in order to attain the 800 C required for regeneration of the getter. The element also would need to operate in the Mars atmosphere, which consists mostly of CO2 at pressures between 4 and 12 torr. Data on the high temperature degradation mechanism of 80Ni- 20Cr in low pressure CO2, coupled with the effects of thermal cycling, were unknown. In addition, the influence of work hardening of the wire during assembly and the potential for catastrophic grain growth also were unknown. Verification of the element reliability as defined by the mission goals required the construction of a test facility that would accurately simulate the duty cycles in a simulated Mars atmosphere. The experimental set-up, along with the test protocol and results will be described.

  12. High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suit Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundersen, Cynthia; Hoffman, Christopher; Munoz, Bruno; Steohenson, Timothy; Thomas, Walter

    2008-01-01

    In support of the GPS for the SAM instrument suite built by GSFC, a life test facility was developed to test the suitability of 80Ni-20Cr wire, 0.0056 inches in diameter, for use as a heater element for the carbon dioxide scrubber. The wire would be required to operate at 1000 C in order to attain the 800 C required for regeneration of the getter. The wire also would need to operate in the Mars atmosphere, which consists mostly of CO2 at pressures between 4 and 12 torr. Data on the high temperature degradation mechanism of 80Ni-20Cr in low pressure CO2, together with the effects of thermal cycling, were unknown. In addition, the influence of work hardening of the wire during assembly and the potential for catastrophic grain growth also were unknown. Verification of the wire reliability as defined by the mission goals required the construction of a test facility that would accurately simulate the duty cycles in a simulated Mars atmosphere. The experimental set-up, along with the test protocol and results will be described.

  13. PRELAUNCH - (SUITING-UP) APOLLO 15 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-26

    S71-41408 (26 July 1971) --- The three Apollo 15 astronauts go through suiting up operations in the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) during the Apollo 15 prelaunch countdown. They are David R. Scott (foreground), commander; Alfred M. Worden (center), command module pilot; and James B. Irwin (background), lunar module pilot. Minutes later the crew rode a special transport van over to Pad A, Launch Complex 39, where their spacecraft awaited them. With the crew was Dr. Donald (Deke) K. Slayton (wearing dark blue sport shirt), director of Flight Crew Operations, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). The Apollo 15 space vehicle was launched at 9:34:00:79 a.m. (EDT), July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission.

  14. Suit Up - 50 Years of Spacewalks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-22

    This NASA documentary celebrates 50 years of extravehicular activity (EVA) or spacewalks that began with the first two EVAs conducted by Russian Alexey Leonov in March 1965 and American astronaut Edward White in June 1965 . The documentary features interviews with NASA Administrator and astronaut, Charles Bolden, NASA Deputy Administrator and spacesuit designer, Dava Newman, as well as other astronauts, engineers, technicians, managers and luminaries of spacewalk history. They share their personal stories and thoughts that cover the full EVA experience-- from the early spacewalking experiences, to spacesuit manufacturing, to modern day spacewalks aboard the International Space Station as well as what the future holds for humans working on a tether in space. "Suit Up," is narrated by actor and fan of space exploration Jon Cryer. Cryer recently traveled to Star City, NASA Headquarters and the Johnson Space Center to film an upcoming Travel Channel documentary series.

  15. UniPOPS: Unified data reduction suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.; Garwood, Robert W.; Salter, Christopher J.; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Cram, Thomas R.; Morgan, Lorrie; Vance, Bob; Hudson, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    UniPOPS, a suite of programs and utilities developed at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), reduced data from the observatory's single-dish telescopes: the Tucson 12-m, the Green Bank 140-ft, and archived data from the Green Bank 300-ft. The primary reduction programs, 'line' (for spectral-line reduction) and 'condar' (for continuum reduction), used the People-Oriented Parsing Service (POPS) as the command line interpreter. UniPOPS unified previous analysis packages and provided new capabilities; development of UniPOPS continued within the NRAO until 2004 when the 12-m was turned over to the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The submitted code is version 3.5 from 2004, the last supported by the NRAO.

  16. STS-92 Mission Specialist Wakata suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan waves while his launch and entry suit is checked during suitup for launch, scheduled for 8:05 p.m. EDT. The mission is the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. This launch is the second for Wakata. Landing is expected Oct. 21 at 3:55 p.m. EDT.

  17. STS-92 Commander Duffy suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy has his launch and entry suit checked before launch, scheduled for 8:05 p.m. EDT. The mission is the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. This launch is the fourth for Duffy. Landing is expected Oct. 21 at 3:55 p.m. EDT.

  18. Nebraska files suit to block disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Just when the Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact thought things might be starting to go its way, the state of Nebraska, following instructions from Gov. Ben Nelson, has filed a new lawsuit to block development of an LLW disposal site within its borders. The suit maintains that the recently reconfigured proposed site (in which an area of wetlands was excluded) has not received [open quotes]community consent,[close quotes] as required by state law; says that site developer, US Ecology, has not obtained county consent; and asks that the court permanently prevent development of any LLW site in Nebraska until communitymore » consent is demonstrated.« less

  19. Women lose suit over involuntary sterilizations (California).

    PubMed

    1978-10-01

    Federal Judge Jesse W. Curtis dismissed a suit brought by 10 Mexican-American women, who charged that between 1971-1974 they were sterilized without their voluntary and informed consent by physicians at the USC-Los Angeles County General Medical Center. Judge Curtis considered the case a communications breakdown between doctor and patient based on the patients' limited ability to speak English. Many women testified that they were pressured by hospital staff to consent to sterilization while they were in labor. Subsequent regulations passed by the California health department prohibit obtaining sterilization consent from a woman in labor or 24 hours postpartum. It further requires the consent form be written in the patient's preferred language. 8 of the plaintiffs had signed consent forms; 2 of the plaintiffs' husbands had signed. In the future, doctors must fully explain the procedure and its effects.

  20. The MCNP6 Analytic Criticality Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-06-16

    Analytical benchmarks provide an invaluable tool for verifying computer codes used to simulate neutron transport. Several collections of analytical benchmark problems [1-4] are used routinely in the verification of production Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP® [5,6]. Verification of a computer code is a necessary prerequisite to the more complex validation process. The verification process confirms that a code performs its intended functions correctly. The validation process involves determining the absolute accuracy of code results vs. nature. In typical validations, results are computed for a set of benchmark experiments using a particular methodology (code, cross-section data with uncertainties, and modeling)more » and compared to the measured results from the set of benchmark experiments. The validation process determines bias, bias uncertainty, and possibly additional margins. Verification is generally performed by the code developers, while validation is generally performed by code users for a particular application space. The VERIFICATION_KEFF suite of criticality problems [1,2] was originally a set of 75 criticality problems found in the literature for which exact analytical solutions are available. Even though the spatial and energy detail is necessarily limited in analytical benchmarks, typically to a few regions or energy groups, the exact solutions obtained can be used to verify that the basic algorithms, mathematics, and methods used in complex production codes perform correctly. The present work has focused on revisiting this benchmark suite. A thorough review of the problems resulted in discarding some of them as not suitable for MCNP benchmarking. For the remaining problems, many of them were reformulated to permit execution in either multigroup mode or in the normal continuous-energy mode for MCNP. Execution of the benchmarks in continuous-energy mode provides a significant advance to MCNP verification methods.« less

  1. 18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT COMPONENTS AND SUPPLIES. TERRY WEST TO LEFT, AND PAUL DUMBACHER TO RIGHT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Conquering systematics in the timing of the pulsar triple system J0337+1715: Towards a unique and robust test of the strong equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusinskaia, N. V.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; Ransom, S. M.; Stairs, I. H.; Lynch, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    PSR J0337+1715 is a millisecond radio pulsar in a hierarchical stellar triple system containing two white dwarfs. The pulsar orbits the inner white dwarf every 1.6 days. In turn, this inner binary system orbits the outer white dwarf every 327 days. The gravitational influence of the outer white dwarf strongly accelerates the inner binary, making this system an excellent laboratory in which to test the strong equivalence principle (SEP) of general relativity - especially because the neutron star has significant gravitational self-binding energy. This system has been intensively monitored using three radio telescopes: Arecibo, Green Bank and Westerbork. Using the more than 25000 pulse times of arrival (TOAs) collected to date, we have modeled the system using direct 3-body numerical integration. Here we present our efforts to quantify the effects of systematics in the TOAs and timing residuals, which can limit the precision to which we can test the SEP in this system. In this work we describe Fourier-based techniques that we apply to the residuals in order to isolate the effects of systematics that could masquerade as an SEP violation. We also demonstrate that tidal effects are insignificant in the modeling.

