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Sample records for tackle liver fluke

  1. Parasite-Associated Cancers (Blood Flukes/Liver Flukes).

    PubMed

    Feng, Meng; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-01-01

    Parasitic infection remains as a persistent public health problem and can be carcinogenic. Three helminth parasites, namely, Clonorchis sinensis (liver fluke) and Opisthorchis viverrini as well as Schistosoma haematobium (blood fluke), are classified as Group 1 carcinogens by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Infection with liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini, Opisthorchis felineus and Clonorchis sinensis), World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2011). Infection by these parasites is frequently asymptomatic and is thus rarely diagnosed at early exposure. Persistent infection can cause severe cancer complications. Until now, the cellular and molecular mechanisms linking fluke infections to cancer formation have yet to be defined, although many studies have focused on these mechanisms in recent years, and numerous findings were made in various aspects of parasite-associated cancers. Herein, we only introduce the fluke-induced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and bladder carcinoma and mainly focus on key findings in the last 5 years.

  2. Identification of the rumen fluke, Calicophoron daubneyi, in GB livestock: possible implications for liver fluke diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D K; Roberts, L C P; Lean, N; Zadoks, R N; Sargison, N D; Skuce, P J

    2013-07-01

    The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, is common in many parts of Great Britain. To detect liver fluke infection and to assess whether fasciolicide treatment has been successful, the faecal egg count (FEC) and faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) are widely used. Rumen fluke is also increasingly reported from Great Britain, but its species identity is yet to be determined. Liver fluke and rumen fluke eggs are morphologically similar, which may lead to erroneous diagnoses of liver fluke infection or treatment failure. As an alternative to FEC, a coproantigen ELISA (cELISA) can be used. The potential for this test to cross-react with rumen fluke species from Great Britain has not been evaluated. Rumen fluke specimens from cattle and sheep in Scotland were identified to species level using DNA sequencing of the ITS-2 region. Subsequently, rumen and liver fluke obtained from naturally co-infected sheep were subjected to immunohistochemistry using antibodies from a commercially available cELISA kit for F. hepatica. Finally, faecal samples from naturally co-infected sheep flocks were examined by FEC and cELISA. Rumen fluke from imported and home-bred cattle and sheep in Scotland belonged to the species Calicophoron daubneyi, rather than Paramphistomum cervi, the species presumed to be most common in Great Britain. Intense staining of the gastrodermis was observed in F. hepatica but cross-reactivity with C. daubneyi was not seen. Faecal samples that contained rumen fluke eggs but not liver fluke eggs were all negative by cELISA. We conclude that C. daubneyi is the most common rumen fluke of domestic ruminants in Scotland and that cELISA reduction testing may be a valuable alternative to FECRT in herds or flocks that are co-infected with liver and rumen fluke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The draft genome of the carcinogenic human liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis is a carcinogenic human liver fluke that is widespread in Asian countries. Increasing infection rates of this neglected tropical disease are leading to negative economic and public health consequences in affected regions. Experimental and epidemiological studies have shown a strong association between the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma and the infection rate of C. sinensis. To aid research into this organism, we have sequenced its genome. Results We combined de novo sequencing with computational techniques to provide new information about the biology of this liver fluke. The assembled genome has a total size of 516 Mb with a scaffold N50 length of 42 kb. Approximately 16,000 reliable protein-coding gene models were predicted. Genes for the complete pathways for glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and fatty acid metabolism were found, but key genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis are missing from the genome, reflecting the parasitic lifestyle of a liver fluke that receives lipids from the bile of its host. We also identified pathogenic molecules that may contribute to liver fluke-induced hepatobiliary diseases. Large proteins such as multifunctional secreted proteases and tegumental proteins were identified as potential targets for the development of drugs and vaccines. Conclusions This study provides valuable genomic information about the human liver fluke C. sinensis and adds to our knowledge on the biology of the parasite. The draft genome will serve as a platform to develop new strategies for parasite control. PMID:22023798

  4. The role of evolutionary biology in research and control of liver flukes in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Echaubard, Pierre; Sripa, Banchob; Mallory, Frank F; Wilcox, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Stimulated largely by the availability of new technology, biomedical research at the molecular-level and chemical-based control approaches arguably dominate the field of infectious diseases. Along with this, the proximate view of disease etiology predominates to the exclusion of the ultimate, evolutionary biology-based, causation perspective. Yet, historically and up to today, research in evolutionary biology has provided much of the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease transmission dynamics, virulence, and the design of effective integrated control strategies. Here we review the state of knowledge regarding the biology of Asian liver Fluke-host relationship, parasitology, phylodynamics, drug-based interventions and liver Fluke-related cancer etiology from an evolutionary biology perspective. We consider how evolutionary principles, mechanisms and research methods could help refine our understanding of clinical disease associated with infection by Liver Flukes as well as their transmission dynamics. We identify a series of questions for an evolutionary biology research agenda for the liver Fluke that should contribute to an increased understanding of liver Fluke-associated diseases. Finally, we describe an integrative evolutionary medicine approach to liver Fluke prevention and control highlighting the need to better contextualize interventions within a broader human health and sustainable development framework. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Evolutionary Biology in Research and Control of Liver Flukes in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Echaubard, Pierre; Sripa, Banchob; Mallory, Frank F.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated largely by the availability of new technology, biomedical research at the molecular-level and chemical-based control approaches arguably dominate the field of infectious diseases. Along with this, the proximate view of disease etiology predominates to the exclusion of the ultimate, evolutionary biology-based, causation perspective. Yet, historically and up to today, research in evolutionary biology has provided much of the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease transmission dynamics, virulence, and the design of effective integrated control strategies. Here we review the state of knowledge regarding the biology of Asian liver Fluke-host relationship, parasitology, phylodynamics, drug-based interventions and liver Fluke-related cancer etiology from an evolutionary biology perspective. We consider how evolutionary principles, mechanisms and research methods could help refine our understanding of clinical disease associated with infection by Liver Flukes as well as their transmission dynamics. We identify a series of questions for an evolutionary biology research agenda for the liver Fluke that should contribute to an increased understanding of liver Fluke-associated diseases. Finally, we describe an integrative evolutionary medicine approach to liver Fluke prevention and control highlighting the need to better contextualize interventions within a broader human health and sustainable development framework. PMID:27197053

  6. Simulating the Risk of Liver Fluke Infection using a Mechanistic Hydro-epidemiological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Ludovica; Dunne, Toby; Rose, Hannah; Walker, Josephine; Morgan, Eric; Vickerman, Peter; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Liver Fluke (Fasciola hepatica) is a common parasite found in livestock and responsible for considerable economic losses throughout the world. Risk of infection is strongly influenced by climatic and hydrological conditions, which characterise the host environment for parasite development and transmission. Despite on-going control efforts, increases in fluke outbreaks have been reported in recent years in the UK, and have been often attributed to climate change. Currently used fluke risk models are based on empirical relationships derived between historical climate and incidence data. However, hydro-climate conditions are becoming increasingly non-stationary due to climate change and direct anthropogenic impacts such as land use change, making empirical models unsuitable for simulating future risk. In this study we introduce a mechanistic hydro-epidemiological model for Liver Fluke, which explicitly simulates habitat suitability for disease development in space and time, representing the parasite life cycle in connection with key environmental conditions. The model is used to assess patterns of Liver Fluke risk for two catchments in the UK under current and potential future climate conditions. Comparisons are made with a widely used empirical model employing different datasets, including data from regional veterinary laboratories. Results suggest that mechanistic models can achieve adequate predictive ability and support adaptive fluke control strategies under climate change scenarios.

  7. The Battle of Worldviews: A Case Study of Liver Fluke Infection in Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Samiphak, Sara; Syme, S Leonard

    2017-10-01

    Control efforts to reduce infection from the parasitic flatworm Opisthorchis viverrini have progressed through understanding the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini, antiparasitic drug developments, technological innovations, health education promoting cooking of fish, and improved hygienic defecation. Yet the problem persists. The case study method was used to examine the fundamental cause of the liver fluke infection problem. Evidence shows that the liver fluke-infected population does not care about living a long life. For them, suffering and death are simply a part of life, and expected. Thus, the cause(s) leading to death is not important. They believe morally bad actions, and predetermined fate associated with kamma in Buddhism, play a big role whether or not one is infected with the liver fluke. Health interventions may be made more effective if they take into account the liver fluke-infected population's worldviews about ethics, morality, life, and death. We researchers should not feel concerned only about medically determined causes of death.

  8. Liver fluke prevention and control in the northeast of Thailand through action research.

    PubMed

    Wongba, N; Thaewnongiew, K; Phathee, K; Laithavewat, L; Duangsong, R; Promthet, S; Tangsawad, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to enhance people's potential to prevent and control liver fluke infestation. The subjects were a total of 96 participants comprising 20 community leaders, 74 individuals handling and preparing food, and 2 officials from the Local Administration. Quantitative data were collected through questionnaire and the results of stool examination of the participants were recorded. The main methods used to collect qualitative data were focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. For qualitative data analysis, the researchers undertook a qualitative content analysis. For quantitative data, conventional descriptive statistics were used and the mean differences with the 95% CI before and after the study were compared. The results in the early stage found that the participants were not aware of the fact that eating raw fish might be the cause of developing cholangiocarcinoma. 94.8% of participants however knew that eating raw fish might be cause having liver fluke infection which can be treated be taking an antihelminthic drug. They perceived that it is way of life since their ancestors already consumed raw fish because they found it to be delicious. However, through participating in this study, it was realized how dangerous it is to get infected with the liver fluke. Participants also learned the life cycle of liver fluke. They talked about this within their families, and communicated as well as cooperated with others to strengthen a network of a club concentrating on not eating raw fish. The communities and the Sub-district Administrative Organization supported the project. In conclusion, it is advisable to improve the behavior of participants in villages so that they became aware how to prevent and control liver fluke infection and therefore the development of cholangiocarcinoma.

  9. GIS-based spatial statistical analysis of risk areas for liver flukes in Surin Province of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rujirakul, Ratana; Ueng-arporn, Naporn; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Loyd, Ryan J; Kaewthani, Sarochinee; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    It is urgently necessary to be aware of the distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, for proper allocation of prevention and control measures. This study aimed to investigate the human behavior, and environmental factors influencing the distribution in Surin Province of Thailand, and to build a model using stepwise multiple regression analysis with a geographic information system (GIS) on environment and climate data. The relationship between the human behavior, attitudes (<50%; X111), environmental factors like population density (148-169 pop/km2; X73), and land use as wetland (X64), were correlated with the liver fluke disease distribution at 0.000, 0.034, and 0.006 levels, respectively. Multiple regression analysis, by equations OV=-0.599+0.005(population density (148-169 pop/km2); X73)+0.040 (human attitude (<50%); X111)+0.022 (land used (wetland; X64), was used to predict the distribution of liver fluke. OV is the patients of liver fluke infection, R Square=0.878, and, Adjust R Square=0.849. By GIS analysis, we found Si Narong, Sangkha, Phanom Dong Rak, Mueang Surin, Non Narai, Samrong Thap, Chumphon Buri, and Rattanaburi to have the highest distributions in Surin province. In conclusion, the combination of GIS and statistical analysis can help simulate the spatial distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, and thus may be an important tool for future planning of prevention and control measures.

  10. Effects of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate in Thai women with liver fluke infestation: results after six months

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Richard A.; Assawasena, Vinich; Chalpati, Sopon; Taewtong, Dilok

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the three-monthly injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on liver and lipid function was assessed in Thai women with liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) infestation, DMPA administration being started in the immediate postpartum period. Immediate postpartum IUD and sterilization acceptors with fluke infestation were recruited as a comparison (control) group for the fluke-positiv DMPA acceptors. Comparable groups of fluke-negative acceptors were recruited in an area of Thailand free of liver fluke transmission. Results are presented for the first 6 follow-up months for 170 DMPA and 177 control fluke-positive subjects and for 153 DMPA and 150 control fluke-negative subjects. Small and similar increases occurred in each of the four groups for alanine amino transferase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin levels while aspartate amino transferase levels changed less in the DMPA groups than in their respective control groups. None of the subjects in either DMPA group had clearly abnormal results in these tests at 6 months. Alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, and triglycerides levels were markedly lower in each group at 6 months than in the puerperal specimens. There was a greater decrease in triglycerides levels in both DMPA groups than in their respective control groups. However, the decrease in the alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol levels was greater only in the fluke-positive DMPA group than in the fluke-positive control group. None of these biochemical results were related to differences in age, parity, or lactation status between the groups. The results indicate that DMPA did not cause any early deleterious effects in the metabolic factors studied in women with liver fluke infestation. PMID:302157

  11. Prevalence of liver fluke infection in Irish horses and assessment of a serological test for diagnosis of equine fasciolosis.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A; Sekiya, M; Egan, S; Wolfe, A; Negredo, C; Mulcahy, G

    2017-03-01

    There is little information on the prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection in the horse population in Ireland or the potential impact of fluke infection on animal health. To investigate F. hepatica infection in the Irish horse population and to assess the diagnostic potential of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the F. hepatica recombinant cathepsin L1 (CL1) antigen. Cross-sectional abattoir survey of horses for liver fluke status. Animals (n = 200) were examined at an abattoir between May 2013 and April 2014. Horses were graded ante mortem for body condition score. Blood and faeces were collected and livers were examined post mortem by gross morphology. A cohort (n = 35) of livers were also examined histologically. Haematology and blood biochemistry, including serum liver enzyme activities, were measured and faeces were sedimented for egg counts. Serum was assayed by indirect ELISA using a recombinant CL1. The prevalence of liver fluke infection was 9.5%. There was no correlation between liver fluke status and time of year, breed classification, age group, sex, body condition score, ante mortem assessment, strongyle infection status, serum liver enzyme activities or CL1 concentration. A comparison of the CL1 ELISA in horse sera compared with a reference standard diagnosis showed high specificity of 95.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91.5-98.0%), but low sensitivity of 42.1% (95% CI 20.2-66.5%). This study is limited by its nature as an abattoir study, the relatively small number of animals examined (n = 200), and the absence of a known negative group of horses. Blood biomarkers are not good indicators of liver fluke infection and the CL1 ELISA is not a sensitive tool for diagnosis of fluke infection in the horse. The prevalence of F. hepatica in horses indicates that further research is required to assess the potential impact of liver fluke on equine liver health. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Detection of major climatic and environmental predictors of liver fluke exposure risk in Ireland using spatial cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Selemetas, Nikolaos; de Waal, Theo

    2015-04-30

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) can cause significant economic and production losses in dairy cow farms. The aim of the current study was to identify important weather and environmental predictors of the exposure risk to liver fluke by detecting clusters of fasciolosis in Ireland. During autumn 2012, bulk-tank milk samples from 4365 dairy farms were collected throughout Ireland. Using an in-house antibody-detection ELISA, the analysis of BTM samples showed that 83% (n=3602) of dairy farms had been exposed to liver fluke. The Getis-Ord Gi* statistic identified 74 high-risk and 130 low-risk significant (P<0.01) clusters of fasciolosis. The low-risk clusters were mostly located in the southern regions of Ireland, whereas the high-risk clusters were mainly situated in the western part. Several climatic variables (monthly and seasonal mean rainfall and temperatures, total wet days and rain days) and environmental datasets (soil types, enhanced vegetation index and normalised difference vegetation index) were used to investigate dissimilarities in the exposure to liver fluke between clusters. Rainfall, total wet days and rain days, and soil type were the significant classes of climatic and environmental variables explaining the differences between significant clusters. A discriminant function analysis was used to predict the exposure risk to liver fluke using 80% of data for modelling and the remaining subset of 20% for post hoc model validation. The most significant predictors of the model risk function were total rainfall in August and September and total wet days. The risk model presented 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity and an accuracy of 95% correctly classified cases. A risk map of exposure to liver fluke was constructed with higher probability of exposure in western and north-western regions. The results of this study identified differences between clusters of fasciolosis in Ireland regarding climatic and environmental variables and

  13. [Genomics and transcriptomics of the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis (Opisthorchiidae, Trematoda)].

    PubMed

    Chelomina, G N

    2017-01-01

    The review summarizes the results of first genomic and transcriptomic investigations of the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis (Opisthorchiidae, Trematoda). The studies mark the dawn of the genomic era for opisthorchiids, which cause severe hepatobiliary diseases in humans and animals. Their results aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of adaptation to parasitism, parasite survival in mammalian biliary tracts, and genome dynamics in the individual development and the development of parasite-host relationships. Special attention is paid to the achievements in studying the codon usage bias and the roles of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Interspecific comparisons at the genomic and transcriptomic levels revealed molecular differences, which may contribute to understanding the specialized niches and physiological needs of the respective species. The studies in C. sinensis provide a basis for further basic and applied research in liver flukes and, in particular, the development of efficient means to prevent, diagnose, and treat clonorchiasis.

  14. The secreted and surface proteomes of the adult stage of the carcinogenic human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Mulvenna, Jason; Sripa, Banchob; Brindley, Paul J.; Gorman, Jeffrey; Jones, Malcolm K.; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Jones, Alun; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Laha, Thewarach; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Smout, Michael J.; Loukas, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, is a serious public health problem in Thailand, Laos and nearby locations in Southeast Asia. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence strongly implicate liver fluke infection in the etiology of one of the liver cancer subtypes, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). To identify parasite proteins critical for liver fluke survival and the etiology of CCA, OFFGEL electrophoresis and Multiple reaction monitoring were employed to characterize 300 parasite proteins from the O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (ES) and, utilizing selective labeling and sequential solubilization, from the host-exposed tegument. The ES included a complex mixture of proteins that have been associated with cancers, including proteases of different mechanistic classes and orthologues of mammalian growth factors and anti-apoptotic proteins. Also identified was a cysteine protease inhibitor which, in other helminth pathogens, induces nitric oxide production by macrophages, and, hence may contribute to malignant transformation of inflamed cells. Proteases in ES included cathepsins, calpain and a protein with homology to autoimmune prostatitis antigen 2. More than 160 tegumental proteins were identified using sequential solubilization of isolated teguments, and a subset of these was localized to the surface membrane of the tegument by labeling living flukes with biotin and confirming surface localization with fluorescence microscopy. These included annexins, which are potential immuno-modulators, and orthologues of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigens Sm29 and tetraspanin-2. Novel roles in pathogenesis were suggested for the tegument-host interface since more than ten biotinylated surface proteins had no homologues in the public databases. The O. viverrini proteins identified here provide an extensive catalogue of novel leads for research on the pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis and the development of novel interventions for this disease

  15. Untangling the Complexity of Liver Fluke Infection and Cholangiocarcinoma in NE Thailand Through Transdisciplinary Learning.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A D; Echaubard, P; Lee, Y T; Chuah, C J; Wilcox, B A; Grundy-Warr, C; Sithithaworn, P; Petney, T N; Laithevewat, L; Ong, X; Andrews, R H; Ismail, T; Sripa, B; Khuntikeo, N; Poonpon, K; Tungtang, P; Tuamsuk, K

    2016-06-01

    This study demonstrates how a transdisciplinary learning approach provided new insights for explaining persistent Opisthorchis viverrini infection in northern Thailand, as well as elucidating problems of focusing solely on the parasite as a means of addressing high prevalence of cholangiocarcinoma. Researchers from diverse backgrounds collaborated to design an investigative homestay program for 72 Singaporean and Thai university students in five northeast Thai villages. The students explored how liver fluke infection and potential cholangiocarcinoma development are influenced by local landscape dynamics, aquatic ecology, livelihoods, food culture and health education. Qualitative fieldwork was guided daily by the researchers in a collaborative, co-learning process that led to viewing this health issue as a complex system, influenced by interlinked multidimensional factors. Our transdisciplinary experience has led us to believe that an incomplete understanding of these linkages may reduce the efficacy of interventions. Further, viewing liver fluke infection and cholangiocarcinoma as the same issue is inadvisable. Although O. viverrini infection is an established risk factor for the development of cholangiocarcinoma, multiple factors are known to influence the likelihood of acquiring either. Understanding the importance of the current livelihood transition, landscape modification and the resulting mismatch between local cultures and new socio-ecological settings on cholangiocarcinoma initiation and liver fluke transmission is of critical importance as it may help readjust our view of the respective role of O. viverrini and other socioeconomic risk factors in cholangiocarcinoma etiology and refine intervention strategies. As demonstrated in this study, transdisciplinary approaches have the potential to yield more nuanced perspectives to complex diseases than research that focuses on specific aspects of their epidemiology. They may therefore be valuable when designing

  16. Population-Based Intervention for Liver Fluke Prevention and Control in Meuang Yang District, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kompor, Pontip; Muang Karn, Rattikarn; Norkaew, Jun; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Photipim, Mali; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Chavengkun, Wasugree; Phong Paew, Somkiat; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Rujirakul, Ratana; Wakhuwathapong, Parichart; Phatisena, Tanida; Eaksanti, Thawatchai; Joosiri, Apinya; Polsripradistdist, Poowadol; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is still a major health problem in rural communities of Thailand. Infection is associated with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), which is found frequently in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of health intervention in the population at risk for opisthorchiasis and CCA. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Meuang Yang district, Nakhon Ratchasima province, northeastern Thailand, between June and October 2015. Participants were completed health intervention comprising 4 stations; 1, VDO clip of moving adult worm of liver fluke; 2, poster of life cycle of liver fluke; 3, microscopy with adult and egg liver fluke; and 4, brochure with the knowledge of liver fluke containing infection, signs, symptoms, related disease, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control. Pre-and-post-test questionnaires were utilized to collect data from all participants. Students paired t-tests were used to analyze differences between before and after participation in the health intervention. Knowledge (mean difference=-7.48, t=-51.241, 95% CI, -7.77, -7.19, p-value =0.001), attitude (mean difference=-9.07, t=-9.818, 95% CI=-10.9, -7.24, p-value=0.001), and practice (mean difference=-2.04, t=-2.688, 95% CI=-3.55, -0.53, p-value=0.008), changed between before and after time points with statistical significance. Community rules were concluded regarding: (1) cooked cyprinoid fish consumption; (2) stop under cooked cyprinoid fish by household cooker; (3) cooked food consumption; (4) hygienic defecation; (5) corrected knowledge campaign close to each household; (6) organizing a village food safety club; (7) and annual health check including stool examination featuring monitoring by village health volunteers and local public health officers. The results indicates that the present health intervention program was effective and easy to understand, with low cost and taking only a short time. Therefore, this program may

  17. Raw fish consumption in liver fluke endemic areas in rural southern Laos.

    PubMed

    Xayaseng, Vilavanh; Phongluxa, Khampheng; van Eeuwijk, Peter; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia, and in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), in particular. We aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of villagers in liver fluke endemic areas related to raw fish preparation, consumption and its health consequences. In February 2010, eight focus group discussions (FGDs, 35 men and 37 women total) and direct observations were conducted in four randomly selected villages in Saravane District, Saravane Province (Lao PDR). FGDs distilled the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of adult community members on raw fish preparation, consumption and its consequences for health. Conversations were transcribed from notes and tape-recorders. MaxQDA software was used for content analysis. Knowledge regarding the health effects of raw fish consumption was heterogeneous. Some participants did not associate liver fluke infection with any ill health, while others linked it to digestive problems. Participants also associated vegetables and tree leave consumption with liver fluke infection. The majority of FGD participants considered fish flesh that had been prepared with weaver ant extract to be safe for consumption. Visual appearance, taste, smell and personal preference were given as reasons for consuming raw fish dishes. Moreover, participants considered it a traditional way of food preparation, practiced for generations in Laos. Ten different fish dishes that use raw or fermented fish were identified. All FGD participants reported consuming dishes with raw fish. This study reveals a low degree of knowledge among local people on the health risks related to frequent consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish. Fish dishes were considered to be 'well-prepared' (that is, 'cooked') even though the fish had not been heated. In future, successful health education campaigns will have to address the specific knowledge, attitudes

  18. CpG-island methylation study of liver fluke-related cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sriraksa, R; Zeller, C; El-Bahrawy, M A; Dai, W; Daduang, J; Jearanaikoon, P; Chau-in, S; Brown, R; Limpaiboon, T

    2011-01-01

    Background: Genetic changes have been widely reported in association with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), while epigenetic changes are poorly characterised. We aimed to further evaluate CpG-island hypermethylation in CCA at candidate loci, which may have potential as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Methods: We analysed methylation of 26 CpG-islands in 102 liver fluke related-CCA and 29 adjacent normal samples using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Methylation of interest loci was confirmed using pyrosequencing and/or combined bisulfite restriction analysis, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: A number of CpG-islands (OPCML, SFRP1, HIC1, PTEN and DcR1) showed frequency of hypermethylation in >28% of CCA, but not adjacent normal tissues. The results showed that 91% of CCA were methylated in at least one CpG-island. The OPCML was the most frequently methylated locus (72.5%) and was more frequently methylated in less differentiated CCA. Patients with methylated DcR1 had significantly longer overall survival (Median; 41.7 vs 21.7 weeks, P=0.027). Low-protein expression was found in >70% of CCA with methylation of OPCML or DcR1. Conclusion: Aberrant hypermethylation of certain loci is a common event in liver fluke-related CCA and may potentially contribute to cholangiocarcinogenesis. The OPCML and DcR1 might serve as methylation biomarkers in CCA that can be readily examined by MSP. PMID:21448164

  19. The effects of farm management practices on liver fluke prevalence and the current internal parasite control measures employed on Irish dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Selemetas, Nikolaos; Phelan, Paul; O'Kiely, Padraig; de Waal, Theo

    2015-01-30

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica is responsible for major production losses in cattle farms. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of farm management practices on liver fluke prevalence on Irish dairy farms and to document the current control measures against parasitic diseases. In total, 369 dairy farms throughout Ireland were sampled from October to December 2013, each providing a single bulk tank milk (BTM) sample for liver fluke antibody-detection ELISA testing and completing a questionnaire on their farm management. The analysis of samples showed that cows on 78% (n=288) of dairy farms had been exposed to liver fluke. There was a difference (P<0.05) between farms where cows were positive or negative for liver fluke antibodies in (a) the total number of adult dairy cows in herds, (b) the number of adult dairy cows contributing to BTM samples, and (c) the size of the total area of grassland, with positive farms having larger numbers in each case. There was no difference (P>0.05) between positive and negative farms in (a) the grazing of dry cows together with replacement cows, (b) whether or not grazed grassland was mowed for conservation, (c) the type of drinking water provision system, (d) spreading of cattle manure on grassland or (e) for grazing season length (GSL; mean=262.5 days). Also, there were differences (P<0.001) between drainage statuses for GSL with farms on good drainage having longer GSL than moderately drained farms. The GSL for dairy cows on farms with good drainage was 11 days longer than for those with moderate drainage (P<0.001). The percentage of farmers that used an active ingredient during the non-lactating period against liver fluke, gastrointestinal nematodes, lungworm, and rumen fluke was 96%, 85%, 77% and 90%, respectively. Albendazole was the most frequently used active ingredient for treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes (57%), liver fluke (40%) and lungworm (47%), respectively. There was a difference

  20. Large numbers of interleukins-22- and -17A-producing T helper cells in cholangiocarcinoma related to liver fluke infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Si-Biao; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Huang, Fei-Fei; Cen, Yu; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2017-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with liver fluke infection involves inflammatory and immune processes; however, whether these involve the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17A and proliferative cytokine IL-22 remains unclear. Here, numbers of IL-22- and IL-17A-producing Th cells and cytokine concentrations in 30 patients with CCA and long-term liver fluke infection, 40 patients with liver-fluke infection but not CCA, and 16 healthy controls were compared. Analyses were performed using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining showed weaker expression of IL-22 and IL-17A in patients with CCA with than in those without liver fluke infection (P < 0.01). Flow cytometry revealed significantly greater median proportions of IL-22-producing T helper cells in patients with CCA (2.2%) than in those without it (0.69%) or controls (0.4%, P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained for IL-17A-producing T helper cells. ELISA revealed plasma concentrations of IL-22 were 1.3-fold higher in patients with CCA than in those without it and 4.6-fold higher than in controls (P < 0.001). Plasma concentrations of IL-17A were 2.5-fold higher in patients with CCA than in those without it, and 21-fold higher than in controls (P < 0.001). Amounts of IL-22 and IL-17A mRNAs in blood were significantly higher in patients with CCA than in the other two groups. Proportions of CD4 + CD45RO + T cells producing IL-22 correlated with proportions producing IL-17A (r = 0.759; P < 0.001), and plasma concentrations of IL-22 correlated with those of IL-17A (r = 0.726; P < 0.001). These results suggest that both IL-17A and IL-22 affect development of CCA related to liver fluke infection. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Nutritional Status among Rural Community Elderly in the Risk Area of Liver Fluke, Surin Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Namwichaisirikul, Niwatchai; Loyd, Ryan A; Churproong, Seekaow; Ueng-Arporn, Naporn; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Rujirakul, Ratana; Nimkhuntod, Porntip; Wakhuwathapong, Parichart; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is becoming an aging society, this presenting as a serious problem situation especially regarding health. Chronic diseases found frequently in the elderly may be related to dietary intake and life style. Surin province has been reported as a risk area for liver fluke with a high incidence of cholangiocarcinma especially in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the nutritional status and associated factors among elderly in Surin province, northeast of Thailand. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 people aged 60 years and above, between September 2012 and July 2014. The participants were selected through a randomized systematic sampling method and completed a pre-designed questionnaire with general information, food recorded, weight, height, waist circumference, and behavior regarding to food consume related to liver fluke infection. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The majority of participants was female (63.5%), age between 60-70 years old (75.6%), with elementary school education (96.6%), living with their (78.9%), and having underlying diseases (38.3%). Carbohydrate (95.3%) was need to improve the consumption. The participants demonstrated under-nutrition (24.4%), over-nutrition (16.4%), and obesity (15.4%). Elderly had a waist circumference as the higher than normal level (34.0%). Gender, female, age 71-80 years old, elementary school and underlying diseases were significantly associated with poor nutritional status. The majority of them had a high knowledge (43.0%), moderate attitude (44.4%), and moderate practice (46.2%) regarding food consumption related to liver fluke infection. In conclusion, these findings data indicated that elderly age group often have an under- or over-nutritional status. Carbohydrate consumption needs to be improved. Some elderly show behavior regarding food consumption that is related to liver fluke infection hat needs

  2. Molecular evidence shows that the liver fluke Fasciola gigantica is the predominant Fasciola species in ruminants from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U; van Paridon, B; Shabbir, M Z; Shafee, M; Ashraf, K; Yaqub, T; Gilleard, J

    2016-03-01

    Fascioliasis is an important disease affecting livestock, with great costs to producers worldwide. It has also become a serious issue for human populations in some endemic areas as an emerging zoonotic infection. There are two Fasciola species of liver fluke responsible for this disease, which occur worldwide, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. Identifying these two species on the basis of adult or egg morphology requires specialist knowledge due to the similarity of characters, and may misidentify putative intermediate or hybrid forms. In this study we sequenced the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) rDNA of liver flukes collected from multiple species of hosts from seven localities in the Punjab and Baluchistan provinces of Pakistan, to determine the distribution of these two species. All 46 flukes processed in this study, collected from seven sites, showed the rDNA ITS-2 genotype corresponding to F. gigantica, contradicting previous reports, based on adult and egg morphology, that both species are present in Pakistan, with F. hepatica being the more common.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype analysis of liver fluke in bison from Bialowieza Primaeval Forest indicates domestic cattle as the likely source of infection.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen M; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Kozak, Monika; Wedrychowicz, Halina; Teofanova, Denitsa; Prodohl, Paulo; Brennan, Gerry; Fairweather, Ian; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan

    2013-01-16

    We have determined the mitochondrial genotype of liver fluke present in Bison (Bison bonasus) from the herd maintained in the Bialowieza National Park in order to determine the origin of the infection. Our results demonstrated that the infrapopulations present in the bison were genetically diverse and were likely to have been derived from the population present in local cattle. From a consideration of the genetic structure of the liver fluke infrapopulations we conclude that the provision of hay at feeding stations may be implicated in the transmission of this parasite to the bison. This information may be of relevance to the successful management of the herd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fine-scale mapping of vector habitats using very high resolution satellite imagery: a liver fluke case-study.

    PubMed

    De Roeck, Els; Van Coillie, Frieke; De Wulf, Robert; Soenen, Karen; Charlier, Johannes; Vercruysse, Jozef; Hantson, Wouter; Ducheyne, Els; Hendrickx, Guy

    2014-12-01

    The visualization of vector occurrence in space and time is an important aspect of studying vector-borne diseases. Detailed maps of possible vector habitats provide valuable information for the prediction of infection risk zones but are currently lacking for most parts of the world. Nonetheless, monitoring vector habitats from the finest scales up to farm level is of key importance to refine currently existing broad-scale infection risk models. Using Fasciola hepatica, a parasite liver fluke, as a case in point, this study illustrates the potential of very high resolution (VHR) optical satellite imagery to efficiently and semi-automatically detect detailed vector habitats. A WorldView2 satellite image capable of <5m resolution was acquired in the spring of 2013 for the area around Bruges, Belgium, a region where dairy farms suffer from liver fluke infections transmitted by freshwater snails. The vector thrives in small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds, ditches and other humid areas consisting of open water, aquatic vegetation and/or inundated grass. These water bodies can be as small as a few m2 and are most often not present on existing land cover maps because of their small size. We present a classification procedure based on object-based image analysis (OBIA) that proved valuable to detect SWBs at a fine scale in an operational and semi-automated way. The classification results were compared to field and other reference data such as existing broad-scale maps and expert knowledge. Overall, the SWB detection accuracy reached up to 87%. The resulting fine-scale SWB map can be used as input for spatial distribution modelling of the liver fluke snail vector to enable development of improved infection risk mapping and management advice adapted to specific, local farm situations.

  5. Clonorchis sinensis, an oriental liver fluke, as a human biological agent of cholangiocarcinoma: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tong-Soo; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Jong-Bo; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases remain an unarguable public health problem worldwide. Liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis is a high risk pathogenic parasitic helminth which is endemic predominantly in Asian countries, including Korea, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, and the far eastern parts of Russia, and is still actively transmitted. According to the earlier 8th National Survey on the Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in 2012, C. sinensis was revealed as the parasite with highest prevalence of 1.86% in general population among all parasite species surveyed in Korea. This fluke is now classified under one of the definite Group 1 human biological agents (carcinogens) by International Agency of Research on Cancer (IARC) along with two other parasites, Opisthorchis viverrini and Schistosoma haematobium. C. sinensis infestation is mainly linked to liver and biliary disorders, especially cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). For the purposes of this mini-review, we will only focus on C. sinensis and review pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of clonorchiasis, disease condition by C. sinensis infestation, and association between C. sinensis infestation and CCA. In this presentation, we briefly consider the current scientific status for progression of CCA by heavy C. sinensis infestation from the food-borne trematode and development of CCA. PMID:27418285

  6. Potential risk of a liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini infection brought by immigrants from prevalent areas: A case study in the lower Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Katahira, Hirotaka; Igarashi, Makoto; Salman, Doaa; Abdelbaset, Abdelbaset E; Sangkaeo, Khamphon

    2018-02-01

    Considering the long lifespan of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, human mobility from prevalent regions to other neighboring areas has the possibility to disperse carriers and complicate the opisthorchiasis problem. To evaluate this, mass screening of the fluke infection was conducted in nine communities of lower Northern Thailand, combined with a questionnaire survey to distinguish the participant's origin. The liver fluke infection was found in 70 individuals (7.2%) of the examined 971 stool samples from seven communities, with light intensity providing small numbers of eggs in the examined stool. Prevalence in the positive communities varied from 2.1% to 28.7%. As a result of generalized linear mixed models fitting, regional origin and raw-fish eating habits were stably selected as variables affecting the parasite infection while occupation and educational background were secondary ones. Majority of the infected cases (64.3%) were found from the immigrants of northeastern Thailand (the fluke prevalent region), providing 2.28-2.42 times higher infectious risk on average against the local residents. Daily consumption of raw fish averaged a 3.12-3.60 times higher risk compared to those with no raw-fish eating habit. Our findings suggest that people's origin and moving history deserve further attentions in health promotion programs including education for safe eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clonorchis sinensis, an oriental liver fluke, as a human biological agent of cholangiocarcinoma: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tong-Soo; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Jong-Bo; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-11-01

    Parasitic diseases remain an unarguable public health problem worldwide. Liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis is a high risk pathogenic parasitic helminth which is endemic predominantly in Asian countries, including Korea, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, and the far eastern parts of Russia, and is still actively transmitted. According to the earlier 8th National Survey on the Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in 2012, C. sinensis was revealed as the parasite with highest prevalence of 1.86% in general population among all parasite species surveyed in Korea. This fluke is now classified under one of the definite Group 1 human biological agents (carcinogens) by International Agency of Research on Cancer (IARC) along with two other parasites, Opisthorchis viverrini and Schistosoma haematobium. C. sinensis infestation is mainly linked to liver and biliary disorders, especially cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). For the purposes of this mini-review, we will only focus on C. sinensis and review pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of clonorchiasis, disease condition by C. sinensis infestation, and association between C. sinensis infestation and CCA. In this presentation, we briefly consider the current scientific status for progression of CCA by heavy C. sinensis infestation from the food-borne trematode and development of CCA. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(11): 590-597].

  8. DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY OF LIVER FLUKE (FASCIOLOIDES MAGNA) INFECTION IN FALLOW DEER (DAMA DAMA) IN SERBIA.

    PubMed

    Trailović, Saša M; Marinković, Darko; Kulišić, Zoran

    2016-04-28

    Giant liver fluke ( Fascioloides magna ) infection is an important health problem of cervids in southeastern Europe. We measured the prevalence and intensity of infection with F. magna in a fenced area near the Danube River in the South Bačka District of Serbia. Parasitologic, pathomorphologic, and histopathologic examinations were conducted from November 2007 to February 2008, beginning with a population of 127 adult fallow deer ( Dama dama ). After a positive diagnosis, therapy with triclabendazole-medicated corn was applied. Deer were treated at four baiting stations, using medicated feed providing triclabendazole at an estimated dose of 10-14 mg/kg of body weight per deer. Treatment lasted for 7 d in early February 2008 and an additional 7 d 2 wk later. For the complete success of pharmacotherapy it was necessary to prevent any contact of deer with the snail intermediate host ( Galba truncatula ). Intervention in the habitat, removing grass and low vegetation, and draining ponds reduces the possibility of contact. Six months after the treatment, livers of hunted deer were reddish, with fibrous tracks; pigmentation and cysts in the parenchyma were surrounded by a fibrous capsule and their fecal samples contained no eggs of F. magna . Over the following years, livers of hunted deer were negative, and the last control cull in March 2015 confirmed complete absence of infection. We reconfirmed the presence of giant liver flukes in fallow deer in Serbia, apparently the result of natural spread across the Danube from Hungary and Croatia. We also report that the treatment of deer with triclabendazole-medicated corn is an effective method for administration of therapeutic doses of drug in semicaptive deer. Interventions in the environment are necessary to prevent recontact of deer with habitats used by the snail intermediate host, and enable the success of the therapy.

  9. Genetic diversity of the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis from Russia and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Chelomina, Galina N; Tatonova, Yulia V; Hung, Nguyen Manh; Ngo, Ha Duy

    2014-10-01

    Clonorchiasis is a parasitic disease of high public health importance in many countries in southeastern Asia and is caused by the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. However, the genetic structure and demographic history of its populations has not been sufficiently studied throughout the geographic range of the species and available data are based mainly on partial gene sequencing. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity of the complete 1560 bp cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequence for geographically isolated C. sinensis populations in Russia and Vietnam, to our knowledge for the first time. The results demonstrated low nucleotide and high haplotype differentiation within and between the two compared regions and a clear geographical vector for the distribution of genetic diversity patterns among the studied populations. These results suggest a deep local adaptation of the parasite to its environment including intermediate hosts and the existence of gene flow across the species' range. Additionally, we have predicted an amino acid substitution in the functional site of the COX1 protein among the Vietnamese populations, which were reported to be difficult to treat with praziquantel. The haplotype networks consisted of several region-specific phylogenetic lineages, the formation of which could have occurred during the most extensive penultimate glaciations in the Pleistocene Epoch. The patterns of genetic diversity and demographics are consistent with population growth of the liver fluke in the late Pleistocene following the Last Glacial Maximum, indicating the lack of a population bottleneck during the recent past in the species' history. The data obtained have important implications for understanding the phylogeography of C. sinensis, its host-parasite interactions, the ability of this parasite to evolve drug resistance, and the epidemiology of clonorchiasis under global climate change. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for

  10. Developmental Transcriptomic Features of the Carcinogenic Liver Fluke, Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tae Im; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Park, Hong-Seog; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is the causative agent of the life-threatening disease endemic to China, Korea, and Vietnam. It is estimated that about 15 million people are infected with this fluke. C. sinensis provokes inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and periductal fibrosis in bile ducts, and may cause cholangiocarcinoma in chronically infected individuals. Accumulation of a large amount of biological information about the adult stage of this liver fluke in recent years has advanced our understanding of the pathological interplay between this parasite and its hosts. However, no developmental gene expression profiles of C. sinensis have been published. In this study, we generated gene expression profiles of three developmental stages of C. sinensis by analyzing expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Complementary DNA libraries were constructed from the adult, metacercaria, and egg developmental stages of C. sinensis. A total of 52,745 ESTs were generated and assembled into 12,830 C. sinensis assembled EST sequences, and then these assemblies were further categorized into groups according to biological functions and developmental stages. Most of the genes that were differentially expressed in the different stages were consistent with the biological and physical features of the particular developmental stage; high energy metabolism, motility and reproduction genes were differentially expressed in adults, minimal metabolism and final host adaptation genes were differentially expressed in metacercariae, and embryonic genes were differentially expressed in eggs. The higher expression of glucose transporters, proteases, and antioxidant enzymes in the adults accounts for active uptake of nutrients and defense against host immune attacks. The types of ion channels present in C. sinensis are consistent with its parasitic nature and phylogenetic placement in the tree of life. We anticipate that the transcriptomic information on essential regulators of development, bile chemotaxis, and

  11. Genome-wide characterization of microsatelittes and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao T.B.; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J.; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers have been used for identification and genetic diversity, however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for genetic diversity study in C. sinensis using genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥ 12 base pairs) were identified from genome database of C. sinensis with hexa-nucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by penta-nucleotide (18.3%) and tri-nucleotide (12.7%). The tetra-nucleotide, di-nucleotide and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75 %, 7.63% and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72 % of 547 Mb of the whole genome size and the frequency of microsatellites were found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri, and tetra-nucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%) and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed heterozygous with observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four-primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for genetic study of C. sinensis. PMID:25782682

  12. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T B; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers that have been used for identification and genetic diversity; however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke is published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for a genetic diversity study in C. sinensis, using a genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥12 base pairs) were identified from a genome database of C. sinensis, with hexanucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by pentanucleotide (18.3%) and trinucleotide (12.7%). The tetranucleotide, dinucleotide, and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75, 7.63, and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72% of 547 Mb of the whole genome size, and the frequency of microsatellites was found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%), and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT, and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed to be heterozygous with observed heterozygosity that ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites, and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for the genetic study of C. sinensis.

  13. Low Genetic Diversity in Wide-Spread Eurasian Liver Fluke Opisthorchis felineus Suggests Special Demographic History of This Trematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Brusentsov, Ilja I.; Katokhin, Alexey V.; Brusentsova, Irina V.; Shekhovtsov, Sergei V.; Borovikov, Sergei N.; Goncharenko, Grigoriy G.; Lider, Lyudmila A.; Romashov, Boris V.; Rusinek, Olga T.; Shibitov, Samat K.; Suleymanov, Marat M.; Yevtushenko, Andrey V.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis felineus or Siberian liver fluke is a trematode parasite (Opisthorchiidae) that infects the hepato-biliary system of humans and other mammals. Despite its public health significance, this wide-spread Eurasian species is one of the most poorly studied human liver flukes and nothing is known about its population genetic structure and demographic history. In this paper, we attempt to fill this gap for the first time and to explore the genetic diversity in O. felineus populations from Eastern Europe (Ukraine, European part of Russia), Northern Asia (Siberia) and Central Asia (Northern Kazakhstan). Analysis of marker DNA fragments from O. felineus mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 3 (cox1, cox3) and nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences revealed that genetic diversity is very low across the large geographic range of this species. Microevolutionary processes in populations of trematodes may well be influenced by their peculiar biology. Nevertheless, we suggest that lack of population genetics structure observed in O. felineus can be primarily explained by the Pleistocene glacial events and subsequent sudden population growth from a very limited group of founders. Rapid range expansion of O. felineus through Asian and European territories after severe bottleneck points to a high dispersal potential of this trematode species. PMID:23634228

  14. Assessing the Role of Climate Variability on Liver Fluke Risk in the UK Through Mechanistic Hydro-Epidemiological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, L.; Dunne, T.; Rose, H.; Walker, J.; Morgan, E.; Vickerman, P.; Wagener, T.

    2016-12-01

    Liver fluke is a flatworm parasite infecting grazing animals worldwide. In the UK, it causes considerable production losses to cattle and sheep industries and costs farmers millions of pounds each year due to reduced growth rates and lower milk yields. Large part of the parasite life-cycle takes place outside of the host, with its survival and development strongly controlled by climatic and hydrologic conditions. Evidence of climate-driven changes in the distribution and seasonality of fluke disease already exists, as the infection is increasingly expanding to new areas and becoming a year-round problem. Therefore, it is crucial to assess current and potential future impacts of climate variability on the disease to guide interventions at the farm scale and mitigate risk. Climate-based fluke risk models have been available since the 1950s, however, they are based on empirical relationships derived between historical climate and incidence data, and thus are unlikely to be robust for simulating risk under changing conditions. Moreover, they are not dynamic, but estimate risk over large regions in the UK based on monthly average climate conditions, so they do not allow investigating the effects of climate variability for supporting farmers' decisions. In this study, we introduce a mechanistic model for fluke, which represents habitat suitability for disease development at 25m resolution with a daily time step, explicitly linking the parasite life-cycle to key hydro-climate conditions. The model is used on a case study in the UK and sensitivity analysis is performed to better understand the role of climate variability on the space-time dynamics of the disease, while explicitly accounting for uncertainties. Comparisons are presented with experts' knowledge and a widely used empirical model.

  15. The effect of lysergic acid diethylamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and related compounds on the liver fluke, fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, T. E.

    1957-01-01

    The rhythmical activity of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, was stimulated by 5-hydroxytryptamine and by lysergic acid diethylamide at very low concentrations. The effect was peripheral and was not mediated through the central ganglion. Other amines also stimulated rhythmical activity, the most potent being the indolamines. Bromolysergic acid diethylamide, and other analogues such as yohimbine, harmine, and dopamine depressed rhythmical movement and antagonized the stimulant action of 5-hydroxytryptamine and lysergic acid diethylamide. Evidence which suggests the presence of tryptamine receptors in the trematode is discussed. PMID:13489165

  16. Liver Fluke Infection and Fish Consumption in Khon Kaen, Thailand: A Case Study on Negotiating the Middle Ground between Western Science and Eastern Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiphak, Sara

    This research investigates why typical strategies for promoting health, prolonging life, and preventing disease do not work in many communities. I use the liver fluke infection endemic in Khon Kaen, Thailand to explore the middle ground between Western science and Eastern culture. Prior work on the O.viverrini infection in Khon Kaen, Thailand has focused almost exclusively on developing effective medical treatment for the liver fluke infection. This dissertation employs a case study designed to explore the conditions that created and perpetuate the problem in the first place. In concrete terms, I analyze how the worldviews of local villagers shape their attitudes toward life (and death), which in turn determine if they engage in the high-risk behavior -- eating undercooked fish -- that makes them vulnerable to the infection. My research focuses on these people in-situ over a three-month period, and includes data from participant-observation, interviews, and video-recordings. This work seeks to illuminate how people's thinking and reasoning skills, and personal/cultural identities affect their abilities to learn and act on new health concepts. This potentially provides a window into future educational strategies in a complex world.

  17. A combination of liver fluke infection and traditional northeastern Thai foods associated with cholangiocarcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Sriraj, Pranee; Boonmars, Thidarut; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Songsri, Jiraporn; Sripan, Panupan; Ratanasuwan, Panaratana; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Wongchalee, Nadchanan; Laummaunwai, Porntip

    2016-10-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection is one of the risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in northeast Thailand, a region with one of the highest reported incidence rates of CCA. The traditional practice of eating raw fish, repeated exposure to liver flukes, and consumption of nitrosamine-contaminated food are major risk factors for CCA. So far, there have been no reports about which northeastern traditional dishes may be involved in CCA development. The present study, thus, investigated the effects of traditional foods. It focused specifically on the consumption of fermented foods in combination with O. viverrini infection in hamsters. Syrian hamsters were divided into six groups: (i) normal hamsters, (ii) O. viverrini infection only and (iii)-(vi) O. viverrini infection plus fermented foods (pla som-fish fermented for 1 day), som wua-fermented beef, som phag-fermented vegetables, and pla ra-fish fermented for 6 months. Syrian hamster livers were used for analysis of histopathological changes through hematoxylin and eosin; Sirius Red; and immunohistostaining for cytokeratin-19, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and CA19-9. Hamster sera were used for liver and kidney function tests. Results of all O. viverrini-infected groups and fermented food groups showed that histopathological changes consisted primarily of aggregations of inflammatory cells surrounding the hepatic bile duct, especially at the hilar region. However, there was a difference in virulence. Interestingly, aggregations of inflammatory cells, new bile duct formation, and fibrosis were observed in subcapsular hepatic tissue, which correlated to positive immunohistochemical staining and increased liver function test. The present study suggests that fermented food consumption can exacerbate cholangitis and cholangiofibrosis, which are risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma-associated opisthorchiasis.

  18. High Prevalence of the Liver Fluke Amphimerus sp. in Domestic Cats and Dogs in an Area for Human Amphimeriasis in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Atherton, Richard; Saunders, Matthew; Small, Alexander; Kumazawa, Hideo; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Background Amphimerus sp. is a liver fluke which recently has been shown to have a high prevalence of infection among an indigenous group, Chachi, who reside in a tropical rainforest in the northwestern region of Ecuador. Since it is unknown which animals can act as a reservoir and/or definitive hosts for Amphimerus sp. in this endemic area, a study was done to determine the prevalence of infection in domestic cats and dogs. This information is important to understand the epidemiology, life cycle and control of this parasite. Methodology/Findings In July 2012, three Chachi communities located on Rio Cayapas, province of Esmeraldas, were surveyed. A total of 89 of the 109 registered households participated in the study. Of the 27 cats and 43 dogs found residing in the communities, stool samples were collected from 14 cats and 31 dogs (total of 45 animals) and examined microscopically for the presence of Amphimerus eggs. The prevalence of infection was 71.4% in cats and 38.7% in dogs, with similar rates of infection in all three communities. Significantly more cats were infected than dogs (p = 0.042). Conclusions/Significance The data show a high rate of Amphimerus sp. infection in domestic cats and dogs residing in Chachi communities. It can be concluded that these animals act as definitive and reservoir hosts for this liver fluke and that amphimeriasis is a zoonotic disease. These findings provide important epidemiological data which will aid in the development and implementation of control strategies against the transmission of Amphimerus. PMID:25647171

  19. Epidemiological investigation of a severe rumen fluke outbreak on an Irish dairy farm.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, James; Garcia-Campos, Andres; McAloon, Conor G; Fagan, Seamus; de Waal, Theo; McElroy, Maire; Casey, Micheal; Good, Barbara; Mulcahy, Grace; Fagan, John; Murphy, Denise; Zintl, Annetta

    2017-11-16

    Although the rumen fluke, Calicophoron daubneyi is now very common and widespread throughout Western Europe, reports of clinical cases are still rare. This study explores the epidemiological background to a severe rumen fluke outbreak in 6-month-old heifers on a dairy farm in Ireland. Sequence analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1) gene of the rumen fluke metacercariae on pasture failed to identify predominant, possibly pathogenic subtypes. However, estimates of metacercarial load indicated that the animals were exposed to a daily dose of about 5334 C. daubneyi metacercariae for a period of 3 weeks resulting in the build-up of very large numbers of immature worms in the small intestine. It is hypothesized that specific environmental conditions may favour this parasite over its competitor, the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, possibly by allowing it to emerge earlier. The possibility that C. daubneyi may be better adapted to the Irish climate than F. hepatica together with the fact that selective treatment against F. hepatica effectively frees the niche for C. daubneyi, may result in the gradual replacement of F. hepatica by C. daubneyi.

  20. High Prevalence of Human Liver Infection by Amphimerus spp. Flukes, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Kumazawa, Hideo; Eisenberg, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Amphimerus spp. flukes are known to infect mammals, but human infections have not been confirmed. Microscopy of fecal samples from 397 persons from Ecuador revealed Opisthorchiidae eggs in 71 (24%) persons. Light microscopy of adult worms and scanning electron microscopy of eggs were compatible with descriptions of Amphimerus spp. This pathogen was only observed in communities that consumed undercooked fish. PMID:22172165

  1. Influence of levamisole and Freund's adjuvant on mouse immunisation with antigens of adults of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica Linnaeus, 1758.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sanchez, Maria de Los Angeles; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; Trejo-Castro, Lauro; Montenegro-Cristino, Natividad; Almanza-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; de la Rosa-Arana, Jorge Luis

    2015-08-28

    We have studied the influence of both levamisole (AL) and Freund's adjuvant (AF) on the immunisation of mice with the secretory antigens of adults of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica Linnaeus, 1758. Total IgG antibodies were detected in all groups where the F. hepatica antigen was administered, been levels of IgG1 increased respect to IgG2a antibodies. During immunisation, IL-4 and IFN-γ were only detected in AL and AF groups, but after infection, IL-4 boosted in all groups. IFN-γ increased two fold in AF and AL groups compared to the saline solution (AS) group. Worm recovering was of 32-35% in groups administered without antigen whereas in AS, AL and AF groups recovering was of 25%, 12% and 8%, respectively. Macroscopical lesions in the liver were scarce in AL and AF groups. Our data suggest that immunisation of mice with antigens of F. hepatica enhances the immune response avoiding both liver damage and worm establishment after challenge infection. The murine model of fasciolosis has appeared to be useful to elucidate the mechanism by which the parasite modulates immune responses toward a Th2 type but also the development of Th1 type-inducing vaccines.

  2. Molecular and structural characteristics of multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 in Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fuhong; Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Ji-Yun; Lu, Yanyan; Pak, Jhang Ho; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10) is a C subfamily member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. MRP7 is a lipophilic anion transporter that pumps endogenous and xenobiotic substrates from the cytoplasm to the extracellular milieu. Here, we cloned and characterized CsMRP7 as a novel ABC transporter from the Chinese liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis. Full-length cDNA of CsMRP7 was 5174 nt, encoded 1636 amino acids (aa), and harbored a 147-bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and 116-bp 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that CsMRP7 was closer to the ABCC subfamily than the ABCB subfamily. Tertiary structures of the N-terminal region (1-322 aa) and core region (323-1621 aa) of CsMRP7 were generated by homology modeling using glucagon receptor (PDB ID: 5ee7_A) and P-glycoprotein (PDB ID: 4f4c_A) as templates, respectively. CsMRP7 nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) was conserved more than NBD1, which was the sites of ATP binding and hydrolysis. Like typical long MRPs, CsMRP7 has an additional membrane-spanning domain 0 (MSD0) and cytoplasmic loop, along with a common structural fold consisting of MSD1-NBD1-MSD2-NBD2 as a single polypeptide assembly. MSD0, MSD1, and MSD2 consisted of TM1-7, TM8-13, and TM14-19, respectively. The CsMRP7 transcript was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adult worms. Truncated NBD1 (39 kDa) and NBD2 (44 kDa) were produced in bacteria and mouse immune sera were raised. CsMRP7 was localized in the apical side of the intestinal epithelium, sperm in the testes and seminal receptacle, receptacle membrane, and mesenchymal tissue around intestine in the adult worm. These results provide molecular information and insights into structural and functional characteristics of CsMRP7 and homologs of flukes.

  3. Molecular phylogenetic identification of Fasciola flukes in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shoriki, Takuya; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Devkota, Bhuminand; Rana, Hari B; Devkota, Shiva P; Humagain, Sudeep K; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2014-12-01

    Eighty-one Fasciola flukes collected from 8 districts in Nepal were analyzed for their species identification on the basis of their spermatogenic status and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and for their phylogenetic relation with Fasciola flukes from other Asian countries on the basis of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene. Sixty-one flukes (75.3%) were aspermic Fasciola sp., and 20 flukes (24.7%) were identified as Fasciola gigantica. All of the aspermic flukes displayed the Fh/Fg type in ITS1, which was predominant in aspermic Fasciola sp. from China, and most (60 flukes) displayed the Fsp-ND1-N1 haplotype in the nad1, which had an identical nucleotide sequence to the major haplotype (Fg-C2) of the aspermic flukes from China. These results suggest that aspermic Fasciola sp. was introduced into Nepal from China. Furthermore, the results of the diversity indices, neutrality indices, and median-joining network analysis with reference haplotypes from Asian countries suggest that aspermic Fasciola sp. rapidly expanded its distribution. In contrasts, F. gigantica displayed 10 nad1 haplotypes, which showed higher population diversity indices than the haplotypes of aspermic flukes, indicating that the F. gigantica population was clearly distributed in Nepal earlier than the aspermic Fasciola population. Although the F. gigantica haplotypes from Nepal formed a star-like phylogeny consisting of a main founder haplotype (Fg-ND1-N1), together with some F. gigantica haplotypes from Myanmar and Thailand, the Nepal population differed genetically from F. gigantica populations of neighboring countries as each country had distinct founder haplotype(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recombinant adenylate kinase 3 from liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis for histochemical analysis and serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Bin; Kim, Paul; Woo, Hae Sun; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Ju Yeong; Lee, Hye Min; Jang, Yun Soo; Kim, Eun-Min; Yong, Tai-Soon; Seong, Baik Lin

    2018-03-27

    Due to the lack of an effective prophylactic intervention and diagnosis, human liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis continues to afflict a large human population, causing a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. With an aim to identify target antigens for sensitive serodiagnosis, adenylate kinase 3 of C. sinensis (CsAK3) was successfully expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli by fusion to an RNA-interacting domain derived from human Lys-tRNA synthetase and purified by Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Anti-CsAK3 serum was raised by immunization of mice, and Western blotting confirmed that CsAK3 was expressed in adult-stage C. sinensis. Histochemical analysis showed that CsAK3 was localized to the subtegumental tissue of C. sinensis and was excreted into the bile duct of the host. When tested against sera from various parasite-infected patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the recombinant CsAK3 elicited a specific response to C. sinensis-infected sera. The results suggest that CsAK3, either alone or in combination with other antigens, could be used for improving the clinical diagnosis of clonorchiasis.

  5. Unusual thiol-based redox metabolism of parasitic flukes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Timir; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    Parasitic flukes are exposed to free radicals and, to a greater extent, reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their life cycle. Despite being relentlessly exposed to ROS released by activated immune cells, these parasites can survive for many years in the host. Cellular thiol-based redox metabolism plays a crucial role in parasite survival within their hosts. Evidence shows that oxidative stress and redox homeostasis maintenance are important clinical and pathobiochemical as well as effective therapeutic principles in various diseases. The characterization of redox and antioxidant enzymes is likely to yield good target candidates for novel drugs and vaccines. The absence of active catalase in fluke parasites offers great potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents that act by perturbing the redox equilibrium of the cell. One of the redox-sensitive enzymes, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), has been accepted as a drug target against blood fluke infections, and related clinical trials are in progress. TGR is the sole enzyme responsible for Trx and GSH reduction in parasitic flukes. The availability of helminth genomes has accelerated the research on redox metabolism of flukes; however, significant achievements have yet to be attained. The present review summarizes current knowledge on the redox and antioxidant system of the parasitic flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacological and morphological characteristics of the muscular system of the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna - Bassi 1875).

