Science.gov

Sample records for taiz city yemen

  1. Efficient management of municipal water: water scarcity in Taiz City, Yemen - issues and options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noaman, A.; Al-Sharjabe, A. W.

    2015-04-01

    The city of Taiz is the third largest city in Yemen, located about 250 km south of Sana'a and about 90 km inland from the Red Sea. Taiz is situated on the foothills and slopes of the Jabal Saber Mountain at elevations between 1100 and 1600 m a.s.l. Its population is rapidly increasing and is expected to grow from about 580 000 in 2012 to over 1 000 000 in 2020. Water supply is the most pressing problem in the city of Taiz today due to the significant shortages of supply (the average consumption is 23 L/d) caused by the depletion of existing water resources and the lack of a clear direction in dealing with the problem. This forces frequent service interruptions (30-40 days) and the service is rarely extended to new users (only 57% of the population are covered). Sanitation is another daunting problem. The (poorly maintained) sewerage network covers only 44% of the population. In several unsewered areas to the north, east and west of the city, raw sewage is disposed of directly into wadis, which causes a health hazard and threatens to contaminate groundwater resources. The proper computation of demand and supply is based on the various fields. It was performed under this study with a particular model: the Water Evaluation and Planning System (WEAP) developed by the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI). WEAP is supported by a geographical information system (GIS). The available and relevant data on poverty and social indicators, water use and sources, surface runoff, surface and groundwater availability, groundwater depletion and management, crop production areas, soil cover, maps, and meteorological information were gathered from a number of sources. There are only two ways to decrease the water deficit: by increasing water supply or decreasing the water demand. Any adaptation project aims at one of the two. Six projects are proposed, with three in each category (1, 2 and 3 to decrease demand, and 4, 5 and 6 to increase supply): - Project 1: Improvement of

  2. Molecular markers associated with resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate-Yemen during the transmission season.

    PubMed

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, artesunate (AS) plus sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) combination has been adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Yemen in response to the high level of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the frequency distribution of molecular markers associated with resistance to CQ and AS plus SP combination among P. falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate, Yemen. Fifty P. falciparum isolates were collected during a cross-sectional study in Mawza district, Taiz, in the period from October 2013 to April 2014. The isolates were investigated for drug resistance-associated molecular markers in five genes, including P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) 86Y as markers of resistance to CQ, mutations in the Kelch 13 (K13) propeller domain for resistance to AS, and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes for resistance to SP. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify target genes in DNA extracts of the isolates followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism for detecting 76T and 86Y mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1, respectively, and by DNA sequencing for detecting mutations in K13, pfdhfr and pfdhps. All the investigated isolates from Mawza district were harboring the pfcrt 76T mutant and the pfmdr1 N86 wild-type alleles. The pfdhfr 51I/108N double mutant allele was found in 2.2% (1/45) of the isolates; however, no mutations were detected at codons 436, 437, 540, 581 and 613 of pfdhps. All P. falciparum isolates that were successfully sequenced (n=47) showed the K13 Y493, R539, I543 and C580 wild-type alleles. In conclusion, the pfcrt 76T mutant allele is fixed in the study area about six years after the official withdrawal of CQ, possibly indicating its over-the-counter availability and continued use as a

  3. Molecular markers associated with resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate-Yemen during the transmission season.

    PubMed

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, artesunate (AS) plus sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) combination has been adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Yemen in response to the high level of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the frequency distribution of molecular markers associated with resistance to CQ and AS plus SP combination among P. falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate, Yemen. Fifty P. falciparum isolates were collected during a cross-sectional study in Mawza district, Taiz, in the period from October 2013 to April 2014. The isolates were investigated for drug resistance-associated molecular markers in five genes, including P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) 86Y as markers of resistance to CQ, mutations in the Kelch 13 (K13) propeller domain for resistance to AS, and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes for resistance to SP. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify target genes in DNA extracts of the isolates followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism for detecting 76T and 86Y mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1, respectively, and by DNA sequencing for detecting mutations in K13, pfdhfr and pfdhps. All the investigated isolates from Mawza district were harboring the pfcrt 76T mutant and the pfmdr1 N86 wild-type alleles. The pfdhfr 51I/108N double mutant allele was found in 2.2% (1/45) of the isolates; however, no mutations were detected at codons 436, 437, 540, 581 and 613 of pfdhps. All P. falciparum isolates that were successfully sequenced (n=47) showed the K13 Y493, R539, I543 and C580 wild-type alleles. In conclusion, the pfcrt 76T mutant allele is fixed in the study area about six years after the official withdrawal of CQ, possibly indicating its over-the-counter availability and continued use as a

  4. Evaluation of Health-Related Quality of Life among Tuberculosis Patients in Two Cities in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Ammar Ali Saleh; Khan, Amer Hayat; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Ahmad, Nafees; Anaam, Mohamed Saif

    2016-01-01

    Background The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of Tuberculosis (TB) patients is important because it directly influences the outcome of TB patients in several aspects. The current study aims to evaluate and to find the factors influencing the HRQoL of TB patients in two major TB-prevalent cities (Taiz and Alhodidah) in Yemen. Methods A prospective study was conducted, and all TB patients meeting the HRQoL criteria were asked to complete the HRQoL SF-36 survey. The records of TB patients were examined for disease confirmation, and a follow-up was consequently performed for patients during treatment between March 2013 and February 2014 in Taiz and Alhodidah Cities. HRQol scores were calculated by using QM scoring software version 4.5, in which the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) were obtained. The scores obtained between 47–53 normal based score (NBS) were considered equivalent to the US normal score. Low scores indicate the poor health situation of TB patients Results A total of 243 TB patients enrolled in the study at the beginning of the treatment. A total of 235 and 197 TB patients completed the questionnaire at the end of the intensive phase (I.P.) and continuation phase (C.P.), respectively. The final dropout rate was 16.2%. The mean PCS and MCS scores at the beginning of treatment were low, thus showing the poor health situation of TB patients. The mean PCS scores at the beginning of treatment, end of I.P., and end of treatment were (36.1), (44.9), and (48), respectively. Moreover, the mean MCS score at the beginning of treatment, end of I.P., and end of treatment were (35.1), (42.2), and (44.3), respectively. The result shows that significant increases are observed at the end of I.P. for PCS and MCS because of the treatment and slight changes at the end of C.P. Despite this finding, the MCS score remains below the normal range (47), thus indicating a significant risk of depression among TB patients. Furthermore

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency among Male Blood Donors in Sana’a City, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nood, Hafiz A.; Bazara, Fakiha A.; Al-Absi, Rashad; Habori, Molham AL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among Yemeni people from different regions of the country living in the capital city, Sana’a, giving an indication of its overall prevalence in Yemen. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among Yemeni male blood donors attending the Department of Blood Bank at the National Centre of the Public Health Laboratories in the capital city, Sana’a, Yemen. Fluorescent spot method was used for screening, spectrophotometeric estimation of G-6-PD activity and separation by electrophoresis was done to determine the G-6-PD phenotype. Results Of the total 508 male blood donors recruited into the study, 36 were G-6-PD deficient, giving a likely G-6-PD deficiency prevalence of 7.1%. None of these deficient donors had history of anemia or jaundice. Thirty-five of these deficient cases (97.2%) showed severe G-6-PD deficiency class II (<10% of normal activity), and their phenotyping presumptively revealed a G-6-PD-Mediterranean variant. Conclusion The results showed a significant presence of G-6-PD deficiency with predominance of a severe G-6-PD deficiency type in these blood donors in Sana’a City, which could represent an important health problem through occurrence of hemolytic anemia under oxidative stress. A larger sample size is needed to determine the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency, and should be extended to include DNA analysis to identify its variants in Yemen. PMID:22359725

  6. Prevalence of oro-dental anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Basalamah, M; Baroudi, K

    2016-04-19

    Practitioners and policy-makers need information about the relative frequency of dental anomalies among children in their region. This study investigated the prevalence of different oral anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen. A sample of 1000 private and public schoolchildren aged 4-12 years were examined by the same examiner using disposable tongue blades. The total prevalence of oral anomalies was 15.1%, most commonly in boys (male:female ratio 3.2:1) aged 7-12 years. The most prevalent dental anomaly related to hard tissues was tooth hypoplasia (2.8%), followed by hypocalcification (2.6%), then microdontia (0.5%), macrodontia (0.4%), hypodontia (0.4%), supernumerary teeth (0.3%), tooth transposition (0.3%), dental fusion (0.2%) and gemination (0.2%). The most prevalent soft tissues anomaly was fissured tongue (4.0%), followed by ankyloglossia (1.8%), geographic tongue (0.9%), macroglossia (0.4%) and hairy tongue (0.3%). Appropriate measures need to be taken early to mitigate the negative impact and later costs of treatment of anomalies.

  7. Prevalence of oro-dental anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Basalamah, M; Baroudi, K

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners and policy-makers need information about the relative frequency of dental anomalies among children in their region. This study investigated the prevalence of different oral anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen. A sample of 1000 private and public schoolchildren aged 4-12 years were examined by the same examiner using disposable tongue blades. The total prevalence of oral anomalies was 15.1%, most commonly in boys (male:female ratio 3.2:1) aged 7-12 years. The most prevalent dental anomaly related to hard tissues was tooth hypoplasia (2.8%), followed by hypocalcification (2.6%), then microdontia (0.5%), macrodontia (0.4%), hypodontia (0.4%), supernumerary teeth (0.3%), tooth transposition (0.3%), dental fusion (0.2%) and gemination (0.2%). The most prevalent soft tissues anomaly was fissured tongue (4.0%), followed by ankyloglossia (1.8%), geographic tongue (0.9%), macroglossia (0.4%) and hairy tongue (0.3%). Appropriate measures need to be taken early to mitigate the negative impact and later costs of treatment of anomalies. PMID:27117648

  8. Cases of hydatidosis in patients referred to Governmental hospitals for cyst removal in Sana'a City, Republic of Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Shibani, Latifa A N; Al-Eryani, Samira M A; Azazy, Ahmed A; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M

    2012-03-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic infestation caused by Echinococcus granulosus. This disease is endemic in many countries including Yemen. The present review article aims to have a glimpse at the present status of hydatidosis in Yemen. This is the first descriptive study, investigating recorded cases of hydatidosis from the five main governmental hospitals in the capital Sana'a city, over a longer period starting from 2001 and ending in 2008. A total of 796 medical records of patients referred to the five main governmental hospitals in Sana'a city for cyst removal, were studied. Of these cases 482 were females and 314 were males. Their mean age was 30.0 ± 16.9 years. Information regarding the location of the cyst in the body, age, sex and residence of each patient was recorded. A higher infection rate was found in females than males (60.6% and 39.4%, respectively). Single organ involvement was observed in 98.6% cases, among which, the most frequent localizations were the liver (60.8%) followed by the lung (24.7%). Cases of hydatidosis appeared to increase during the period 2001-2008, with the lowest number (n=26) and the highest number (n=140) recorded in 2001 and 2007, respectively. We conclude that the risk of hydatidosis is still high in Yemen, where street or stray dogs move freely down town and the population should be aware about the role of dogs in the transmission of this disease. Hospital records provide a useful indication of infection expressed as annual rate of hospital cases. Finally, the collaboration of Public Health Authorities, the Veterinary Medical Authorities and the Environmental Affairs Authorities is a must to control this disease.

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C infections and associated factors among blood donors in Aden City, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Waleedi, A A; Khader, Y S

    2012-06-01

    This study determined the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV ) and associated risk factors among blood donors in Aden city, Yemen. A systematic sample of 469 male blood donors was selected from those attending the national blood bank service in Aden between June and October 2007. Data were collected by questionnaire and blood samples collected. Of the 469 participants, 24 (5.1%) were positive for HBsAg and 6 (1.3%) for anti-HCV. In multivariate analysis, history of: blood transfusion (OR = 22.8), dental treatment (OR = 3.6), cupping (OR = 3.9) and malaria infection (OR = 6.8) were significantly associated with being positive for HBsAg. Those with history of blood donation were less likely to be positive for HBsAg (OR = 0.17). Those with a history of blood donation were significantly less likely to be positive for anti-HCV positivity (OR = 0.05), while those with history of blood transfusion were more likely to test positive (OR = 65.6). The prevalence of HBV and HCV among blood donors in Yemen is still high compared to many other countries.

  10. [North] Yemen.

    PubMed

    1987-11-01

    The Yemen Arab Republic, also called North Yemen, is a small republic on the southern tip of the Arabian peninsula facing the Red Sea. Yemen has a temperate interior suitable for agriculture. 8.7 million people of Semetic Arab origin are growing at a rate of 3.1% yearly. The infant mortality rate is 173/1000; the life expectancy is 44 years, and the per capita income is about $550. Yemen was once self-sufficient in food production, exporting fine coffee. Years of civil wars, emigration to Saudi Arabia for work, production of the cash crop "qat" for internal consumption, and the recent drought have contributed to the decline of agriculture. Yemen's economy is maintained by foreign aid from Saudi Arabia, the Soviet Union, China, and the United States. U.S. aid has centered around food, roads and other development projects and primary health care such as immunization and reduction of child mortality.

  11. [South] Yemen.

    PubMed

    1989-12-01

    Yemen has an area of 112,000 square miles, the terrain is mountainous in the interior, and has a flat and sandy coast. The climate is extremely hot with little rainfall. 2.2 million is the population level with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The ethnic background is Arab, the religion is Islam and the language is Arabic. 50 years is the average life expectancy and the infant mortality rate is 142/1000. The labor force is 42% agriculture, fisheries, industry and commerce 31%, and services 27%. A republic formed in 1967, the government has a constitution approved in 1978. They have 1 party, the Yemeni Socialist Party with a executive presidium, a supreme people's council and a federal high court. Natural resources include oil and fish, and agricultural products are cotton, hides, skins, and coffee. In 1962 the Federation of South Arabia was formed and a treaty was signed in 1959 for independence by 1968. There was much turmoil from 1967 until 1986 when Haydar Bakr Al-Attus gained power, and there are still strong internal rivalries. The economy has been concentrated in the city of Aden, and with the loss of tourist trade in 1967, and closing of the British base, it has declined by more than 20% by 1968. Attempts are being made to build roads, fisheries, villages, a power plant, and agriculture and irrigation projects.