  3. Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures in an (A)BSL-4 Laboratory: 1. Biosafety Level 4 Suit Laboratory Suite Entry and Exit Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Janosko, Krisztina; Holbrook, Michael R.; Adams, Ricky; Barr, Jason; Bollinger, Laura; Newton, Je T'aime; Ntiforo, Corrie; Coe, Linda; Wada, Jiro; Pusl, Daniela; Jahrling, Peter B.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) suit laboratories are specifically designed to study high-consequence pathogens for which neither infection prophylaxes nor treatment options exist. The hallmarks of these laboratories are: custom-designed airtight doors, dedicated supply and exhaust airflow systems, a negative-pressure environment, and mandatory use of positive-pressure (“space”) suits. The risk for laboratory specialists working with highly pathogenic agents is minimized through rigorous training and adherence to stringent safety protocols and standard operating procedures. Researchers perform the majority of their work in BSL-2 laboratories and switch to BSL-4 suit laboratories when work with a high-consequence pathogen is required. Collaborators and scientists considering BSL-4 projects should be aware of the challenges associated with BSL-4 research both in terms of experimental technical limitations in BSL-4 laboratory space and the increased duration of such experiments. Tasks such as entering and exiting the BSL-4 suit laboratories are considerably more complex and time-consuming compared to BSL-2 and BSL-3 laboratories. The focus of this particular article is to address basic biosafety concerns and describe the entrance and exit procedures for the BSL-4 laboratory at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick. Such procedures include checking external systems that support the BSL-4 laboratory, and inspecting and donning positive-pressure suits, entering the laboratory, moving through air pressure-resistant doors, and connecting to air-supply hoses. We will also discuss moving within and exiting the BSL-4 suit laboratories, including using the chemical shower and removing and storing positive-pressure suits. PMID:27768063

  4. Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures in an (A)BSL-4 Laboratory: 1. Biosafety Level 4 Suit Laboratory Suite Entry and Exit Procedures.

    PubMed

    Janosko, Krisztina; Holbrook, Michael R; Adams, Ricky; Barr, Jason; Bollinger, Laura; Newton, Je T'aime; Ntiforo, Corrie; Coe, Linda; Wada, Jiro; Pusl, Daniela; Jahrling, Peter B; Kuhn, Jens H; Lackemeyer, Matthew G

    2016-10-03

    Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) suit laboratories are specifically designed to study high-consequence pathogens for which neither infection prophylaxes nor treatment options exist. The hallmarks of these laboratories are: custom-designed airtight doors, dedicated supply and exhaust airflow systems, a negative-pressure environment, and mandatory use of positive-pressure ("space") suits. The risk for laboratory specialists working with highly pathogenic agents is minimized through rigorous training and adherence to stringent safety protocols and standard operating procedures. Researchers perform the majority of their work in BSL-2 laboratories and switch to BSL-4 suit laboratories when work with a high-consequence pathogen is required. Collaborators and scientists considering BSL-4 projects should be aware of the challenges associated with BSL-4 research both in terms of experimental technical limitations in BSL-4 laboratory space and the increased duration of such experiments. Tasks such as entering and exiting the BSL-4 suit laboratories are considerably more complex and time-consuming compared to BSL-2 and BSL-3 laboratories. The focus of this particular article is to address basic biosafety concerns and describe the entrance and exit procedures for the BSL-4 laboratory at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick. Such procedures include checking external systems that support the BSL-4 laboratory, and inspecting and donning positive-pressure suits, entering the laboratory, moving through air pressure-resistant doors, and connecting to air-supply hoses. We will also discuss moving within and exiting the BSL-4 suit laboratories, including using the chemical shower and removing and storing positive-pressure suits.

  5. The experience in operation and improving the Orlan-type space suits.

    PubMed

    Abramov, I P

    1995-07-01

    Nowadays significant experience has been gained in Russia concerning extravehicular activity (EVA) with cosmonauts wearing a semi-rigid space suit of the "Orlan" type. The conditions for the cosmonauts' vital activities, the operational and ergonomic features of the space suit and its reliability are the most critical factors defining the efficiency of the scheduled operation to be performed by the astronaut and his safety. As the missions performed by the cosmonauts during EVA become more and more elaborate, the requirements for EVA space suits and their systems become more and more demanding, resulting in their consistent advancement. This paper provides certain results of the space suit's operation and analysis of its major problems as applied to the Salyut and MIR orbiting stations. The modification steps of the space suit in the course of operation (Orlan-D, Orlan-DM, Orlan-DMA) and its specific features are presented. The concept of the suited cosmonauts' safety is described as well as trends for future space suit improvements.

  6. Hazard Analysis for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Used in One-g Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kate; Ross, Amy; Blanco, Raul; Wood, Art

    2012-01-01

    This Hazard Analysis document encompasses the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) and associated ancillary equipment. It has been prepared using JSC17773, "Preparing Hazard Analyses for JSC Ground Operation", as a guide. The purpose of this document is to present the potential hazards involved in ground (23 % maximum O2, One-g) operations of the Mark III and associated ancillary support equipment system. The hazards listed in this document are specific to suit operations only; each supporting facility (Bldg. 9, etc.) is responsible for test specific Hazard Analyses. A "hazard" is defined as any condition that has the potential for harming personnel or equipment. This analysis was performed to document the safety aspects associated with manned use of the Mark III for pressurized and unpressurized ambient, ground-based, One-g human testing. The hazards identified herein represent generic hazards inherent to all standard JSC test venues for nominal ground test configurations. Non-standard test venues or test specific configurations may warrant consideration of additional hazards analysis prior to test. The cognizant suit engineer is responsible for the safety of the astronaut/test subject, space suit, and suit support personnel. The test requester, for the test supported by the suit test engineer and suited subject, is responsible for overall safety and any necessary Test Readiness Reviews (TRR).

  7. STS-82 Suit-up for Post Insertion Training in Crew Compartment Trainer 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-30

    S96-18556 (30 Oct. 1996) --- Astronauts Scott J. Horowitz (standing) and Kenneth D. Bowersox wind up suit donning for a training session in JSC's systems integration facility. Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry escape suit, the STS-82 pilot and mission commander joined their crewmates in simulating an emergency ejection, using an escape pole on the mid deck, as well as other phases of their scheduled February mission.

  8. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  9. A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    This joint mobility KC lecture included information from two papers, "A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements" and "Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing," as presented for the International Conference on Environmental Systems in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The first paper discusses historical joint torque testing methodologies and approaches that were tested in 2008 and 2009. The second paper discusses the testing that was completed in 2009 and 2010.

  10. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply: A unique public-private partnership for conducting research on the sustainability of animal housing systems using a multistakeholder approach.

    PubMed

    Mench, J A; Swanson, J C; Arnot, C

    2016-03-01

    The growing emphasis on ensuring the sustainability of animal agriculture is providing an impetus for the adoption of new approaches to structuring and conducting research. Sustainability is a complex topic involving many considerations related to the economic, social, and environmental impacts of production systems. Successfully addressing this topic requires multidisciplinary research as well as a high degree of communication with food system stakeholders to ensure that the research results contribute to informed decision making. In this paper, we provide an overview of a public-private partnership, the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), which was formed to support research evaluating the sustainability of laying hen housing systems. Because of increasing public concerns about the behavioral restriction imposed on laying hens housed in conventional cages, the U.S. egg industry is faced with a need to transition to alternative systems. However, before the CSES project, there was limited information available about how this transition might affect trade-offs related to the sustainability of egg production. The goal of the CSES project was to provide this information by conducting holistic research on a commercial farm that had 3 different hen housing systems. The CSES members represented a variety of stakeholders, including food retailers and distributors, egg producers, universities, and governmental (USDA ARS) and nongovernmental organizations. The CSES was facilitated by a not-for-profit intermediary, the Center for Food Integrity, which was also responsible for communicating the research results to food system stakeholders, including via quantitative and qualitative consumer research. In this paper, we describe the structural aspects of the CSES that were responsible for the successful completion and dissemination of the research as well as the insights that were gained regarding multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration, conducting

  11. [Antigravity suit used for neurosurgical operations in sitting position].

    PubMed

    Szpiro-Zurkowska, A; Milczarek, Z; Marchel, A; Jagielski, J

    1996-01-01

    The aviator's antigravity suit (G-suit) was used for 40 operations on neurosurgical patients operated on in sitting position. The G-suit was filled with air to 0.2 atmosphere (20 kPa) pressure in 26 cases, and 0.3 atm. (30 kPa) in 14 cases. In all cases G-suit filling was followed by central venous pressure rise and mean arterial pressure rise. Venous air embolism was found in 5 (12.5%) patients. No other complications connected with the use of G-suit were observed.