    PubMed

    Trailović, Saša M; Marinković, Darko; Trailović, Jelena Nedeljković; Milovanović, Mirjana; Marjanović, Djordje S; Aničić, Milan R

    2015-12-01

    Motility is required for feeding, reproduction and maintenance of the fluke in the host's liver. According to that, the neuromuscular system can be an attractive drugable target for chemotherapy. Musculature of the Fascioloides magna is organized into three layers, an outer circular layer, beneath this layer the longitudinal layer, and third, the oblique, or diagonal layer underlies the longitudinal layer. In our study, the administration of atropine or caffeine did not cause classic muscle contractions of F. magna muscle strips. However, the Electrical Field Stimulation (EFS) induced stable and repeatable contractions, which enabled us to examine their sensitivity to the various substances. Acetylcholine (ACh) (300 μM and 1 mM), caused only a slight relaxation, without affecting the amplitude of spontaneous contractions or the amplitude of contractions induced by EFS. Contrary to that, atropine (100 μM) caused a significant increase in the basal tone and an increase of EFS-induced contractions. If acetylcholine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in trematodes, the described effects of atropine are achieved by the blockade of inhibitory neurotransmission. On the other hand, with respect to the process of excitation-contraction coupling, the plant alkaloid ryanodine (30 μM) significantly reduced the basal tone, as well as EFS-induced contractions of F. magna muscle strips. Ryanodine inhibited the potentiating effect of atropine on the basal tone and contractions caused by EFS, which indicates that the contractile effect of atropine is dependent on Ca(++) release from intracellular stores. Caffeine (500 μM) caused relaxation of fluke muscle strips and at the same time significantly enhanced the EFS-induced contractions. Both effects of caffeine can be explained by entry of extracellular Ca(++) into muscle cells. The muscle contractility of F. magna depends both on the entry of extracellular calcium, and calcium release from intracellular stores, which are

  7. Morphology of the core fibrous layer of the cetacean tail fluke.

    PubMed

    Gough, William T; Fish, Frank E; Wainwright, Dylan K; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2018-06-01

    The cetacean tail fluke blades are not supported by any vertebral elements. Instead, the majority of the blades are composed of a densely packed collagenous fiber matrix known as the core layer. Fluke blades from six species of odontocete cetaceans were examined to compare the morphology and orientation of fibers at different locations along the spanwise and chordwise fluke blade axes. The general fiber morphology was consistent with a three-dimensional structure comprised of two-dimensional sheets of fibers aligned tightly in a laminated configuration along the spanwise axis. The laminated configuration of the fluke blades helps to maintain spanwise rigidity while allowing partial flexibility during swimming. When viewing the chordwise sectional face at the leading edge and mid-chord regions, fibers displayed a crossing pattern. This configuration relates to bending and structural support of the fluke blade. The trailing edge core was found to have parallel fibers arranged more dorso-ventrally. The fiber morphology of the fluke blades was dorso-ventrally symmetrical and similar in all species except the pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), which was found to have additional core layer fiber bundles running along the span of the fluke blade. These additional fibers may increase stiffness of the structure by resisting tension along their long spanwise axis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Egg-specific expression of protein with DNA methyltransferase activity in the biocarcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Hee; Cho, Hye-Jeong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kong, Yoon; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Bae, Young-An

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent reports regarding the biology of cytosine methylation in Schistosoma mansoni, the impact of the regulatory machinery remains unclear in diverse platyhelminthes. This ambiguity is reinforced by discoveries of DNA methyltransferase 2 (DNMT2)-only organisms and the substrate specificity of DNMT2 preferential to RNA molecules. Here, we characterized a novel DNA methyltransferase, named CsDNMT2, in a liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. The protein exhibited structural properties conserved in other members of the DNMT2 family. The native and recombinant CsDNMT2 exhibited considerable enzymatic activity on DNA. The spatiotemporal expression of CsDNMT2 mirrored that of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC), both of which were elevated in the C. sinensis eggs. However, CsDNMT2 and 5 mC were marginally detected in other histological regions of C. sinensis adults including ovaries and seminal receptacle. The methylation site seemed not related to genomic loci occupied by progenies of an active long-terminal-repeat retrotransposon. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that C. sinensis has preserved the functional DNA methylation machinery and that DNMT2 acts as a genuine alternative to DNMT1/DNMT3 to methylate DNA in the DNMT2-only organism. The epigenetic regulation would target functional genes primarily involved in the formation and/or maturation of eggs, rather than retrotransposons.

  9. Random and systematic sampling error when hooking fish to monitor skin fluke (Benedenia seriolae) and gill fluke (Zeuxapta seriolae) burden in Australian farmed yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    PubMed

    Fensham, J R; Bubner, E; D'Antignana, T; Landos, M; Caraguel, C G B

    2018-05-01

    The Australian farmed yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi, YTK) industry monitor skin fluke (Benedenia seriolae) and gill fluke (Zeuxapta seriolae) burden by pooling the fluke count of 10 hooked YTK. The random and systematic error of this sampling strategy was evaluated to assess potential impact on treatment decisions. Fluke abundance (fluke count per fish) in a study cage (estimated 30,502 fish) was assessed five times using the current sampling protocol and its repeatability was estimated the repeatability coefficient (CR) and the coefficient of variation (CV). Individual body weight, fork length, fluke abundance, prevalence, intensity (fluke count per infested fish) and density (fluke count per Kg of fish) were compared between 100 hooked and 100 seined YTK (assumed representative of the entire population) to estimate potential selection bias. Depending on the fluke species and age category, CR (expected difference in parasite count between 2 sampling iterations) ranged from 0.78 to 114 flukes per fish. Capturing YTK by hooking increased the selection of fish of a weight and length in the lowest 5th percentile of the cage (RR = 5.75, 95% CI: 2.06-16.03, P-value = 0.0001). These lower end YTK had on average an extra 31 juveniles and 6 adults Z. seriolae per Kg of fish and an extra 3 juvenile and 0.4 adult B. seriolae per Kg of fish, compared to the rest of the cage population (P-value < 0.05). Hooking YTK on the edge of the study cage biases sampling towards the smallest and most heavily infested fish in the population, resulting in poor repeatability (more variability amongst sampled fish) and an overestimation of parasite burden in the population. In this particular commercial situation these finding supported that health management program, where the finding of an underestimation of parasite burden could provide a production impact on the study population. In instances where fish populations and parasite burdens are more homogenous, sampling

  10. Fasciola hepatica: Histology of the Reproductive Organs and Differential Effects of Triclabendazole on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Fluke Isolates and on Flukes from Selected Field Cases.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Robert

    2015-06-26

    This review summarises the findings of a series of studies in which the histological changes, induced in the reproductive system of Fasciola hepatica following treatment of the ovine host with the anthelmintic triclabendazole (TCBZ), were examined. A detailed description of the normal macroscopic arrangement and histological features of the testes, ovary, vitelline tissue, Mehlis' gland and uterus is provided to aid recognition of the drug-induced lesions, and to provide a basic model to inform similar toxicological studies on F. hepatica in the future. The production of spermatozoa and egg components represents the main energy consuming activity of the adult fluke. Thus the reproductive organs, with their high turnover of cells and secretory products, are uniquely sensitive to metabolic inhibition and sub-cellular disorganisation induced by extraneous toxic compounds. The flukes chosen for study were derived from TCBZ-sensitive (TCBZ-S) and TCBZ-resistant (TCBZ-R) isolates, the status of which had previously been proven in controlled clinical trials. For comparison, flukes collected from flocks where TCBZ resistance had been diagnosed by coprological methods, and from a dairy farm with no history of TCBZ use, were also examined. The macroscopic arrangement of the reproductive system in flukes was studied using catechol/carmine stained whole mounts, and the histology of the main organs was examined using conventional haematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Validation of apoptosis in the fluke sections was carried out using an in situ hybridisation method designed to label endonuclease-induced DNA strand breaks. In TCBZ-S flukes exposed to TCBZ metabolites for 24-96 h in vivo, but not in TCBZ-R flukes, those tissues where active meiosis and/or mitosis occurred (testis, ovary, and vitelline follicles), were found to display progressive loss of cell content. This was due to apparent failure of cell division to keep pace with expulsion of the mature or effete products

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of Amphimerus spp. liver fluke infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cevallos, William; Calvopiña, Manuel; Nipáz, Victoria; Vicente-Santiago, Belén; López-Albán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Guevara, Ángel; Muro, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amphimerus spp. is a liver fluke that infects humans and domestic animals. It is highly prevalent in some Ecuadorian communities. Currently, diagnosis is based on the microscopic observation of eggs in faeces, but this has variable sensitivity. More sensitive methods are needed for diagnostic testing. OBJECTIVE The main objective of this work was to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using crude antigens from Amphimerus spp. adult worms to detect anti-Amphimerus IgG in human sera. METHODS Crude somatic antigens were obtained from adult Amphimerus spp. worms. Human sera from 119 patients were tested: 48 from individuals with a confirmed Amphimerus spp. infection, 78 from non-infected Ecuadorians living in the endemic region, 60 from persons living in non-endemic areas (20 Ecuadorians, 20 Europeans, and 20 Africans), and 33 who had other parasitic and non-parasitic infections. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS Results were analysed using the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis with an area under curve (AUC) value of 0.967. The accuracy of the ELISA was high. The sensitivity was 85.0% [95% confidence interval (CI): 80.3-89.7%] and the specificity was 71.0% (95% CI: 65.2-76.8%). Some cross reactivity was detected against Paragonimus mexicanus, Fasciola hepatica, Schistosomiasis, Taenia solium, Strongyloides stercoralis, Mansonella spp., and Vampirolepis nana. MAIN CONCLUSIONS We have developed the first ELISA technique that detects anti-Amphimerus IgG in human sera with good sensitivity, repeatability and reproducibility. However, more specific antigens are needed to further enhance performance of this assay. Regardless, this ELISA test could be useful for early diagnosis and prompt treatment of human Amphimerus spp. infections. PMID:28443982

  12. In vitro antihelmintic effect of fifteen tropical plant extracts on excysted flukes of Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Mercado, José Manuel; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Alonso-Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Vera-Montenegro, Yolanda; Avila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; García-Bores, Ana María

    2015-02-27

    Fasciolosis due to Fasciola hepatica is the most important hepatic disease in veterinary medicine. Its relevance is important because of the major economical losses to the cattle industry such as: reduction in milk, meat and wool production; miscarriages, anemia, liver condemnation and occasionally deaths, are estimated in billons of dollars. The emergence of fluke resistance due to over or under dosing of fasciolides as well as environmental damage produced by the chemicals eliminated in field have stimulated the need for alternative methods to control Fasciola hepatica. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anthelmintic effect of fifteen tropical plant extracts used in tradicional Mexican medicine, on newly excysted flukes of Fasciola hepatica. The flukes were exposed in triplicate at 500, 250 and 125 mg/L to each extract. The efficacy was assessed as the mortality rate based on the number of live and dead flukes after 24, 48 and 72 h post-exposure. The plants with anthelmintic effect were evaluated once again with a concentration of 375 mg/L in order to confirm the results and to calculate lethal concentrations at 50%, 90% and 99% (LC(50), LC(90), and LC(99)). Plant extracts of Lantana camara, Bocconia frutescens, Piper auritum, Artemisia mexicana and Cajanus cajan had an in vitro anthelmintic effect (P <0.05). The LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) to A. mexicana, C. cajan and B. frutescens were 92.85, 210.44 and 410.04 mg/L, 382.73, 570.09 and 788.9 mg/L and 369.96, 529.94 and 710.34 mg/L, respectively. It is concluded that five tropical plant extracts had promising anthelmintic effects against F. hepatica. Further studies on toxicity and in vivo biological evaluation in ruminant models might help to determine the anthelmintic potential of these plant extracts.

  13. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola flukes from eastern India.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kei; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Singh, T Shantikumar; Shoriki, Takuya; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Fasciola flukes from eastern India were characterized on the basis of spermatogenesis status and nuclear ITS1. Both Fasciola gigantica and aspermic Fasciola flukes were detected in Imphal, Kohima, and Gantoku districts. The sequences of mitochondrial nad1 were analyzed to infer their phylogenetical relationship with neighboring countries. The haplotypes of aspermic Fasciola flukes were identical or showed a single nucleotide substitution compared to those from populations in the neighboring countries, corroborating the previous reports that categorized them in the same lineage. However, the prevalence of aspermic Fasciola flukes in eastern India was lower than those in the neighboring countries, suggesting that they have not dispersed throughout eastern India. In contrast, F. gigantica was predominant and well diversified, and the species was thought to be distributed in the area for a longer time than the aspermic Fasciola flukes. Fasciola gigantica populations from eastern India were categorized into two distinct haplogroups A and B. The level of their genetic diversity suggests that populations belonging to haplogroup A have dispersed from the west side of the Indian subcontinent to eastern India with the artificial movement of domestic cattle, Bos indicus, whereas populations belonging to haplogroup B might have spread from Myanmar to eastern India with domestic buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fasciola hepatica: a comparative survey of adult fluke resistance to triclabendazole, nitroxynil and closantel on selected upland and lowland sheep farms in Northern Ireland using faecal egg counting, coproantigen ELISA testing and fluke histology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, R E B; McMahon, C; Ellison, S; Edgar, H W; Kajugu, P-E; Gordon, A; Irwin, D; Barley, J P; Malone, F E; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2015-01-15

    In order to investigate the incidence and distribution of adult fluke resistance to the fasciolicide tricalbendazole (TCBZ) amongst populations of Fasciola hepatica in sheep flocks in Northern Ireland (NI), individual rectal faeces samples were collected from 3 groups of 20 sheep, before (pre-dose), and 21 days after (post-dose) treatment of the animals with TCBZ, nitroxynil or closantel, on each of 13 well-managed sheep farms distributed across the province. The efficacy of each flukicide was determined for each farm, using faecal egg count reduction (FECRT) and F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA testing. In certain flocks, 2 sheep with high pre-dose faecal egg counts (FEC) were killed 3 days and 21 days respectively after TCBZ treatment, and the histology of the fluke reproductive organs was compared with that of flukes from untreated sheep, and from sheep treated with nitroxynil or closantel 2 days prior to death, using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and an in situ hybridisation method (TdT-mediated dUDP nick end labelling [TUNEL]) to demonstrate apoptosis. Results from FECRT revealed that in all flocks with a high fluke burden, TCBZ was ineffective in treating chronic fasciolosis, and this finding was generally supported by the results of the coproantigen reduction test (CRT). The histology of reproductive organs of flukes from TCBZ-treated sheep in these flocks was normal, when compared with untreated flukes, and this, together with the FECRT and CRT findings, indicated a likely diagnosis of TCBZ resistance in all the flocks with a high fluke burden. In contrast, nitroxynil and closantel were found to be fully effective against TCBZ-resistant flukes in each of the flocks bearing a high chronic fluke burden. All of the flocks with a high fluke burden and TCBZ resistance were managed on lowland in the South and East of NI. Upland flocks, in the North and West, had low fluke burdens, or were clear of infection; and FECs were too low to allow valid resistance

  15. Molecular analysis of aspermic Fasciola flukes from Korea on the basis of the nuclear ITS1 region and mitochondrial DNA markers and comparison with Japanese aspermic Fasciola flukes.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2012-07-01

    It has been speculated that populations of aspermic Fasciola flukes in Korea and Japan have a close phylogenetic relationship. To evaluate this, we analyzed 33 Korean aspermic Fasciola flukes on the basis of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) sequences. Fh, Fg, and Fh/Fg types were detected in the ITS1 region and displayed the fragment patterns of F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and both species, respectively by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Additionally, three concatenated haplotypes of nad1 and cox1(nad1/cox1) were detected, and 2 of these, Kor1/Kor1 (Fsp1/Fsp1) haplotype and Kor2a/Kor2 (Fsp2/Fsp2) haplotype, were shared by Korean and Japanese aspermic flukes. The Fst value (0.019), calculated using the concatenated sequences, indicated that Korean and Japanese aspermic Fasciola populations were genetically undifferentiated. Interestingly, a combination of the Fh/Fg type and Kor1/Kor1 haplotype was found at the highest frequency in Korean aspermic flukes, whereas the Fg type and Fsp2/Fsp2 haplotype combination was found at a conspicuously high frequency in Japanese aspermic flukes. This indicates that a founder effect caused by the introduction of infected hosts may have played a key role in the introduction of aspermic Fasciola flukes from Korea into Japan.

  16. Molecular characterization of Fasciola flukes obtained from wild sika deer and domestic cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Shiroma, Tomoko; Kariya, Tatsuya; Nakao, Ryo; Ohari, Yuma; Hayashi, Kei; Fukumoto, Shinya

    2017-10-01

    The number of wild sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) continues to increase in Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. The major concern for the livestock industry is the transmission of pathogens between sika deer and cattle. Fasciolosis is an important disease that can occur in both animals. The aim of this study was to examine the possible mutual transmission of this disease in Hokkaido Prefecture. A total of 105 Fasciola flukes were obtained from sika deer and 96 from domestic cattle. The Fasciola flukes in Japan are reported to possess no mature sperm. However, in this study, 14 flukes from sika deer and eight flukes from cattle contained mature sperm in their seminal vesicles. All the Fasciola flukes from the two host animals had Fh/Fg type in nuclear phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) gene, with a mixed fragment pattern derived from F. hepatica and F. gigantica, which are considered to be hybrid Fasciola flukes. However, almost all the flukes had Fsp1 haplotype in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene, indicating that their maternal lineage was F. hepatica. A new haplotype, Fsp3, was detected in one fluke obtained from cattle and differed in one nucleotide from Fsp1. Therefore, the Fasciola flukes detected in both host species had almost identical molecular characteristics. These findings suggest the mutual transmission of Fasciola flukes between sika deer and domestic cattle in Hokkaido. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Fluke Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    be an extension of Utah’s nascent Quarks system, oriented to closely coupled cluster environments. However, the grant did not actually begin until... Intel x86, implemented ten virtual machine monitors and servers, including a virtual memory manager, a checkpointer, a process manager, a file server...Fluke, we developed a novel hierarchical processor scheduling frame- work called CPU inheritance scheduling [5]. This is a framework for scheduling

  18. Foodborne Intestinal Flukes in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Hee; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Rim, Han-Jong

    2009-01-01

    In Southeast Asia, a total of 59 species of foodborne intestinal flukes have been known to occur in humans. The largest group is the family Heterophyidae, which constitutes 22 species belonging to 9 genera (Centrocestus, Haplorchis, Heterophyes, Heterophyopsis, Metagonimus, Procerovum, Pygidiopsis, Stellantchasmus, and Stictodora). The next is the family Echinostomatidae, which includes 20 species in 8 genera (Artyfechinostomum, Acanthoparyphium, Echinochasmus, Echinoparyphium, Echinostoma, Episthmium, Euparyphium, and Hypoderaeum). The family Plagiorchiidae follows the next containing 5 species in 1 genus (Plagiorchis). The family Lecithodendriidae includes 3 species in 2 genera (Phaneropsolus and Prosthodendrium). In 9 other families, 1 species in 1 genus each is involved; Cathaemaciidae (Cathaemacia), Fasciolidae (Fasciolopsis), Gastrodiscidae (Gastrodiscoides), Gymnophallidae (Gymnophalloides), Microphallidae (Spelotrema), Neodiplostomidae (Neodiplostomum), Paramphistomatidae (Fischoederius), Psilostomidae (Psilorchis), and Strigeidae (Cotylurus). Various types of foods are sources of human infections. They include freshwater fish, brackish water fish, fresh water snails, brackish water snails (including the oyster), amphibians, terrestrial snakes, aquatic insects, and aquatic plants. The reservoir hosts include various species of mammals or birds.The host-parasite relationships have been studied in Metagonimus yokogawai, Echinostoma hortense, Fasciolopsis buski, Neodiplostomum seoulense, and Gymnophalloides seoi; however, the pathogenicity of each parasite species and host mucosal defense mechanisms are yet poorly understood. Clinical aspects of each parasite infection need more clarification. Differential diagnosis by fecal examination is difficult because of morphological similarity of eggs. Praziquantel is effective for most intestinal fluke infections. Continued efforts to understand epidemiological significance of intestinal fluke infections, with

  19. A case of a facultative life-cycle diversification in the fluke Pleurogenoides sp. (Lecithodendriidae, Plagiorchiida).

    PubMed

    Hassl, Andreas R

    2010-10-01

    Numerous specimens of the native, intestinal digenean fluke Pleurogenoides sp. (Lecithodendriidae, Plagiorchiida), a genus known for the simultaneous co-existence of genuine adults and progenetic, adult-like metacercaria, were found by chance parasitizing in the oesophagus of a recently imported, tropical Bristly Bush Viper (Atheris hispida). The snake had before been force-fed with native water frogs, the assumed definitive host of these flukes. Hence water frogs act as the second intermediate host or as a paratenic host for Pleurogenoides flukes, as they must house progenetic fluke larvae, which develop to genuine adults when transmitted to an appropriate consecutive host, the ancestral definitive host, a reptile. The European Pleurogenoides fluke species seem to display a facultative life-cycle diversification, they can adjust their life-history strategy according to their immediate transmission opportunities. This phenotypic plasticity allows the parasite to respond quickly to any changes in the abundance of a host; usually this biological oddity results in a life-cycle truncation by the elimination of the definitive host.

  20. Establishment of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines from patients in the endemic area of liver fluke infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saensa-Ard, Sunitta; Leuangwattanawanit, Saman; Senggunprai, Laddawan; Namwat, Nisana; Kongpetch, Sarinya; Chamgramol, Yaovalux; Loilome, Watcharin; Khansaard, Walaiporn; Jusakul, Apinya; Prawan, Auemduan; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Khantikeo, Narong; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2017-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a rare type of cancer which is an increasingly discernible health threat. The disease is usually very difficult in diagnosis and various treatment modalities are typically not effective. Cholangiocarcinoma is a complex and very heterogeneous malignancy characterized by tumor location, different risk factors, molecular profiling, and prognosis. Cancer cell lines represent an important tool for investigation in various aspects of tumor biology and molecular therapeutics. We established two cell lines, KKU-452 and KKU-023, which were derived from patients residing in the endemic area of liver fluke infection in Thailand. Both of tumor tissues have gross pathology of perihilar and intrahepatic mass-forming cholangiocarcinoma. Two cell lines were characterized for their biological, molecular and genetic properties. KKU-452 and KKU-023 cells are both adherent cells with epithelium morphology, but have some differences in their growth pattern (a doubling time of 17.9 vs 34.8 h, respectively) and the expression of epithelial bile duct markers, CK7 and CK19. Cytogenetic analysis of KKU-452 and KKU-023 cells revealed their highly complex karyotypes; hypertriploid and hypotetraploid, respectively, with multiple chromosomal aberrations. Both cell lines showed mutations in p53 but not in KRAS. KKU-452 showed a very rapid migration and invasion properties in concert with low expression of E-cadherin and high expression of N-cadherin, whereas KKU-023 showed opposite characters. KKU-023, but not KKU-452, showed in vivo tumorigenicity in xenografted nude mice. Those two established cholangiocarcinoma cell lines with unique characters may be valuable for better understanding the process of carcinogenesis and developing new therapeutics for the patients.

  1. Modeling impacts of climate change on the potential distribution of the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannatrai, A; Pratumchart, K; Suwannatrai, K; Thinkhamrop, K; Chaiyos, J; Kim, C S; Suwanweerakamtorn, R; Boonmars, T; Wongsaroj, T; Sripa, B

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change is now regarded as imposing a significant threat of enhancing transmission of parasitic diseases. Maximum entropy species distribution modeling (MaxEnt) was used to explore how projected climate change could affect the potential distribution of the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, in Thailand. A range of climate variables was used: the Hadley Global Environment Model 2-Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) climate change model and also the IPCC scenarios A2a for 2050 and 2070. Occurrence data from surveys conducted in 2009 and 2014 were obtained from the Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand. The MaxEnt model performed better than random for O. viverrini with training AUC values greater than 0.8 under current and future climatic conditions. The current distribution of O. viverrini is significantly affected by precipitation and minimum temperature. According to current conditions, parts of Thailand climatically suitable for O. viverrini are mostly in the northeast and north, but the parasite is largely absent from southern Thailand. Under future climate change scenarios, the distribution of O. viverrini in 2050 should be significantly affected by precipitation, maximum temperature, and mean temperature of the wettest quarter, whereas in 2070, significant factors are likely to be precipitation during the coldest quarter, maximum, and minimum temperatures. Maps of predicted future distribution revealed a drastic decrease in presence of O. viverrini in the northeast region. The information gained from this study should be a useful reference for implementing long-term prevention and control strategies for O. viverrini in Thailand.

  2. Presence and species identity of rumen flukes in cattle and sheep in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Ploeger, H W; Ankum, L; Moll, L; van Doorn, D C K; Mitchell, G; Skuce, P J; Zadoks, R N; Holzhauer, M

    2017-08-30

    The purpose of the study was to gain knowledge about the prevalence and identity of rumen flukes (RF) in cattle and sheep in the Netherlands. Routine faecal examinations of diagnostic submissions between May 2009 and September 2014 showed a mean annual herd or flock RF prevalence of 15.8% for cattle and 8.0% for sheep. Prevalence in cattle was higher after 2012 than before, which may reflect a change in detection method as well as an increase in true prevalence. During November and December 2014, an abattoir survey was conducted to allow for scoring of rumen fluke burden and to obtain specimens for molecular species characterization. Over 8 visits to 5 abattoirs in areas deemed to pose a high risk for trematode infection, 116 cows and 41 sheep from 27 herds and 10 flocks were examined. Prevalence of RF was higher in beef cattle than in dairy cattle and higher in cattle than in sheep. Median fluke burden was >100 specimens per animal for most positive animals. Using a semi-quantitative RF density score as a gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of a modified quantitative Dorsman egg counting method were estimated at 82.6% and 83.3%, respectively. Of 14 collected adult rumen flukes, twelve (8 bovine and 4 ovine specimens) were identified as Calicophoron daubneyi. The other two, of bovine origin, were identified as Paramphistomum leydeni, which was unexpected as in other European countries all recently collected rumen flukes in both cattle and sheep were identified as C. daubneyi. The findings implicate that multiple rumen fluke species, intermediate host species and transmission cycles may play a role in rumen fluke infections in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Intestinal and liver flukes of birds of prey (Accipitriformes, Falconiformes, Strigiformes) from Slovakia: uniform or diverse compound?

    PubMed

    Komorová, Petronela; Sitko, Jiljí; Špakulová, Marta; Hurníková, Zuzana

    2016-07-01

    During 2012-2014 up to 286 birds of the orders Falconiformes (5 species), Accipitriformes (11 species), and Strigiformes (7 species) were examined for trematodes and this represents the first detailed study in Slovakia. A total of 12 trematode species belonging to the families Diplostomidae, Cyathocotylidae, Strigeidae, and Opisthorchiidae were identified. Rare infections were found in falcons where only two species (40 %) and three of 85 examined birds (3.5 %) were infected with a low range of two to four worms of generalists Strigea falconis or Plagiorchis elegans. Contrary to that, ten accipitriformes species (90.9 %) and 63 of 156 bird individuals (40.4 %) were infected with nine flukes: Conodiplostomum perlatum, Conodiplostomum spathula, Neodiplostomum attenuatum, Neodiplostomum spathoides, Parastrigea flexilis, Strigea falconis, Strigea vandenbrokae, Paracoenogonimus ovatus, and Metorchis bilis. S. falconis and N. attenuatum were the most frequent, occurring in parallel in eight and four bird species, in numbers up to 575 and 224. The intensity of infection with other fluke species was low ranging from one to 13 worms. Three owl (Strigiformes) representatives (42.9 %) were exclusive hosts for Neodiplostomum canaliculatum and Strigea strigis, and the proportion of positive and dissected individual birds was 10:45 (22.2 %). Both trematodes occurred in two or three owl species. In conclusion, apparent dissimilarity of trematode load of three unrelated lines of falcons, eagles, and owls was revealed. The present study extends our knowledge on the composition of the trematode fauna in Slovakia as all species except S. falconis and P. elegans that represent new host and species records in Slovakia.

  4. Invasion of Flukes of the Echinostomatidae Family in Racing Pigeon ( Columba livia var. domestica) Lofts.

    PubMed

    Ledwoń, Aleksandra; Dolka, Beata; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dolka, Izabella; Szeleszczuk, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Over 4 years, only two known cases of fluke invasions were diagnosed in racing pigeons ( Columba livia ) originating from different regions of Poland. In both cases, the invasion was characterized by a very high mortality (approximately 70%), and the source of the infestation was snails of the Lymnaeidae family eaten by pigeons. Fluke invasions in pigeons are extremely rare and to date have not been described in Poland. Therefore, the occurrence of the symptoms of hemorrhagic diarrhea and sudden deaths of either adult pigeons or nestlings were suspected to be associated with poisoning. Autopsy revealed an invasion of flukes causing hemorrhagic enteritis. Renal failure and spleen atrophy were also found in the birds. Using molecular biology techniques, infestation with the fluke Echinostoma revolutum was determined in the second case.

  5. Protease Inhibitors of Parasitic Flukes: Emerging Roles in Parasite Survival and Immune Defence.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; McManus, Donald P

    2017-05-01

    Protease inhibitors play crucial roles in parasite development and survival, counteracting the potentially damaging immune responses of their vertebrate hosts. However, limited information is currently available on protease inhibitors from schistosomes and food-borne trematodes. Future characterization of these molecules is important not only to expand knowledge on parasitic fluke biology but also to determine whether they represent novel vaccine and/or drug targets. Moreover, protease inhibitors from flukes may represent lead compounds for the development of a new range of therapeutic agents against inflammatory disorders and cancer. This review discusses already identified protease inhibitors of fluke origin, emphasizing their biological function and their possible future development as new intervention targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A natural focus of the blood fluke Orientobilharzia turkestanica (Skrjabin, 1913) (Trematoda: Schistosomatidae) in red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Majoros, Gábor; Dán, Adám; Erdélyi, Károly

    2010-06-24

    The large American liver fluke, Fascioloides magna - introduced to Europe before 1875 - was the first non-indigenous trematode to be detected in Hungarian cervids in 1995. As the most precious deer population became infected in the Gemenc game reserve a study has been launched to assess the extent and the effect of F. magna infections and to examine the options for the treatment of infected deer populations. Livers of red deer shot during regular hunting were submitted for the survey and were investigated by necropsy for the presence of F. magna and other liver dwelling trematodes. Recovered parasites were counted, sorted and stored in 70% ethanol. Unexpectedly, blood flukes were found in liver blood vessels at necropsy. They were identified as Orientobilharzia turkestanica (Skrjabin, 1913) by their morphological features as well as by molecular methods. This parasite is widespread in the middle belt of Asia from Korea to the eastern part of Turkey and infects mainly bovids. It was never found in red deer until now and this is the first report of its occurrence in Hungary and Europe. A subsequent search for the local intermediate host of O. turkestanica in the Gemenc area identified only the pulmonate snail Radix auricularia (Linnaeus, 1758) [syn: Lymnaea auricularia] as a vector capable of producing cercariae of this trematode. Cercariae of O. turkestanica were examined morphologically and were confirmed to be the larvae of this trematode by PCR. O. turkestanica appears to be fairly common in red deer of the Gemenc area. No clinical or pathological effect of the infection could be identified in this study. A form of cercarial dermatitis locally called "water mange" was formerly attributed to the larvae of avian shistosomes. It regularly occurred among fishermen fishing in shallow ponds remaining after floods along the Danube in the Gemenc area. This isolated habitat of O. turkestanica presents an exceptional opportunity to study epidemical situations of typical

  7. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of the liver amphistome Explanatum explanatum (Creplin, 1847) Fukui, 1929 in ruminants from Bangladesh and Nepal based on nuclear ribosomal ITS2 and mitochondrial nad1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, U K; Rana, H B; Devkota, B; Itagaki, T

    2017-07-01

    Explanatum explanatum flukes, liver amphistomes of ruminants, cause significant economic loss in the livestock industry by inducing severe liver damage. A total of 66 flukes from 26 buffaloes and 7 cattle in four different geographic areas of Bangladesh and 20 flukes from 10 buffaloes in the Chitwan district of Nepal were subjected for analysis. The sequences (442 bp) of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA and the variable fragments (657 bp) of mitochondrial nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) of E. explanatum flukes from Bangladesh and Nepal were analysed. The aim of this study was molecular characterization of the flukes and to elucidate their origin and biogeography. In the ITS2 region, two genotypes were detected among the flukes from Bangladesh, while flukes from Nepal were of only one genotype. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from the nad1 gene revealed that at least four divergent populations (groups I-IV) are distributed in Bangladesh, whereas two divergent populations were found to be distributed in Nepal. Fst values (pairwise fixation index) suggest that Bangladeshi and Nepalese populations of group I to IV are significantly different from each other; but within groups III and IV, the populations from Bangladesh and Nepal were genetically close. This divergence in the nad1 gene indicates that each lineage of E. explanatum from diverse geography was co-adapted during the multiple domestication events of ruminants. This study, for the first time, provides molecular characterization of E. explanatum in Bangladesh and Nepal, and may provide useful information for elucidating its origin and dispersal route in Asia.

  8. New Genus of Blood Fluke (Digenea: Schistosomatoidea) from Malaysian Freshwater Turtles (Geoemydidae) and its Phylogenetic Position Within Schistosomatoidea.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jackson R; Platt, Thomas R; Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2016-08-01

    :  Baracktrema obamai n. gen., n. sp. infects the lung of geoemydid turtles (black marsh turtle, Siebenrockiella crassicollis [type host] and southeast Asian box turtle, Cuora amboinensis ) in the Malaysian states of Perak, Perlis, and Selangor. Baracktrema and Unicaecum Stunkard, 1925 are the only accepted turtle blood fluke genera having the combination of a single cecum, single testis, oviducal seminal receptacle, and uterine pouch. Baracktrema differs from Unicaecum by having a thread-like body approximately 30-50× longer than wide and post-cecal terminal genitalia. Unicaecum has a body approximately 8-12× longer than wide and terminal genitalia that are anterior to the distal end of the cecum. The new genus further differs from all other accepted turtle blood fluke genera by having a cecum that is highly convoluted for its entire length, a spindle-shaped ovary between the cirrus sac and testis, a uterine pouch that loops around the primary vitelline collecting duct, a Laurer's canal, and a dorsal common genital pore. Phylogenetic analysis of the D1-D3 domains of the nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (28S) revealed, with high nodal support and as predicted by morphology, that Baracktrema and Unicaecum share a recent common ancestor and form a clade sister to the freshwater turtle blood flukes of Spirorchis, paraphyletic Spirhapalum, and Vasotrema and that, collectively, these flukes were sister to all other tetrapod blood flukes (Hapalorhynchus + Griphobilharzia plus the marine turtle blood flukes and schistosomes). Pending a forthcoming emended morphological diagnosis of the family, the clade including Spirorchis spp., paraphyletic Spirhapalum, Vasotrema, Baracktrema, and Unicaecum is a likely placeholder for "Spirorchiidae Stunkard, 1921 " (type genus Spirorchis MacCallum, 1918 ; type species Spirorchis innominatus Ward, 1921 ). The present study comprises the 17th blood fluke known to infect geoemydid turtles and the first proposal of a new genus of

  9. Hybrid origin of Asian aspermic Fasciola flukes is confirmed by analyzing two single-copy genes, pepck and pold

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Kei; ICHIKAWA-SEKI, Madoka; MOHANTA, Uday Kumar; SHORIKI, Takuya; CHAICHANASAK, Pannigan; ITAGAKI, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear gene markers, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold), have been developed for precise discrimination of Fasciola flukes instead of internal transcribed spacer 1. In this study, these two genes of 730 Fasciola flukes from eight Asian countries were analyzed. The results were compared with their mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) lineages for obtaining a definitive evidence of the hybrid origin of aspermic Fasciola flukes. All the flukes categorized into the aspermic nad1 lineages possessed both the fragment patterns of F. hepatica and F. gigantica (mixed types) in pepck and/or pold. These findings provide clear evidence for the hybrid origin of aspermic Fasciola lineages and suggest that “aspermic Fasciola flukes” should hereafter be called “hybrid Fasciola flukes”. PMID:29187710

  10. RNA-Seq Reveals Infection-Induced Gene Expression Changes in the Snail Intermediate Host of the Carcinogenic Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Sotillo, Javier; Tesana, Smarn; Laha, Thewarach; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Nolan, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the snail intermediate host of the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, the leading cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in the Greater Mekong sub-region of Thailand. Despite the severe public health impact of Opisthorchis-induced CCA, knowledge of the molecular interactions occurring between the parasite and its snail intermediate host is scant. The examination of differences in gene expression profiling between uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos could provide clues on fundamental pathways involved in the regulation of snail-parasite interplay. Methodology/Principal Findings Using high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing and extensive bioinformatic analyses, we characterized the transcriptomes of uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos. Comparative analyses of gene expression profiling allowed the identification of 7,655 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), associated to 43 distinct biological pathways, including pathways associated with immune defense mechanisms against parasites. Amongst the DEGs with immune functions, transcripts encoding distinct proteases displayed the highest down-regulation in Bithynia specimens infected by O. viverrini; conversely, transcription of genes encoding heat-shock proteins and actins was significantly up-regulated in parasite-infected snails when compared to the uninfected counterparts. Conclusions/Significance The present study lays the foundation for functional studies of genes and gene products potentially involved in immune-molecular mechanisms implicated in the ability of the parasite to successfully colonize its snail intermediate host. The annotated dataset provided herein represents a ready-to-use molecular resource for the discovery of molecular pathways underlying susceptibility and resistance mechanisms of B. siamensis goniomphalos to O. viverrini and for comparative analyses with pulmonate snail intermediate hosts of other

  11. Prevalence and seasonal incidence of nematode parasites and fluke infections of sheep and goats in eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Menkir M; Uggla, Arvid; Waller, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    A 2-year abattoir survey was carried out to determine the prevalence, abundance and seasonal incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) nematodes and trematodes (flukes) of sheep and goats in the semi-arid zone of eastern Ethiopia. During May 2003 to April 2005, viscera including liver, lungs and GI tracts were collected from 655 sheep and 632 goats slaughtered at 4 abattoirs located in the towns of Haramaya, Harar, Dire Dawa and Jijiga in eastern Ethiopia. All animals were raised in the farming areas located within the community boundaries for each town. Collected materials were transported within 24 h to the parasitology laboratory of Haramaya University for immediate processing. Thirteen species belonging to 9 genera of GI nematodes (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, Nematodirus filicollis, N. spathiger Oesopha-gostomum columbianum, O. venulosum, Strongyloides papillosus, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Trichuris ovis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina), and 4 species belonging to 3 genera of trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, Paramphistomum {Calicohoron} microbothrium and Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were recorded in both sheep and goats. All animals in this investigation were infected with multiple species to varying degrees. The mean burdens of adult nematodes were generally moderate in both sheep and goats and showed patterns of seasonal abundance that corresponded with the bi-modal annual rainfall pattern, with highest burdens around the middle of the rainy season. In both sheep and goats there were significant differences in the mean worm burdens and abundance of the different nematode species between the four geographic locations, with worm burdens in the Haramaya and Harar areas greater than those observed in the Dire Dawa and Jijiga locations. Similar seasonal variations were also observed in the prevalence of flukes. But there were no significant differences in the prevalence of each fluke species between the

  12. Genetic and infective diversity of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda: Digenea) from Cuba.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, A A; Lounnas, M; Sánchez, J; Alba, A; Milesi, A; Hurtrez-Boussès, S

    2016-11-01

    In this study we present the first approach to exploration of the genetic diversity of Cuban Fasciola hepatica populations using microsatellite markers, coupled with observed prevalence in slaughterhouses. Nine populations of flukes recovered from cows and buffalos were studied in the central-western region of Cuba. The observed infection rates of definitive hosts (bovines) were 70-100% in most cases. An important amount of polymorphism was found in the four loci explored. However, no apparent genetic differences were found between populations from different provinces or bovine species. The absence of deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium suggests a high rate of cross-fertilization between F. hepatica individuals. This result was confirmed when all multilocus genotypes were tested for clonal reproduction and only four individuals differed statistically (P sex< 0.05). High values of expected heterozygosity coupled with highly probable mixing among strains make the metapopulation genetically diversified but similar in terms of certain alleles (low F ST values). These results suggest a close relationship between parasite diversity and cattle management in Cuba. Our findings should be taken into consideration by veterinary authorities to help mitigate fasciolosis transmission.

  13. Consequences of eye fluke infection on anti-predator behaviours in invasive round gobies in Kalmar Sound.

    PubMed

    Flink, Henrik; Behrens, Jane W; Svensson, P Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Larvae of the eye fluke, Diplostomum, emerge from snails and infect fish by penetrating skin or gills, then move to the lens where they may impair the vision of the fish. For the fluke to reproduce, a bird must eat the infected fish, and it has been suggested that they therefore actively manipulate the fish's behaviour to increase the risk of predation. We found that round gobies Neogobius melanostomus, a species that was recently introduced to the Kalmar Sound of the Baltic Sea, had an eye fluke prevalence of 90-100%. We investigated how the infection related to behavioural variation in round gobies. Our results showed that the more intense the parasite-induced cataract, the weaker the host's response was to simulated avian attack. The eye flukes did not impair other potentially important anti-predator behaviours, such as shelter use, boldness and the preference for shade. Our results are in accordance with the suggestion that parasites induce changes in host behaviour that will facilitate transfer to their final host.

  14. Investigating the impact of fasciolosis on cattle carcase performance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vazquez, Manuel J; Lewis, Fraser I

    2013-03-31

    Liver fluke is a manifestation of bovine fasciolosis and its presence is compulsorily investigated as part of routine official abattoir inspections. It is known that the presence of fasciolosis negatively influences beef production, interfering with weight gain and fertility. Recent reports suggest increased occurrence of this parasite worldwide. This paper aims to investigate the impact of fasciolosis on beef cattle performance by examining the association of liver fluke with carcase characteristics and its value. Cattle slaughtered between 2005 and 2010 (328, 137 cattle (of which 12.6% were positive to liver fluke) sourced from 2278 farms) are analysed adjusting for the effect of gender, age, breed, season and year. Carcases with liver fluke have lower cold weight than those carcases free of fluke, estimated coefficient -0.63 kg (95% confidence intervals (CI) -0.93, -0.33). Carcases with liver fluke have lower price than those carcases free of fluke, estimated coefficient -£1.5 (95% CI -2.24, -0.74). The presence of liver fluke is associated with lower carcase conformation scores compared to carcases with fluke absence, proportional odds ratio (POR) 0.89 (95% CI 0.87-0.91). Similarly, the presence of liver fluke is associated with lower levels of fat in the carcase compared to carcases with fluke absence, POR 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99). These results indicate a potential negative effect of the parasitism on carcase performance. The downgrading of the carcase impacts its value and therefore the price paid to the farmer. Both farmers and abattoir operators share a common interest in the control of fasciolosis in order to optimise the profitability of beef production. This study shows the utility of abattoir post-mortem inspection as a tool to monitoring animal health and production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An integrated pipeline for next generation sequencing and annotation of the complete mitochondrial genome of the giant intestinal fluke, Fasciolopsis buski (Lankester, 1857) Looss, 1899

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Ghatani, Sudeep; Shylla, Jollin A.; Sahu, Ranjana; Mullapudi, Nandita

    2013-01-01

    Helminths include both parasitic nematodes (roundworms) and platyhelminths (trematode and cestode flatworms) that are abundant, and are of clinical importance. The genetic characterization of parasitic flatworms using advanced molecular tools is central to the diagnosis and control of infections. Although the nuclear genome houses suitable genetic markers (e.g., in ribosomal (r) DNA) for species identification and molecular characterization, the mitochondrial (mt) genome consistently provides a rich source of novel markers for informative systematics and epidemiological studies. In the last decade, there have been some important advances in mtDNA genomics of helminths, especially lung flukes, liver flukes and intestinal flukes. Fasciolopsis buski, often called the giant intestinal fluke, is one of the largest digenean trematodes infecting humans and found primarily in Asia, in particular the Indian subcontinent. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies now provide opportunities for high throughput sequencing, assembly and annotation within a short span of time. Herein, we describe a high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline for mt genomics for F. buski that emphasizes the utility of short read NGS platforms such as Ion Torrent and Illumina in successfully sequencing and assembling the mt genome using innovative approaches for PCR primer design as well as assembly. We took advantage of our NGS whole genome sequence data (unpublished so far) for F. buski and its comparison with available data for the Fasciola hepatica mtDNA as the reference genome for design of precise and specific primers for amplification of mt genome sequences from F. buski. A long-range PCR was carried out to create an NGS library enriched in mt DNA sequences. Two different NGS platforms were employed for complete sequencing, assembly and annotation of the F. buski mt genome. The complete mt genome sequences of the intestinal fluke comprise 14,118 bp and is thus the shortest

  16. EGG-HATCHING MECHANISM OF HUMAN LIVER FLUKE, OPISTHORCHIS VIVERRINI: A ROLE FOR LEUCINE AMINOPEPTIDASES FROM THE SNAIL HOST, BITHYNIA SIAMENSIS GONIOMPHALOS.

    PubMed

    Tesana, Smarn; Khampoosa, P; Piratae, S; Prasopdee, S; Sripanidkulchai, B

    2018-05-08

    The human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda, Digenea) uses snails of the genus Bithynia as first intermediate host. Peculiarly among trematodes, the eggs of O. viverrini hatch within the digestive tract of its snail host. It remains uncertain whether hatching in this species is mediated through mechanical fracture of the eggshell or by digestion with specific digestive enzymes. This study aimed to characterize enzymes with specific inhibitor and factors involved in the hatching activity of O. viverrini eggs. For measuring egg hatching in vivo, 50 O. viverrini mature eggs were fed to individual Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snail at various temperature conditions for 24 hrs. Ex vivo, mature eggs were incubated with crude snail extract and commercial leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). Egg-hatching of O. viverrini was temperature dependent, with optimal hatching occurring at 24-28 C, with a peak of hatching of 93.54% in vivo and 30.55% ex vivo occurring at these temperatures. Ex vivo hatching rates increased to 45.87% under anaerobic conditions at 28 C. Some 22.70% and 16.21% of heat-killed eggs also hatched within the snail digestive tract and snail extract, respectively, indicating that host molecules are involved in the hatching response. Most eggs hatch in the anterior regions of the digestive tract. Hatching was completely inhibited in the presence of bestatin, an inhibitor of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), but not in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors. Bestatin inhibition of hatching was reversible. Finally, egg hatching could be induced by addition of a porcine LAP. The results indicate that this digenean utilizes both LAP of the snail host and movement of miracidia for hatching.

  17. Factors affecting abundance and prevalence of blood fluke, Cardicola forsteri, infection in commercially ranched southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, in Australia.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Hamish M; Hayward, Craig J; Nowak, Barbara F

    2015-05-30

    A survey of blood fluke, Cardicola forsteri, infection in ranched southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, was undertaken over three farming seasons, from March 2004 to September 2006. Analyses of covariance and logistic regression were used to explore the effects of company, year, season, time in culture, and condition index on intensity, abundance and prevalence of blood fluke infection. Average prevalence of blood fluke infection was 62.64% over the period of the survey. Average intensity was 6.20 (± 0.57) fluke per infected host and the average abundance was 3.70 (± 0.57) fluke per host. Year did not influence mean intensity or abundance although a significant decrease in prevalence in 2005 was evident. Tuna harvested in winter had a significantly greater abundance and prevalence of blood fluke than the tuna harvested in autumn. No effect of intensity or abundance of infection was observed on the condition of the infected tuna. A universal factor in explaining variation in C. forsteri intensity, abundance and prevalence was company. Differences in infection levels between tuna from different companies may be related to differences in husbandry measures employed on each farm, or due to different average sizes of tuna farmed by each of the companies, or due to the location of the operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stimulating Neoblast-Like Cell Proliferation in Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Supports Growth and Progression towards the Adult Phenotype In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Toet, Hayley; McCammick, Erin; O’Connor, Anna; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Brennan, Gerard P.; Halton, David W.; Spithill, Terry W.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    Fascioliasis (or fasciolosis) is a socioeconomically important parasitic disease caused by liver flukes of the genus Fasciola. Flukicide resistance has exposed the need for new drugs and/or a vaccine for liver fluke control. A rapidly improving ‘molecular toolbox’ for liver fluke encompasses quality genomic/transcriptomic datasets and an RNA interference platform that facilitates functional genomics approaches to drug/vaccine target validation. The exploitation of these resources is undermined by the absence of effective culture/maintenance systems that would support in vitro studies on juvenile fluke development/biology. Here we report markedly improved in vitro maintenance methods for Fasciola hepatica that achieved 65% survival of juvenile fluke after 6 months in standard cell culture medium supplemented with 50% chicken serum. We discovered that this long-term maintenance was dependent upon fluke growth, which was supported by increased proliferation of cells resembling the “neoblast” stem cells described in other flatworms. Growth led to dramatic morphological changes in juveniles, including the development of the digestive tract, reproductive organs and the tegument, towards more adult-like forms. The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevented neoblast-like cell proliferation and inhibited growth/development. Supporting our assertion that we have triggered the development of juveniles towards adult-like fluke, mass spectrometric analyses showed that growing fluke have an excretory/secretory protein profile that is distinct from that of newly-excysted juveniles and more closely resembles that of ex vivo immature and adult fluke. Further, in vitro maintained fluke displayed a transition in their movement from the probing behaviour associated with migrating stage worms to a slower wave-like motility seen in adults. Our ability to stimulate neoblast-like cell proliferation and growth in F. hepatica underpins the first simple platform for their long-term in

  19. Cardiovascular flukes (Trematoda: Spirorchiidae) in Caretta caretta Linnaeus, 1758 from the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Erica; Negrisolo, Enrico; Cassini, Rudi; Garofalo, Luisa; Poppi, Lisa; Tessarin, Cinzia; Marcer, Federica

    2017-10-10

    The northern Adriatic Sea represents one of the most important neritic foraging grounds for the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta L. in the Mediterranean Sea. Four genera of blood flukes with variable prevalence and pathogenic impact have been reported worldwide in this species. Hapalotrema Looss, 1899 and Amphiorchis Price, 1934 are the only two genera reported in Mediterranean waters; however, updated data describing spirorchiidiasis in the central and eastern Mediterranean and infection prevalence are still lacking. This work aimed to investigate the presence and pathology of spirorchiidiasis in C. caretta in the Mediterranean Sea. One hundred sixty-eight animals stranded along the northwestern Adriatic coast between 2009 and 2015 were submitted to necropsy and subsequent analyses for the detection of adult flukes, detection of eggs in the faeces and spleen and histopathology. Molecular analyses were carried out on hosts (mitochondrial D-loop) and parasites (28S gene and ITS2 spacer) to trace the turtle origins and identify the fluke phylogenetic relationships. Spirorchiidiasis was detected in 16.7% of the animals. Hapalotrema mistroides (Monticelli, 1899) and Neospirorchis sp. were found in twenty-six and ten cases, respectively. Adult flukes were found in six cases, while eggs were detectable through copromicroscopic examination for all infected turtles, and the results for the detection of eggs in the spleen agreed with the copromicroscopic analysis. Only mild lesions were observed. Eggs of types 1 and 3 were grossly visible in the gastrointestinal mucosa, vasculitis was rarely observed in the heart and great vessels, and multifocal granulomas were widespread in the tissues. Molecular identification unambiguously assigned the spirorchiid samples to H. mistroides and Neospirorchis sp. Genetic characterization of loggerhead mtDNA pointed to a Mediterranean origin of the turtle hosts. This survey provides new data on the spread of spirorchiidiasis in the

  20. Characteristics and molecular phylogeny of Fasciola flukes from Bangladesh, determined based on spermatogenesis and nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Shoriki, Takuya; Katakura, Ken; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to precisely discriminate Fasciola spp. based on DNA sequences of nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene. We collected 150 adult flukes from the bile ducts of cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats from six different regions of Bangladesh. Spermatogenic status was determined by analyzing stained seminal vesicles. The ITS1 types were analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The nad1 haplotypes were identified based on PCR and direct sequencing and analyzed phylogenetically by comparing with nad1 haplotypes of Fasciola spp. from other Asian countries. Of the 127 aspermic flukes, 98 were identified as Fg type in ITS1, whereas 29 were identified as Fh/Fg type, indicating a combination of ITS1 sequences of Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. All the 127 aspermic flukes showed Fsp-NDI-Bd11 in nad1 haplotype with nucleotide sequences identical to aspermic Fasciola sp. from Asian countries. Further, 20 spermic flukes were identified as F. gigantica based on their spermatogenic status and Fg type in ITS1. F. gigantica population was thought to be introduced into Bangladesh considerably earlier than the aspermic Fasciola sp. because 11 haplotypes with high haplotype diversity were detected from the F. gigantica population. However, three flukes from Bangladesh could not be precisely identified, because their spermatogenic status, ITS1 types, and nad1 haplotypes were ambiguous. Therefore, developing a robust method to distinguish aspermic Fasciola sp. from other Fasciola species is necessary in the future.

  1. Strategies to tackle the challenges of external beam radiotherapy for liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Lock, Michael I; Klein, Jonathan; Chung, Hans T; Herman, Joseph M; Kim, Edward Y; Small, William; Mayr, Nina A; Lo, Simon S

    2017-05-18

    Primary and metastatic liver cancer is an increasingly common and difficult to control disease entity. Radiation offers a non-invasive treatment alternative for these patients who often have few options and a poor prognosis. However, the anatomy and aggressiveness of liver cancer poses significant challenges such as accurate localization at simulation and treatment, management of motion and appropriate selection of dose regimen. This article aims to review the options available and provide information for the practical implementation and/or improvement of liver cancer radiation programs within the context of stereotactic body radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy guidelines. Specific patient inclusion and exclusion criteria are presented given the significant toxicity found in certain sub-populations treated with radiation. Indeed, certain sub-populations, such as those with tumor thrombosis or those with larger lesions treated with transarterial chemoembolization, have been shown to have significant improvements in outcome with the addition of radiation and merit special consideration. Implementing a liver radiation program requires three primary challenges to be addressed: (1) immobilization and motion management; (2) localization; and (3) dose regimen and constraint selection. Strategies to deal with motion include simple internal target volume (ITV) expansions, non-gated ITV reduction strategies, breath hold methods, and surrogate marker methods to enable gating or tracking. Localization of the tumor and organs-at-risk are addressed using contrast infusion techniques to take advantage of different normal liver and cancer vascular anatomy, imaging modalities, and margin management. Finally, a dose response has been demonstrated and dose regimens appear to be converging. A more uniform approach to treatment in terms of technique, dose selection and patient selection will allow us to study liver radiation in larger and, hopefully, multicenter randomized

  2. Strategies to tackle the challenges of external beam radiotherapy for liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Michael I; Klein, Jonathan; Chung, Hans T; Herman, Joseph M; Kim, Edward Y; Small, William; Mayr, Nina A; Lo, Simon S

    2017-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver cancer is an increasingly common and difficult to control disease entity. Radiation offers a non-invasive treatment alternative for these patients who often have few options and a poor prognosis. However, the anatomy and aggressiveness of liver cancer poses significant challenges such as accurate localization at simulation and treatment, management of motion and appropriate selection of dose regimen. This article aims to review the options available and provide information for the practical implementation and/or improvement of liver cancer radiation programs within the context of stereotactic body radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy guidelines. Specific patient inclusion and exclusion criteria are presented given the significant toxicity found in certain sub-populations treated with radiation. Indeed, certain sub-populations, such as those with tumor thrombosis or those with larger lesions treated with transarterial chemoembolization, have been shown to have significant improvements in outcome with the addition of radiation and merit special consideration. Implementing a liver radiation program requires three primary challenges to be addressed: (1) immobilization and motion management; (2) localization; and (3) dose regimen and constraint selection. Strategies to deal with motion include simple internal target volume (ITV) expansions, non-gated ITV reduction strategies, breath hold methods, and surrogate marker methods to enable gating or tracking. Localization of the tumor and organs-at-risk are addressed using contrast infusion techniques to take advantage of different normal liver and cancer vascular anatomy, imaging modalities, and margin management. Finally, a dose response has been demonstrated and dose regimens appear to be converging. A more uniform approach to treatment in terms of technique, dose selection and patient selection will allow us to study liver radiation in larger and, hopefully, multicenter randomized

  3. Cholangiocarcinoma: Lessons from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sripa, Banchob; Pairojkul, Chawalit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review To present the background of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in Thailand focusing on recent epidemiological data and pathogenesis of this bile duct cancer. Recent findings More systematic tumor registration in Thailand nowadays uncovers new high incidence areas that do not confine to only in the northeastern part but also some provinces in the northern Thailand. The link between the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, and CCA, particularly in the cellular and molecular pathogenesis is more elucidated. Summary Thailand is still the country with highest incidence of CCA in the world. Liver fluke induces chronic inflammation leading to oxidative DNA damage of the infected biliary epithelium and malignant transformation. Eradication of the fluke and identification of high risk population are urgently needed. PMID:18408464

  4. Identification of Fasciola flukes in Thailand based on their spermatogenesis and nuclear ribosomal DNA, and their intraspecific relationships based on mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Chaichanasak, Pannigan; Ichikawa, Madoka; Sobhon, Prasert; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 147 Fasciola flukes obtained from cattle in Thailand based on their spermatogenetic ability, and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) genes as molecular markers. One hundred twenty-eight flukes, which had abundant sperm in their seminal vesicles (spermic) and showed the PCR-RFLP pattern of F. gigantica in the ITS1, were accurately identified as F. gigantica. The other 19 flukes that had no sperm in their seminal vesicles were aspermic Fasciola sp. with the RFLP patterns identical to that of F. gigantica. Twenty-nine ND1 haplotypes (Fg-ND1-Thai 2-30) were distinguished in the 128 F. gigantica flukes and were divided into haplotypes unique to Thailand and those common to other countries, suggesting the possibility that ancestral haplotypes were introduced into Thailand. Three haplotypes (Fg-ND1-Thai 7, 9 and 27) appeared to be the major haplotypes found in F. gigantica from Thailand. Only one haplotype (Fg-ND1-Thai 1) was found in the 19 aspermic Fasciola sp. flukes obtained from geographical regions, and the nucleotide sequence of Fg-ND1-Thai 1 was identical to that of the aspermic Fasciola sp. from Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam and Myanmar, suggesting that they were descendants with a common provenance and expanded to these countries in the relatively recent past. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tackling antibiotic resistance in India.

    PubMed

    Wattal, Chand; Goel, Neeraj

    2014-12-01

    Infectious diseases are major causes of mortality in India. This is aggravated by the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) both in the community and in hospitals. Due to the emergence of resistance to all effective antibiotics in nosocomial pathogens, the situation calls for emergency measures to tackle AMR in India. India has huge challenges in tackling AMR, ranging from lack of surveillance mechanisms for monitoring AMR and use; effective hospital control policies; sanitation and non-human use of antimicrobial. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Govt. of India has taken initiatives to tackle AMR. Extensive guidelines have been drafted and a model worksheet has been developed as a roadmap to tackle AMR.

  6. Liver enzymes and blood metabolites in a population of free-ranging red deer (Cervus elaphus) naturally infected with Fascioloides magna.

    PubMed

    Severin, K; Mašek, T; Janicki, Z; Konjević, D; Slavica, A; Marinculić, A; Martinković, F; Vengušt, G; Džaja, P

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effects of Fascioloides magna infection on the serum biochemistry values of the naturally infected red deer population in eastern Croatia. The investigation was performed on 47 red deer with F. magna infection confirmed patho-anatomically in 27 animals (57.4%). Fibrous capsules and migratory lesions were found in 14 deer while only fibrous capsules without migratory lesions were found in 13 deer. In 13 deer both immature and mature flukes were found, in 5 deer only immature flukes were found and in 9 deer only mature flukes were found. Fascioloides magna infected deer with fibrous capsules and migratory lesions had significantly higher values for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and globulin, and lower values for albumin/globulin ratio and glucose compared to uninfected deer. Fascioloides magna infected deer with fibrous capsules without the presence of migratory lesions had higher values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and globulin, and lower values for albumin/globulin ratio and glucose, than the uninfected deer. The number of immature flukes was positively correlated with values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), LDH, GLDH, urea and triglycerides. The number of migratory lesions was positively correlated with GGT, GLDH, globulin and urea values. The creatinine value was positively correlated with the number of mature flukes. The trial showed that F. magna infection causes significant changes in serum biochemistry. Moreover, these changes do not completely resemble changes following F. hepatica infection. Further investigation of changes in liver enzymes and other serum metabolites in controlled, experimentally induced fascioloidosis in red deer is needed to better understand the pathogenesis of F. magna.

  7. Pathological Lesions and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expressions in the Liver of Mice Experimentally Infected with Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Li; Shen, Ji-Qing; Xue, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-12-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) formation and intrinsic nitrosation may be involved in the possible mechanisms of liver fluke-associated carcinogenesis. We still do not know much about the responses of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induced by Clonorchis sinensis infection. This study was conducted to explore the pathological lesions and iNOS expressions in the liver of mice with different infection intensity levels of C. sinensis. Extensive periductal inflammatory cell infiltration, bile duct hyperplasia, and fibrosis were commonly observed during the infection. The different pathological responses in liver tissues strongly correlated with the infection intensity of C. sinensis. Massive acute spotty necrosis occurred in the liver parenchyma after a severe infection. The iNOS activity in liver tissues increased, and iNOS-expressing cells with morphological differences were observed after a moderate or severe infection. The iNOS-expressing cells in liver tissues had multiple origins.