  12. Yemen Arab Republic.

    PubMed

    1985-07-01

    The government of the Yemen Arab Republic does not have a population policy, but promotes family planning for health reasons since one of its goals is to reduce maternal and child mortality and morbidity. The 2nd 5-Year Plan (1982-86) aims for increased gross domestic product and per capita income, regional development, infrastructure development, job creation, and human resources mobilization. The population increased from 4.8 million in 1970 to 5.8 million in 1980 and is projected to reach 6.5 million by 1985 (indicating a 2.4% growth rate from 1980-1985). Life expectancy is 44 years for both sexes; infant mortality now stands at a high 156/1000 due largely to early marriage and little maternal care. The government concentrates on improving health care, mainly through its national health plans, by emphasizing immunization, education, and training doctors abroad. Current total fertility is 6.7, the birth rate is 48.5/1000, and the average age at marriage for girls is 13. Contraceptives and sterilization are available; abortion for contraceptive purposes is illegal. Up to 30% of Yemen's labor force may have emigrated to neighboring Gulf states and Saudi Arabia. The shortage in labor is partially made up by immigrants from the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, but the government still considers emigration too high since many of those who leave are the most skilled. There is no policy on international migration, due to the great value of remittances, but the government would like to encourage return migration. Yemen's urban population increased from 1.9% in 1950 to 15.3% in 1980. 4/5 of the population live in 5 of Yemen's 10 governorates. The government's policy seeks to strengthen the agricultural sector, improve living quality in rural areas, build up a balanced regional infrastructure, and establish more educational opportunities in small cities and villages. PMID:12314236

  13. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  14. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  15. Human malaria in the highlands of Yemen

    PubMed Central

    AL-Mekhlafi, A M; AL-Mekhlafi, H M; Mahdy, M A K; Azazy, A A; Fong, M Y

    2011-01-01

    Between June 2008 and March 2009, a cross-sectional study of human malaria was carried out in four governorates of Yemen, two (Taiz and Hodiedah) representing the country’s highlands and the others (Dhamar and Raymah) the country’s coastal plains/foothills. The main aims were to determine the prevalences of Plasmodium infection among 455 febrile patients presenting for care at participating health facilities and to investigate the potential risk factors for such infection. Malarial infection was detected in 78 (17·1%) of the investigated patients and was more likely to be detected among the febrile patients from the highlands than among those presenting in the coastal plains/foothills (22·6% v.13·9%; χ2 = 10·102; P = 0·018). Binary logistic-regression models identified low household income [odds ratio (OR) = 13·52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2·62–69·67; P = 0·002], living in a household with access to a water pump (OR = 4·18; CI = 1·60–10·96; P = 0·004) and living in a household near a stream (OR = 4·43; CI = 1·35–14·56; P = 0·014) as significant risk factors for malarial infection in the highlands. Low household income was the only significant risk factor identified for such infection in the coastal plains and foothills (OR = 8·20; CI = 1·80–37·45; P = 0·007). It is unclear why febrile patients in the highlands of Yemen are much more likely to be found to have malarial infection than their counterparts from the coastal plains and foothills. Although it is possible that malarial transmission is relatively intense in the highlands, it seems more likely that, compared with those who live at lower altitudes, those who live in the highlands are less immune to malaria, and therefore more likely to develop febrile illness following malarial infection. Whatever the cause of the symptomatic malarial infection commonly found in the highlands of Yemen, it is a matter of serious

  16. Human malaria in the highlands of Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Mekhlafi, A M; Al-Mekhlafi, H M; Mahdy, M A K; Azazy, A A; Fong, M Y