  12. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were severely abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub-layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

  13. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  14. The Inelastic Instrument suite at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E; Abernathy, Douglas L; Ehlers, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The instruments in the extensive suite of spectrometers at the SNS are in various stages of installation and commissioning. The Back Scattering Spectrometer (BASIS) is installed and is in commissioning. It's near backscattering analyzer crystals provide the 3 eV resolution as expected. BASIS will enter the user program in the fall of 2007. The ARCS wide angular-range thermal to epithermal neutron spectrometer will come on line in the fall of 2007 followed shortly by the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer. These two direct geometry instruments provide moderate resolution and the ability to trade resolution for flux. In addition both instrumentsmore » have detector coverage out to 140o to provide a large Q range. The SEQUOIA spectrometer, complete in 2008, is the direct geometry instrument that will provide fine resolution in the thermal to epithermal range. The Spin-Echo spectrometer, to be completed on a similar time scale, will provide the finest energy resolution worldwide. The HYSPEC spectrometer, available no later than 2011, will provide polarized capabilities and optimized flux in the thermal energy range. Finally, the Vision chemical spectrometer will use crystal analyzers to study energy transfers into the epithermal range« less

  15. Apollo 8 Astronaut Anders Suits Up For Countdown Demonstration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 8 astronaut William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, is suited up for the Apollo 8 mission countdown demonstration test. The first manned Apollo mission launched aboard the Saturn V and first manned Apollo craft to enter lunar orbit, the SA-503, Apollo 8 mission lift off occurred on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. Aboard were Anders and fellow astronauts James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  16. Advanced Design Heat PumpRadiator for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Passow, Christian; Phillips, Scott; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Absorption cooling using a LiCl/water heat pump can enable lightweight and effective thermal control for EVA suits without venting water to the environment. The key components in the system are an absorber/radiator that rejects heat to space and a flexible evaporation cooling garment that absorbs heat from the crew member. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of the absorber/radiator and evaporation cooling garment. New design concepts and fabrication approaches will significantly reduce the mass of the absorber/radiator. We have also identified materials and demonstrated fabrication approaches for production of a flexible evaporation cooling garment. Data from tests of the absorber/radiator s modular components have validated the design models and allowed predictions of the size and weight of a complete system.

  17. SSAGES: Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sidky, Hythem; Colón, Yamil J; Helfferich, Julian; Sikora, Benjamin J; Bezik, Cody; Chu, Weiwei; Giberti, Federico; Guo, Ashley Z; Jiang, Xikai; Lequieu, Joshua; Li, Jiyuan; Moller, Joshua; Quevillon, Michael J; Rahimi, Mohammad; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Rathee, Vikramjit S; Reid, Daniel R; Sevgen, Emre; Thapar, Vikram; Webb, Michael A; Whitmer, Jonathan K; de Pablo, Juan J

    2018-01-28

    Molecular simulation has emerged as an essential tool for modern-day research, but obtaining proper results and making reliable conclusions from simulations requires adequate sampling of the system under consideration. To this end, a variety of methods exist in the literature that can enhance sampling considerably, and increasingly sophisticated, effective algorithms continue to be developed at a rapid pace. Implementation of these techniques, however, can be challenging for experts and non-experts alike. There is a clear need for software that provides rapid, reliable, and easy access to a wide range of advanced sampling methods and that facilitates implementation of new techniques as they emerge. Here we present SSAGES, a publicly available Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations designed to interface with multiple widely used molecular dynamics simulations packages. SSAGES allows facile application of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques-including adaptive biasing force, string methods, and forward flux sampling-that extract meaningful free energy and transition path data from all-atom and coarse-grained simulations. A noteworthy feature of SSAGES is a user-friendly framework that facilitates further development and implementation of new methods and collective variables. In this work, the use of SSAGES is illustrated in the context of simple representative applications involving distinct methods and different collective variables that are available in the current release of the suite. The code may be found at: https://github.com/MICCoM/SSAGES-public.

  18. SSAGES: Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sidky, Hythem; Colón, Yamil J.; Helfferich, Julian

    Molecular simulation has emerged as an essential tool for modern-day research, but obtaining proper results and making reliable conclusions from simulations requires adequate sampling of the system under consideration. To this end, a variety of methods exist in the literature that can enhance sampling considerably, and increasingly sophisticated, effective algorithms continue to be developed at a rapid pace. Implementation of these techniques, however, can be challenging for experts and non-experts alike. There is a clear need for software that provides rapid, reliable, and easy access to a wide range of advanced sampling methods, and that facilitates implementation of new techniquesmore » as they emerge. Here we present SSAGES, a publicly available Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations designed to interface with multiple widely used molecular dynamics simulations packages. SSAGES allows facile application of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques—including adaptive biasing force, string methods, and forward flux sampling—that extract meaningful free energy and transition path data from all-atom and coarse grained simulations. A noteworthy feature of SSAGES is a user-friendly framework that facilitates further development and implementation of new methods and collective variables. In this work, the use of SSAGES is illustrated in the context of simple representative applications involving distinct methods and different collective variables that are available in the current release of the suite.« less

  19. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Cox, Marlon

    2009-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In two previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads. Another paper at this year s conference discusses similar testing with real human metabolic loads, including some closed-loop testing with emergency breathing masks. The Orion ARS is designed to also support extravehicular activity operations from a depressurized cabin. The next step in developmental testing at JSC was, therefore, to test this ARS technology in a typical closed space suit loop environment with low-pressure pure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure oxygen loop testing of a new Orion ARS technology, and was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in December 2008. The test investigated pressure drops through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors and general swing-bed performance with both umbilical configurations as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  20. SSAGES: Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidky, Hythem; Colón, Yamil J.; Helfferich, Julian; Sikora, Benjamin J.; Bezik, Cody; Chu, Weiwei; Giberti, Federico; Guo, Ashley Z.; Jiang, Xikai; Lequieu, Joshua; Li, Jiyuan; Moller, Joshua; Quevillon, Michael J.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Rathee, Vikramjit S.; Reid, Daniel R.; Sevgen, Emre; Thapar, Vikram; Webb, Michael A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2018-01-01

    Molecular simulation has emerged as an essential tool for modern-day research, but obtaining proper results and making reliable conclusions from simulations requires adequate sampling of the system under consideration. To this end, a variety of methods exist in the literature that can enhance sampling considerably, and increasingly sophisticated, effective algorithms continue to be developed at a rapid pace. Implementation of these techniques, however, can be challenging for experts and non-experts alike. There is a clear need for software that provides rapid, reliable, and easy access to a wide range of advanced sampling methods and that facilitates implementation of new techniques as they emerge. Here we present SSAGES, a publicly available Software Suite for Advanced General Ensemble Simulations designed to interface with multiple widely used molecular dynamics simulations packages. SSAGES allows facile application of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques—including adaptive biasing force, string methods, and forward flux sampling—that extract meaningful free energy and transition path data from all-atom and coarse-grained simulations. A noteworthy feature of SSAGES is a user-friendly framework that facilitates further development and implementation of new methods and collective variables. In this work, the use of SSAGES is illustrated in the context of simple representative applications involving distinct methods and different collective variables that are available in the current release of the suite. The code may be found at: https://github.com/MICCoM/SSAGES-public.

  1. GT-6 PREFLIGHT ACTIVITY (LEAVE SUITING TRAILER) - ASTRONAUT WALTER M. SCHIRRA, JR. - SUIT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-15

    S65-59974 (15 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (leading), command pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, leave the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during the Gemini-6 prelaunch countdown at Cape Kennedy, Florida. They entered a special transport van which carried them to Pad 19 and their spacecraft. Gemini-6 lifted off at 8:37 a.m. (EST) on Dec. 15, 1965. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  2. Labeled line drawing of launch and entry suit identifies various components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Line drawings illustrate how a crewmember would be seated during space shuttle launch and entry in the mission specialist seat wearing the launch and entry suit (LES), a partial pressure suit. Front and profile drawings are labeled with numbers. The legend for the views includes: 1) Mission Specialist seat; 2) crewman; 3) helmet; 4) anti-exposure / counter pressure garment; 5) boots; 6) parachute harness; 7) parachute pack; 8) life raft with sea dye marker; 9) suit mounted oxygen (O2) manifold; 10) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit controller; 11) emergency O2 supply; 12) seawars; 13) ventilation fan; 14) orbiter O2 line; 15) headset interface unit (HIU); 16) communication (COMM) line to HIU; 17) flotation device. Crew escape system (CES) and LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions.

  3. Development of a Fan for Future Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul. Heather L.; Converse, David; Dionne, Steven; Moser, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    NASA's next generation space suit system will place new demands on the fan used to circulate breathing gas through the ventilation loop of the portable life support system. Long duration missions with frequent extravehicular activities (EVAs), the requirement for significant increases in reliability and durability, and a mission profile that imposes strict limits on weight, volume and power create the basis for a set of requirements that demand more performance than is available from existing fan designs. This paper describes the development of a new fan to meet these needs. A centrifugal fan was designed with a normal operating speed of approximately 39,400 rpm to meet the ventilation flow requirements while also meeting the aggressive minimal packaging, weight and power requirements. The prototype fan also operates at 56,000 rpm to satisfy a second operating condition associated with a single fan providing ventilation flow to two spacesuits connected in series. This fan incorporates a novel nonmetallic "can" to keep the oxygen flow separate from the motor electronics, thus eliminating ignition potential. The nonmetallic can enables a small package size and low power consumption. To keep cost and schedule within project bounds a commercial motor controller was used. The fan design has been detailed and implemented using materials and approaches selected to address anticipated mission needs. Test data is presented to show how this fan performs relative to anticipated ventilation requirements for the EVA portable life support system. Additionally, data is presented to show tolerance to anticipated environmental factors such as acoustics, shock, and vibration. Recommendations for forward work to progress the technology readiness level and prepare the fan for the next EVA space suit system are also discussed.