  8. Factors influencing tackle injuries in rugby union football

    PubMed Central

    Garraway, W. M.; Lee, A. J.; Macleod, D. A.; Telfer, J. W.; Deary, I. J.; Murray, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of selected aspects of lifestyle, personality, and other player related factors on injuries in the tackle. To describe the detailed circumstances in which these tackles occurred. METHODS: A prospective case-control study was undertaken in which the tackling and tackled players ("the cases") involved in a tackle injury were each matched with "control" players who held the same respective playing positions in the opposing teams. A total of 964 rugby matches involving 71 senior clubs drawn from all districts of the Scottish Rugby Union (SRU) were observed by nominated linkmen who administered self report questionnaires to the players identified as cases and controls. Information on lifestyle habits, match preparation, training, and coaching experience was obtained. A validated battery of psychological tests assessed players' trait anger and responses to anger and hostility. The circumstances of the tackles in which injury occurred were recorded by experienced SRU coaching staff in interviews with involved players after the match. RESULTS: A total of 71 tackle injury episodes with correct matching of cases and controls were studied. The following player related factors did not contribute significantly to tackle injuries: alcohol consumption before the match, feeling "below par" through minor illness, the extent of match preparation, previous coaching, or practising tackling. Injured and non- injured players in the tackle did not differ in their disposition toward, or expression of, anger or hostility. Some 85% of tackling players who were injured were three quarters, and 52% of injuries occurred when the tackle came in behind the tackled player or within his peripheral vision. Either the tackling or tackled player was sprinting or running in all of these injury episodes. One third of injuries occurred in differential speed tackles--that is, when one player was travelling much faster than the other at impact. The player with the lower

  9. Adherence of carp leucocytes to adults and cercariae of the blood fluke Sanguinicola inermis.

    PubMed

    Richards, D T; Hoole, D; Lewis, J W; Ewens, E; Arme, C

    1996-03-01

    Live adult and cercarial stages of Sanguinicola inermis Plehn, 1905 (Trematoda:Sanguinicolidae) were maintained in vitro in the presence of carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) leucocytes. Cells and parasites were fixed at intervals from 0.25 to 48 h and examined using light microscopy, SEM and TEM. Within 12 h of exposure, leucocytes were found attached to cercariae although, by 24 h, fewer cells were found attached to postcercarial, juvenile adult stages that had shed their tails. Neutrophils and macrophages were found attached to the damaged tegument of cercarie that had not transformed by 48 h. Few cells were attached to the tegument of adult flukes that were alive when fixed. However, there was extensive tegumental damage and numerous cells were attached to adult flukes that had died before fixation. The results are discussed with reference to parasite survival within the vascular system of the host.

  10. Pulmonary Arterial Lesions in New World Camelids in Association With Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Fasciola hepatica Infection.

    PubMed

    Hilbe, M; Robert, N; Pospischil, A; Gerspach, C

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, dicrocoeliasis is regarded as the most significant parasitic infection of llamas and alpacas. Fasciola hepatica infestation is also a problem but less common. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the lungs of New World camelids (NWCs) for evidence of arterial hypertension in association with liver changes due to liver fluke infestation. The lungs of 20 llamas and 20 alpacas with liver fluke infestation were histologically evaluated. The hematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson (VG)-elastica stains as well as immunohistology for the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were used to visualize the structures of arterial walls. Parasitology of fecal matter (11 llamas and 17 alpacas) confirmed that most of these animals were infested with both Dicrocoelium dendriticum and other gastrointestinal parasites. In most cases (10/12 llamas, 4/6 alpacas), liver enzyme activity in serum was elevated. Histologically, arteries in the lungs of 9 of 20 llamas (45%) and 3 of 20 alpacas (15%) showed severe intimal and adventitial and slight to moderate medial thickening, which was confirmed with α-SMA and VG-elastica staining. All animals exhibited typical liver changes, such as fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia, in association with the presence of liver flukes. This study shows that liver flukes can induce proliferative changes in lung arteries in NWCs that resemble those seen with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to liver parasites in humans. However, the degree of liver fluke infestation was not correlated with the extent of liver damage, or with the amount of thoracic or abdominal effusion or pulmonary arterial changes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Tackling in Youth Football.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    American football remains one of the most popular sports for young athletes. The injuries sustained during football, especially those to the head and neck, have been a topic of intense interest recently in both the public media and medical literature. The recognition of these injuries and the potential for long-term sequelae have led some physicians to call for a reduction in the number of contact practices, a postponement of tackling until a certain age, and even a ban on high school football. This statement reviews the literature regarding injuries in football, particularly those of the head and neck, the relationship between tackling and football-related injuries, and the potential effects of limiting or delaying tackling on injury risk. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Ancient Human Parasites in Ethnic Chinese Populations.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hui-Yuan; Mitchell, Piers D

    2016-10-01

    Whilst archaeological evidence for many aspects of life in ancient China is well studied, there has been much less interest in ancient infectious diseases, such as intestinal parasites in past Chinese populations. Here, we bring together evidence from mummies, ancient latrines, and pelvic soil from burials, dating from the Neolithic Period to the Qing Dynasty, in order to better understand the health of the past inhabitants of China and the diseases endemic in the region. Seven species of intestinal parasite have been identified, namely roundworm, whipworm, Chinese liver fluke, oriental schistosome, pinworm, Taenia sp. tapeworm, and the intestinal fluke Fasciolopsis buski . It was found that in the past, roundworm, whipworm, and Chinese liver fluke appear to have been much more common than the other species. While roundworm and whipworm remained common into the late 20th century, Chinese liver fluke seems to have undergone a marked decline in its prevalence over time. The iconic transport route known as the Silk Road has been shown to have acted as a vector for the transmission of ancient diseases, highlighted by the discovery of Chinese liver fluke in a 2,000 year-old relay station in northwest China, 1,500 km outside its endemic range.

  13. Concurrent epizootic hyperinfections of sea lice (predominantly Caligus chiastos) and blood flukes (Cardicola forsteri) in ranched Southern Bluefin tuna.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Craig J; Ellis, David; Foote, Danielle; Wilkinson, Ryan J; Crosbie, Phillip B B; Bott, Nathan J; Nowak, Barbara F

    2010-10-11

    Peaks in epizootics of sea lice (mostly Caligus chiastos) and blood flukes (Cardicola forsteri) among Southern Bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) appear to coincide with the onset of an increased mortality. The mortality event occurs 6-12 weeks after T. maccoyii have been transferred into static ranching pontoons from the wild. However, to date available data on parasite occurrence before commercial harvesting begins, are scant. This research gathered epizootiological data from weeks 4 to 13 post-transfer, for 153 T. maccoyii sampled from two research and four commercial pontoons. Counts of both parasites in the research pontoons reached levels far heavier than previously documented in ranched T. maccoyii. For sea lice, the prevalence in most pontoons was 100%; the highest intensity reached 495 individuals, and mean counts at the peak of the infection exceeded 265 lice per fish. Almost all of the 5407 individual lice counted were identified as adult C. chiastos (89.44% female, 10.14% male); adult females of two other species were also present, C. amblygenitalis (0.13%), in addition to an undescribed species, C. sp. (0.04%). Lice counts were correlated positively with gross eye pathology scores (r(s,151df)=0.3394, p=0.0000), negatively correlated with condition index (r(s,151df)=-0.5396, p=0.0000), and positively correlated with plasma cortisol (r(s,131df)=0.3906, p=0.0000) and glucose (r(s,131df)=0.2240, p=0.0096). For the blood fluke, prevalences were less uniform than those of sea lice, with lower rates of infection at the beginning (ranging from 10% to 40%), reaching 100% mid-study, and declining again (40% in one pontoon). The highest intensity reached 441 individual flukes. Fluke counts were negatively correlated with plasma haemoglobin (r(s,151df)=-0.2436, p=0.0051) and positively with lysozyme (r(s,151df)=0.3013, p=0.0019). Fluke counts were also correlated with sea lice counts (r(s,150df)=0.3143, p=0.0000). Peaks in these epizootics occurred near the onset of

  14. Tackle technique and tackle-related injuries in high-level South African Rugby Union under-18 players: real-match video analysis.

    PubMed

    Burger, Nicholas; Lambert, Michael I; Viljoen, Wayne; Brown, James C; Readhead, Clint; Hendricks, Sharief

    2016-08-01

    The high injury rate associated with rugby union is primarily due to the tackle, and poor contact technique has been identified as a risk factor for injury. We aimed to determine whether the tackle technique proficiency scores were different in injurious tackles versus tackles that did not result in injury using real-match scenarios in high-level youth rugby union. Injury surveillance was conducted at the under-18 Craven Week tournaments (2011-2013). Tackle-related injury information was used to identify injury events in the match video footage and non-injury events were identified for the injured player cohort. Injury and non-injury events were scored for technique proficiency and Cohen's effect sizes were calculated and the Student t test (p<0.05) was performed to compare injury versus non-injury scores. The overall mean score for front-on ball-carrier proficiency was 7.17±1.90 and 9.02±2.15 for injury and non-injury tackle events, respectively (effect size=moderate; p<0.05). The overall mean score for side/behind ball-carrier proficiency was 4.09±2.12 and 7.68±1.72 for injury and non-injury tackle events, respectively (effect size=large; p<0.01). The overall mean score for front-on tackler proficiency was 7.00±1.95 and 9.35±2.56 for injury and non-injury tackle events, respectively (effect size=moderate; p<0.05). The overall mean score for side/behind tackler proficiency was 5.47±1.60 and 8.14±1.75 for injury and non-injury tackle events, respectively (effect size=large; p<0.01). Higher overall mean and criterion-specific tackle-related technique scores were associated with a non-injury outcome. The ability to perform well during tackle events may decrease the risk of injury and may manifest in superior performance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Guillain-Barré Syndrome in a Boy With Lung Fluke Infection: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui-Wei; Gao, Feng; Xia, Zhe-Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most common acute peripheral neuropathy in children in most countries. The cause and pathogenesis of the disease have yet to be clarified. There have been only a few reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome resulting from parasite infections worldwide, no cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection have been reported. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection. The child had a history of consumption of undercooked crabs. He was diagnosed with paragonimiasis. The patient experienced paralysis of and pain in the lower limbs about 3 weeks after symptom onset. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examination findings supported the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Parasitic infections should also be considered when determining which antecedent infection is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Antifibrotic effect of xanthohumol in combination with praziquantel is associated with altered redox status and reduced iron accumulation during liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Thanee, Malinee; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loilome, Watcharin; Thanan, Raynoo; Kimawaha, Phongsaran; Boonmars, Tidarat; Silakit, Runglawan; Namwat, Nisana

    2018-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) caused by infection of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, (Ov) is the major public health problem in northeast Thailand. Following Ov infection the subsequent molecular changes can be associated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced chronic inflammation, advanced periductal fibrosis, and cholangiocarcinogenesis. Notably, resistance to an activation of cell death in prolonged oxidative stress conditions can occur but some damaged/mutated cells could survive and enable clonal expansion. Our study used a natural product, xanthohumol (XN), which is an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, to examine whether it could prevent Ov-associated CCA carcinogenesis. We measured the effect of XN with or without praziquantel (PZ), an anti-helminthic treatment, on DNA damage, redox status change including iron accumulation and periductal fibrosis during CCA genesis induced by administration of Ov and N-dinitrosomethylamine (NDMA) in hamsters. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: group I, Ov infection and NDMA administration (ON); group II, Ov infection and NDMA administration and PZ treatment (ONP); the latter 2 groups were similar to group I and II, but group III received additional XN (XON) and group IV received XN plus PZ (XONP). The results showed that high 8-oxodG (a marker of DNA damage) was observed throughout cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, increased expression of CD44v8-10 (a cell surface in regulation of the ROS defense system), whereas decreased expression of phospho-p38MAPK (a major ROS target), was found during the progression of the bile duct cell transformation. In addition, high accumulation of iron and expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR-1) in both malignant bile ducts and inflammatory cells were detected. Furthermore, fibrosis also increased with the highest level being on day 180. On the other hand, the groups of XN with or without PZ supplementations showed an effective reduction in all the markers

  17. Upregulation of 14-3-3 eta in chronic liver fluke infection is a potential diagnostic marker of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haonon, Ornuma; Rucksaken, Rucksak; Pinlaor, Porntip; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Chamgramol, Yaovalux; Intuyod, Kitti; Onsurathum, Sudarat; Khuntikeo, Narong; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2016-03-01

    To discover protein markers in chronic/advanced opisthorchiasis for the early detection of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV)-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Liver tissues derived from normal hamsters and those with chronic/advanced opisthorchiasis (n = 5 per group) were subjected to 2DE and LC-MS/MS. Candidate protein expression was confirmed in hamster models and human CCA tissue microarray (TMA) using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Proteomics analysis detected 14-3-3 eta only in infected hamsters, not in uninfected controls. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis confirmed low expression of 14-3-3 eta in normal hamster livers and demonstrated increased expression through time in infected livers. This protein was also observed in parasite organs, especially during the chronic phase of opisthorchiasis. Moreover, increased expression of 14-3-3 eta, relative to normal hamster livers, was observed during the early stage of CCA induced by OV infection and administration of N-nitrosodimethylamine. Immunohistochemical analysis of human TMA revealed that 14-3-3 eta was highly expressed in CCA (84.23%, 187/222 cases) but was not found in hepatocellular carcinoma or healthy liver tissues. 14-3-3 eta protein has potential as a screening and early diagnostic marker for CCA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. 46 CFR 184.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 184.300 Section 184.300... Ground tackle and mooring lines. A vessel must be fitted with ground tackle and mooring lines necessary for the vessel to be safely anchored or moored. The ground tackle and mooring lines provided must be...

  19. 46 CFR 184.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 184.300 Section 184.300... Ground tackle and mooring lines. A vessel must be fitted with ground tackle and mooring lines necessary for the vessel to be safely anchored or moored. The ground tackle and mooring lines provided must be...

  20. Tackle mechanisms and match characteristics in women's elite football tournaments.

    PubMed

    Tscholl, P; O'Riordan, D; Fuller, C W; Dvorak, J; Junge, A

    2007-08-01

    Several tools have been used for assessing risk situations and for gathering tackle information from international football matches for men but not for women. To analyse activities in women's football and to identify the characteristics and risk potentials of tackles. Retrospective video analysis. Video recordings of 24 representative matches from six women's top-level tournaments were analysed for tackle parameters and their risk potential. 3531 tackles were recorded. Tackles in which the tackling player came from the side and stayed on her feet accounted for nearly half of all challenges for the ball in which body contact occurred. 2.7% of all tackles were classified as risk situations, with sliding-in tackles from behind and the side having the highest risk potential. Match referees sanctioned sliding-in tackles more often than other tackles (20% v 17%, respectively). Tackle parameters did not change in the duration of a match; however, there was an increase in the number of injury risk situations and foul plays towards the end of each half. Match properties provide valuable information for a better understanding of injury situations in football. Staying on feet and jumping vertically tackle actions leading to injury were sanctioned significantly more times by the referee than those not leading to injury (p<0.001), but no such difference was seen for sliding-in tackles (previously reported to have the highest injury potential in women's football). Therefore, either the laws of the game are not adequate or match referees in women's football are not able to distinguish between sliding-in tackles leading to and those not leading to injury.

  1. The Evolution of Organ Allocation for Liver Transplantation: Tackling Geographic Disparity Through Broader Sharing.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David A; Vagefi, Parsia A; Roberts, John P

    2015-08-01

    The liver transplant allocation system has evolved to a ranking system of “sickest-first” system based on objective criteria. Yet, organs continue to be distributed first within OPOs and regions that are largely based on historical practice patterns related to kidney transplantation and were never designed to minimize waitlist death or equalize opportunity for liver transplant. The current proposal is a move to enhance survival though the application of modern mathematical techniques to optimize liver distribution. Like MELDbased allocation, it will never be perfect and should be continually evaluated and revised. However, the disparity in access, which favors those residing in or able to travel to privileged areas, to the detriment of the patients dying on the list in underserved areas, is simply not defensible in 2015.

  2. Eye fluke-induced cataracts in natural fish populations: is there potential for host manipulation?

    PubMed

    Seppälä, O; Karvonen, A; Valtonen, E T

    2011-02-01

    Manipulation of host phenotype (e.g. behaviour, appearance) is suggested to be a common strategy to enhance transmission in trophically transmitted parasites. However, in many systems, evidence of manipulation comes exclusively from laboratory studies and its occurrence in natural host populations is poorly understood. Here, we examined the potential for host manipulation by Diplostomum eye flukes indirectly by quantifying the physiological effects of parasites on fish. Earlier laboratory studies have shown that Diplostomum infection predisposes fish to predation by birds (definitive hosts of the parasites) by reducing fish vision through cataract formation. However, occurrence of cataracts and the subsequent potential for host manipulation in natural fish populations has remained poorly explored. We studied the occurrence of eye fluke-induced cataracts from 7 common fish species (Gymnocephalus cernuus, Rutilus rutilus, Leuciscus leuciscus, Alburnus alburnus, Osmerus eperlanus, Coregonus lavaretus and Gasterosteus aculeatus) from the Bothnian Bay in the Baltic Sea. We found that the parasite-induced cataracts were common in fish and they also reached high levels which are likely to predispose fish to predation. However, we observed such cataracts only in species with the highest parasite abundances, which suggests that only certain hosts may be strongly affected by the infection.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Changes in the Distribution of Blood Fluke Infection in Nicolea gracilibranchis (Polychaeta: Terebellidae), the Intermediate Host for Cardicola orientalis (Digenea: Aporocotylidae), at a Tuna Farming Site in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Ishimuru, Katsuya; Honryo, Tomoki; Shin, Sang Phil; Uchida, Hiro'omi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2017-10-01

    Fish blood flukes of the genus Cardicola (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) are important pathogens in tuna aquaculture. Recent advances in marine blood fluke research have led to the elucidation of the lifecycles of 3 Cardicola spp. infecting tuna; all 3 flukes utilize terebellid polychaetes as the intermediate host. In our survey, we obtained large numbers of Nicolea gracilibranchis infected by larval Cardicola orientalis at our tuna farming site. To determine the spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of N. gracilibranchis surrounding tuna culture cages and their infection by C. orientalis, we conducted monthly sampling for a period of 1 yr. Terebellids were most abundant on the floats and ropes of culture cages, but a significantly higher proportion of infected N. gracilibranchis was detected on ropes, particularly up to 4 m in depth. Cardicola orientalis infection in N. gracilibranchis was clearly seasonal, with a higher infection rate between April and July. Our findings indicate that the infected terebellids inhabit specific microhabitats, and both abiotic and biotic factors likely influence blood fluke infection in the intermediate terebellid host. This information is important to better understand the general biology of marine aporocotylids and may be useful to develop a control strategy for blood fluke infection in tuna aquaculture.

  4. Three-Dimensional Geometry of the Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) Flukes in Relation to Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 27(4): 889–898 (October 2011) C© 2010 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2010.00439.x Three...Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383, U.S.A. E-mail: ffish@wcupa.edu NATALIA RYBCZYNSKI Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario K1P...distributed in the ice-packed stretches of waters bordering Greenland and the Canadian High Arctic (Laidre et al. 2003). The flukes of mature male

  5. Opisthorchiasis and Opisthorchis-associated cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand and Laos

    PubMed Central

    Sripa, Banchob; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mairiang, Eimorn; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason; Laha, Thewarach; Hotez, Peter J.; Brindley, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Thailand and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR; Laos). Currently, more than 600 million people are at risk of infection with these fish-borne trematodes and/or their close relatives. Opisthorchiasis has been studied extensively in Thailand, where about 8 million people are infected with the liver fluke. Here we review the pathogenesis, control and re-emergence of O. viverrini infection, in particular in Thailand and, to a lesser extent in Lao PDR given the contiguous geographical range of O. viverrini through these two regions. We also review the association of O. viverrini infection and cholangiocarcinoma, bile duct cancer, and highlight new findings on pathogenesis of liver fluke induced cholangiocarcinogenesis. Last, we comment on national control strategies in Thailand for the control of O. viverrini infection aimed at reduction in the prevalence of O. viverrini-associated liver cancer in the longer term. PMID:20655862

  6. Opisthorchiasis and Opisthorchis-associated cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand and Laos.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Banchob; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mairiang, Eimorn; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason; Laha, Thewarach; Hotez, Peter J; Brindley, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Thailand and the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR; Laos). Currently, more than 600 million people are at risk of infection with these fish-borne trematodes and/or their close relatives. Opisthorchiasis has been studied extensively in Thailand, where about 8 million people are infected with the liver fluke. Here we review the pathogenesis, control and re-emergence of O. viverrini infection, in particular in Thailand and, to a lesser extent in Lao PDR given the contiguous geographical range of O. viverrini through these two regions. We also review the association of O. viverrini infection and cholangiocarcinoma, bile duct cancer, and highlight new findings on pathogenesis of liver fluke-induced cholangiocarcinogenesis. Last, we comment on national control strategies in Thailand for the control of O. viverrini infection aimed at reduction in the prevalence of O. viverrini-associated liver cancer in the longer term. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-sanctioning of illegal tackles in South African youth community rugby.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Boucher, S J; Lambert, M; Viljoen, W; Readhead, C; Hendricks, S; Kraak, W J

    2018-06-01

    The tackle event in rugby union ('rugby') contributes to the majority of players' injuries. Referees can reduce this risk by sanctioning dangerous tackles. A study in elite adult rugby suggests that referees only sanction a minority of illegal tackles. The aim of this study was to assess if this finding was similar in youth community rugby. Observational study. Using EncodePro, 99 South African Rugby Union U18 Youth Week tournament matches were coded between 2011 and 2015. All tackles were coded by a researcher and an international referee to ensure that laws were interpreted correctly. The inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were 0.97-1.00. A regression analysis compared the non-sanctioned rates over time. In total, 12 216 tackles were coded, of which less than 1% (n=113) were 'illegal'. The majority of the 113 illegal tackles were front-on (75%), high tackles (72%) and occurred in the 2nd/4th quarters (29% each). Of the illegal tackles, only 59% were sanctioned. The proportions of illegal tackles and sanctioning of these illegal tackles to all tackles improved by 0.2% per year from 2011-2015 (p<0.05). In these youth community rugby players, 59% of illegal tackles were not sanctioned appropriately. This was better than a previous study in elite adult rugby, where only 7% of illegal tackles were penalised. Moreover, the rates of illegal tackles and non-sanctioned illegal tackles both improved over time. However, it is critical that referees consistently enforce all laws to enhance injury prevention efforts. Further studies should investigate the reasons for non-sanctioning. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental stages of fish blood flukes, Cardicola forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae), in their polychaete intermediate hosts collected at Pacific bluefin tuna culture sites in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuo; Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Shin, Sang Phil; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Honryo, Tomoki; Sugihara, Yukitaka; Uchida, Hiro'omi

    2017-02-01

    Farming of Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, is a rapidly growing industry in Japan. Aporocotylid blood flukes of the genus Cardicola comprising C. orientalis, C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri are parasites of economic importance for PBT farming. Recently, terebellid polychaetes have been identified as the intermediate hosts for all these parasites. We collected infected polychaetes, Terebella sp., the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis, from ropes and floats attached to tuna cages in Tsushima, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Also, Neoamphitrite vigintipes (formerly as Amphitrite sp. sensu Shirakashi et al., 2016), the intermediate host of C. forsteri, were collected from culture cages in Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The terebellid intermediate hosts harbored the sporocysts and cercariae in their body cavity. Developmental stages of these blood flukes were molecularly identified using species specific PCR primers. In this paper, we describe the cercaria and sporocyst stages of C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri and compare their morphological characteristics among three Cardicola blood flukes infecting PBT. We also discuss phylogenetic relations of the six genera of the terebellid intermediate hosts (Artacama, Lanassa, Longicarpus, Terebella, Nicolea and Neoamphitrite) of blood flukes infecting marine fishes, based on their morphological characters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 46 CFR 121.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 121.300 Section 121.300... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Mooring and Towing Equipment § 121.300 Ground tackle and mooring lines. A vessel must be fitted with ground tackle and mooring lines necessary for the vessel to be safely anchored...

  10. 46 CFR 121.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 121.300 Section 121.300... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Mooring and Towing Equipment § 121.300 Ground tackle and mooring lines. A vessel must be fitted with ground tackle and mooring lines necessary for the vessel to be safely anchored...

  11. A major cathepsin B protease from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has atypical active site features and a potential role in the digestive tract of newly excysted juvenile parasites

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Simone A.; Piedrafita, David; Phillips, Carolyn I.; Samarawickrema, Nirma; Law, Ruby H.P.; Smooker, Peter M.; Quinsey, Noelene S.; Irving, James A.; Greenwood, Deanne; Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Bogyo, Matthew; Turk, Boris; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Spithill, Terry W.; Pike, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage of the Fasciola hepatica lifecycle occurs just prior to invasion into the wall of the gut of the host, rendering it an important target for drug development. The cathepsin B enzymes from NEJ flukes have recently been demonstrated to be crucial to invasion and migration by the parasite. Here we characterize one of the cathepsin B enzymes (recombinant FhcatB1) from NEJ flukes. FhcatB1 has biochemical properties distinct from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes, with an atypical preference for Ile over Leu or Arg residues at the P2 substrate position and an inability to act as an exopeptidase. FhcatB1 was active across a broad pH range (optimal activity at pH 5.5–7.0) and resistant to inhibition by cystatin family inhibitors from sheep and humans, suggesting that this enzyme would be able to function in extracellular environments in its mammalian hosts. It appears, however, that the FhcatB1 protease functions largely as a digestive enzyme in the gut of the parasite, due to the localization of a specific, fluorescently labeled inhibitor with an Ile at the P2 position. Molecular modelling and dynamics were used to predict the basis for the unusual substrate specificity: a P2 Ile residue positions the substrate optimally for interaction with catalytic residues of the enzyme, and the enzyme lacks an occluding loop His residue crucial for exopeptidase activity. The unique features of the enzyme, particularly with regard to its specificity and likely importance to a vital stage of the parasite’s life cycle, make it an excellent target for therapeutic inhibitors or vaccination. PMID:19401154

  12. Toward integrated opisthorchiasis control in Northeast Thailand: The Lawa Project

    PubMed Central

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mallory, Frank F.; Smith, John F.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode is a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. Despite a long history of control programs in Thailand and a nationwide reduction, O. viverrini infection prevalence remains high in the Northeastern Provinces. Therefore, a new strategy for controlling the liver fluke infection using the EcoHealth/One Health approach was introduced into the Lawa Lake area in Khon Kaen province where the liver fluke is endemic. A program has been carried using anthelminthic treatment, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. As a result, the infection rate in the more than 10 villages surrounding the Lake has declined to approximate one third of the average of 50% as estimated by a baseline survey. Strikingly, the Cyprinoid fish species in the Lake, which are the intermediate host, now showed less than 1% prevalence compared to a maximum of 70% at baseline. This liver fluke control program, named “Lawa model,” is now recognized nationally and internationally, and being expanding to other parts of Thailand and neighboring Mekong countries. Challenges to O. viverrini disease control, and lessons learned in developing an integrative control program using a community-based, ecosystem approach, and scaling-up regionally based on Lawa as a model are described. PMID:25102053

  13. Toward integrated opisthorchiasis control in northeast Thailand: the Lawa project.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mallory, Frank F; Smith, John F; Wilcox, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode is a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. Despite a long history of control programmes in Thailand and a nationwide reduction, O. viverrini infection prevalence remains high in the northeastern provinces. Therefore, a new strategy for controlling the liver fluke infection using the EcoHealth/One Health approach was introduced into the Lawa Lake area in Khon Kaen province where the liver fluke is endemic. A programme has been carried using anthelminthic treatment, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. As a result, the infection rate in the more than 10 villages surrounding the lake has declined to approximate one third of the average of 50% as estimated by a baseline survey. Strikingly, the Cyprinoid fish species in the lake, which are the intermediate host, now showed less than 1% prevalence compared to a maximum of 70% at baseline. This liver fluke control programme, named "Lawa model," is now recognised nationally and internationally, and being expanding to other parts of Thailand and neighbouring Mekong countries. Challenges to O. viverrini disease control, and lessons learned in developing an integrative control programme using a community-based, ecosystem approach, and scaling-up regionally based on Lawa as a model are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tackle and impact detection in elite Australian football using wearable microsensor technology.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; McLean, Owen C; Breed, Ray V P; Spittle, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a wearable microsensor device (MinimaxX(TM) S4, Catapult Innovations, Melbourne, VIC, Australia) to automatically detect tackles and impact events in elite Australian football (AF) was assessed during four matches. Video observation was used as the criterion measure. A total of 352 tackles were observed, with 78% correctly detected as tackles by the manufacturer's software. Tackles against (i.e. tackled by an opponent) were more accurately detected than tackles made (90% v 66%). Of the 77 tackles that were not detected at all, the majority (74%) were categorised as low-intensity. In contrast, a total of 1510 "tackle" events were detected, with only 18% of these verified as tackles. A further 57% were from contested ball situations involving player contact. The remaining 25% were in general play where no contact was evident; these were significantly lower in peak Player Load™ than those involving player contact (P < 0.01). The tackle detection algorithm, developed primarily for rugby, was not suitable for tackle detection in AF. The underlying sensor data may have the potential to detect a range of events within contact sports such as AF, yet to do so is a complex task and requires sophisticated sport and event-specific algorithms.

  15. Momentum and Kinetic Energy Before the Tackle in Rugby Union

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Sharief; Karpul, David; Lambert, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior) and position (forwards vs. backs), and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact). Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60). Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg.m.s-1 n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg.m.s-1, d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29). Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards) are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact. Key Points First study to quantify momentum, kinetic energy, and magnitude of impact in rugby tackles across different levels in matches without a device attached to a player. Physical components alone, of either ball-carrier or

  16. Momentum and kinetic energy before the tackle in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Sharief; Karpul, David; Lambert, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior) and position (forwards vs. backs), and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact). Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60). Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1) n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1), d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29). Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards) are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact. Key PointsFirst study to quantify momentum, kinetic energy, and magnitude of impact in rugby tackles across different levels in matches without a device attached to a player.Physical components alone, of either ball

  17. Tackle characteristics and injury in a cross section of rugby union football.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Andrew S; Savage, Trevor N; McCrory, Paul; Fréchède, Bertrand O; Wolfe, Rory

    2010-05-01

    The tackle is the game event in rugby union most associated with injury. This study's main aims were to measure tackle characteristics from video using a qualitative protocol, to assess whether the characteristics differed by level of play, and to measure the associations between tackle characteristics and injury. A cohort study was undertaken. The cohort comprised male rugby players in the following levels: younger than 15 yr, 18 yr, and 20 yr, grade, and elite (Super 12 and Wallabies). All tackle events and technique characteristics were coded in 77 game halves using a standardized qualitative protocol. Game injuries and missed-game injuries were identified and correlated with tackle events. A total of 6618 tackle events, including 81 resulting in a game injury, were observed and coded in the 77 game halves fully analyzed (145 tackle events per hour). An increase in the proportion of active shoulder tackles was observed from younger than 15 yr (13%) to elite (31%). Younger players engaged in more passive tackles and tended to stay on their feet more than experienced players. Younger than 15 yr rugby players had a significantly lower risk of tackle game injury compared with elite players. No specific tackle technique was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of game injury. There was a greater risk of game injury associated with two or more tacklers involved in the tackle event, and the greatest risk was associated with simultaneous contact by tacklers, after adjusting for level of play. Tackle characteristics differed between levels of play. The number of tacklers and the sequence of tackler contact with the ball carrier require consideration from an injury prevention perspective.

  18. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  19. Role and mechanisms of autophagy in acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Hua; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2018-04-23

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the USA and many other countries. Although the metabolism and pathogenesis of APAP has been extensively investigated for decades, the mechanisms by which APAP induces liver injury are incompletely known, which hampers the development of effective therapeutic approaches to tackle this important clinical problem. Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation pathway, which aims at recycling cellular components and damaged organelles in response to adverse environmental conditions and stresses as a survival mechanism. There is accumulating evidence indicating that autophagy is activated in response to APAP overdose in specific liver zone areas, and pharmacological activation of autophagy protects against APAP-induced liver injury. Increasing evidence also suggests that hepatic autophagy is impaired in nonalcoholic fatty livers (NAFLD), and NAFLD patients are more susceptible to APAP-induced liver injury. Here, we summarized the current progress on the role and mechanisms of autophagy in protecting against APAP-induced liver injury. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Technical determinants of tackle and ruck performance in International rugby union.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Sharief; van Niekerk, Tiffany; Sin, Drew Wade; Lambert, Mike; den Hollander, Steve; Brown, James; Maree, Willie; Treu, Paul; Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben

    2018-03-01

    The most frequently occurring contact events in rugby union are the tackle and ruck. The ability repeatedly to engage and win the tackle and ruck has been associated with team success. To win the tackle and ruck, players have to perform specific techniques. These techniques have not been studied at the highest level of rugby union. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify technical determinants of tackle and ruck performance at the highest level of rugby union. A total of 4479 tackle and 2914 ruck events were coded for the Six Nations and Championship competitions. Relative risk ratio (RR), the ratio of the probability of an outcome occurring when a characteristic was observed (versus the non-observed characteristic), was determined using multinomial logistic regression. Executing front-on tackles reduced the likelihood of offloads and tackle breaks in both competitions (Six Nations RR 3.0 Behind tackle, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.9-4.6, effect size [ES] = large, P < 0.001); Championship RR 2.9 Jersey tackle, 95% CI: 1.3-6.4, ES = moderate, P = 0.01). Fending during contact increased the chances of offloading and breaking the tackle in both competitions (Six Nations RR 4.5 Strong, 95% CI: 2.2-9.2, ES = large, P = P < 0.001; Championship RR 5.1 Moderate, 95% CI: 3.5-7.4, ES = large, P < 0.001). For the ruck, actively placing the ball increased the probability of maintaining possession (Six Nations RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.1-4.3, ES = moderate, P = 0.03); Championship RR 4.0, 95% CI: 1.3-11.8, ES = large, P = 0.01). The techniques identified in this study should be incorporated and emphasised during training to prepare players for competition. Furthermore, these techniques need to be added to coaching manuals for the tackle and ruck.

  1. Lead fishing weights and other fishing tackle in selected waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hansen, Scott P.; Creekmore, T.E.; Brand, C.J.; Evers, D.C.; Duerr, A.E.; DeStefano, S.

    2003-01-01

    From 1995 through 1999, 2,240 individuals of 28 species of waterbirds were examined in the United States for ingested lead fishing weights. A combination of radiography and visual examination of stomachs was used to search for lead weights and blood and liver samples from live birds and carcasses, respectively, were collected for lead analysis. Ingested lead weights were found most frequently in the Common Loon (Gavia immer) (11 of 313 = 3.5%) and Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) (10 of 365 = 2.7%), but also in one of 81 (1.2%) Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) and one of 11 (9.1%) Black-crowned Night Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax). Birds with ingested lead fishing weights (including split shot, jig heads, and egg, bell, and pyramid sinkers) were found in California, Florida, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. The size and mass of ingested lead weights ranged from split shot of 7 mm in the longest dimension, weighing less than 2 g, to a 22 ?? 39 mm pyramid sinker that weighed 78.2 g. Six ingested lead weights were more than 25.4 mm in the longest dimension. Lead concentrations in the blood and liver of birds with lead fishing weights in their stomachs ranged up to 13.9 ppm and 26.0 ppm (wet weight basis), respectively. During the study, we also noted the presence of ingested or entangled fishing tackle, with no associated lead weights, in eight species.

  2. Time-dependent tegumental surface changes in juvenile Fasciola gigantica in response to triclabendazole treatment in goat.

    PubMed

    Shareef, P A Ahammed; Brennan, Gerard P; McVeigh, Paul; Khan, M A Hannan; Morphew, Russell M; Mousley, Angela; Marks, Nikki J; Saifullah, M K; Brophy, Peter M; Maule, Aaron G; Abidi, S M A

    2014-08-01

    Triclabendazole (TCBZ), the anthelmintic drug active against both mature and immature liver flukes, was used to investigate the effect of in vivo treatment on the tegumental surface of juvenile Fasciola gigantica. Five goats were infected with 150 F. gigantica metacercariae each by oral gavage. Four of them were treated with single dose of TCBZ at 10mg/kg at four weeks post-infection. They were euthanized at 0 (untreated), 24, 48, 72 and 96h post treatment. Juvenile flukes were manually retrieved from the goat livers and processed for scanning electron microscopy. In control flukes, the anterior region was adorned with sharply pointed spines projecting away from the surface, while in the posterior region, spines become shorter and narrower, loosing serration and with the appearance of distinct furrows and papillae. The dorsal surface retained the same pattern of surface architecture similar to that of ventral surface. Flukes obtained from 24h post-treatment did not show any apparent change and were still very active. However, there were limited movements and some blebbing, swelling, deposition of tegumental secretions and some flattening displayed by the flukes of 48h post-treatment. All the worms were found dead 72h post-treatment and showed advanced level of tegumental disruptions, consisting of severe distortion of spines, sloughing off the tegument to expose the basal lamina, formation of pores and isolated patches of lesions. By 96h post-treatment, the disruption was extremely severe and the tegument was completely sheared off causing deeper lesions that exposed the underlying musculature. The disruption was more severe at posterior than anterior region and on ventral than dorsal surface. The present study further establishes the time-course of TCBZ action in vivo with 100% efficacy against the juvenile tropical liver fluke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Collapsed scrums and collision tackles: what is the injury risk?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Simon P; Trewartha, Grant; England, Mike; Stokes, Keith A

    2015-04-01

    To establish the propensity for specific contact events to cause injury in rugby union. Medical staff at participating English community-level rugby clubs reported any injury resulting in the absence for one match or more from the day of the injury during the 2009/2010 (n=46), 2010/2011 (n=67) and 2011/2012 (n=76) seasons. Injury severity was defined as the number of matches missed. Thirty community rugby matches were filmed and the number of contact events (tackles, collision tackles, rucks, mauls, lineouts and scrums) recorded. Of 370 (95% CI 364 to 378) contact events per match, 141 (137 to 145) were tackles, 115 (111 to 119) were rucks and 32 (30 to 33) were scrums. Tackles resulted in the greatest propensity for injury (2.3 (2.2 to 2.4) injuries/1000 events) and the greatest severity (16 (15 to 17) weeks missed/1000 events). Collision tackles (illegal tackles involving a shoulder charge) had a propensity for injury of 15 (12.4 to 18.3) injuries/1000 events and severity was 92 (75 to 112) weeks missed/1000 events, both of which were higher than any other event. Additional scrum analysis showed that only 5% of all scrums collapsed, but the propensity for injury was four times higher (2.9 (1.5 to 5.4) injuries/1000 events) and the severity was six times greater (22 (12 to 42) weeks missed/1000 events) than for non-collapsed scrums. Injury prevention in the tackle should focus on technique with strict enforcement of existing laws for illegal collision tackles. The scrum is a relatively controllable event and further attempts should be made to reduce the frequency of scrum collapse. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Blood flukes Cardicola parvus and C. laruei (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae): life cycles and cryptic infection in spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus (Teleost: Sciaenidae).

    PubMed

    Siegel, Sasha V; Rivero, Andrea V; Oberstaller, Jenna; Colon, Beatrice L; de Buron, Isaure; Kyle, Dennis E

    2018-04-01

    Aporocotylidae comprises a diverse family of fish blood flukes, with adults found in blood or body cavity of marine, brackish, or freshwater fish. Aporocotylids are unique among the Digenea with many developing in polychaetes. The life cycle has been elucidated for only a few species that develop in polychaetes from marine/brackish environments and none for western Atlantic aporocotylids. The basis for this study was observations of blood fluke larvae in annelids from South Carolina, USA in 1982 prior to possible usage of molecular tools to specifically identify parasite larvae. Recent description of aporocotylid species and genotyping tools prompted revisiting original collection sites to examine polychaetes and fish as potential hosts. Polycirrid Enoplobranchus sanguineus and terebellids Amphitrite ornata, and Terebella lapidaria revealed infections with aporocotylid larvae. Adult blood flukes were also collected from fish commonly encountered in the same habitat: spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), black drum (Pogonias cromis), and Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). Sporocysts containing cercariae were found in individuals of each annelid species. Adult Cardicola parvus were found in spotted seatrout and Atlantic croaker, C. laruei in spotted seatrout, C. currani in red drum, and C. palmeri in black drum. Genotype analysis of ITS-2 and lsrDNA of all forms confirmed conspecific infections by C. parvus in E. sanguineus and A. ornata and C. laruei in T. lapidaria. This is the first description of complete life cycles of aporocotylids in the Western Atlantic and first evidence of cryptic infections of Cy. nebulosus with C. parvus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Echinostome Flukes Receovered from Humans in Khammouane Province, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Yong, Tai-Soon; Eom, Keeseon S.; Min, Duk-Young; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Phammasack, Bounlay; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Rim, Han-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Echinostome eggs were detected in 22 (1.1%) of 2,074 people residing in riparian villages along the Mekong River in Khammouane Province, Lao PDR. In order to recover the adult flukes, 9 persons were treated with praziquantel and purged with magnesium salts. A total of 55 echinostome specimens (4 species) were recovered from the 9 persons. Echinostoma revolutum (8 specimens) was recovered from 3 persons, Artyfechinostomum malayanum (8 specimens) was from 2 persons, Echinochasmus japonicus (33 specimens) was from 7 persons, and Euparyphium sp. (6 specimens) was from 1 person. In Lao PDR, only human infections with E. japonicus were previously known. Therefore, the present study describes human infections with E. revolutum, A. malayanum, and Euparyphium sp. for the first time in Lao PDR. These results indicate that the surveyed villages of Khammouane Province, Lao PDR are low-grade endemic foci of echinostomiasis. PMID:22949759

  6. Severe and Catastrophic Neck Injuries Resulting from Tackle Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torg, Joseph S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Use of the spring-loaded blocking and tackling devices should be discontinued due to severe neck injuries resulting from their use; employment of the head and helmet as the primary assault weapon in blocking, tackling, and head butting should be condemned for the same reason. (MJB)

  7. Understanding the main route of drug entry in adult Fasciola hepatica: Further insights into closantel pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, L; Canton, C; Cadenazzi, G; Larsen, K; Virkel, G; Moreno, L; Fairweather, I; Lanusse, C; Alvarez, L

    2017-10-01

    Closantel (CLS) is highly effective against adult liver flukes after its oral or subcutaneous (sc) administration in ruminants. Trans-tegumental diffusion and oral ingestion are the two potential routes available for the entry of drugs into Fasciola hepatica. The work reported here contributes to improve the understanding of CLS pharmacology. The main goals of were: I) to determine the pattern of in vivo CLS accumulation into adult F. hepatica and relevant tissues in CLS-treated sheep; II) to investigate the influence of the physicochemical composition of the incubation medium on the CLS diffusion process into adult F. hepatica; III) to assess the ovicidal activity of CLS against F. hepatica eggs; and IV) to investigate the in vivo effect of CLS treatment on glutathione S-transferases activity in adult liver flukes exposed to CLS. Fourteen healthy sheep were each orally infected with 75 F. hepatica metacercariae. Sixteen (16) weeks after infection, animals were treated with CLS by oral (n = 6, 10 mg/kg) or sub-cutaneous (sc) (n = 6, 5 mg/kg) route. At 12, 24 and 36 h post-treatment, animals were sacrificed (n = 2) and samples of blood, bile and adult F. hepatica were collected. In addition, flukes recovered from non-treated sheep (n = 2) were ex vivo incubated (60 min) in the presence of CLS in either RPMI or bile as incubation medium. CLS concentration was measured by HPLC. The ovicidal activity of CLS was investigated using eggs obtained from the bile of untreated sheep. Finally, glutathione S-transferase activity in F. hepatica recovered from untreated and CLS-treated sheep was assessed. In the in vivo studies, the highest CLS concentrations were measured in plasma and adult liver flukes. A positive correlation was observed between CLS concentration in plasma and in F. hepatica. Results obtained in the current work indicate that the in vivo accumulation of CLS into adult liver flukes occurs mainly by the oral route. After ex

  8. Isolation of Brucella pinnipedialis from Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, Varpu; Nylund, Minna; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Heikkinen, Petra; Kauhala, Kaarina; Jay, Maryne; Isomursu, Marja

    2017-10-01

    Brucella infection in seals was reported for the first time in 1994 around the coast of Scotland. Since then, marine mammal Brucella infections were found to be widely distributed in the northern hemisphere. Two Brucella species affect marine mammals: Brucella pinnipedialis in pinnipeds and Brucella ceti in cetaceans. We examined the livers of Baltic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the Finnish coast (n=122) hunted, found dead, or killed as by-catch in fishing gear in 2013-15 as part of population health monitoring. We detected B. pinnipedialis in the livers of three grey seals. The bacterium was isolated from livers displaying parasitic cholangitis. We also detected Brucella DNA in liver flukes (Pseudamphistomum truncatum) obtained from a Brucella-infected grey seal, suggesting that flukes might be possible vectors of this pathogen in the marine environment.

  9. 46 CFR 121.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 121.300 Section 121.300 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Mooring and Towing Equipment § 121.300 Ground tackle and mooring lines. A...

  10. Bile duct obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors that have spread to the biliary system Liver and bile duct worms (flukes) The risk factors include: History of ... Increased bilirubin level Increased alkaline phosphatase level Increased liver enzymes The ... CT scan Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ( ...

  11. Tackling racism in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-11-30

    Essential facts Trade union Unite has developed a policy briefing on a new toolkit to combat racism in the NHS. It can help nurses and other staff tackle racial discrimination in health, with black and minority ethnic (BME) nurses often treated unequally compared with their white colleagues.

  12. Blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) of walking catfishes (Siluriformes: Clariidae): new genus and species from the Mekong River (Vietnam) with comments on related catfish aporocotylids.

    PubMed

    Truong, Triet Nhat; Bullard, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Nomasanguinicola canthoensis gen. et sp. n. infects the branchial vessels of bighead catfish, Clarias macrocephalus Günther (Siluriformes: Clariidae), in the Mekong River near Can Tho, southern Vietnam. Nomasanguinicola differs from all other genera of fish blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) by the combination of lacking body spines and by having an anterior sucker with two flanking columns of large denticles, an intestine comprising several short papilla-like caeca, an inverse U-shaped uterus, and an ootype located near the separate genital pores. The new species has an ootype that is posterior to the level of the female genital pore. That feature most easily differentiates it from the only other putative aporocotylid species having an anterior sucker with two flanking columns of large denticles, Plehniella dentata Paperna, 1964 and Sanguinicola clarias Imam, Marzouk, Hassan et Itman, 1984, which have an ootype that is lateral (P. dentata) or anterior (S. clarias) to the level of the female genital pore. These two species apparently lack extant type materials, infect North African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell), and herein are considered incertae sedis, but likely comprise species of Nomasanguinicola. An updated list of hosts, sites of infection and geographic localities for the six species and three genera of blood flukes that mature in catfishes is provided. The new species is the first fish blood fluke recorded from Vietnam and only the third reported from a walking catfish (Clariidae).

  13. The global burden of liver disease: the major impact of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Fan, Jian-Gao; Zhang, Zheng; Gao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of illness and death worldwide. In China alone, liver diseases, primarily viral hepatitis (predominantly hepatitis B virus [HBV]), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease, affect approximately 300 million people. The establishment of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1992 has resulted in a substantial decline in the number of newly HBV-infected patients; however, the number of patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases is rising at an alarming rate. Liver cancer, one of the most deadly cancers, is the second-most common cancer in China. Approximately 383,000 people die from liver cancer every year in China, which accounts for 51% of the deaths from liver cancer worldwide. Over the past 10 years, China has made some significant efforts to shed its "leader in liver diseases" title by investing large amounts of money in funding research, vaccines, and drug development for liver diseases and by recruiting many Western-trained hepatologists and scientists. Over the last two decades, hepatologists and scientists in China have made significant improvements in liver disease prevention, diagnosis, management, and therapy. They have been very active in liver disease research, as shown by the dramatic increase in the number of publications in Hepatology. Nevertheless, many challenges remain that must be tackled collaboratively. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and characteristics of liver diseases and liver-related research in China. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Regulation of Ovary Development in the Pathogenic Blood Fluke Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihui; Zhao, Jiangping; Wang, Jianbin; Hu, Chao; Peng, Jinbiao; Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Liu, Juntao; Lin, Jiaojiao; Jin, Youxin; Davis, Richard E; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomes, blood flukes, are an important global public health concern. Paired adult female schistosomes produce large numbers of eggs that are primarily responsible for the disease pathology and critical for dissemination. Consequently, understanding schistosome sexual maturation and egg production may open novel perspectives for intervening with these processes to prevent clinical symptoms and to interrupt the life-cycle of these blood-flukes. microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of many biological processes including development, cell proliferation, metabolism, and signal transduction. Here, we report on the identification of Schistosoma japonicum miRNAs using small RNA deep sequencing in the key stages of male-female pairing, gametogenesis, and egg production. We identified 38 miRNAs, including 10 previously unknown miRNAs. Eighteen of the miRNAs were differentially expressed between male and female schistosomes and during different stages of sexual maturation. We identified 30 potential target genes for 16 of the S. japonicum miRNAs using antibody-based pull-down assays and bioinformatic analyses. We further validated some of these target genes using either in vitro luciferase assays or in vivo miRNA suppression experiments. Notably, suppression of the female enriched miRNAs bantam and miR-31 led to morphological alteration of ovaries in female schistosomes. These findings uncover key roles for specific miRNAs in schistosome sexual maturation and egg production.

  15. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Regulation of Ovary Development in the Pathogenic Blood Fluke Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Peng, Jinbiao; Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Liu, Juntao; Lin, Jiaojiao; Jin, Youxin; Davis, Richard E.; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes, blood flukes, are an important global public health concern. Paired adult female schistosomes produce large numbers of eggs that are primarily responsible for the disease pathology and critical for dissemination. Consequently, understanding schistosome sexual maturation and egg production may open novel perspectives for intervening with these processes to prevent clinical symptoms and to interrupt the life-cycle of these blood-flukes. microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of many biological processes including development, cell proliferation, metabolism, and signal transduction. Here, we report on the identification of Schistosoma japonicum miRNAs using small RNA deep sequencing in the key stages of male-female pairing, gametogenesis, and egg production. We identified 38 miRNAs, including 10 previously unknown miRNAs. Eighteen of the miRNAs were differentially expressed between male and female schistosomes and during different stages of sexual maturation. We identified 30 potential target genes for 16 of the S. japonicum miRNAs using antibody-based pull-down assays and bioinformatic analyses. We further validated some of these target genes using either in vitro luciferase assays or in vivo miRNA suppression experiments. Notably, suppression of the female enriched miRNAs bantam and miR-31 led to morphological alteration of ovaries in female schistosomes. These findings uncover key roles for specific miRNAs in schistosome sexual maturation and egg production. PMID:26871705

  16. The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Berriman, Matthew; Haas, Brian J.; LoVerde, Philip T.; Wilson, R. Alan; Dillon, Gary P.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Andrade, Luiza F.; Ashton, Peter D.; Aslett, Martin A.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.; Blandin, Gaelle; Caffrey, Conor R.; Coghlan, Avril; Coulson, Richard; Day, Tim A.; Delcher, Art; DeMarco, Ricardo; Djikeng, Appoliniare; Eyre, Tina; Gamble, John A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Gu, Yong; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hirai, Hirohisha; Hirai, Yuriko; Houston, Robin; Ivens, Alasdair; Johnston, David A.; Lacerda, Daniela; Macedo, Camila D.; McVeigh, Paul; Ning, Zemin; Oliveira, Guilherme; Overington, John P.; Parkhill, Julian; Pertea, Mihaela; Pierce, Raymond J.; Protasio, Anna V.; Quail, Michael A.; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle; Rogers, Jane; Sajid, Mohammed; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stanke, Mario; Tivey, Adrian R.; White, Owen; Williams, David L.; Wortman, Jennifer; Wu, Wenjie; Zamanian, Mostafa; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Barrell, Barclay G.; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2009-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. We report here analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and novel families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternate splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, while the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases, provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and novel targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints while a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease. PMID:19606141

  17. The Global Burden of Liver Disease: The Major Impact of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Fan, Jian-Gao; Zhang, Zheng; Gao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of illness and death worldwide. In China alone, liver diseases, primarily viral hepatitis (predominantly hepatitis B virus, HBV), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease affect approximately 300 million people. The establishment of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1992 has resulted in a substantial decline in the number of newly HBV-infected patients; however, the number of patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases is rising at an alarming rate. Liver cancer, one of the most deadly cancers, is the second most common cancer in China. Approximately 383,000 people die from liver cancer every year in China, which accounts for 51% of the deaths from liver cancer worldwide. Over the past 10 years, China has made some significant efforts to shed its “leader in liver diseases” title by investing large amounts of money in funding research, vaccines and drug development for liver diseases, and by recruiting many Western-trained hepatologists and scientists. Over the last two decades, hepatologists and scientists in China have made significant improvements in liver disease prevention, diagnosis, management and therapy. They have been very active in liver disease research, as shown by the dramatic increase in the number of publications in Hepatology. Nevertheless, many challenges remain that must be tackled collaboratively. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and characteristics of liver diseases and liver-related research in China. PMID:25164003

  18. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    PubMed

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does player time-in-game affect tackle technique in elite level rugby union?

    PubMed

    Tierney, Gregory J; Denvir, Karl; Farrell, Garreth; Simms, Ciaran K

    2018-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that fatigue may be a major factor in tackle-related injury risk in rugby union and hence more injuries occur in the later stages of a game. The aim of this study is to identify changes in ball carrier or tackler proficiency characteristics, using elite level match video data, as player time-in-game increases. Qualitative observational cohort study. Three 2014/15 European Rugby Champions Cup games were selected for ball carrier and tackler proficiency analysis. Analysis was only conducted on players who started and remained on the field for the entire game. A separate analysis was conducted on 10 randomly selected 2014/15 European Rugby Champions Cup/Pro 12 games to assess the time distribution of tackles throughout a game. A Chi-square test and one-way way ANOVA with post-hoc testing was conducted to identify significant differences (p<0.05) for proficiency characteristics and tackle counts between quarters in the game, respectively. Player time-in-game did not affect tackle proficiency for both the ball carrier and tackler. Any results that showed statistical significance did not indicate a trend of deterioration in proficiency with increased player time-in-game. The time distribution of tackles analysis indicated that more tackles occurring in the final quarter of the game than the first (p=0.04) and second (p=<0.01). It appears that player time-in-game does not affect tackler or ball carrier tackle technique proficiency at the elite level. More tackles occurring in the final quarter of a game provides an alternative explanation to more tackle-related injuries occurring at this stage. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. TSCA Section 21 Petition Requesting EPA to Regulate Lead in Fishing Tackle

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This petition requests EPA to promulgate regulations under section 6 of TSCA to protect the environment from fishing tackle containing lead including fishing weights, sinkers, lures, jigs, and/or other tackle.

  1. Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe: general overview and diseases caused by trematodes (flukes).

    PubMed

    Auer, Herbert; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    Parasitic helminths and helminthoses do not only occur in the tropics and subtropics but are also prevalent in Austria and other Central European countries. Their prevalence is, however, more or less rather low. In total, we know more than 20 helminth species, which are diagnosed regularly in Austria; some of them occur in Austria autochthonously, some others are acquired abroad and are transferred as souvenirs to Central Europe. The spectrum of helminths described in this overview comprises species of the trematodes (flukes), cestodes (tapeworms), and nematodes (roundworms).The topic "Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe" is divided into three parts: The first part comprises a short introduction into the field of medical helminthology and is primarily dedicated to the description of trematodes and trematode-caused diseases.

  2. Baltimore District Tackles High Suspension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the Baltimore District tackles its high suspension rates. Driven by an increasing belief that zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are ineffective, more educators are embracing strategies that do not exclude misbehaving students from school for offenses such as insubordination, disrespect, cutting class, tardiness, and…

  3. Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis spp. in Vietnam: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Doanh, Pham N; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2016-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini are clinically important small liver flukes because of their known association with development of cholangiocarcinoma. In Vietnam, high prevalence of C. sinensis infection in humans was previously reported in northern provinces, and O. viverrini infection has been detected in several central provinces. However, diagnosis of C. sinensis and O. viverrini infections in the past was merely based on faecal egg examination. This method alone can lead to misidentification at the species level because of morphological similarity between the eggs of these liver flukes and minute intestinal trematodes of the family Heterophyidae. In fact, recent surveys in Vietnam revealed that infection with several minute intestinal flukes, such as Haplorchis pumilio and H. taichui, are much more common than infection with C. sinensis or O. viverrini, and they often co-infect humans. Thus, previously reported prevalence of small liver fluke infection in Vietnam was likely over-estimated due to mis identification of parasites in copro-parasitological examinations. In addition, there is some confusion about identification of cercariae, metacercariae and also adults of C. sinensis and O. viverrini in intermediate and definitive hosts. The aim of this review is, therefore, to draw realistic pictures of the past and present scientific reports on the epidemiology and biology of C. sinensis and Opisthorchis spp. infection in Vietnam. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Update on trematode infections in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Vázquez, F A; Meana, A; Valcárcel, F; Martínez-Valladares, M

    2012-09-30

    Trematode parasites live in the liver, fore stomachs or blood vessels of a wide range of animals and humans. Most of them have a special economic and veterinary significance. Liver fluke disease of sheep and other animal species is caused by the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Hepatic fasciolosis occurs throughout the world, where climatic conditions are suitable for the survival of aquatic intermediate host snails. Also of importance for ruminants, in some parts of the world, are Fasciola gigantica and Fascioloides magna. Other trematodes infecting ruminants include Dicrocoelium dendriticum; Eurytrema pancreaticum and Eurytrema coelomaticum. Among the Paramphistomidae, some species can infect sheep and other ruminants. Finally, Schistosoma spp. are found in the blood vessels of ruminants and are of minor importance in temperate regions. The manuscript concentrates on trematode species of veterinary importance for domestic sheep. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Exploring and Expanding the Fatty-Acid-Binding Protein Superfamily in Fasciola Species.

    PubMed

    Morphew, Russell M; Wilkinson, Toby J; Mackintosh, Neil; Jahndel, Veronika; Paterson, Steve; McVeigh, Paul; Abbas Abidi, Syed M; Saifullah, Khalid; Raman, Muthusamy; Ravikumar, Gopalakrishnan; LaCourse, James; Maule, Aaron; Brophy, Peter M

    2016-09-02

    The liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica infect livestock worldwide and threaten food security with climate change and problematic control measures spreading disease. Fascioliasis is also a foodborne disease with up to 17 million humans infected. In the absence of vaccines, treatment depends on triclabendazole (TCBZ), and overuse has led to widespread resistance, compromising future TCBZ control. Reductionist biology from many laboratories has predicted new therapeutic targets. To this end, the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) superfamily has proposed multifunctional roles, including functions intersecting vaccine and drug therapy, such as immune modulation and anthelmintic sequestration. Research is hindered by a lack of understanding of the full FABP superfamily complement. Although discovery studies predicted FABPs as promising vaccine candidates, it is unclear if uncharacterized FABPs are more relevant for vaccine formulations. We have coupled genome, transcriptome, and EST data mining with proteomics and phylogenetics to reveal a liver fluke FABP superfamily of seven clades: previously identified clades I-III and newly identified clades IV-VII. All new clade FABPs were analyzed using bioinformatics and cloned from both liver flukes. The extended FABP data set will provide new study tools to research the role of FABPs in parasite biology and as therapy targets.

  6. Opisthorchiasis control in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jongsuksuntigul, P; Imsomboon, T

    2003-11-01

    History of opisthorchiasis control started in 1950 as a small scale helminthiasis control program in some high risk areas. Following a number of studies and trial projects of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, the national liver fluke control program has been developed and operated under several National Public Health Development Plans. Presently, the program is being operated in some provinces of the Central, and all provinces of the Northeast and North of Thailand. The main strategies for liver fluke control comprise of three interrelated approaches, namely stool examinations and treatment of positive cases with praziquantel for eliminating human host reservoir; health education for a promotion of cooked fish consumption to prevent infection, and the improvement of hygienic defecation for the interruption of disease transmission. Between 1984 and 1987, the positive rate of liver fluke infection was 63.6%. In 1988, the positive rate went down to 35.6%. Following the region wide control program started in 1989, the annual positive rates had subsequently decreased to 9.4% in the year 2001. The prevalence rate was remarkably high in the North and moderately high in the Northeast, while the prevalence in the Central region was considerably low and there was no evidence of disease transmission in the South.

  7. Automatic blood vessel based-liver segmentation using the portal phase abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Iinuma, Gen

    2018-02-01

    Liver segmentation is the basis for computer-based planning of hepatic surgical interventions. In diagnosis and analysis of hepatic diseases and surgery planning, automatic segmentation of liver has high importance. Blood vessel (BV) has showed high performance at liver segmentation. In our previous work, we developed a semi-automatic method that segments the liver through the portal phase abdominal CT images in two stages. First stage was interactive segmentation of abdominal blood vessels (ABVs) and subsequent classification into hepatic (HBVs) and non-hepatic (non-HBVs). This stage had 5 interactions that include selective threshold for bone segmentation, selecting two seed points for kidneys segmentation, selection of inferior vena cava (IVC) entrance for starting ABVs segmentation, identification of the portal vein (PV) entrance to the liver and the IVC-exit for classifying HBVs from other ABVs (non-HBVs). Second stage is automatic segmentation of the liver based on segmented ABVs as described in [4]. For full automation of our method we developed a method [5] that segments ABVs automatically tackling the first three interactions. In this paper, we propose full automation of classifying ABVs into HBVs and non- HBVs and consequently full automation of liver segmentation that we proposed in [4]. Results illustrate that the method is effective at segmentation of the liver through the portal abdominal CT images.