    2011-04-01

    Between June 2008 and March 2009, a cross-sectional study of human malaria was carried out in four governorates of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, two (<span class="hlt">Taiz</span> and Hodiedah) representing the country's highlands and the others (Dhamar and Raymah) the country's coastal plains/foothills. The main aims were to determine the prevalences of Plasmodium infection among 455 febrile patients presenting for care at participating health facilities and to investigate the potential risk factors for such infection. Malarial infection was detected in 78 (17·1%) of the investigated patients and was more likely to be detected among the febrile patients from the highlands than among those presenting in the coastal plains/foothills (22·6% v.13·9%; χ(2)=10·102; P=0·018). Binary logistic-regression models identified low household income [odds ratio (OR)=13·52; 95% confidence interval (CI)=2·62-69·67; P=0·002], living in a household with access to a water pump (OR=4·18; CI=1·60-10·96; P=0·004) and living in a household near a stream (OR=4·43; CI=1·35-14·56; P=0·014) as significant risk factors for malarial infection in the highlands. Low household income was the only significant risk factor identified for such infection in the coastal plains and foothills (OR = 8·20; CI=1·80-37·45; P=0·007). It is unclear why febrile patients in the highlands of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are much more likely to be found to have malarial infection than their counterparts from the coastal plains and foothills. Although it is possible that malarial transmission is relatively intense in the highlands, it seems more likely that, compared with those who live at lower altitudes, those who live in the highlands are less immune to malaria, and therefore more likely to develop febrile illness following malarial infection. Whatever the cause of the symptomatic malarial infection commonly found in the highlands of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, it is a matter of serious concern that should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23369243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23369243"><span id="translatedtitle">First molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alyousefi, N A; Mahdy, M A K; Lim, Y A L; Xiao, L; Mahmud, R</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of humans and animals and has a worldwide distribution. The parasite has a unique epidemiology in Middle Eastern countries where the IId subtype family of Cryptosporidium parvum dominates. However, there has been no information on Cryptosporidium species in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Thus, this study was conducted in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to examine the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and subtype families. Fecal samples were collected from 335 patients who attended hospitals in Sana'a <span class="hlt">city</span>. Cryptosporidium species were determined by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18 s rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis subtypes were identified based on sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Out of 335 samples, 33 (9.9%) were positive for Cryptosporidium. Of them, 97% were identified as C. parvum whilst 1 case (3%) was caused by C. hominis. All 7 C. parvum isolates subtyped belonged to the IIaA15G2R1 subtype. The common occurrence of the zoonotic IIa subtype family of C. parvum highlights the potential occurrence of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. However, this postulation needs confirmation with future molecular epidemiological studies of cryptosporidiosis in both humans and animals in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=EJ356784','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=EJ356784"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of Childhood Disabilities in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Qirbi, Azza</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A survey of childhood disabilities was conducted in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> covering the three main <span class="hlt">cities</span> and 37 towns and villages. Results indicated a disability prevalence rate of approximately 13% of which over 30% were oral or auditory based and over 20% were visual. (Author/DB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IREdu..59...47Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IREdu..59...47Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Promoting gender parity in basic education: Lessons from a technical cooperation project in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yuki, Takako; Mizuno, Keiko; Ogawa, Keiichi; Mihoko, Sakai</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Many girls are not sent to school in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, despite basic education being free as well as compulsory for all children aged 6-15. Aiming to improve girls' enrolment by increasing parental and community involvement, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) offered a technical cooperation project in June 2005 called Broadening Regional Initiative for Developing Girls' Education (BRIDGE). Phase 1 of this project ran for three and a half years, piloting a participatory school management model supported by school grants in six districts of the <span class="hlt">Taiz</span> Governorate in the Southwest of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. To find out how successful this approach has been in a traditional society, the authors of this paper analysed the gender parity index (GPI) of the project's pilot schools. Based on data collected at three points in time (in the initial and final years of the project, and two years after the project's end), their findings suggest that interventions in school management which strongly emphasise girls' education can be effective in improving gender parity rather quickly, regardless of the schools' initial conditions. However, the authors also observe that the pilot schools' post-project performance in terms of gender parity is mixed. While the local government allocated budgets for school grants to all pilot schools even after the project's end, training and monitoring activities were cut back. The authors further observe that the variation in performance appears to be significantly correlated with school leaders' initial perceptions of gender equality and with the number of female teachers employed. These findings point to the importance of providing schools with continuous long-term guidance and of monitoring those which implement school improvement programmes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012HydJ...20.1177T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012HydJ...20.1177T"><span id="translatedtitle">Local groundwater governance in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: building on traditions and enabling communities to craft new rules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taher, Taha; Bruns, Bryan; Bamaga, Omar; Al-Weshali, Adel; van Steenbergen, Frank</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Local groundwater management in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the means by which stakeholders can work together to improve water governance are discussed. In the last few decades the discourse on groundwater management in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has increasingly been cast in terms of crisis, triggered by rapidly declining water tables around <span class="hlt">cities</span> and in the main agricultural areas. However, in some places in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, communities have responded by implementing local rules that have reduced conflict and provided more reliable and equitable access to water. This trend towards development of local groundwater governance is described, and could make a major contribution in realizing the goals of national water-sector policies and strategies. Twenty-four cases have been identified from different parts of the country and five cases are presented in detail. The article discusses how the process of local management could be nurtured and how it could contribute to rebalancing water use in several parts of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15350475','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15350475"><span id="translatedtitle">Renal failure in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Rohani, M</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Renal failure remains a serious cause of mortality in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Our region has 1.25 million population and our hospital is the central hospital, which has a nephrology department and performs dialysis for the region. Between January 1998 and December 2002, we admitted 547 patients; including children, with acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). CRF was observed in 400 patients, an incidence of 64 per million per year and a prevalence of 320 per million. ARF occurred in 147 persons with an incidence of 23.5 per million per year and a prevalence of 117.5 patients per million. Of all patients, 72% were adults (age range, 20-60 years) with a male preponderance. As a tropical country, malaria (27.9%), diarrhea (13.6%), and other infectious diseases were the main causes. Next most common were obstructive diseases causing CRF and ARF (26.8% and 12.9%, respectively), mainly urolithiasis, Schistosomiasis, and prostatic enlargement. However the cause of CRF in 57.5% of patients was unknown as most persons presented late with end-stage disease (64.7%), requiring immediate intervention. Other causes, such as hepatorenal syndrome, snake bite, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, showed low occurrence rates. Patients presented to the hospital mostly in severe uremia and without a clear history of prior medications. The major findings were vomiting, acidosis, and hypertension with serum creatinine values ranging between 2.8-45 mg/dL (mean value, 13.4 mg/dL). Anemia was observed in 80.4% of CRF versus 62.6% of ARF patients. Hypertension prevalence was 65.5% among CRF patients, of whom 25% were in hypertensive crisis, whereas among ARF the prevalence was only 26.5%. PMID:15350475</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12267833','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12267833"><span id="translatedtitle">People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-08-01</p> <p>The population of the People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> grew from 992,000 in 1950 to 1.7 million in 1975, and the total fertility rate has remained relatively constant at 7 since 1950. The Government has not adopted a population policy per se, but has included sectoral policies that have implications for the size, growth, composition, and distribution of the population. The Government maintains that population issues should be viewed comprehensively within the framework of economic and social development. Measures to achieve economic growth, combined with the expansion of health, education, cultural, and social services, as well as the eradication of illiteracy and the emancipation of women, are expected to have a major impact on the society's demographic structure. The Government's main concern with regard to population growth is a reduction in morbidity and mortality. The rate of growth is projected to increase from 2.7% in 1980-85 to 2.9 in the year 2000, at which point it should begin to decline. The crude death rate is presently 18.8/1000 and is expected to drop to 13.1/1000 by 2000. Infant mortality stood at 138/1000 in 1980-85. Morbidity and mortality are unacceptably high among infants, children, nomads, and rural residents. Priorities for the health sector include the development and expansion of health services, intensive preventive health care for mothers and children, development of a safe drinking water system, nutrition and health education campaigns, and training of health personnel. Measures that are expected to decrease fertility include family planning education, an expansion of facilities to rural areas, and improvements in the status of women. Family planning services are freely available from maternal and child health centers, mainly in urban areas. A mass literacy campaign seeks to increase the female literacy rate to 90%, and women's participation in wage labor is being encouraged. A further goal of population policy is to modify spatial</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769118','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769118"><span id="translatedtitle">Urinary Bladder Cancer in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Samawi, Abdullah Saleh; Aulaqi, Saleh Mansoor</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objectives The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998) classification. Methods This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30th April 2009. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and categorized according to WHO/ISUP 1998 classification. Results Out of 316 urinary bladder cancers, 248 (78%) were urothelial neoplasms, 53 (17%) were squamous cell carcinoma, 7 (2%) were adenocarcinoma, and 3 (1%) were rhabdomyosarcoma. The remaining cases were metastatic carcinomas (n=3), small cell carcinoma (n=1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1). The urothelial neoplasms observed were carcinoma in situ 4 (2%), papilloma 7 (3%), papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential 26 (11%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade 107 (43%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 18 (7%), and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 85 (34%), with 60 years mean age for males and 58 years for females; along with a male to female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was observed in the 61-70 years age group. Conclusion This study documents a high frequency of urothelial neoplasms, mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade with male preponderance and peak incidence in 6th decade of age. PMID:24044060</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5473316','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5473316"><span id="translatedtitle">Diversity in the Mideast; Kuwait and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vielvoye, R.</p> <p>1991-12-02</p> <p>This paper reports on two types of action which mark oil industry activity at opposite ends of the Arabian Peninsula. In Kuwait, the astounding achievements of firefighting teams have captured world headlines. Some 1,200 miles to the south, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is establishing itself as a center for exploration and production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED204390','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED204390"><span id="translatedtitle">Education in North <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Problems and Hopes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Saif, Philip S.</p> <p></p> <p>The background of the educational system in North <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is reviewed and some of the problems facing the system are described. The findings from examining documents and on-site visitations are summarized as follows: (1) the view is confirmed that developing countries with long history and cultural heritage are torn between keeping their traditions…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED254093','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED254093"><span id="translatedtitle">English Teaching Profile: <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.</p> <p></p> <p>A description of the role and status of the English language in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic begins with a general statement concerning the distribution of English speakers and the use of English language materials. Subsequent sections outline: (1) the use and status of English within the educational system at all levels, including teacher education;…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=EJ772618','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=EJ772618"><span id="translatedtitle">Working Children and Educational Inclusion in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dyer, Caroline</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has a very high number of working children, employed in a variety of occupations, ranging from street vending to guards on farms, and domestic labour. Including these children in formal education is a major challenge facing the Republic, which has one of the lowest rates of female participation in primary education in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED404885.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED404885.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Language Institutes in Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuntz, Patricia S.</p> <p></p> <p>A study investigated the characteristics of 14 second language institutes available to adults in Sana'a (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>), an area in which second language instruction has historically been difficult to obtain. Data were gathered through interviews and observation. It was found that seven of the institutions offer English instruction, and five offer Arabic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4444972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4444972"><span id="translatedtitle">Mother and child health care in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coulter, P</p> <p>1974-11-14</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, a country in which 1/2 of the children die before their 15th birthday, is just beginning to develop rural health services. After the revolution in 1962, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> was left with only a few poorly equipped <span class="hlt">city</span> hospitals, a handful of trained medical personnel, and a complete lack of health facilities at the village level. Village health centers, which emphasize both preventive and curative aspects of maternal and child health, are now being established. The personnel at these centers are stressing the value of breast-feeding in an attmept to counter the growing practice of bottle feeding. Bottle feeding is completely inappropriate in the rural areas since the water, fuel, and utensils needed to sterilize the bottles are lacking. In addition, illiteracy prevents the mothers from mixing and administering powdered products safely. For those women unable to breast-feed, the health centers are providing the mothers with instructions for spoon and bottle feeding. There is a pressing need to train more individuals to serve as auxiliary health personnel. The health programs must be designed to take into account the traditional beliefs of the villagers. For example, any attempt to treat rickets must take into account the belief that sunlight is harmful to children. Programs must also recognize the lack of resources in the community. Promoting a diet of meat, eggs, and fruit is pointless since these items are either not available or are too expensive for most of the villagers to purchase. Men who do most of the shopping must also be educated on health and nutrition matters. Due to the traditional segregation of the sexes, this training will have to be provided in separate settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25386011','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25386011"><span id="translatedtitle">The challenges of pharmacy education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Worafi, Yaser Mohammed</p> <p>2014-10-15</p> <p>Pharmacy education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has faced many challenges since its introduction in the 1980s. Most Yemeni pharmacy schools, especially private ones, are experiencing difficulties in providing the right quality and quantity of clinical educational experiences. Most of these challenges are imbedded in a teaching style and curricula that have failed to respond to the needs of the community and country. The slow shift from traditional drug-dispensing to a patient-centered or focused approach in pharmacy practice requires a fundamental change in the roles and responsibilities of both policymakers and educators. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss the challenges facing the pharmacy education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>; (2) to provided recommendations to overcome challenges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC54A..02K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC54A..02K"><span id="translatedtitle">Climate Change And Hydrologic Instability In <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kelley, C. P.; Funk, C. C.; McNally, A.; Shukla, S.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is one of the most food insecure nations in the world. Its agriculture is strongly dependent on soil moisture that is heavily influenced by surface temperature and annual precipitation. We examine observations of rainfall and surface temperature and find that the rainfall, which exhibits strong interannual variability, has seen a moderate downward trend over the last 35 years while surface temperature has seen a very significant rise over the same period. <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has high vulnerability and low resilience to these climate changes stemming from many geopolitical and socioeconomic factors. The threshold of resilience has been crossed as <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is embroiled in chaos and conflict. We examine the relationship between climate change and agricultural and water insecurity using observed data and the Noah land surface model. We further used atmospheric reanalyses to explore the atmospheric teleconnections that affect the anomalous regional circulation. According to these investigations the robust surface temperature increase over recent decades, expected to continue under climate change, has strongly depleted the soil moisture. This drying of the soil exacerbated the acute hydrologic insecurity in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, stemming predominantly from unsustainable groundwater use, and was likely a contributing factor to the ongoing conflict. We show that during naturally occurring dry years and under climate change this region experiences anomalous dry air advection from the northeast and that these regional circulation changes appear to be linked to tropical sea-surface temperature forcing and to the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude circulation. These results are an important example of the emerging influence of climate change in hydrologically insecure regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23523861','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23523861"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular characterization of Giardia duodenalis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alyousefi, Naela A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Xiao, Lihua; Mahmud, Rohela; Lim, Yvonne A L</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Giardia duodenalis is an important intestinal protozoan in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> with infection rates ranging from 18% to 27%. To date, there has been no genotyping study to provide a better understanding of the transmission dynamic. This study was conducted to genotype and subtype G. duodenalis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Stool samples were collected from 503 Yemeni outpatients between 1 and 80 years old, including 219 males and 284 females. Giardia cysts were detected via microscopy after the formal-ether concentration. Genotyping of Giardia was carried out using PCR and sequence analysis of the 16s rRNA and b-giardin genes. Of the 89 microscopy-positive Giardia samples, 65 were successfully sequenced, of which 66% (43 of 65) were identified as G. duodenalis assemblage A and 34% (22 of 65) as assemblage B. Further subtyping analysis based on b-giardin gene identified the presence of subtypes A2 and A3, which belong to the anthroponotic sub-assemblage AII. Data of the study suggest that anthroponotic transmission played a potential role in the transmission of giardiasis in the community. However, further genotyping and subtyping studies of specimens from humans and animals living in the same households are needed for a more definitive understanding of giardiasis transmission in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED285716','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED285716"><span id="translatedtitle">Study of Educational Aspirations of Preparatory School Students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Edington, Everett D.</p> <p></p> <p>To identify causes for low enrollment in secondary agricultural schools in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, the United States Agency for International Development and the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Ministry of Education surveyed 990 preparatory (junior high) students, examining their educational aspirations, differences between rural and urban youth, major influences on student aspirations,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3225123','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3225123"><span id="translatedtitle">Health care in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lambeth, S</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic has health-care problems similar to other developing countries yet lacks the abundant oil reserves of its Arabian peninsula neighbors to address these problems. An ambitious 5 year health plan developed in 1977 has been impeded by a lack of material and human resources. The infant mortality rate remains one of the highest in the world, schistosomiasis drains the energy of the people, and tuberculosis and malaria remain endemic. Progress is, however, being made in health-care educational programs within Sanaa University and the Health Manpower Institutes to develop the resources of the Yemeni people to meet the health-care needs of their country. PMID:3225123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25683097','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25683097"><span id="translatedtitle">Challenges in renal transplantation in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H</p> <p>2015-02-16</p> <p>Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23556343','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23556343"><span id="translatedtitle">Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-18/pdf/2012-12225.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-18/pdf/2012-12225.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 29533 - Blocking Property of Persons Threatening the Peace, Security, or Stability of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-05-18</p> <p>... agents, or any other person. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, May 16, 2012. [FR Doc. 2012-12225 Filed..., Security, or Stability of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws... actions and policies of certain members of the Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and others threaten <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445592','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445592"><span id="translatedtitle">LNG projects make progress in Oman and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-02-24</p> <p>Two LNG projects in the Middle East, one in Oman and the other in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, are due on stream at the turn of the century--each the largest single project ever put together in its country. Officials described their projects at a yearend 1996 conference in Paris by Institut Francais du Petrole and Petrostrategies. The Oman project develops gas reserves, does gas processing, and transports the gas 360 km to a liquefaction plant to be built on the coast. The <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> project involves a liquefaction plant and an export terminal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=6&id=ED272327','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=6&id=ED272327"><span id="translatedtitle">A Bibliography of Agriculture and Rural Life in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Swanjord, Don Edward</p> <p></p> <p>Intended as a key to current work in agriculture in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, this bibliography cites more than 520 resources produced since 1963 including monographs, journal articles, theses and dissertations, conference papers, case studies, reports, proposals, surveys, bibliographies, and United Nations publications. Foreign language materials in German, French,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED491649.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED491649.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Conflict, Development and Community Participation in Education: Pakistan and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jones, Adele</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>In development policy, community participation has increasingly come to be seen as a way to encourage community interest, involvement, ownership and ultimately, sustainability of projects. Education has also been affected by this discourse. The following paper examines two countries affected by conflict (Pakistan and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>), asking what type of…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-08/pdf/2010-22235.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-08/pdf/2010-22235.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 54697 - Unblocking of Thirteen Specially Designated Nationals Pursuant to Executive Order 13224</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-09-08</p> <p>... HONEY CENTER), Sanaa, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> . AL-KADR, Ahmad Sa'id (a.k.a. AL-KANADI, Abu Abd Al-Rahman); DOB 01 Mar..., Al- Hasabah, Sanaa, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>; By the Shrine Next to the Gas Station, Jamal Street, <span class="hlt">Ta'iz</span>, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>; Al-'Arudh Square, Khur Maksar, Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>; Al- Nasr Street, Doha, Qatar . AWEYS, Dahir Ubeidullahi,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23877790','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23877790"><span id="translatedtitle">HIV prevalence and related risk behaviors in men who have sex with men, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> 2011.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mirzazadeh, Ali; Emmanuel, Faran; Gharamah, Fouzia; Al-Suhaibi, Abdul Hamed; Setayesh, Hamidreza; McFarland, Willi; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at growing risk of HIV infection in many parts of the world; however, the epidemic has not been well explored among this population in most Arab countries. To estimate the prevalence of HIV and related risk behaviors among MSM in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, we recruited 261 adult MSM from the port <span class="hlt">cities</span> of Aden and Al-Hudaydah through venue- and facility-based sampling. Behavioral data were collected with a face-to-face questionnaire, and HIV status was determined by serological testing. HIV prevalence was 5.9 % (95 % CI 4.8-7.3). One-fourth (25.8 %, 95 % CI 20.7-31.5) had tested for HIV in the last year and received results; 27.8 % (95 % CI 22.5-33.7) had comprehensive knowledge about HIV; 20.0 % (95 % CI 15.8-25.0) reported condom use at last anal sex; and 31.4 % (95 % CI 25.9-37.3) reported that they or their sexual partner had a sexually transmitted disease symptom. Injecting drugs in the last year was reported by 0.8 % (95 % CI 0.1-9.2). Multiple risk behaviors, low HIV knowledge, few preventive behaviors, and HIV prevalence greater than 5 % denote a concentrated and potentially expanding HIV epidemic among MSM in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. No time should be lost in intervening to prevent further expansion of the epidemic to levels already seen among MSM outside the Middle East.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057394','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057394"><span id="translatedtitle">Oral and pharyngeal cancers in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a retrospective study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halboub, E S; Abdulhuq, M; Al-Mandili, A</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Hospital-based studies have revealed very high relative frequencies of oral and pharyngeal cancers in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This study estimated the relative frequencies of oral and pharyngeal cancers among Yemeni cancer patients registered in 2007 and 2008 and determined patients' demographic and tumour characteristics. Of the registered 7515 cases, 302 (4.0%) were oral cancer and 239 (3.2%) pharyngeal cancer. Oral cancer was significantly more frequent among females while pharyngeal cancer was significantly more frequent among males. Oral cancer patients were significantly older than pharyngeal cancer patients. The tongue was the most affected oral site (53.6%) while the nasopharynx comprised 89.5% of pharyngeal cancers. The most frequent morphological type was squamous cell carcinoma (93.2%). High proportions of oral cancer (71.5%) and pharyngeal cancer (77.4%) patients were diagnosed at advanced stages. Compared with other countries in the region, oral cancer and nasopharyngeal cancer represent substantial national health burdens in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4734826','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4734826"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title3-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title3-vol1-other-id204.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title3-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title3-vol1-other-id204.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Notice of May 13, 2013 Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> On May 16, 2012, by Executive Order 13611, I declared a national emergency pursuant to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-13/pdf/2013-22327.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-13/pdf/2013-22327.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 56767 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-09-13</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Pursuant to Section 7031(b)(3) of the... the Act with respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and I hereby waive this restriction. This determination and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-15/pdf/2013-11690.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-15/pdf/2013-11690.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 28465 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-15</p> <p>.... (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, May 13, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013-11690 Filed 5-14-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295... Emergency With Respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> On May 16, 2012, by Executive Order 13611, I declared a national emergency... by the actions and policies of certain members of the Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and others that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061762','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061762"><span id="translatedtitle">Co-circulation of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses, Al Hudaydah, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, 2012.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rezza, Giovanni; El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lista, Florigio</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>We investigated 400 cases of dengue-like illness in persons hospitalized during an outbreak in Al Hudaydah, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, in 2012. Overall, 116 dengue and 49 chikungunya cases were diagnosed. Dengue virus type 2 was the predominant serotype. The co-circulation of these viruses indicates that mosquitoborne infections represent a public health threat in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1059036','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1059036"><span id="translatedtitle">Quality Education Improvement: <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the Problem of the "Brain Drain"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Muthanna, Abdulghani</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents an overview of the problems that hinder improvement of the quality of education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with a particular focus on higher education institutions. It discusses in particular the problem of the brain drain and why this phenomenon is occurring in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Semi-structured interviews with three professors at higher education…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-19/pdf/2013-09303.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-19/pdf/2013-09303.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 23625 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-19</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Pursuant to Section 7031(b)(3) of the...(b)(1) of the Act with respect to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and I hereby waive this restriction. This determination...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713844A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713844A"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid groundwater-related land subsidence in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> observed by multi-temporal InSAR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abdullin, Ayrat; Xu, Wenbin; Kosmicki, Maximillian; Jonsson, Sigurjon</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Several basins in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are suffering from a rapid drawdown of groundwater, which is the most important water source for agricultural irrigation, industry and domestic use. However, detailed geodetic measurements in the region have been lacking and the extent and magnitude of groundwater-related land subsidence has been poorly known. We used 13 ascending ALOS and 15 descending Envisat images to study land subsidence of several basins in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with a special focus on the Sana'a and Mabar basins. From multitemporal synthetic aperture radar interferometric analysis (persistent scatterers (PS) and small baseline subsets (SBAS)) we examined the spatio-temporal behavior of the subsidence induced by depletion of groundwater aquifer systems from November 2003 to February 2011. In the interferometric data processing, we carefully chose interferogram pairs to minimize spatial and temporal decorrelation, because of high subsidence rates and the type of land cover. Our results show that the spatial pattern of subsidence remained quite stable during the observation period in both the Sana'a and Mabar basins. In the Sana'a basin, the maximum subsidence rate exceeded 14 cm/year in the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction between 2003 and 2008 in an agricultural area just north of Sana'a <span class="hlt">city</span>, where water wells have been drying up according to the well data. The subsidence rate was lower in the urban areas, or approximately 1 cm/year, exhibiting annual variations. The main subsidence was found in the center and southern parts of the <span class="hlt">city</span>, while deformation in the northern part is less obvious. For the Mabar basin, the subsidence rate exceeded 30 cm/year in the agricultural area north of the town of Mabar during 2007 - 2011. The southern part of the Mabar basin also experienced high subsidence rates, although somewhat lower than to the north. Excessive water pumping is the main cause of the ground subsidence and it has already led to extensive ground fracturing at the edge of some</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4675517','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4675517"><span id="translatedtitle">Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gondos, Adnan S.; Al-Moyed, Khaled A.; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A.; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A.; Alyousefi, Naelah A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41–50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors. PMID:26657128</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657128','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657128"><span id="translatedtitle">Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657128','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657128"><span id="translatedtitle">Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors. PMID:26657128</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23469646','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23469646"><span id="translatedtitle">Intestinal parasitosis among Yemeni patients with cancer, Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Qobati, Salah A; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Al-Zoa, Abdulla M Bin; Derhim, Mohamed</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The profile of intestinal parasitosis was assessed among patients on anticancer chemotherapy in Sana'a <span class="hlt">city</span>, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> during the period from April to December 2011. A total of 206 patients (115 males & 91 females), aged 3 to 18 years with mean of 14.17 +/- 3.13 were subjected to stool examinations by different techniques. The overall rate of intestinal parasites was 63.1%. Cryptosporidium parvum was the highest (30.1%) followed by G. lamblia (18.0%) and then C. cayetanensis (5.3%). Blastocystis hominis and E. histolytica/dispar were detected in 4.9% & 2.4% respectively. E. coli, H. nana and A. lumbricoides were diagnosed in an equal of 1.5% and S. stercoralis was seen in one case only. The majority of infected patients suffered from diarrhea. They showed 4.64 risk of protozoan infections compared to those who passed formed stool with statistically significant difference. Diarrhea was associated with higher risk of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis (OR = 2.73 & 2.67 respectively). The risk of intestinal parasitosis neither differed significantly with patients' age nor sex.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8617192','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8617192"><span id="translatedtitle">Vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosen, D S; al Sharif, Z; Bashir, M; al Shabooti, A; Pizzarello, L D</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>In June 1992, the Ministry of Health (MOH) of the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, UNICEF/Sana'a, the Saudi Eye Foundation, and Helen Keller International joined together to screen 2438 children aged 1-5 from 18 rural districts in the Tihama region of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> for xerophthalmia (abnormal dryness of the eye due to a deficiency of tears), followed by trachoma (chronic eye infection characterized by granulations and scarring of the cornea) screening, blood sampling, and anthropometry and collection of morbidity prevalence data on a subsample (338 children). 2.21% of the children had active xerophthalmia. Boys were more likely to have xerophthalmia than girls (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1). Children aged 4-5 were more likely to have it than those under age 4 (OR = 2.9). In fact, no child aged 12-23 months had xerophthalmia. Most xerophthalmia cases (77.8%) had Bitot's spots. Bitot's spots cases tended to have the spots in both eyes (71%) and be children aged 4-5 (66.6%). The prevalence of Bitot's spots exceeded the minimum criteria for public health significance of xerophthalmia (1.72% vs. 0.50%). The prevalence of night blindness stood at 0.45%. One xerophthalmia case had keratomalacia and another had bilateral corneal scarring (0.04% each). 94% of the children with xerophthalmia who provided blood samples had serum retinol levels below 20 mcg/dl. Children with xerophthalmia had much lower retinol levels than those without xerophthalmia (11.4 vs. 18.8 mcg/dl; p .001). Likewise, children with night blindness had lower levels than those without night blindness (10.9 vs. 18.3 mcg/dl; p .001). Among the subsample, the proportion of children with deficient or marginal serum retinol levels ( 10 mcg/dl and 20 mcg/dl, respectively) exceeded the minimum criteria for public health significance of vitamin A deficiency (7.2% vs. 5% and 62.3% vs. 15%, respectively). 70% of children with marginal serum levels were 24-47 months old. Excess undernutrition existed at levels of 70% for below the 25th</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25183027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25183027"><span id="translatedtitle">Phylogeny of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses in Al Hudayda governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Lista, Florigio; Rezza, Giovanni</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, which is located in the southwestern end of the Arabian Peninsula, is one of countries most affected by recurrent epidemics caused by emerging vector-borne viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) outbreaks have been reported with increasing frequency in several governorates since the year 2000, and the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been also responsible of large outbreaks and it is now a major public health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. We report the results of the phylogenetic analysis of DENV-2 and CHIKV isolates (NS1 and E1 genes, respectively) detected in an outbreak occurred in Al-Hudayda in 2012. Estimates of the introduction date of CHIKV and DENV-2, and the phylogeographic analysis of DENV-2 are also presented. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> isolates of DENV belonged to the lineage 2 Cosmopolitan subtype, whereas CHIKV isolates from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> belonged to the ECSA genotype. All the CHIKV isolates from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were statistically supported and dated back to the year 2010 (95% HPD: 2009-2011); these sequences showed an alanine in the aminoacid position 226 of the E1 protein. Phylogeographic analysis of DENV-2 virus showed that cluster 1, which included <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> isolates, dated back to 2003 Burkina Faso strains (95% HPD 1999-2007). The <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, cluster dated back to 2011 (95% HPD 2009-2012). Our study sheds light on the global spatiotemporal dynamics of DENV-2 and CHIKV in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This study reinforces both the need to monitor the spread of CHIKV and DENV, and to apply significant measures for vector control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20572928','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20572928"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of socio-economic and behavioural factors on childhood malnutrition in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sunil, T S</p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>This study examined the effects of socio-economic and behavioural factors on childhood malnutrition in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The three anthropometric indicators such as height-for-age, weight-for-height and weight-for-age are used to examine the nutritional status of children aged less 5 years in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The independent variables include background characteristics, behavioural risk factors and illness characteristics. Data for the study come the most recent <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Demographic and Health Survey, a nationally representative sample, conducted in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in 1997. Logistic regression analysis is used to estimate the odds of being malnourished. The three anthropometric indicators show high to very high levels of child malnutrition in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The prevalence of stunting and underweight is so widespread that almost every other child under the age of 5 is either stunted or underweight. Social, economic and behavioural factors show very significant association with childhood malnutrition. The study results indicate the importance of social and behavioural factors in describing childhood malnutrition in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The study results will help develop nutritional and health promotion policies in order to improve childhood malnutrition in this country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22091938','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22091938"><span id="translatedtitle">Fertility, mortality, migration and family planning in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Allman, J; Hill, A G</p> <p>1978-03-01</p> <p>Abstract Until the end of the seven years' civil war following the revolution of 1962, almost no reliable statistical information of any kind about the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic (North <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) and its people was available. Since President al-Hamdi's takeover of 1974, the demand for more accurate statistics for developing planning has led to a number of studies which give us the first numerical insights into the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s population. The National Population Census of 1975 is the most important of these studies since it showed two things very clearly. First, it indicated that the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s population is large and concentrated in selected rural areas where there are real problems of crowding and shortages of good agricultural land. Secondly, the Census showed that the lack of domestic economic opportunities partially related to the high rural population densities, and the numerous opportunities in the oil-rich states of the Middle East, especially Sa'udi Arabia, had resulted in an out-migration of young males of prime ages of very large proportions. This article elaborates further on the dynamics of the population in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and reports on the results of a small sample survey carried out in May 1976which provides further insights into the factors affecting fertility and mortality during this early stage of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s economic and social development. PMID:22091938</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12290055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12290055"><span id="translatedtitle">International and return migration: the experience of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>"This study deals with the impact of...return migrants (or returnees) on the social and economic development of the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in both the short and long terms, and assesses the possibility of their integration into the society and economy of the new Republic. The first section offers a brief history of Yemeni migration and description of the demographic and economic characteristics of the returnees compared with those of the non-migrant population. It also discusses the volume of remittances.... The second section...discusses the problems encountered in integrating [returnees] into the socio-economic fabric of the new State, the absorptive capacity of the various economic sectors, and the prospects for their employment in the short and medium run."