  4. Data acquisition techniques for exploiting the uniqueness of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer: Application to sampling pulsed gas systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectra are produced in most mass spectrometers by sweeping some parameter within the instrument as the sampled gases flow into the ion source. It is evident that any fluctuation in the gas during the sweep (mass scan) of the instrument causes the output spectrum to be skewed in its mass peak intensities. The time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with its fast, repetitive mode of operation produces spectra without skewing or varying instrument parameters and because all ion species are ejected from the ion source simultaneously, the spectra are inherently not skewed despite rapidly changing gas pressure or composition in the source. Methods of exploiting this feature by utilizing fast digital data acquisition systems, such as transient recorders and signal averagers which are commercially available are described. Applications of this technique are presented including TOFMS sampling of vapors produced by both pulsed and continuous laser heating of materials.

  5. Targeted Synthesis of Unique Nickel Sulfide (NiS, NiS2) Microarchitectures and the Applications for the Enhanced Water Splitting System.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Huijuan; Liu, Li; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Ju; Xu, Chaohe; Hu, Ning; Wang, Yu

    2017-01-25

    Water splitting is one of the ideal technologies to meet the ever increasing demands of energy. Many materials have aroused great attention in this field. The family of nickel-based sulfides is one of the examples that possesses interesting properties in water-splitting fields. In this paper, a controllable and simple strategy to synthesize nickel sulfides was proposed. First, we fabricated NiS 2 hollow microspheres via a hydrothermal process. After a precise heat control in a specific atmosphere, NiS porous hollow microspheres were prepared. NiS 2 was applied in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and shows a marvelous performance both in acid medium (an overpotential of 174 mV to achieve a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 and the Tafel slope is only 63 mV/dec) and in alkaline medium (an overpotential of 148 mV to afford a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 and the Tafel slope is 79 mV/dec). NiS was used in oxygen evolution reaction (OER) showing a low overpotential of 320 mV to deliver a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 , which is meritorious. These results enlighten us to make an efficient water-splitting system, including NiS 2 as HER catalyst in a cathode and NiS as OER catalyst in an anode. The system shows high activity and good stabilization. Specifically, it displays a stable current density of 10 mA/cm 2 with the applying voltage of 1.58 V, which is a considerable electrolyzer for water splitting.

  6. Development of the DL/H-1 full pressure suit for private spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Pablo de; Harris, Gary L.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to detail the need for full pressure suits to protect spaceflight participants during the experimental phases of flight testing of new space vehicles. It also details the objectives, historical background, basis for design, problems encountered by the designers and final development of the DL/H-1 full pressure suit. It will include justification for its use and results of the initial tests in the high altitude chamber and spacecraft simulator at the J.D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences at the University of North Dakota. For the test flights of early commercial space vehicles and tourist suborbital spacecrafts, emergency protection from the rarified air of the upper atmosphere and the vacuum of low Earth orbit almost certainly will be a requirement. Suborbital vehicles could be operating in "space equivalent conditions" for as long as 30 min to as much as several hours. In the case of cabin pressure loss, without personal protection, catastrophic loss of crew and vehicle could result. This paper explains the different steps taken by the authors who designed and built a preflight hardware pressure suit that can meet the physiological and comfort requirements of the tourist suborbital industry and the early commercial private spaceflight community. The suborbital tourist and commercial spaceflight industry have unique problems confronting the pressure suit builder such as unpressurized comfort, reasonable expense, unique sizing of the general population, decompression complications of persons not fitting a past military physiology profile and equipment weight issues. In addition, the lack of a certifying agency or guidance from international or national aviation authorities has created the opportunity for the emerging civilian pressure suit industry to create a new safety standard by which it can regulate itself in the same way the recreational SCUBA diving industry has since the late 1950s.

  7. Metabolic and Subjective Results Review of the Integrated Suit Test Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.R.; Stroud, L.C.; Klein, J.; Desantis, L.; Gernhardt, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Crewmembers will perform a variety of exploration and construction activities on the lunar surface. These activities will be performed while inside an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuit. In most cases, human performance is compromised while inside an EVA suit as compared to a crewmember s unsuited performance baseline. Subjects completed different EVA type tasks, ranging from ambulation to geology and construction activities, in different lunar analog environments including overhead suspension, underwater and 1-g lunar-like terrain, in both suited and unsuited conditions. In the suited condition, the Mark III (MKIII) EVA technology demonstrator suit was used and suit pressure and suit weight were parameters tested. In the unsuited conditions, weight, mass, center of gravity (CG), terrain type and navigation were the parameters. To the extent possible, one parameter was varied while all others were held constant. Tests were not fully crossed, but rather one parameter was varied while all others were left in the most nominal setting. Oxygen consumption (VO2), modified Cooper-Harper (CH) ratings of operator compensation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured for each trial. For each variable, a lower value correlates to more efficient task performance. Due to a low sample size, statistical significance was not attainable. Initial findings indicate that suit weight, CG and the operational environment can have a large impact on human performance during EVA. Systematic, prospective testing series such as those performed to date will enable a better understanding of the crucial interactions of the human and the EVA suit system and their environment. However, work remains to be done to confirm these findings. These data have been collected using only unsuited subjects and one EVA suit prototype that is known to fit poorly on a large demographic of the astronaut population. Key findings need to be retested using an EVA suit prototype better suited to a

  8. A method of evaluating efficiency during space-suited work in a neutral buoyancy environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; West, Phillip; Newton, Frederick K.; Gilbert, John H.; Squires, William G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate efficiency as related to the work transmission and the metabolic cost of various extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks during simulated microgravity (whole body water immersion) using three space suits. Two new prototype space station suits, AX-5 and MKIII, are pressurized at 57.2 kPa and were tested concurrently with the operationally used 29.6 kPa shuttle suit. Four male astronauts were asked to perform a fatigue trial on four upper extremity exercises during which metabolic rate and work output were measured and efficiency was calculated in each suit. The activities were selected to simulate actual EVA tasks. The test article was an underwater dynamometry system to which the astronauts were secured by foot restraints. All metabolic data was acquired, calculated, and stored using a computerized indirect calorimetry system connected to the suit ventilation/gas supply control console. During the efficiency testing, steady state metabolic rate could be evaluated as well as work transmitted to the dynamometer. Mechanical efficiency could then be calculated for each astronaut in each suit performing each movement.

  9. Some problems of selection and evaluation of the Martian suit enclosure concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Isaak; Moiseyev, Nikolay; Stoklitsky, Anatoly

    2005-12-01

    One of the most important tasks for preparation of a future manned mission to Mars is to create a space suit, which ensures efficient and safe operation of the man on the planet surface. The concept of space suit (SS) utilisation on the Mars surface will be determined mainly by the Mars mission scenario. Currently the preference is given to utilisation of robotics with the crew driving a Mars rover vehicle, whereby the suit will be used solely as an additional safety means. However, one cannot exclude the necessity of a durable self-contained stay of the man outside a pressurised compartment, to pick up, for instance, soil samples or do certain repair work in case of an emergency. The requirements to the Mars suit and especially to the personal self-contained life support system (LSS) will depend in many respects on the Mars environmental conditions, the space vehicle system concept and performance characteristics, the airlock and its interface design, the availability of expendable elements for the LSS, etc. The paper reviews principal problems, which have to be solved during development of the Martian suit. A special attention is paid to the issue of suited man mobility during traversing on the planet surface. The paper also reviews the arguments for application of a suit semi-rigid design concept and evaluates potentialities of using certain elements of the existing "Orlan" type suit. The paper presents results of a number of studies on selection of the planetary SS enclosure concept and on experimental evaluation of mobility of the lower torso and leg enclosures in conjunction with a specially designed prototype model (tentative model) of the SS enclosure.

  10. Human skin in vitro permeation of bentazon and isoproturon formulations with or without protective clothing suit.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Aurélie; Hopf, Nancy B; Miles, Alexandra; Spring, Philipp; Charrière, Nicole; Garrigou, Alain; Baldi, Isabelle; Vernez, David

    2014-01-01

    Skin exposures to chemicals may lead, through percutaneous permeation, to a significant increase in systemic circulation. Skin is the primary route of entry during some occupational activities, especially in agriculture. To reduce skin exposures, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) is recommended. PPE efficiency is characterized as the time until products permeate through material (lag time, Tlag). Both skin and PPE permeations are assessed using similar in vitro methods; the diffusion cell system. Flow-through diffusion cells were used in this study to assess the permeation of two herbicides, bentazon and isoproturon, as well as four related commercial formulations (Basagran(®), Basamais(®), Arelon(®) and Matara(®)). Permeation was measured through fresh excised human skin, protective clothing suits (suits) (Microchem(®) 3000, AgriSafe Pro(®), Proshield(®) and Microgard(®) 2000 Plus Green), and a combination of skin and suits. Both herbicides, tested by itself or as an active ingredient in formulations, permeated readily through human skin and tested suits (Tlag < 2 h). High permeation coefficients were obtained regardless of formulations or tested membranes, except for Microchem(®) 3000. Short Tlag, were observed even when skin was covered with suits, except for Microchem(®) 3000. Kp values tended to decrease when suits covered the skin (except when Arelon(®) was applied to skin covered with AgriSafe Pro and Microgard(®) 2000), suggesting that Tlag alone is insufficient in characterizing suits. To better estimate human skin permeations, in vitro experiments should not only use human skin but also consider the intended use of the suit, i.e., the active ingredient concentrations and type of formulations, which significantly affect skin permeation.