  8. The Effects of Verbal Instruction and Shaping to Improve Tackling by High School Football Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Antonio M.; Pyles, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated verbal instruction and shaping using TAG (teaching with acoustical guidance) to improve tackling by 3 high school football players. Verbal instruction and shaping improved tackling for all 3 participants. In addition, performance was maintained as participants moved more quickly through the tackling procedure.

  9. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N.; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Moran, Corey S.; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  10. Morphological and Molecular Discrimination of Fasciola Species Isolated From Domestic Ruminants of Urmia City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    YAKHCHALI, Mohammad; MALEKZADEH-VIAYEH, Reza; IMANI-BARAN, Abbas; MARDANI, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: The trematodes of the genus Fasciola (the liver flukes) are among the well-known instances of food-borne parasites worldwide. Differentiation of Fasciola species is important because of their different transmission and epidemiological characteristics. The current study was undertaken to discriminate Fasciola species in the domestic ruminants of Urmia city, Iran. Methods: Adult flukes were isolated from the naturally infected livers of the slaughtered water buffaloes and sheep. The flukes were initially identified based on morphological and morphometric parameters. A 618-bp-long fragment of the 28SrRNA gene of Fasciola was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified fragment was digested by DraII or AvaII enzymes for a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequenced for the phylogenetic tree construction. Results: Based on the morphometric examination, the flukes belonged to F. hepatica, F. gigantica and an intermediate Fasciola form. The PCR-RFLP analysis was able to differentiate F. hepatica from F. gigantica. While the phylogenetic reconstruction justified, to some extent, the morphological diagnosis, it failed to segregate F. hepatica from F. gigantica identified in this and the previous studies. Conclusion: To resolve fully the problem of taxonomy and evolution in Fasciola species, employing a broad range of molecular and morphological approaches is necessary. This is crucial for epidemiological surveys and successful clinical management of their infection. PMID:25904945

  11. Disease screening profiles and colostrum management practices on 16 Irish suckler beef farms.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, James; Earley, Bernadette; Barrett, Damien; Doherty, Michael L; Crosson, Paul; de Waal, Theo; Mee, John F

    2015-01-01

    Calf output is a key element in determining the profitability of a suckler beef enterprise. Infectious agents such as Bovine Virus Diarrhoea (BVD) virus, colostrum management and parasitic challenge can all affect calf output. Prior to the national BVD eradication programme, there was little published information on either the prevalence or effect of BVD in Irish beef herds. There is little published information on colostrum management practices in Irish commercial beef herds and there have also been few studies published on the prevalence of liver fluke or rumen fluke infection in Irish beef herds. Sixteen farms participating in the Teagasc/Farmers Journal BETTER farm beef programme were used in this study. Fourteen herds were screened for the presence of BVD virus in 2010 using RT-PCR. In 13 herds, blood samples were collected from calves (2-14 days of age) in November 2011 - April 2012 to determine their passive immune status using the zinc sulphate turbidity (ZST) test, while in 12 herds, blood and faecal samples were taken in order to determine the level of exposure to gastrointestinal and hepatic helminths. The overall prevalence of BVD virus-positive cattle was 0.98% (range 0 - 3% per herd, range 0.6 - 3.0% per positive herd). Eighteen of the 82 calves (22%) sampled had ZST values less than 20 units (herd mean range 17.0 - 38.5 units) indicating a failure of passive transfer. The overall animal-level (herd-level) prevalence of liver fluke and rumen fluke infection in these herds was 40.5% (100%) and 20.8% (75%), respectively. The potential costs associated with the presence of animals persistently infected with BVD virus through the increased use of antibiotics; the rate of failure of passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins and the high prevalence of liver fluke infection in these herds highlight that some Irish suckler beef farms may not be realizing their economic potential due to a range of herd health issues. The use of farm-specific herd health

  12. Specific tackling situations affect the biomechanical demands experienced by rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario; Preatoni, Ezio; Trewartha, Grant

    2017-03-01

    Tackling in Rugby Union is an open skill which can involve high-speed collisions and is the match event associated with the greatest proportion of injuries. This study aimed to analyse the biomechanics of rugby tackling under three conditions: from a stationary position, with dominant and non-dominant shoulder, and moving forward, with dominant shoulder. A specially devised contact simulator, a 50-kg punch bag instrumented with pressure sensors, was translated towards the tackler (n = 15) to evaluate the effect of laterality and tackling approach on the external loads absorbed by the tackler, on head and trunk motion, and on trunk muscle activities. Peak impact force was substantially higher in the stationary dominant (2.84 ± 0.74 kN) than in the stationary non-dominant condition (2.44 ± 0.64 kN), but lower than in the moving condition (3.40 ± 0.86 kN). Muscle activation started on average 300 ms before impact, with higher activation for impact-side trapezius and non-impact-side erector spinae and gluteus maximus muscles. Players' technique for non-dominant-side tackles was less compliant with current coaching recommendations in terms of cervical motion (more neck flexion and lateral bending in the stationary non-dominant condition) and players could benefit from specific coaching focus on non-dominant-side tackles.

  13. Prevalence of infection and molecular confirmation by using ITS-2 region of Fasciola gigantica found in domestic cattle from Chiang Mai province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phalee, Anawat; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the infection of Fasciola gigantica (F. gigantica) in domestic cattle from Chiang Mai province and molecular confirmation using ITS-2 region. The liver and gall bladder of Bubalus bubalis (B. bubalis) and Bos taurus (B. taurus) from slaughterhouses were examined adult worms and prevalence investigation. The species confirmation with phylogenetic analysis using ITS-2 sequences was performed by maximum likelihood and UPGMA methods. The total prevalences of infection in B. bubalis and Bubalus taurus (B. taurus) were 67.27% and 52.94% respectively. The respective prevalence in both B. bubalis and B. taurus were acquired from Doi-Saket, Muang, and Sanpatong districts, with 81.25%, 62.50% and 60.00% for B. bubalis and 62.50%, 50.00% and 47.06% for Bos taurus respectively. The species confirmation of F. gigantica and some related species by basing on maximum likelihood and UPGMA methods used, 4 groups of trematodes were generated, first F. gigantica group including specimen of Chiang Mai, second 2 samples of F. hepatica, third group of 3 rumen flukes; Orthocoelium streptocoelium, F. elongatus and Paramphistomum epliclitum and fourth group of 3 minute intestinal flukes; Haplorchis taichui, Stellantchasmu falcatus, Haplorchoides sp. and liver fluke; Opisthorchis viverrini respectively. These results can be confirmed the Giant liver fluke which mainly caused fascioliasis in Chiang Mai was identified as F. gigantica and specimens were the same as those of F. gigantica recorded in other different countries. Nucleotide sequence of ITS-2 region has been proven as effective diagnostic tool for the identification of F. gigantica. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating behavioral skills training to teach safe tackling skills to youth football players.

    PubMed

    Tai, Sharayah S M; Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2017-10-01

    With concussion rates on the rise for football players, there is a need for further research to increase skills and decrease injuries. Behavioral skills training is effective in teaching a wide variety of skills but has yet to be studied in the sports setting. We evaluated behavioral skills training to teach safer tackling techniques to six participants from a Pop Warner football team. Safer tackling techniques increased during practice and generalized to games for the two participants who had opportunities to tackle in games. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  15. 21 CFR 520.45a - Albendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver...) body weight (10 mg/kilogram (kg)) as a single oral dose using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica); heads and segments of...

  16. 21 CFR 520.38a - Albendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver...) body weight (10 mg/kilogram (kg)) as a single oral dose using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica); heads and segments of...

  17. 21 CFR 520.45a - Albendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver...) body weight (10 mg/kilogram (kg)) as a single oral dose using dosing gun or dosing syringe. (ii) Indications for use. For removal and control of adult liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica); heads and segments of...

  18. Tackling Noncommunicable Diseases in Africa: Caveat Lector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensah, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable disease (NCD), principally cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic lung disease, and diabetes, constitutes the major cause of death worldwide. Evidence of a continuing increase in the global burden of these diseases has generated recent urgent calls for global action to tackle and reduce related death and disability. Because the…

  19. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T.; Segel, Nicholas H.; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  20. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T; Segel, Nicholas H; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-12-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs.

  1. Echinostoma ilocanum Infection in Two Residents of Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Cho, Jaeeun; Eom, Keeseon S.; Yong, Tai-Soon; Min, Duk-Young; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Phommasack, Bounlay; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Rim, Han-Jong

    2018-01-01

    Adult specimens of Echinostoma ilocanum (Garrison, 1908) Odhner, 1911 (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) were recovered from 2 riparian people who resided along the Mekong River in Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR. In fecal examinations done by the Kato-Katz technique, they revealed echinostome eggs together with eggs of Opisthorchis viverrini (and minute intestinal fluke eggs) and hookworms. To recover the adult flukes, they were treated with praziquantel 30–40 mg/kg in a single dose and purged with magnesium salts. A total of 658 adult fluke specimens were recovered from the 2 people; 456 from case 1 and 202 from case 2. Specimens from case 1 consisted of 335 echinostomes (301 E. ilocanum and 34 species undetermined), 120 O. viverrini, and 1 Haplorchis taichui, and those from case 2 consisted of 36 E. ilocanum, 134 O. viverrini, and 32 H. taichui. Thus, the number of E. ilocanum specimens was 337 in total (average per person, 168.5). From this study, it is suggested that foodborne intestinal flukes and liver flukes are highly prevalent along the Mekong River in Savannakhet Province. The present report describes for the first time human infections with E. ilocanum in Lao PDR. PMID:29529854

  2. Identity of Fasciola spp. in sheep in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Said; ElKhatam, Ahmed; Zidan, Shereif; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-12-01

    In Egypt, liver flukes, Fasciola spp. (Digenea: Fasciolidae), have a serious impact on the farming industry and public health. Both Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica are known to occur in cattle, providing the opportunity for genetic recombination. Little is known on the identity and genetic variability of Fasciola populations in sheep. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of liver flukes in sheep in Menofia Province as a representative area of the delta region in Egypt, as measured by postmortem examination of slaughtered animals at three abattoirs. The identity and genetic variability of Fasciola spp. in slaughtered animals were determined by PCR-sequence analysis of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes. Physical inspection of the liver indicated that 302 of 2058 (14.7%) slaughtered sheep were infected with Fasciola spp. Sequence analysis of the ITS1 and nad1 genes of liver flukes from 17 animals revealed that 11 animals were infected with F. hepatica, four with F. gigantica, and two with both species. Seventy eight of 103 flukes genetically characterized from these animals were F. hepatica, 23 were F. gigantica, and two had ITS1 sequences identical to F. hepatica but nad1 sequences identical to F. gigantica. nad1 sequences of Egyptian isolates of F. gigantica showed pronounced differences from those in the GenBank database. Egyptian F. gigantica haplotypes formed haplogroup D, which clustered in a sister clade with haplogroups A, B and C circulating in Asia, indicating the existence of geographic isolation in the species. Both F. hepatica and F. gigantica are prevalent in sheep in Egypt and an introgressed form of the two occurs as the result of genetic recombination. In addition, a geographically isolated F. gigantica population is present in the country. The importance of these observations in epidemiology of fascioliasis needs to be examined in future

  3. Tackling the challenges of matching biomedical ontologies.

    PubMed

    Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Mott, Isabela; Martins, Catarina; Couto, Francisco M; Cruz, Isabel F

    2018-01-15

    Biomedical ontologies pose several challenges to ontology matching due both to the complexity of the biomedical domain and to the characteristics of the ontologies themselves. The biomedical tracks in the Ontology Matching Evaluation Initiative (OAEI) have spurred the development of matching systems able to tackle these challenges, and benchmarked their general performance. In this study, we dissect the strategies employed by matching systems to tackle the challenges of matching biomedical ontologies and gauge the impact of the challenges themselves on matching performance, using the AgreementMakerLight (AML) system as the platform for this study. We demonstrate that the linear complexity of the hash-based searching strategy implemented by most state-of-the-art ontology matching systems is essential for matching large biomedical ontologies efficiently. We show that accounting for all lexical annotations (e.g., labels and synonyms) in biomedical ontologies leads to a substantial improvement in F-measure over using only the primary name, and that accounting for the reliability of different types of annotations generally also leads to a marked improvement. Finally, we show that cross-references are a reliable source of information and that, when using biomedical ontologies as background knowledge, it is generally more reliable to use them as mediators than to perform lexical expansion. We anticipate that translating traditional matching algorithms to the hash-based searching paradigm will be a critical direction for the future development of the field. Improving the evaluation carried out in the biomedical tracks of the OAEI will also be important, as without proper reference alignments there is only so much that can be ascertained about matching systems or strategies. Nevertheless, it is clear that, to tackle the various challenges posed by biomedical ontologies, ontology matching systems must be able to efficiently combine multiple strategies into a mature matching

  4. The Lawa model: A sustainable, integrated opisthorchiasis control program using the EcoHealth approach in the Lawa Lake region of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Sangnikul, Thinnakorn

    2017-08-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a major foodborne parasitic zoonotic disease in Thailand and neighboring Mekong countries. The infection is associated with several hepatobiliary diseases including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The rates of CCA in regions where the parasite is endemic are unprecedented. Extensive research on various aspects of opisthorchiasis has been conducted in recent decades. However, the current status of O. viverrini infection in the country is approaching 85% prevalence in certain endemic areas even after more than 30years of control programs in Thailand. The complex life cycle of the fluke, which involves several hosts/environments, makes it difficult to control by conventional methods. Therefore, a new control strategy using the EcoHealth/One Health approach named the "Lawa model" was introduced into the liver fluke endemic Lawa Lake region in Khon Kaen Province. This program has been underway for over ten years. The program includes treatment with anthelmintic drugs, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. We developed the "Liver fluke-free school program" as a part of the Lawa model with successful results. All key stakeholders were empowered to obtain competency in their control activities for the sustainability of the program in the community. Nowadays, the infection rate in the 12 villages surrounding the lake has declined to less than 10% from an average of 60% at the start. The Cyprinid fish species now show less than 1% prevalence of infection compared with a maximum of 70% during the baseline survey. No infected Bithynia snails in the lake were found during recent field studies. Of the lessons learned from the Lawa model, the importance of community participation is one practical and essential component. The key to the success of the project is multi-stakeholder participation with the active

  5. A Legal Approach to Tackling Contract Cheating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Michael J.; Newton, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    The phenomenon of contract cheating presents, potentially, a serious threat to the quality and standards of Higher Education around the world. There have been suggestions, cited below, to tackle the problem using legal means, but we find that current laws are not fit for this purpose. In this article we present a proposal for a specific new law to…

  6. Elucidation of the first definitively identified life cycle for a marine turtle blood fluke (Trematoda: Spirorchiidae) enables informed control.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Thomas H; Crespo-Picazo, Jose L; Cutmore, Scott C; Stacy, Brian A; Chapman, Phoebe A; García-Párraga, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Blood flukes of the family Spirorchiidae are significant pathogens of both free-ranging and captive marine turtles. Despite a significant proportion of marine turtle mortality being attributable to spirorchiid infections, details of their life cycles remain almost entirely unknown. Here we report on the molecular elucidation of the complete life cycle of a marine spirorchiid, identified as Amphiorchis sp., infecting vermetid gastropods and captive hatched neonate Caretta caretta in the Oceanogràfic Aquarium, in Valencia, Spain. Specimens of a vermetid gastropod, Thylaeodus cf. rugulosus (Monterosato, 1878), collected from the aquarium filtration system housing diseased C. caretta, were infected with sporocysts and cercariae consistent with the family Spirorchiidae. We generated rDNA sequence data [internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and partial 28S rDNA] from infections from the vermetid which were identical to sequences generated from eggs from the serosa of the intestine of neonate C. caretta, and an adult spirorchiid from the liver of a C. caretta from Florida, USA. Given the reliability of these markers in the delineation of trematode species, we consider all three stages to represent the same species and tentatively identify it as a species of Amphiorchis Price, 1934. The source of infection at the Oceanogràfic Foundation Rehabilitation Centre, Valencia, Spain, is inferred to be an adult C. caretta from the western Mediterranean being rehabilitated in the same facility. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this Amphiorchis sp. is closely related to other spirorchiids of marine turtles (species of Carettacola Manter & Larson, 1950, Hapalotrema Looss, 1899 and Learedius Price, 1934). We discuss implications of the present findings for the control of spirorchiidiasis in captivity, for the better understanding of epidemiology in wild individuals, and the elucidation of further life cycles. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by

  7. Microfluidic Gut-liver chip for reproducing the first pass metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choe, Aerim; Ha, Sang Keun; Choi, Inwook; Choi, Nakwon; Sung, Jong Hwan

    2017-03-01

    After oral intake of drugs, drugs go through the first pass metabolism in the gut and the liver, which greatly affects the final outcome of the drugs' efficacy and side effects. The first pass metabolism is a complex process involving the gut and the liver tissue, with transport and reaction occurring simultaneously at various locations, which makes it difficult to be reproduced in vitro with conventional cell culture systems. In an effort to tackle this challenge, here we have developed a microfluidic gut-liver chip that can reproduce the dynamics of the first pass metabolism. The microfluidic chip consists of two separate layers for gut epithelial cells (Caco-2) and the liver cells (HepG2), and is designed so that drugs go through a sequential absorption in the gut chamber and metabolic reaction in the liver chamber. We fabricated the chip and showed that the two different cell lines can be successfully co-cultured on chip. When the two cells are cultured on chip, changes in the physiological function of Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were noted. The cytochrome P450 metabolic activity of both cells were significantly enhanced, and the absorptive property of Caco-2 cells on chip also changed in response to the presence of flow. Finally, first pass metabolism of a flavonoid, apigenin, was evaluated as a model compound, and co-culture of gut and liver cells on chip resulted in a metabolic profile that is closer to the reported profile than a monoculture of gut cells. This microfluidic gut-liver chip can potentially be a useful platform to study the complex first pass metabolism of drugs in vitro.

  8. Venous tree separation in the liver: graph partitioning using a non-ising model.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Thomas; Kaftan, Jens N; Schuh, Andreas; Tietjen, Christian; Soza, Grzegorz; Aach, Til

    2011-01-01

    Entangled tree-like vascular systems are commonly found in the body (e.g., in the peripheries and lungs). Separation of these systems in medical images may be formulated as a graph partitioning problem given an imperfect segmentation and specification of the tree roots. In this work, we show that the ubiquitous Ising-model approaches (e.g., Graph Cuts, Random Walker) are not appropriate for tackling this problem and propose a novel method based on recursive minimal paths for doing so. To motivate our method, we focus on the intertwined portal and hepatic venous systems in the liver. Separation of these systems is critical for liver intervention planning, in particular when resection is involved. We apply our method to 34 clinical datasets, each containing well over a hundred vessel branches, demonstrating its effectiveness.

  9. Genomes of Fasciola hepatica from the Americas Reveal Colonization with Neorickettsia Endobacteria Related to the Agents of Potomac Horse and Human Sennetsu Fevers.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Samantha N; Tort, Jose F; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Fischer, Kerstin; Rosa, Bruce A; Smircich, Pablo; Fontenla, Santiago; Choi, Young-Jun; Tyagi, Rahul; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Mann, Victoria H; Kammili, Lakshmi; Latham, Patricia S; Dell'Oca, Nicolas; Dominguez, Fernanda; Carmona, Carlos; Fischer, Peter U; Brindley, Paul J; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2017-01-01

    Food borne trematodes (FBTs) are an assemblage of platyhelminth parasites transmitted through the food chain, four of which are recognized as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Fascioliasis stands out among the other NTDs due to its broad and significant impact on both human and animal health, as Fasciola sp., are also considered major pathogens of domesticated ruminants. Here we present a reference genome sequence of the common liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica isolated from sheep, complementing previously reported isolate from cattle. A total of 14,642 genes were predicted from the 1.14 GB genome of the liver fluke. Comparative genomics indicated that F. hepatica Oregon and related food-borne trematodes are metabolically less constrained than schistosomes and cestodes, taking advantage of the richer millieux offered by the hepatobiliary organs. Protease families differentially expanded between diverse trematodes may facilitate migration and survival within the heterogeneous environments and niches within the mammalian host. Surprisingly, the sequencing of Oregon and Uruguay F. hepatica isolates led to the first discovery of an endobacteria in this species. Two contigs from the F. hepatica Oregon assembly were joined to complete the 859,205 bp genome of a novel Neorickettsia endobacterium (nFh) closely related to the etiological agents of human Sennetsu and Potomac horse fevers. Immunohistochemical studies targeting a Neorickettsia surface protein found nFh in specific organs and tissues of the adult trematode including the female reproductive tract, eggs, the Mehlis' gland, seminal vesicle, and oral suckers, suggesting putative routes for fluke-to-fluke and fluke-to-host transmission. The genomes of F. hepatica and nFh will serve as a resource for further exploration of the biology of F. hepatica, and specifically its newly discovered trans-kingdom interaction with nFh and the impact of both species on disease in ruminants and humans.

  10. Genomes of Fasciola hepatica from the Americas Reveal Colonization with Neorickettsia Endobacteria Related to the Agents of Potomac Horse and Human Sennetsu Fevers

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Samantha N.; Rosa, Bruce A.; Fontenla, Santiago; Choi, Young-Jun; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Kammili, Lakshmi; Latham, Patricia S.; Dell’Oca, Nicolas; Dominguez, Fernanda; Carmona, Carlos; Fischer, Peter U.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2017-01-01

    Food borne trematodes (FBTs) are an assemblage of platyhelminth parasites transmitted through the food chain, four of which are recognized as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Fascioliasis stands out among the other NTDs due to its broad and significant impact on both human and animal health, as Fasciola sp., are also considered major pathogens of domesticated ruminants. Here we present a reference genome sequence of the common liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica isolated from sheep, complementing previously reported isolate from cattle. A total of 14,642 genes were predicted from the 1.14 GB genome of the liver fluke. Comparative genomics indicated that F. hepatica Oregon and related food-borne trematodes are metabolically less constrained than schistosomes and cestodes, taking advantage of the richer millieux offered by the hepatobiliary organs. Protease families differentially expanded between diverse trematodes may facilitate migration and survival within the heterogeneous environments and niches within the mammalian host. Surprisingly, the sequencing of Oregon and Uruguay F. hepatica isolates led to the first discovery of an endobacteria in this species. Two contigs from the F. hepatica Oregon assembly were joined to complete the 859,205 bp genome of a novel Neorickettsia endobacterium (nFh) closely related to the etiological agents of human Sennetsu and Potomac horse fevers. Immunohistochemical studies targeting a Neorickettsia surface protein found nFh in specific organs and tissues of the adult trematode including the female reproductive tract, eggs, the Mehlis’ gland, seminal vesicle, and oral suckers, suggesting putative routes for fluke-to-fluke and fluke-to-host transmission. The genomes of F. hepatica and nFh will serve as a resource for further exploration of the biology of F. hepatica, and specifically its newly discovered trans-kingdom interaction with nFh and the impact of both species on disease in ruminants and humans. PMID:28060841

  11. Distribution of Foxp3+ T cells in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes of goats and sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, A; Zafra, R; Pérez, J; McNeilly, T N; Pacheco, I L; Buffoni, L; Martínez-Moreno, F J; Molina-Hernández, V; Martínez-Moreno, A

    2016-10-30

    Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs) are now considered to play a key role in modulation of immune responses during parasitic helminth infections. Immunomodulation is a key factor in Fasciola hepatica infection; however, the distribution and role of Foxp3 + Tregs cells have not been investigated in F. hepatica infected ruminants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Foxp3 + Tregs in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes from experimentally infected sheep and goats during acute and chronic stages of infection. Three groups of goats (n=6) and three groups of sheep (n=6) were used in this study. Goats in groups 1-2 and sheep in groups 4-5 were orally infected with metacercarie of ovine origin. Groups 1 and 4 were killed during the acute stage of the infection, at nine days post infection (dpi); groups 2 and 5 were killed during the chronic stage, at 15 and19 weeks post infection respectively (wpi). Groups 3 (goats) and 6 (sheep) were left as uninfected controls. Fluke burdens and liver damage were assessed and the avidin-biotin-complex method was used for the immunohistochemical study. At nine dpi in acute hepatic lesions, the number of both Foxp3 + and CD3 + T lymphocytes increased significantly in goats and sheep. In the chronic stages of infection (15-19wpi), the number of Foxp3 + and CD3 + T lymphocytes were also significantly increased with respect to control livers, particularly in portal spaces with severely enlarged bile ducts (response to adult flukes) while the increase was lower in granulomas, chronic tracts and smaller portal spaces (response to tissue damage). Foxp3 + Tregs were increased in the cortex of hepatic lymph nodes of sheep (chronic infection) and goats (acute and chronic infection). The estimated proportion of T cells which were Foxp3+ was significantly increased in the large bile ducts and hepatic lymph node cortex of chronically infected goats but not sheep. This first report of the expansion of Foxp3 + Tregs in acute and chronic

  12. Animal Fascioliasis: Perspectives from high altitudinal regions.

    PubMed

    Lyngdoh, Damanbha; Sharma, Sunil; Roy, Bishnupada; Tandon, Veena

    2016-12-15

    The parasitic flukes of the genus Fasciola (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda: Digenea) cause fascioliasis or liver-rot disease in ruminant livestock in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Classically, two species of Fasciola- F. hepatica and F. gigantica, are universally recognized as taxonomically valid species. Our survey studies on ovid and bovid animals including yak and mithun from high altitudinal mountainous regions in Northeast India revealed the occurrence of Fasciola gigantica and also Fasciola sp.- an intermediate form, at altitudes between 5000 and 14,085 feet above sea level (asl). Two morphotypes- F. hepatica - like and F. gigantica - like, of Fasciola species were reported from the high altitudinal areas of Northeast India; most of these locales constitute new-locality and first records for the occurrence of these liver flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Participatory epidemiology of endemic diseases in West African cattle - Ethnoveterinary and bioveterinary knowledge in Fulani disease control.

    PubMed

    Majekodunmi, Ayodele O; Dongkum, Charles; Idehen, Christopher; Langs, Dachung Tok; Welburn, Susan C

    2018-06-01

    Fulani pastoralists in Nigeria lack adequate access to good quality veterinary services and often resort to treating their animals themselves. There are several negative aspects to this, including poor treatment outcomes, misuse of veterinary drugs and subsequent resistance, and further barriers to good relations between pastoralists and veterinary services. A participatory epidemiology survey was undertaken in Fulani communities, to examine their ability to diagnose and treat bovine diseases. Qualitative participatory epidemiology techniques including semi-structured interviews, ranking and participant and non-participant observations were used for data collection. Quantitative analysis to match Fulani disease descriptions to veterinary diseases was done by hierarchical clustering and multi-dimensional scaling. A concurrent parasitological survey for soil-transmitted parasites, trypanosomiasis and tick-borne diseases was undertaken to validate results. Fulani pastoralists displayed high levels of ethnoveterinary knowledge and good clinical diagnostic abilities. Diseases considered important by pastoralists included: hanta (CBPP); sammore (trypanosomiasis); boro (foot and mouth disease), gortowel (liver fluke) , dauda (parasitic gastro-enteritis with bloody diarrhoea) and susa (parasitic gastro-enteritis). The parasitology survey supported the participatory epidemiology results but also showed a high prevalence of tick-borne diseases that were not mentioned by pastoralists in this study. The use of " hanta " to describe CBPP is important as the accepted translation is liver-fluke ( hanta is the Hausa word for liver). Gortowel and dauda , two previously undescribed Fulfulde disease names have now been matched to liver fluke and PGE with bloody diarrhoea. Fulani showed low levels of bovine veterinary knowledge with mostly incorrect veterinary drugs chosen for treatment. Levels of ethno- and bio-veterinary knowledge and their application within pastoralist livestock

  14. Paramphistomum cervi: surface topography of the tegument of adult fluke.

    PubMed

    Panyarachun, Busaba; Sobhon, Prasert; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Anupunpisit, Vipavee; Anuracpreeda, Panat

    2010-06-01

    Adult Paramphistomum cervi or rumen fluke are pear-shaped, slightly concave ventrally and convex dorsally. The worm measures about 5-13 mm in length and 2-5 mm in width across the mid-section. As observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the tegumental surface in all part of the body, appears highly corrugated with transverse folds alternating with grooves and is spineless. At high magnification, the surface of the fold is composed of microfolds or ridges separated by microgrooves or pits. Corrugations and invaginations of the ventral surface are also more extensive than on the dorsal surface of the body. Both anterior and posterior suckers have thick rims covered with transverse folds without spine. The genital pore is situated at the anterior third of the body. There are two types of sensory papillae on the surface: type 1 is bulbous in shape, measuring 10-15 microm in diameter at the base with nipple-like tips, and type 2 has a similar shape and size and also a short cilia on top. These sensory papillae usually occur in large clusters, each having between 5 and 20 units depending on the region of the body. Clusters of papillae on the ventral surface and around the anterior suckers tend to be more numerous and larger in size. The dorsal surface of the body has the least number of papillae. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Family Health Strategies to tackle violence involving adolescents].

    PubMed

    Vieira Netto, Moysés Francisco; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira

    2016-05-01

    The Family Health Strategy (FHS) has an acknowledged potential for the promotion of health and the prevention of violence. This is an integrative bibliographic review with the aim of evaluating the performance of FHS professionals in tackling and preventing violence involving adolescents. It is an integrative review of dissertations and theses on healthcare published from 1994 to 2014. The collection of 17 dissertations and 2 doctoral theses reveals that these studies are recent. The FHS professionals acknowledge the vulnerability of adolescents to inflicting and being subject to violence, however the FHS proves ineffective in tackling and preventing such violence. The predominance of the medical technical care model, the deficiencies in Public Health education in professional training and the lack of institutional support are seen as the main obstacles. Many of these professionals are unaware of the files for notification of violence. The existence of family violence and criminal groups were the aspects most mentioned in the territories. The social representation of adolescents as being "problematic" and the lack of ESF actions that promote an increase youth leadership and empowerment were clearly detected.

  16. Stellantchasmus falcatus (Digenea: Heterophyidae) in Cambodia: Discovery of Metacercariae in Mullets and Recovery of Adult Flukes in an Experimental Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Jeoung, Hoo-Gn; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong

    2016-01-01

    Stellantchasmus falcatus (Digenea: Heterophyidae) is first reported from Cambodia through recovery of the metacercariae from mullet fish and adult flukes from an experimentally infected hamster. We purchased 7 mullets, Chelon macrolepis, in a local market of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and each of them was examined by the artificial digestion method on May 2010. The metacercariae of S. falcatus were detected in all mullets (100%) examined, and their average density was 177 per fish. They were elliptical, 220×168 μm in average size. They were orally infected to an hamster to obtain adult flukes. Adults recovered at day 10 post infection were observed with a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). They were small, 450×237 μm in average size, had a small oral sucker (41×50 μm), subglobular pharynx (29×21 μm), slender esophagus (57 μm), long and thick-walled expulsor (119×32 μm), spherical ovary (58×69 μm), and 2 ovoid testes (right: 117×74 μm; left: 114×63 μm). Eggs were small, yellow, and 23×12 μm in average size. In SEM observations, tegumental spines were densely distributed on the whole tegument, and single small type I sensory papillae were distributed around the lip of oral sucker. The small ventral sucker was dextrally located and had 8 type I sensory papillae on the left margin. It has been first confirmed in the present study that the mullet, C. macrolepis, is playing the role of a second intermediate host of S. falcatus in Cambodia. PMID:27658608

  17. Effect of the Filamentous Fungus Mucor circinelloides On The Development of Eggs of the Rumen Fluke Calicophoron daubneyi (Paramphistomidae).

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Fabián; Hernández, José A; Cazapal-Monteiro, Cristiana F; Pedreira, José; Sanchís, Jaime; Romasanta, Ángel; Sánchez-Andrade, Rita; Paz-Silva, Adolfo; Arias, María S

    2017-06-01

    Ruminants infected by Paramphistomidae flukes shed eggs in the feces, which pass through different stages in the environment until the infective stages (metacercariae) are reached. The activity of the soil fungus Mucor circinelloides on the development of eggs of the rumen fluke Calicophoron daubneyi was presently tested with 3 probes, i.e., in petri plates, feces, and an aqueous environment (tubes). The effect of the fungus was assessed by recording the numbers of undeveloped, nonviable, and embryonated eggs. Nonviable eggs were considered when vacuolization occurred, the inner structures were not clearly observed, the eggshell was broken, or the embryo inside was destroyed. By considering the ability of hyphae of M. circinelloides to develop in the presence of C. daubneyi eggs, attach to their surface, and penetrate and destroy the inner embryo, this ovicidal effect was classified as type 3. After a period of 50 days, the percentage of undeveloped eggs in the feces of infected cattle was 40%; furthermore, 27% of the eggs were nonviable, and 33% were embryonated (1 miracidium inside). The addition of 4 doses of M. circinelloides spores directly onto the feces resulted in 9-31% undeveloped eggs, 38-60% nonviable eggs, and 9-21% embryonated eggs, and no statistical significances were obtained among the different doses. Placing the eggs of C. daubneyi into an aqueous solution containing 10 7 spores of M. circinelloides/ml for 29 days resulted in 43% undeveloped eggs, 40% nonviable eggs, and 17% embryonated eggs, whereas in the controls, the percentages were 48%, 12%, and 40%, respectively. These data demonstrate the usefulness of the spores of the fungus M. circinelloides in limiting the development of the eggs of the trematode C. daubneyi.

  18. Mechanisms and Factors Associated With Tackle-Related Injuries in South African Youth Rugby Union Players.

    PubMed

    Burger, Nicholas; Lambert, Mike Ian; Viljoen, Wayne; Brown, James Craig; Readhead, Clint; den Hollander, Steve; Hendricks, Sharief

    2017-02-01

    The majority of injuries in rugby union occur during tackle events. The mechanisms and causes of these injuries are well established in senior rugby union. To use information from an injury database and assess video footage of tackle-related injuries in youth rugby union matches to identify environmental factors and mechanisms that are potentially confounding to these injuries. Descriptive epidemiological study. Injury surveillance was conducted at the under-18 Craven Week rugby tournament. Tackle-related injury information was used to identify injury events in match video footage (role-matched noninjury tackle events were identified for the cohort of injured players). Events were coded using match situational variables (precontact, contact, and postcontact). Relative risk ratio (RRR; ratio of probability of an injury or noninjury outcome occurring when a characteristic was observed) was reported by use of logistic regression. In comparison with the first quarter, injury risk was greater in the third (RRR = 9.75 [95% CI, 1.71-55.64]; P = .010) and fourth quarters (RRR = 6.97 [95% CI, 1.09-44.57]; P = .040) for ball carriers and in the fourth quarter (RRR = 9.63 [95% CI, 1.94-47.79]; P = .006) for tacklers. Ball carriers were less likely to be injured when they were aware of impending contact (RRR = 0.14 [95% CI, 0.03-0.66]; P = .012) or when they executed a moderate fend (hand-off) (RRR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.06-0.84]; P = .026). Tacklers were less likely to be injured when performing shoulder tackles (same side as leading leg) in comparison to an arm-only tackle (RRR = 0.02 [95% CI, 0.001-0.79]; P = .037). Ball carriers (RRR = 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01-0.89]; P = .040) and tacklers (RRR = 0.02 [95% CI, 0.001-0.32]; P =.006) were less likely to be injured when initial contact was made with the tackler's shoulder/arm instead of his head/neck. The relative risk of tackle-related injury was higher toward the end of matches. Incorrect technique may contribute to increased injury

  19. Local Communities and Schools Tackling Sustainability and Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Rick; Chodkiewicz, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Local communities and their schools remain key sites for actions tackling issues of sustainability and climate change. A government-funded environmental education initiative, the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (AuSSI), working together with state based Sustainable Schools Programs (SSP), has the ability to support the development of…

  20. Specific and common antigens of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini (Opisthorchidae, Trematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Ho; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Lee, Mejeong; Li, Shunyu; Chung, Byung-Suk; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Tesana, Smarn

    2003-01-01

    The antigenic characterizations and serological reactions of human liver flukes, Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini, were analyzed by immunoblot. The antigenic profiles of the crude extract of Clonorchis contained major proteins of 8, 26-28, 34-37, 43, and 70 kDa, and those of Opisthorchis 34-37, 43, 70, and 100 kDa. Of these, the 8, 26-28 and 34-37 kDa bands of Clonorchis and the 100 kDa of Opisthorchis were major components of each excretory-secretory antigen. The 8 and 26-28 kDa bands were specific to Clonorchis but the 100 kDa of Opisthorchis cross-reacted with the sera of clonorchiasis, and the 34-37, 70 and 100 kDa bands cross-reacted with sera of other helminthiases. The frequency and intensity of the immunoblot reactions were positively correlated with the intensity of the liver fluke infection. PMID:12972729

  1. 2. VIEW OF BLOCK AND TACKLE FOR MOVING CEDAR LOGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF BLOCK AND TACKLE FOR MOVING CEDAR LOGS FROM POND TO JACK LADDER--AN ENDLESS CHAIN CONVEYOR THAT MOVES LOGS INTO MILL - Lester Shingle Mill, 1602 North Eighteenth Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, OR

  2. 46 CFR 184.300 - Ground tackle and mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ground tackle and mooring lines. 184.300 Section 184.300 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Mooring and Towing Equipment § 184.300...

  3. Fasciola gigantica: tegumental surface alterations following treatment in vitro with the sulphoxide metabolite of triclabendazole.

    PubMed

    Meaney, M; Fairweather, I; Brennan, G P; Ramasamy, P; Subramanian, P B

    2002-04-01

    The effect of the active sulphoxide metabolite of the fasciolicide triclabendazole on the surface morphology of the tropical liver fluke, Fasciola gigantica, was determined in vitro by scanning electron microscopy. At a concentration of 10 microg/ml, swelling and blebbing of the tegument was evident after only 6 h incubation. The blebbing was focussed on the spines. With progressively longer incubation periods, blebbing on the spines became more severe, leading to tegumental sloughing and spine loss. Tegumental loss became more widespread and, after incubation periods of 18 h and 24 h in vitro, perforations of the basal lamina were evident and, in some cases, holes penetrated through the entire fluke in the tail region. The ventral surface was consistently more severely affected than the dorsal and similarly the posterior region of the fluke was more disrupted than the anterior region. The results confirm the potent activity of triclabendazole against F. gigantica.

  4. Clonorchis sinensis lysophospholipase A upregulates IL-25 expression in macrophages as a potential pathway to liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lina; Shi, Mengchen; Zhao, Lu; Lin, Zhipeng; Tang, Zeli; Sun, Hengchang; Chen, Tingjin; Lv, Zhiyue; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-06-17

    Liver fibrosis is an excessive wound-healing reaction that requires the participation of inflammatory cells and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis caused by viruses and alcohol has been well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying liver fibrosis induced by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis are poorly understood. Lysophospholipase A (LysoPLA), which deacylates lysophospholipids, plays a critical role in mediating the virulence and pathogenesis of parasites and fungi; however, the roles of C. sinensis lysophospholipase A (CsLysoPLA) in C. sinensis-induced liver fibrosis remain unknown. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was cultured and treated with CsLysoPLA. IL-25 and members of its associated signaling pathway were detected by performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. A human hepatic stellate cell line (LX-2) was cultured and exposed to IL-25. LX-2 cell activation markers were examined via quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Migration was analyzed in transwell plates. Treating RAW264.7 cells with CsLysoPLA significantly induced IL-25 expression. Elevated PKA, B-Raf, and ERK1/2 mRNA levels and phosphorylated B-Raf and ERK1/2 were detected in CsLysoPLA-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The PKA inhibitor H-89 weakened B-Raf and ERK1/2 phosphorylation whereas the AKT activator SC79 attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW264.7 cells. Both H-89 and SC79 inhibited CsLysoPLA-induced IL-25 upregulation. In addition, stimulation of LX-2 cells with IL-25 upregulated the expression of mesenchymal cell markers, including α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen type I (Collagen-I), and promoted cell migration. CsLysoPLA activates HSCs by upregulating IL-25 in macrophages through the PKA-dependent B-Raf/ERK1/2 pathway and potentially promotes hepatic fibrosis during C. sinensis infection.

  5. Tackling antibiotic resistance: the environmental framework.

    PubMed

    Berendonk, Thomas U; Manaia, Célia M; Merlin, Christophe; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Cytryn, Eddie; Walsh, Fiona; Bürgmann, Helmut; Sørum, Henning; Norström, Madelaine; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Huovinen, Pentti; Stefani, Stefania; Schwartz, Thomas; Kisand, Veljo; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and key measures are required to reduce the risks posed by antibiotic resistance genes that occur in the environment. These measures include the identification of critical points of control, the development of reliable surveillance and risk assessment procedures, and the implementation of technological solutions that can prevent environmental contamination with antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes. In this Opinion article, we discuss the main knowledge gaps, the future research needs and the policy and management options that should be prioritized to tackle antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  6. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Explanatum explanatum in India based on nucleotide sequences of ribosomal ITS2 and the mitochondrial gene nad1.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kei; Mohanta, Uday K; Ohari, Yuma; Neeraja, Tambireddy; Singh, T Shantikumar; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the phylogenetic relationship between Explanatum explanatum populations in India and other countries of the Indian subcontinent. Seventy liver amphistomes collected from four localities in India were identified as E. explanatum based on the nucleotide sequences of ribosomal ITS2. The flukes were then analyzed phylogenetically based on the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial gene nad1 in comparison with flukes from Bangladesh and Nepal. In the resulting phylogenetic tree, the nad1 haplotypes from India were divided into four clades, and the flukes showing the haplotypes of clades A and C were predominant in India. The haplotypes of the clades A and C have also been detected in Bangladesh and Nepal, and therefore, it seems they occur commonly throughout the Indian subcontinent. The results of AMOVA suggested that gene flow was likely to occur between E. explanatum populations in these countries. These countries are geographically close and have been historically and culturally connected to each other, and therefore, the movements of host ruminants among these countries might have been involved in the migration of the flukes and their gene flow.

  7. Farm-level risk factors for Fasciola hepatica infection in Danish dairy cattle as evaluated by two diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi-Storm, Nao; Denwood, Matthew; Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Halasa, Tariq; Rattenborg, Erik; Boes, Jaap; Enemark, Heidi Larsen; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2017-11-09

    The prevalence of bovine fasciolosis in Denmark is increasing but appropriate guidelines for control are currently lacking. In order to help develop a control strategy for liver fluke, a risk factor study of farm management factors was conducted and the utility of bulk tank milk (BTM ELISA) as a tool for diagnosis in Danish dairy cattle farms was assessed. This case-control study aimed to identify farm-level risk factors for fasciolosis in Danish dairy farms (> 50 animals slaughtered in 2013) using two diagnostic methods: recordings of liver condemnation at slaughter, and farm-level Fasciola hepatica antibody levels in BTM. A case farm was defined as having a minimum of 3 incidents of liver condemnation due to liver fluke at slaughter (in any age group) during 2013, and control farms were located within 10 km of at least one case farm and had no history of liver condemnation due to liver fluke during 2011-2013. The selected farmers were interviewed over telephone about grazing and control practices, and BTM from these farms was collected and analysed by ELISA in 2014. The final complete dataset consisting of 131 case and 63 control farms was analysed using logistic regression. Heifers grazing on wet pastures, dry cows grazing on wet pastures, herd size, breed and concurrent beef cattle production were identified as risk factors associated with being classified as a case farm. With the categorised BTM ELISA result as the response variable, heifers grazing on wet pastures, dry cows grazing on wet pastures, and purchase of cows were identified as risk factors. Within the case and control groups, 74.8 and 12.7% of farms were positive for fasciolosis on BTM ELISA, respectively. The differences are likely to be related to the detection limit of the farm-level prevalence by the BTM ELISA test, time span between slaughter data and BTM, and the relatively low sensitivity of liver inspection at slaughter. Control of bovine fasciolosis in Denmark should target heifers and

  8. Exposure to N-nitroso compounds in a population of high liver cancer regions in Thailand: volatile nitrosamine (VNA) levels in Thai food.

    PubMed

    Mitacek, E J; Brunnemann, K D; Suttajit, M; Martin, N; Limsila, T; Ohshima, H; Caplan, L S

    1999-04-01

    The recent case-control studies in Thailand indicate that a high incidence of liver cancer in Thailand has not been associated with common risk factors such as hepatitis B infection, aflatoxin intake and alcohol consumption. While the infestation by the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) accounted for the high risk in north-east Thailand, there was no such exposure in the other regions of the country where the incidence of liver cancer is also high. Case-control studies suggest that exposure to exogenous and possibly endogenous nitrosamines in food or tobacco in betel nut and cigarettes may play a role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), while OV infestation and chemical interaction of nitrosamines may also be aetiological factors in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Over 1800 samples of fresh and preserved food were systematically collected and tested between 1988 and 1996. All the food items identified by anthropological studies to be consumed frequently in four major regions of Thailand were analysed for volatile nitrosamines using gas chromatography combined with a thermal energy analyser. Relatively high levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) and N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) were detected in fermented fish ("Plasalid"). NDMA was also detected at levels ranging from trace amounts to 66.5 microg/kg in several salted and dried fish ("Larb-pla" and "Pla-siu"). NDMA and NPYR were frequently detected in several vegetables, particularly fermented beans ("Tau-chiau") at levels ranging between 1 and 95.1 microg/kg and 0-146 microg/kg, respectively. The possible role of nitrosamines in Thai food in the aetiology of liver cancer (HCC, CCA) is discussed.

  9. Heterophysiasis, an intestinal fluke infection of man and vertebrates transmitted by euryhaline gastropods and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraschewski, H.

    1984-03-01

    Heterophyes heterophyes, agent of human heterophyiasis in the Near East, is transmitted in marine lagoons and saline inland waters, where the euryhaline intermediate hosts are abundant. In Egypt, mullets, the predominant second intermediate hosts, are customarily consumed raw; thus man becomes infected easily. Symptoms of human infections are usually considered mild. Mullets do not seem to be affected by the metacercariae encysted in the muscles, whereas the growth of the snail host Pirenella conica was found to be enhanced due to the infestation by the trematodes. In laboratory experiments, the flukes were found to be well developed in dogs, foxes and cats, but failed to reach sexual maturity in several other potentially piscivorous mammals and birds. In nature, dogs probably serve as the major reservoir hosts. Heterophyiasis is most prevalent in the Nile Delta, a huge brackish water area which is densely populated by humans and, consequently, also by dogs and cats. In the Far East, besides Heterophyes nocens, several other heterophysids with marine or fresh-water life-cycles are known to infect humans.

  10. Pulmonary embolization of immature Fascioloides magna causing fatal hemothorax confirmed by molecular technique in a heifer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Rosser, Thomas Graham; Cooley, Jim

    2016-09-01

    The current report describes the use of a molecular technique to identify immature Fascioloides magna An 18-month-old Brangus heifer was found dead in the field without any prior clinical signs. The cause of death was exsanguination into the thoracic cavity associated with pulmonary embolization and infection by immature Fascioloides magna resulting in 2 large foci of pulmonary necrosis and focal arteriolar and lung rupture. The liver had a few random migratory tracts with typical iron and porphyrin fluke exhaust, but no identified fluke larvae. A single immature fluke was found in the lungs, and species level identification as F. magna was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 region, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2) and of partial 28S rRNA gene sequence. This is one of only a few pulmonary fascioloidiasis cases associated with hemothorax in the veterinary literature. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew C; Gow, Neil A R; Gurr, Sarah J

    2016-12-05

    Emerging infections caused by fungi have become a widely recognized global phenomenon. Their notoriety stems from their causing plagues and famines, driving species extinctions, and the difficulty in treating human mycoses alongside the increase of their resistance to antifungal drugs. This special issue comprises a collection of articles resulting from a Royal Society discussion meeting examining why pathogenic fungi are causing more disease now than they did in the past, and how we can tackle this rapidly emerging threat to the health of plants and animals worldwide.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Tackling misconceptions in geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuppens, S.; Deprez, J.; Dehaene, W.; De Cock, M.

    2018-07-01

    To improve the teaching and learning materials for a curriculum it is important to incorporate the findings from educational research. In light of this, we present creative exercises and experiments to elicit, confront and resolve misconceptions in geometrical optics. Since ray diagrams can be both the cause and the solution for many misconceptions we focus strongly on improving understanding of this tool to solve and understand optical phenomena. Through a combination of a conceptual understanding programme (CUP) and provocative exercises with ray diagrams we aim to elicit conceptual or cognitive conflict and exploit this to tackle misconceptions and increase students’ conceptual understanding through inquiry. We describe exercises for image formation by a plane mirror, image formation by a convex lens and indirect and direct observation of a real image formed by a convex lens as examples of our approach.

  13. The impact of tackle football injuries on the American healthcare system with a neurological focus.

    PubMed

    McGinity, Michael J; Grandhi, Ramesh; Michalek, Joel E; Rodriguez, Jesse S; Trevino, Aron M; McGinity, Ashley C; Seifi, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Recent interest in the study of concussion and other neurological injuries has heightened awareness of the medical implications of American tackle football injuries amongst the public. Using the National Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) and the National Inpatient Sample (NIS), the largest publicly available all-payer emergency department and inpatient healthcare databases in the United States, we sought to describe the impact of tackle football injuries on the American healthcare system by delineating injuries, specifically neurological in nature, suffered as a consequence of tackle football between 2010 and 2013. The NEDS and NIS databases were queried to collect data on all patients presented to the emergency department (ED) and/or were admitted to hospitals with an ICD code for injuries related to American tackle football between the years 2010 and 2013. Subsequently those with football-related neurological injuries were abstracted using ICD codes for concussion, skull/face injury, intracranial injury, spine injury, and spinal cord injury (SCI). Patient demographics, length of hospital stay (LOS), cost and charge data, neurosurgical interventions, hospital type, and disposition were collected and analyzed. A total of 819,000 patients presented to EDs for evaluation of injuries secondary to American tackle football between 2010 and 2013, with 1.13% having injuries requiring inpatient admission (average length of stay 2.4 days). 80.4% of the ED visits were from the pediatric population. Of note, a statistically significant increase in the number of pediatric concussions over time was demonstrated (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.2). Patients were more likely to be admitted to trauma centers, teaching hospitals, the south or west regions, or with private insurance. There were 471 spinal cord injuries and 1,908 total spine injuries. Ten patients died during the study time period. The combined ED and inpatient charges were $1.35 billion. Injuries related to tackle

  14. The impact of tackle football injuries on the American healthcare system with a neurological focus

    PubMed Central

    McGinity, Michael J.; Grandhi, Ramesh; Michalek, Joel E.; Rodriguez, Jesse S.; Trevino, Aron M.; McGinity, Ashley C.

    2018-01-01

    Background Recent interest in the study of concussion and other neurological injuries has heightened awareness of the medical implications of American tackle football injuries amongst the public. Objective Using the National Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) and the National Inpatient Sample (NIS), the largest publicly available all-payer emergency department and inpatient healthcare databases in the United States, we sought to describe the impact of tackle football injuries on the American healthcare system by delineating injuries, specifically neurological in nature, suffered as a consequence of tackle football between 2010 and 2013. Methods The NEDS and NIS databases were queried to collect data on all patients presented to the emergency department (ED) and/or were admitted to hospitals with an ICD code for injuries related to American tackle football between the years 2010 and 2013. Subsequently those with football-related neurological injuries were abstracted using ICD codes for concussion, skull/face injury, intracranial injury, spine injury, and spinal cord injury (SCI). Patient demographics, length of hospital stay (LOS), cost and charge data, neurosurgical interventions, hospital type, and disposition were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 819,000 patients presented to EDs for evaluation of injuries secondary to American tackle football between 2010 and 2013, with 1.13% having injuries requiring inpatient admission (average length of stay 2.4 days). 80.4% of the ED visits were from the pediatric population. Of note, a statistically significant increase in the number of pediatric concussions over time was demonstrated (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.2). Patients were more likely to be admitted to trauma centers, teaching hospitals, the south or west regions, or with private insurance. There were 471 spinal cord injuries and 1,908 total spine injuries. Ten patients died during the study time period. The combined ED and inpatient charges were $1

  15. Larval stages of the bluefin tuna blood fluke Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) found from Terebella sp. (Polychaeta: Terebellidae).

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yukitaka; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Tamaki, Akio; Yamanishi, Ryohei; Kanai, Kinya

    2014-04-01

    We found aporocotylid larval stages (sporocysts and cercariae) from five individuals of terebellid polychaete Terebella sp., which were collected from seabed substrate and ropes and floats attached to tuna cages in a tuna farm on the coast of Tsushima Island, Nagasaki, Japan. Nucleotide sequences of the regions of internal transcribed spacer 2 ribosomal DNA and 28S ribosomal DNA from these larval stages were 100% identical to those of Cardicola opisthorchis registered in GenBank. C. opisthorchis is a pathogen causing blood fluke infection of Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis, which is considered to have a significant impact on the Japanese Pacific bluefin tuna aquaculture industry. This is the first description of the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis. This indicates that the life cycle of C. opisthorchis is completed within tuna farms in this area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tackling Work Related Stress in a National Health Service Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Donna; Whyatt, Hilary

    2004-01-01

    The challenge of tackling the problem of coping with work related stress in a National Health Service (NHS) Trust was undertaken. Ideas were developed within the context of two different action learning sets and led to actions resulting in a large therapy Taster Session event and the establishment of a centre offering alternative therapies and…

  17. The Role of Empathy in Preparing Teachers to Tackle Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Helena; Tubritt, John; Norman, James O'Higgins

    2018-01-01

    Much research on bullying behaviour in schools among students has been carried out since the 1970's, when Olweus started a large-scale project in Norway which is now generally regarded as the first scientific study on bullying. Yet, there has been little research on how teachers respond to reports of bullying and tackle bullying behaviour in…

  18. The diterpenoid 7-keto-sempervirol, derived from Lycium chinense, displays anthelmintic activity against both Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer; Brown, Martha; Peak, Emily; Bartholomew, Barbara; Nash, Robert J; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2015-03-01

    Two platyhelminths of biomedical and commercial significance are Schistosoma mansoni (blood fluke) and Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke). These related trematodes are responsible for the chronic neglected tropical diseases schistosomiasis and fascioliasis, respectively. As no vaccine is currently available for anti-flukicidal immunoprophylaxis, current treatment is mediated by mono-chemical chemotherapy in the form of mass drug administration (MDA) (praziquantel for schistosomiasis) or drenching (triclabendazole for fascioliasis) programmes. This overreliance on single chemotherapeutic classes has dramatically limited the number of novel chemical entities entering anthelmintic drug discovery pipelines, raising significant concerns for the future of sustainable blood and liver fluke control. Here we demonstrate that 7-keto-sempervirol, a diterpenoid isolated from Lycium chinense, has dual anthelmintic activity against related S. mansoni and F. hepatica trematodes. Using a microtiter plate-based helminth fluorescent bioassay (HFB), this activity is specific (Therapeutic index = 4.2, when compared to HepG2 cell lines) and moderately potent (LD50 = 19.1 μM) against S. mansoni schistosomula cultured in vitro. This anti-schistosomula effect translates into activity against both adult male and female schistosomes cultured in vitro where 7-keto-sempervirol negatively affects motility/behaviour, surface architecture (inducing tegumental holes, tubercle swelling and spine loss/shortening), oviposition rates and egg morphology. As assessed by the HFB and microscopic phenotypic scoring matrices, 7-keto-sempervirol also effectively kills in vitro cultured F. hepatica newly excysted juveniles (NEJs, LD50 = 17.7 μM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation of adult F. hepatica liver flukes co-cultured in vitro with 7-keto-sempervirol additionally demonstrates phenotypic abnormalities including breaches in tegumental integrity and spine loss. 7-keto-sempervirol negatively

  19. Hypogonadism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mintziori, Gesthimani; Poulakos, Pavlos; Tsametis, Christos; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2017-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is more common in men than in women. Thus, it has been suggested that sex steroids do have a role in the development of NAFLD. The aim of the current paper is to illustrate the association between NAFLD and hypogonadism, by reviewing data derived from both human and animal studies. The prevalence of NAFLD is high in men with hypogonadism, including those with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), as well as in women in post-menopause, those under estrogen receptor antagonist treatment or women with Turner syndrome. Estrogens seem to play a pivotal role in hepatic lipid homeostasis, as demonstrated in animal models with diminished ovarian estrogens (i.e., ovariectomized mice) and low serum testosterone (T) concentration is independently associated with NAFLD. The elucidation of the exact role of sex steroids in NAFLD pathogenesis would create a unique opportunity to develop novel therapies to tackle NAFLD disease.

  20. The evolution of policy and actions to tackle obesity in England.

    PubMed

    Jebb, S A; Aveyard, P N; Hawkes, C

    2013-11-01

    Tackling obesity has been a policy priority in England for more than 20 years. Two formal government strategies on obesity in 2008 and 2011 drew together a range of actions and developed new initiatives to fill perceived gaps. Today, a wide range of policies are in place, including support for breastfeeding and healthy weaning practices, nutritional standards in schools, restrictions on marketing foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children, schemes to boost participation in sport, active travel plans, and weight management services. Data from annual surveys show that the rate of increase in obesity has attenuated in recent years, but has not yet been reversed. This paper considers the actions taken and what is known about the impact of individual policies and the overarching strategy to tackle obesity in England. © 2013 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. Seasonal pattern of Fasciola hepatica antibodies in dairy herds in Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuerpick, Birte; Schnieder, Thomas; Strube, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, is one of the most important parasitoses in cattle farming worldwide. In dairy cows, the trematode leads to economic losses due to decreased milk yield, a negative impact on reproduction parameters, and liver condemnations. In the present study, the seasonal patterns of F. hepatica antibodies in bulk-tank milk from dairy herds located in East Frisia, a region of the federal state Lower Saxony in the north of Germany, were investigated. This region was chosen since it is known as a high risk area for fluke infections due to its coastal location at the North Sea with the consequence of rather moist pastures. Between 669 and 868 bulk-tank milk samples were collected in January, September and November 2008 and 2010, respectively, and analysed for antibodies against F. hepatica with an in-house ELISA based on excretory-secretory antigens of the liver fluke. The overall East Frisian prevalence was 49.1%, 57.1% and 53.9% in January, September and November 2008 and 45.1%, 49.5% and 48.4% in 2010. From a number of 606 farms, which were sampled in all six investigated months, 34.5% of the farms continued to remain positive, whereas 30.9% continued to remain negative. A percentage of 69.1% (419 farms) were positive on at least one sampling occasion during the study period. The distributions of optical density ratio (ODR) values were skewed to the left but showed a second, lower peak in a high ODR range. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference concerning the prevalence increase from January to September 2008. Furthermore, the prevalence decrease from September as well as November 2008 to these months in 2010 was significantly different, what might result from a more frequent use of anthelminthics or different climatic conditions.