</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26795842','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26795842"><span id="translatedtitle">The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb</p> <p>2016-04-30</p> <p>The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20164005','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20164005"><span id="translatedtitle">Pattern of head and neck cancer in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdul-Hamid, G; Saeed, N M; Al-Kahiry, W; Shukry, S</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Head and neck cancer constitutes one of the commonest malignancies in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. There may be a role for the use of Shamma and Zarda and Khat for the increase of HNC in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This study was conducted retrospectively with an overall aim to describe the pattern of head and neck cancers among Yemeni patients attending the Oncology Department of Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, for the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2004. The study included 183 patients with head and neck cancers (Lymphoma and thyroid were excluded), 134 were males (73.2%) and 49 were females (26.8%) , with male to female ratio of 2.7:1. The mean age was 51.3 +/- 14.9 years (range: 3 - 82 years). Statistically, there is significant difference between the mean age of male (49.5 +/- 15.1 years) and female (45.4 +/- 16.3 years) patients with head and neck cancers [t= 2.1, p: 0.03]. The common types of head and neck cancers in this study are cancers of the oral cavity (31.7%), followed by pharyngeal (22.9%) and laryngeal (19.1%). In relation to sex, there is a significant statistical relationship between certain head and neck cancers and sex (p: 0.0000). In males, the common cancers are oral cavity cancers (22.7%), laryngeal (22.1%) and pharyngeal cancers (20.8%). The common histopathological type of head and neck cancers in this study is the well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (70.5%). This study concluded that head and neck cancers are among the common health problems affecting Yemeni patients and recommended further wide national studies to determine the real incidence and the risk factors associated with such cancer. PMID:20164005</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4464V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4464V"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural analysis of a fractured basement reservoir, central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Veeningen, Resi; Rice, Hugh; Schneider, Dave; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The Pan-African Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), within which <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> lies, formed as a result of Neoproterozoic collisional events between c. 870-550 Ma. Several subsequent phases of extension occurred, from the Mesozoic (due to the breakup of Gondwana) to the Recent (forming the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea). These resulted in the formation of numerous horst- and-graben structures and the development of fractured basement reservoirs in the southeast part of the ANS. Two drill cores from the Mesozoic Marib-Shabwa Basin, central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, penetrated the upper part of the Pan-African basement. The cores show both a lithological and structural inhomogeneity, with variations in extension-related deformation structures such as dilatational breccias, open fractures and closed veins. At least three deformation events have been recognized: D1) Ductile to brittle NW-SE directed faulting during cooling of a granitic pluton. U-Pb zircon ages revealed an upper age limit for granite emplacement at 627±3.5 Ma. As these structures show evidence for ductile deformation, this event must have occurred during the Ediacaran, shortly after intrusion, since Rb/Sr and (U-Th)/He analyses show that subsequent re-heating of the basement did not take place. D2) The development of shallow dipping, NNE-SSW striking extensional faults that formed during the Upper Jurassic, simultaneously with the formation of the Marib-Shabwa Basin. These fractures are regularly cross-cut by D3. D3) Steeply dipping NNE-SSW to ENE-WSW veins that are consistent with the orientation of the opening of the Gulf of Aden. These faults are the youngest structures recognized. The formation of ductile to brittle faults in the granite (D1) resulted in a hydrothermally altered zone ca. 30 cm wide replacing (mainly) plagioclase with predominantly chlorite, as well as kaolinite and heavy element minerals such as pyrite. The alteration- induced porosity has an average value of 20%, indicating that the altered zone is potentially a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011QSRv...30..783F&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011QSRv...30..783F&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Holocene and Pleistocene pluvial periods in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, southern Arabia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fleitmann, Dominik; Burns, Stephen J.; Pekala, Marek; Mangini, Augusto; Al-Subbary, Abdulkarim; Al-Aowah, Mohammad; Kramers, Jan; Matter, Albert</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Arabia is an important potential pathway for the dispersal of Homo sapiens ("out of Africa"). Yet, because of its arid to hyper-arid climate humans could only migrate across southern Arabia during pluvial periods when environmental conditions were favorable. However, knowledge on the timing of Arabian pluvial periods prior to the Holocene is mainly based on a single and possibly incomplete speleothem record from Hoti Cave in Northern Oman. Additional terrestrial records from the Arabian Peninsula are needed to confirm the Hoti Cave record. Here we present a new speleothem record from Mukalla Cave in southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The Mukalla Cave and Hoti Cave records clearly reveal that speleothems growth occurred solely during peak interglacial periods, corresponding to Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 1 (early to mid-Holocene), 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 (Eemian), 7.1, 7.5 and 9. Of these humid periods, highest precipitation occurred during MIS 5.5 and lowest during early to middle Holocene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2536389','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2536389"><span id="translatedtitle">Diphtheria: a possible foodborne outbreak in Hodeida, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jones, E. E.; Kim-Farley, R. J.; Algunaid, M.; Parvez, M. A.; Ballad, Y. A.; Hightower, A. W.; Orenstein, W. A.; Broome, C. V.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Between 29 August 1981 and 16 January 1982, an epidemic of diphtheria produced 149 cases in Hodeida, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. The overall attack rate was 11.8 per 10 000; the most frequent victims were males under 5 years of age, with an attack rate of 55.7 per 10 000. Severity of the illness varied inversely with age and the number of previous doses of DPT. A case—control study showed that vaccination with DPT was protective (P = 0.03) with an efficacy of 87.3% (95% confidence interval, 32.2-99.5%) among those who had received 3 or more doses. Risk factors for the development of disease were previous contact with a case (P = 0.002), previous contact with a person having skin disease (P = 0.04), obtaining drinking-water from a wheeled carrier (P = 0.008), and consumption of factory-made yoghurt (P = 0.003). The secondary attack rate among household contacts under 15 years of age was at least 1.3%. PMID:3874714</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26795842','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26795842"><span id="translatedtitle">The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb</p> <p>2016-04-30</p> <p>The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management. PMID:26795842</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/10854','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/10854"><span id="translatedtitle">A brief investigation of the surface-water hydrology of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Riggs, Henry Chiles</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, near the southwest tip of the Arabian Peninsula, is a mountainous country bordered by a desert on the east and a coastal plain on the west. Rainfall is low and seasonal; consequently, most streams (wadis) are ephemeral. The natural flow regimens of many of the smaller wadis are modified by terracing for agriculture. The only streamflow data available in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are short records on four large wadis. A brief field investigation and application of reconnaissance techniques are the bases for the largely qualitative description of the hydrology, and for the proposal to collect streamflow data needed for orderly development of the expanding economy. (Woodard-USGS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED535479.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED535479.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Level of Students' Achievement in Mathematics at the End of Elementary Education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Khair, Tarig Mohamed Ali Mohamed; Khairani, Ahmad Zamri; Elrofai, Tahra Aisa</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of student's achievement in mathematics in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This study use a sample of 200 male students and 200 female students, chosen from eight government schools on the basis of diversified sampling techniques. A mathematics test which composed of seventy five items that covered geometrical…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ776360.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ776360.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Distribution of Public Education Spending for the Poor: The Case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yuki, Takako</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores the issue of how a country for which the prioritization of public spending towards poverty reduction is a key policy concern can monitor the distributional effects of public spending. Employing standard benefit-incidence analysis, this paper empirically examines how public education spending is currently distributed in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1005209','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1005209"><span id="translatedtitle">Promoting Gender Parity in Basic Education: Lessons from a Technical Cooperation Project in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yuki, Takako; Mizuno, Keiko; Ogawa, Keiichi; Mihoko, Sakai</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Many girls are not sent to school in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, despite basic education being free as well as compulsory for all children aged 6-15. Aiming to improve girls' enrollment by increasing parental and community involvement, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) offered a technical cooperation project in June 2005 called Broadening Regional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED351778.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED351778.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Teacher Incentive Systems, Final Report. Policy Research Initiative: Haiti, Liberia, Somalia, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kemmerer, Frances; Thiagarajan, Sivasailam</p> <p></p> <p>Findings of a study that examined the implementation of a teacher incentives initiative in four countries--Haiti, Liberia, Somalia, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>--are presented in this paper. The countries are participating in a 10-year initiative founded in 1984, Improving the Efficiency of Educational Systems (IEES). Methodology involved interviews with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED433097','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=4&id=ED433097"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of the Convention on the Rights of the Child in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beatty, Sharon; Croken, Barbara; al Hamdani, Abdul Hakim; Jibran, Fatima; al Makhlafi, Saed</p> <p></p> <p>Nearly a decade after ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), more information is needed about how it is being used to advance children's rights. The <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> CRC Impact Study is part of the International CRC Impact Study, a project of Radda Barnen/Swedish Save the Children. The study's focus is on how and whether the Yemeni…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED558675','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED558675"><span id="translatedtitle">Dancing on the Heads of Snakes: An Intertextual Analysis of Political Metaphor in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Al-Zuraiki, Mokhtar</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This dissertation examines the use and linguistic behavior of the "al-raqs ala ru'oos al-tha'abeen" "dancing on the heads of snakes" metaphor and metaphors about unity in pro-government and anti-government discourse in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. It adopts an intertextual, discourse-based approach that, following Oakley and Coulson (2008),…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED289374.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED289374.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Field Guide for Continued Study of the Arabic Language in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Oman.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Critchfield, David Lawrence</p> <p></p> <p>A set of materials for independent study of Arabic is designed for Peace Corps volunteers working in Oman and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> who have had Arabic language training but need additional skills. It establishes guidelines for independent study and working with a tutor, helps check language performance, and provides grammatical information for reference. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1018531','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ1018531"><span id="translatedtitle">A Tragic Educational Experience: Academic Injustice in Higher Education Institutions in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Muthanna, Abdulghani</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This article outlines the tragic educational experience of one Yemeni scholar who has been oppressed by the education policy that Yemeni university administrators are accustomed to implementing while employing candidates. The institutions of higher education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with the absence of justice, have experienced major ordeals in improving the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6826588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6826588"><span id="translatedtitle">Contraception, marital fertility, and breast-feeding in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goldberg, H I; Anderson, J E; Miller, D; Dawam, O</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Major findings from an analysis of demographic information collected in a 1979 survey in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic (North <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) are that: levels of contraceptive use are extremely low in the rural areas that constitute most of the nation and considerably higher in the capital, Sana'a; fertility is very high and, until recently, was higher in Sana'a than in rural areas; mortality of children is very high with small urban-rural differentials; breastfeeding durations tend to be short, considering <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s extremely low level of development; and, female infants appear to be breastfed longer than male infants in Sana'a, a phenomenon never previously documented. It is argued that the observed convergence between fertility levels in Sana'a and rural <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> results from increased contraception in Sana'a, which offsets fertility differences caused by longer breastfeeding in rural areas. Background characteristics surveyed include literacy of husband, rural or urban residence, presence of electricity, and if husband lived at home or away. Characteristics are correlated to duration of marriage; distribution of children by age; % of women and those at risk of pregnancy using contraception; mean number of total live births per woman; mean length of interbirth intervals; % of women currently pregnant; % of children surviving to interview; % of children ever breastfed; and % distributions of age at which bottle milk was 1st given to infants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12319811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12319811"><span id="translatedtitle">The socio-economic impact of the involuntary mass return to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in 1990.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Hear, N</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>800,000 <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> nationals were forced to leave Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and other countries in the region during the Gulf War. Their mass return to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> followed immediately after reunification of North and South <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Analysis reveals that the term "migrant worker" is a misnomer and obscures the variations in wealth, residence, and status. Returnees had variable lengths of stay abroad, number of dependents or family members abroad or at home, types of occupation, ownership of assets, frequency of visits to the community of origin, and remittances. The range of long-term migrants included wealthy merchants and bankers, middle level service and retail workers, and poor workers in the informal sector. The common thread is that all suffered some decline in standard of living. The return was less disruptive for short-term migrants. Some long-term residents no longer had social and economic ties to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and some had no experience living in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. About 33% were estimated to be without ties to home communities. The decline in remittances from abroad affected foreign exchange receipts. The country shifted from labor scarcity to unemployment conditions. The infrastructure in housing, education, and social services was strained. The one-time influx of capital was short-lived. Returnees comprised about 7% of the total population. The feared upheaval politically and economically did not occur. Suggested improvements for future mass resettlement include offering shanty dwellers a supplemental feeding program, a means of obtaining secure housing, and increased infrastructure. The long-term benefits of encouraging a return to agriculture should have been more widely promoted. PMID:12319811</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11117954','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11117954"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk factors for human brucellosis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a case control study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Shamahy, H A; Whitty, C J; Wright, S G</p> <p>2000-10-01</p> <p>Brucellosis is known to occur in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> but its epidemiology has not been extensively studied. The present investigation examined risk factors for human brucellosis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> using a hospital-based case-control study. A total of 235 consecutive patients with brucellosis attending the Central Health Laboratory in Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, were matched in respect of age, sex, and place of residence, rural or urban, with 234 controls selected from individuals attending the Central Health Laboratory for unrelated health problems. Clinical information on patients and controls was supplemented with occupational and socio-economic data obtained by interview of cases and controls using a standard questionnaire. After controlling for confounding factors significant risk factors for infection related to occupation as a farmer (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.4-4.5, P < 0.0001)), shepherd (OR 7.8 (95% CI 1.0-61, P 0.05)) or microbiologist (OR 24.5 (95% CI 2.9-204, P 0.003)); and drinking fresh milk (OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.3-4.3, P 0.001)) and laban (OR 22.7 (95% CI 1.7-4.2 P < 0.0001)). Taking other milk products and offal were not risk factors. Socio-economic and educational factors were also independent risk factors. Occupational, food and socio-economic risk factors significantly confounded one another. <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> shares some but not all of the risk factors of neighbouring countries. The interrelation between the various factors is complex and studying any one in isolation may give a false impression of its public health significance. Control through education of the population to minimize exposure to, and contact with, animals and their milk and milk products and to boil milk before drinking it or using it to make buttermilk, would be difficult as these would represent such fundamental changes to established patterns of behaviour of this society. Ideally there would be a campaign to control the infection by animal vaccination but the costs and logistic difficulty would be great. Presently there is a clear need</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24952121','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24952121"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid diagnosis of schistosomiasis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> using a simple questionnaire and urine reagent strips.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bassiouny, H K; Hasab, A A; El-Nimr, N A; Al-Shibani, L A; Al-Waleedi, A A</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Schistosomiasis ranks second to malaria in terms of socioeconomic and public health importance in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This study assessed the validity of a morbidity questionnaire and urine reagent strips as a rapid tool for screening schoolchildren for urinary schistosomiasis as compared with the presence of eggs in urine as the gold-standard parasitological diagnosis. The study examined urine samples and interviewed 696 children (mean age 12.5 years) attending a primary-preparatory school in south <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Urinary schistosomiasis was confirmed in 126 (18.1%) children. Diagnostic performance was poor for 2 items in the morbidity questionnaire (self-reported history of previous infection and self-reported history of antischistosomal treatment). However, self-reported dysuria, self-reported haematuria in the questionnaire and microhaematuria by reagent strips (alone or with macrohaematuria) revealed good diagnostic performance. The results indicated that reagent strips are a valid method for detection of microhaematuria for identifying individuals and communities infected with Schistosoma haematobium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26613828','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26613828"><span id="translatedtitle">Attitudes Toward Restricting the Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Women Living With HIV Infection in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Badahdah, Abdallah M</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A considerable amount of research has demonstrated the pervasive and destructive power of discrimination against people living with HIV, which limits their full and equal participation in society. This study surveyed 613 young adults from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> about their attitudes toward the sexual and reproductive rights of women living with HIV (WLWH). Among survey respondents, 80% believed that WLWH should be sterilized and not allowed to get married. Furthermore, 62% thought that WLWH should be forced to have abortions if they became pregnant. Men were more likely than women to impose restrictions on the sexual and reproductive rights of WLWH. HIV stigma predicted respondent attitudes toward WLWH, but religiosity and knowledge about HIV did not. The results of the study have implications for developing programs to protect and promote the rights of WLWH in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12537152','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12537152"><span id="translatedtitle">The prevalence and correlates of consanguineous marriages in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: similarities and contrasts with other Arab countries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jurdi, Rozzet; Saxena, Prem C</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Using data on 9762 women from the 1997 <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Demographic and Maternal and Child Health Survey, this paper examines the prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of consanguineous marriages in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The results indicate that 40% of marriages are consanguineous, over 85% of which are between first cousins. The prevalence of consanguineous marriages appears to have increased over time, particularly for the last marriage cohort. As for socioeconomic correlates, the study confirms the inverse association between consanguineous marriages and women's education and occupation, age at marriage and economic status. However, no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of consanguinity has been found by place of residence and geographical region. Somewhat unexpected results have been obtained by husband's background characteristics, with higher educated men and those working in the modern sector of the economy being more likely to be married to cousins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22262701','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22262701"><span id="translatedtitle">Palynological study of the genera Ruellia, Ecbolium, Asystasia, Blepharis and Dicliptera (Acanthaceae) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Al-Hakimi, S. Anisa; Maideen, Haja; Latiff, A.</p> <p>2013-11-27</p> <p>Pollen morphology of five genera of the family Acanthaceae, namely Ruellia, Blepharis, Asystasia, Ecbolium and Dicliptera (Acanthaceae) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has been examined using light and scanning electron microscope. Pollen descriptions were provided with two shapes distinguished, spheroidal and prolate. Most of the pollen grains were tricolporate amd psuedocolpi except those of Blepharis which are colpate. The surface is coarsely reticulate, in addition to the lumina that varies in size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27271178','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27271178"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional inequalities in child malnutrition in Egypt, Jordan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharaf, Mesbah Fathy; Rashad, Ahmed Shoukry</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>There is substantial evidence that on average, urban children have better health outcomes than rural children. This paper investigates the underlying factors that account for the regional disparities in child malnutrition in three Arab countries, namely; Egypt, Jordan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. We use data on a nationally representative sample from the most recent rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey. A Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis is conducted to decompose the rural-urban differences in child nutrition outcomes into two components; one that is explained by regional differences in the level of the determinants (covariate effects), and another component that is explained by differences in the effect of the determinants on the child nutritional status (coefficient effects). Results show that the under-five stunting rates are 20 % in Egypt, 46.5 % in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and 7.7 % in Jordan. The rural- urban gap in child malnutrition was minor in the case of Egypt (2.3 %) and Jordan (1.5 %), while the regional gap was significant in the case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (17.7 %). Results of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition show that the covariate effect is dominant in the case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> while the coefficients effect dominates in the case of Jordan. Income inequality between urban and rural households explains most of the malnutrition gap. Results were robust to the different decomposition weighting schemes. By identifying the underlying factors behind the rural- urban health disparities, the findings of this paper help in designing effective intervention measures aimed at reducing regional inequalities and improving population health outcomes. PMID:27271178</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26890365','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26890365"><span id="translatedtitle">Plagiarism: A Shared Responsibility of All, Current Situation, and Future Actions in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Muthanna, Abdulghani</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>As combating plagiarism is a shared responsibility of all, this article focuses on presenting the current situation of higher education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The critical review of four implementable policy documents and interviews revealed the absence of research ethics code, research misconduct policy, and institutional policies in the country. This led to the presence of several acts of research dishonesty. The article concludes with an initiative for necessary future actions in the nation. PMID:26890365</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-03/pdf/2012-16283.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-03/pdf/2012-16283.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 39392 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-03</p> <p>.... 744 (22 U.S.C. 2752, 2778, 2780, 2791, and 2797); E.O. 11958, 42 FR 4311; 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 79; 22 U.S.C. 2651a; 22 U.S.C. 287c; E.O. 12918, 59 FR 28205; 3 CFR, 1994 Comp., p. 899; Sec. 1225, Pub. L... Part 126 RIN 1400-AD23 Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1571..389A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1571..389A"><span id="translatedtitle">Palynological study of the genera Ruellia, Ecbolium, Asystasia, Blepharis and Dicliptera (Acanthaceae) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al-Hakimi, S. Anisa; Maideen, Haja; Latiff, A.