  11. Cerebroglycan: an integral membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is unique to the developing nervous system and expressed specifically during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are found on the surface of all adherent cells and participate in the binding of growth factors, extracellular matrix glycoproteins, cell adhesion molecules, and proteases and antiproteases. We report here the cloning and pattern of expression of cerebroglycan, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)- anchored HSPG that is found in the developing rat brain (previously referred to as HSPG M13; Herndon, M. E., and A. D. Lander. 1990. Neuron. 4:949-961). The cerebroglycan core protein has a predicted molecular mass of 58.6 kD and five potential heparan sulfate attachment sites. Together with glypican (David, G., V. Lories, B. Decock, P. Marynen, J.-J. Cassiman, and H. Van den Berghe. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 111:3165-3176), it defines a family of integral membrane HSPGs characterized by GPI linkage and conserved structural motifs, including a pattern of 14 cysteine residues that is absolutely conserved. Unlike other known integral membrane HSPGs, including glypican and members of the syndecan family of transmembrane proteoglycans, cerebroglycan is expressed in only one tissue: the nervous system. In situ hybridization experiments at several developmental stages strongly suggest that cerebroglycan message is widely and transiently expressed by immature neurons, appearing around the time of final mitosis and disappearing after cell migration and axon outgrowth have been completed. These results suggest that cerebroglycan may fulfill a function related to the motile behaviors of developing neurons. PMID:8294498

  12. An integrated health and social care organisation in Sweden: creation and structure of a unique local public health and social care system.

    PubMed

    Øvretveit, John; Hansson, Johan; Brommels, Mats

    2010-10-01

    Research and citizens have noted failures in coordinating health and social services and professionals, and the need to address this issue to realize benefits from increasing specialisation. Different methods have been proposed and one has been structural integration of separate services within one organisation. This paper reports an empirical longitudinal study of the development of an integrated health and social care organisation in Sweden combining service provision, purchasing and political governance for a defined population. The study found a combination of influences contributed to the development of this new organisation. The initial structural macro-integration facilitated, but did not of itself result in better clinical care coordination. Other actions were needed to modify the specialised systems and cultures which the organisation inherited. The study design was not able to establish with any degree of certainty whether better patient and cost outcomes resulted, but it did find structural and process changes which make improved outcomes likely. The study concludes that coordinated actions at different levels and of different types were needed to achieve care coordination for patients and that a phased approach was necessary where management capacity and outside expertise are limited. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The liberal illusion of uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Stern, Chadly; West, Tessa V; Schmitt, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    In two studies, we demonstrated that liberals underestimate their similarity to other liberals (i.e., display truly false uniqueness), whereas moderates and conservatives overestimate their similarity to other moderates and conservatives (i.e., display truly false consensus; Studies 1 and 2). We further demonstrated that a fundamental difference between liberals and conservatives in the motivation to feel unique explains this ideological distinction in the accuracy of estimating similarity (Study 2). Implications of the accuracy of consensus estimates for mobilizing liberal and conservative political movements are discussed.

  14. Advanced Sensor Platform to Evaluate Manloads For Exploration Suit Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane; Pierce, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Space suit manloads are defined as the outer bounds of force that the human occupant of a suit is able to exert onto the suit during motion. They are defined on a suit-component basis as a unit of maximum force that the suit component in question must withstand without failure. Existing legacy manloads requirements are specific to the suit architecture of the EMU and were developed in an iterative fashion; however, future exploration needs dictate a new suit architecture with bearings, load paths, and entry capability not previously used in any flight suit. No capability currently exists to easily evaluate manloads imparted by a suited occupant, which would be required to develop requirements for a flight-rated design. However, sensor technology has now progressed to the point where an easily-deployable, repeatable and flexible manloads measuring technique could be developed leveraging recent advances in sensor technology. INNOVATION: This development positively impacts schedule, cost and safety risk associated with new suit exploration architectures. For a final flight design, a comprehensive and accurate man loads requirements set must be communicated to the contractor; failing that, a suit design which does not meet necessary manloads limits is prone to failure during testing or worse, during an EVA, which could cause catastrophic failure of the pressure garment posing risk to the crew. This work facilitates a viable means of developing manloads requirements using a range of human sizes & strengths. OUTCOME / RESULTS: Performed sensor market research. Highlighted three viable options (primary, secondary, and flexible packaging option). Designed/fabricated custom bracket to evaluate primary option on a single suit axial. Manned suited manload testing completed and general approach verified.

  15. Quantifying Astronaut Tasks: Robotic Technology and Future Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of this research effort was to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited EVA by developing models of the constitutive and compatibility relations of a space suit, based on experimental data gained from human test subjects as well as a 12 degree-of-freedom human-sized robot, and utilizing these fundamental relations to estimate a human factors performance metric for space suited EVA work. The three specific objectives are to: 1) Compile a detailed database of torques required to bend the joints of a space suit, using realistic, multi- joint human motions. 2) Develop a mathematical model of the constitutive relations between space suit joint torques and joint angular positions, based on experimental data and compare other investigators' physics-based models to experimental data. 3) Estimate the work envelope of a space suited astronaut, using the constitutive and compatibility relations of the space suit. The body of work that makes up this report includes experimentation, empirical and physics-based modeling, and model applications. A detailed space suit joint torque-angle database was compiled with a novel experimental approach that used space-suited human test subjects to generate realistic, multi-joint motions and an instrumented robot to measure the torques required to accomplish these motions in a space suit. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model is developed to predict joint torque from the joint angle history. Two physics-based models of pressurized fabric cylinder bending are compared to experimental data, yielding design insights. The mathematical model is applied to EVA operations in an inverse kinematic analysis coupled to the space suit model to calculate the volume in which space-suited astronauts can work with their hands, demonstrating that operational human factors metrics can be predicted from fundamental space suit information.

  16. A unique combination of genetic systems for the synthesis of trehalose in Rubrobacter xylanophilus: properties of a rare actinobacterial TreT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Fernandes, Chantal; Empadinhas, Nuno; da Costa, Milton S

    2008-12-01

    Trehalose is the primary organic solute in Rubrobacter xylanophilus under all conditions tested, including those for optimal growth. We detected genes of four different pathways for trehalose synthesis in the genome of this organism, namely, the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps)/trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (Tpp), TreS, TreY/TreZ, and TreT pathways. Moreover, R. xylanophilus is the only known member of the phylum Actinobacteria to harbor TreT. The Tps sequence is typically bacterial, but the Tpp sequence is closely related to eukaryotic counterparts. Both the Tps/Tpp and the TreT pathways were active in vivo, while the TreS and the TreY/TreZ pathways were not active under the growth conditions tested and appear not to contribute to the levels of trehalose observed. The genes from the active pathways were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and Tps was found to be highly specific for GDP-glucose, a rare feature among these enzymes. The trehalose-6-phosphate formed was specifically dephosphorylated to trehalose by Tpp. The recombinant TreT synthesized trehalose from different nucleoside diphosphate-glucose donors and glucose, but the activity in R. xylanophilus cell extracts was specific for ADP-glucose. The TreT could also catalyze trehalose hydrolysis in the presence of ADP, but with a very high K(m). Here, we functionally characterize two systems for the synthesis of trehalose in R. xylanophilus, a representative of an ancient lineage of the actinobacteria, and discuss a possible scenario for the exceptional occurrence of treT in this extremophilic bacterium.

  17. Histological eosinophilic gastritis is a systemic disorder associated with blood and extra-gastric eosinophilia, Th2 immunity, and a unique gastric transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Julie M.; Collins, Margaret H.; Stucke, Emily M.; Putnam, Philip E.; Franciosi, James P.; Kushner, Jonathan P.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The definition of eosinophilic gastritis (EG) is currently limited to histological EG based on the tissue eosinophil count. Objective We aimed to provide additional fundamental information about the molecular, histopathological, and clinical characteristics of EG. Methods Genome-wide transcript profiles and histological features of gastric biopsies as well as blood eosinophil numbers were analyzed in EG and control patients (n = 15 each). Results The peak gastric antrum eosinophil count was 282.7 ± 163.9 eosinophils/400X high-power field (HPF) in EG and 11.0 ± 8.5 eosinophils/HPF in control patients (P = 6.1 × 10−7). EG patients (87%) had co-existing eosinophilic inflammation in multiple gastrointestinal segments; the esophagus represented the most common secondary site. Elevated peripheral blood eosinophil numbers (EG 1.09 ± 0.88 × 103 [K]/μl vs. control 0.09 ± 0.08 K/μl, P = .0027) positively correlated with peak gastric eosinophil counts (Pearson r2 = .8102, P < .0001). MIB-1+ (proliferating), CD117+ (mast cells), and FOXP3+ cells (regulatory and/or activated T cells) were increased in EG. Transcript profiling revealed changes in 8% of the genome in EG gastric tissue. Only 7% of this EG transcriptome overlapped with the eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) transcriptome. Significantly increased IL4, IL5, IL13, IL17, CCL26 and mast cell-specific transcripts and decreased IL33 were observed. Conclusion EG is a systemic disorder involving profound blood and gastrointestinal tract eosinophilia, Th2 immunity, and a conserved gastric transcriptome markedly distinct from the EoE transcriptome. The data herein define germane cellular and molecular pathways of EG and provide a basis for improving diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25234644

  18. Flexible Packaging Concept for a Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gretchen; Dillon, Paul; Oliver, Joe; Zapata, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Neither the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the space suit currently used for space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions, nor the Apollo EMU, the space suit successfully used on previous lunar missions, will satisfy the requirements for the next generation Constellation Program (CxP) lunar suit. The CxP system or Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) must be able to tolerate more severe environmental and use conditions than any previous system. These conditions include missions to the severely cold lunar poles and up to 100 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) excursions without ground maintenance. Much effort is focused on decreasing the mass and volume of the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) over previous suit designs in order to accommodate the required increase in functionality. This paper documents the progress of a conceptual packaging effort of a flexible backpack for the CSSE PLSS. The flexible backpack concept relies on a foam protection system to absorb, distribute, and dissipate the energy from falls on the lunar surface. Testing and analysis of the foam protection system concept that was conducted during this effort indicates that this method of system packaging is a viable solution.