  2. Prevalence of fascioliasis (liver flukes) infection in cattle and buffaloes slaughtered at the municipal abattoir of El-Kharga, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Elshraway, Nagwa T.; Mahmoud, Wafaa G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of fascioliasis infections in cattle and buffaloes, slaughtered in El-Kharga city slaughterhouse at New Valley Governorate. Materials and Methods: The slaughtered animals were daily inspected for liver fascioliasis allover 2016. Macroscopic fascioliasis was detected from a total of 2251 basing on animals specie, sex, season, and Fasciola spp. in addition to microscopic examination of blood, fecal samples which collected from female cattle and buffalo (50 each). Results: The total prevalence rate of Fasciola sp. infection occurs in the study area were about 695/2251 (30.88%) from the total cattle and bovine slaughtered carcasses. The incidence of fascioliasis was 4/12 (33.33%) and 678/2200 (30.82%) for females and males cattle carcasses, respectively, while the infection rate in buffalo carcasses was 1/4 (25.00%) and 12/35 (34.29%) for females and males buffalo carcasses, respectively. Conclusion: The moderate fasciolosis infection in cattle and buffaloes slaughtered at the municipal abattoir of El-Kharga, Egypt. The highest fascioliasis infection was recorded during winter and autumn. It constitutes a major cause of economic losses at El-Kharga abattoir and threat public health. PMID:28919682

  3. Molecular identification of Fasciola spp. (Digenea: Fasciolidae) in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Y.; Amer, S.; Mercier, A.; Courtioux, B.; Dreyfuss, G.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 134 Egyptian liver flukes were collected from different definitive hosts (cattle, sheep, and buffaloes) to identify them via the use of PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of the first nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1). Specimens of F. hepatica from France, as well as F. gigantica from Cameroon were included in the study for comparison. PCR products of ITS1 were subjected for digestion by RsaI restriction enzyme and visualized on agarose gel. According to RFLP pattern, Egyptian flukes were allocated into two categories. The first was identical to that of French hepatica flukes to have a pattern of 360, 100, and 60 (bp) band size, whereas the second resembled to that of Cameroonian gigantica worms to have a profile of 360, 170, and 60 bp in size. Results of RFLP analysis were confirmed by sequence analysis of representative ITS1 amplicons. No hybrid forms were detected in the present study. Taken together, this study concluded that both species of Fasciola are present in Egypt, whereas the hybrid form may be not very common. PMID:22550630

  4. Fasciola hepatica vaccine: we may not be there yet but we're on the right road.

    PubMed

    Molina-Hernández, Verónica; Mulcahy, Grace; Pérez, Jose; Martínez-Moreno, Álvaro; Donnelly, Sheila; O'Neill, Sandra M; Dalton, John P; Cwiklinski, Krystyna

    2015-02-28

    Major advances have been made in identifying potential vaccine molecules for the control of fasciolosis in livestock but we have yet to reach the level of efficacy required for commercialisation. The pathogenesis of fasciolosis is associated with liver damage that is inflicted by migrating and feeding immature flukes as well as host inflammatory immune responses to parasite-secreted molecules and tissue damage alarm signals. Immune suppression/modulation by the parasites prevents the development of protective immune responses as evidenced by the lack of immunity observed in naturally and experimentally infected animals. In our opinion, future efforts need to focus on understanding how parasites invade and penetrate the tissues of their hosts and how they potentiate and control the ensuing immune responses, particularly in the first days of infection. Emerging 'omics' data employed in an unbiased approach are helping us understand liver fluke biology and, in parallel with new immunological data, to identify molecules that are essential to parasite development and accessible to vaccine-induced immune responses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Portrait of the Transcriptome of the Neglected Trematode, Fasciola gigantica—Biological and Biotechnological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neil D.; Jex, Aaron R.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Hall, Ross S.; Campbell, Bronwyn E.; Spithill, Terence W.; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Tangkawattana, Prasarn; Laha, Thewarach; Gasser, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Fasciola gigantica (Digenea) is an important foodborne trematode that causes liver fluke disease (fascioliasis) in mammals, including ungulates and humans, mainly in tropical climatic zones of the world. Despite its socioeconomic impact, almost nothing is known about the molecular biology of this parasite, its interplay with its hosts, and the pathogenesis of fascioliasis. Modern genomic technologies now provide unique opportunities to rapidly tackle these exciting areas. The present study reports the first transcriptome representing the adult stage of F. gigantica (of bovid origin), defined using a massively parallel sequencing-coupled bioinformatic approach. From >20 million raw sequence reads, >30,000 contiguous sequences were assembled, of which most were novel. Relative levels of transcription were determined for individual molecules, which were also characterized (at the inferred amino acid level) based on homology, gene ontology, and/or pathway mapping. Comparisons of the transcriptome of F. gigantica with those of other trematodes, including F. hepatica, revealed similarities in transcription for molecules inferred to have key roles in parasite-host interactions. Overall, the present dataset should provide a solid foundation for future fundamental genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic explorations of F. gigantica, as well as a basis for applied outcomes such as the development of novel methods of intervention against this neglected parasite. PMID:21408104

  6. Austropeplea ollula (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae): A new molluscan intermediate host of a human intestinal fluke, Echinostoma cinetorchis (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Park, Yun-Kyu; Hwang, Myung-Ki

    2001-01-01

    Three freshwater snail species of the family Lymnaeidae have been reported from Korea, Radix auricularia coreana, Austropeplea ollula and Fossaria truncatula. Out of 3 lymnaeid snail species, A. ollula was naturally infected with the Echinostoma cinetorchis cercariae (infection rate = 0.7%). In the experiments with the laboratory-bred snails, F. truncatula as well as A. ollula was also susceptible to the E. cinetorchis miracidia with infection rates of 25% and 40%, respectively. All of three lymnaeid snail species exposed to the E. cinetorchis cercariae were infected with the E. cinetorchis metacercariae. It is evident that A. ollula acts as the first molluscan intermediate host of E. cinetorchis in Korea, and F. truncatula may be a possible candidate for the first intermediate host of this intestinal fluke. Also, three lymnaeid snail species targeted were experimentally infected with E. cinetorchis metacercariae. PMID:11590915

  7. Molecular and Morphological Characterization of Fasciola spp. Isolated from Different Host Species in a Newly Emerging Focus of Human Fascioliasis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Reza; Sarkari, Bahador; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmuod; Mowlavi, Gholam Reza; Moshfe, Abdolali

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to find out the morphometric and genotypic divergences of the flukes isolated from different hosts in a newly emerging focus of human fascioliasis in Iran. Adult Fasciola spp. were collected from 34 cattle, 13 sheep, and 11 goats from Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, southwest of Iran. Genomic DNA was extracted from the flukes and PCR-RFLP was used to characterize the isolates. The ITS1, ITS2, and mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) of NDI and COI from individual liver flukes were amplified and the amplicons were sequenced. Genetic variation within and between the species was evaluated by comparing the sequences. Moreover, morphometric characteristics of flukes were measured through a computer image analysis system. Based on RFLP profile, from the total of 58 isolates, 41 isolates (from cattle, sheep, and goat) were identified as Fasciola hepatica, while 17 isolates from cattle were identified as Fasciola gigantica. Comparison of the ITS1 and ITS2 sequences showed six and seven single-base substitutions, resulting in segregation of the specimens into two different genotypes. The sequences of COI markers showed seven DNA polymorphic sites for F. hepatica and 35 DNA polymorphic sites for F. gigantica. Morphological diversity of the two species was observed in linear, ratios, and areas measurements. The findings have implications for studying the population genetics, epidemiology, and control of the disease. PMID:25018891

  8. Early Results of a Helmetless-Tackling Intervention to Decrease Head Impacts in Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E.; Broglio, Steven P.; Cook, Summer B.; Cantu, Robert C.; Ferrara, Michael S.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Myers, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test a helmetless-tackling behavioral intervention for reducing head impacts in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football players. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Football field. Patients or Other Participants Fifty collegiate football players (intervention = 25, control = 25). Intervention(s) The intervention group participated in a 5-minute tackling drill without their helmets and shoulder pads twice per week in the preseason and once per week through the season. During this time, the control group performed noncontact football skills. Main Outcome Measure(s) Frequency of head impacts was recorded by an impact sensor for each athlete-exposure (AE). Data were tested with a 2 × 3 (group and time) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significant interactions and main effects (P < .05) were followed with t tests. Results Head impacts/AE decreased for the intervention group compared with the control group by the end of the season (9.99 ± 6.10 versus 13.84 ± 7.27, respectively). The intervention group had 30% fewer impacts/AE than the control group by season's end (9.99 ± 6.10 versus 14.32 ± 8.45, respectively). Conclusion A helmetless-tackling training intervention reduced head impacts in collegiate football players within 1 season. PMID:26651278

  9. Are Elementary School Teachers Prepared to Tackle Bullying? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenburg, Beau; Bosman, Rie; Veenstra, René

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate to what extent elementary school teachers were prepared to tackle bullying. Interview data from 22 Dutch elementary school teachers (M[subscript age]?=?43.3, 18 classrooms in eight schools) were combined with survey data from 373 students of these teachers (M age?=?10.7, grades 3-6, ages 8- to…

  10. Tackling Behaviour in Your Primary School: A Practical Handbook for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken; Morgan, Nicola S.

    2012-01-01

    "Tackling Behaviour in the Primary School" provides ready-made advice and support for classroom professionals and can be used, read and adapted to suit the busy everyday lives of teachers working in primary schools today. This valuable text sets the scene for managing behaviour in the primary classroom in the context of the Children Act 2004…

  11. Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Moose, Steve

    2018-02-05

    Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting.

  12. Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Moose, Steve

    2010-03-25

    Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting.

  13. Liver metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic; Colorectal cancer - liver metastases; Colon cancer - liver metastases; Esophageal cancer - liver metastases; Lung cancer - liver metastases; Melanoma - liver metastases

  14. Improving animal and human health through understanding liver fluke immunology.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, D; Spithill, T W; Smith, R E; Raadsma, H W

    2010-08-01

    Sheep, goats and cattle represent the most numerous and economically important agricultural species worldwide used as sources for milk, fibre and red meat. In addition, in the developing world, these species often represent the sole asset base for small-holder livestock farmers and cattle/buffaloes often provide the majority of draught power for crop production. Production losses caused by helminth diseases of these animals are a major factor in extending the cycle of poverty in developing countries and a major food security issue for developed economies. Fasciola spp. are one of the most important zoonotic diseases with a global economic impact in livestock production systems and a poorly defined but direct effect on human health. Improvements in human and animal health will require a concerted research effort into the development of new accurate and simple diagnostic tests and increased vaccine and drug development against Fasciola infections. Here, the use of definitive natural host breeds with contrasting resistance to Fasciola infections is discussed as a resource to contrast parasite-host interactions and identify parasite immune evasion strategies. Such studies are likely to boost the discovery of new vaccine, drug and diagnostic candidates and provide the foundation for future genetic selection of resistant animals.

  15. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Florencia; Merlino, Alicia; dell´Oca, Nicolás; Gil, Jorge; Tort, José F.; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo; Cabrera, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1). Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells. Conclusions/Significance Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34) is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues

  16. Maximum residue level validation of triclabendazole marker residues in bovine liver, muscle and milk matrices by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Michelle; O'Mahony, John; Moloney, Mary; Cooper, Kevin M; Furey, Ambrose; Kennedy, D Glenn; Danaher, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Triclabendazole is the only anthelmintic drug, which is active against immature, mature and adult stages of fluke. The objective of this work was to develop an analytical method to quantify and confirm the presence of triclabendazole residues around the MRL. In this work, a new analytical method was developed, which extended dynamic range to 1-100 and 5-1000 μg kg(-1) for milk and tissue, respectively. This was achieved using a mobile phase containing trifluoroacetic acid (pK(a) of 0.3), which resulted in the formation of the protonated pseudomolecular ions, [M+H](+), of triclabendazole metabolites. Insufficient ionisation of common mobile phase additives due to low pK(a) values (<2) was identified as the cause of poor linearity. The new mobile phase conditions allowed the analysis of triclabendazole residues in liver, muscle and milk encompassing their EU maximum residue levels (MRL) (250, 225 and 10 μg kg(-1) respectively). Triclabendazole residues were extracted using a modified QuEChERS method and analysed by positive electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry with all analytes eluted by 2.23 min. The method was validated at the MRL according to Commission Decision (CD) 2002/657/EC criteria. The decision limit (CCα) of the method was in the range of 250.8-287.2, 2554.9-290.8 and 10.9-12.1 μg kg(-1) for liver, muscle and milk, respectively. The performance of the method was successfully verified for triclabendazole in muscle by participating in a proficiency study, the method was also applied to incurred liver, muscle and milk samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro polarization of carp leucocytes in response to the blood fluke Sanguinicola inermis Plehn, 1905 (Trematoda: Sanguinicolidae).

    PubMed

    Richards, D T; Hoole, D; Lewis, J W; Ewens, E; Arme, C

    1996-05-01

    An in vitro assay was used to determine the effects of Sanguinicola inermis adults and cercariae on the polarization responses of pronephric leucocytes of carp. Leucocytes were isolated and exposed to live adult flukes or cercariae for up to 48 h. Differences in polarization responses were related to the presence of the parasite, the presence or absence of carp serum and the time of incubation. The mean proportions of cells exhibiting polarization in unstimulated controls ranged from 5 to 30% over the experimental period. Within 15 min of exposure to adults or cercariae, significant increases in mean polarization responses were observed of up to 75% and levels remained higher than control values for over 24 h. Overall, the presence of normal carp serum, either untreated or heat inactivated, did not enhance the polarization responses of leucocytes incubated with only cercariae or adults. However, between 0.25 and 3 h, the presence of carp serum with cercariae significantly enhanced polarization responses when compared with cells incubated with cercariae alone.

  18. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully working livers after a successful transplant. The donor liver is transported in a cooled salt-water (saline) ... Liver failure - liver transplant; Cirrhosis - liver transplant Images Donor liver attachment Liver transplant - series References Carrion AF, Martin ...

  20. Role of liver progenitors in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Syn, Wing-Kin; Dollé, Laurent; van Grunsven, Leo A; Canbay, Ali

    2015-02-01

    During massive liver injury and hepatocyte loss, the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the liver by replication of resident hepatocytes is overwhelmed. Treatment of this condition depends on the cause of liver injury, though in many cases liver transplantation (LT) remains the only curative option. LT for end stage chronic and acute liver diseases is hampered by shortage of donor organs and requires immunosuppression. Hepatocyte transplantation is limited by yet unresolved technical difficulties. Since currently no treatment is available to facilitate liver regeneration directly, therapies involving the use of resident liver stem or progenitor cells (LPCs) or non-liver stem cells are coming to fore. LPCs are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. Non-liver stem cells include embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the first section, we aim to provide an overview of the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens and hormones in regulating LPC response and briefly discuss the prognostic value of the LPC response in clinical practice. In the latter section, we will highlight the role of other (non-liver) stem cells in transplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of ES cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), as well as MSCs.

  1. Whole-Genome and Epigenomic Landscapes of Etiologically Distinct Subtypes of Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jusakul, Apinya; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yong, Chern Han; Lim, Jing Quan; Huang, Mi Ni; Padmanabhan, Nisha; Nellore, Vishwa; Kongpetch, Sarinya; Ng, Alvin Wei Tian; Ng, Ley Moy; Choo, Su Pin; Myint, Swe Swe; Thanan, Raynoo; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Lim, Weng Khong; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Boot, Arnoud; Liu, Mo; Ong, Choon Kiat; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Lie, Stefanus; Lim, Alvin Soon Tiong; Lim, Tse Hui; Tan, Jing; Loh, Jia Liang; McPherson, John R.; Khuntikeo, Narong; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajaraphongsa; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit; Totoki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Hiromi; Arai, Yasuhito; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Dima, Simona; Duda, Dan G.; Popescu, Irinel; Broet, Philippe; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Yu, Ming-Chin; Scarpa, Aldo; Lai, Jiaming; Luo, Di-Xian; Carvalho, André Lopes; Vettore, André Luiz; Rhee, Hyungjin; Park, Young Nyun; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Gordân, Raluca; Rozen, Steven G.; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a hepatobiliary malignancy exhibiting high incidence in countries with endemic liver-fluke infection. We analysed 489 CCAs from 10 countries, combining whole-genome (71 cases), targeted/exome, copy-number, gene expression, and DNA methylation information. Integrative clustering defined four CCA clusters – Fluke-Positive CCAs (Clusters 1/2) are enriched in ERBB2 amplifications and TP53 mutations, conversely Fluke-Negative CCAs (Clusters 3/4) exhibit high copy-number alterations and PD-1/PD-L2 expression, or epigenetic mutations (IDH1/2, BAP1) and FGFR/PRKA-related gene rearrangements. Whole-genome analysis highlighted FGFR2 3′UTR deletion as a mechanism of FGFR2 upregulation. Integration of non-coding promoter mutations with protein-DNA binding profiles demonstrates pervasive modulation of H3K27me3-associated sites in CCA. Clusters 1 and 4 exhibit distinct DNA hypermethylation patterns targeting either CpG islands or shores – mutation signature and subclonality analysis suggests that these reflect different mutational pathways. Our results exemplify how genetics, epigenetics and environmental carcinogens can interplay across different geographies to generate distinct molecular subtypes of cancer. PMID:28667006

  2. Clonorchis sinensis and Clonorchiasis: The Relevance of Exploring Genetic Variation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daxi; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Gasser, Robin B

    2018-01-01

    Parasitic trematodes (flukes) cause substantial mortality and morbidity in humans. The Chinese liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, is one of the most destructive parasitic worms in humans in China, Vietnam, Korea and the Russian Far East. Although C. sinensis infection can be controlled relatively well using anthelmintics, the worm is carcinogenic, inducing cholangiocarcinoma and causing major suffering in ~15 million people in Asia. This chapter provides an account of C. sinensis and clonorchiasis research-covering aspects of biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunity, diagnosis, treatment and control, genetics and genomics. It also describes progress in the area of molecular biology (genetics, genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics) and highlights challenges associated with comparative genomics and population genetics. It then reviews recent advances in the sequencing and characterisation of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes for a Korean isolate of C. sinensis and summarises salient comparative genomic work and the implications thereof. The chapter concludes by considering how advances in genomic and informatics will enable research on the genetics of C. sinensis and related parasites, as well as the discovery of new fluke-specific intervention targets. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid detection and differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini using real-time PCR and high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xian-Quan; Yu, Hai-Qiong; Li, Rong; Yue, Qiao-Yun; Liu, Guo-Hua; Bai, Jian-Shan; Deng, Yan; Qiu, De-Yi; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini are both important fish-borne pathogens, causing serious public health problem in Asia. The present study developed an assay integrating real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the specific detection and rapid identification of C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Primers targeting COX1 gene were highly specific for these liver flukes, as evidenced by the negative amplification of closely related trematodes. Assays using genomic DNA extracted from the two flukes yielded specific amplification and their identity was confirmed by sequencing, having the accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. The assay was proved to be highly sensitive with a detection limit below 1 pg of purified genomic DNA, 5 EPG, or 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis. Moreover, C. sinensis and O. viverrini were able to be differentiated by their HRM profiles. The method can reduce labor of microscopic examination and the contamination of agarose electrophoresis. Moreover, it can differentiate these two flukes which are difficult to be distinguished using other methods. The established method provides an alternative tool for rapid, simple, and duplex detection of C. sinensis and O. viverrini.

  4. SciTech Connect

    Jusakul, Apinya; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yong, Chern Han

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a hepatobiliary malignancy exhibiting high incidence in countries with endemic liver-fluke infection. We analysed 489 CCAs from 10 countries, combining whole-genome (71 cases), targeted/exome, copy-number, gene expression, and DNA methylation information. Integrative clustering defined four CCA clusters - Fluke- Positive CCAs (Clusters 1/2) are enriched in ERBB2 amplifications and TP53 mutations, conversely Fluke-Negative CCAs (Clusters 3/4) exhibit high copy-number alterations and PD-1/PD-L2 expression, or epigenetic mutations (IDH1/2, BAP1) and FGFR/PRKA-related gene rearrangements. Whole-genome analysis highlighted FGFR2 3’UTR deletion as a mechanism of FGFR2 upregulation. Integration of non-coding promoter mutations with protein-DNA binding profiles demonstrates pervasive modulation ofmore » H3K27me3-associated sites in CCA. Clusters 1 and 4 exhibit distinct DNA hypermethylation patterns targeting either CpG islands or shores - mutation signature and subclonality analysis suggests that these reflect different mutational pathways. Lastly, our results exemplify how genetics, epigenetics and environmental carcinogens can interplay across different geographies to generate distinct molecular subtypes of cancer.« less

  5. Whole-Genome and Epigenomic Landscapes of Etiologically Distinct Subtypes of Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jusakul, Apinya; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yong, Chern Han

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a hepatobiliary malignancy exhibiting high incidence in countries with endemic liver-fluke infection. We analysed 489 CCAs from 10 countries, combining whole-genome (71 cases), targeted/exome, copy-number, gene expression, and DNA methylation information. Integrative clustering defined four CCA clusters - Fluke- Positive CCAs (Clusters 1/2) are enriched in ERBB2 amplifications and TP53 mutations, conversely Fluke-Negative CCAs (Clusters 3/4) exhibit high copy-number alterations and PD-1/PD-L2 expression, or epigenetic mutations (IDH1/2, BAP1) and FGFR/PRKA-related gene rearrangements. Whole-genome analysis highlighted FGFR2 3’UTR deletion as a mechanism of FGFR2 upregulation. Integration of non-coding promoter mutations with protein-DNA binding profiles demonstrates pervasive modulation ofmore » H3K27me3-associated sites in CCA. Clusters 1 and 4 exhibit distinct DNA hypermethylation patterns targeting either CpG islands or shores - mutation signature and subclonality analysis suggests that these reflect different mutational pathways. Lastly, our results exemplify how genetics, epigenetics and environmental carcinogens can interplay across different geographies to generate distinct molecular subtypes of cancer.« less

  6. Whole-Genome and Epigenomic Landscapes of Etiologically Distinct Subtypes of Cholangiocarcinoma

    DOE PAGES

    Jusakul, Apinya; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yong, Chern Han; ...

    2017-06-30

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a hepatobiliary malignancy exhibiting high incidence in countries with endemic liver-fluke infection. We analysed 489 CCAs from 10 countries, combining whole-genome (71 cases), targeted/exome, copy-number, gene expression, and DNA methylation information. Integrative clustering defined four CCA clusters - Fluke- Positive CCAs (Clusters 1/2) are enriched in ERBB2 amplifications and TP53 mutations, conversely Fluke-Negative CCAs (Clusters 3/4) exhibit high copy-number alterations and PD-1/PD-L2 expression, or epigenetic mutations (IDH1/2, BAP1) and FGFR/PRKA-related gene rearrangements. Whole-genome analysis highlighted FGFR2 3’UTR deletion as a mechanism of FGFR2 upregulation. Integration of non-coding promoter mutations with protein-DNA binding profiles demonstrates pervasive modulation ofmore » H3K27me3-associated sites in CCA. Clusters 1 and 4 exhibit distinct DNA hypermethylation patterns targeting either CpG islands or shores - mutation signature and subclonality analysis suggests that these reflect different mutational pathways. Lastly, our results exemplify how genetics, epigenetics and environmental carcinogens can interplay across different geographies to generate distinct molecular subtypes of cancer.« less

  7. Extracorporeal Bioartificial Liver for Treating Acute Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, Anuj; Jain, Shivali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Liver is a vital organ of the human body performing myriad of essential functions. Liver-related ailments are often life-threatening and dramatically deteriorate the quality of life of patients. Management of acute liver diseases requires adequate support of various hepatic functions. Thus far, liver transplantation has been proven as the only effective solution for acute liver diseases. However, broader application of liver transplantation is limited by demand for lifelong immunosuppression, shortage of organ donors, relative high morbidity, and high cost. Therefore, research has been focused on attempting to develop alternative support systems to treat liver diseases. Earlier attempts have been made to use nonbiological therapies based on the use of conventional detoxification procedures such as filtration and dialysis. However, the absence of liver cells in such techniques reduced the overall survival rate of the patients and led to inadequate essential liver-specific functions. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of biological therapy-based extracorporeal liver support systems as a bridge to liver transplantation or to support the ailing liver. A bioartificial liver support is an extracorporeal device through which plasma is circulated over living and functionally active hepatocytes packed in a bioreactor with the aim to aid the diseased liver until it regenerates or until a suitable graft for transplantation is available. This review article gives a brief overview of efficacy of various liver support systems that are currently available. Also, the development of advanced liver support systems, which has been analyzed for improving the important system component such as cell source and other culture and circulation conditions for the maintenance of the liver-specific functions, have been described. PMID:22416599

  8. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in the pancreatic fluke Eurytrema pancreaticum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min-Jun; Wang, Chun-Ren; Huang, Si-Yang; Fu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Zheng, Xu; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2013-01-25

    Eurytrema pancreaticum is one of the most common flukes, which mainly infects ruminants globally and infects human beings accidentally; causing eurytremiasis that has high veterinary and economic importance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs and are now considered as a key mechanism of gene regulation at the post-transcription level. We investigated the global miRNA expression profile of E. pancreaticum adults using next-generation sequencing technology combined with real-time quantitative PCR. By using the genome of the closely-related species Schistosoma japonicum as reference, we obtained 27 miRNA candidates out of 16.45 million raw sequencing reads, with 13 of them found as known miRNAs in S. japonicum and/or S. mansoni, and the remaining 14 miRNAs were considered as novel. Five out of the 13 known miRNAs coming from one family named as sja-miR-2, including family members from miR-2a to miR-2e. Targets of 19 miRNAs were successfully predicated out of the 17401 mRNA and EST non-redundant sequences of S. japonicum. It was found that a significant high number of targets were related to "chch domain-containing protein mitochondrial precursor" (n = 29), "small subunit ribosomal protein s30e" (n = 21), and "insulin-induced gene 1 protein" (n = 9). Besides, "egg protein cp3842" (n = 2), "fumarate hydratase" (n = 2), "ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme" (n = 2), and "sperm-associated antigen 6" (n = 1) were also found as targets of the miRNAs of E. pancreaticum. The present study represents the first global characterization of E. pancreaticum miRNAs, which provides novel resources for a better understanding of the parasite, which, in turn, has implications for the effective control of the disease it causes.

  9. Towards an Evidence-Based Approach to Tackling Health Inequalities: The English Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoran, Amanda; Kelly, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This short paper considers the development of an evidence-based approach to tackling health inequalities. Inequalities in health in England at the beginning of the 21st century have widened and are stark. Despite overall improvements in death rates, the growing gap between social groups means that now some parts of England have the same levels of…

  10. Role of liver progenitors in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Syn, Wing-Kin; Dollé, Laurent; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    During massive liver injury and hepatocyte loss, the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the liver by replication of resident hepatocytes is overwhelmed. Treatment of this condition depends on the cause of liver injury, though in many cases liver transplantation (LT) remains the only curative option. LT for end stage chronic and acute liver diseases is hampered by shortage of donor organs and requires immunosuppression. Hepatocyte transplantation is limited by yet unresolved technical difficulties. Since currently no treatment is available to facilitate liver regeneration directly, therapies involving the use of resident liver stem or progenitor cells (LPCs) or non-liver stem cells are coming to fore. LPCs are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. Non-liver stem cells include embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the first section, we aim to provide an overview of the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens and hormones in regulating LPC response and briefly discuss the prognostic value of the LPC response in clinical practice. In the latter section, we will highlight the role of other (non-liver) stem cells in transplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of ES cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), as well as MSCs. PMID:25713804

  11. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-07-07

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients.

  12. Liver transplantation for metastatic liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Foss, Aksel; Lerut, Jan P

    2014-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a validated treatment of primary hepatobiliary tumours. Over the last decade, a renewed interest for liver transplantation as a curative treatment of colorectal liver metastasis (CR-LM) and neuro-endocrine metastasis (NET-LM) has developed. The ELTR and UNOS analyses showed that liver transplantation may offer excellent disease-free survival (ranging from 30 to 77%) in case of NET-LM, on the condition that stringent selection criteria are implemented. The interest for liver transplantation in the treatment of CR-LM has been fostered by the Norwegian SECA study. Five-year A 5-year survival rate of 60% could be reached. Despite the high recurrence rate (90%), one-third of patients were disease free following pulmonary surgery for metastases. Liver transplantation will take a more prominent place in the therapeutic algorithm of CR-LM and NET-LM. Larger experiences are necessary to improve knowledge about tumour biology and to refine selection criteria. A multimodal approach adding neo and adjuvant medical treatment to the transplant procedure will be key to bring this oncologic transplant project into the clinical arena. The preserved liver function in these patients will allow a more deliberate access to split liver and living donation for these indications.

  13. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anatomy of a Natural Composite Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    from the vitellaria of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica. Biochemistry 28, 6104-6110. 2. Waite, J.H., Hansen, D.C., & Little, K.T. (1989) The glue...certainly belong to distinct genera and inhabit distinct ecological niches. Adhesive protein sequences from two non-molluscan species, Fasciola hepatica...choros), Gd (Geukensia demissa), Fh ( Fasciola hepatica), Me (Mytilus edulis), Mg (Mytella guyanensis), Mms (Modiolus modiolus squamosus), Pc

  15. Clonorchis sinensis omega-class glutathione transferases are reliable biomarkers for serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis and opisthorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-G; Ahn, C-S; Sripa, B; Eom, K S; Kang, I; Sohn, W-M; Nawa, Y; Kong, Y

    2018-04-09

    To determine the potential for immunodiagnostic application of two recombinant forms of Clonorchis sinensis omega-class glutathione transferases (rCsGSTo1 and rCsGSTo2) against human small liver-fluke C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini infections. Specific antibody levels against rCsGSTo1 and rCsGSTo2 in patients' sera of egg-positive opisthorchiasis (n = 87) and clonorchiasis (n = 120), as well as those in sera from patients with other helminthic infections (n = 252) and healthy controls (n = 40) were retrospectively analysed by ELISA. We observed highly positive correlation coefficients between specific antibody levels against rCsGSTo1 and rCsGSTo2 and egg counts per gramme of faeces (EPG) of patients with opisthorchiasis (n = 87; r = 0.88 for rCsGSTo1 and r = 0.90 for rCsGSTo2). Sera from opisthorchiasis patients whose EPG counts >100 (n = 43) revealed high antibody titres against both antigens. Patients' sera with low EPG counts (<100, n = 44) also exhibited reliable sensitivities of 93.2% and 97.7% for rCsGSTo1 and rCsGSTo2, respectively. Sera from clonorchiasis patients showed sensitivities of 90% (108/120 samples) and 89.2% (107/120 sera) for rCsGSTo1 and rCsGSTo2. Overall diagnostic sensitivities for liver-fluke infections were 92.3% for rCsGSTo1 (191/207 samples) and 93.2% for rCsGSTo2 (193/207 samples). Specificities were 89.7% (rCsGSTo1) and 97.6% (rCsGSTo2). Detection of specific antibody levels against rCsGSTo1 or rCsGSTo2 might be promising for the serodiagnosis of patients infected with these two phylogenetically close carcinogenic liver-flukes. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. People Participation Towards Opisthorchis viverrini Prevention and Control in Chaiyaphum Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phongsiripapat, Rutjirapat; Chimplee, Kanokporn; Rujirakul, Ratana; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Keawpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive and qualitative study was aimed to study the people participation and their approaches toward the human carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, prevention and control in Ban Chaun sub-district administrative organization (BCSAO) and Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality (BNSM), Bamnet Narong district, Chaiyaphum Province, Thailand between June 2013 and February 2014. Participants were purposive selected, included chiefs of sub-district administrative organizations, sub-district municipalities, sub-district health promotion hospitals (SHPHs), heads of village, and a further sample was selected with a multi- stage random sampling for public health volunteers, and villagers. The pre-designed questionnaire contained items for individualized status and the participatory steps of sharing ideas, decision-making, and planning, procession, evaluation, and mutual benefit, for the project O. viverrini prevention and control (POPC). In-depth interviews were used for collection of need approaches to POPC. With 375 participants who completed the questionnaire, it was found that people had a high level regarding to participate in the POPC, particularly in the process stage (X_ =3.78, S.D. = 0.56), but the lowest level was found in sharing ideas, decision making, and planning step (X_ =3.65, S.D. = 0.63). By comparison, participant status and organization did not significantly differ with people participation. In each step, Ban Chaun sub-district had a high level of participation in the step of sharing ideas, decision making, and planning toward POPC, more than Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality (t=2.20, p=0.028). Approaches for POPC in Ban Chaun sub-district and Bamnet Narong sub-district municipality included requirements for budget support, annual campaigns for liver fluke prevention and control, campaign promotion, risk group observation, home visiting, community rules regarding reducing raw fish consumption in their

  17. Modelling the variation in skin-test tuberculin reactions, post-mortem lesion counts and case pathology in tuberculosis-exposed cattle: Effects of animal characteristics, histories and co-infection.

    PubMed

    Byrne, A W; Graham, J; Brown, C; Donaghy, A; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo, M; McNair, J; Skuce, R A; Allen, A; McDowell, S W

    2018-06-01

    Correctly identifying bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle remains a significant problem in endemic countries. We hypothesized that animal characteristics (sex, age, breed), histories (herd effects, testing, movement) and potential exposure to other pathogens (co-infection; BVDV, liver fluke and Mycobacterium avium reactors) could significantly impact the immune responsiveness detected at skin testing and the variation in post-mortem pathology (confirmation) in bTB-exposed cattle. Three model suites were developed using a retrospective observational data set of 5,698 cattle culled during herd breakdowns in Northern Ireland. A linear regression model suggested that antemortem tuberculin reaction size (difference in purified protein derivative avium [PPDa] and bovine [PPDb] reactions) was significantly positively associated with post-mortem maximum lesion size and the number of lesions found. This indicated that reaction size could be considered a predictor of both the extent (number of lesions/tissues) and the pathological progression of infection (maximum lesion size). Tuberculin reaction size was related to age class, and younger animals (<2.85 years) displayed larger reaction sizes than older animals. Tuberculin reaction size was also associated with breed and animal movement and increased with the time between the penultimate and disclosing tests. A negative binomial random-effects model indicated a significant increase in lesion counts for animals with M. avium reactions (PPDb-PPDa < 0) relative to non-reactors (PPDb-PPDa = 0). Lesion counts were significantly increased in animals with previous positive severe interpretation skin-test results. Animals with increased movement histories, young animals and non-dairy breed animals also had significantly increased lesion counts. Animals from herds that had BVDV-positive cattle had significantly lower lesion counts than animals from herds without evidence of BVDV infection. Restricting the data set to only

  18. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  19. Liver Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    Liver hemangioma Overview A liver hemangioma (he-man-jee-O-muh) is a noncancerous (benign) mass in the liver. A liver hemangioma is made up of a tangle of blood vessels. Other terms for a liver hemangioma are hepatic hemangioma and cavernous hemangioma. Most ...

  20. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  1. The Role of Labour Inspectorates in Tackling the Psychosocial Risks at Work in Europe: Problems and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Toukas, Dimitrios; Delichas, Miltiadis; Toufekoula, Chryssoula; Spyrouli, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Significant changes in the past year have taken place in the world of work that are bringing new challenges with regard to employee safety and health. These changes have led to emerging psychosocial risks (PSRs) at work. The risks are primarily linked to how work is designed, organized, and managed, and to the economic and social frame of work. These factors have increased the level of work-related stress and can lead to serious deterioration in mental and physical health. In tackling PSRs, the European labor inspectorates can have an important role by enforcing preventive and/or corrective interventions in the content and context of work. However, to improve working conditions, unilateral interventions in the context and content of work are insufficient and require adopting a common strategy to tackle PSRs, based on a holistic approach. The implementation of a common strategy by the European Labor Inspectorate for tackling PSRs is restricted by the lack of a common legislative frame with regard to PSR evaluation and management, the different levels of labor inspectors' training, and the different levels of employees' and employers' health and safety culture. PMID:26929837

  2. Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Safe Tackling Skills to Youth Football Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Sharayah S. M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2017-01-01

    With concussion rates on the rise for football players, there is a need for further research to increase skills and decrease injuries. Behavioral skills training is effective in teaching a wide variety of skills but has yet to be studied in the sports setting. We evaluated behavioral skills training to teach safer tackling techniques to six…

  3. Biodegradable Bioadherent Microcapsules for Orally Administered Sustained Release Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    Fasciola hepatica which is a known bioadhesive’’. The encapsulation method is the classical, well described water in oil technique for the preparation of...immunization, Vaccine 12 (1994) 387-340. 6. Waite, J.H., Rice-Ficht, A.C., Presclerotized eggshell protein from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica...Biochemistry 26 (1987) 7819-7825. 7. Waite, J.H., Rice-Ficht, A.C., Eggshell precursor proteins of Fasciola hepatica: II. Microheterogeneity in vitelline

  4. Life history and biology of Fascioloides magna (Trematoda) and its native and exotic hosts

    PubMed Central

    Malcicka, Miriama

    2015-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are model systems in a wide range of ecological and evolutionary fields and may be utilized for testing numerous theories and hypotheses in terms of both applied and fundamental research. For instance, they are important in terms of studying coevolutionary arms races, species invasions, and in economic terms the health of livestock and humans. Here, I present a comprehensive description of the life history, biogeography, and biology of the giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, and both its intermediate and definitive hosts. F. magna is native to North America where it uses several species of freshwater snails (Lymnaeidae) as intermediate hosts and four main species of ungulates as definitive hosts. The fluke has also been introduced into parts of Europe where it is now established in two lymnaeid snail species and three ungulate species. This study gives a comprehensive description of different developmental stages of the fluke in its two host classes, as well as detailed notes on historical and present distributions of F. magna in North America and Europe as well as in its snail and deer hosts (with range maps provided). Aberrant and dead-end hosts are also discussed in detail, and descriptive phylogenies are provided for all of the organisms. I briefly discuss how F. magna represents a model example of multiple-level ecological fitting, a phenomenon not yet described in the empirical literature. Lastly, I explore possible future scenarios for fluke invasion in Europe, where it is currently expanding its range. PMID:25897378

  5. Perioperative management of liver surgery-review on pathophysiology of liver disease and liver failure.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Lukas; Eschertzhuber, Stephan; Tiefenthaler, Werner

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of patients present for liver surgery. Given the complex pathophysiological changes in chronic liver disease (CLD), it is pivotal to understand the fundamentals of chronic and acute liver failure. This review will give an overview on related organ dysfunction as well as recommendations for perioperative management and treatment of liver failure-related symptoms.

  6. Sporadic incidence of Fascioliasis detected during hepatobiliary procedures: a study of 18 patients from Sulaimaniyah governorate.

    PubMed

    Hawramy, Tahir Abdullah Hussein; Saeed, Kamal Ahmed; Qaradaghy, Seerwan Hama Sharif; Karboli, Taha Ahmed; Nore, Beston Faiek; Bayati, Noora Hisham Abood

    2012-12-21

    Fascioliasis is an often-neglected zoonotic disease and currently is an emerging infection in Iraq. Fascioliasis has two distinct phases, an acute phase, exhibiting the hepatic migratory stage of the fluke's life cycle, and a chronic biliary phase manifested with the presence of the parasite in the bile ducts through hepatic tissue. The incidence of Fascioliasis in Sulaimaniyah governorate was unexpected observation. We believe that shedding light on this disease in our locality will increase our physician awareness and experience in early detection, treatment in order to avoid unnecessary surgeries. We retrospectively evaluated this disease in terms of the demographic features, clinical presentations, and managements by reviewing the medical records of 18 patients, who were admitted to the Sulaimani Teaching Hospital and Kurdistan Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients were complained from hepatobiliary and/or upper gastrointestinal symptoms and diagnosed accidentally with Fascioliasis during hepatobiliary surgeries and ERCP by direct visualization of the flukes and stone analysis. Elevated liver enzymes, white blood cells count and eosinophilia were notable laboratory indices. The dilated CBD, gallstones, liver cysts and abscess were found common in radiological images. Fascioliasis diagnosed during conventional surgical CBD exploration and choledochodoudenostomy, open cholecystectomy, surgical drainage of liver abscess, ERCP and during gallstone analysis. Fascioliasis is indeed an emerging disease in our locality, but it is often underestimated and ignored. We recommend the differential diagnosis of patients suffering from Rt. Hypochondrial pain, fever and eosinophilia. The watercress ingestion was a common factor in patient's history.

  7. Tackling the x-ray cargo inspection challenge using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Rogers, Thomas W.; Morton, Edward J.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-05-01

    The current infrastructure for non-intrusive inspection of cargo containers cannot accommodate exploding com-merce volumes and increasingly stringent regulations. There is a pressing need to develop methods to automate parts of the inspection workflow, enabling expert operators to focus on a manageable number of high-risk images. To tackle this challenge, we developed a modular framework for automated X-ray cargo image inspection. Employing state-of-the-art machine learning approaches, including deep learning, we demonstrate high performance for empty container verification and specific threat detection. This work constitutes a significant step towards the partial automation of X-ray cargo image inspection.

  8. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental alcoholic liver disease. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship and consequences for alcoholic liver disease. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25872593

  9. The effects of different plant extracts on intestinal cestodes and on trematodes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Semmler, Margit; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Strassen, Bianca; Fischer, Katja; Aksu, Gülendem; Klimpel, Sven; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, chloroform, aqueous, (polyethylene glycol/propylene carbonate) PEG/PC extracts were made from coconut, onion, garlic, fig, date tree, chicory, ananas, and cistrose. These extracts were tested in vivo and in vitro on their anthelmintic activity against cestodes (Hymenolepis diminuta, H. microstoma, Taenia taeniaeformis) and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, Echinostoma caproni). In all in vitro tests, the target parasites died. It turned out that the treatment of mice and rats with a combination of onion and coconut extracts (with PEG/PC) eliminated all cestodes from their final hosts. In addition, the same composition was effective against the intestinal fluke E. caproni, but not against the liver fluke F. hepatica in the final host, while both worms were killed in vitro. Inoculation of fluids of coconut eliminated T. taeniaeformis tapeworms from naturally infected cats. This goal was not reached with oil of cistrose.

  10. The recombinant gut-associated M17 leucine aminopeptidase in combination with different adjuvants confers a high level of protection against Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Acosta, Daniel; Silveira, Fernando; Rossi, Silvina; Giacaman, Sheila; Basika, Tatiana; Gayo, Valeria; Rosadilla, Diego; Roche, Leda; Tort, José; Carmona, Carlos

    2011-11-08

    Fasciola hepatica M17 leucine aminopeptidase (FhLAP) is thought to play a role in catabolizing peptides generated by the concerted activity of gut-associated endopeptidases on host polypeptides, thus releasing amino acids to be used in protein anabolism. In this study, a recombinant functional form of this homo hexameric metallopeptidase produced in Escherichia coli was used in combination with adjuvants of different types in a vaccination trial in Corriedale sheep against experimental challenge with F. hepatica metacercariae. The experimental assay consisted of 6 groups of 10 animals; 5 of the groups (1-5) were subcutaneously inoculated at weeks 0 and 4 with 100 μg of rFhLAP mixed with Freund's complete plus incomplete adjuvant (group 1), Alum (group 2), Adyuvac 50 (group 3), DEAE-D (group 4) and Ribi (group 5); the adjuvant control group (group 6) received Freund's adjuvant. Two weeks after the booster, the sheep were orally challenged with 200 metacercariae. Immunization with rFhLAP induced significant reduction in fluke burdens in all vaccinated groups: 83.8% in the Freund's group, 86.7% in the Alum group, 74.4% in the Adyuvac 50 group, 49.8% in the Ribi group and 49.5% in the DEAE-D group compared to the adjuvant control group. Morphometric analysis of recovered liver flukes showed no significant size modifications in the different vaccination groups. All vaccine preparations elicited specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 responses. This study shows that a liver fluke vaccine based on rFhLAP combined with different adjuvants significantly reduced worm burden in a ruminant species that was high in animals that received the enzyme along with the commercially approved adjuvants Alum and Adyuvac 50. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Highland cattle and Radix labiata, the hosts of Fascioloides magna

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fascioloides magna is a pathogenic fluke introduced to Europe ca 140 years ago. As it is spreading over the continent, new intermediate and definitive hosts might be involved in transmission of the parasite. In Europe, several studies reported potential new intermediate snail hosts (Radix spp.) for F. magna, and also several cases of fascioloidosis of wild and domestic animals were published. However, the data based on molecular and histological analyses confirming these findings remained unreported. This study aims to refer to unique findings of F. magna in European snails and domestic animals (the first observation in the Czech Republic in the last 30 years) and demonstrate the use of molecular techniques in determination of F. magna. Results Two snails of R. labiata naturally infected with F. magna were found; mature cercariae and daughter rediae were observed. Maturity of cercariae was checked by histological methods, however, their ability to encyst was not confirmed. Co-infection of F. magna and Fasciola hepatica in the liver of two highland cattle bulls was proved. Adult fasciolid flukes producing eggs were found in the liver pseudocysts (F. magna) and the bile ducts (F. hepatica). Identification of intermediate hosts, intramolluscan stages, adult flukes and eggs was performed by sequencing the ITS2 region. Connection of F. magna pseudocysts with the gut (via the bile ducts) was not confirmed by means of histological and coprological examinations. Conclusions For the first time, Radix labiata was confirmed as the snail host for F. magna under natural conditions and, together with the finding of F. magna infection in cattle, we can expect further transmission of F. magna from wildlife to livestock in localities shared by these hosts. PMID:24517409

  12. Prolyl Oligopeptidase from the Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni: From Functional Analysis to Anti-schistosomal Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fajtová, Pavla; Štefanić, Saša; Hradilek, Martin; Dvořák, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Jílková, Adéla; Ulrychová, Lenka; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Mareš, Michael; Horn, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that infects over 240 million people worldwide, and for which there is a need to identify new targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Our research is focused on Schistosoma mansoni prolyl oligopeptidase (SmPOP) from the serine peptidase family S9, which has not been investigated in detail in trematodes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that SmPOP is expressed in adult worms and schistosomula in an enzymatically active form. By immunofluorescence microscopy, SmPOP is localized in the tegument and parenchyma of both developmental stages. Recombinant SmPOP was produced in Escherichia coli and its active site specificity investigated using synthetic substrate and inhibitor libraries, and by homology modeling. SmPOP is a true oligopeptidase that hydrolyzes peptide (but not protein) substrates with a strict specificity for Pro at P1. The inhibition profile is analogous to those for mammalian POPs. Both the recombinant enzyme and live worms cleave host vasoregulatory, proline-containing hormones such as angiotensin I and bradykinin. Finally, we designed nanomolar inhibitors of SmPOP that induce deleterious phenotypes in cultured schistosomes. Conclusions/Significance We provide the first localization and functional analysis of SmPOP together with chemical tools for measuring its activity. We briefly discuss the notion that SmPOP, operating at the host-parasite interface to cleave host bioactive peptides, may contribute to the survival of the parasite. If substantiated, SmPOP could be a new target for the development of anti-schistosomal drugs. PMID:26039195

  13. Detection of antibodies in wild ruminants to evaluate exposure to liver trematodes.

    PubMed

    Arias, María Sol; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; León-Vizcaíno, Luis; Paz-Silva, Adolfo; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio; Alonso, Francisco

    2012-08-01

    Wild ruminants sharing pastures with domestic livestock are at risk of infection by liver trematodes. Detection of antibodies provides a very useful tool to gain more knowledge about the distribution of these parasites. Non-lethal methods are strongly encouraged for the analysis of the risk of infection among wild ruminants. A seroepidemiological survey was conducted to analyze exposure to hepatic trematodes ( Fasciola hepatica and Dicrocoelium dendriticum ) in wild ruminants from southern Spain. Blood samples were collected from 69 bovids (Mouflon + Spanish ibex) and 143 cervids (red deer + fallow deer) from Sierra de Cazorla, Segura and Las Villas Natural Park. The samples were analyzed using the excretory/secretory antigens of each trematode to determine the IgG response. All the animals were examined at necropsy for the presence of flukes, and the species, age, and gender of the animals were recorded. Fasciola hepatica were only observed in cervids (3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  2-8), while D. dendriticum specimens were recorded in 1% (0-8) of bovids and 4% (CI  =  2-9) of the cervids. The IgG-seroprevalence against F. hepatica was significantly higher in the cervids. Statistical differences according to gender were observed. The bovids exhibited the greatest percentages of positive cases to D. dendriticum antigens, and the DdES-seroprevalence was related to age of the animals. When considering all the factors, the FhES-seroprevalence was initially distributed according to the type of ruminant (cervids), gender (male), and age (>2 yr).

  14. Benign Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  15. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  16. The Virtual Liver: Modeling Chemical-Induced Liver Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver) project is aimed at modeling chemical-induced processes in hepatotoxicity and simulating their dose-dependent perturbations. The v-Liver embodies an emerging field of research in computational tissue modeling that integrates molecular and cellul...

  17. A bioartificial liver to treat severe acute liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Rozga, J; Podesta, L; LePage, E; Morsiani, E; Moscioni, A D; Hoffman, A; Sher, L; Villamil, F; Woolf, G; McGrath, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the safety and efficacy of a bioartificial liver support system in patients with severe acute liver failure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The authors developed a bioartificial liver using porcine hepatocytes. The system was tested in vitro and shown to have differentiated liver functions (cytochrome P450 activity, synthesis of liver-specific proteins, bilirubin synthesis, and conjugation). When tested in vivo in experimental animals with liver failure, it gave substantial metabolic and hemodynamic support. METHODS: Seven patients with severe acute liver failure received a double lumen catheter in the saphenous vein; blood was removed, plasma was separated and perfused through a cartridge containing 4 to 6 x 10(9) porcine hepatocytes, and plasma and blood cells were reconstituted and reinfused. Each treatment lasted 6 to 7 hours. RESULTS: All patients tolerated the procedure(s) well, with neurologic improvement, decreased intracranial pressure (23.0 +/- 2.3 to 7.8 +/- 1.7 mm Hg; p < 0.005) associated with an increase in cerebral perfusion pressure, decreased plasma ammonia (163.3 +/- 21.3 to 112.2 +/- 9.8 microMoles/L; p < 0.01), and increased encephalopathy index (0.60 +/- 0.17 to 1.24 +/- 0.22; p < 0.03). All patients survived, had a liver transplant, and were discharged from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: This bioartificial liver is safe and serves as an effective "bridge" to liver transplant in some patients. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8185403

  18. What are the implications of the spontaneous spleno-renal shunts in liver cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although significant advances are expected to be made in the assessment of the portal hypertension-related complications, the prognostic role of spleno-renal shunts has not been fully explored so far. Clarifying this aspect could help tackle the life-treating events occurring in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationships between the spleno-renal shunts presence at doppler ultrasound and the liver cirrhosis complications. Methods Design: eighty one patients out of 129 formed the study population (35 females). Chronic liver damage in these patients was caused by HCV (66), HBV (2), alcohol abuse (2) or unknown etiology, likely non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (11). Setting: two Liver Units of university/primary hospitals in Southern Italy. Main outcome measures: grading of esofageal varices; detection of ascites: assessment of hepatic encephalopathy; evaluation of liver cirrhosis severity; tracking hepatocellular carcinoma; doppler features of spleno-renal shunts and splenic flow velocity; spleen longitudinal diameter at sonography. Results The prevalence of spleno-renal shunts was 18.5%, without no difference concerning the etiology (HCV versus non-HCV, p = 0.870); the prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with spleno-renal shunts was superior to that of patients without them (Pearson Chi-square, p = 0.006, power of sample size 74%), also after adjustment for liver decompensation (p = 0.024). The median score of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with and without spleno-renal shunts was similar, i.e., 0 (range, 0-2) versus 0 (0 - 3), p = 0.67. The median splenic vein flow velocity in patients with spleno-renal shunts was significantly inferior to that of patients without them, i.e., 13 cm/sec (95% confidence intervals, 6-18) versus 21 cm/sec (17-24), p < 0.0001. By far the largest percentage of large esophageal varices was in patients without spleno-renal shunts (p = 0.005). In contrast, the

  19. Tackle-related injury rates and nature of injuries in South African Youth Week tournament rugby union players (under-13 to under-18): an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Burger, Nicholas; Lambert, Mike I; Viljoen, Wayne; Brown, James C; Readhead, Clint; Hendricks, Sharief

    2014-08-12

    The tackle situation is most often associated with the high injury rates in rugby union. Tackle injury epidemiology in rugby union has previously been focused on senior cohorts but less is known about younger cohorts. The aim of this study was to report on the nature and rates of tackle-related injuries in South African youth rugby union players representing their provinces at national tournaments. Observational cohort study. Four South African Youth Week tournaments (under-13 Craven Week, under-16 Grant Khomo Week, under-18 Academy Week, under-18 Craven Week). Injury data were collected from 3652 youth rugby union players (population at risk) in 2011 and 2012. Tackle-related injury severity ('time-loss' and 'medical attention'), type and location, injury rate per 1000 h (including 95% CIs). Injury rate ratios (IRR) were calculated and modelled using a Poisson regression. A χ(2) analysis was used to detect linear trends between injuries and increasing match quarters. The 2012 under-13 Craven Week had a significantly greater 'time-loss' injury rate when compared with the 2012 under-18 Academy Week (IRR=4.43; 95% CI 2.13 to 9.21, p<0.05) and under-18 Craven Week (IRR=3.52; 95% CI 1.54 to 8.00, p<0.05). The Poisson regression also revealed a higher probability of 'overall' ('time-loss' and 'medical attention' combined) and 'time-loss' tackle-related injuries occurring at the under-13 Craven Week. The proportion of 'overall' and 'time-loss' injuries increased significantly with each quarter of the match when all four tournaments were combined (p<0.05). There was a difference in the tackle-related injury rate between the under-13 tournament and the two under-18 tournaments, and the tackle-related injury rate was higher in the final quarter of matches. Ongoing injury surveillance is required to better interpret these findings. Injury prevention strategies targeting the tackle may only be effective once the rate and nature of injuries have been accurately determined

  20. Tackle-related injury rates and nature of injuries in South African Youth Week tournament rugby union players (under-13 to under-18): an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Nicholas; Lambert, Mike I; Viljoen, Wayne; Brown, James C; Readhead, Clint; Hendricks, Sharief

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The tackle situation is most often associated with the high injury rates in rugby union. Tackle injury epidemiology in rugby union has previously been focused on senior cohorts but less is known about younger cohorts. The aim of this study was to report on the nature and rates of tackle-related injuries in South African youth rugby union players representing their provinces at national tournaments. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Four South African Youth Week tournaments (under-13 Craven Week, under-16 Grant Khomo Week, under-18 Academy Week, under-18 Craven Week). Participants Injury data were collected from 3652 youth rugby union players (population at risk) in 2011 and 2012. Outcome measures Tackle-related injury severity (‘time-loss’ and ‘medical attention’), type and location, injury rate per 1000 h (including 95% CIs). Injury rate ratios (IRR) were calculated and modelled using a Poisson regression. A χ2 analysis was used to detect linear trends between injuries and increasing match quarters. Results The 2012 under-13 Craven Week had a significantly greater ‘time-loss’ injury rate when compared with the 2012 under-18 Academy Week (IRR=4.43; 95% CI 2.13 to 9.21, p<0.05) and under-18 Craven Week (IRR=3.52; 95% CI 1.54 to 8.00, p<0.05). The Poisson regression also revealed a higher probability of ‘overall’ (‘time-loss’ and ‘medical attention’ combined) and ‘time-loss’ tackle-related injuries occurring at the under-13 Craven Week. The proportion of ‘overall’ and ‘time-loss’ injuries increased significantly with each quarter of the match when all four tournaments were combined (p<0.05). Conclusions There was a difference in the tackle-related injury rate between the under-13 tournament and the two under-18 tournaments, and the tackle-related injury rate was higher in the final quarter of matches. Ongoing injury surveillance is required to better interpret these findings. Injury prevention strategies

  1. Liver transplantation in the treatment of severe iatrogenic liver injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lauterio, Andrea; De Carlis, Riccardo; Di Sandro, Stefano; Ferla, Fabio; Buscemi, Vincenzo; De Carlis, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The place of liver transplantation in the treatment of severe iatrogenic liver injuries has not yet been widely discussed in the literature. Bile duct injuries during cholecystectomy represent the leading cause of liver transplantation in this setting, while other indications after abdominal surgery are less common. Urgent liver transplantation for the treatment of severe iatrogenic liver injury may-represent a surgical challenge requiring technically difficult and time consuming procedures. A debate is ongoing on the need for centralization of complex surgery in tertiary referral centers. The early referral of patients with severe iatrogenic liver injuries to a tertiary center with experienced hepato-pancreato-biliary and transplant surgery has emerged as the best treatment of care. Despite widespread interest in the use of liver transplantation as a treatment option for severe iatrogenic injuries, reported experiences indicate few liver transplants are performed. This review analyzes the literature on liver transplantation after hepatic injury and discusses our own experience along with surgical advances and future prospects in this uncommon transplant setting. PMID:28932348

  2. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Delta agent (hepatitis D) Drug-induced cholestasis Fatty liver disease Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C ... abscess Reye syndrome Sclerosing cholangitis Wilson disease Images Fatty liver, CT scan Liver with disproportional fattening, CT scan ...

  3. Dr. Liver: A preoperative planning system of liver graft volumetry for living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jae Do; Yu, Hee Chul; Choi, Younggeun; Yang, Kwangho; Lee, Tae Beom; Hwang, Hong Pil; Ahn, Sungwoo; You, Heecheon

    2018-05-01

    Manual tracing of the right and left liver lobes from computed tomography (CT) images for graft volumetry in preoperative surgery planning of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is common at most medical centers. This study aims to develop an automatic system with advanced image processing algorithms and user-friendly interfaces for liver graft volumetry and evaluate its accuracy and efficiency in comparison with a manual tracing method. The proposed system provides a sequential procedure consisting of (1) liver segmentation, (2) blood vessel segmentation, and (3) virtual liver resection for liver graft volumetry. Automatic segmentation algorithms using histogram analysis, hybrid level-set methods, and a customized region growing method were developed. User-friendly interfaces such as sequential and hierarchical user menus, context-sensitive on-screen hotkey menus, and real-time sound and visual feedback were implemented. Blood vessels were excluded from the liver for accurate liver graft volumetry. A large sphere-based interactive method was developed for dividing the liver into left and right lobes with a customized cutting plane. The proposed system was evaluated using 50 CT datasets in terms of graft weight estimation accuracy and task completion time through comparison to the manual tracing method. The accuracy of liver graft weight estimation was assessed by absolute difference (AD) and percentage of AD (%AD) between preoperatively estimated graft weight and intraoperatively measured graft weight. Intra- and inter-observer agreements of liver graft weight estimation were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) using ten cases randomly selected. The proposed system showed significantly higher accuracy and efficiency in liver graft weight estimation (AD = 21.0 ± 18.4 g; %AD = 3.1% ± 2.8%; percentage of %AD > 10% = none; task completion time = 7.3 ± 1.4 min) than the manual tracing method (AD = 70

  4. Using old liver grafts for liver transplantation: where are the limits?

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Caso Maestro, Oscar; Cambra Molero, Félix; Justo Alonso, Iago; Alegre Torrado, Cristina; Manrique Municio, Alejandro; Calvo Pulido, Jorge; Loinaz Segurola, Carmelo; Moreno González, Enrique

    2014-08-21

    The scarcity of ideal liver grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has led transplant teams to investigate other sources of grafts in order to augment the donor liver pool. One way to get more liver grafts is to use marginal donors, a not well-defined group which includes mainly donors > 60 years, donors with hypernatremia or macrosteatosis > 30%, donors with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus positive serologies, cold ischemia time > 12 h, non-heart-beating donors, and grafts from split-livers or living-related donations. Perhaps the most practical and frequent measure to increase the liver pool, and thus to reduce waiting list mortality, is to use older livers. In the past years the results of OLT with old livers have improved, mainly due to better selection and maintenance of donors, improvements in surgical techniques in donors and recipients, and intra- and post-OLT management. At the present time, sexagenarian livers are generally accepted, but there still exists some controversy regarding the use of septuagenarian and octogenarian liver grafts. The aim of this paper is to briefly review the aging process of the liver and reported experiences using old livers for OLT. Fundamentally, the series of septuagenarian and octogenarian livers will be addressed to see if there is a limit to using these aged grafts.

  5. Using old liver grafts for liver transplantation: Where are the limits?

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Caso Maestro, Oscar; Cambra Molero, Félix; Justo Alonso, Iago; Alegre Torrado, Cristina; Manrique Municio, Alejandro; Calvo Pulido, Jorge; Loinaz Segurola, Carmelo; Moreno González, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The scarcity of ideal liver grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has led transplant teams to investigate other sources of grafts in order to augment the donor liver pool. One way to get more liver grafts is to use marginal donors, a not well-defined group which includes mainly donors > 60 years, donors with hypernatremia or macrosteatosis > 30%, donors with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus positive serologies, cold ischemia time > 12 h, non-heart-beating donors, and grafts from split-livers or living-related donations. Perhaps the most practical and frequent measure to increase the liver pool, and thus to reduce waiting list mortality, is to use older livers. In the past years the results of OLT with old livers have improved, mainly due to better selection and maintenance of donors, improvements in surgical techniques in donors and recipients, and intra- and post-OLT management. At the present time, sexagenarian livers are generally accepted, but there still exists some controversy regarding the use of septuagenarian and octogenarian liver grafts. The aim of this paper is to briefly review the aging process of the liver and reported experiences using old livers for OLT. Fundamentally, the series of septuagenarian and octogenarian livers will be addressed to see if there is a limit to using these aged grafts. PMID:25152573

  6. Impact of liver volume and liver function on posthepatectomy liver failure after portal vein embolization- A multivariable cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Alizai, Patrick H; Haelsig, Annabel; Bruners, Philipp; Ulmer, Florian; Klink, Christian D; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Neumann, Ulf P; Schmeding, Maximilian

    2018-01-01

    Liver failure remains a life-threatening complication after liver resection, and is difficult to predict preoperatively. This retrospective cohort study evaluated different preoperative factors in regard to their impact on posthepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) after extended liver resection and previous portal vein embolization (PVE). Patient characteristics, liver function and liver volumes of patients undergoing PVE and subsequent liver resection were analyzed. Liver function was determined by the LiMAx test (enzymatic capacity of cytochrome P450 1A2). Factors associated with the primary end point PHLF (according to ISGLS definition) were identified through multivariable analysis. Secondary end points were 30-day mortality and morbidity. 95 patients received PVE, of which 64 patients underwent major liver resection. PHLF occurred in 7 patients (11%). Calculated postoperative liver function was significantly lower in patients with PHLF than in patients without PHLF (67 vs. 109 μg/kg/h; p = 0.01). Other factors associated with PHLF by univariable analysis were age, future liver remnant, MELD score, ASA score, renal insufficiency and heart insufficiency. By multivariable analysis, future liver remnant was the only factor significantly associated with PHLF (p = 0.03). Mortality and morbidity rates were 4.7% and 29.7% respectively. Future liver remnant is the only preoperative factor with a significant impact on PHLF. Assessment of preoperative liver function may additionally help identify patients at risk for PHLF.