</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Pollen morphology of five genera of the family Acanthaceae, namely Ruellia, Blepharis, Asystasia, Ecbolium and Dicliptera (Acanthaceae) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has been examined using light and scanning electron microscope. Pollen descriptions were provided with two shapes distinguished, spheroidal and prolate. Most of the pollen grains were tricolporate amd psuedocolpi except those of Blepharis which are colpate. The surface is coarsely reticulate, in addition to the lumina that varies in size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26598889','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26598889"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of Integrated Outreach Activities in Improving Nutritional Status among Under-Five Children in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Mudhwahi, Ali A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper intends to review the feasibility of scaling-up nutrition activities through integrated outreach activities to respond to development challenges. Evaluating the efficiency and effectiveness of current packages of outreach services during the period of 2006-2014 is the aim of this review for better access to basic and social services and economic opportunities in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The two components of health system performance are related to: (i) the levels of coverage for health interventions; and (ii) financial risk protection, with a focus on equity. In this sense, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s intervention coverage indicators of the health-related MDGs, such as immunization, integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI), reproductive health (RH) and disease control including non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have shown good progress. Yet, malnutrition is still highly prevalent among under-five children in the country. Coverage indicators of the outreach approach in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, which started in 2006, indicate a strong role of the integrated services in reaching under-five children of the most vulnerable communities with basic health services including preventive and curative ones. As well, these activities respond to the financial risk protection challenges with enhancing efficiency in the provision of health services. Considering that nutrition is part of the package of integrated outreach services, inter-related measures of universal coverage in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are to be addressed together with setting the impact indicators for essential health services coverage targeting the neediest populations. Coverage of health services encompasses the full targeted population in the most malnutrition-affected areas, especially the west coast of the country, for intervention and for the age group these services are directed to.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27271178','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27271178"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional inequalities in child malnutrition in Egypt, Jordan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharaf, Mesbah Fathy; Rashad, Ahmed Shoukry</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>There is substantial evidence that on average, urban children have better health outcomes than rural children. This paper investigates the underlying factors that account for the regional disparities in child malnutrition in three Arab countries, namely; Egypt, Jordan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. We use data on a nationally representative sample from the most recent rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey. A Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis is conducted to decompose the rural-urban differences in child nutrition outcomes into two components; one that is explained by regional differences in the level of the determinants (covariate effects), and another component that is explained by differences in the effect of the determinants on the child nutritional status (coefficient effects). Results show that the under-five stunting rates are 20 % in Egypt, 46.5 % in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and 7.7 % in Jordan. The rural- urban gap in child malnutrition was minor in the case of Egypt (2.3 %) and Jordan (1.5 %), while the regional gap was significant in the case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (17.7 %). Results of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition show that the covariate effect is dominant in the case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> while the coefficients effect dominates in the case of Jordan. Income inequality between urban and rural households explains most of the malnutrition gap. Results were robust to the different decomposition weighting schemes. By identifying the underlying factors behind the rural- urban health disparities, the findings of this paper help in designing effective intervention measures aimed at reducing regional inequalities and improving population health outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764686','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764686"><span id="translatedtitle">Hepatitis C Virus Epidemiology in Djibouti, Somalia, Sudan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chaabna, Karima; Kouyoumjian, Silva P.; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To characterize hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemiology and assess country-specific population-level HCV prevalence in four countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region: Djibouti, Somalia, Sudan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Methods Reports of HCV prevalence were systematically reviewed as per PRISMA guidelines. Pooled HCV prevalence estimates in different risk populations were conducted when the number of measures per risk category was at least five. Results We identified 101 prevalence estimates. Pooled HCV antibody prevalence in the general population in Somalia, Sudan and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> was 0.9% (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 0.3%–1.9%), 1.0% (95%CI: 0.3%–1.9%) and 1.9% (95%CI: 1.4%–2.6%), respectively. The only general population study from Djibouti reported a prevalence of 0.3% (CI: 0.2%–0.4%) in blood donors. In high-risk populations (e.g., haemodialysis and haemophilia patients), pooled HCV prevalence was 17.3% (95%CI: 8.6%–28.2%) in Sudan. In <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, three studies of haemodialysis patients reported HCV prevalence between 40.0%-62.7%. In intermediate-risk populations (e.g.. healthcare workers, in patients and men who have sex with men), pooled HCV prevalence was 1.7% (95%CI: 0.0%–4.9%) in Somalia and 0.6% (95%CI: 0.4%–0.8%) in Sudan. Conclusion National HCV prevalence in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> appears to be higher than in Djibouti, Somalia, and Sudan as well as most other MENA countries; but otherwise prevalence levels in this subregion are comparable to global levels. The high HCV prevalence in patients who have undergone clinical care appears to reflect ongoing transmission in clinical settings. HCV prevalence in people who inject drugs remains unknown. PMID:26900839</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2942841','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2942841"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Characterization of Leishmania Species Isolated from Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Bin Shuaib, Naemah O. M.; Azazy, Ahmed A.; Mahmud, Rohela</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease endemic in the tropics and subtropics with a global yearly incidence of 1.5 million. Although CL is the most common form of leishmaniasis, which is responsible for 60% of DALYs lost due to tropical-cluster diseases prevalent in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, available information is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted to determine the molecular characterization of Leishmania species isolated from human cutaneous lesions in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Dermal scrapes were collected and examined for Leishmania amastigotes using the Giemsa staining technique. Amplification of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1(ITS-1) gene was carried out using nested PCR and subsequent sequencing. The sequences from Leishmania isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The trees identified Leishmania tropica from 16 isolates which were represented by two sequence types. Conclusions/Significance The predominance of the anthroponotic species (i.e. L. tropica) indicates the probability of anthroponotic transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. These findings will help public health authorities to build an effective control strategy taking into consideration person–to-person transmission as the main dynamic of transmission of CL. PMID:20862227</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23721474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23721474"><span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive strategies, karyology, parasites, and taxonomic status of Dugesia populations from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Dugesiidae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harrath, Abdul Halim; Sluys, Ronald; Aldahmash, Waleed; Al-Razaki, Abdulkarim; Alwasel, Saleh</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>We present new data on the distribution, reproductive strategies, karyology, and taxonomic status of populations of freshwater planarians from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Nine populations were sampled and significant differences in their reproductive strategies and karyology are reported. The present study presents the first fully documented record of a naturally sexual, diploid (2n = 18) population of a Dugesia species in the eastern part of the Afrotropical region. Morphological characters combined with karyological data suggest that these Dugesia populations from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> represent a new species, which is herein described as Dugesia arabica Harrath and Sluys, sp. nov. This new species is mainly distinguishable from other Dugesia species that are distributed exclusively in the Mediterranean basin and in the eastern part of the Afrotropical region by the presence of the following features: well-developed and cone-shaped penis papilla, housing an ejaculatory duct that runs ventrally and has a subterminal and ventral opening; a considerably expanded and folded section of the bursal canal at the level of the oviducal openings; absence of a layer of longitudinal muscles on the copulatory bursa and the bursal canal. Specimens from two populations from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were infested with a gregarine Protozoon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1977/0733/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1977/0733/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Data from geologic investigations in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic during 1976</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Grolier, Maurice J.; Domenico, J.A.; Donato, Mary; Tibbitts, G.C.; Overstreet, W.C.; Ibrahim, Mohammad Mukred</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The results of semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements in 126 specimens of rocks from the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic, collected mainly during February 1976 from the Precambrian area in the southeastern part of the country, provide background data for use in geochemical evaluation of areas potentially favorable for mineral deposits. Gold and thorium were undetected; the lower limits of determination are 10 parts per million (ppm) and 20 ppm, respectively. For the other elements, the abundances follow geochemical norms for crustal distribution: (1) Fe, Nb, and Zr in Holocene weathering products; (2) Ca and Sr in Pliocene limestone; (3) Mo in Pliocene(?) or Miocene(?) dikes; (4) Be, La, and Sn in Miocene(?) alkalic granite; (5) As, Be, and La in Tertiary and/or Cretaceous felsic tuff; (6) V in Tertiary and/or Cretaceous carbonaceous sedimentary rocks interbedded with volcanic rocks; (7) Be, La, Sn, and Zr in Tertiary and/or Cretaceous undivided volcanics; (8) Sn and W in Precambrian felsite and pegmatite; (9) Co, Cr, Ni, and Ti in Precambrian mafic rocks; (10) Mg and Sr in Precambrian marble and calcsilicate rocks; (11) Y in Precambrilan schist; (12) B and Sc dispersed in rocks of many ages; and (13) Ag, Ba, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn in a hydrothermal replacement deposit in Precambrian sediment. None of the rocks contained as much as 205 ppm equivalent uranium. The highest values for Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd were obtained on a sample of hydrothermally altered siltstone not personally collected by the writers. It was said to have come from the Ma'rib area in the eastern part of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. The source must be studied, because this single sample is high-grade base-metal ore. Among the samples collected by the writers, the economically most significant are altered tuffs, ignimbrites, and felsites exposed between Jibal Hufash and Manakhah on the road from Hudaydah to San'a'. They are strongly anomalous for As and weakly anomalous, variously</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3177815','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3177815"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: baseline data and implications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED422796','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED422796"><span id="translatedtitle">Higher Education in the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: The University of Sana'a. Policy, Research, and External Affairs Working Papers Series. Education and Employment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Selvaratnam, Viswanathan; Regel, Omporn L.</p> <p></p> <p>This analytical report reviews higher education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, specifically at <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>'s national university, the University of Sana'a. It finds that university enrollment has been increasing very rapidly from 17,000 students in 1987 to a projected enrollment of 79,000 students by 2000. This explosive growth has resulted in overcrowded classrooms,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23176779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23176779"><span id="translatedtitle">Morphological variation between isolates of the nematode Haemonchus contortus from sheep and goat populations in Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gharamah, A A; Rahman, W A; Siti Azizah, M N</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Haemonchus contortus is a highly pathogenic nematode parasite of sheep and goats. This work was conducted to investigate the population and host variations of the parasitic nematode H. contortus of sheep and goats from Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Eight morphological characters were investigated, namely the total body length, cervical papillae, right spicule, left spicule, right barb, left barb, gubernaculum and cuticular ridge (synlophe) pattern. Statistical analysis showed the presence of morphological variation between populations of H. contortus from Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with minor variation in the synlophe pattern of these isolates. Isolates from each country were grouped together in the scatterplots with no host isolation. Body, cervical papillae and spicule lengths were the most important characters that distinguished between populations of the two countries. This variation between Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> may be attributed to geographical isolation and the possible presence of a different isolate of this worm in each country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.1638A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.1638A"><span id="translatedtitle">Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-<span class="hlt">Yemen</span> conjugate margin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ali, M. Y.; Watts, A. B.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We have used biostratigraphic data from deep exploration wells to determine the tectonic subsidence history of the Somaliland (northwestern Somalia)-<span class="hlt">Yemen</span> conjugate margin, a poorly known margin in the central part of the Gulf of Aden. Bathymetry and magnetic anomaly data suggest the Gulf of Aden is a young feature that formed following the rifting apart and breakup of the African and Arabian plates ~32 Ma. Our tectonic subsidence data suggest, however, that the present-day Gulf of Aden developed on an earlier Mesozoic rift system. The oldest episode of rifting initiated at ~156 Ma and lasted for ~10 Ma and had a NW-SE trend. We interpret the rift as a late stage event associated with the breakup of Gondwana and the separation of Africa and Madagascar. At ~80 Ma, there is evidence of an intermediate rift event which correlates with a rapid increase in spreading rate on the ridges separating the African and Indian and African and Antarctica plates and a contemporaneous slowing down of Africa's plate motion. The combined effect of all three rifting events has been to thin the crust and upper mantle by up to a factor of 2. The amount of thinning deduced from the wells is in accord with the crustal structure inferred from available seismic refraction data and process-oriented gravity and flexure modeling. The margin is asymmetric with a steeper gradient in the Moho on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> side than the Somaliland side. The main discrepancy is on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> side where the gravity-derived Moho is 10 km deeper than the well-derived Moho. We attribute the discrepancy to the addition of material at the base of the crust since rifting, possibly magma sourced from the Afar plume.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23098451','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23098451"><span id="translatedtitle">Why is hepatocellular carcinoma less attributable to viral hepatitis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saeed, Nadeem Mohammed; Bawazir, Amen Ahmed; Al-Zuraiqi, Masuod; Al-Negri, Fadhel; Yunus, Faisel</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are still public health problems in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with older individuals having much higher prevalence than younger generations. However, research on the prevalence of viral hepatitis in association with hepatocellular cancer (HCC) has not yet been undertaken in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HCC patients and to estimate the risk of these infections being associated with the development of HCC. A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients attending oncology outpatient in Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, through the period 2008-mid 2010 with confirmed diagnosis of HCC. A total of 88 cases were studied thoroughly with different investigations such as CT-scan, ultrasound, tumour marker, alpha-feto-protein and histopathological biopsy. A structured questionnaire was also applied and physical examination done to assess the general condition of the patients. Statistical package (SPSS version 16) was used for analysis of the data. The mean age of the cases was 61.2 years (± 12.6) with half over 60 years. There were fewer male patients (36%) compared to females and most (97%) only had basic /no formal education. Seventy nine (89%) were diagnosed as HCC cases with histopathological biopsy while the rest were diagnosed by ultrasound, CT scan, tumour marker, and alpha-feto-protein. Around one-third of the subjects were positive for HBsAg and HCV antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed infection with HCV and use of smoking was associated with HCC diagnosis. Although an association was observed between the occurrence of HCC and viral hepatitis (either HBV or HCV) and cigarette smoking, but the rate of viral infection was lower than what has been reported elsewhere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T53C2729A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T53C2729A"><span id="translatedtitle">Subsidence history, crustal structure and evolution of the Somaliland-<span class="hlt">Yemen</span> conjugate margin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ali, M. Y.; Watts, A. B.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We have used biostratigraphic data from deep exploration wells to determine the tectonic subsidence history of the Somaliland-<span class="hlt">Yemen</span> conjugate rifted margin, a poorly known margin in the central part of the Gulf of Aden. Bathymetry and magnetic anomaly data suggest the Gulf of Aden is a young feature that formed following the break up and rifting apart of the African and Arabian plates ~32 Ma. Our tectonic subsidence data suggest, however, that the present-day Gulf of Aden developed on an earlier Mesozoic rift system. The oldest rift, which has a NW-SE trend, initiated ~156 Ma and lasted for ~10 Ma. We interpret the rift as a late stage event associated with the break-up of Gondwanaland and the separation of Africa and Madagascar. At ~80 Ma, there is evidence of another rift event which we associate with the separation of Madagascar and India, an increase in spreading rate in the Indian Ocean and the emplacement of the Deccan large igneous province. The combined effect of all three rifting events has been to thin the crust and upper mantle by up to a factor of 2. The amount of thinning deduced from the wells is in accord with the crustal structure inferred from available seismic refraction data and process-oriented gravity modelling and suggests that the margin is asymmetric with a steeper Moho gradient on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> side than the Somaliland side. The main discrepancy is on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> side where the gravity-derived Moho is deeper than the well-derived Moho. We attribute the discrepancy to the addition of material at the base of the crust since rifting, possibly magma sourced to the Afar plume. We do not require, however, a contribution of dynamic topography associated with the plume to explain the tectonic subsidence data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/9261','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/9261"><span id="translatedtitle">A qualitative appraisal of the hydrology of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic from Landsat images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Grolier, Maurice J.; Tibbitts, G. Chase; Ibrahim, M.M.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Six series of Landsat-1 and Landsat-2 images taken between 1972 and 1976 were analyzed to describe the flow regimens of streams and the regional distribution of vegetation in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. The findings provide a factual basis for planning a surface-water data collection program, and for preparing maps of plant distribution and agricultural land use. They lay the foundation for modernized water development, for effecting a program of country-wide water management. The work was undertaken as part of the program of the U.S. Agency for International Development with the cooperation of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Mineral and Petroleum Authority, Ministry of Economy. A false-color composite mosaic of the nine images which cover the country was prepared using Landsat 1 images taken at relatively low sun-angle in winter 1972-73. Catchment areas and the major drainage basins of the country were delineated on this mosaic. In order of increasing water availability, the four catchment areas of the YAR are: Ar Rub al Khali, Wadi Jawf (Arabian Sea), Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden. Most streams are ephemeral. No lakes were detected during the period under investigation, but sebkhas--salt flats or low salt-encrusted plains--are common along the Red Sea coast. In spite of resolution and scale constraints, streamflow was interpreted as perennial or intermittent, wherever it could be detected on several Landsat images covering the same scene at seasonal or yearly intervals. Much of the land under cultivation is restricted to valley floors, and to valley slopes and irrigated terraces adjacent to stream channels. Little or no vegetation could be detected over large regions of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. (USGS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27170111','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27170111"><span id="translatedtitle">Diversity and composition of estuarine and lagoonal fish assemblages of Socotra Island, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lavergne, E; Zajonz, U; Krupp, F; Naseeb, F; Aideed, M S</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Estuarine and lagoonal surveys of Socotra Island and selected sites on the Hadhramout coast of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were conducted with the objective of documenting and analysing fish diversity and assemblage structure. A total of 74 species in 35 families were recorded, among which 65 species in 32 families were from Socotra and 20 species in 17 families were from mainland <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Twenty-one species represent new faunal records for Socotra. Including historic records re-examined in this study, the total fish species richness of estuaries and lagoons of Socotra Island reaches 76, which is relatively high compared to species inventories of well-researched coastal estuaries in southern Africa. Five species dominate the occurrence and abundance frequencies: Terapon jarbua, Hyporhamphus sindensis, Aphanius dispar, Ambassis gymnocephala and Chelon macrolepis. Rarefaction and extrapolation analyses suggest that the actual number of fish species inhabiting some of those estuaries might be higher than the one observed. Thus, additional sampling at specific sites should be conducted to record other less conspicuous species. Ordination and multivariate analyses identified four main distinct assemblage clusters. Two groups are geographically well structured and represent northern Socotra and mainland <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, respectively. The other two assemblage groups tend to be determined to a greater extent by the synchrony between physical (e.g. estuary opening periods) and biological (e.g. spawning and recruitment periods) variables than by geographical location. Finally, the single intertidal lagoon of Socotra represents by itself a specific fish assemblage. The high proportion of economically important fish species (38) recorded underscores the paramount importance of these coastal water bodies as nursery sites, and for sustaining vital provisioning ecosystem services. PMID:27170111</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20799566','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20799566"><span id="translatedtitle">Indicators of rational drug use and health services in Hadramout, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bashrahil, K A</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>WHO standard indicators of rational drug use, this study analysed 550 prescriptions from 20 health facilities at different levels throughout Hadramout governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A mean of 2.8 (SD 0.2) drugs were prescribed per prescription, with a low rate of prescribing drugs by generic name (39.2%). The proportion of prescriptions for antibiotics was 66.2%, for injectable drugs 46.0% and for vitamins/tonics 23.6%. The essential drugs list was available in 78.9% of facilities and a high percentage of drugs were prescribed from the list (81.2%). Other official sources of local drug information were less available. PMID:20799566</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543702','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543702"><span id="translatedtitle">[Human infection due to Bertiella sp (cestode: Anoplocephalidae) in a man originating from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in Algeria].