  19. Effect of introduction of a new electronic anesthesia record (Epic) system on the safety and efficiency of patient care in a gastrointestinal endoscopy suite-comparison with historical cohort.

    PubMed

    Goudra, B; Singh, P M; Borle, A; Gouda, G

    2016-01-01

    Use of electronic medical record systems has increased in the recent years. Epic is one such system gaining popularity in the USA. Epic is a private company, which invented the electronic documentation system adopted in our hospital. In spite of many presumed advantages, its use is not critically analyzed. Some of the perceived advantages are increased efficiency and protection against litigation as a result of accurate documentation. In this study, retrospective data of 305 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (wherein electronic charting was used - "Epic group") were compared with 288 patients who underwent the same procedure with documentation saved on a paper chart ("paper group"). Time of various events involved in the procedure such as anesthesia start, endoscope insertion, endoscope removal, and transfer to the postanesthesia care unit were routinely documented. From this data, the various time durations were calculated. Both "anesthesia start to scope insertion" times and "scope removal to transfer" times were significantly less in the Epic group compared to the paper group. Use of Epic system led to a saving of 4 min of procedure time per patient. However, the mean oxygen saturation was significantly less in the Epic group. In spite of perceived advantages of Epic documentation system, significant hurdles remain with its use. Although the system allows seamless flow of patients, failure to remove all artifacts can lead to errors and become a source of potential litigation hazard.

  20. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes.

  1. STS-102 MS Voss suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - -- While suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, Mission Specialist James Voss shows his support of International Women'''s Day, March 8, with a sign in both Cyrillic and English. Voss is also part of a crew, known as Expedition One, who will be replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20.

  2. The Characterization of Biosignatures in Caves Using an Instrument Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckert, Kyle; Chanover, Nancy J.; Getty, Stephanie; Voelz, David G.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; McMillan, Nancy; Xiao, Xifeng; Boston, Penelope J.; Li, Xiang; McAdam, Amy; Glenar, David A.; Chavez, Arriana

    2017-12-01

    The search for life and habitable environments on other Solar System bodies is a major motivator for planetary exploration. Due to the difficulty and significance of detecting extant or extinct extraterrestrial life in situ, several independent measurements from multiple instrument techniques will bolster the community's confidence in making any such claim. We demonstrate the detection of subsurface biosignatures using a suite of instrument techniques including IR reflectance spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We focus our measurements on subterranean calcium carbonate field samples, whose biosignatures are analogous to those that might be expected on some high-interest astrobiology targets. In this work, we discuss the feasibility and advantages of using each of the aforementioned instrument techniques for the in situ search for biosignatures and present results on the autonomous characterization of biosignatures using multivariate statistical analysis techniques.

  3. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington suits up for launch. Herrington will be making his first Shuttle flight. This is also the first launch of the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut -- John B. Herrington -- on Space Transportation System. The primary mission for the crew is bringing the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and returning the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for 8:15 p.m. EST.

  4. An overview of suite for automated global electronic biosurveillance (SAGES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Sheri L.; Feighner, Brian H.; Loschen, Wayne A.; Wojcik, Richard A.; Skora, Joseph F.; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Blazes, David L.

    2012-06-01

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

  5. Assessment of Thermal Protection Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    Assessment of Thermal Protect! " Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits A AA L. A. Kuehn Diver thermal comfort in cold water is presently only...with proper control oj inlet suit water flow% and temperature, as well as heating of inspired gas, this suit technology suffices for thermal comfort for...technology provides in part to the convective heat loss that it prpsents, sustained long-term thermal comfort in cold water, Webb (W) has defined a

  6. Development of an Objective Space Suit Mobility Performance Metric Using Metabolic Cost and Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating EVA suit performance and mobility have historically concentrated on isolated joint range of motion and torque. However, these techniques do little to evaluate how well a suited crewmember can actually perform during an EVA. An alternative method of characterizing suited mobility through measurement of metabolic cost to the wearer has been evaluated at Johnson Space Center over the past several years. The most recent study involved six test subjects completing multiple trials of various functional tasks in each of three different space suits; the results indicated it was often possible to discern between different suit designs on the basis of metabolic cost alone. However, other variables may have an effect on real-world suited performance; namely, completion time of the task, the gravity field in which the task is completed, etc. While previous results have analyzed completion time, metabolic cost, and metabolic cost normalized to system mass individually, it is desirable to develop a single metric comprising these (and potentially other) performance metrics. This paper outlines the background upon which this single-score metric is determined to be feasible, and initial efforts to develop such a metric. Forward work includes variable coefficient determination and verification of the metric through repeated testing.

  7. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    A space suit's mobility is critical to an astronaut's ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. Mobility can be broken down into two parts: range of motion (ROM) and torque. These two measurements describe how the suit moves and how much force it takes to move. Two methods were chosen to define mobility requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). One method focuses on range of motion and the second method centers on joint torque. A joint torque test was conducted to determine a baseline for current advanced space suit joint torques. This test utilized the following space suits: Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), I-Suit, D-Suit, Enhanced Mobility (EM)- ACES, and Mark III (MK-III). Data was collected data from 16 different joint movements of each suit. The results were then reviewed and CSSE joint torque requirement values were selected. The focus of this paper is to discuss trends observed during data analysis.

  8. Skin blood flow with elastic compressive extravehicular activity space suit.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Gotoh, Taro M; Morita, Hironobu; Hargens, Alan R

    2003-10-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), current space suits are pressurized with 100% oxygen at approximately 222 mmHg. A tight elastic garment, or mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit that generates pressure by compression, may have several advantages over current space suit technology. In this study, we investigated local microcirculatory effects produced with negative ambient pressure with an MCP sleeve. The MCP glove and sleeve generated pressures similar to the current space suit. MCP remained constant during negative pressure due to unchanged elasticity of the material. Decreased skin capillary blood flow and temperature during MCP compression was counteracted by greater negative pressure or a smaller pressure differential.

  9. Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember s health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, realtime EVA.

  10. Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.

    2009-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember's health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, real-time EVA.

  11. 77 FR 69393 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... submitted to the GUDID data base. Sec. 830.300. Two years after publication of a final rule.... The label... are required to be labeled with a UDI, must be submitted to the GUDID data base. Sec. 830.300. All... a UDI, must be submitted to the GUDID data base. Sec. 830.300. Five years after publication of a...

  12. Scientific Computation Application Partnerships in Materials and Chemical Sciences, Charge Transfer and Charge Transport in Photoactivated Systems, Developing Electron-Correlated Methods for Excited State Structure and Dynamics in the NWChem Software Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, Christopher J.

    Charge transfer and charge transport in photoactivated systems are fundamental processes that underlie solar energy capture, solar energy conversion, and photoactivated catalysis, both organometallic and enzymatic. We developed methods, algorithms, and software tools needed for reliable treatment of the underlying physics for charge transfer and charge transport, an undertaking with broad applicability to the goals of the fundamental-interaction component of the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the exascale initiative of the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research.

  13. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-07

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved.

  14. STS-82 Suit-up for Post Insertion Training in Crew Compartment Trainer 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-30

    S96-18547 (30 Oct. 1996) --- Astronaut Kenneth D. Bowersox, STS-82 mission commander, chats with a crewmate (out of frame) prior to an emergency bailout training session in JSC's systems integration facility. Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry escape suit, Bowersox and his crew simulated an emergency ejection, using the escape pole system on the middeck.