  7. Validation of graft and standard liver size predictions in right liver living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chan, See Ching; Lo, Chung Mau; Chok, Kenneth S H; Sharr, William W; Cheung, Tan To; Tsang, Simon H Y; Chan, Albert C Y; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2011-12-01

    To assess the accuracy of a formula derived from 159 living liver donors to estimate the liver size of a normal subject: standard liver weight (g) = 218 + body weight (kg) × 12.3 + 51 (if male). Standard liver volume (SLV) is attained by a conversion factor of 1.19 mL/g. The total liver volume (TLV) of each of the subsequent consecutive 126 living liver donors was determined using the right liver graft weight (RGW) on the back table, right/left liver volume ratio on computed tomography, and the conversion factor. The estimated right liver graft weight (ERGW) was determined by the right liver volume on computed tomography (CT) and the conversion factor. SLV and ERGW were compared with TLV and RGW, respectively, by paired sample t test. Donor characteristics of both series were similar. SLV and TLV were 1,099.6 ± 139.6 and 1,108.5 ± 175.2 mL, respectively, ( R 2  = 0.476) ( p  = 0.435). The difference between SLV and TLV was only -8.9 ± 128.2 mL (-1.0 ± 11.7%). ERGW and RGW were 601.5 ± 104.1 and 597.1 ± 102.2 g, respectively ( R 2  = 0.781) ( p  = 0.332). The conversion factor from liver weight to volume for this series was 1.20 mL/g. The difference between ERGW and RGW was 4.3 ± 49.8 g (0.3 ± 8.8%). ERGW was smaller than RGW for over 10% (range 0.21-40.66 g) in 18 of the 126 donors. None had the underestimation of RGW by over 20%. SLV and graft weight estimations were accurate using the formula and conversion factor.

  8. Beyond Individual Behaviour Change: The Role of Power, Knowledge and Strategy in Tackling Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenis, Anneleen; Mathijs, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Individual behaviour change is fast becoming a kind of "holy grail" to tackle climate change, in environmental policy, the environmental movement and academic literature. This is contested by those who claim that social structures are the main problem and who advocate collective social action. The objective of the research presented in…

  9. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services (C.L.A.S.S.) -- www. ...

  10. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as ‘pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity. PMID:26639736

  11. Hepatic Dendritic Cells, the Tolerogenic Liver Environment, and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dou, Lei; Ono, Yoshihiro; Chen, Yi-Fa; Thomson, Angus W; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2018-05-01

    The unique liver immune microenvironment favors resistance to inflammation that promotes normal physiological function. At the same time, it endows the liver with tolerogenic properties that may promote pathological processes. Hepatic dendritic cells (HDCs) initiate and orchestrate immune responses depending on signals they receive from the local environment and are thought to contribute to liver tolerance. Thus, HDCs facilitate impaired T cell responses that are observed in persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, hepatocellular carcinoma progression, and liver allograft transplantation. HDCs also participate in anti-inflammatory responses in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Moreover, they promote the regression of fibrosis from various fibrogenic liver injuries. These findings suggest that HDCs regulate intrahepatic immune responses, allowing the liver to maintain homeostasis and integrity even under pathological conditions. This review focuses on the tolerogenic properties of HDCs based on recent research and in relation to liver disease pathogenesis and its therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Comparative studies on Pb and Cd levels in parasites of terrestrial and aquatic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Sures, B.; Taraschewski, H.

    1995-12-31

    Several fish parasites (Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Nematoda) and organs of their respective intermediate and final hosts were analyzed for heavy metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Pb and Cd were also quantified in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica as well as in different organs of the large intestinal roundworm Ascaris suum. The levels of these heavy metals in the parasites were compared to those of muscle, liver, kidney and intestine of the respective definitive hosts cattle and swine obtained from a slaughter house. Most parasites accumulated significantly higher levels of metals than their final hosts. This was most conspicuous inmore » acanthocephalans which contained up to 3 {times} 10{sup 3} fold more lead than the muscle of their fish hosts and up to 1.1 {times} 10{sup 4} more lead than the water surrounding the fish. In these helminths cadmium was enriched up to 400 fold compared to the muscle of the fish and up to 2.7 {times} 10{sup 4} compared to the water. In contrast to the accumulation capacity of adult acanthocephalans their larvae contained about 30 to 180 times less Pb and Cd. Thus, the predominant accumulation of both metals appears in the adult worms. The cestodes of fish and the liver flukes of cattle accumulated the metals up to 200 fold compared to the muscle of their hosts. The nematodes did not contain higher levels of the metals than their hosts. Thus, parasites, especially acanthocephalans, seem to be sensitive bioindicators of Pb and Cd in their environments.« less

  13. Using Invention to Change How Students Tackle Problems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen M.; van Stolk, Adrian P.; Spiegelman, George B.

    2010-01-01

    Invention activities challenge students to tackle problems that superficially appear unrelated to the course material but illustrate underlying fundamental concepts that are fundamental to material that will be presented. During our invention activities in a first-year biology class, students were presented with problems that are parallel to those that living cells must solve, in weekly sessions over a 13-wk term. We compared students who participated in the invention activities sessions with students who participated in sessions of structured problem solving and with students who did not participate in either activity. When faced with developing a solution to a challenging and unfamiliar biology problem, invention activity students were much quicker to engage with the problem and routinely provided multiple reasonable hypotheses. In contrast the other students were significantly slower in beginning to work on the problem and routinely produced relatively few ideas. We suggest that the invention activities develop a highly valuable skill that operates at the initial stages of problem solving. PMID:21123697

  14. Evidence in support of the call to ban the tackle and harmful contact in school rugby: a response to World Rugby.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Allyson M; White, Adam John; Kirkwood, Graham

    2017-08-01

    In a paper published in BJSM (June 2016), World Rugby employees Ross Tucker and Martin Raftery and a third coauthor Evert Verhagen took issue with the recent call to ban tackling in school rugby in the UK and Ireland. That call (to ban tackling) was supported by a systematic review published in BJSM Tucker et al claim that: (1) the mechanisms and risk factors for injury along with the incidence and severity of injury in youth rugby union have not been thoroughly identified or understood; (2) rugby players are at no greater risk of injury than other sports people, (3) this is particularly the case for children under 15 years and (4) removing the opportunity to learn the tackle from school pupils might increase rates of injuries. They conclude that a ban 'may be unnecessary and may also lead to unintended consequences such as an increase in the risk of injury later in participation.' Here we aim to rebut the case by Tucker et al We share new research that extends the findings of our original systematic review and meta-analysis. A cautionary approach requires the removal of the tackle from school rugby as the quickest and most effective method of reducing high injury rates in youth rugby, a public health priority. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Long-term Survivors After Liver Resection for Breast Cancer Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    BacalbaȘa, Nicolae; Balescu, Irina; Dima, Simona; Popescu, Irinel

    2015-12-01

    Although breast cancer liver metastases are considered a sign of systemic recurrence and are considered a poor prognostic factor that transforms the patient into a candidate for palliative chemotherapy, surgery might be performed with good results. Success reported after liver resection for colorectal hepatic metastases encouraged the oncological surgeon to apply similar protocols in breast cancer liver metastases. Data of patients submitted to hepatectomies for breast cancer liver metastases in the "Dan Setlacec" Center of Gastrointestinal Disease and Liver Transplantation, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest were retrospectively reviewed. Among five cases survival after liver surgery surpassed 5 years and was considered long-term survival. One of the five cases was submitted to a second liver resection. Most often long-term survivors were reported among patients with single, metachronous and smaller than 5-cm lesions. In selected cases liver resection for breast cancer liver metastases can be associated with a significant increase in survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  17. Improving Psychosexual Knowledge in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Pilot of the Tackling Teenage Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Linda P.; van der Vegt, Esther J.; Visser, Kirsten; Tick, Nouchka; Boudesteijn, Frieda; Verhulst, Frank C.; Maras, Athanasios; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that psychosexual functioning in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is hampered and emphasize the need for a specialized training program tailored to their needs. Therefore, an individual training program was developed; the Tackling Teenage Training (TTT) program. The current pilot study systematically…

  18. Fatal trematodiasis in research turtles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C A; Griffith, J W; Tenorio, P; Hytrek, S; Lang, C M

    1998-08-01

    During a 5-year period, 16 freshwater turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans and Chrysemys picta) that were purchased for research purposes died spontaneously. Clinical signs of disease included lethargy, constant swimming, swimming sideways, hemiplegia, and ulcerative lesions on the carapace. At necropsy, subcutaneous edema, hepatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, splenic necrosis, and intestinal parasites were identified. Histologically, trematode eggs were seen within the liver, brain, spleen, kidney, myocardium, lung, pancreas, testes, and bladder, and were associated with granulomatous reactions. The size and distribution of the eggs were consistent with Spirorchis sp. infection, although adults could not be found to confirm the species. Spirorchid flukes are 1 to 2 mm long and inhabit the heart and blood vessels where they produce eggs. Spirorchis parvus are capable of invading various tissues, including pancreas and the central nervous system. The pathogenicity of the flukes seems to be related to widespread deposition of the eggs, which may block small blood vessels within the intestines, causing necrosis and bacteremia. Antemortem diagnosis is made by direct examination of fecal smears for eggs. Postmortem diagnosis is accomplished by examination of tissues for adult parasites and microgranulomas associated with the fluke eggs. The parasite requires a snail intermediate host to complete its life cycle. Intramuscular or oral administration of praziquantel is reported to be an effective treatment.

  19. Shared liver-like transcriptional characteristics in liver metastases and corresponding primary colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Song, Xuekun; Ao, Lu; Chen, Rou; Chi, Meirong; Guo, You; Zhang, Jiahui; Li, Hongdong; Zhao, Wenyuan; Guo, Zheng; Wang, Xianlong

    2018-01-01

    Background & Aims : Primary tumors of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with liver metastasis might gain some liver-specific characteristics to adapt the liver micro-environment. This study aims to reveal potential liver-like transcriptional characteristics associated with the liver metastasis in primary colorectal carcinoma. Methods: Among the genes up-regulated in normal liver tissues versus normal colorectal tissues, we identified "liver-specific" genes whose expression levels ranked among the bottom 10% ("unexpressed") of all measured genes in both normal colorectal tissues and primary colorectal tumors without metastasis. These liver-specific genes were investigated for their expressions in both the primary tumors and the corresponding liver metastases of seven primary CRC patients with liver metastasis using microdissected samples. Results: Among the 3958 genes detected to be up-regulated in normal liver tissues versus normal colorectal tissues, we identified 12 liver-specific genes and found two of them, ANGPTL3 and CFHR5 , were unexpressed in microdissected primary colorectal tumors without metastasis but expressed in both microdissected liver metastases and corresponding primary colorectal tumors (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.05). Genes co-expressed with ANGPTL3 and CFHR5 were significantly enriched in metabolism pathways characterizing liver tissues, including "starch and sucrose metabolism" and "drug metabolism-cytochrome P450". Conclusions: For primary CRC with liver metastasis, both the liver metastases and corresponding primary colorectal tumors may express some liver-specific genes which may help the tumor cells adapt the liver micro-environment.

  20. Clamp-crushing vs. radiofrequency-assisted liver resection:changes in liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Palibrk, Ivan; Milicic, Biljana; Stojiljkovic, Ljuba; Manojlovic, Nebojsa; Dugalic, Vladimir; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Kalezic, Nevena; Zuvela, Marinko; Milicevic, Miroslav

    2012-05-01

    Liver resection is the gold standard in managing patients with metastatic or primary liver cancer. The aim of our study was to compare the traditional clamp-crushing technique to the radiofrequency- assisted liver resection technique in terms of postoperative liver function. Liver function was evaluated preoperatively and on postoperative days 3 and 7. Liver synthetic function parameters (serum albumin level, prothrombin time and international normalized ratio), markers of hepatic injury and necrosis (serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin level) and microsomal activity (quantitative lidocaine test) were compared. Forty three patients completed the study (14 had clamp-crushing and 29 had radiofrequency assisted liver resection). The groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, pre-operative liver function, operative time and perioperative transfusion rate. In postoperative period, there were similar changes in monitored parameters in both groups except albumin levels, that were higher in radiofrequency-assisted liver resection group (p=0.047). Both, traditional clamp-crushing technique and radiofrequency assisted liver resection technique, result in similar postoperative changes of most monitored liver function parameters.

  1. Impact of Estimated Liver Volume and Liver Weight on Gender Disparity in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Emre, Sukru H.; Magder, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES While lower Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores due to lower levels of serum creatinine in women might account for some gender disparity in liver transplant (LT) rates, even within MELD scores, women are transplanted at lower rates than men. It is unclear what causes this disparity, but transplant candidate-donor liver size mismatch may be a factor. METHODS We analyzed Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data for patients with end-stage liver disease on the waiting list. Pooled conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between gender and LT and determine the degree to which this association was explained by lower MELD scores or liver size. RESULTS A total of 28,866 patients and 424,001 person-months were included in the analysis. Median estimated liver volume (eLV) and liver weight (eLW) were significantly lower in women than in men on the LT waiting list (P<0.0001). Controlling for region and blood type, women were 25% less likely to receive LT in a given month compared to men (P<0.0001). When MELD was included in the model, the odds ratio (OR) for gender increased to 0.84 suggesting that 9 percentage points of the 25% gender disparity was due to MELD score. When eLV was added to the model, there was an additional 3% increase in OR of gender suggesting that transplant candidate-donor liver size mismatch is an underlying factor for lower LT rates in women compared to men (OR=0.87, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Lower LT rates among women on the waiting list can be explained in part by lower MELD scores, eLV and eLW than those of men. However; at least half of the gender disparity still remains unexplained. PMID:23008117

  2. Alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 100,000 deaths are attributed to alcohol abuse each year. In 2009, the World Health Organization listed alcohol use as one of the leading causes of the global burden of disease and injury. Alcoholic liver disease, a direct result of chronic alcohol abuse, insidiously destroys the normal functions of the liver. The end result of the disease, cirrhosis, culminates in a dysfunctional and diffusely scarred liver. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, imaging considerations, and treatment of alcoholic liver disease and cirrhosis. Normal liver function, liver hemodynamics, the disease of alcoholism, and the deleterious effects of alcohol also are reviewed.

  3. Review fantastic medical implications of 3D-printing in liver surgeries, liver regeneration, liver transplantation and drug hepatotoxicity testing: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Xiong, Nan-Yan; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Hu, Jin-Tian; Kong, De-Cheng; Yuan, Jiang-Yong

    2018-06-07

    The epidemiological trend in liver diseases becomes more serious worldwide. Several recent articles published by International Journal of Surgery in 2018 particularly emphasized the encouraging clinical benefits of hepatectomy, liver regeneration and liver transplantation, however, there are still many technical bottlenecks underlying these therapeutic approaches. Remarkably, a few preliminary studies have shown some clues to the role of three-dimensional (3D) printing in improving traditional therapy for liver diseases. Here, we concisely elucidated the curative applications of 3D-printing (no cells) and 3D Bio-printing (with hepatic cells), such as 3D-printed patient-specific liver models and devices for medical education, surgical simulation, hepatectomy and liver transplantation, 3D Bio-printed hepatic constructs for liver regeneration and artificial liver, 3D-printed liver tissues for evaluating drug's hepatotoxicity, and so on. Briefly, 3D-printed liver models and bioactive tissues may facilitate a lot of key steps to cure liver disorders, predictably bringing promising clinical benefits. This work further provides novel insights into facilitating treatment of hepatic carcinoma, promoting liver regeneration both in vivo and in vitro, expanding transplantable liver resources, maximizing therapeutic efficacy as well as minimizing surgical complications, medical hepatotoxicity, operational time, economic costs, etc. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  5. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Hepatitis D Hepatitis E Hepatitis G Liver cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver ...

  6. Perioperative liver and spleen elastography in patients without chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Sam; Borsiin, Hanna; Öberg, Carl-Fredrik; Brange, Hannes; Mijovic, Zoran; Sturesson, Christian

    2018-02-27

    To investigate changes in hepatic and splenic stiffness in patients without chronic liver disease during liver resection for hepatic tumors. Patients scheduled for liver resection for hepatic tumors were considered for enrollment. Tissue stiffness measurements on liver and spleen were conducted before and two days after liver resection using point shear-wave elastography. Histological analysis of the resected liver specimen was conducted in all patients and patients with marked liver fibrosis were excluded from further study analysis. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of resection and whether they had received preoperative chemotherapy or not. The relation between tissue stiffness and postoperative biochemistry was investigated. Results are presented as median (interquartile range). 35 patients were included. The liver stiffness increased in patients undergoing a major resection from 1.41 (1.24-1.63) m/s to 2.20 (1.72-2.44) m/s ( P = 0.001). No change in liver stiffness in patients undergoing a minor resection was found [1.31 (1.15-1.52) m/s vs 1.37 (1.12-1.77) m/s, P = 0.438]. A major resection resulted in a 16% (7%-33%) increase in spleen stiffness, more ( P = 0.047) than after a minor resection [2 (-1-13) %]. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy ( n = 20) did not differ from others in preoperative right liver lobe [1.31 (1.16-1.50) vs 1.38 (1.12-1.56) m/s, P = 0.569] or spleen [2.79 (2.33-3.11) vs 2.71 (2.37-2.86) m/s, P = 0.515] stiffness. Remnant liver stiffness on the second postoperative day did not show strong correlations with maximum postoperative increase in bilirubin ( R 2 = 0.154, Pearson's r = 0.392, P = 0.032) and international normalized ratio ( R 2 = 0.285, Pearson's r = 0.534, P = 0.003). Liver and spleen stiffness increase after a major liver resection for hepatic tumors in patients without chronic liver disease.

  7. Perioperative liver and spleen elastography in patients without chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sam; Borsiin, Hanna; Öberg, Carl-Fredrik; Brange, Hannes; Mijovic, Zoran; Sturesson, Christian

    2018-01-01

    AIM To investigate changes in hepatic and splenic stiffness in patients without chronic liver disease during liver resection for hepatic tumors. METHODS Patients scheduled for liver resection for hepatic tumors were considered for enrollment. Tissue stiffness measurements on liver and spleen were conducted before and two days after liver resection using point shear-wave elastography. Histological analysis of the resected liver specimen was conducted in all patients and patients with marked liver fibrosis were excluded from further study analysis. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of resection and whether they had received preoperative chemotherapy or not. The relation between tissue stiffness and postoperative biochemistry was investigated. RESULTS Results are presented as median (interquartile range). 35 patients were included. The liver stiffness increased in patients undergoing a major resection from 1.41 (1.24-1.63) m/s to 2.20 (1.72-2.44) m/s (P = 0.001). No change in liver stiffness in patients undergoing a minor resection was found [1.31 (1.15-1.52) m/s vs 1.37 (1.12-1.77) m/s, P = 0.438]. A major resection resulted in a 16% (7%-33%) increase in spleen stiffness, more (P = 0.047) than after a minor resection [2 (-1-13) %]. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy (n = 20) did not differ from others in preoperative right liver lobe [1.31 (1.16-1.50) vs 1.38 (1.12-1.56) m/s, P = 0.569] or spleen [2.79 (2.33-3.11) vs 2.71 (2.37-2.86) m/s, P = 0.515] stiffness. Remnant liver stiffness on the second postoperative day did not show strong correlations with maximum postoperative increase in bilirubin (R2 = 0.154, Pearson’s r = 0.392, P = 0.032) and international normalized ratio (R2 = 0.285, Pearson’s r = 0.534, P = 0.003). CONCLUSION Liver and spleen stiffness increase after a major liver resection for hepatic tumors in patients without chronic liver disease. PMID:29492187

  8. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Kukuk, Guido M; Schaefer, Stephanie G; Fimmers, Rolf; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R; Ezziddin, Samer; Spengler, Ulrich; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a

  9. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Perla Oliveira; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Nascimento, Maria de Fátima Araújo; Vieira, Andrea; Ribeiro, Mauricio Alves; David, André Ibrahim; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver cancer, and NAFLD prevalence in different liver tumors. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of the clinical, laboratory and histological data of 120 patients diagnosed with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms and treated at a tertiary center where they underwent hepatic resection and/or liver transplantation, with subsequent evaluation of the explant or liver biopsy. The following criteria were used to exclude patients from the study: a history of alcohol abuse, hepatitis B or C infection, no tumor detected in the liver tissue examined by histological analysis, and the presence of chronic autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, or hepatoblastoma. The occurrence of NAFLD and the association with its known risk factors were studied. The risk factors considered were diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, body mass index, dyslipidemia, and arterial hypertension. Presence of reticulin fibers in the hepatic neoplasms was assessed by histological analysis using slide-mounted specimens stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or Masson’s trichrome and silver impregnation. Analysis of tumor-free liver parenchyma was carried out to determine the association between NAFLD and its histological grade. RESULTS: No difference was found in the association of NAFLD with the general population (34.2% and 30.0% respectively, 95%CI: 25.8-43.4). Evaluation by cancer type showed that NAFLD was more prevalent in patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 3.99, 95%CI: 1.78-8.94, P < 0.001 vs OR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.18-2.01, P = 0.406 and OR = 0.70, 95%CI: 0.18-2.80, P = 0.613, respectively). There was a higher prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.50, 95%CI: 1.06-11.57, P = 0.032). Evaluation of the

  10. Genererating a core cluster of Fasciola hepatica virulence and immunomodulation-related genes using a comparative in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Haçarız, Orçun; Sayers, Gearóid P

    2018-04-01

    A total of 71 virulence and immunomodulation-related transcripts (VIRs) of Fasciola hepatica have been previously proposed (Haçarız et al., 2015). In an attempt to further refine this cohort, an in silico meta analysis approach was carried out using publicly available sequence data of related liver flukes, Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Data of both liver flukes were investigated in terms of sequential homology with data of non-parasitic organisms, pathogens and VIRs of F. hepatica, directional selection (Ka/Ks), and cytokine signaling relation (protein motif based). Some VIRs of F. hepatica [showing homology with immune receptors (for toll/interleukin-1, TGF-β or TNF-α), TGF-β, TNF-α, CD147, or relation with suppressors of cytokine signaling/IKBKE 1 or stimulation of TGF-β (through thrombospondin similarity)] were found to be orthologous with those of both C. sinensis and O. viverrini. The in silico analysis indicates that on the basis of genetic commonality, a total of 30 VIRs of F. hepatica are highlighted as of foremost importance in the parasite evasion strategy, through controlling of host immune system. Findings in this study could be important to further enhance our understanding of the parasitic mechanisms and develop effective control strategies against F. hepatica and other related parasites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Liver and sport].

    PubMed

    Watelet, J

    2008-11-01

    The liver is a vital organ and plays a central role in energy exchange, protein synthesis as well as the elimination of waste products from the body. Acute and chronic injury may disturb a variety of liver functions to different degrees. Over the last three decades, the effects of physical activity and competitive sport on the liver have been described by various investigators. These include viral hepatitis and drug-induced liver disorders. Herein, we review acute and chronic liver diseases potentially caused by sport. Team physicians, trainers and others, responsible for the health of athletes, should be familiar with the risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of liver diseases that occur in sports.

  12. Liver anatomy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Misih, Sherif R Z; Bloomston, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Understanding the complexities of the liver has been a long-standing challenge to physicians and anatomists. Significant strides in the understanding of hepatic anatomy have facilitated major progress in liver-directed therapies--surgical interventions, such as transplantation, hepatic resection, hepatic artery infusion pumps, and hepatic ablation, and interventional radiologic procedures, such as transarterial chemoembolization, selective internal radiation therapy, and portal vein embolization. Without understanding hepatic anatomy, such progressive interventions would not be feasible. This article reviews the history, general anatomy, and the classification schemes of liver anatomy and their relevance to liver-directed therapies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Akt in Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Santel, Ansgar; Ribera, Jordi; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2017-02-01

    The liver is continuously exposed to diverse insults, which may culminate in pathological processes causing liver disease. An effective therapeutic strategy for chronic liver disease should control the causal factors of the disease and stimulate functional liver regeneration. Preclinical studies have shown that interventions aimed at maintaining Akt activity in a dysfunctional liver meet most of the criteria. Although the central function of Akt is cell survival, other cellular aspects such as glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, cell-cycle progression, and lipid metabolism have been shown to be prominent functions of Akt in the context of hepatic physiology. In this review, the authors describe the benefits of the Akt signaling pathway, emphasizing its importance in coordinating proper cellular growth and differentiation during liver regeneration, hepatic function, and liver disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The normal functioning of brain is intimately as well as intricately interrelated with normal functioning of the liver. Liver plays a critical role of not only providing vital nutrients to the brain but also of detoxifying the splanchnic blood. Compromised liver function leads to insufficient detoxification thus allowing neurotoxins (such as ammonia, manganese, and other chemicals) to enter the cerebral circulation. In addition, portosystemic shunts, which are common accompaniments of advanced liver disease, facilitate free passage of neurotoxins into the cerebral circulation. The problem is compounded further by additional variables such as gastrointestinal tract bleeding, malnutrition, and concurrent renal failure, which are often associated with liver cirrhosis. Neurologic damage in chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis seems to be multifactorial primarily attributable to the following: brain accumulation of ammonia, manganese, and lactate; altered permeability of the blood-brain barrier; recruitment of monocytes after microglial activation; and neuroinflammation, that is, direct effects of circulating systemic proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, IL-1β, and IL-6. Radiologist should be aware of the conundrum of neurologic complications that can be encountered in liver disease, which include hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocerebral degeneration, hepatic myelopathy, cirrhosis-related parkinsonism, cerebral infections, hemorrhage, and osmotic demyelination. In addition, neurologic complications can be exclusive to certain disorders, for example, Wilson disease, alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, etc). Radiologist should be aware of their varied clinical presentation and radiological appearances as the diagnosis is not always straightforward. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Orchestrating liver development.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Miriam; Evans, Todd; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2015-06-15

    The liver is a central regulator of metabolism, and liver failure thus constitutes a major health burden. Understanding how this complex organ develops during embryogenesis will yield insights into how liver regeneration can be promoted and how functional liver replacement tissue can be engineered. Recent studies of animal models have identified key signaling pathways and complex tissue interactions that progressively generate liver progenitor cells, differentiated lineages and functional tissues. In addition, progress in understanding how these cells interact, and how transcriptional and signaling programs precisely coordinate liver development, has begun to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this complexity. Here, we review the lineage relationships, signaling pathways and transcriptional programs that orchestrate hepatogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Effect of airplane transport of donor livers on post-liver transplantation survival

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; MacQuillan, Gerry; Adams, Leon A; Garas, George; Collins, Megan; Nwaba, Albert; Mou, Linjun; Bulsara, Max K; Delriviere, Luc; Jeffrey, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of long haul airplane transport of donor livers on post-transplant outcomes. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of patients who received a liver transplantation was performed in Perth, Australia from 1992 to 2012. Donor and recipient characteristics information were extracted from Western Australian liver transplantation service database. Patients were followed up for a mean of six years. Patient and graft survival were evaluated and compared between patients who received a local donor liver and those who received an airplane transported donor liver. Predictors of survival were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using cox regression. RESULTS One hundred and ninety-three patients received a local donor liver and 93 patients received an airplane transported donor liver. Airplane transported livers had a significantly lower alanine transaminase (mean: 45 U/L vs 84 U/L, P = 0.035), higher donor risk index (mean: 1.88 vs 1.42, P < 0.001) and longer cold ischemic time (CIT) (mean: 10.1 h vs 6.4 h, P < 0.001). There was a weak correlation between CIT and transport distance (r2 = 0.29, P < 0.001). Mean follow up was six years and 93 patients had graft failure. Multivariate analysis found only airplane transport retained significance for graft loss (HR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.16-3.17). One year graft survival was 0.88 for those with a local liver and was 0.71 for those with an airplane transported liver. One year graft loss was due to primary graft non-function or associated with preservation injury in 20.8% of recipients of an airplane transported liver compared with 4.6% in those with a local liver (P = 0.027). CONCLUSION Airplane transport of donor livers was independently associated with reduced graft survival following liver transplantation. PMID:27895402

  17. Effect of airplane transport of donor livers on post-liver transplantation survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; MacQuillan, Gerry; Adams, Leon A; Garas, George; Collins, Megan; Nwaba, Albert; Mou, Linjun; Bulsara, Max K; Delriviere, Luc; Jeffrey, Gary P

    2016-11-07

    To evaluate the effect of long haul airplane transport of donor livers on post-transplant outcomes. A retrospective cohort study of patients who received a liver transplantation was performed in Perth, Australia from 1992 to 2012. Donor and recipient characteristics information were extracted from Western Australian liver transplantation service database. Patients were followed up for a mean of six years. Patient and graft survival were evaluated and compared between patients who received a local donor liver and those who received an airplane transported donor liver. Predictors of survival were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using cox regression. One hundred and ninety-three patients received a local donor liver and 93 patients received an airplane transported donor liver. Airplane transported livers had a significantly lower alanine transaminase (mean: 45 U/L vs 84 U/L, P = 0.035), higher donor risk index (mean: 1.88 vs 1.42, P < 0.001) and longer cold ischemic time (CIT) (mean: 10.1 h vs 6.4 h, P < 0.001). There was a weak correlation between CIT and transport distance ( r 2 = 0.29, P < 0.001). Mean follow up was six years and 93 patients had graft failure. Multivariate analysis found only airplane transport retained significance for graft loss (HR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.16-3.17). One year graft survival was 0.88 for those with a local liver and was 0.71 for those with an airplane transported liver. One year graft loss was due to primary graft non-function or associated with preservation injury in 20.8% of recipients of an airplane transported liver compared with 4.6% in those with a local liver ( P = 0.027). Airplane transport of donor livers was independently associated with reduced graft survival following liver transplantation.

  18. Antioxidants in liver health

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Grajales, Sael; Muriel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are a worldwide medical problem because the liver is the principal detoxifying organ and maintains metabolic homeostasis. The liver metabolizes various compounds that produce free radicals (FR). However, antioxidants scavenge FR and maintain the oxidative/antioxidative balance in the liver. When the liver oxidative/antioxidative balance is disrupted, the state is termed oxidative stress. Oxidative stress leads to deleterious processes in the liver and produces liver diseases. Therefore, restoring antioxidants is essential to maintain homeostasis. One method of restoring antioxidants is to consume natural compounds with antioxidant capacity. The objective of this review is to provide information pertaining to various antioxidants found in food that have demonstrated utility in improving liver diseases. PMID:26261734

  19. Resolution of donor non-alcoholic fatty liver disease following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Posner, Andrew D; Sultan, Samuel T; Zaghloul, Norann A; Twaddell, William S; Bruno, David A; Hanish, Steven I; Hutson, William R; Hebert, Laci; Barth, Rolf N; LaMattina, John C

    2017-09-01

    Transplant surgeons conventionally select against livers displaying high degrees (>30%) of macrosteatosis (MaS), out of concern for primary non-function or severe graft dysfunction. As such, there is relatively limited experience with such livers, and the natural history remains incompletely characterized. We present our experience of transplanted livers with high degrees of MaS and microsteatosis (MiS), with a focus on the histopathologic and clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine cases were identified with liver biopsies available from both the donor and the corresponding liver transplant recipient. Donor liver biopsies displayed either MaS or MiS ≥15%, while all recipients received postoperative liver biopsies for cause. The mean donor MaS and MiS were 15.6% (range 0%-60%) and 41.3% (7.5%-97.5%), respectively. MaS decreased significantly from donor (M=15.6%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=0.86%), P<.001. Similarly, MiS decreased significantly from donor biopsies (M=41.3%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=1.8%), P<.001. At a median of 68 days postoperatively (range 4-384), full resolution of MaS and MiS was observed in 27 of 29 recipients. High degrees of MaS and MiS in donor livers resolve in recipients following liver transplantation. Further insight into the mechanisms responsible for treating fatty liver diseases could translate into therapeutic targets. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients' survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Liver regeneration in donors and adult recipients after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Haga, Junko; Shimazu, Motohide; Wakabayashi, Go; Tanabe, Minoru; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Hoshino, Ken; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-12-01

    In living donor liver transplantation, the safety of the donor operation is the highest priority. The introduction of the right lobe graft was late because of concerns about donor safety. We investigated donor liver regeneration by the types of resected segments as well as recipients to assess that appropriate regeneration was occurring. Eighty-seven donors were classified into 3 groups: left lateral section donors, left lobe donors, and right lobe donors. Forty-seven adult recipients were classified as either left or right lobe grafted recipients. Volumetry was retrospectively performed at 1 week, 1, 2, 3, and 6 months, and 1 year after the operation. In the right lobe donor group, the remnant liver volume was 45.4%, and it rapidly increased to 68.9% at 1 month and 89.8% at 6 months. At 6 months, the regeneration ratios were almost the same in all donor groups. The recipient liver volume increased rapidly until 2 months, exceeding the standard liver volume, and then gradually decreased to 90% of the standard liver volume. Livers of the right lobe donor group regenerated fastest in the donor groups, and the recipient liver regenerated faster than the donor liver. Analyzing liver regeneration many times with a large number of donors enabled us to understand the normal liver regeneration pattern. Although the donor livers did not reach their initial volume, the donors showed normal liver function at 1 year. The donors have returned to their normal daily activities. Donor hepatectomy, even right hepatectomy, can be safely performed with accurate preoperative volumetry and careful decision-making concerning graft-type selection.

  2. Left Lobe Auxiliary Liver Transplantation for End-stage Hepatitis B Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-F; Chen, X-P; Chen, Z-S; Wei, L; Dong, S-L; Guo, H; Jiang, J-P; Teng, W-H; Huang, Z-Y; Zhang, W-G

    2017-06-01

    Auxiliary liver transplantation (ALT) for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis previously showed poor results, because the native liver was a significant source of HBV recurrence and the graft could be rapidly destroyed by HBV infection in an immunosuppressive condition. Four patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis were unable to undergo orthotopic liver transplantation because the only available grafts of left lobe were too small. Under entecavir-based anti-HBV treatment, they underwent ALT in which the recipient left liver was removed and the small left lobe graft was implanted in the corresponding space. The mean graft weight/recipient weight was 0.49% (range, 0.38%-0.55%). One year after transplantation, the graft sizes were increased to 273% and the remnant livers were decreased to 44%. Serum HBV DNA was persistently undetectable. Periodic graft biopsy showed no signs of tissue injury and negative immunostaining for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen. After a mean follow-up period of 21 months, all patients live well with normal graft function. Our study suggests that ALT for HBV-related liver cirrhosis is feasible under entecavir-based anti-HBV treatment. Successful application of small left livers in end-stage liver cirrhosis may significantly increase the pool of left liver grafts for adult patients. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many possible causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  4. Fatty Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatty liver disease that is not related to heavy alcohol use. There are two kinds: Simple fatty ... disease? Alcoholic fatty liver disease is due to heavy alcohol use. Your liver breaks down most of ...

  5. American Liver Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Helpful Links Liver Cancer Information Available in Chinese Learn more about liver cancer HERE . Thanks to ... in Northern California, you can speak to a Chinese speaking agent with your liver cancer questions. Call ...

  6. Magnetic resonance elastography is as accurate as liver biopsy for liver fibrosis staging.

    PubMed

    Morisaka, Hiroyuki; Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Tadao; Kondo, Tetsuo; Funayama, Satoshi; Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Liver MR elastography (MRE) is available for the noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis; however, no previous studies have compared the diagnostic ability of MRE with that of liver biopsy. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of liver fibrosis staging between MRE-based methods and liver biopsy using the resected liver specimens as the reference standard. A retrospective study at a single institution. In all, 200 patients who underwent preoperative MRE and subsequent surgical liver resection were included in this study. Data from 80 patients were used to estimate cutoff and distributions of liver stiffness values measured by MRE for each liver fibrosis stage (F0-F4, METAVIR system). In the remaining 120 patients, liver biopsy specimens were obtained from the resected liver tissues using a standard biopsy needle. 2D liver MRE with gradient-echo based sequence on a 1.5 or 3T scanner was used. Two radiologists independently measured the liver stiffness value on MRE and two types of MRE-based methods (threshold and Bayesian prediction method) were applied. Two pathologists evaluated all biopsy samples independently to stage liver fibrosis. Surgically resected whole tissue specimens were used as the reference standard. The accuracy for liver fibrosis staging was compared between liver biopsy and MRE-based methods with a modified McNemar's test. Accurate fibrosis staging was achieved in 53.3% (64/120) and 59.1% (71/120) of patients using MRE with threshold and Bayesian methods, respectively, and in 51.6% (62/120) with liver biopsy. Accuracies of MRE-based methods for diagnoses of ≥F2 (90-91% [108-9/120]), ≥F3 (79-81% [95-97/120]), and F4 (82-85% [98-102/120]) were statistically equivalent to those of liver biopsy (≥F2, 79% [95/120], P ≤ 0.01; ≥F3, 88% [105/120], P ≤ 0.006; and F4, 82% [99/120], P ≤ 0.017). MRE can be an alternative to liver biopsy for fibrosis staging. 3. Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1268-1275. © 2017

  7. An evaluation of sampling methods and supporting techniques for tackling lead in drinking water in Aberta Province

    EPA Science Inventory

    A collaborative project commenced in August 2013 with the aim of demonstrating a range of techniques that can be used in tackling the problems of lead in drinking water. The main project was completed in March 2014, with supplementary sampling exercises in mid-2014. It involved t...

  8. Can Smoking Cessation Services Be Better Targeted to Tackle Health Inequalities? Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how smoking cessation services could be more effectively targeted to tackle socioeconomic inequalities in health. Design: Secondary analysis of data from a household interview survey undertaken for Middlesbrough Council in north east England using the technique of Qualitative Comparative Analysis. Setting: Home-based…

  9. Bioartificial liver: current status.

    PubMed

    Pless, G; Sauer, I M

    2005-11-01

    Liver failure remains a life-threatening syndrome. With the growing disparity between the number of suitable donor organs and the number of patients awaiting transplantation, efforts have been made to optimize the allocation of organs, to find alternatives to cadaveric liver transplantation, and to develop extracorporeal methods to support or replace the function of the failing organ. An extracorporeal liver support system has to provide the main functions of the liver: detoxification, synthesis, and regulation. The understanding that the critical issue of the clinical syndrome in liver failure is the accumulation of toxins not cleared by the failing liver led to the development of artificial filtration and adsorption devices (artificial liver support). Based on this hypothesis, the removal of lipophilic, albumin-bound substances, such as bilirubin, bile acids, metabolites of aromatic amino acids, medium-chain fatty acids, and cytokines, should be beneficial to the clinical course of a patient in liver failure. Artificial detoxification devices currently under clinical evaluation include the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS), Single-Pass Albumin Dialysis (SPAD), and the Prometheus system. The complex tasks of regulation and synthesis remain to be addressed by the use of liver cells (bioartificial liver support). The Extracorporeal Liver Assist Device (ELAD), HepatAssist, Modular Extracorporeal Liver Support system (MELS), and the Amsterdam Medical Center Bioartificial Liver (AMC-BAL) are bioartificial systems. This article gives a brief overview on these artificial and bioartificial devices and discusses remaining obstacles.

  10. Three new species of blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) infecting pufferfishes (Teleostei: Tetraodontidae) from off Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yong, R Q-Y; Cutmore, S C; Bray, R A; Miller, T L; Semarariana, I W Y; Palm, H W; Cribb, T H

    2016-10-01

    We describe three new species of blood flukes (Aporocotylidae) and propose their classification within the genus Psettarium Goto & Ozaki, 1929. All three species were collected from the circulatory systems of pufferfishes caught off Bali, central Indonesia. Psettarium pulchellum n. sp. was found in the gills of both the narrow-lined puffer (Arothron manilensis de Procé) and the spiny blaasop (Tylerius spinosissimus Regan), while P. ogawai n. sp. and P. jimbaranense n. sp. were found in the gills of the reticulated puffer (Arothron reticularis Bloch & Schneider). The morphological characteristics of these taxa necessitated emendation of the diagnosis for the genus Psettarium, to accommodate the presence of an oral sucker, multiple or entirely post-caecal testes and a degenerate posterior testis. Features such as proportion of body length occupied by the oesophagus, and posterior caeca being ≥7× the length of anterior caeca, are no longer regarded as useful genus-level characters. Additionally, Sasala nolani is reassigned to this genus as Psettarium nolani n. comb. In phylogenetic analyses of the 28S and ITS2 rDNA regions, all three new taxa form a well-supported clade, together with Psettarium sinense and Psettarium nolani n. comb., the two other species of tetraodontid-infecting aporocotylids for which comparative rDNA data were available. The short branch lengths within this clade, despite dramatic morphological differences between the five species, suggest that rapid morphological diversification has occurred among the tetraodontid-infecting aporocotylids. The genus Psettarium has long been considered problematic. Further commentary is given on the history of this genus and how the issues presented might be resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Industry Responsibilities in Tackling Direct-to-Consumer Marketing of Unproven Stem Cell Treatments.

    PubMed

    Master, Z; Fu, W; Paciulli, D; Sipp, D

    2017-08-01

    The direct-to-consumer marketing of unproven stem cell interventions (SCIs) is a serious public health concern. Regulations and education have had modest impact, indicating that different actors must play a role to stop this unfettered market. We consider the role of the biotech industry in tackling unproven SCIs. Grounded in the concept of corporate social responsibility, we argue that biotech companies should screen consumers to ensure that products and services are being used appropriately and educate employees about unproven SCIs. © 2017 ASCPT.

  12. Tackling unsafe abortion in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Nyong'o, D; Oodit, G

    1996-01-01

    Despite a contraceptive prevalence rate of 75% Mauritius has a high incidence of unsafe abortions because of unprotected intercourse experienced by many young women in a rapidly industrializing environment. The Mauritius Family Planning Association (MFPA) tackled the issue of unsafe abortion in 1993. Abortion is illegal in the country, and the Catholic Church also strongly opposes modern family planning methods, thus the use of withdrawal and/or calendar methods have been increasing. The MFPA organized an advocacy symposium in 1993 on unsafe abortion with the result of revealing the pressure the Church was exerting relative to abortion and contraceptives. The advocacy campaign of the MFPA consists of having abortion legalized on health grounds and improving family planning services, especially for young unmarried women and men. The full support of the media was secured on the abortion issue: articles appeared, meetings were attended by the press, and public relations support was also received from them. The MFPA worked closely with parliamentarians. A motion was tabled in 1994 in the National Assembly which called for legalization of abortion on health grounds, but the Church squelched its debate. In March 1994 MFPA hosted the IPPF African Regional Conference on Unsafe Abortion in Mauritius with the participation of over 100 representatives from 20 countries, and subsequently a second motion was tabled without parliamentary debate. The deliberations were covered by the media and the Ministry of Women's Rights recognized abortion as an urgent issue as outlined in a white paper prepared for the Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing in 1995. The campaign changed the policy climate favorably making the public more conscious of unsafe abortion. The Ministry of Health decided to collect more data and the newly elected government seems to be more open about this issue.

  13. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    PubMed

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors < 60 years, and DCD donors < 50 years of age. Between January 2002 and December 2014, 52,271 liver transplants were performed in the United States. Of these, 41,181 (78.8%) underwent transplantation with livers from DBD donors of age < 60 years, 8905 (17.0%) from DBD donors ≥ 60 years old, and 2195 (4.2%) livers from DCD donors < 50 years of age. DCD livers of age < 50 years with < 6 hours of cold ischemia time (CIT) had superior graft survival when compared with DBD livers ≥ age 60 years (P < 0.001). In 2014, there were 133 discarded DCD livers; of these, 111 (83.4%) were from donors < age 50 years old. Young DCD donor livers (age < 50 years old) with short CITs yield results better than that seen with DBD livers > 60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Feasibility of using marginal liver grafts in living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Ke-Fei; Liu, Fei; Wei, Yong-Gang; Li, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is one of the most effective treatments for end-stage liver disease caused by related risk factors when liver resection is contraindicated. Additionally, despite the decrease in the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) over the past two decades, the absolute number of HBsAg-positive people has increased, leading to an increase in HBV-related liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Consequently, a large demand exists for LT. While the wait time for patients on the donor list is, to some degree, shorter due to the development of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), there is still a shortage of liver grafts. Furthermore, recipients often suffer from emergent conditions, such as liver dysfunction or even hepatic encephalopathy, which can lead to a limited choice in grafts. To expand the pool of available liver grafts, one option is the use of organs that were previously considered “unusable” by many, which are often labeled “marginal” organs. Many previous studies have reported on the possibilities of using marginal grafts in orthotopic LT; however, there is still a lack of discussion on this topic, especially regarding the feasibility of using marginal grafts in LDLT. Therefore, the present review aimed to summarize the feasibility of using marginal liver grafts for LDLT and discuss the possibility of expanding the application of these grafts. PMID:29930466

  15. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Liver function tests are common tests that are used to see how well the liver is working. Tests include: ... E, Bowne WB, Bluth MH. Evaluation of liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  16. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  17. Augmenter of Liver Regeneration (alr) Promotes Liver Outgrowth during Zebrafish Hepatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Farooq, Muhammad; Sheng, Donglai; Chandramouli, Chanchal; Lan, Tian; Mahajan, Nilesh K.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Hong, Yunhan; Lisowsky, Thomas; Ge, Ruowen

    2012-01-01

    Augmenter of Liver Regeneration (ALR) is a sulfhydryl oxidase carrying out fundamental functions facilitating protein disulfide bond formation. In mammals, it also functions as a hepatotrophic growth factor that specifically stimulates hepatocyte proliferation and promotes liver regeneration after liver damage or partial hepatectomy. Whether ALR also plays a role during vertebrate hepatogenesis is unknown. In this work, we investigated the function of alr in liver organogenesis in zebrafish model. We showed that alr is expressed in liver throughout hepatogenesis. Knockdown of alr through morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO) leads to suppression of liver outgrowth while overexpression of alr promotes liver growth. The small-liver phenotype in alr morphants results from a reduction of hepatocyte proliferation without affecting apoptosis. When expressed in cultured cells, zebrafish Alr exists as dimer and is localized in mitochondria as well as cytosol but not in nucleus or secreted outside of the cell. Similar to mammalian ALR, zebrafish Alr is a flavin-linked sulfhydryl oxidase and mutation of the conserved cysteine in the CxxC motif abolishes its enzymatic activity. Interestingly, overexpression of either wild type Alr or enzyme-inactive AlrC131S mutant promoted liver growth and rescued the liver growth defect of alr morphants. Nevertheless, alr C131S is less efficacious in both functions. Meantime, high doses of alr MOs lead to widespread developmental defects and early embryonic death in an alr sequence-dependent manner. These results suggest that alr promotes zebrafish liver outgrowth using mechanisms that are dependent as well as independent of its sulfhydryl oxidase activity. This is the first demonstration of a developmental role of alr in vertebrate. It exemplifies that a low-level sulfhydryl oxidase activity of Alr is essential for embryonic development and cellular survival. The dose-dependent and partial suppression of alr expression through MO

  18. A Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model for Liver Transporter Substrates Under Liver Cirrhosis Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Barton, HA; Maurer, TS

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a disease characterized by the loss of functional liver mass. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to interpret and predict how the interplay among physiological changes in cirrhosis affects pharmacokinetics. However, previous PBPK models under cirrhotic conditions were developed for permeable cytochrome P450 substrates and do not directly apply to substrates of liver transporters. This study characterizes a PBPK model for liver transporter substrates in relation to the severity of liver cirrhosis. A published PBPK model structure for liver transporter substrates under healthy conditions and the physiological changes for cirrhosis are combined to simulate pharmacokinetics of liver transporter substrates in patients with mild and moderate cirrhosis. The simulated pharmacokinetics under liver cirrhosis reasonably approximate observations. This analysis includes meta-analysis to obtain system-dependent parameters in cirrhosis patients and a top-down approach to improve understanding of the effect of cirrhosis on transporter-mediated drug disposition under cirrhotic conditions. PMID:26225262

  19. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) ... kidneys ) is working. What Is a Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel? A liver function panel is a blood ...

  20. Tackling maize fusariosis: in search of Fusarium graminearum biosuppressors.

    PubMed

    Adeniji, Adetomiwa Ayodele; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2018-06-22

    This review presents biocontrol agents employed to alleviate the deleterious effect of the pathogen Fusarium graminearum on maize. The control of this mycotoxigenic phytopathogen remains elusive despite the elaborate research conducted on its detection, identification, and molecular fingerprinting. This could be attributed to the fact that in vitro and greenhouse biocontrol studies on F. graminearum have exceeded the number of field studies done. Furthermore, along with the variances seen among these F. graminearum suppressing biocontrol strains, it is also clear that the majority of research done to tackle F. graminearum outbreaks was on wheat and barley cultivars. Most fusariosis management related to maize targeted other members of Fusarium such as Fusarium verticillioides, with biocontrol strains from the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas being used frequently in the experiments. We highlight relevant current techniques needed to identify an effective biofungicide for maize fusariosis and recommend alternative approaches to reduce the scarcity of data for indigenous maize field trials.

  1. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola gigantica from western Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kei; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Allamanda, Puttik; Wibowo, Putut Eko; Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Sodirun; Guswanto, Azirwan; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Fasciola gigantica and aspermic (hybrid) Fasciola flukes are thought to be distributed in Southeast Asian countries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the distribution of these flukes from unidentified ruminants in western Java, Indonesia, and to determine their distribution history into the area. Sixty Fasciola flukes from western Java were identified as F. gigantica based on the nucleotide sequences of the nuclear phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold) genes. The flukes were then analyzed phylogenetically based on the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene, together with Fasciola flukes from other Asian countries. All but one F. gigantica fluke were classified in F. gigantica haplogroup C, which mainly contains nad1 haplotypes detected in flukes from Thailand, Vietnam, and China. A population genetic analysis suggested that haplogroup C spread from Thailand to the neighboring countries including Indonesia together with domestic ruminants, such as the swamp buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. The swamp buffalo is one of the important definitive hosts of Fasciola flukes in Indonesia, and is considered to have been domesticated in the north of Thailand. The remaining one fluke displayed a novel nad1 haplotype that has never been detected in the reference countries. Therefore, the origin of the fluke could not be established. No hybrid Fasciola flukes were detected in this study, in contrast to neighboring Asian countries. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Liver-fat and liver-function indices derived from Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI for prediction of future liver remnant growth after portal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Barth, Borna K; Fischer, Michael A; Kambakamba, Patryk; Lesurtel, Mickael; Reiner, Caecilia S

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the use of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived fat- and liver function-measurements for prediction of future liver remnant (FLR) growth after portal vein occlusion (PVO) in patients scheduled for major liver resection. Forty-five patients (age, 59 ± 13.9 y) who underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI within 24 ± 18 days prior to PVO were included in this study. Fat-Signal-Fraction (FSF), relative liver enhancement (RLE) and corrected liver-to-spleen ratio (corrLSR) of the FLR were calculated from in- and out-of-phase (n=42) as well as from unenhanced T1-weighted, and hepatocyte-phase images (n=35), respectively. Kinetic growth rate (KGR, volume increase/week) of the FLR after PVO was the primary endpoint. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to determine cutoff values for prediction of impaired FLR-growth. FSF (%) showed significant inverse correlation with KGR (r=-0.41, p=0.008), whereas no significant correlation was found with RLE and corrLSR. FSF was significantly higher in patients with impaired FLR-growth than in those with normal growth (%FSF, 8.1 ± 9.3 vs. 3.0 ± 5.9, p=0.02). ROC-analysis revealed a cutoff-FSF of 4.9% for identification of patients with impaired FLR-growth with a specificity of 82% and sensitivity of 47% (AUC 0.71 [95%CI:0.54-0.87]). Patients with impaired FLR-growth according to the FSF-cutoff showed a tendency towards higher postoperative complication rates (posthepatectomy liver failure in 50% vs. 19%). Liver fat-content, but not liver function derived from Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a predictor of FLR-growth after PVO. Thus, liver MRI could help in identifying patients at risk for insufficient FLR-growth, who may need re-evaluation of the therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Caught in the (Education) Act: Tackling Michael Gove's Education Revolution. Report on 19th November 2011 Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A number of significant campaigning organisations and education trades unions--the Anti-Academies Alliance, CASE, Comprehensive Future, Forum, ISCG and the Socialist Educational Association, along with ASCL, ATL, NASUWT and NUT--staged a conference in London on 19 November 2011, with the title 'Caught in the (Education) Act: tackling Michael…

  4. LAMPhimerus: A novel LAMP assay for detecting Amphimerus sp. DNA in human stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Fontecha-Cuenca, Cristina; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Sato, Megumi; López Abán, Julio; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphimeriasis is a fish-borne disease caused by the liver fluke Amphimerus spp. that has recently been reported as endemic in the tropical Pacific side of Ecuador with a high prevalence in humans and domestic animals. The diagnosis is based on the stool examination to identify parasite eggs, but it lacks sensitivity. Additionally, the morphology of the eggs may be confounded with other liver and intestinal flukes. No immunological or molecular methods have been developed to date. New diagnostic techniques for specific and sensitive detection of Amphimerus spp. DNA in clinical samples are needed. Methodology/Principal findings A LAMP targeting a sequence of the Amphimerus sp. internal transcribed spacer 2 region was designed. Amphimerus sp. DNA was obtained from adult worms recovered from animals and used to optimize the molecular assays. Conventional PCR was performed using outer primers F3-B3 to verify the proper amplification of the Amphimerus sp. DNA target sequence. LAMP was optimized using different reaction mixtures and temperatures, and it was finally set up as LAMPhimerus. The specificity and sensitivity of both PCR and LAMP were evaluated. The detection limit was 1 pg of genomic DNA. Field testing was done using 44 human stool samples collected from localities where fluke is endemic. Twenty-five samples were microscopy positive for Amphimerus sp. eggs detection. In molecular testing, PCR F3-B3 was ineffective when DNA from fecal samples was used. When testing all human stool samples included in our study, the diagnostic parameters for the sensitivity and specificity were calculated for our LAMPhimerus assay, which were 76.67% and 80.77%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance We have developed and evaluated, for the first time, a specific and sensitive LAMP assay for detecting Amphimerus sp. in human stool samples. The procedure has been named LAMPhimerus method and has the potential to be adapted for field diagnosis and disease surveillance in

  5. Elucidating the transcriptome of Fasciola hepatica - a key to fundamental and biotechnological discoveries for a neglected parasite.

    PubMed

    Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Jex, Aaron R; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-01-01

    Liver flukes of animals are parasitic flatworms (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) of major socioeconomic importance in many countries. Key representatives, such as Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica, cause "liver fluke disease" (= fascioliasis), which is of major animal health significance worldwide. In particular, F. hepatica is a leading cause of production losses to the livestock (mainly sheep and cattle) and meat industries due to clinical disease, reduced weight gain and milk production, and deaths. This parasite is also a major food-borne pathogen of humans throughout parts of the Middle East, Asia and South America. Currently, there is a significant focus on the development of new approaches for the prevention and control of fascioliasis in livestock. Recent technological advances in genomics and bioinformatics provide unique opportunities for the identification and prevalidation of drug targets and vaccines through a better understanding of the biology of F. hepatica and related species as well as their relationship with their hosts at the molecular level. Surprisingly, despite the widespread socioeconomic impact of fascioliasis, genomic datasets for F. hepatica are scant, limiting the molecular biological research of this parasite. The present article explores specifically the transcriptome of the adult stage of F. hepatica using an integrated genomic-bioinformatic platform. The analysis of the current data reveals numerous molecules of biological relevance, some of which are inferred to be involved in key biological processes or pathways that could serve as targets for new trematocidal drugs or vaccines. Improved insights into the transcriptome of F. hepatica should pave the way for future, comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of other developmental stages of this and related parasites, such as F. gigantica, cancer-causing flatworms (Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini) and blood flukes (Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum). Prediction of the

  6. Role of ischaemic preconditioning in liver regeneration following major liver resection and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, D; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S; Graham, AM; Prasad, KR

    2007-01-01

    Liver ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) is known to protect the liver from the detrimental effects of ischaemic-reperfusion injury (IRI), which contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality following major liver surgery. Recent studies have focused on the role of IPC in liver regeneration, the precise mechanism of which are not completely understood. This review discusses the current understanding of the mechanism of liver regeneration and the role of IPC in this setting. Relevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords “liver”, “ischaemic reperfusion”, “ischaemic preconditioning”, “regeneration”, “hepatectomy” and “transplantation”. The underlying mechanism of liver regeneration is a complex process involving the interaction of cytokines, growth factors and the metabolic demand of the liver. IPC, through various mediators, promotes liver regeneration by up-regulating growth-promoting factors and suppresses growth-inhibiting factors as well as damaging stresses. The increased understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in IPC will enable the development of alternative treatment modalities aimed at promoting liver regeneration following major liver resection and transplantation. PMID:17278187

  7. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jun L.; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced clinical decision making in patients with chronic liver disease, allowing a rapid and informed judgment of disease stage and prognosis. Should a liver biopsy be required, the appropriateness is clearer and the diagnostic yield is greater with the use of these adjuncts. While a number of non-invasive liver fibrosis markers are now used in routine practice, a steady stream of innovative approaches exists. With improvement in the reliability, reproducibility and feasibility of these markers, their potential role in disease management is increasing. Moreover, their adoption into clinical trials as outcome measures reflects their validity and dynamic nature. This review will summarize and appraise the current and novel non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, both blood and imaging based, and look at their prospective application in everyday clinical care. PMID:27378924

  8. Drug-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    David, Stefan; Hamilton, James P

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is common and nearly all classes of medications can cause liver disease. Most cases of DILI are benign, and improve after drug withdrawal. It is important to recognize and remove the offending agent as quickly as possible to prevent the progression to chronic liver disease and/or acute liver failure. There are no definite risk factors for DILI, but pre-existing liver disease and genetic susceptibility may predispose certain individuals. Although most patients have clinical symptoms that are identical to other liver diseases, some patients may present with symptoms of systemic hypersensitivity. Treatment of drug and herbal-induced liver injury consists of rapid drug discontinuation and supportive care targeted to alleviate unwanted symptoms. PMID:21874146

  9. [Are non-invasive tests going to replace liver biopsy for diagnosis of liver fibrosis?].

    PubMed

    Restellini, Sophie; Spahr, Laurent

    2012-06-27

    Liver fibrosis is associated with chronic liver diseases, and may evolve into cirrhosis that may be complicated by liver failure and portal hypertension. Detection and quantification of liver fibrosis is a key point in the follow-up of patients with chronic liver diseases. Liver biopsy is the gold standard method to assess and quantify fibrosis, but its invasiveness is a limiting factor in everyday clinical practice. Non invasive markers using either biological or radiological parameters have been developed and may decrease the need for liver biopsy in some cases. However, information is limited to fibrosis, and cut-offs values and diagnostic accuracies for significant fibrosis may vary according to the etiology of liver disease. Liver biopsy allows the assessment of intermediate stages of fibrosis and describes accompanying lesions.

  10. Role of parasites in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandong, B M; Ngbea, J A; Raymond, Vhriterhire

    2013-01-01

    In areas of parasitic endemicity, the occurrence of cancer that is not frequent may be linked with parasitic infection. Epidemiological correlates between some parasitic infections and cancer is strong, suggesting a strong aetiological association. The common parasites associated with human cancers are schistosomiasis, malaria, liver flukes (Clonorchis sinenses, Opistorchis viverrini). To review the pathology, literature and methods of diagnosis. Literature review from peer reviewed Journals cited in PubMed and local journals. Parasites may serve as promoters of cancer in endemic areas of infection.

  11. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  12. Functional characterization of liver-associated lymphocytes in patients with liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Winnock, M; Garcia-Barcina, M; Huet, S; Bernard, P; Saric, J; Bioulac-Sage, P; Gualde, N; Balabaud, C

    1993-10-01

    The liver-associated lymphocytes (LAL) population is mainly composed of cells with natural killer (NK) activity expressing the CD3+/-CD56+ phenotype. No evident difference has been found in the phenotypic data between patients with benign or malignant liver disease. In this study, the cytotoxic pattern of this population has been characterized from patients who underwent an operation for benign or metastatic liver disease. LAL were isolated by sinusoidal high-pressure lavage from partial hepatectomies. Phenotype was characterized by flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity was evaluated by standard 4-hour 51Cr release assays against NK and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK)-sensitive targets. In patients with benign liver disease, LAL showed spontaneous high levels of NK activity and LAK activity compared with peripheral blood lymphocytes. In patients with metastatic liver disease, no difference was observed in the levels of NK activity between LAL and peripheral blood, and the level of LAK activity was far lower than that expressed in patients with benign liver disease. These results show that the cytotoxic pattern of peripheral blood lymphocytes does not mirror that of LAL. In patients with benign liver disease, LAL are in a state of activation, whereas the decreased level of LAL cytotoxicity in patients with metastatic liver disease suggests that the cytotoxic activity of these cells could be inhibited by the presence of suppressive factors.

  13. Increase of infiltrating monocytes in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Pan, Zhiyun; Xia, Juan; Xiong, Yali; Wang, Guiyang; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Jun; Yan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhaoping; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes have been demonstrated to contribute to tissue damage in experimental models of liver injury and fibrosis. However, less is known about monocyte infiltration in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In the present study, we demonstrated that CD68+ hepatic macrophages and MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies as compared with normal liver tissue. In addition, CLD patients with higher inflammatory grading scores had more CD68+ macrophages and MAC387+ monocytes infiltration in their livers compared to those with lower scores. Significantly more MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were found in the liver tissue of CLD patients with higher fibrotic staging scores compared to those with lower scores. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression was significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies. MCP-1 staining scores were significantly positively associated with the numbers of MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes in CLD patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that infiltrating monocytes may play a pathological role in exacerbating chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. MCP-1 may be involved in the monocyte infiltration and progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD.