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Achir, I; Zaït, H; Hamrioui, B</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>Bertiella is a frequent parasite in animals, particularly in nonhuman primates. The infestation occurs in man by accidental ingestion of the intermediate host, an acarus containing the cysticercoid larva of Bertiella studeri or Bertiella mucronata. The diagnosis is based on the morphology of the gravid proglottis and eggs with pyriform embryo which is characteristic of the Anoplocephalinae. Human infection is asymptomatic or can induce minor non specific digestive disturbances and the niclosamide is effective in one single dose. The authors report the first case of human bertiellosis in Algeria in a student originating from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1412896D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1412896D"><span id="translatedtitle">Paleocene-Early Eocene larger foraminiferal biostratigraphy of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Oman</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Di Carlo, M.; Serra-Kiel, J.; Pignatti, J.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The Paleogene larger foraminiferal biostratigraphy is today rather well assessed for the Tethyan domain. In order to contribute to the full integration of the Middle-East in the widely employed Shallow Benthic Zonation, a preliminary report on the Paleocene-Early Eocene larger foraminiferal assemblages from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Oman is provided here. The sections investigated in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> range in age from the Upper Cretaceous to the Oligocene. The Paleogene of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is widely affected by dolomitization and only by analyzing over 1,700 thin sections from 60 stratigraphic sections (mainly from Hadramaut and Socotra) it has been possible to adequately investigate the fossil assemblages. In contrast, the deposits from northern Oman are characterized by rich and extraordinarily well-preserved Paleocene-Lower Eocene larger foraminiferal assemblages. This preliminary report focuses mainly on the Paleocene-Early Eocene deposits of the Umm-er-Radhuma formation. The Paleocene-Lower Eocene assemblages are characterized by strong affinities with northern Somalia. Hyaline forms such as Daviesina khatiyahi, Miscellanea gr. rhomboidea/dukhani, M. miscella, Saudia, Sakesaria, Lockhartia, Ranikothalia, Dictyokathina largely prevail in SBZ 3-4 deposits. Nummulites, Ranikothalia and Daviesina ruida characterize the Lower Ypresian. Subordinately, porcelaneous forms such as "Taberina" daviesi and conical agglutinated (Daviesiconus) also occur; alveolinids (such as Alveolina vredenburgi and A. decipiens) are relatively abundant in the basal Lower Ypresian of Socotra. In contrast to the coeval deposits from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, the Paleocene section of Oman (Wadi Duqm, Abat-Tiwi platform) yields very well-preserved larger foraminiferal assemblages and agglutinated and porcelaneous forms are well represented. The occurrence of abundant Globoreticulina paleocenica is noteworthy along with an as yet undescribed Lacazinella species. The co-occurrence of Coskinon sp., "Plumokathina dienii", Dictyoconus turriculus and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED080356.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED080356.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).</p> <p></p> <p>Data relating to population and family planning in 17 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23142236','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23142236"><span id="translatedtitle">Could introducing vacuum delivery into the education curriculum of community midwives in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> improve maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity outcomes?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kizler, Rose; Hollins Martin, Caroline J</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>At present in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> the neonatal mortality rate stands at 12%. A contributing factor is that when abnormalities arise during labour in rural areas, there is an absence of trained medical staff to manage complications. Consequently, childbearing women are expected to travel long distances to hospitals to receive Essential Obstetric Care (EOC). This paper presents a debate over whether vacuum delivery should be introduced into the education curriculum of community midwifery courses in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. It is proposed that this fundamental change to both the educational system and the community midwives role could facilitate a reduction in maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity figures in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27325293','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27325293"><span id="translatedtitle">Onchocerciasis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Time to take action against a neglected tropical parasitic disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Beier, John C</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Onchocerciasis is a neglected parasitic disease affecting the poorest underserved people in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A national control programme with goals to eliminate onchocerciasis has yet to be launched due to the current upheaval and social unrest in the country. The disease, locally termed as sowda, is unique in its clinicopathologic pattern, being of the localized, non-blinding, hyperreactive onchocercal skin disease. Although early reports identified endemic foci along seasonal watercourses, there is a need to redefine its epidemiologic patterns as well as health and socioeconomic impacts. Laboratory diagnosis of sowda among Yemeni patients is difficult due to the low load of microfilariae in skin snips and the presence of asymptomatic itching-free microfilaria carriers. Adoption of ivermectin use at three-month intervals as a control strategy has not been evaluated because the drug is mostly used in clinics and distributed to only a few affected communities. This paper addresses key aspects of onchocerciasis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and highlights the need for screening at-risk populations using highly sensitive techniques and mapping the distributions of the parasite in human and vector populations of blackflies. The new research should be integrated with the launch of a national onchocerciasis control programme to achieve onchocerciasis elimination. PMID:27325293</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10791536','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10791536"><span id="translatedtitle">Women's rights, a tourist boom, and the power of khat in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kandela, P</p> <p>2000-04-22</p> <p>This article discusses the issues of women's rights, the tourism and the prevalent use of khat in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, based on the author's experience. Widespread social and legal discrimination against women has resulted from the changes occurring in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. This situation is exacerbated by the lack of action from the government, which has alarmed the women's organization. Despite exerted efforts by nongovernmental organizations in controlling this situation, programs continue to fail due to obstructions from government officials. In addition, the changes encountered by the country had resulted to a high profile of kidnapping tourists for the past years. The income from the tourism is too important to be jeopardized; thus the government provided an impetus for the development of the country's infrastructure. The intent of the government towards modernization, however, tends to be sapped by the extensive use of khat. The author states that unless substantial medical evidence is forthcoming about ill effects of the substance, significant impact on the widespread use of khat is unlikely.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6146038','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6146038"><span id="translatedtitle">Oil exploration and development in Marib/Al Jawf basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Maycock, I.D.</p> <p>1988-02-01</p> <p>In 1981, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Hunt Oil Company (YHOC) negotiated a production-sharing agreement covering 12,600 km/sup 2/ in the northeast part of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. A reconnaissance seismic program of 1864 km acquired in 1982 revealed the presence of a major half graben, designated the Marib/Al Jawf basin by YHOC. A sedimentary section up to 18,000 ft thick has been recognized. Geologic field mapping identified Jurassic carbonates covered by Cretaceous sands overlying Permian glaciolacustrine sediments, Paleozoic sandstones, or Precambrian basement. The first well, Alif-1, drilled in 1984, aimed at a possible Jurassic carbonate objective, encountered hydrocarbon-bearing sands in the Jurassic-Cretaceous transition between 5000 and 6000 ft. Appraisal and development drilling followed. The Alif field is believed to contain in excess of 400 million bbl of recoverable oil. Subsequent wildcat drilling has located additional accumulations while further amplifying basin stratigraphy. Rapid basin development took place in the Late Jurassic culminating with the deposition of Tithonian salt. The evaporites provide an excellent seal for hydrocarbons apparently sourced from restricted basin shales and trapped in rapidly deposited clastics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26409137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26409137"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and perceptions of epilepsy among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Eryani, Bilguis; Saied, Khaled Ghilan; Sharaf Alddin, Reem; Al-Sobaihi, Saber; Lutf, Wesam; Al-Taiar, Abdullah</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the knowledge and perceptions about epilepsy and the attitudes toward people with epilepsy (PWEs) among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 1155 students. Approximately 23% thought that epilepsy is a form of insanity, and 18% thought that it is a form of mental retardation. About 22% and 10% believed that evil spirits and an evil eye cause epilepsy, respectively. Similarly, 12% believed that children with epilepsy (CWEs) should be isolated from other children, while 12% and 14% thought that PWEs should not get married and should not have children, respectively. Approximately 23% of the students would not allow their child to play with CWEs, and 37% would not employ PWEs in a clerical job. Furthermore, 64% of the students would not agree to marry PWEs. Some misconceptions were strongly linked to attitudes toward PWEs. In conclusion, the negative attitudes toward PWEs among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were slightly more common compared with other settings in the Middle East and showed significant differences between genders which may warrant consideration when designing educational campaigns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23245418','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23245418"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of reproductive morbidity on women's lives and costs of accessing treatment in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dejong, Jocelyn; Bahubaishi, Najia; Attal, Bothaina</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Research on the consequences of reproductive morbidity for women's lives and their economic and social roles is relatively under-developed. There is also a lack of consensus on appropriate conceptual frameworks to understand the social determinants of reproductive morbidity as well as their social and economic implications. We report here on an exploratory study in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> using quantitative (n=72 women) and qualitative methods (n=35 women), in 2005 and 2007 respectively, with women suffering from uterine prolapse, infertility or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). It explored women's views on how reproductive morbidity affected their lives, marital security and their households, and the burden of paying for treatment. We also interviewed six health professionals about women's health care-seeking for these conditions. Sixty per cent of women reported that treatment was not affordable, and 43% had to sell assets or take out a loan to pay for care. Prolapse and PID interfered particularly in subsistence and household activities while infertility created social pressure. Reproductive morbidity is not a priority in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, given its multiple public health needs and low resources, but by failing to provide comprehensive and affordable services for women, the country incurs developmental losses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012HydJ...20.1375A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012HydJ...20.1375A"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic modeling for groundwater assessment in Sana'a Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alwathaf, Yahia; El Mansouri, Bouabid</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is a semi-arid country with very limited water resources. Sana'a Basin is located in the central part of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and is the major source of water for drinking and irrigation. High abstraction rates in Sana'a Basin rising from 21.1 million (M) m3 in 1972 to 227.7 Mm3 in 2006, have led to a major decline in water levels and deterioration in groundwater quality. Effective management of groundwater resources in Sana'a Basin can be aided by modelling. FEFLOW was used to build a groundwater flow model for the basin and the model was calibrated under transient conditions for the period 1972-2006. The water balance for transient conditions of the Sana'a Basin in 2006 indicated that the total annual inflow was 116.9 Mm3, and the total annual outflow was 245.8 Mm3. Three scenarios for potential groundwater extraction for the period 2006-2020 are presented. The first represents the present status based on the 2006 extraction rates without introducing any management measures. The second is based on maximum domestic, agricultural and industrial consumption of water resources. The third simulates the effect of water-resource augmentation, i.e. the increase of groundwater recharge, and maximizes sustainability by reducing water consumption. Identified areas of the basin require prompt management action.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22538095','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22538095"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic variation of Haemonchus contortus (Trichostrongylidae) in sheep and goats from Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gharamah, A A; Azizah, M N Siti; Rahman, W A</p> <p>2012-09-10</p> <p>The large stomach worm, Haemonchus contortus, commonly known as "the barber's pole worm", is a blood-sucking nematode found in the abomasa of sheep and goats. This work is the first documentation on the ND4 sequences of H. contortus from sheep and goats in Malaysia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the results provide a preliminary insight on the genetic differences of H. contortus found in the two countries. In general, this study showed a high degree of diversity and low population structure of this species within the same country in comparison with higher genetic structuring at a wider geographical scale. The results also showed that the majority of genetic variance was within H. contortus populations. The Malaysian sheep and goat populations investigated appeared to share the same isolate of H. contortus while different isolates may be found in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> which must be taken into account in the design of an effective control strategy. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) confirmed that all samples investigated in this study belonged to H. contortus. However presence of other Haemonchus species parasitizing these two hosts can only be confirmed by further detailed studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25009193','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25009193"><span id="translatedtitle">Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gharout-Sait, Alima; Alsharapy, Samer-Ahmed; Brasme, Lucien; Touati, Abdelaziz; Kermas, Rachida; Bakour, Sofiane; Guillard, Thomas; de Champs, Christophe</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>Ten carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (eight Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates and two Enterobacter cloacae) isolates from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were investigated using in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing, phenotypic carbapenemase detection, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and replicon typing. Carbapenemase, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant genes were identified using PCR and sequencing. All of the 10 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were resistant to β-lactams, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole. Imipenem, doripenem and meropenem MICs ranged from 2 to >32 mg l(-1) and ertapenem MICs ranged from 6 to >32 mg l(-1). All of the K. pneumoniae isolates showed ESBL activity in phenotypic tests. Genes encoding blaNDM were detected in all strains. All K. pneumoniae strains produced CTX-M-15 ESBL and SHV β-lactamases. TEM-1 β-lactamase was detected in seven isolates. Nine isolates were qnr positive including QnrB1, QnrA1 and QnrS1, and six isolates produced AAC-6'-Ib-cr. MLST identified five different sequence types (STs): ST1399, ST147, ST29, ST405 and ST340. Replicon typing showed the presence of IncFII1K plasmids in four transformants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of NDM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21364705','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21364705"><span id="translatedtitle">An analytical framework for capacity development in EIA - The case of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Loon, Louise van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Kolhoff, Arend; Runhaar, Hens A.C.</p> <p>2010-02-15</p> <p>Most countries worldwide nowadays apply Environmental Assessment (EA) as an ex ante tool to evaluate environmental impacts of policies, plans, programmes, and projects. However, the application and performance of EA differ significantly. Scientific analysis of how EA performs mainly focuses on two levels: the micro (or project) level and the macro (or system) level. Macro level analysis usually focuses on institutions for EA and the organisation of stakeholder interaction in EA. This article proposes a more comprehensive framework for analysing EA systems that combines other approaches with a capacity approach and an explicit consideration of the context in which EA systems are developed and performed. In order to illustrate the value of our framework, we apply it to the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, where over the last decades many EA capacity development programmes have been executed; however, EA performance has not substantially improved. The <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> case study illustrates that the capacity development approach allows an understanding of the historical process, the stakeholders, the knowledge component, and the material and technical aspects of EA, but perhaps more important is a systemic understanding of the outcomes: problems are not isolated, but influence and even maintain each other. In addition, by taking into account the context characteristics, our framework allows for the assessment of the feasibility of capacity development programmes that aim at improving EA system performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26409137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26409137"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and perceptions of epilepsy among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Eryani, Bilguis; Saied, Khaled Ghilan; Sharaf Alddin, Reem; Al-Sobaihi, Saber; Lutf, Wesam; Al-Taiar, Abdullah</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the knowledge and perceptions about epilepsy and the attitudes toward people with epilepsy (PWEs) among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 1155 students. Approximately 23% thought that epilepsy is a form of insanity, and 18% thought that it is a form of mental retardation. About 22% and 10% believed that evil spirits and an evil eye cause epilepsy, respectively. Similarly, 12% believed that children with epilepsy (CWEs) should be isolated from other children, while 12% and 14% thought that PWEs should not get married and should not have children, respectively. Approximately 23% of the students would not allow their child to play with CWEs, and 37% would not employ PWEs in a clerical job. Furthermore, 64% of the students would not agree to marry PWEs. Some misconceptions were strongly linked to attitudes toward PWEs. In conclusion, the negative attitudes toward PWEs among university students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> were slightly more common compared with other settings in the Middle East and showed significant differences between genders which may warrant consideration when designing educational campaigns. PMID:26409137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6962154','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6962154"><span id="translatedtitle">Oil exploration and development in Marib/Al Jawf basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Maycock, I.D.</p> <p>1986-07-01</p> <p>In 1981, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Hunt Oil Company (YHOC) negotiated a production-sharing agreement covering 12,600 km/sup 2/ in the northeast part of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. A reconnaissance seismic program of 1864 km acquired in 1982 revealed the presence of a major half graben, designated the Marib/Al Jawf basin by YHOC. A sedimentary section up to 18,000 ft thick has been recognized. Geologic field mapping identified Jurassic carbonates covered by Cretaceous sands overlying Permian glaciolacustrine sediments, Paleozoic sandstones, or Precambrian basement. The first well drilled in 1984, aimed at a possible Jurassic carbonate objective, encountered hydrocarbon-bearing sands in the Jurassic-Cretaceous transition between 5000 and 6000 ft. A successful appraisal drilling program has demonstrated satisfactory lateral reservoir continuity. Further wildcat drilling demonstrates macro-unit correlation within the eastern part of the basin. Rapid basin development apparently commenced in the late Kimmeridgian, culminating with the deposition of Tithonian evaporites. Available geochemical analysis indicates sourcing from restricted-basin sediments. Excellent traps, reservoirs, and source beds underlying the Tithonian evaporites indicate that a significant new petroliferous province is present.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26184944','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26184944"><span id="translatedtitle">Complete Genome Sequence of Chikungunya Virus Isolated from an Aedes aegypti Mosquito during an Outbreak in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, 2011.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fahmy, Nermeen T; Klena, John D; Mohamed, Amr S; Zayed, Alia; Villinski, Jeffrey T</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Chikungunya virus is recognized as a serious public health problem. The complete genome was sequenced for a chikungunya virus isolated from the mosquito Aedes aegypti during a 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, which resulted in significant human fatalities. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this Yemeni isolate is most closely related to Indian Ocean strains of the east/central/south African genotype. PMID:26184944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505132','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505132"><span id="translatedtitle">Complete Genome Sequence of Chikungunya Virus Isolated from an Aedes aegypti Mosquito during an Outbreak in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, 2011</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Klena, John D.; Mohamed, Amr S.; Zayed, Alia; Villinski, Jeffrey T.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Chikungunya virus is recognized as a serious public health problem. The complete genome was sequenced for a chikungunya virus isolated from the mosquito Aedes aegypti during a 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, which resulted in significant human fatalities. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this Yemeni isolate is most closely related to Indian Ocean strains of the east/central/south African genotype. PMID:26184944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED546423','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED546423"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential Predictive Validity of High School GPA and College Entrance Test Scores for University Students in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Al-Hattami, Abdulghani Ali Dawod</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>High school grade point average and college entrance test scores are two admission criteria that are currently used by most colleges in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to select their prospective students. Given their widespread use, it is important to investigate their predictive validity to ensure the accuracy of the admission decisions in these institutions. This study…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED061072.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED061072.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Situation Report--Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).</p> <p></p> <p>Data relating to population and family planning in twelve foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic. Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=6&id=ED328676','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=6&id=ED328676"><span id="translatedtitle">The 1984 Literacy Campaign in the People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A Case Study. Notes, Comments...No. 183.