  15. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination

  16. Uniqueness of large positive solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Gómez, Julián; Maire, Luis

    2017-08-01

    We establish the uniqueness of the positive solution of the singular problem (1.1) through some standard comparison techniques involving the maximum principle. Our proofs do not invoke to the blow-up rates of the solutions, as in most of the specialized literature. We give two different types of results according to the geometrical properties of Ω and the regularity of partial Ω . Even in the autonomous case, our theorems are extremely sharp extensions of all existing results. Precisely, when a(x)≡ 1, it is shown that the monotonicity and superadditivity of f( u) with constant C≥ 0 entail the uniqueness; f is said to be superadditive with constant C≥ 0 if f(a+b) ≥ f(a) + f(b) - C \\quad for all a, b ≥ 0. This condition, introduced by Marcus and Véron (J Evol Equ 3:637-652, 2004), weakens all previous sufficient conditions for uniqueness, as it will become apparent in this paper.

  17. Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

  18. EVA Suit Studies: Human Forward Contamination Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background: NASA Strategic Knowledge Gap B5: Forward Contamination for Mars. Issue: we have knowledge gaps!: Whether / how microbes are released from crewed pressure systems. Why do we care?: Informs Mars operational concepts - How to protect the science; Informs architecture decisions - How “open” Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems are; Informs landing site selection decisions - How close we can land / operate to where life may be present. Project goal: get some data to fill in these gaps: Data will help determine whether we’re ready to go to Mars, or if we need to change our systems or operational designs.

  19. Design and Development of a Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Hill, Roger W.; Phillips, Scott D.; Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation subsystems in future space suits require a dedicated ventilation fan. The unique requirements for the ventilation fan - including stringent safety requirements and the ability to increase output to operate in buddy mode - combine to make a regenerative blower an attractive choice. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of a regenerative blower designed to meet requirements for ventilation subsystems in future space suits. We have developed analysis methods for the blower s complex, internal flows and identified impeller geometries that enable significant improvements in blower efficiency. We verified these predictions by test, measuring aerodynamic efficiencies of 45% at operating conditions that correspond to the ventilation fan s design point. We have developed a compact motor/controller to drive the blower efficiently at low rotating speed (4500 rpm). Finally, we have assembled a low-pressure oxygen test loop to demonstrate the blower s reliability under prototypical conditions.

  20. Healthcare-Wide Hazards: Surgical Suite

    MedlinePlus

    ... smoke evacuators and room suction systems with inline filters. Keep the smoke evacuator or room suction hose ... all surgical or other procedures. Consider all tubing, filters, and absorbers as infectious waste and dispose of ...

  1. Sensor Suits for Human Motion Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-18

    published (b) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (1) Shunji Moromugi, Y. Koujina, Seigo Ariki, Akira Okamoto, Takayuki Tanaka, Maria Q...of ISOT2005 (9) Seok-Hwan Kim, Shunji Moromugi and Takakazu Ishimatsu, (2004). "Development of advanced walking assist system employing stiffness...sensor", Proceedings of 19th International Conference on Control, Automation and Systems, Bangkok, Thailand, pp.1638-1641. (10) Shunji Moromugi

  2. The European space suit, a design for productivity and crew safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar; Berthier, S.; Ollivier, Y.

    In order to fulfil the two major mission objectives, i.e. support planned and unplanned external servicing of the COLUMBUS FFL and support the HERMES vehicle for safety critical operations and emergencies, the European Space Suit System baseline configuration incorporates a number of design features, which shall enhance the productivity and the crew safety of EVA astronauts. The work in EVA is today - and will be for several years - a manual work. Consequently, to improve productivity, the first challenge is to design a suit enclosure which minimizes movement restrictions and crew fatigue. It is covered by the "ergonomic" aspect of the suit design. Furthermore, it is also necessary to help the EVA crewmember in his work, by giving him the right information at the right time. Many solutions exist in this field of Man-Machine Interface, from a very simple system, based on cuff check lists, up to advanced systems, including Head-Up Displays. The design concept for improved productivity encompasses following features: • easy donning/doffing thru rear entry, • suit ergonomy optimisation, • display of operational information in alpha-numerical and graphical from, and • voice processing for operations and safety critical information. Concerning crew safety the major design features are: • a lower R-factor for emergency EVA operations thru incressed suit pressure, • zero prebreath conditions for normal operations, • visual and voice processing of all safety critical functions, and • an autonomous life support system to permit unrestricted operations around HERMES and the CFFL. The paper analyses crew safety and productivity criteria and describes how these features are being built into the design of the European Space Suit System.

  3. The European space suit, a design for productivity and crew safety.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I; Berthier, S; Ollivier, Y

    1991-01-01

    In order to fulfill the two major mission objectives, i.e. support planned and unplanned external servicing of the COLUMBUS FFL and support the HERMES vehicle for safety critical operations and emergencies, the European Space Suit System baseline configuration incorporates a number of design features, which shall enhance the productivity and the crew safety of EVA astronauts. The work in EVA is today--and will be for several years--a manual work. Consequently, to improve productivity, the first challenge is to design a suit enclosure which minimizes movement restrictions and crew fatigue. It is covered by the "ergonomic" aspect of the suit design. Furthermore, it is also necessary to help the EVA crewmember in his work, by giving him the right information at the right time. Many solutions exist in this field of Man-Machine Interface, from a very simple system, based on cuff check lists, up to advanced systems, including Head-Up Displays. The design concept for improved productivity encompasses following features: easy donning/doffing thru rear entry, suit ergonomy optimisation, display of operational information in alpha-numerical and graphical form, and voice processing for operations and safety critical information. Concerning crew safety the major design features are: a lower R-factor for emergency EVA operations thru increased suit pressure, zero prebreath conditions for normal operations, visual and voice processing of all safety critical functions, and an autonomous life support system to permit unrestricted operations around HERMES and the CFFL. The paper analyses crew safety and productivity criteria and describes how these features are being built into the design of the European Space Suit System.

  4. Postural hypotension and the anti-gravity suit.

    PubMed

    Brook, W H

    1994-10-01

    An air force anti-gravity suit, as used by fighter pilots to prevent loss of consciousness, has been successfully employed to treat severe postural hypotension in a patient with Shy-Drager syndrome. The definition of postural hypotension is reviewed, and reference is made to the previous use of the anti-gravity suit in the treatment of this condition.

  5. 28 CFR 51.11 - Right to bring suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.11 Right to bring suit. Submission to the Attorney General does not affect the right of the submitting authority to bring an action in... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Right to bring suit. 51.11 Section 51.11...

  6. 28 CFR 51.11 - Right to bring suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.11 Right to bring suit. Submission... affecting voting neither has the purpose nor will have the effect of denying or abridging the right to vote... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Right to bring suit. 51.11 Section 51.11...

  7. 28 CFR 51.31 - Communications concerning voting suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communications concerning voting suits... Groups § 51.31 Communications concerning voting suits. Individuals and groups are urged to notify the Chief, Voting Section, Civil Rights Division, of litigation concerning voting in jurisdictions subject...

  8. 19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION GARMENT (LCVG), SUIT GLOVES, WAIST INSERTS, UPPER AND LOWER ARMS (LEFT, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM), LOWER TORSO ASSEMBLIES (LTA) (MIDDLE RIGHT TO LOWER RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. 33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... readily accessible location in or near the berthing area of the person for whom the exposure suit is... stowed in that location) is readily accessible to the station. (c) Each exposure suit on a MODU must be... type or multi-tone type, of corrosion resistant construction, and in good working order. The whistle...

  10. Shuttle Space Suit: Fabric/LCVG Model Validation. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tweed, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Ware, J.; Persans, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed space suit computational model is being developed at the Langley Research Center for radiation exposure evaluation studies. The details of the construction of the space suit are critical to estimation of exposures and assessing the risk to the astronaut on EVA. Past evaluations of space suit shielding properties assumed the basic fabric layup (Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, fabric restraints, and pressure envelope) and LCVG could be homogenized as a single layer overestimating the protective properties over 60 percent of the fabric area. The present space suit model represents the inhomogeneous distributions of LCVG materials (mainly the water filled cooling tubes). An experimental test is performed using a 34-MeV proton beam and high-resolution detectors to compare with model-predicted transmission factors. Some suggestions are made on possible improved construction methods to improve the space suit s protection properties.

  11. Freud: a software suite for high-throughput simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Eric; Spellings, Matthew; Anderson, Joshua; Glotzer, Sharon

    Computer simulation is an indispensable tool for the study of a wide variety of systems. As simulations scale to fill petascale and exascale supercomputing clusters, so too does the size of the data produced, as well as the difficulty in analyzing these data. We present Freud, an analysis software suite for efficient analysis of simulation data. Freud makes no assumptions about the system being analyzed, allowing for general analysis methods to be applied to nearly any type of simulation. Freud includes standard analysis methods such as the radial distribution function, as well as new methods including the potential of mean force and torque and local crystal environment analysis. Freud combines a Python interface with fast, parallel C + + analysis routines to run efficiently on laptops, workstations, and supercomputing clusters. Data analysis on clusters reduces data transfer requirements, a prohibitive cost for petascale computing. Used in conjunction with simulation software, Freud allows for smart simulations that adapt to the current state of the system, enabling the study of phenomena such as nucleation and growth, intelligent investigation of phases and phase transitions, and determination of effective pair potentials.