  14. Redesigning primary care to tackle the global epidemic of noncommunicable disease.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E; Nigenda, Gustavo; Knaul, Felicia M

    2015-03-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the major contributors to death and disability worldwide. Nearly 80% of the deaths in 2010 occurred in low- and middle-income countries, which have experienced rapid population aging, urbanization, rise in smoking, and changes in diet and activity. Yet the health systems of low- and middle-income countries, historically oriented to infectious disease and often severely underfunded, are poorly prepared for the challenge of caring for people with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory disease. We have discussed how primary care can be redesigned to tackle the challenge of NCDs in resource-constrained countries. We suggest that four changes will be required: integration of services, innovative service delivery, a focus on patients and communities, and adoption of new technologies for communication.

  15. A case of probable mixed-infection with Clonorchis sinensis and Fasciola sp.: CT and parasitological findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Yun-Sik; Yun, Ji Hye; Kim, Jeong Ju; Choi, Won Hyung; Oh, In Hwan; Song, Hyun Ouk; Chu, Jong Phil

    2010-06-01

    We report here a human case probably mixed-infected with Clonorchis sinensis and Fasciola sp. who was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scan, serological findings, and/or fecal examination. The patient was a 43-year-old Korean female and was admitted to Kyung Hee University Hospital with the complaints of fever and abdominal pain. On admission, marked eosinophilia was noted in her peripheral blood. CT scan showed specific lesions for clonorchiasis and fascioliasis in the liver, along with lesions suggestive of amebic abscess. Micro-ELISA revealed positive results for the 2 helminthic infections. Eggs of C. sinensis and trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica were observed in the stool. Treatment with praziquantel followed by metronidazole and tinidazole reduced abnormalities in the liver and eosinophilia. This is the first case report of a possible co-infection with 2 kinds of liver flukes in the Republic of Korea.

  16. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2017-05-16

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  17. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  18. Liver Transplantation in the Mouse: Insights Into Liver Immunobiology, Tissue Injury and Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Ono, Yoshihiro; Geller, David A.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2016-01-01

    The surgically-demanding mouse orthotopic liver transplant model was first described in 1991. It has proved a powerful research tool for investigation of liver biology, tissue injury, the regulation of alloimmunity and tolerance induction and the pathogenesis of specific liver diseases. Liver transplantation in mice has unique advantages over transplantation of the liver in larger species, such as the rat or pig, since the mouse genome is well-characterized and there is much greater availability of both genetically-modified animals and research reagents. Liver transplant experiments using various transgenic or gene knockout mice has provided valuable mechanistic insights into the immuno- and pathobiology of the liver and the regulation of graft rejection and tolerance over the past 25 years. The molecular pathways identified in regulation of tissue injury and promotion of liver transplant tolerance provide new potential targets for therapeutic intervention to control adverse inflammatory responses/ immune-mediated events in the hepatic environment and systemically. Conclusion: Orthotopic liver transplantation in the mouse is a valuable model for gaining improved insights into liver biology, immunopathology and allograft tolerance that may result in therapeutic innovation in liver and other diseases. PMID:26709949

  19. Incidence and Risk Factors for Liver Abscess After Thermal Ablation of Liver Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu-Feng; Li, Na; Chen, Xu-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are the most frequently used thermal ablation methods for the treatment of liver cancer. Liver abscess is a common and severe complication of thermal ablation treatment. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of liver abscess formation after thermal ablation of liver cancer. Materials and Methods The clinical data of 423 patients who underwent 691 thermal ablation procedures for liver cancer were collected in order to retrospectively analyze the basic characteristics, incidence, and risk factors associated with liver abscess formation. Patients with multiple risk factors for liver abscess formation were enrolled in a risk factor group, and patients with no risk factors were enrolled in a control group. The chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the relationship between the occurrence of liver abscesses and potential risk factors. Results Two hundred and eight patients underwent 385 RFA procedures, and 185 patients underwent 306 MWA procedures. The total incidence of liver abscesses was 1.7%, while the rates in the RFA group (1.8%) and MWA groups (1.6%) were similar (P > 0.05). The rates of liver abscesses in patients who had child-pugh class B and class C cirrhosis (P = 0.0486), biliary tract disease (P = 0.0305), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.0344), and porta hepatis tumors (P = 0.0123) were 4.0%, 6.7%, 6.5%, and 13.0%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between these four groups and the control group (all P < 0.05). The incidence of liver abscesses in the combined ablation and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) group (P = 0.0026) was significantly lower than that of the ablation group (P < 0.05). Conclusions The incidence of liver abscesses after liver cancer thermal ablation is low. Child-Pugh Class B and Class C cirrhosis, biliary tract disease, diabetes mellitus, and porta hepatis

  20. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  1. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  2. Does a SLAP lesion affect shoulder muscle recruitment as measured by EMG activity during a rugby tackle?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study objective was to assess the influence of a SLAP lesion on onset of EMG activity in shoulder muscles during a front on rugby football tackle within professional rugby players. Methods Mixed cross-sectional study evaluating between and within group differences in EMG onset times. Testing was carried out within the physiotherapy department of a university sports medicine clinic. The test group consisted of 7 players with clinically diagnosed SLAP lesions, later verified on arthroscopy. The reference group consisted of 15 uninjured and full time professional rugby players from within the same playing squad. Controlled tackles were performed against a tackle dummy. Onset of EMG activity was assessed from surface EMG of Pectorialis Major, Biceps Brachii, Latissimus Dorsi, Serratus Anterior and Infraspinatus muscles relative to time of impact. Analysis of differences in activation timing between muscles and limbs (injured versus non-injured side and non injured side versus matched reference group). Results Serratus Anterior was activated prior to all other muscles in all (P = 0.001-0.03) subjects. In the SLAP injured shoulder Biceps was activated later than in the non-injured side. Onset times of all muscles of the non-injured shoulder in the injured player were consistently earlier compared with the reference group. Whereas, within the injured shoulder, all muscle activation timings were later than in the reference group. Conclusions This study shows that in shoulders with a SLAP lesion there is a trend towards delay in activation time of Biceps and other muscles with the exception of an associated earlier onset of activation of Serratus anterior, possibly due to a coping strategy to protect glenohumeral stability and thoraco-scapular stability. This trend was not statistically significant in all cases PMID:20184752

  3. Promoting healthy diets and tackling obesity and diet-related chronic diseases: what are the agricultural policy levers?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2007-06-01

    Diet-related chronic diseases are now a serious global public health problem. Public health groups are calling for the agricultural sector to play a greater role in tackling the threat. To identify potential points of policy intervention in the agricultural sector that could be leveraged to promote healthy diets and tackle obesity and diet-related chronic diseases. A review of the literature on the dietary implications of agriculture, a conceptual analysis of the issues, and the identification of relevant examples. There are two main potential points of intervention in the agricultural sector that could be leveraged to promote healthy diets: agricultural policies and agricultural production practices. Agricultural policies and practices affect diet through their influence on food availability, price, and nutrient quality, which in turn affects food choices available to consumers. Agricultural policies amenable to intervention include input, production, and trade policies; agricultural production practices amenable to intervention include crop breeding, crop fertilization practices, livestock-feeding practices, and crop systems diversity. It is well-known that agricultural policies and production practices influence what farmers choose to grow. Agricultural policies and production practices could also play a role in influencing what consumers choose to eat. To identify how agricultural policies and practices can usefully contribute toward promoting healthy diets and tackling obesity and diet-related chronic diseases, health policymakers need to examine whether current agricultural policies and production practices are contributing to-or detracting from-efforts to attain dietary goals; where and how could agricultural intervention help achieve dietary goals; and whether there are trade-offs between these interventions and other important concerns, such as undernutrition and the livelihoods of agricultural producers. Given the potential of agriculture to contribute to

  4. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Bruno; Dahmen, Uta; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; König, Matthias; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Ricken, Tim; Schleicher, Jana; Ole Schwen, Lars; Vlaic, Sebastian; Waschinsky, Navina

    2017-01-01

    The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery. PMID:29249974

  5. Identification Of Inequalities In The Selection Of Liver Surgery For Colorectal Liver Metastases In Sweden.

    PubMed

    Norén, A; Sandström, P; Gunnarsdottir, K; Ardnor, B; Isaksson, B; Lindell, G; Rizell, M

    2018-04-01

    Liver resection for colorectal liver metastases offers a 5-year survival rate of 25%-58%. This study aimed to analyze whether patients with colorectal liver metastases undergo resection to an equal extent and whether selection factors play a role in the selection process. Data were retrieved from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry (2007-2011) for colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastases. The patients identified were linked to the Swedish Registry of Liver and Bile surgery and the National Patient Registry to identify whether liver surgery or ablative treatment was performed. Analyses for age, sex, type of primary tumor and treating hospital (university, county, or district), American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and radiology for detection of metastatic disease were performed. Of 28,355 patients with colorectal cancer, 21.6% (6127/28,355) presented with liver metastases. Of the patients with liver metastases, 18.5% (1134/6127) underwent liver resection or ablation. The cumulative proportion of liver resection/ablation was 4% (1134/28,355) of all colorectal cancer. If "not bowel resected" were excluded, the proportion slightly increased to 4.7% (1134/24,262). Around 15% of the patients with metastases were registered as referrals for liver surgery. In a multivariable analysis patients treated at a university hospital for primary tumor were more frequently surgically treated for liver metastases (p < 0.0001). Patients with liver metastases from rectal cancer (p < 0.0001) and men more often underwent liver resection (p = 0.006). A difference was found between health-care regions for the frequency of liver surgery (p < 0.0001). Patients >70 years and those with American Society of Anesthesiologists class >2 underwent liver resection less frequently. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver was more often used in diagnostic work-up in men. Patients with colorectal liver metastases are unequally treated in Sweden, as indicated by the

  6. The persistent problem of lead poisoning in birds from ammunition and fishing tackle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Gervais, Jennifer; Herring, Garth; Rivers, James W.; Schulz, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a metabolic poison that can negatively influence biological processes, leading to illness and mortality across a large spectrum of North American avifauna (>120 species) and other organisms. Pb poisoning can result from numerous sources, including ingestion of bullet fragments and shot pellets left in animal carcasses, spent ammunition left in the field, lost fishing tackle, Pb-based paints, large-scale mining, and Pb smelting activities. Although Pb shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in the United States (since 1991) and Canada (since 1999), Pb exposure remains a problem for many avian species. Despite a large body of scientific literature on exposure to Pb and its toxicological effects on birds, controversy still exists regarding its impacts at a population level. We explore these issues and highlight areas in need of investigation: (1) variation in sensitivity to Pb exposure among bird species; (2) spatial extent and sources of Pb contamination in habitats in relation to bird exposure in those same locations; and (3) interactions between avian Pb exposure and other landscape-level stressors that synergistically affect bird demography. We explore multiple paths taken to reduce Pb exposure in birds that (1) recognize common ground among a range of affected interests; (2) have been applied at local to national scales; and (3) engage governmental agencies, interest groups, and professional societies to communicate the impacts of Pb ammunition and fishing tackle, and to describe approaches for reducing their availability to birds. As they have in previous times, users of fish and wildlife will play a key role in resolving the Pb poisoning issue.

  7. Decellularized human liver as a natural 3D-scaffold for liver bioengineering and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Rombouts, Krista; Rennie Hall, Andrew; Urbani, Luca; Vinh Luong, Tu; Al-Akkad, Walid; Longato, Lisa; Brown, David; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dhillon, Amar P.; Fuller, Barry; Davidson, Brian; Moore, Kevin; Dhar, Dipok; De Coppi, Paolo; Malago, Massimo; Pinzani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Liver synthetic and metabolic function can only be optimised by the growth of cells within a supportive liver matrix. This can be achieved by the utilisation of decellularised human liver tissue. Here we demonstrate complete decellularization of whole human liver and lobes to form an extracellular matrix scaffold with a preserved architecture. Decellularized human liver cubic scaffolds were repopulated for up to 21 days using human cell lines hepatic stellate cells (LX2), hepatocellular carcinoma (Sk-Hep-1) and hepatoblastoma (HepG2), with excellent viability, motility and proliferation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Biocompatibility was demonstrated by either omental or subcutaneous xenotransplantation of liver scaffold cubes (5 × 5 × 5 mm) into immune competent mice resulting in absent foreign body responses. We demonstrate decellularization of human liver and repopulation with derived human liver cells. This is a key advance in bioartificial liver development. PMID:26248878

  8. Community-Based Health Education and Communication Model Development for Opisthorchiasis Prevention in a High Risk Area, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Promthet, Paitoon; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Promthet, Supannee

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a community-based health education and communication programme on reducing liver fluke infections caused by the consumption of uncooked fish among people in a high-risk area of Thailand. The study was quasi-experimental in nature, with three-stages. Stage 1 involved a situational and capacity analysis of designated communities in Khon Kaen province. This was followed by the development of a model for community-based health education and communication to prevent liver fluke infections among high-risk people, and, lastly, implementation and evaluation of the model were performed. Data were collected using both qualitative and quantitative methods. In total, 390 people were surveyed, and quasi-experimental and comparison groups, each with 90 people, were assessed between May 2011 and April 2012. Analysis was using statistical OR, 95 % CI, the Willcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test, the chi-square test, and the Mann-Whitney U test. The findings showed that most respondents had a high level of knowledge and understanding of liver fluke disease (89.5%, 95% CI:86.0-92.4), and positive attitudes toward the prevention of the disease (94.4%, 95% CI:91.6-96.4). However, with regard to changes in consumption of uncooked fish, most respondents were still in the pre-contemplation phase (55.1%, 95% CI:50.0-60.1), followed by the contemplation phase, 22.6%. Furthermore, four factors were found to be associated with the consumption of uncooked fish--the consumption of alcohol (OR 4.16, 95% CI:1.79-9.65), gender (OR 3.17 , 95% CI:1.53-6.54), smoking (OR 3.03, 95% CI:1.31-7.05), and age 40 years and above (OR 2.68, 95% CI:1.02-7.05). After nine months of the health education and communication programme using local media based on local wisdom, culture and persons, the results showed that, compared to the control group, members of the experimental group had a higher level of knowledge, a better attitude and lower levels of ill- advised

  9. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  10. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence.

  11. Bulk milk-estimated seroprevalence of Fasciola hepatica in dairy herds and collecting of risk factor data in East Frisia, northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuerpick, Birte; Fiedor, Christiane; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Schnieder, Thomas; Strube, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola (F) hepatica is one of the most important trematodes in cattle farming worldwide. Fasciolosis in dairy cows is leading to production losses due to decreased milk yield, liver condemnation and impaired reproduction. The treatment of dairy cows is unsatisfactory, because available drugs are either effective against adult flukes only or have long withdrawal times or in some countries may not be used at all. In the present study the prevalence of F. hepatica in dairy farms located in East Frisia, which is part of the federal state Lower Saxony, was investigated. East Frisia is considered a high risk area for Fasciola hepatica infections, because of its coastal location, high precipitation and moist pastures. About 750 bulk milk samples were collected in January and November 2006 and analysed for F. hepatica antibodies using the Pourquier ELISA. In addition, questionnaires, which were answered by 260 of the participating farmers, were evaluated to analyse management-related factors associated with fasciolosis. In January and November, 52.1% and 53.6% of the bulk milk samples, respectively, showed positive results. Thereby, 88.1% of the examined farms showed an unchanged infection status, whereas 6.2% of the farms became seropositive during the grazing season and 5.8% of the dairy herds turned seronegative. Statistical analysis revealed a significant negative association between average annual milk production and the frequency of infections with F. hepatica.

  12. DNA sequence analyses reveal co-occurrence of novel haplotypes of Fasciola gigantica with F. hepatica in South Africa and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mucheka, Vimbai T; Lamb, Jennifer M; Pfukenyi, Davies M; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-11-30

    The aim of this study was to identify and determine the genetic diversity of Fasciola species in cattle from Zimbabwe, the KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga provinces of South Africa and selected wildlife hosts from Zimbabwe. This was based on analysis of DNA sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) regions. The sample of 120 flukes was collected from livers of 57 cattle at 4 abattoirs in Zimbabwe and 47 cattle at 6 abattoirs in South Africa; it also included three alcohol-preserved duiker, antelope and eland samples from Zimbabwe. Aligned sequences (ITS 506 base pairs and CO1 381 base pairs) were analyzed by neighbour-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Phylogenetic trees revealed the presence of Fasciola gigantica in cattle from Zimbabwe and F. gigantica and Fasciola hepatica in the samples from South Africa. F. hepatica was more prevalent (64%) in South Africa than F. gigantica. In Zimbabwe, F. gigantica was present in 99% of the samples; F. hepatica was found in only one cattle sample, an antelope (Hippotragus niger) and a duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia). This is the first molecular confirmation of the identity Fasciola species in Zimbabwe and South Africa. Knowledge on the identity and distribution of these liver flukes at molecular level will allow disease surveillance and control in the studied areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Living Donor Liver Transplantation Using a Liver Graft With Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Hideya; Imai, Hisashi; Onishi, Yasuharu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Kojiro; Ogura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite of recent development of imaging modalities, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (IPSS) is rarely diagnosed. Therefore, living donor liver transplantation using a liver graft with IPSS has not been previously published. Materials and Methods We report a 28-year-old male patient with end-stage liver disease secondary to Wilson disease. His 26-year-old brother was a potential living donor, who had an IPSS of 25 mm in diameter at segment 6 as shown by computed tomography. Liver function tests were normal, and blood ammonia concentration was in the upper limit of normal. Results Living donor liver transplantation was uneventfully performed. After surgery, a recipient liver function tests showed a quick recovery, and serum ammonia levels were consistently normal. Although thrombosis inside the IPSS was confirmed by computed tomography on postoperative day 21, this thrombosis disappeared at 3 months posttransplant with anticoagulants. Currently (12 months posttransplant), the patient has fully recovered, and the IPSS is still the same size. Conclusions Based on our experience, liver allografts with IPSS can be accepted as potential liver allografts. PMID:27500240

  14. Impaired lipid accumulation in the liver of Tsc2-heterozygous mice during liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Obayashi, Yoko, E-mail: youko_oobayashi@ajinomoto.com; Campbell, Jean S.; Fausto, Nelson

    Highlights: •Tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation in early liver regeneration. •Liver regeneration in the Tsc2+/− mice was not enhanced. •The Tsc2+/− livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies during liver regeneration. •Mortality rate increased in Tsc2+/− mice after partial hepatectomy. •Tuberin plays a critical role in hepatic lipid accumulation to support regeneration. -- Abstract: Tuberin is a negative regulator of mTOR pathway. To investigate the function of tuberin during liver regeneration, we performed 70% hepatectomy on wild-type and Tsc2+/− mice. We found the tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation during early liver regeneration in wild-type mice. However, liver regeneration inmore » the Tsc2+/− mice was not enhanced. Instead, the Tsc2+/− livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies, and this was accompanied by increased mortality. These findings suggest that tuberin plays a critical role in liver energy balance by regulating hepatocellular lipid accumulation during early liver regeneration. These effects may influence the role of mTORC1 on cell growth and proliferation.« less

  15. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  16. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  17. Propylthiouracil-Induced Acute Liver Failure: Role of Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Andres F.; Czul, Frank; Arosemena, Leopoldo R.; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Garcia, Monica T.; Tekin, Akin; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Martin, Paul; Ghanta, Ravi K.

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil- (PTU-) induced hepatotoxicity is rare but potentially lethal with a spectrum of liver injury ranging from asymptomatic elevation of transaminases to fulminant hepatic failure and death. We describe two cases of acute hepatic failure due to PTU that required liver transplantation. Differences in the clinical presentation, histological characteristics, and posttransplant management are described as well as alternative therapeutic options. Frequent monitoring for PTU-induced hepatic dysfunction is strongly advised because timely discontinuation of this drug and implementation of noninvasive therapeutic interventions may prevent progression to liver failure or even death. PMID:21234410

  18. Operative risks of domino liver transplantation for the FAP liver donor and the FAP liver recipient.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Daniel; Salloum, Chady; Samuel, Didier; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the operative risks of domino liver transplantation (LT). Two retrospective analyses were conducted (comparison of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) liver donors [61 patients] versus FAP nondonors [39 patients] and FAP liver recipients [61 patients] versus cadaveric liver recipients [61 patients]). First analysis showed a 60-day mortality of 6.6% for FAP donors and 7.7% for FAP nondonors (p = 1.0). Both groups had similar vascular and biliary complication rates. Both groups had similar 1- and 5-year patient and graft survival rates (83.4 % versus 87.2%, and 79.8 % versus 71.8%, p = 0.7) and (83.3% versus 87.2%, and 79.1% versus 71.8%, p = 0.7). The second analysis showed a 1.6% mortality for FAP liver recipients versus 3.2% of the control group (p = 1). Both groups had similar morbidity and technical complication rates (18.0% versus 13.1%, p = 0.45) and (0.18 versus 0.15, p = 0.65). Domino procedure doesn't add any risk to FAP donor or recipient. It increases the organ pool allowing transplantation of marginal recipients who otherwise are denied cadaveric LT.

  19. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. Circulating lipocalin 2 is neither related to liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease nor to residual liver function in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Pohl, Rebekka; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Schacherer, Doris; Eisinger, Kristina; Wiest, Reiner; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-09-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is induced in the injured liver and associated with inflammation. Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum LCN2 is a non-invasive marker to assess hepatic steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore, LCN2 was measured by ELISA in serum of 32 randomly selected patients without fatty liver (controls), 24 patients with ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis mainly due to alcohol. Systemic LCN2 was comparable in patients with liver steatosis, those with liver cirrhosis and controls. LCN2 negatively correlated with bilirubin in both cohorts. In cirrhosis, LCN2 was not associated with more advanced liver injury defined by the CHILD-PUGH score and model for end-stage liver disease score. Resistin but not C-reactive protein or chemerin positively correlated with LCN2. LCN2 levels were not increased in patients with ascites or patients with esophageal varices. Consequently, reduction of portal pressure by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt did not affect LCN2 levels. Hepatic venous blood (HVS), portal venous blood and systemic venous blood levels of LCN2 were similar. HVS LCN2 was unchanged in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis compared to those with well-compensated disease arguing against increased hepatic release. Current data exclude that serum LCN2 is of any value as steatosis marker in patients with NAFLD and indicator of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tackling wicked problems in infection prevention and control: a guideline for co-creation with stakeholders.

    PubMed

    van Woezik, Anne F G; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Kulyk, Olga; Siemons, Liseth; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2016-01-01

    Infection prevention and control can be seen as a wicked public health problem as there is no consensus regarding problem definition and solution, multiple stakeholders with different needs and values are involved, and there is no clear end-point of the problem-solving process. Co-creation with stakeholders has been proposed as a suitable strategy to tackle wicked problems, yet little information and no clear step-by-step guide exist on how to do this. The objectives of this study were to develop a guideline to assist developers in tackling wicked problems using co-creation with stakeholders, and to apply this guideline to practice with an example case in the field of infection prevention and control. A mixed-method approach consisting of the integration of both quantitative and qualitative research was used. Relevant stakeholders from the veterinary, human health, and public health sectors were identified using a literature scan, expert recommendations, and snowball sampling. The stakeholder salience approach was used to select key stakeholders based on 3 attributes: power, legitimacy, and urgency. Key values of stakeholders (N = 20) were derived by qualitative semi-structured interviews and quantitatively weighted and prioritized using an online survey. Our method showed that stakeholder identification and analysis are prerequisites for understanding the complex stakeholder network that characterizes wicked problems. A total of 73 stakeholders were identified of which 36 were selected as potential key stakeholders, and only one was seen as a definite stakeholder. In addition, deriving key stakeholder values is a necessity to gain insights into different problem definitions, solutions and needs stakeholders have regarding the wicked problem. Based on the methods used, we developed a step-by-step guideline for co-creation with stakeholders when tackling wicked problems. The mixed-methods guideline presented here provides a systematic, transparent method to

  2. Transgressive Local Act: Tackling Domestic Violence with Forum and Popular Theatre in "Sisterhood Bound as Yuan Ze Flowers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wan-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a community theatre project in Kaohsiung County, Taiwan that aimed to tackle domestic violence through a collaboration between local community female elders and the facilitator. The paper investigates how an outside facilitator could unfix the assumed community identities which tend to exclude outsiders or sub-groups, in this…

  3. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijewantha, Hasitha S

    2017-01-01

    Liver disease in Sri Lanka is mainly due to alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In contrast to other South Asian countries, the prevalence of hepatitis B and C is low in Sri Lanka and prevalence of hepatitis A is intermediate. The few reported cases of hepatitis E in Sri Lanka are mainly in people who have traveled to neighboring South Asian countries. Wilson's disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, drug-induced liver disease, and primary biliary cirrhosis are recognized causes of liver disease in Sri Lanka. Pyogenic and amebic liver abscesses and dengue infection are the other causes of liver disease. Some of the commonly used plants as traditional herbal medicine in Sri Lanka have been shown to have deleterious effects on the liver in animal studies. Considering the high popularity of traditional herbal medicine in the country, it is likely that herbal medicine is an etiological factor for liver disease in Sri Lanka, but no published data are available. Address reprint requests to: Wijewantha HS. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(1):78-81.

  4. Redesigning Primary Care to Tackle the Global Epidemic of Noncommunicable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Knaul, Felicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the major contributors to death and disability worldwide. Nearly 80% of the deaths in 2010 occurred in low- and middle-income countries, which have experienced rapid population aging, urbanization, rise in smoking, and changes in diet and activity. Yet the health systems of low- and middle-income countries, historically oriented to infectious disease and often severely underfunded, are poorly prepared for the challenge of caring for people with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory disease. We have discussed how primary care can be redesigned to tackle the challenge of NCDs in resource-constrained countries. We suggest that four changes will be required: integration of services, innovative service delivery, a focus on patients and communities, and adoption of new technologies for communication. PMID:25602898

  5. Non-invasive evaluation of liver stiffness after splenectomy in rabbits with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Jun; Ling, Wen-Wu; Wang, Hong; Meng, Ling-Wei; Cai, He; Peng, Bing

    2016-12-14

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in animal models and determine the longitudinal changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ after splenectomy at different stages of fibrosis. Liver stiffness was measured in sixty-eight rabbits with CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis at different stages and eight healthy control rabbits by ElastPQ. Liver biopsies and blood samples were obtained at scheduled time points to assess liver function and degree of fibrosis. Thirty-one rabbits with complete data that underwent splenectomy at different stages of liver fibrosis were then included for dynamic monitoring of changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ and liver function according to blood tests. LSM by ElastPQ was significantly correlated with histologic fibrosis stage ( r = 0.85, P < 0.001). The optimal cutoff values by ElastPQ were 11.27, 14.89, and 18.21 kPa for predicting minimal fibrosis, moderate fibrosis, and cirrhosis, respectively. Longitudinal monitoring of the changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ showed that early splenectomy (especially F1) may delay liver fibrosis progression. ElastPQ is an available, convenient, objective and non-invasive technique for assessing liver stiffness in rabbits with CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis. In addition, liver stiffness measurements using ElastPQ can dynamically monitor the changes in liver stiffness in rabbit models, and in patients, after splenectomy.

  6. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E.; Adams, John H.; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites -hypnozoites. The lack of tractable animal models for P. vivax constitutes a severe obstacle to investigate this unique aspect of its biology and to test drug efficacy against liver stages. We show that the FRG KO huHep liver-humanized mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, development of liver stages, and the formation of small non-replicating hypnozoites. Cellular characterization of P. vivax liver stage development in vivo demonstrates complete maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites and continuing persistence of hypnozoites. Primaquine prophylaxis or treatment prevents and eliminates liver stage infection. Thus, the P. vivax/FRG KO huHep mouse infection model constitutes an important new tool to investigate the biology of liver stage development and dormancy and might aid in the discovery of new drugs for the prevention of relapsing malaria. PMID:25800544

  7. Expansion of the 'Antibiotic Guardian' one health behavioural campaign across Europe to tackle antibiotic resistance: pilot phase and analysis of AMR knowledge.

    PubMed

    Newitt, Sophie; Anthierens, Sibyl; Coenen, Samuel; Lo Fo Wong, Danilo; Salvi, Cristiana; Puleston, Richard; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane

    2018-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major public health threat. The UK Antibiotic Guardian (AG) behavioural change campaign developed to tackle AMR was expanded across Europe through translation into Russian, Dutch and French. Demographics and knowledge of AGs were analyzed between 01 November 2016 and 31 December 2016. A total of 367 pledges were received with the majority from the public and health care professionals. The pilot has significantly increased the proportion of pledges from Europe (excluding UK) (χ2 = 108.7, P < 0.001). AMR knowledge was greater in AGs (including the public) compared to the EU Eurobarometer survey. Further promotion across Europe is required to measure an impact on tackling AMR.

  8. Acute liver failure with thyrotoxicosis treated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cascino, Matthew D; McNabb, Brian; Gardner, David G; Woeber, Kenneth A; Fox, Alyson N; Wang, Bruce; Fix, Oren K

    2013-01-01

    We describe a young woman with previously undiagnosed thyrotoxicosis who presented with acute liver failure (ALF). We present a case report and review the relevant literature. An extensive evaluation excluded possible causes of ALF other than thyrotoxicosis. The management of thyrotoxicosis posed several unique challenges in the setting of ALF, particularly because we did not want to use potentially hepatotoxic thionamides. The patient was treated with prednisone and propranolol and was started on potassium iodide when she was listed for liver transplantation. She underwent an uncomplicated liver transplant and subsequent thyroidectomy and is doing well. This well-characterized case describes thyrotoxicosis as a possible cause of ALF after thoroughly excluding other possible causes and illustrates the challenges of simultaneously managing both disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ALF possibly resulting from untreated thyrotoxicosis that was successfully treated with liver transplantation.

  9. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Physicians’ practices for diagnosing liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases: A nationwide, Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Giada; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Klein, Marina B; Deschenes, Marc; Myers, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine practices among physicians in Canada for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. METHODS: Hepatologists, gastroenterologists, infectious diseases specialists, members of the Canadian Gastroenterology Association and/or the Canadian HIV Trials Network who manage patients with liver diseases were invited to participate in a web-based, national survey. RESULTS: Of the 237 physicians invited, 104 (43.9%) completed the survey. Routine assessment of liver fibrosis was requested by the surveyed physicians mostly for chronic hepatitis C (76.5%), followed by autoimmune/cholestatic liver disease (59.6%) and chronic hepatitis B (52.9%). Liver biopsy was the main diagnostic tool for 46.2% of the respondents, Fibroscan (Echosens, France) for 39.4% and Fibrotest (LabCorp, USA) for 7.7%. Etiology-specific differences were observed: noninvasive methods were mostly used for hepatitis C (63% versus 37% liver biopsy) and hepatitis B (62.9% versus 37.1% liver biopsy). For 42.7% of respondents, the use of noninvasive methods reduced the need for liver biopsy by >50%. Physicians’ characteristics associated with higher use of noninvasive methods were older age and being based at a university hospital or in private practice versus community hospital. Physicians’ main concerns regarding noninvasive fibrosis assessment methods were access/availability (42.3%), lack of guidelines for clinical use (26.9%) and cost/lack of reimbursement (14.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians who manage patients with chronic liver diseases in Canada require routine assessment of liver fibrosis stage. Although biopsy remains the primary diagnostic tool for almost one-half of respondents, noninvasive methods, particularly Fibroscan, have significantly reduced the need for liver biopsy in Canada. Limitations in access to and availability of the noninvasive methods represent a significant barrier. Finally, there is a need for clinical guidelines and a better

  11. Opisthorchiasis in Thailand: review and current status.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya-J; Pengsaa, Prasit

    2008-04-21

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini (O. viverrini) remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatomegaly, cholecystitis, chole-lithiasis and cholangiocarcinoma. The liver fluke infection was induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas of Thailand. Health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in high-risk areas.

  12. Severe iron deficiency anemia and marked eosinophilia in adolescent girls with the diagnosis of human fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Tavil, Betül; Ok-Bozkaya, İkbal; Tezer, Hasan; Tunç, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Human fascioliasis (HF), caused by the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, is an endemic infection in many parts of tropical countries. HF can also be seen in some of the non-tropical countries. This report describes two girls with severe iron deficiency anemia and eosinophilia, who were diagnosed as HF. The infection was successfully eliminated with the administration of triclabendazole. No side effects or recurrence was observed after the treatment. It should be kept in mind that marked eosinophilia with severe iron deficiency anemia should alert pediatricians to the possibility of F. hepatica infection.

  13. Digital liver biopsy: Bio-imaging of fatty liver for translational and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Marcello; Summers, Paul; Faita, Francesco; Brunetto, Maurizia R; Callea, Francesco; De Nicola, Andrea; Di Lascio, Nicole; Farinati, Fabio; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Gridelli, Bruno; Mirabelli, Peppino; Neri, Emanuele; Salvadori, Piero A; Rebelos, Eleni; Tiribelli, Claudio; Valenti, Luca; Salvatore, Marco; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2018-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of functional, molecular and structural bio-imaging is providing an extraordinary new opportunity to overcome the limits of invasive liver biopsy and introduce a “digital biopsy” for in vivo study of liver pathophysiology. To foster the application of bio-imaging in clinical and translational research, there is a need to standardize the methods of both acquisition and the storage of the bio-images of the liver. It can be hoped that the combination of digital, liquid and histologic liver biopsies will provide an innovative synergistic tri-dimensional approach to identifying new aetiologies, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the optimization of personalized therapy of liver diseases and liver cancer. A group of experts of different disciplines (Special Interest Group for Personalized Hepatology of the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, Institute for Biostructures and Bio-imaging of the National Research Council and Bio-banking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure) discussed criteria, methods and guidelines for facilitating the requisite application of data collection. This manuscript provides a multi-Author review of the issue with special focus on fatty liver. PMID:29527259

  14. Digital liver biopsy: Bio-imaging of fatty liver for translational and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Marcello; Summers, Paul; Faita, Francesco; Brunetto, Maurizia R; Callea, Francesco; De Nicola, Andrea; Di Lascio, Nicole; Farinati, Fabio; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Gridelli, Bruno; Mirabelli, Peppino; Neri, Emanuele; Salvadori, Piero A; Rebelos, Eleni; Tiribelli, Claudio; Valenti, Luca; Salvatore, Marco; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2018-02-27

    The rapidly growing field of functional, molecular and structural bio-imaging is providing an extraordinary new opportunity to overcome the limits of invasive liver biopsy and introduce a "digital biopsy" for in vivo study of liver pathophysiology. To foster the application of bio-imaging in clinical and translational research, there is a need to standardize the methods of both acquisition and the storage of the bio-images of the liver. It can be hoped that the combination of digital, liquid and histologic liver biopsies will provide an innovative synergistic tri-dimensional approach to identifying new aetiologies, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the optimization of personalized therapy of liver diseases and liver cancer. A group of experts of different disciplines (Special Interest Group for Personalized Hepatology of the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, Institute for Biostructures and Bio-imaging of the National Research Council and Bio-banking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure) discussed criteria, methods and guidelines for facilitating the requisite application of data collection. This manuscript provides a multi-Author review of the issue with special focus on fatty liver.

  15. Mechanistic insights of rapid liver regeneration after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for stage hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Vernadakis, Spyridon; Papalampros, Alexandros; Vailas, Michail; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Petrou, Athanasios; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-07

    To highlight the potential mechanisms of regeneration in the Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy models (clinical and experimental) that could unlock the myth behind the extraordinary capability of the liver for regeneration, which would help in designing new therapeutic options for the regenerative drive in difficult setup, such as chronic liver diseases. Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy has been recently advocated to induce rapid future liver remnant hypertrophy that significantly shortens the time for the second stage hepatectomy. The introduction of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy in the surgical armamentarium of therapeutic tools for liver surgeons represented a real breakthrough in the history of liver surgery. A comprehensive literature review of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy and its utility in liver regeneration is performed. Liver regeneration after Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy is a combination of portal flow changes and parenchymal transection that generate a systematic response inducing hepatocyte proliferation and remodeling. Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy represents a real breakthrough in the history of liver surgery because it offers rapid liver regeneration potential that facilitate resection of liver tumors that were previously though unresectable. The jury is still out though in terms of safety, efficacy and oncological outcomes. As far as Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy -induced liver regeneration is concerned, further research on the field should focus on the role of non-parenchymal cells in liver regeneration as well as on the effect of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy in liver regeneration in the setup of

  16. Role of innate immunity and the microbiota in liver fibrosis: crosstalk between the liver and gut

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Ekihiro; Schnabl, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a wound-healing scar response following chronic liver inflammation including alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, viral hepatitis, cholestatic liver disease and autoimmune liver diseases. The liver has a unique vascular system within the gastrointestinal tract, as the majority of the liver's blood supply comes from the intestine through the portal vein. When the intestinal barrier function is disrupted, an increase in intestinal permeability leads to the translocation of intestine-derived bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and unmethylated CpG containing DNA to the liver via the portal vein. These gut-derived bacterial products stimulate innate immune receptors, namely Toll-like receptors (TLRs), in the liver. TLRs are expressed on Kupffer cells, endothelial cells, dendritic cells, biliary epithelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and hepatocytes. TLRs activate these cells to contribute to acute and chronic liver diseases. This review summarizes recent studies investigating the role of TLRs, intestinal microbiota and bacterial translocation in liver fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:22124143

  17. Non-invasive evaluation of liver stiffness after splenectomy in rabbits with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Jun; Ling, Wen-Wu; Wang, Hong; Meng, Ling-Wei; Cai, He; Peng, Bing

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the diagnostic performance of liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in animal models and determine the longitudinal changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ after splenectomy at different stages of fibrosis. METHODS Liver stiffness was measured in sixty-eight rabbits with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis at different stages and eight healthy control rabbits by ElastPQ. Liver biopsies and blood samples were obtained at scheduled time points to assess liver function and degree of fibrosis. Thirty-one rabbits with complete data that underwent splenectomy at different stages of liver fibrosis were then included for dynamic monitoring of changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ and liver function according to blood tests. RESULTS LSM by ElastPQ was significantly correlated with histologic fibrosis stage (r = 0.85, P < 0.001). The optimal cutoff values by ElastPQ were 11.27, 14.89, and 18.21 kPa for predicting minimal fibrosis, moderate fibrosis, and cirrhosis, respectively. Longitudinal monitoring of the changes in liver stiffness by ElastPQ showed that early splenectomy (especially F1) may delay liver fibrosis progression. CONCLUSION ElastPQ is an available, convenient, objective and non-invasive technique for assessing liver stiffness in rabbits with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. In addition, liver stiffness measurements using ElastPQ can dynamically monitor the changes in liver stiffness in rabbit models, and in patients, after splenectomy. PMID:28028365

  18. Stages of Childhood Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment Option Overview Go ... different types of treatment for patients with childhood liver cancer. Different types of treatments are available for children ...

  19. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-06-21

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions.

  20. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  1. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  2. Acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Slack, Andy; Wendon, Julia

    2011-06-01

    ALF is a multisystem disorder necessitating both predictive and reactive management strategies to support and protect organs from the initial and subsequent insults encountered. Early referral to a specialist liver centre with the option of liver transplantation is recommended. Furthermore, a good understanding of the poor prognostic variables is necessary to determine those most at risk of developing ALF in order to facilitate timely, safe transfer and listing for liver transplantation.

  3. Plasma cholesterol-lowering and transient liver dysfunction in mice lacking squalene synthase in the liver[S

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Shuichi; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Tozawa, Ryuichi; Tazoe, Fumiko; Takahashi, Manabu; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Yamamuro, Daisuke; Sakai, Kent; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Honda, Akira; Ishibashi, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of squalene, the first specific intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. To test the feasibility of lowering plasma cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic SS, we generated mice in which SS is specifically knocked out in the liver (L-SSKO) using Cre-loxP technology. Hepatic SS activity of L-SSKO mice was reduced by >90%. In addition, cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver slices was almost eliminated. Although the hepatic squalene contents were markedly reduced in L-SSKO mice, the hepatic contents of cholesterol and its precursors distal to squalene were indistinguishable from those of control mice, indicating the presence of sufficient centripetal flow of cholesterol and/or its precursors from the extrahepatic tissues. L-SSKO mice showed a transient liver dysfunction with moderate hepatomegaly presumably secondary to increased farnesol production. In a fed state, the plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly reduced in L-SSKO mice, primarily owing to reduced hepatic VLDL secretion. In a fasted state, the hypolipidemic effect was lost. mRNA expression of liver X receptor α target genes was reduced, while that of sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 target genes was increased. In conclusion, liver-specific ablation of SS inhibits hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and induces hypolipidemia without increasing significant mortality. PMID:25755092

  4. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling

    PubMed Central

    Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect “underfitting” condition. PMID:27594879

  5. Tackling NCD in LMIC: Achievements and Lessons Learned From the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Engelgau, Michael M; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Smith, Richard; Miranda, Jaime; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Belis, Deshiree; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Effectively tackling the growing noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is a major challenge. To address research needs in this setting for NCDs, in 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and UnitedHealth Group (UHG) engaged in a public-private partnership that supported a network of 11 LMIC-based research centers and created the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence (COE) Program. The Program's overall goal was to contribute to reducing the cardiovascular and lung disease burdens by catalyzing in-country research institutions to develop a global network of biomedical research centers. Key elements of the Program included team science and collaborative approaches, developing research and training platforms for future investigators, and creating a data commons. This Program embraced a strategic approach for tackling NCDs in LMICs and will provide capacity for locally driven research efforts that can identify and address priority health issues in specific countries' settings. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Outcome of 1000 liver cancer patients evaluated at the UPMC Liver Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Dvorchik, Igor; Gamblin, T Clark; Carr, Brian I

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated 1000 consecutive patients with liver tumors at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Liver Cancer Center over the 4-year period from August 2000 to August 2004. Of the 1000 patients seen, 573 had primary liver cancer and 427 had metastatic cancer to the liver. The mean age of the patients evaluated was 62.2 years, and 61% were male. Treatment consisted of a liver surgical procedure (resection or radiofrequency ablation) in 369 cases (36.9%), hepatic intra-arterial regional therapy (transarterial chemoembolization or (90)yttrium microspheres) in 524 cases (52.4%), systemic chemotherapy in 35 cases (3.5%), and palliative care in 72 patients (7.2%). For treated patients, median survival was 884 days for those undergoing resection/radiofrequency ablation, compared to 295 days with regional therapy. These data indicate that over 90% of patients with liver cancer evaluated at a tertiary referral center can be offered some form of therapy. Survival rates are superior with a liver resection or ablation procedure, which is likely consistent with selection bias. Hepatocellular carcinoma was the most common tumor seen due to referral pattern and screening of hepatitis patients at a major liver transplant center. The most common reason for offering palliative care was hepatic insufficiency usually associated with cirrhosis.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is the Liver Another Target?

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH). OSA has been associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome as well as with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a common condition ranging in severity from uncomplicated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH), liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD is liver biopsy. Obesity and insulin resistance lead to liver steatosis, but the causes of the progression to NASH are not known. Emerging evidence suggests that OSA may play a role in the progression of hepatic steatosis and the development of NASH. Several cross-sectional studies showed that the severity of IH in patients with OSA predicted the severity of NAFLD on liver biopsy. However, neither prospective nor interventional studies with continuous positive airway pressure treatment have been performed. Studies in a mouse model showed that IH causes triglyceride accumulation in the liver and liver injury as well as hepatic inflammation. The mouse model provided insight in the pathogenesis of liver injury showing that (1) IH accelerates the progression of hepatic steatosis by inducing adipose tissue lipolysis and increasing free fatty acids (FFA) flux into the liver; (2) IH up-regulates lipid biosynthetic pathways in the liver; (3) IH induces oxidative stress in the liver; (4) IH up-regulates hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha and possibly HIF-2 alpha, which may increase hepatic steatosis and induce liver inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of FFA and different transcription factors in the pathogenesis of IH-induced NAFLD is yet to be established. Thus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that IH of OSA may contribute to the progression of NAFLD but definitive clinical studies and experiments in the mouse model have yet to be done. PMID:23087670

  8. Quantification of liver fibrosis via second harmonic imaging of the Glisson's capsule from liver surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuoyu; Kang, Chiang Huen; Gou, Xiaoli; Peng, Qiwen; Yan, Jie; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Cheng, Chee Leong; He, Yuting; Kang, Yuzhan; Xia, Wuzheng; So, Peter T C; Welsch, Roy; Rajapakse, Jagath C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-04-01

    Liver surface is covered by a collagenous layer called the Glisson's capsule. The structure of the Glisson's capsule is barely seen in the biopsy samples for histology assessment, thus the changes of the collagen network from the Glisson's capsule during the liver disease progression are not well studied. In this report, we investigated whether non-linear optical imaging of the Glisson's capsule at liver surface would yield sufficient information to allow quantitative staging of liver fibrosis. In contrast to conventional tissue sections whereby tissues are cut perpendicular to the liver surface and interior information from the liver biopsy samples were used, we have established a capsule index based on significant parameters extracted from the second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of capsule collagen from anterior surface of rat livers. Thioacetamide (TAA) induced liver fibrosis animal models was used in this study. The capsule index is capable of differentiating different fibrosis stages, with area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) up to 0.91, making it possible to quantitatively stage liver fibrosis via liver surface imaging potentially with endomicroscopy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The increasing burden of potentially preventable liver disease among adult liver transplant recipients: A comparative analysis of liver transplant indication by era in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jessica; Balderson, Glenda; Hellard, Margaret; Gow, Paul; Strasser, Simone; Stuart, Katherine; Wigg, Alan; Jeffrey, Gary; Gane, Ed; Angus, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV), alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), and non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are leading indications for adult liver transplantation in Australia and New Zealand. However, these diseases are potentially preventable through effective primary and/or secondary prevention strategies. This study evaluates the relative contribution of potentially preventable liver diseases to liver transplant numbers in Australia and New Zealand over time. Prospectively recorded clinical, demographic, and outcome data were collected from the Australian and New Zealand Liver Transplant Registry for all primary adult liver transplants performed in Australia and New Zealand from 1 January 1985 until 31 December 2012. Potentially preventable liver disease was defined as HBV, HCV, NAFLD, ALD, and HCC. The etiology of liver disease leading to liver transplantation and the proportion of preventable liver disease-related liver transplantation was compared between Era 1 (1985-1993), Era 2 (1994-2003), and Era 3 (2004-2012). Overall, 1252 of 3266 adult primary liver transplants (38.3%) were performed for potentially preventable liver disease. There was a significant increase in the proportion of liver transplants because of preventable liver disease from 21.2% (93 of 439) in Era 1, to 49.8% (623 of 1252) in Era 2 and 63.5% (1000 of 1575) in Era 3 (P < 0.0001). Over time, there was a significant increase in HCV (P < 0.0001), ALD (P = 0.002), and NAFLD (P < 0.0001) as a primary indication for adult liver transplant, whereas HBV has significantly decreased from Era 1 to Era 3 as an indication for transplant (P < 0.0001). The number of transplants performed for HCC also increased across Eras (P < 0.0001), with 84% due to underlying potentially preventable liver disease. Since 2004, the majority of primary adult liver transplants within Australia and New Zealand have been because of potentially preventable liver diseases and the

  10. Plants Consumption and Liver Health

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a very important organ with a lot of functions for the host to survive. Dietary components are essential for and can be beneficial or detrimental to the healthy or diseased liver. Plants food is an essential part of the human diet and comprises various compounds which are closely related to liver health. Selected food plants can provide nutritional and medicinal support for liver disease. At the present, the knowledge of the effects of plants on the liver is still incomplete. The most urgent task at the present time is to find the best dietary and medicinal plants for liver health in an endless list of candidates. This review article updates the knowledge about the effects of plants consumption on the health of the liver, putting particular emphasis on the potential beneficial and harmful impact of dietary and medicinal plants on liver function. PMID:26221179

  11. Microbiota and the liver.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting-Chin David; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos; Rustgi, Vinod K

    2018-04-01

    The gut microbiome outnumbers the human genome by 150-fold and plays important roles in metabolism, immune system education, tolerance development, and prevention of pathogen colonization. Dysbiosis has been associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and alcoholic liver disease (ALD) as well as cirrhosis and complications. This article provides an overview of this relationship. Liver Transplantation 24 539-550 2018 AASLD. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. [Robot-assisted liver resection].

    PubMed

    Aselmann, H; Möller, T; Kersebaum, J-N; Egberts, J H; Croner, R; Brunner, M; Grützmann, R; Becker, T

    2017-06-01

    Robotic liver resection can overcome some of the limitations of laparoscopic liver surgery; therefore, it is a promising tool to increase the proportion of minimally invasive liver resections. The present article gives an overview of the current literature. Furthermore, the results of a nationwide survey on robotic liver surgery among hospitals in Germany with a DaVinci system used in general visceral surgery and the perioperative results of two German robotic centers are presented.

  13. Robotic liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  14. Liver Masses: What Physicians Need to Know About Ordering and Interpreting Liver Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Arman; Gaba, Ron C; Lokken, R Peter; Berggruen, Senta M; Mar, Winnie A

    2017-10-18

    This paper reviews diagnostic imaging techniques used to characterize liver masses and the imaging characteristics of the most common liver masses. The role of recently adopted ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents will be emphasized. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is an inexpensive exam which can confirm benignity of certain liver masses without ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging using hepatocyte-specific gadolinium-based contrast agents can help confirm or narrow the differential diagnosis of liver masses.

  15. The current status of opisthorchiasis and clonorchiasis in the Mekong Basin

    PubMed Central

    Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Andrews, Ross H.; Van De, Nguyen; Wongsaroj, Thitima; Sinuon, Muth; Odermatt, Peter; Nawa, Yukifumi; Liang, Song; Brindley, Paul J.; Sripa, Banchob

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights the current status and control of liver fluke infections in the Mekong Basin countries where Opisthorchis and Clonorchis are highly endemic. Updated data on prevalence and distribution have been summarized from presentations in the “96 Years of Opisthorchiasis. International Congress of Liver Flukes”. It is disturbing that despite treatment and control programs have been in place for decades, all countries of the Lower Mekong Basin are still highly endemic with O. viverrini and/or C. sinensis as well as alarmingly high levels of CCA incidence. A common pattern that is emerging in each country is the difference in transmission of O. viverrini between lowlands which have high prevalence versus highlands which have low prevalence. This seems to be associated with wetlands, flooding patterns and human movement and settlement. A more concerted effort from all community, educational, public health and government sectors is necessary to successfully combat this fatal liver disease of the poor. PMID:21893213

  16. Adipokines in Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Buechler, Christa; Haberl, Elisabeth M; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Aslanidis, Charalampos

    2017-06-29

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis, which is considered a serious disease. The Child-Pugh score and the model of end-stage liver disease score have been established to assess residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. The development of portal hypertension contributes to ascites, variceal bleeding and further complications in these patients. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is used to lower portal pressure, which represents a major improvement in the treatment of patients. Adipokines are proteins released from adipose tissue and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. These proteins affect various biological processes that are involved in liver function, including angiogenesis, vasodilation, inflammation and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The best studied adipokines are adiponectin and leptin. Adiponectin protects against hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis, and leptin functions as a profibrogenic factor. These and other adipokines are supposed to modulate disease severity in patients with liver cirrhosis. Consequently, circulating levels of these proteins have been analyzed to identify associations with parameters of hepatic function, portal hypertension and its associated complications in patients with liver cirrhosis. This review article briefly addresses the role of adipokines in hepatitis and liver fibrosis. Here, studies having analyzed these proteins in systemic blood in cirrhotic patients are listed to identify adipokines that are comparably changed in the different cohorts of patients with liver cirrhosis. Some studies measured these proteins in systemic, hepatic and portal vein blood or after TIPS to specify the tissues contributing to circulating levels of these proteins and the effect of portal hypertension, respectively.

  17. Adipokines in Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Haberl, Elisabeth M.; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Aslanidis, Charalampos

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis, which is considered a serious disease. The Child-Pugh score and the model of end-stage liver disease score have been established to assess residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. The development of portal hypertension contributes to ascites, variceal bleeding and further complications in these patients. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is used to lower portal pressure, which represents a major improvement in the treatment of patients. Adipokines are proteins released from adipose tissue and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. These proteins affect various biological processes that are involved in liver function, including angiogenesis, vasodilation, inflammation and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The best studied adipokines are adiponectin and leptin. Adiponectin protects against hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis, and leptin functions as a profibrogenic factor. These and other adipokines are supposed to modulate disease severity in patients with liver cirrhosis. Consequently, circulating levels of these proteins have been analyzed to identify associations with parameters of hepatic function, portal hypertension and its associated complications in patients with liver cirrhosis. This review article briefly addresses the role of adipokines in hepatitis and liver fibrosis. Here, studies having analyzed these proteins in systemic blood in cirrhotic patients are listed to identify adipokines that are comparably changed in the different cohorts of patients with liver cirrhosis. Some studies measured these proteins in systemic, hepatic and portal vein blood or after TIPS to specify the tissues contributing to circulating levels of these proteins and the effect of portal hypertension, respectively. PMID:28661458

  18. Sexual dysfunction in chronic liver disease: is liver transplantation an effective cure?

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Germani, Giacomo; Masier, Annalisa; De Martin, Eleonora; Gambato, Martina; Salonia, Andrea; Bo, Patrizio; Vitale, Alessandro; Cillo, Umberto; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Senzolo, Marco

    2010-06-27

    The goal of liver transplantation is not only to ensure patient long-term survival but also to offer the opportunity to achieve psychologic and physical integrity. Quality of life after liver transplantation may be affected by unsatisfactory sexual function. Before liver transplantation, sexual dysfunction and sex hormone disturbances are reported in men and women mainly due to abnormality of physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in some cases, origin of liver disease. Successful liver transplantation should theoretically restore hormonal balance and improve sexual function both in men and women, thus improving the reproductive performance. However, after transplantation, up to 25% of patients report persistent sexual dysfunction, and approximately one third of patients describe the appearance of de novo sexual dysfunction. Despite the described high prevalence of this condition, epidemiologic data are relatively scant. Further studies on pathophysiology and risk factors in the field of sexual function after liver transplantation along with new strategies to support and inform patients on the waiting list and after surgery are needed.

  19. Combined effects of social stress and liver fluke infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, Damira F; Marenina, Mariya K; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Tenditnik, Mikhail V; Katokhin, Alexey V; Pavlov, Konstantin S; Sivkov, Anton Yu; Vishnivetskaya, Galina B; Lvova, Maria N; Tolstikova, Tatiana G; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of two influences, social stress and acute opisthorchiasis, were investigated in inbred C57BL/6J male mice. In the model of social stress, mice were repeatedly attacked and defeated by aggressive outbred ICR male mice and were in continuous sensory contact with an aggressive conspecific mouse in their home cage for 20 days. Acute opisthorchiasis was provoked by invasion of Opisthorchis felineus (50 larvae per animal) on the fourth day after the social stress was induced. Simultaneous action of both factors caused the hypertrophy of adrenal glands, as well as elevated the activity of cathepsins B and L in the spleen. This effect on the activity of the cysteine proteases in the hippocampus and hypothalamus following O. felineus invasion was the predominant result of simultaneous action with social stress. Acute opisthorchiasis, social stress, and their combination caused an increase in the level of blood IL-6 in approximately 30% of the animals. Social stress induced a more pronounced effect on mouse plus-maze behavior than O. felineus invasion. Our results suggest a more severe negative effect of the simultaneous influence of both factors on most of the parameters that were investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent viral liver disease (hepatitis B and C) after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Martínez, Marco Antonio; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis C represents more than 35% of liver transplant candidates worldwide. Meanwhile, hepatitis B continues to be an important cause of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in Asia and Africa. Recurrent viral liver disease is a significant event after liver transplantation and continues to be one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and loss in the middle and long-term follow-up. Mechanisms of liver reinfection and disease recurrence vary between these two viruses and pre-emptive as well as the therapeutic approaches are different. Hepatitis B patients can be managed with immune globulin immediately after liver transplant and various agents such as nucleotide and nucleoside analogues can be associated. As a result, disease recurrence has been delayed or prevented in these patients. Individuals transplanted for hepatitis C are known to have universal reinfection and a high rate of disease recurrence has been reported in the literature. Strategies to treat hepatitis C recurrence are limited to the use of pegylated interferon and ribavirin when disease is demonstrated histologically and biochemically, although other strategies have been described with limited or no success. We herein review the mechanisms of disease recurrence and the current as well as the future therapeutic approaches to prevent and to treat these diseases.

  1. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  2. Cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of liver volume and total liver fat burden in adults with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Chen, Joshua; Le, Thuy-Anh; Changchien, Christopher; Hamilton, Gavin; Middleton, Michael S.; Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between fractional liver fat content, liver volume, and total liver fat burden. Methods In 43 adults with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis participating in a clinical trial, liver volume was estimated by segmentation of magnitude-based low-flip-angle multiecho GRE images. The liver mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF) was calculated. The total liver fat index (TLFI) was estimated as the product of liver mean PDFF and liver volume. Linear regression analyses were performed. Results Cross-sectional analyses revealed statistically significant relationships between TLFI and liver mean PDFF (R2 = 0.740 baseline/0.791 follow-up, P < 0.001 baseline/P < 0.001 follow-up), and between TLFI and liver volume (R2 = 0.352/0.452, P < 0.001/< 0.001). Longitudinal analyses revealed statistically significant relationships between liver volume change and liver mean PDFF change (R2 = 0.556, P < 0.001), between TLFI change and liver mean PDFF change (R2 = 0.920, P < 0.001), and between TLFI change and liver volume change (R2 = 0.735, P < 0.001). Conclusion Liver segmentation in combination with MRI-based PDFF estimation may be used to monitor liver volume, liver mean PDFF, and TLFI in a clinical trial. PMID:25015398

  3. Transjugular Liver Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, George; Ferral, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Liver biopsy is considered the gold standard for the evaluation of acute and chronic liver disorders. Transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) was described by Dotter in 1964 and clinically performed for the first time by Hanafee in 1967. TJLB consists of obtaining liver tissue through a rigid cannula introduced into one of the hepatic veins, typically using jugular venous access. The quality of the TJLB specimens has improved so much that the samples obtained by this method are comparable with those obtained with the percutaneous technique. TJLB is indicated for patients with coagulopathy, ascites, peliosis hepatis, morbid obesity, liver transplant, or in patients undergoing a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure. The technical success rate for a TJLB procedure ranges from 87 to 97%. Sample fragmentation has been reported in 14 to 25% of the TJLB samples. The complication rates are low and range between 1.3% and 6.5%. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the fundamental aspects of the TJLB procedure, including technique, indications, contraindications, results, and complications. PMID:23729981

  4. Iron homeostasis in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erik R; Shah, Yatrik M

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is tightly regulated. A principal function of the liver is the regulation of iron homeostasis. The liver senses changes in systemic iron requirements and can regulate iron concentrations in a robust and rapid manner. The last 10 years have led to the discovery of several regulatory mechanisms in the liver which control the production of iron regulatory genes, storage capacity, and iron mobilization. Dysregulation of these functions leads to an imbalance of iron, which is the primary causes of iron-related disorders. Anemia and iron overload are two of the most prevalent disorders worldwide and affect over a billion people. Several mutations in liver-derived genes have been identified, demonstrating the central role of the liver in iron homeostasis. During conditions of excess iron, the liver increases iron storage and protects other tissues, namely the heart and pancreas from iron-induced cellular damage. However, a chronic increase in liver iron stores results in excess reactive oxygen species production and liver injury. Excess liver iron is one of the major mechanisms leading to increased steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23720289

  5. Human liver segments: role of cryptic liver lobes and vascular physiology in the development of liver veins and left-right asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Peeters, Mathijs M J P; Kruepunga, Nutmethee; Mekonen, Hayelom K; Mommen, Greet M C; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2017-12-07

    Couinaud based his well-known subdivision of the liver into (surgical) segments on the branching order of portal veins and the location of hepatic veins. However, both segment boundaries and number remain controversial due to an incomplete understanding of the role of liver lobes and vascular physiology on hepatic venous development. Human embryonic livers (5-10 weeks of development) were visualized with Amira 3D-reconstruction and Cinema 4D-remodeling software. Starting at 5 weeks, the portal and umbilical veins sprouted portal-vein branches that, at 6.5 weeks, had been pruned to 3 main branches in the right hemi-liver, whereas all (>10) persisted in the left hemi-liver. The asymmetric branching pattern of the umbilical vein resembled that of a "distributing" vessel, whereas the more symmetric branching of the portal trunk resembled a "delivering" vessel. At 6 weeks, 3-4 main hepatic-vein outlets drained into the inferior caval vein, of which that draining the caudate lobe formed the intrahepatic portion of the caval vein. More peripherally, 5-6 major tributaries drained both dorsolateral regions and the left and right ventromedial regions, implying a "crypto-lobar" distribution. Lobar boundaries, even in non-lobated human livers, and functional vascular requirements account for the predictable topography and branching pattern of the liver veins, respectively.