  12. Los Angeles Settles ACLU Suit on Layoffs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A settlement crafted last week seeking to curb the use of seniority as a factor in teacher layoffs in the Los Angeles school system could become one of the nation's most far-reaching overhauls of the "last hired, first fired" policies common in school districts. If approved by a judge, the settlement would shield up to 45 low-performing…

  13. Using Wireless Response Systems to Replicate Behavioral Research Findings in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    College instructors are increasingly relying on wireless clicker systems as instructional tools in the classroom. Instructors commonly use clicker systems for such classroom activities as taking attendance, giving quizzes, and taking opinion polls. However, these systems are uniquely well suited for the teaching of psychology and other courses…

  14. Consciousness: a unique way of processing information.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Giorgio

    2018-02-08

    In this article, I argue that consciousness is a unique way of processing information, in that: it produces information, rather than purely transmitting it; the information it produces is meaningful for us; the meaning it has is always individuated. This uniqueness allows us to process information on the basis of our personal needs and ever-changing interactions with the environment, and consequently to act autonomously. Three main basic cognitive processes contribute to realize this unique way of information processing: the self, attention and working memory. The self, which is primarily expressed via the central and peripheral nervous systems, maps our body, the environment, and our relations with the environment. It is the primary means by which the complexity inherent to our composite structure is reduced into the "single voice" of a unique individual. It provides a reference system that (albeit evolving) is sufficiently stable to define the variations that will be used as the raw material for the construction of conscious information. Attention allows for the selection of those variations in the state of the self that are most relevant in the given situation. Attention originates and is deployed from a single locus inside our body, which represents the center of the self, around which all our conscious experiences are organized. Whatever is focused by attention appears in our consciousness as possessing a spatial quality defined by this center and the direction toward which attention is focused. In addition, attention determines two other features of conscious experience: periodicity and phenomenal quality. Self and attention are necessary but not sufficient for conscious information to be produced. Complex forms of conscious experiences, such as the various modes of givenness of conscious experience and the stream of consciousness, need a working memory mechanism to assemble the basic pieces of information selected by attention.

  15. Mobility and Agility During Locomotion in the Mark III Space Suit.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, Conor R; Rhodes, Richard A; Stirling, Leia A

    2017-06-01

    The Mark III (MIII) space suit assembly (SSAs) implements a multibearing, hard-material hip brief assembly (HBA). We hypothesize that: 1) the MIII HBA restricts operator mobility and agility which manifests in effects to gait parameters; 2) the waist bearing provides rotational motion, partially alleviating the restrictions; and 3) there are resistive, speed-dependent torques associated with the spinning bearings which further diminish mobility and agility. A subject (Suited and Unsuited) performed two planetary tasks-walking forward (WF) and backward (WB). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc comparisons were performed to determine interaction effects. Motion capture data was processed to obtain gait parameters: static base (m), dynamic base (m), step length (m), stride length (m), cadence (steps/min), center of mass speed (m · s-1), foot clearance (toe and heel) (m), and bearing angular velocities (° · s-1). The static base when Suited (0.355 m) was larger than Unsuited (0.263 m). The Suited dynamic base (pooled, 0.200 m) was larger than both Unsuited WF (0.081 m) and WB (0.107 m). When Suited, the operator had lower clearance heights. The waist bearings provided about 7.2° of rotation when WB and WF. The maximum torque, while WF, in the right upper and mid bearings was 15.6 ± 1.35 Nm and 16.3 ± 1.28 Nm. This study integrated suit component properties and the emergent biomechanics of the operator to investigate how biomechanics are affected. The human hip has three collocated degrees of freedom (DOFs), whereas the HBA has a single DOF per bearing. The results can inform requirements for future SSA and other wearable system designs and evaluations.Cullinane CR, Rhodes RA, Stirling LA. Mobility and agility during locomotion in the Mark III space suit. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):589-596.

  16. Uniqueness of Zinc as a Bioelement: Principles and Applications in Bioinorganic Chemistry--III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to delineate certain basic principles and applications of bioinorganic chemistry to oxidation-reduction reactions. Examines why zinc(II) is so uniquely suited to enzymated reactions of the acid-base type. Suggests the answer may be in the natural abundance and the basic physicochemical properties of zinc(II). (MVL)

  17. Unraveling transcriptional control and cis-regulatory codes using the software suite GeneACT

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Tom Hiu; Kwan, Yin Lam; Hamady, Micah; Liu, Xuedong

    2006-01-01

    Deciphering gene regulatory networks requires the systematic identification of functional cis-acting regulatory elements. We present a suite of web-based bioinformatics tools, called GeneACT , that can rapidly detect evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites or microRNA target sites that are either unique or over-represented in differentially expressed genes from DNA microarray data. GeneACT provides graphic visualization and extraction of common regulatory sequence elements in the promoters and 3'-untranslated regions that are conserved across multiple mammalian species. PMID:17064417

  18. The Next Generation of Cold Immersion Dry Suit Design Evolution for Hypothermia Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, Joel

    2013-01-01

    This new utility patent is an active design that relies on the lung's role as an organic heat exchanger for providing deep body core heating of air. It is based on the fact that the greatest heat loss mechanism for an insulated human body immersed in a cold water environment is due to heat loss through respiration. This innovation successfully merges two existing technologies (cold immersion suit and existing valve technologies) to produce a new product that helps prevent against the onset of hypothermia at sea. During normal operations, a human maintains an approximate body temperature of [98.6 F (37 C)]. A mechanism was developed to recover the warm temperature from the body and reticulate it in a survival suit. The primary intention is to develop an encompassing systems design that can both easily and cost effectively be integrated in all existing currently manufactured cold water survival suits, and as such, it should be noted that the cold water immersion suit is only used as a framework or tool for laying out the required design elements. At the heart of the suit is the Warm Air Recovery (WAR) system, which relies on a single, large Main Purge Valve (MPV) and secondary Purge Valves (PV) to operate. The main purge valve has a thin membrane, which is normally closed, and acts as a one-way check valve. When warm air is expelled from the lungs, it causes the main purge valve to open. Air forced from the MPV is dumped directly into the suit, thereby providing warmth to the torso, legs, and arms. A slight positive over-pressure in the suit causes warm waste air (or water if the suit is punctured) to be safely vented into the sea through large PVs located at the bottom of each arm and leg. The secondary purge valves act to prevent the buildup of large concentrations of CO2 gas and help guard against asphyxia. It is noted that the MPV causes the inhalation and exhalation cycles to be completely isolated from one another in the current suit design.

  19. A wearable exoskeleton suit for motion assistance to paralysed patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Zhong, Chun-Hao; Zhao, Xuan; Ma, Hao; Guan, Xiao; Li, Xi; Liang, Feng-Yan; Cheng, Jack Chun Yiu; Qin, Ling; Law, Sheung-Wai; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-10-01

    The number of patients paralysed due to stroke, spinal cord injury, or other related diseases is increasing. In order to improve the physical and mental health of these patients, robotic devices that can help them to regain the mobility to stand and walk are highly desirable. The aim of this study is to develop a wearable exoskeleton suit to help paralysed patients regain the ability to stand up/sit down (STS) and walk. A lower extremity exoskeleton named CUHK-EXO was developed with considerations of ergonomics, user-friendly interface, safety, and comfort. The mechanical structure, human-machine interface, reference trajectories of the exoskeleton hip and knee joints, and control architecture of CUHK-EXO were designed. Clinical trials with a paralysed patient were performed to validate the effectiveness of the whole system design. With the assistance provided by CUHK-EXO, the paralysed patient was able to STS and walk. As designed, the actual joint angles of the exoskeleton well followed the designed reference trajectories, and assistive torques generated from the exoskeleton actuators were able to support the patient's STS and walking motions. The whole system design of CUHK-EXO is effective and can be optimised for clinical application. The exoskeleton can provide proper assistance in enabling paralysed patients to STS and walk.

  20. Community Intercomparison Suite (CIS) v1.4.0: a tool for intercomparing models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Schutgens, Nick; Cook, Nicholas; Kipling, Zak; Kershaw, Philip; Gryspeerdt, Edward; Lawrence, Bryan; Stier, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The Community Intercomparison Suite (CIS) is an easy-to-use command-line tool which has been developed to allow the straightforward intercomparison of remote sensing, in situ and model data. While there are a number of tools available for working with climate model data, the large diversity of sources (and formats) of remote sensing and in situ measurements necessitated a novel software solution. Developed by a professional software company, CIS supports a large number of gridded and ungridded data sources "out-of-the-box", including climate model output in NetCDF or the UK Met Office pp file format, CloudSat, CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization), MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), Cloud and Aerosol CCI (Climate Change Initiative) level 2 satellite data and a number of in situ aircraft and ground station data sets. The open-source architecture also supports user-defined plugins to allow many other sources to be easily added. Many of the key operations required when comparing heterogenous data sets are provided by CIS, including subsetting, aggregating, collocating and plotting the data. Output data are written to CF-compliant NetCDF files to ensure interoperability with other tools and systems. The latest documentation, including a user manual and installation instructions, can be found on our website (http://cistools.net). Here, we describe the need which this tool fulfils, followed by descriptions of its main functionality (as at version 1.4.0) and plugin architecture which make it unique in the field.