  6. The Origin of New-Onset Diabetes After Liver Transplantation: Liver, Islets, or Gut?

    PubMed

    Ling, Qi; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Baohong; Li, Lanjuan; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-04-01

    New-onset diabetes is a frequent complication after solid organ transplantation. Although a number of common factors are associated with the disease, including recipient age, body mass index, hepatitis C infection, and use of immunosuppressive drugs, new-onset diabetes after liver transplantation (NODALT) has the following unique aspects and thus needs to be considered its own entity. First, a liver graft becomes the patient's primary metabolic regulator after liver transplantation, but this would not be the case for kidney or other grafts. The metabolic states, as well as the genetics of the graft, play crucial roles in the development of NODALT. Second, dysfunction of the islets of Langerhans is common in cirrhotic patients and would be exacerbated by immunosuppressive agents, particularly calcineurin inhibitors. On the other hand, minimized immunosuppressive protocols have been widely advocated in liver transplantation because of liver tolerance (immune privilege). Third and last, through the "gut-liver axis," graft function is closely linked to gut microbiota, which is now considered an important metabolic organ and known to independently influence the host's metabolic homeostasis. Liver transplant recipients present with specific gut microbiota that may be prone to trigger metabolic disorders. In this review, we proposed 3 possible sites for the origin of NODALT, which are liver, islets, and gut, to help elucidate the underlying mechanism of NODALT.

  7. Prevalence and co-infection of intestinal parasites among thai rural residents at high-risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma: a cross-sectional study in a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Nopparat; Promthet, Supannee; Wiangnon, Surapon; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are still important to the health of Thai rural residents. IPIs are the cause of many chronic diseases with, for example, opisthorchiasis resulting in progression to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). This cross-sectional study in a prospective cohort study aimed to examine the prevalence and co- infection of intestinal parasites among Northeastern Thai rural residents, recruited into the Khon Kaen Cohort Study (KKCS), and who were residing in areas of high-risk for developing CCA. On recruitment, subjects had completed questionnaires and provided fecal samples for IPI testing using the formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique. Data on selected general characteristics and the results of the fecal tests were analysed. IPI test results were available for 18,900 of cohort subjects, and 38.50% were found to be positive for one or more types of intestinal parasite. The prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini (O. viverrini) infection was the highest (45.7%), followed by intestinal flukes (31.9%), intestinal nematodes (17.7%), intestinal protozoa (3.02%), and intestinal cestodes (1.69%). The pattern of different infections was similar in all age groups. According to a mapping analysis, a higher CCA burden was correlated with a higher prevalence of O. viverrini and intestinal flukes and a greater intensity of O. viverrini. Both prevention and control programs against liver fluke and other intestinal parasites are needed and should be delivered simultaneously. We can anticipate that the design of future control and prevention programmes will accommodate a more community-orientated and participatory approach.

  8. Whole-Genome and Epigenomic Landscapes of Etiologically Distinct Subtypes of Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jusakul, Apinya; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yong, Chern Han; Lim, Jing Quan; Huang, Mi Ni; Padmanabhan, Nisha; Nellore, Vishwa; Kongpetch, Sarinya; Ng, Alvin Wei Tian; Ng, Ley Moy; Choo, Su Pin; Myint, Swe Swe; Thanan, Raynoo; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Lim, Weng Khong; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Boot, Arnoud; Liu, Mo; Ong, Choon Kiat; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Lie, Stefanus; Lim, Alvin Soon Tiong; Lim, Tse Hui; Tan, Jing; Loh, Jia Liang; McPherson, John R; Khuntikeo, Narong; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajaraphongsa; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit; Totoki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Hiromi; Arai, Yasuhito; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Dima, Simona; Duda, Dan G; Popescu, Irinel; Broet, Philippe; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Yu, Ming-Chin; Scarpa, Aldo; Lai, Jiaming; Luo, Di-Xian; Carvalho, André Lopes; Vettore, André Luiz; Rhee, Hyungjin; Park, Young Nyun; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gordân, Raluca; Rozen, Steven G; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a hepatobiliary malignancy exhibiting high incidence in countries with endemic liver-fluke infection. We analyzed 489 CCAs from 10 countries, combining whole-genome (71 cases), targeted/exome, copy-number, gene expression, and DNA methylation information. Integrative clustering defined 4 CCA clusters-fluke-positive CCAs (clusters 1/2) are enriched in ERBB2 amplifications and TP53 mutations; conversely, fluke-negative CCAs (clusters 3/4) exhibit high copy-number alterations and PD-1 / PD-L2 expression, or epigenetic mutations ( IDH1/2, BAP1 ) and FGFR / PRKA -related gene rearrangements. Whole-genome analysis highlighted FGFR2 3' untranslated region deletion as a mechanism of FGFR2 upregulation. Integration of noncoding promoter mutations with protein-DNA binding profiles demonstrates pervasive modulation of H3K27me3-associated sites in CCA. Clusters 1 and 4 exhibit distinct DNA hypermethylation patterns targeting either CpG islands or shores-mutation signature and subclonality analysis suggests that these reflect different mutational pathways. Our results exemplify how genetics, epigenetics, and environmental carcinogens can interplay across different geographies to generate distinct molecular subtypes of cancer. Significance: Integrated whole-genome and epigenomic analysis of CCA on an international scale identifies new CCA driver genes, noncoding promoter mutations, and structural variants. CCA molecular landscapes differ radically by etiology, underscoring how distinct cancer subtypes in the same organ may arise through different extrinsic and intrinsic carcinogenic processes. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1116-35. ©2017 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. LiverAtlas: a unique integrated knowledge database for systems-level research of liver and hepatic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Yang, Chunyuan; Wang, Shaochuang; Chen, Tao; Li, Mansheng; Wang, Xue; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Kang; Ma, Jie; Wu, Songfeng; Zhang, Xueli; Zhu, Yunping; Wu, Jinsheng; He, Fuchu

    2013-09-01

    A large amount of liver-related physiological and pathological data exist in publicly available biological and bibliographic databases, which are usually far from comprehensive or integrated. Data collection, integration and mining processes pose a great challenge to scientific researchers and clinicians interested in the liver. To address these problems, we constructed LiverAtlas (http://liveratlas.hupo.org.cn), a comprehensive resource of biomedical knowledge related to the liver and various hepatic diseases by incorporating 53 databases. In the present version, LiverAtlas covers data on liver-related genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and hepatic diseases. Additionally, LiverAtlas provides a wealth of manually curated information, relevant literature citations and cross-references to other databases. Importantly, an expert-confirmed Human Liver Disease Ontology, including relevant information for 227 types of hepatic disease, has been constructed and is used to annotate LiverAtlas data. Furthermore, we have demonstrated two examples of applying LiverAtlas data to identify candidate markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the systems level and to develop a systems biology-based classifier by combining the differential gene expression with topological features of human protein interaction networks to enhance the ability of HCC differential diagnosis. LiverAtlas is the most comprehensive liver and hepatic disease resource, which helps biologists and clinicians to analyse their data at the systems level and will contribute much to the biomarker discovery and diagnostic performance enhancement for liver diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Fraction from human and rat liver which is inhibitory for proliferation of liver cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, T S; Ottenweller, J; Luke, A; Santos, S; Keeting, P; Cuy, R; Lea, M A

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken with human and rat liver of a fraction reported to have growth inhibitory activity when prepared from rat liver. Fractions which were soluble in 70% ethanol and insoluble in 87% ethanol were prepared from liver cytosols. Electrophoretic analysis under denaturing conditions indicated that there were several quantitative or qualitative differences in the fractions from the two species. Fractions from both human and rat liver were found to be inhibitory for the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA of foetal chick hepatocytes. Under conditions in which the rat fraction inhibited precursor incorporation into DNA of rat liver epithelial cells there was not a significant inhibitory effect with the fraction from human liver. DNA synthesis in a rat hepatoma cell line was not significantly inhibited by preparations from either species. The data suggested that corresponding fractions from both rat and human liver could have inhibitory effects on precursor incorporation into DNA but the magnitude of the effects and target cell specificity may differ.

  11. Liver transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Soyama, Akihiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Egawa, Hiroto

    2016-10-01

    As of December 31, 2014, 7937 liver transplants (7673 living donor transplants and 264 deceased donor liver transplantations [DDLTs; 261 from heart-beating donors and 3 from non-heart-beating donors]) have been performed in 67 institutions in Japan. The revised Organ Transplant Law in Japan came into effect in July 2010, which allows organ procurement from brain-dead individuals, including children, with family consent if the patient had not previously refused organ donation. However, the number of deceased donor organ donations has not increased as anticipated. The rate of deceased organ donations per million population (pmp) has remained at less than 1. To maximize the viability of the limited numbers of donated organs, a system has been adopted that includes the partnership of well-trained transplant consultant doctors and local doctors. For compensating for the decreased opportunity of on-site training, an educational system regarding quality organ procurement for transplant surgeons has also been established. Furthermore, experts in the field of liver transplantation are currently discussing adoption of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score for allocation, promoting split-liver transplantation, arranging in-house coordinators, and improving the frequency of proposing the option to donate organs to the families. To overcome the shortage of donors during efforts to promote organ donation, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been developed in Japan. Continuous efforts to increase DDLT in addition to the successful experience of LDLT will increase the benefits of liver transplantation for more patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1401-1407 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Hot topics in liver transplantation: organ allocation--extended criteria donor--living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Müllhaupt, Beat; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gerlach, J Tilman; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the mainstay for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and some metabolic disorders. Its main drawback, though, is the disparity between the number of donors and the patients needing a liver graft. In this review we will discuss the recent changes regarding organ allocation, extended donor criteria, living donor liver transplantation and potential room for improvement. The gap between the number of donors and patients needing a liver graft forced the transplant community to introduce an objective model such as the modified model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) in order to obtain a transparent and fair organ allocation system. The use of extended criteria donor livers such as organs from older donors or steatotic grafts is one possibility to reduce the gap between patients on the waiting list and available donors. Finally, living donor liver transplantation has become a standard procedure in specialized centers as another possibility to reduce the donor shortage. Recent data clearly indicate that center experience is of major importance in achieving good results. Great progress has been made in recent years. However, further research is needed to improve results in the future.

  13. Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, Model for Liver Transplantation Survival and Donor Risk Index as predictive models of survival after liver transplantation in 1,006 patients.

    PubMed

    Aranzana, Elisa Maria de Camargo; Coppini, Adriana Zuolo; Ribeiro, Maurício Alves; Massarollo, Paulo Celso Bosco; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation has not increased with the number of patients requiring this treatment, increasing deaths among those on the waiting list. Models predicting post-transplantation survival, including the Model for Liver Transplantation Survival and the Donor Risk Index, have been created. Our aim was to compare the performance of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, the Model for Liver Transplantation Survival and the Donor Risk Index as prognostic models for survival after liver transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 1,270 patients who received a liver transplant from a deceased donor in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, between July 2006 and July 2009. All data obtained from the Health Department of the State of São Paulo at the 15 registered transplant centers were analyzed. Patients younger than 13 years of age or with acute liver failure were excluded. The majority of the recipients had Child-Pugh class B or C cirrhosis (63.5%). Among the 1,006 patients included, 274 (27%) died. Univariate survival analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model showed hazard ratios of 1.02 and 1.43 for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and the Model for Liver Transplantation Survival, respectively (p<0.001). The areas under the ROC curve for the Donor Risk Index were always less than 0.5, whereas those for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and the Model for Liver Transplantation Survival were significantly greater than 0.5 (p<0.001). The cutoff values for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (≥29.5; sensitivity: 39.1%; specificity: 75.4%) and the Model for Liver Transplantation Survival (≥1.9; sensitivity 63.9%, specificity 54.5%), which were calculated using data available before liver transplantation, were good predictors of survival after liver transplantation (p<0.001). The Model for Liver Transplantation Survival displayed similar death prediction performance to that of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease. A simpler model

  14. Utility of pre-procurement bedside liver biopsy in the deceased extended-criteria liver donor.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Richard S; Borup, Tim C; Popa, Sam; Saxena, Romil; Cummings, Oscar; Tector, A Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The Indiana Organ Procurement Organization (IOPO) utilizes preoperative bedside liver biopsies in certain extended-criteria donors (ECDs), obtained by the on-site coordinator, to determine the utility of pursuing donation. This study reports the clinical and financial outcomes for this management strategy. All bedside liver biopsies obtained in ECDs over a five-yr period were reviewed. Study variables included the following: indication for biopsy, biopsy results, taking the case to the operating room, transplantation of the donor liver, and graft survival. All biopsies were processed at a single university center. There were 110 donors biopsied. Primary indications included the following: old age (29%), extensive/current alcohol abuse (26%), hepatitis C-positive serology (21%), obesity (25%), and severely elevated liver function enzymes (18%). Biopsy results demonstrated a potentially transplantable liver in 73 cases (66%), all of whom were taken to the OR (while 37 ruled out for donation based upon liver biopsy [34%]). Of all biopsied livers, 49 ultimately were transplanted (45%). Intra-operative decisions included the following: transplant 51/73 (70%), surgeon decision to exclude 20/73 (27%), nonuse due to finding of malignancy two (3%). Bedside liver biopsy may be a valuable tool to determine the utility in pursuing donation in ECDs, particularly with liver-only donors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The International Liver Transplantation Society Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipient Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Charles M.; Quintini, Cristiano; Dhawan, Anil; Durand, Francois; Heimbach, Julie K.; Kim-Schluger, Hyung Leona; Kyrana, Eirini; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lerut, Jan; Lo, Chung-Mau; Pomfret, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been increasingly embraced around the world as an important strategy to address the shortage of deceased donor livers. The aim of this guideline, approved by the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS), is to provide a collection of expert opinions, consensus, and best practices surrounding LDLT. Recommendations were developed from an analysis of the National Library of Medicine living donor transplantation indexed literature using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Writing was guided by the ILTS Policy on the Development and Use of Practice Guidelines (www.ilts.org). Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations support specific approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care of living donor liver transplant recipients. PMID:28437386

  16. Evaluation of abnormal liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swastik; Dhiman, Radha K; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-04-01

    Incidentally detected abnormality in liver function tests is a common situation encountered by physicians across all disciplines. Many of these patients do not have primary liver disease as most of the commonly performed markers are not specific for the liver and are affected by myriad factors unrelated to liver disease. Also, many of these tests like liver enzyme levels do not measure the function of the liver, but are markers of liver injury, which is broadly of two types: hepatocellular and cholestatic. A combination of a careful history and clinical examination along with interpretation of pattern of liver test abnormalities can often identify type and aetiology of liver disease, allowing for a targeted investigation approach. Severity of liver injury is best assessed by composite scores like the Model for End Stage Liver Disease rather than any single parameter. In this review, we discuss the interpretation of the routinely performed liver tests along with the indications and utility of quantitative tests. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. How Effective Are Percutaneous Liver-Directed Therapies in Patients with Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases?

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Emam, Ahmed; Naguib, Nagy N.; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the clinical indications, technical developments, and outcome of liver-directed therapies in interventional oncology of non-colorectal liver metastases. Methods Liver-directed therapies are classified into vascular transarterial techniques such as chemoperfusion (TACP), chemoembolization (TACE), radioembolization (selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT)), and chemosaturation, as well as thermal ablation techniques like microwave ablation (MWA), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), cryotherapy, and irreversible electroporation (IRE). The authors searched the database PubMed using the following terms: ‘image-guided tumor ablation’, ‘thermal ablation therapies’, ‘liver metastases of uveal melanoma’, ‘neuroendocrine carcinoma’, ‘breast cancer’, and ‘non-colorectal liver metastases’. Results Various combinations of the above-mentioned therapy protocols are possible. In neuroendocrine carcinomas, oligonodular liver metastases are treated successfully via thermal ablation like RFA, LITT, or MWA, and diffuse involvement via TACE or SIRT. Although liver involvement in breast cancer is a systemic disease, non-responding nodular metastases can be controlled via RFA or LITT. In ocular or cutaneous melanoma, thermal ablation is rarely considered as an interventional treatment option, as opposed to TACE, SIRT, or chemosaturation. Rarely liver-directed therapies are used in pancreatic cancer, most likely due to problems such as biliary digestive communications after surgery and the risk of infections. Rare indications for thermal ablation are liver metastases of other primary cancers like non-small cell lung, gastric, and ovarian cancer. Conclusion Interventional oncological techniques play a role in patients with liver-dominant metastases. PMID:26889144

  18. Kinetic analysis of contralateral liver hypertrophy after radioembolization of primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Sonia T; Abuodeh, Yazan; Naghavi, Arash; Frakes, Jessica; Hoffe, Sarah; Kis, Bela; Anaya, Daniel A

    2018-05-01

    Radioembolization induces liver hypertrophy, although the extent and rate of hypertrophy are unknown. Our goal was to examine the kinetics of contralateral liver hypertrophy after transarterial radioembolization. A retrospective study (2010-2014) of treatment-naïve patients with primary/secondary liver malignancies undergoing right lobe radioembolization was performed. Computed tomography volumetry was performed before and 1, 3, and 6 months after radioembolization. Outcomes of interest were left lobe (standardized future liver remnant) degree of hypertrophy, kinetic growth rate, and ability to reach goal standardized future liver remnant ≥40%. Medians were compared with the Kruskall-Wallis test. Time to event analysis was used to estimate time to reach goal standardized future liver remnant. In the study, 25 patients were included. At 1, 3, and 6 months, median degree of hypertrophy was 4%, 8%, and 12% (P < .001), degree of hypertrophy relative to baseline future liver remnants was 11%, 17%, and 31% (P = .015), and kinetic growth rate was 0.8%, 0.5%, and 0.4%/week (P = .002). In patients with baseline standardized future liver remnant <40% (N= 16), median time to reach standardized future liver remnant ≥40% was 7.3 months, with 75% accomplishing standardized future liver remnant ≥40% at 8.2 months. Radioembolization induces hypertrophy of the contralateral lobe to a similar extent as existing methods, although at a lower rate. The role of radioembolization as a dual therapy (neoadjuvant and hypetrophy-inducing) for selected patients needs to be studied. (Surgery 2017;160:XXX-XXX.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonacetaminophen Drug-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Arul M; Lewis, James H

    2018-05-01

    Acute liver failure of all causes is diagnosed in between 2000 and 2500 patients annually in the United States. Drug-induced acute liver failure is the leading cause of acute liver failure, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Nonacetaminophen drug injury represents 11% of all cases in the latest registry from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Although rare, acute liver failure is clinically dramatic when it occurs, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. In contrast with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure, non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure has a more ominous prognosis with a lower liver transplant-free survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant and liver disease patients. Pre-Transplant Protein Malnutrition -- Many patients with end stage liver disease do ... to lose weight sensibly and slowly, without causing malnutrition (especially protein malnutrition). Losing excess weight decreases the ...

  1. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000211.htm Amebic liver abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amebic liver abscess is a collection of pus ...

  2. Liver Biopsy in Chronic Liver Diseases: Is There a Favorable Benefit: Risk Balance?

    PubMed

    Larrey, Dominique; Meunier, Lucy; Ursic-Bedoya, José

    2017-01-01

    Liver biopsy is still useful in selected clinical situations in which it is the only tool to obtain information necessary for the diagnosis, the prognosis, and the decision for treatment. Main examples are viral hepatitis with confounding co-morbidities, non alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune liver diseases.

  3. Fatty liver in children

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Mortazavi, Fakhrossadat; Mogaddasi, Nafiseh; Robabeh, Ghergherehchi; Ghaffari, Shamsi; Hasani, Alka

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a referral center of pediatrics in the northwest of Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study all subjects aged between six months to 15 years that were referred to the sonography unit, were investigated for fatty liver from March 2005 to August 2006. Patients with fatty liver change underwent detailed clinical and laboratory evaluation. Results: From 1500 children who were investigated, 34 subjects with sonographic evidence of fatty liver were enrolled in this study (2.3%). The mean age was 6.53 ± 3.07 years. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase was detected in 38.2% and 47.1% of patients, respectively. The mean level of cholesterol was 461 ± 182.23 mg/dl and 94.1% of patients had hypercholesterolemia. Total cholesterol level and serum aminotransferase levels had a significant positive correlation with severity of fatty liver (p < 0.05). Mean body mass index was significantly higher in patients with severe fatty liver (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The epidemiology of pediatric NAFLD should inform future attempts to develop evaluated screening protocols. Moreover, these data should guide efforts to delineate the pathophysiology of fatty liver in children. PMID:19536316

  4. Conventional Anchor Test Results at San Diego and Indian Island

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    operational practicality of using the Stockless anchor with welded open flukes, since tests have indicated higher capac- ities for the anchor with...Tests (Ref 1) of the Stockless anchor in mud with flukes free-swinging and with flukes welded open show significant increase.s in efficiency for the...latter condition, 4 versus 2, indicating that the anchor flukes did not open completely or at all for the free swinging (usual) condition. Towne (Ref 1

  5. Tackling childhood obesity: the importance of understanding the context.

    PubMed

    Knai, Cécile; McKee, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Recommendations to tackle major health problems such as childhood obesity may not be appropriate if they fail to take account of the prevailing socio-political, cultural and economic context. We describe the development and application of a qualitative risk analysis approach to identify non-scientific considerations framing the policy response to obesity in Denmark and Latvia. Interviews conducted with key stakeholders in Denmark and Latvia, undertaken following a review of relevant literature on obesity and national policies. A qualitative risk analysis model was developed to help explain the findings in the light of national context. Non-scientific considerations that appeared to influence the response to obesity include the perceived relative importance of childhood obesity; the nature of stakeholder relations and its impact on decision-making; the place of obesity on the policy agenda; the legitimacy of the state to act for population health and views on alliances between public and private sectors. Better recognition of the exogenous factors affecting policy-making may lead to a more adequate policy response. The development and use of a qualitative risk analysis model enabled a better understanding of the contextual factors and processes influencing the response to childhood obesity in each country.

  6. Tackling Critical Catalytic Residues in Helicobacter pylori l-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Maristella; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Valentini, Giovanna; Scotti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial asparaginases (amidohydrolases, EC 3.5.1.1) are important enzymes in cancer therapy, especially for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. They are tetrameric enzymes able to catalyze the deamination of l-ASN and, to a variable extent, of l-GLN, on which leukemia cells are dependent for survival. In contrast to other known l-asparaginases, Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 type II enzyme (HpASNase) is cooperative and has a low affinity towards l-GLN. In this study, some critical amino acids forming the active site of HpASNase (T16, T95 and E289) have been tackled by rational engineering in the attempt to better define their role in catalysis and to achieve a deeper understanding of the peculiar cooperative behavior of this enzyme. Mutations T16E, T95D and T95H led to a complete loss of enzymatic activity. Mutation E289A dramatically reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme, but increased its thermostability. Interestingly, E289 belongs to a loop that is very variable in l-asparaginases from the structure, sequence and length point of view, and which could be a main determinant of their different catalytic features. PMID:25826146

  7. Tackling Critical Catalytic Residues in Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Maristella; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Valentini, Giovanna; Scotti, Claudia

    2015-03-27

    Bacterial asparaginases (amidohydrolases, EC 3.5.1.1) are important enzymes in cancer therapy, especially for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. They are tetrameric enzymes able to catalyze the deamination of L-ASN and, to a variable extent, of L-GLN, on which leukemia cells are dependent for survival. In contrast to other known L-asparaginases, Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 type II enzyme (HpASNase) is cooperative and has a low affinity towards L-GLN. In this study, some critical amino acids forming the active site of HpASNase (T16, T95 and E289) have been tackled by rational engineering in the attempt to better define their role in catalysis and to achieve a deeper understanding of the peculiar cooperative behavior of this enzyme. Mutations T16E, T95D and T95H led to a complete loss of enzymatic activity. Mutation E289A dramatically reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme, but increased its thermostability. Interestingly, E289 belongs to a loop that is very variable in L-asparaginases from the structure, sequence and length point of view, and which could be a main determinant of their different catalytic features.

  8. Protein C activity and postoperative metabolic liver function after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wagener, G; Diaz, G; Guarrera, J V; Minhaz, M; Renz, J F; Sladen, R N

    2012-06-01

    Protein C is a natural thrombin antagonist produced by hepatocytes. Its levels are low in liver failure and predispose patients to increased risk for thrombosis. Little is known about the relationship between protein C activity and hepatic function after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We measured protein C activity of 41 patients undergoing liver transplantation by the Staclot method (normal range, 70%-130%) preoperatively and then daily on postoperative days (POD) 0-5. The mean protein C activity was low before OLT (34.3 ± 4.3%) and inversely correlated with the preoperative Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (Spearman's r = -0.643; P < .0001). Mean activity increased significantly on POD 1 (58.9 ± 4.5%), and remained above preoperative levels through POD 5. Ten patients developed metabolic liver dysfunction defined by a serum total bilirubin >5 mg/dL on POD 7. These patients had significantly lower protein C activity from POD 3 (47.2 ± 9.6% vs 75.9 ± 5.8%; P = .01) to POD 5. Preoperative protein C activity correlated inversely with the severity of liver failure as indicated by preoperative MELD score. Protein C activity recovered rapidly in patients with good allograft function but remained significantly lower in patients who had limited metabolic function as evidenced by increased total bilirubin levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabonomics Research Progress on Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengqian; Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qingwei; Wu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics as the new omics technique develops after genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and has rapid development at present. Liver diseases are worldwide public health problems. In China, chronic hepatitis B and its secondary diseases are the common liver diseases. They can be diagnosed by the combination of history, virology, liver function, and medical imaging. However, some patients seldom have relevant physical examination, so the diagnosis may be delayed. Many other liver diseases, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and autoimmune liver diseases, still do not have definite diagnostic markers; the diagnosis consists of history, medical imaging, and the relevant score. As a result, the clinical work becomes very complex. So it has broad prospects to explore the specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver diseases with metabolomics. In this paper, there are several summaries which are related to the current research progress and application of metabolomics on biomarkers of liver diseases.

  10. Tackling causes and costs of ED presentation for American football injuries: a population-level study.

    PubMed

    Smart, Blair J; Haring, R Sterling; Asemota, Anthony O; Scott, John W; Canner, Joseph K; Nejim, Besma J; George, Benjamin P; Alsulaim, Hatim; Kirsch, Thomas D; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    American tackle football is the most popular high-energy impact sport in the United States, with approximately 9 million participants competing annually. Previous epidemiologic studies of football-related injuries have generally focused on specific geographic areas or pediatric age groups. Our study sought to examine patient characteristics and outcomes, including hospital charges, among athletes presenting for emergency department (ED) treatment of football-related injury across all age groups in a large nationally representative data set. Patients presenting for ED treatment of injuries sustained playing American tackle football (identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code E007.0) from 2010 to 2011 were studied in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. Patient-specific injuries were identified using the primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code and categorized by type and anatomical region. Standard descriptive methods examined patient demographics, diagnosis categories, and ED and inpatient outcomes and charges. During the study period 397363 football players presented for ED treatment, 95.8% of whom were male. Sprains/strains (25.6%), limb fractures (20.7%), and head injuries (including traumatic brain injury; 17.5%) represented the most presenting injuries. Overall, 97.9% of patients underwent routine ED discharge with 1.1% admitted directly and fewer than 11 patients in the 2-year study period dying prior to discharge. The proportion of admitted patients who required surgical interventions was 15.7%, of which 89.9% were orthopedic, 4.7% neurologic, and 2.6% abdominal. Among individuals admitted to inpatient care, mean hospital length of stay was 2.4days (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.6) and 95.6% underwent routine discharge home. The mean total charge for all patients was $1941 (95% confidence interval, $1890-$1992) with substantial

  11. Liver transplantation around the world.

    PubMed

    Trotter, James F

    2017-04-01

    In the past few years, there have been important changes in the development of liver transplantation around the world. In particular, several emerging countries have rapidly developed transplant programs. There have also been important changes in liver allocation, utilization of donors by cardiac death, and living donors. A review of the practices in different countries around the world will help provide the reader with a better appreciation of their own program as well as the recognition of potential areas of improvement based on the experience of their colleagues. A recent series of articles has been published in the journal Liver Transplantation summarizing the practice of liver transplantation from representative countries around the world. The volume of liver transplant varies widely by country and there has been an important growth in volume in emerging countries. Most liver transplant candidates are prioritized for surgery by the Model for Endstage Liver Disease score and with the exception of Germany and the USA most patients are transplanted at Model for Endstage Liver Disease score from 18 to 20. Hepatitis C is the most common indication for liver transplant with the notable exception of several European countries. Innovative strategies to incentivize donation have been developed in several countries.

  12. Detection of liver cancer and abnormal liver tissue by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Ding, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiujun; Lin, Junxiu; Wang, Deli

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced human serum Raman spectra of liver cancer are measured. The spectra differences in serum from normal people and liver disease patients are analyzed. For the typical spectrum of normal serum, there are three sharp Raman peaks and relative intensity of Raman peaks excited by 514.5nm is higher than that excited by 488.0nm. For the Raman spectrum of liver cancer serum there are no peaks or very weak Raman peaks at the same positions. Results from more than two hundred case measurements show that clinical diagnostic accuracy is 92.86%. And then, the liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis are studied applying the technology of LIF. To liver cirrhosis, the shape of Raman peak is similar to normal and fluorescence spectrum is similar to that of liver cancer from statistic data. The experiment indicates that there is notable fluorescence difference between the abnormal and normal liver tissue and have blue shift in fluorescence peak. Except for human serum, we use rats serum for researching either. Compared with results of path al examination, we analyze the spectra of normal cases, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocirrhosis respectively in an attempt to find some difference between them. Red shift of fluorescence peak is observed with disease evolution using 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser. However, no distinct changes happen with 488.0nm excitation. These results have important reference values to explore the method of laser spectrum diagnosis.

  13. Tackling Health Inequalities in the United Kingdom: The Progress and Pitfalls of Policy

    PubMed Central

    Exworthy, Mark; Blane, David; Marmot, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Goal Assess the progress and pitfalls of current United Kingdom (U.K.) policies to reduce health inequalities. Objectives (1) Describe the context enabling health inequalities to get onto the policy agenda in the United Kingdom. (2) Categorize and assess selected current U.K. policies that may affect health inequalities. (3) Apply the “policy windows” model to understand the issues faced in formulating and implementing such policies. (4) Examine the emerging policy challenges in the U.K. and elsewhere. Data Sources Official documents, secondary analyses, and interviews with policymakers. Study Design Qualitative, policy analysis. Data Collection 2001–2002. The methods were divided into two stages. The first identified policies which were connected with individual inquiry recommendations. The second involved case-studies of three policies areas which were thought to be crucial in tackling health inequalities. Both stages involved interviews with policy-makers and documentary analysis. Principal Findings (1) The current U.K. government stated a commitment to reducing health inequalities. (2) The government has begun to implement policies that address the wider determinants. (3) Some progress is evident but many indicators remain stubborn. (4) Difficulties remain in terms of coordinating policies across government and measuring progress. (5) The “policy windows” model explains the limited extent of progress and highlights current and possible future pitfalls. (6) The U.K.'s experience has lessons for other governments involved in tackling health inequalities. Conclusions Health inequalities are on the agenda of U.K. government policy and steps have been made to address them. There are some signs of progress but much remains to be done including overcoming some of the perverse incentives at the national level, improving joint working, ensuring appropriate measures of performance/progress, and improving monitoring arrangements. A conceptual policy model aids

  14. Liver Disease in Mitochondrial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Way S.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Liver involvement, a common feature in childhood mitochondrial hepatopathies, particularly in the neonatal period, may manifest as neonatal acute liver failure, hepatic steatohepatitis, cholestasis, or cirrhosis with chronic liver failure of insidious onset. There are usually significant neuromuscular symptoms, multisystem involvement, and lactic acidemia. The liver disease is usually progressive and eventually fatal. Current medical therapy of mitochondrial hepatopathies is largely ineffective, and the prognosis is usually poor. The role of liver transplantation in patients with liver failure remains poorly defined because of the systemic nature of the disease that does not respond to transplantation. Several specific molecular defects (mutations in nuclear genes such as SCO1, BCS1L, POLG, DGUOK, and MPV17 and deletion or rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA) have been identified in recent years. Prospective, longitudinal multicenter studies will be needed to address the gaps in our knowledge in these rare liver diseases. PMID:17682973

  15. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases.

  16. High School Football Players Use Their Helmets to Tackle Other Players Despite Knowing the Risks

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Andrew M; Nakatsuka, Austin S

    2017-01-01

    There is greater attention to head-related injuries and concussions in American football. The helmet's structural safety and the way that football players use their helmets are important in preventing head injuries. Current strategies include penalizing players for high-risk behavior such as leading with their helmet or hitting an opposing player above the shoulder. Passive strategies include helmet modification to better protect the head of the players or to change the playing style of the players. Hawai‘i high school varsity football players were surveyed to determine how they use their helmets and how a new helmet design would affect their style of play. One hundred seventy-seven surveys were completed; 79% said that they used their helmet to hit an opposing player during a tackle and 46% said they made this contact intentionally. When asked about modifying helmets with a soft material on the outside, 48% said they thought putting a soft cover over a regular helmet would protect their head better. However, many participants said that putting a soft cover over their regular helmet was a bad idea for various reasons. Most young football players use their helmets to block or tackle despite being taught they would be penalized or potentially injured if they did so. By gaining a better understanding of why and how players use their helmets and how they would respond to new helmet designs, steps can be taken to reduce head injuries for all levels of play. PMID:28352493

  17. High School Football Players Use Their Helmets to Tackle Other Players Despite Knowing the Risks.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Andrew M; Nakatsuka, Austin S; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2017-03-01

    There is greater attention to head-related injuries and concussions in American football. The helmet's structural safety and the way that football players use their helmets are important in preventing head injuries. Current strategies include penalizing players for high-risk behavior such as leading with their helmet or hitting an opposing player above the shoulder. Passive strategies include helmet modification to better protect the head of the players or to change the playing style of the players. Hawai'i high school varsity football players were surveyed to determine how they use their helmets and how a new helmet design would affect their style of play. One hundred seventy-seven surveys were completed; 79% said that they used their helmet to hit an opposing player during a tackle and 46% said they made this contact intentionally. When asked about modifying helmets with a soft material on the outside, 48% said they thought putting a soft cover over a regular helmet would protect their head better. However, many participants said that putting a soft cover over their regular helmet was a bad idea for various reasons. Most young football players use their helmets to block or tackle despite being taught they would be penalized or potentially injured if they did so. By gaining a better understanding of why and how players use their helmets and how they would respond to new helmet designs, steps can be taken to reduce head injuries for all levels of play.

  18. Intention of donors to re-donate livers after living donor liver transplantation in a liver transplant center in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Min; Chung, Kuo-Piao; Chen, Teng-Wei; Hsieh, Chung-Bao

    2014-08-25

    The aim of this study was to examine donor complications, satisfaction with the liver donation process, and factors associated with re-donation. To address these issues, we conducted a cross-sectional study to assess donor complications and used questionnaires (including the Likert scale for donation satisfaction and simple yes/no responses for willingness to re-donate) in 110 adults who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) at Tri-Service General Hospital. The following clinical characteristics were determined: donation volume; first-degree relative; education; duration of hospital stay; occupation (donor-associated); MELD score; Child classification; complications; outcome (recipient-associated); and graft/recipient weight ratio (donor-recipient-associated). Descriptive statistics and mean values were compared using t-tests and p values <0.05 were considered significant. Twelve donors among 110 participants experienced complications above Clavien grade II. No surgical mortalities were observed. There were no differences in age, gender, left/right liver graft, donation volume, length of hospital stay, or satisfaction in donor complications. Ninety-four donors had satisfaction (score=4 and 5) about the donation process and no dissatisfaction was reported (score=1). Based on multivariate analysis, the intention to re-donate among liver donors was related to first-degree relatives, donor satisfaction, and recipient complications (P<0.05). Factors associated with a willingness to re-donate included first-degree relatives of the recipient, donor satisfaction with the donation process, and recipient complications. This study not only showed the safety of liver donation, but also had a positive effect on the intention to re-donate to enhance motivation for liver donation and increase the recruitment of living liver donors.

  19. Simultaneous Liver-Kidney Transplantation: Impact on Liver Transplant Patients and the Kidney Transplant Waiting List.

    PubMed

    Miles, Clifford D; Westphal, Scott; Liapakis, AnnMarie; Formica, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The number of simultaneous liver-kidney transplants (SLKT) performed in the USA has been rising. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network implemented a new policy governing SLKT that specifies eligibility criteria for candidates to receive a kidney with a liver, and creates a kidney waitlist "safety net" for liver recipients with persistent renal failure after transplant. This review explores potential impacts for liver patients and the kidney waitlist. Factors that have contributed to the rise in SLKT including Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD)-based allocation, regional sharing for high MELD candidates, and the rising incidence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis will continue to increase the number of liver transplant candidates with concurrent renal insufficiency. The effect of center behavior based on the new policy is harder to predict, given wide historic variability in SLKT practice. Continued increase in combined liver/kidney failure is likely, and SLKT and kidney after liver transplant may both increase. Impact of the new policy should be carefully monitored, but influences beyond the policy need to be accounted for.

  20. Polyploidization of liver cells.

    PubMed

    Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, there are a number of exceptions. Organisms containing an increase in DNA content by whole number multiples of the entire set of chromosomes are defined as polyploid. Cells that contain more than two sets of chromosomes were first observed in plants about a century ago and it is now recognized that polyploidy cells form in many eukaryotes under a wide variety of circumstance. Although it is less common in mammals, some tissues, including the liver, show a high percentage of polyploid cells. Thus, during postnatal growth, the liver parenchyma undergoes dramatic changes characterized by gradual polyploidization during which hepatocytes of several ploidy classes emerge as a result of modified cell-division cycles. This process generates the successive appearance of tetraploid and octoploid cell classes with one or two nuclei (mononucleated or binucleated). Liver cells polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence and to lead both to the progressive loss of cell pluripotency and a markedly decreased replication capacity. In adults, liver polyploidization is differentially regulated upon loss of liver mass and liver damage. Interestingly, partial hepatectomy induces marked cell proliferation followed by an increase in liver ploidy. In contrast, during hepatocarcinoma (HCC), growth shifts to a nonpolyploidizing pattern and expansion of the diploid hepatocytes population is observed in neoplastic nodules. Here we review the current state of understanding about how polyploidization is regulated during normal and pathological liver growth and detail by which mechanisms hepatocytes become polyploid.

  1. Liver-brain interactions in inflammatory liver diseases: implications for fatigue and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Charlotte; Swain, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory liver diseases are often accompanied by behavior alterations including fatigue, mood disorders, cognitive dysfunction and sleep disturbances. These altered behaviors can adversely affect patient quality of life. The communication pathways between the inflamed liver and the brain that mediate changes in central neural activity leading to behavior alterations during liver inflammation are poorly understood. Neural and humoral communication pathways have been most commonly implicated as driving peripheral inflammation to brain signaling. Classically, the cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 have received the greatest scientific attention as potential mediators of this communication pathway. In mice with liver inflammation we have identified a novel immune-mediated liver-to-brain communication pathway whereby CCR2(+) monocytes found within the peripheral circulation transmigrate into the brain parenchyma in response to MCP-1/CCL2 expressing activated microglia. Inhibition of cerebral monocyte infiltration in these mice significantly improved liver inflammation associated sickness behaviors. Importantly, in recent work we have found that at an earlier time point, when cerebral monocyte infiltration is not evident in mice with liver inflammation, increased monocyte:cerebral endothelial cell adhesive interactions are observed using intravital microscopy of the brain. These monocyte:cerebral endothelial cell adhesive interactions are P-selectin mediated, and inhibition of these interactions attenuated microglial activation and sickness behavior development. Delineating the pathways that the periphery uses to communicate with the brain during inflammatory liver diseases, and the central neurotransmitter systems that are altered through these communication pathways (e.g., serotonin, corticotrophin releasing hormone) to give rise to liver inflammation-associated sickness behaviors, will allow for the identification of novel therapeutic targets to decrease the

  2. The liver sieve and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Robin; Cogger, Victoria C; Dobbs, Bruce; Jamieson, Hamish; Warren, Alessandra; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2012-04-01

    The 'liver sieve' is a term developed to describe the appearance and the role of fenestrations in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC). LSECs are gossamer-thin cells that line the hepatic sinusoid and they are perforated with pores called fenestrations clustered in sieve plates. There is growing evidence that fenestrations act like a permselective ultrafiltration system which is important for the hepatic uptake of many substrates, particularly chylomicron remnant lipoproteins. The liver sieve is a very efficient exchange system, however in conditions such as hepatic cirrhosis and fibrosis, diabetes mellitus and old age, there is defenestration of the liver sieve. Such defenestration has been shown to influence the hepatic uptake of various substrates including lipoproteins. In the future, pharmacological manipulation of the liver sieve may play a number of therapeutic roles including the management of dyslipidaemia; increasing the efficiency of liver-targeted gene therapy; and improving regeneration of old livers. (C) 2012 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.

  3. Evaluation of Encapsulated Liver Cell Spheroids in a Fluidised-Bed Bioartificial Liver for Treatment of Ischaemic Acute Liver Failure in Pigs in a Translational Setting

    PubMed Central

    Selden, Clare; Spearman, Catherine Wendy; Kahn, Delawir; Miller, Malcolm; Figaji, Anthony; Erro, Eloy; Bundy, James; Massie, Isobel; Chalmers, Sherri-Ann; Arendse, Hiram; Gautier, Aude; Sharratt, Peter; Fuller, Barry; Hodgson, Humphrey

    2013-01-01

    Liver failure is an increasing problem. Donor-organ shortage results in patients dying before receiving a transplant. Since the liver can regenerate, alternative therapies providing temporary liver-support are sought. A bioartificial-liver would temporarily substitute function in liver failure buying time for liver regeneration/organ-procurement. Our aim: to develop a prototype bioartificial-liver-machine (BAL) comprising a human liver-derived cell-line, cultured to phenotypic competence and deliverable in a clinical setting to sites distant from its preparation. The objective of this study was to determine whether its use would improve functional parameters of liver failure in pigs with acute liver failure, to provide proof-of-principle. HepG2cells encapsulated in alginate-beads, proliferated in a fluidised-bed-bioreactor providing a biomass of 4–6×1010cells, were transported from preparation-laboratory to point-of-use operating theatre (6000miles) under perfluorodecalin at ambient temperature. Irreversible ischaemic liver failure was induced in anaesthetised pigs, after portal-systemic-shunt, by hepatic-artery-ligation. Biochemical parameters, intracranial pressure, and functional-clotting were measured in animals connected in an extracorporeal bioartificial-liver circuit. Efficacy was demonstrated comparing outcomes between animals connected to a circuit containing alginate-encapsulated cells (Cell-bead BAL), and those connected to circuit containing alginate capsules without cells (Empty-bead BAL). Cells of the biomass met regulatory standards for sterility and provenance. All animals developed progressive liver-failure after ischaemia induction. Efficacy of BAL was demonstrated since animals connected to a functional biomass (+ cells) had significantly smaller rises in intracranial pressure, lower ammonia levels, more bilirubin conjugation, improved acidosis and clotting restoration compared to animals connected to the circuit without cells. In the +cell

  4. [Non-invasive assessment of fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2015-04-05

    As the result of various harmful effects (infectious agents, metabolic diseases, unhealthy diet, obesity, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) hepatic damage may develop, which can progress towards liver steatosis, and fibrosis as well. The most common etiological factors of liver damages are hepatitis B and C infection, alcohol consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic liver diseases. Due to the dangers and complications of liver biopsy, studies are focused on non-invasive markers and radiological imaging for liver steatosis, progression of fatty liver, activity of the necroinflammation and the severity of the fibrosis. Authors review the possibilities of non-invasive assessment of liver steatosis. The statistical features of the probes (positive, negative predictive values, sensitivity, specificity) are reviewed. The role of radiological imaging is also discussed. Although the non-invasive methods discussed in this article are useful to assess liver steatosis, further studies are needed to validate to follow progression of the diseases and to control therapeutic response.

  5. Toward surface quantification of liver fibrosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuting; Kang, Chiang Huen; Xu, Shuoyu; Tuo, Xiaoye; Trasti, Scott; Tai, Dean C. S.; Raja, Anju Mythreyi; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Welsch, Roy; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring liver fibrosis progression by liver biopsy is important for certain treatment decisions, but repeated biopsy is invasive. We envision redefinition or elimination of liver biopsy with surface scanning of the liver with minimally invasive optical methods. This would be possible only if the information contained on or near liver surfaces accurately reflects the liver fibrosis progression in the liver interior. In our study, we acquired the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of liver tissues from bile duct-ligated rat model of liver fibrosis. We extracted morphology-based features, such as total collagen, collagen in bile duct areas, bile duct proliferation, and areas occupied by remnant hepatocytes, and defined the capsule and subcapsular regions on the liver surface based on image analysis of features. We discovered a strong correlation between the liver fibrosis progression on the anterior surface and interior in both liver lobes, where biopsy is typically obtained. The posterior surface exhibits less correlation with the rest of the liver. Therefore, scanning the anterior liver surface would obtain similar information to that obtained from biopsy for monitoring liver fibrosis progression.

  6. Chronic hepatitis C and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Giada; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide and predisposes to liver fibrosis and end-stage liver complications. Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen, and is considered as a wound healing response to chronic liver injury. Its staging is critical for the management and prognosis of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, whose number is expected to rise over the next decades, posing a major health care challenge. This review provides a brief update on HCV epidemiology, summarizes basic mechanistic concepts of HCV-dependent liver fibrogenesis, and discusses methods for assessment of liver fibrosis that are routinely used in clinical practice. Liver biopsy was until recently considered as the gold standard to diagnose and stage liver fibrosis. However, its invasiveness and drawbacks led to the development of non-invasive methods, which include serum biomarkers, transient elastography and combination algorithms. Clinical studies with CHC patients demonstrated that non-invasive methods are in most cases accurate for diagnosis and for monitoring liver disease complications. Moreover, they have a high prognostic value and are cost-effective. Non-invasive methods for assessment of liver fibrosis are gradually being incorporated into new guidelines and are becoming standard of care, which significantly reduces the need for liver biopsy. PMID:25170193

  7. Gut microbiome and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Cani, Patrice D; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-12-01

    The gut microbiota has recently evolved as a new important player in the pathophysiology of many intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. The liver is the organ which is in closest contact with the intestinal tract, and is exposed to a substantial amount of bacterial components and metabolites. Various liver disorders such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic liver disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been associated with an altered microbiome. This dysbiosis may influence the degree of hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis through multiple interactions with the host's immune system and other cell types. Whereas few results from clinical metagenomic studies in liver disease are available, evidence is accumulating that in liver cirrhosis an oral microbiome is overrepresented in the lower intestinal tract, potentially contributing to disease process and severity. A major role for the gut microbiota in liver disorders is also supported by the accumulating evidence that several complications of severe liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy are efficiently treated by various prebiotics, probiotics and antibiotics. A better understanding of the gut microbiota and its components in liver diseases might provide a more complete picture of these complex disorders and also form the basis for novel therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Association of liver enzymes and computed tomography markers of liver steatosis with familial longevity.

    PubMed

    Sala, Michiel; Kroft, Lucia J M; Röell, Boudewijn; van der Grond, Jeroen; Slagboom, P Eline; Mooijaart, Simon P; de Roos, Albert; van Heemst, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Familial longevity is marked by enhanced peripheral but not hepatic insulin sensitivity. The liver has a critical role in the pathogenesis of hepatic insulin resistance. Therefore we hypothesized that the extent of liver steatosis would be similar between offspring of long-lived siblings and control subjects. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the extent of liver steatosis in non-diabetic offspring of long-lived siblings and age-matched controls by measuring liver enzymes in plasma and liver fat by computed tomography (CT). We measured nonfasting alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and Υ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in 1625 subjects (736 men, mean age 59.1 years) from the Leiden Longevity Study, comprising offspring of long-lived siblings and partners thereof. In a random subgroup, fasting serum samples (n = 230) were evaluated and CT was performed (n = 268) for assessment of liver-spleen (L/S) ratio and the prevalence of moderate-to-severe non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Linear mixed model analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, use of alcohol and hepatotoxic medication, and correlation of sibling relationship. Offspring of long-lived siblings had higher nonfasting ALT levels as compared to control subjects (24.3 mmol/L versus 23.2 mmol/L, p = 0.03), while AST and GGT levels were similar between the two groups. All fasting liver enzyme levels were similar between the two groups. CT L/S ratio and prevalence of moderate-to-severe NAFLD was similar between groups (1.12 vs 1.14, p = 0.25 and 8% versus 8%, p = 0.91, respectively). Except for nonfasting levels of ALT, which were slightly higher in the offspring of long-lived siblings compared to controls, no differences were found between groups in the extent of liver steatosis, as assessed with liver biochemical tests and CT. Thus, our data indicate that the extent of liver steatosis is similar between offspring of long-lived siblings and

  9. Serial Liver Stiffness Measurements and Monitoring of Liver-Transplanted Patients in a Real-Life Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Luca; Valente, Giovanna; Piai, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver transplanted patients need close surveillance for early signs of graft disease. Objectives Transient elastography can safely be repeated over time, offering serial liver stiffness measurement values. Serial stiffness measurements were compared to single baseline stiffness measurements in predicting the appearance of liver-related clinical events and guiding subsequent clinical decisions. Methods One hundred and sixty liver transplanted patients were observed for three years in our real-life practice. Results Liver stiffness measurements were stable in 75% of patients, decreased in 4% of patients, and increased in 21% of patients. The pattern of increased stiffness measurements was associated with both HCV-RNA positive status and the presence of an active biliary complication of liver transplantation and was more predictive of a clinically significant event resulting from any disease of the transplanted liver when compared to a stable pattern or to a single liver stiffness measurement. The procedures that were consequently performed were often diagnostic for unexpected situations, both in HCV-RNA positive and HCV-RNA negative patients. Conclusions The pattern of longitudinally increased liver stiffness measurements efficiently supported clinical decisions for individualized management strategies. Repeated transient elastography in real-life clinical practice appears to have a practical role in monitoring liver transplanted patients. PMID:28123442

  10. Spectrum of pathogens in native liver, bile, and blood during pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schukfeh, Nagoud; Doerner, Judith M; Heintschel von Heinegg, Evelyn; Steinmann, Joerg; Metzelder, Martin L; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F; Paul, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    During LTX, there may be a risk that pathogens of the native liver are released into the systemic circulation. No investigations on incidence/spectrum of pathogens in native livers have been published. We hypothesized that pathogens are found in the native liver of a large proportion of pediatric patients during LTX and investigated the microbiology of native livers. These data may help optimize antibiotic therapy. Twenty-two consecutive pediatric patients (median age 14 months, range, 5 months-15 yr) receiving LTX in our department from October 2010 to October 2011 were included in this prospective study. Tissue and bile were collected from the explanted liver and were cultivated on different media. All liver tissues were investigated using a broad-range PCR (SepsiTest(®)). In 16 patients, blood cultures were collected post-transplantation. Eleven patients (50%) had at least one pathogen detected; nine of these patients had an underlying diagnosis of biliary atresia. SepsiTest(®) was positive in seven patients. In four patients it was the only test detecting any pathogen. In detail, the positivity rate for liver tissue in all patients was 41% (n = 9); for bile 25% (n = 3); and for blood 25% (n = 4). Thirteen different pathogens (69% bacterial, 31% fungal) were isolated. A highly-sensitive broad-range PCR appears to be an effective method to detect pathogens in native livers of patients undergoing LTX. A high number and variety of microbes, including a high proportion of fungal pathogens, were detected. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    PubMed Central

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  12. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    PubMed

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation - Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Mijic, Maja; Jakopcic, Ivan; Milic, Sandra; Hrstic, Irena; Sobocan, Nikola; Stimac, Davor; Burra, Patrizia

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) is a challenging and multisystem disease that has a high socioeconomic impact. NAFLD/NASH is a main cause of macrovesicular steatosis and has multiple impacts on liver transplantation (LT), on patients on the waiting list for transplant, on post-transplant setting as well as on organ donors. Current data indicate new trends in the area of chronic liver disease. Due to the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, NASH cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma caused by NASH will soon become a major indication for LT. Furthermore, due to an increasing incidence of MetS and, consequently, NAFLD, there will be more steatotic donor livers and less high quality organs available for LT, in addition to a lack of available liver allografts. Patients who have NASH and are candidates for LT have multiple comorbidities and are unique LT candidates. Finally, we discuss long-term grafts and patient survival after LT, the recurrence of NASH and NASH appearing de novo after transplantation. In addition, we suggest topics and areas that require more research for improving the health care of this increasing patient population. PMID:29662288

  14. Effects of the liver volume and donor steatosis on errors in the estimated standard liver volume.

    PubMed

    Siriwardana, Rohan Chaminda; Chan, See Ching; Chok, Kenneth Siu Ho; Lo, Chung Mau; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2011-12-01

    An accurate assessment of donor and recipient liver volumes is essential in living donor liver transplantation. Many liver donors are affected by mild to moderate steatosis, and steatotic livers are known to have larger volumes. This study analyzes errors in liver volume estimation by commonly used formulas and the effects of donor steatosis on these errors. Three hundred twenty-five Asian donors who underwent right lobe donor hepatectomy were the subjects of this study. The percentage differences between the liver volumes from computed tomography (CT) and the liver volumes estimated with each formula (ie, the error percentages) were calculated. Five popular formulas were tested. The degrees of steatosis were categorized as follows: no steatosis [n = 178 (54.8%)], ≤ 10% steatosis [n = 128 (39.4%)], and >10% to 20% steatosis [n = 19 (5.8%)]. The median errors ranged from 0.6% (7 mL) to 24.6% (360 mL). The lowest was seen with the locally derived formula. All the formulas showed a significant association between the error percentage and the CT liver volume (P < 0.001). Overestimation was seen with smaller liver volumes, whereas underestimation was seen with larger volumes. The locally derived formula was most accurate when the liver volume was 1001 to 1250 mL. A multivariate analysis showed that the estimation error was dependent on the liver volume (P = 0.001) and the anthropometric measurement that was used in the calculation (P < 0.001) rather than steatosis (P ≥ 0.07). In conclusion, all the formulas have a similar pattern of error that is possibly related to the anthropometric measurement. Clinicians should be aware of this pattern of error and the liver volume with which their formula is most accurate. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Intestinal microbiota in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tanvir R; Barritt, A Sidney

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota have emerged as a topic of intense interest in gastroenterology and hepatology. The liver is on the front line as the first filter of nutrients, toxins and bacterial metabolites from the intestines and we are becoming increasingly aware of interactions among the gut, liver and immune system as important mediators of liver health and disease. Manipulating the microbiota with therapeutic intent is a rapidly expanding field. In this review, we will describe what is known about the contribution of intestinal microbiota to liver homeostasis; the role of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of liver disease including alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the therapeutic manifestations of altering intestinal microbiota via antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Cod Liver Oil

    MedlinePlus

    Cod liver oil contains certain "fatty acids" that prevent the blood from clotting easily. These fatty acids also reduce pain and swelling. ... Morue, Huile de Poisson, Liver Oil, N-3 Fatty Acids, Omega 3, Oméga 3, Omega 3 Fatty Acids, ...

  17. Gut-Liver Axis Derangement in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Marco; Pierri, Luca; Vajro, Pietro

    2017-08-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent type of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group, paralleling an obesity pandemic. A "multiple-hit" hypothesis has been invoked to explain its pathogenesis. The "first hit" is liver lipid accumulation in obese children with insulin resistance. In the absence of significant lifestyle modifications leading to weight loss and increased physical activity, other factors may act as "second hits" implicated in liver damage progression leading to more severe forms of inflammation and hepatic fibrosis. In this regard, the gut-liver axis (GLA) seems to play a central role. Principal players are the gut microbiota, its bacterial products, and the intestinal barrier. A derangement of GLA (namely, dysbiosis and altered intestinal permeability) may promote bacteria/bacterial product translocation into portal circulation, activation of inflammation via toll-like receptors signaling in hepatocytes, and progression from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH). Among other factors a relevant role has been attributed to the farnesoid X receptor, a nuclear transcriptional factor activated from bile acids chemically modified by gut microbiota (GM) enzymes. The individuation and elucidation of GLA derangement in NAFLD pathomechanisms is of interest at all ages and especially in pediatrics to identify new therapeutic approaches in patients recalcitrant to lifestyle changes. Specific targeting of gut microbiota via pre-/probiotic supplementation, feces transplantation, and farnesoid X receptor modulation appear promising.

  18. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  19. Characterization of the liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) proteome indicates potential for application in liver disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Jie; Wu, Songfeng; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yujuan; Liu, Kehui; Wang, Jinglan; Sun, Longqin; Chen, Ning; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Xing, Baocai; Zhao, Xiaohang; Qian, Xiaohong; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2010-02-05

    Tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) forms the interface between circulating body fluids and intracellular fluid. Pathological alterations of liver cells could be reflected in TIF, making it a promising source of liver disease biomarkers. Mouse liver TIF was extracted, separated by SDS-PAGE, analyzed by linear ion trap mass spectrometer, and 1450 proteins were identified. These proteins may be secreted, shed from membrane vesicles, or represent cellular breakdown products. They show different profiling patterns, quantities, and possibly modification/cleavage of intracellular proteins. The high solubility and even distribution of liver TIF supports its suitability for proteome analysis. Comparison of mouse liver TIF data with liver tissue and plasma proteome data identified major proteins that might be released from liver to plasma and serve as blood biomarkers of liver origin. This result was partially supported by comparison of human liver TIF data with human liver and plasma proteome data. Paired TIFs from tumor and nontumor liver tissues of a hepatocellular carcinoma patient were analyzed and the profile of subtracted differential proteins supports the potential for biomarker discovery in TIF. This study is the first analysis of the liver TIF proteome and provides a foundation for further application of TIF in liver disease biomarker discovery.

  20. Augmenter of liver regeneration protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury by promoting autophagy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongbo; Han, Weijia; Shi, Honglin; Ren, Feng; Chen, Dexi; Chen, Yu; Duan, Zhongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) exerts strong hepatoprotective properties in various animal models of liver injury, but its protective mechanisms have not yet been explored. Autophagy is a recently recognized rudimentary cellular response to inflammation and injury. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that ALR may protect against acute liver injury through the autophagic pathway. Methods The level and role of ALR in liver injury were studied in a mouse model of acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The effect of ALR on autophagy was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. After autophagy was inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), apoptosis and proliferation were detected in the mouse model with acute liver injury. The ALR and autophagic levels were measured in patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) and acute liver failure (ALF), respectively. Results During the progression of acute liver injury, the ALR levels increased slightly in early stage and significantly decreased in late stage in mice Treatment with an ALR plasmid via tail vein injection protected mice against acute liver injury. The protective effect of ALR relied on the induction of autophagy, which was supported by the following evidence: (1) ALR overexpression directly induced autophagy flux in vitro and in vivo; and (2) ALR treatment suppressed apoptosis and promoted proliferation in mice exposed to CCl4, but the inhibition of autophagy reversed these effects. More importantly, the ALR levels decreased in patients with LC and ALF compared with normal controls. Conclusion We demonstrated that ALR ameliorated liver injury via an autophagic mechanism, which indicates a potential therapeutic application for liver injury. PMID:28061452

  1. Liver manipulation during liver surgery in humans is associated with hepatocellular damage and hepatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Maartje A J; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Schreurs, Joris J W; Bloemen, Johanne G; Bieghs, Veerle; Rensen, Sander S; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2013-04-01

    Manipulation of the liver during liver surgery results in profound hepatocellular damage. Experimental data show that mobilization-induced hepatocellular damage is related to hepatic inflammation. To date, information on this link in humans is lacking. As it is possible to modulate inflammation, it is clinically relevant to unravel this relationship. This observational study aimed to establish the association between liver mobilization and hepatic inflammation in humans. Consecutive patients requiring mobilization of the right hemi-liver during liver surgery were studied. Plasma samples and liver biopsies were collected prior to and directly after mobilization and after transection of the liver. Hepatocellular damage was assayed by liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and aminotransferase levels. Hepatic inflammation was determined by (a) immunohistochemical identification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and CD68- positive cells and (b) hepatic gene expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1). A total of 25 patients were included. L-FABP levels increased significantly during mobilization (301 ± 94 ng/ml to 1599 ± 362 ng/ml, P = 0.008), as did ALAT levels (36 ± 5 IU/L to 167 ± 21 IU/L, P < 0.001). A significant increase in MPO (P = 0.001) and CD68 (P = 0.002) positive cells was noticed in the liver after mobilization. The number of MPO-positive cells correlated with the duration of mobilization (Pearson correlation=0.505, P = 0.033). Hepatic gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, chemo-attractant IL-8 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 increased significantly during liver manipulation. Liver mobilization is associated with hepatocellular damage and liver inflammation, as shown by infiltration of inflammatory cells and upregulation of genes involved in acute inflammation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on Normal Liver Regeneration: Towards a Novel Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Cardoso; Elisa M. Heber; David W. Nigg

    2007-10-01

    The “TAORMINA project” developed a new method for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of human multifocal unresectable liver metastases based on whole liver ex-situ BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), followed by whole liver autograft. This technique involved a high risk, prolonged anhepatic phase. The Roffo Institute liver surgeons (JEC) herein propose a novel technique to pursue ex-situ liver BNCT studies with a drastically lower surgical risk for the patient. The technique would involve, sequentially, ex-situ BNCT of left liver segments II and III, partial liver autograft, and induction of partial atrophy of the untreated right liver. The working hypothesis ismore » that the atrophy of the right, untreated,