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fara, Mohammed Saeed; Fisher, Nigel</p> <p></p> <p>In 1984, the People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> undertook a nationwide literacy campaign, which mobilized the entire nation in an effort to reach an estimated 194,000 illiterate people, 77 percent of them women. The campaign plan demanded the full and active participation of formal school teachers and students at secondary level and above as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED066319.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED066319.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).</p> <p></p> <p>Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), and People's Democratic Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Information is provided under two topics, general background and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ830061','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&id=EJ830061"><span id="translatedtitle">The Status of Quality Assurance and Accreditation Systems within Higher Education Institutions in the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Anaam, Mahyoub Ali; Alhammadi, Abdullah Othman; Kwairan, Abdulwahab Awadh</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the status of quality assurance and accreditation systems within higher education institutions in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The paper initially describes the stages of development and changes that have occurred in the field of quality and accreditation in Yemeni higher education. The paper shows that no formal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED249848','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=5&id=ED249848"><span id="translatedtitle">The Admission and Academic Placement of Students from: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, J. K., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>Information is provided on the educational systems of Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic in order to assist U.S. colleges and universities as they work with international student agencies and representatives from these countries. For each country, placement recommendations are offered, along with notes to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3749985','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3749985"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and Associated Factors of Schistosomiasis among Children in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Implications for an Effective Control Programme</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Mahmud, Rohela; Surin, Johari</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, is a life-threatening public health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> especially in rural communities. This cross-sectional study aims to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of schistosomiasis among children in rural <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Methods/Findings Urine and faecal samples were collected from 400 children. Urine samples were examined using filtration technique for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium eggs while faecal samples were examined using formalin-ether concentration and Kato Katz techniques for the presence of S. mansoni. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental information were collected via a validated questionnaire. Overall, 31.8% of the participants were found to be positive for schistosomiasis; 23.8% were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. Moreover, 39.5% of the participants were anaemic whereas 9.5% had hepatosplenomegaly. The prevalence of schistosomiasis was significantly higher among children aged >10 years compared to those aged ≤10 years (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis confirmed that presence of other infected family member (P<0.001), low household monthly income (P = 0.003), using unsafe sources for drinking water (P = 0.003), living nearby stream/spring (P = 0.006) and living nearby pool/pond (P = 0.002) were the key factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis among these children. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals that schistosomiasis is still highly prevalent in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. These findings support an urgent need to start an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control programme with a mission to move towards the elimination phase. Besides periodic drug distribution, health education and community mobilisation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, introduction of proper sanitation are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.8262V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.8262V"><span id="translatedtitle">Fracture and vein characterization of a crystalline basement reservoir, central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Veeningen, R.; Grasemann, B.; Decker, K.; Bischoff, R.; Rice, A. H. N.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The country of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is located in the south-western part of the Arabian plate. The Pan-African basement found in western and central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is highly deformed during the Proterozoic eon and is part of the Arabian-Nubian shield ANS (670-540Ma). This ANS is a result of the amalgamation of high-grade gneiss terranes and low-grade island arcs. The development of an extensive horst-and-graben system related to the breakup of Gondwana in the Mesozoic, has reactivated the Pan-African basement along NW-SE trending normal faults. As a result, younger Meosozoic marls, sandstones, clastics and limestones are unconformably overlying the basement. Some of these formations act as a source and/or reservoir for hydrocarbons. Due to fracturing of the basement, hydrocarbons have migrated horizontally into the basement, causing the crystalline basement to be a potential hydrocarbon reservoir. Unfortunately, little is known about the Pan-African basement in Central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and due its potential as a reservoir, the deformation and oil migration history (with a main focus on the fracturing and veining history) of the basement is investigated in high detail. Representative samples are taken from 2 different wells from the Habban Field reservoir, located approximately 320 ESE of Sana'a. These samples are analysed using e.g. the Optical Microscope, SEM, EDX and CL, but also by doing Rb-Sr age dating, isotope analysis and fluid inclusion analysis. In well 1, the only lithology present is an altered gneiss with relative large (<5 cm diameter) multi-mineralic veins. In well 3, quartzite (top), gneiss (middle) and quartz porphyry's (middle) are intruded by a so called "younger" granitoid body (592.6±4.1Ma). All lithologies record polyphase systems of mineral veins. Pyrite and saddle dolomite in these veins have euhedral shapes, which means that they have grown in open cavities. Calcite is the youngest mineral in these veins, closing the vein and aborting the fluid flow. Fluid inclusions inside</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22469818','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22469818"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of Chikungunya virus in Aedes aegypti during 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zayed, Alia; Awash, Abdullah A; Esmail, Mohammed A; Al-Mohamadi, Hani A; Al-Salwai, Mostafa; Al-Jasari, Adel; Medhat, Iman; Morales-Betoulle, Maria E; Mnzava, Abraham</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>In October 2010, the Ministry of Public Health and Population reported an outbreak of dengue-like acute febrile illness in Al Hodayda governorate. By January 2011, a total of 1542 cases had been recorded from 19 of the 26 districts in the governorate with 104 purportedly associated deaths. In response this event, in January 2011 entomological investigations aimed at identifying the primary vector and the epidemic associated etiological agent were carried out. Based on the reported cases and the progress of the outbreak in the governorate, mosquito collection was undertaken in two of the most recent outbreak areas; Al Khokha district (130km south of Al Hodayda) and Al Muneera district (100km north). Mosquito adults were collected from houses using BG-sentinel™ traps, aspiration of resting mosquitoes and knock-down spraying. Indoor and outdoor containers adjacent to the houses were inspected for larvae. Subsequently mosquito pools were analyzed by RT-PCR for detection of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4), and for Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Aedes aegypti was the dominant mosquito species collected. Four pools represent 40% of the tested pools, all containing adult female Ae. aegypti, were positive for CHIKV. Three CHIKV isolates were obtained from the RNA positive mosquito pools and identified by rRT-PCR. This finding marks the first record of CHIKV isolated from Ae. aegypti in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The larval container and Breteau indices in the visited localities surveyed were estimated at 53.8 and 100, respectively. The emergence of this unprecedented CHIKV epidemic in Al Hodayda is adding up another arboviral burden to the already existing vector-borne diseases. Considering the governorate as one focal port in the Red Sea region, the spread of the disease to other areas in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and in neighboring countries is anticipated. Public health education and simple measures to detect and prevent mosquito breeding in water storage containers could prevent</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006QuRes..66..454D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006QuRes..66..454D"><span id="translatedtitle">Holocene paleoclimates of southern Arabia from lacustrine deposits of the Dhamar highlands, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davies, Caroline Pickens</p> <p>2006-11-01</p> <p>This paper presents new evidence from the Dhamar highlands, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, of paleohydrologic response to fluctuations in Holocene climate. Stratigraphic, geochemical, and chronological analyses of highland peat and lacustrine deposits contribute to knowledge of the timing of early Holocene moisture changes on the Arabian Peninsula, providing a backdrop to understanding early cultural development in the Arabian highlands. The location of the Dhamar highlands, characterized by intermontane valleys surrounded by the highest mountains on the Arabian Peninsula and adjacent to the Indian Ocean is ideal for examining the influence of the Indian Ocean Monsoon (IOM) on the moisture history of this region. Fluctuations in the lacustrine and paleosol records of the Dhamar highlands reflect both local changes in paleohydrology and regional influences on the Holocene paleoclimatic conditions in southwest Arabia. In addition, a peat deposit with a radiocarbon age of 10,253 - 10,560 cal yr BP documents some of the earliest Holocene high moisture conditions on the Arabian Peninsula.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880127','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880127"><span id="translatedtitle">Feeding ecology of some fish species occurring in artisanal fishery of Socotra Island (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hassan Ali', Mohammed Kaed; Belluscio, Andrea; Ventura, Daniele; Ardizzone, Giandomenico</p> <p>2016-04-30</p> <p>The demersal species Lethrinus borbonicus, Lethrinus mahsena, Lethrinus microdon, Lethrinus nebulosus, Lutjanus bohar, Lutjanus gibbus, Lutjanus kasmira, Epinephelus fasciatus, Epinephelus stoliczkae, Carangoides gymnostethus and Euthynnus affinis are important coastal fishes species of the northern coast of Socotra (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>), exploited by local fishery. The biology and feeding ecology of these species are poorly known in the area. A total of 1239 specimens were sampled from the main fishing landing site of the island (Hadibo). Total length and weight were measured, stomach contents were analyzed, diet overlap, Fulton's Condition index, and trophic levels were estimated. C. gymnostethus, L. microdon and L. kasmira occupied the highest position (T=4.50), L. nebulosus occupied the lower one (TL=3.41). The role of the increasing abundance of small pelagic fish in the diet of many species after the upwelling event is evident, but also different feeding strategies are reported, according to fish ecology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880438','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880438"><span id="translatedtitle">The Essential Oil Compositions of Ocimum basilicum from Three Different Regions: Nepal, Tajikistan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharopov, Farukh S; Satyal, Prabodh; Ali, Nasser A Awadh; Pokharel, Suraj; Zhang, Hanjing; Wink, Michael; Kukaniev, Muhammadsho A; Setzer, William N</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The aerial parts of Ocimum basilicum L. were collected from four different geographical locations, Sindhuli and Biratnagar (Nepal), Chormaghzak village (Tajikistan), and Sana'a (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>). The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A cluster analysis of 179 essential oil compositions revealed six major chemotypes: Linalool, eugenol, estragole, methyl eugenol, 1,8-cineole, and geraniol. All four of the basil oils in this study were of the linalool-rich variety. Some of the basil oils were screened for bioactivity including antimicrobial, cytotoxicity in human cancer cells, brine shrimp lethality, nematicidal, larvicidal, insecticidal, and antioxidant. The basil oils in this study were not notably antibacterial, cytotoxic, antioxidant, nor nematicidal, but were active in the brine shrimp lethality test, and did show larvicidal and insecticidal activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880438','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26880438"><span id="translatedtitle">The Essential Oil Compositions of Ocimum basilicum from Three Different Regions: Nepal, Tajikistan, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharopov, Farukh S; Satyal, Prabodh; Ali, Nasser A Awadh; Pokharel, Suraj; Zhang, Hanjing; Wink, Michael; Kukaniev, Muhammadsho A; Setzer, William N</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The aerial parts of Ocimum basilicum L. were collected from four different geographical locations, Sindhuli and Biratnagar (Nepal), Chormaghzak village (Tajikistan), and Sana'a (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>). The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A cluster analysis of 179 essential oil compositions revealed six major chemotypes: Linalool, eugenol, estragole, methyl eugenol, 1,8-cineole, and geraniol. All four of the basil oils in this study were of the linalool-rich variety. Some of the basil oils were screened for bioactivity including antimicrobial, cytotoxicity in human cancer cells, brine shrimp lethality, nematicidal, larvicidal, insecticidal, and antioxidant. The basil oils in this study were not notably antibacterial, cytotoxic, antioxidant, nor nematicidal, but were active in the brine shrimp lethality test, and did show larvicidal and insecticidal activities. PMID:26880438</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4170957','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4170957"><span id="translatedtitle">Barriers to Completing TB Diagnosis in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Services Should Respond to Patients' Needs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anderson de Cuevas, Rachel M.; Al-Sonboli, Najla; Al-Aghbari, Nasher; Yassin, Mohammed A.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Theobald, Sally J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objectives and Background Obtaining a diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is a prerequisite for accessing specific treatment, yet one third of estimated new cases are missed worldwide by National Programmes. This study investigated economic, geographical, socio-cultural and health system factors hindering adults' attendance and completion of the TB diagnostic process in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, to inform interventions designed to improve patient access to services. Methodology The study employed a mixed methods design comprising a cross-sectional survey and In-Depth-Interviews (IDIs) and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) among patients abandoning the diagnosis or registering for treatment. Adults with cough of ≥2 weeks attending a large governmental referral centre in Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, between 2009 and 2010, were eligible to participate. Results 497 and 446 (89.7%) participants were surveyed the first and second day of attending the services and 48 IDIs and 12 FGDs were also conducted. The majority of patients were disadvantaged and had poor literacy (61% illiterate), had travelled from rural areas (47%) and attended with companions (84%). Key barriers for attendance identified were clinic and transport costs (augmented by companions), distance from home, a preference for private services, strong social stigma and a lack of understanding of the diagnostic process. There were discrepancies between patient- and doctor-reported diagnosis and 46% of patients were unaware that TB treatment is free. Females faced more difficulties to attend than men. The laboratory practice of providing first-day negative smear results and making referrals to the private sector also discouraged patients from returning. Strategies to bring TB diagnostic services closer to communities and address the multiple barriers patients face to attend, will be important to increase access to TB diagnosis and care. PMID:25244396</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3734526','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3734526"><span id="translatedtitle">Epidemiology of hypertension in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: effects of urbanization and geographical area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Bamoshmoosh, Mohamed; Rapi, Stefano; Massetti, Luciano; Al-Hidabi, Dawood; Al Goshae, Husni</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Although globalization can contribute to increased blood pressure by spreading unhealthy behaviors, it also provides powerful means to tackle hypertension. The dissemination of information about and advice on cardiovascular prevention and facilitated contact with health services are valuable resources. To investigate the effects of urbanization, geographical area, and air temperature on hypertension burden and kidney damage, a survey was performed in 2008 with a door-to-door approach among urban and rural adult dwellers of three geographic areas (capital, inland, coast) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Subjects (n=10 242) received two visits several days apart to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension. Proteinuria (dipstick test ⩾+1) was used as a marker of kidney damage. Prevalence rates were weighted to represent the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> population aged 15–69 years in 2008. Rates of hypertension and proteinuria progressively increased from the capital (6.4% 95% confidence level (CI) 5.8–7.0 and 5.1% 4.4–5.9, respectively), to inland areas (7.9% 7.0–8.7 and 6.1% 5.1–7.1), to the coastal area (10.1% 8.9–11.4 and 8.9% 7.3–10.4). When compared with urban dwellers, rural dwellers had similar hypertension prevalence (adjusted odds ratios (ORs) 1.03; 95% CI 0.91–1.17) but higher proteinuria rates (adjusted ORs 1.55; 1.31–1.85). Overall, home temperature was associated with a lower hypertension rate (adjusted OR 0.98; 0.96–0.99). This large population study reveals that the highest burden of hypertension and kidney damage is detectable in remote areas of the country. PMID:23486167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23514843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23514843"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between hypertension, diabetes and proteinuria in rural and urban households in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Modesti, P A; Bamoshmoosh, M; Rapi, S; Massetti, L; Bianchi, S; Al-Hidabi, D; Al Goshae, H</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Little information is available on the meanings of proteinuria in low-resource settings. A population-based, cross-sectional survey was performed in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> on 10 242 subjects aged 15-69 years, stratified by age, gender and urban/rural residency. Hypertension is defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) of 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP of 90 mm Hg, and/or self-reported use of antihypertensive drugs; diabetes is diagnosed as fasting glucose of 126 mg dl(-1) or self-reported use of hypoglycaemic medications; proteinuria is defined as +1 at dipstick urinalysis. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations were determined by multivariable logistic regression models. Prevalence (weighted to the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> population aged 15-69 years) of hypertension, diabetes and proteinuria were 7.5, 3.7 and 5.1% in urban, and 7.8, 2.6 and 7.3% in rural locations, respectively. Proteinuria and hypertension were more prevalent among rural dwellers (adjusted ORs 1.56; 95% confidence limit (Cl) 1.31-1.86, and 1.23; 1.08-1.41, respectively), diabetes being less prevalent in rural areas (0.70; 0.58-0.85). Differently from hypertension and diabetes, proteinuria was inversely related with age. Most importantly, 4.6 and 6.1% of urban and rural dwellers, respectively, had proteinuria in the absence of hypertension and diabetes. The approach of considering kidney damage as a consequence of hypertension and diabetes might limit the effectiveness of prevention strategies in low-income countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486167"><span id="translatedtitle">Epidemiology of hypertension in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: effects of urbanization and geographical area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Bamoshmoosh, Mohamed; Rapi, Stefano; Massetti, Luciano; Al-Hidabi, Dawood; Al Goshae, Husni</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Although globalization can contribute to increased blood pressure by spreading unhealthy behaviors, it also provides powerful means to tackle hypertension. The dissemination of information about and advice on cardiovascular prevention and facilitated contact with health services are valuable resources. To investigate the effects of urbanization, geographical area, and air temperature on hypertension burden and kidney damage, a survey was performed in 2008 with a door-to-door approach among urban and rural adult dwellers of three geographic areas (capital, inland, coast) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Subjects (n=10 242) received two visits several days apart to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension. Proteinuria (dipstick test +1) was used as a marker of kidney damage. Prevalence rates were weighted to represent the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> population aged 15-69 years in 2008. Rates of hypertension and proteinuria progressively increased from the capital (6.4%; 95% confidence level (CI) 5.8-7.0 and 5.1%; 4.4-5.9, respectively), to inland areas (7.9%; 7.0-8.7 and 6.1%; 5.1-7.1), to the coastal area (10.1%; 8.9-11.4 and 8.9%; 7.3-10.4). When compared with urban dwellers, rural dwellers had similar hypertension prevalence (adjusted odds ratios (ORs) 1.03; 95% CI 0.91-1.17) but higher proteinuria rates (adjusted ORs 1.55; 1.31-1.85). Overall, home temperature was associated with a lower hypertension rate (adjusted OR 0.98; 0.96-0.99). This large population study reveals that the highest burden of hypertension and kidney damage is detectable in remote areas of the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAfES.102..131V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAfES.102..131V"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermochronology and geochemistry of the Pan-African basement below the Sab'atayn Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Veeningen, Resi; Rice, A. Hugh N.; Schneider, David A.; Grasemann, Bernhard</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Three important lithologies occur in two drill wells from the Pan-African basement underlying the Mesozoic Sab'atayn Basin, in a previously undocumented area of the Pan-African, 83 and 90 km NE of known exposures in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Cores from well 1 include amphibolite, with basaltic to andesitic compositions, affected by crustal contamination during emplacement into a thickened crust. Deeper in the well, an unfoliated dark red monzogranite has a U-Pb zircon age of 628.8 ± 3.1 Ma and a Rb-Sr biotite cooling age of 591.6 ± 5.8 Ma (∼300 °C). Regional constraints suggest emplacement in a transitional tectonic setting with compressional terrane amalgamation followed by extensional collapse. Sm-Nd isotope analysis yields a TDM model age of 1.24 Ga with negative εNd values, suggesting the monzogranite is part of the Al Bayda island arc terrane. Cores from well 2 contains a weakly deformed, massive (unbedded) medium grey meta-arkose exhibiting essentially no geochemical signature of weathering and with an almost pure dacitic composition. This rock may have been directly derived from an (extrusive) granitoid that was emplaced prior to, or during terrane amalgamation. A (U-Th-Sm)/He zircon age of 156 ± 14 Ma constrains the time of basement cooling to ∼180 °C, synchronous with basin formation. These lithologies provide new insights in the development of the Pan-African basement of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, extending our knowledge of the nearby surface geology to the subsurface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26408588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26408588"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular characterization of cystic echinococcosis: First record of G7 in Egypt and G1 in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alam-Eldin, Yosra H; Abdel Aaty, Heba E; Ahmed, Mona A</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Few molecular studies have identified the current status of cystic echinococcosis in Egypt. The present study aimed to ascertain the genotype(s) of Echinococcus granulosus responsible for human hydatidosis in different Egyptian governorates (regions). Animal isolates were collected from 40 camels, 5 pigs and 44 sheep. 27 human isolates were included in the present study. Specific PCR was performed and followed by DNA sequencing for mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and BLAST analysis.The sheep cysts were not hydatid cysts. G6 genotype (camel starin) predominates in human, camel and pig isolates. G7 genotype (pig strain) was detected in two human isolates and one pig isolate. G1 genotype (sheep strain) was detected in one human isolate from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and in no animal isolates. This is the first record of G7 in Egypt and G1 in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26001972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26001972"><span id="translatedtitle">Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Malaria is still a major public health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27..192B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27..192B"><span id="translatedtitle">Imprint of Southern Red Sea Major Tectonic Zone In A New Bouguer Anomaly Map of Southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Margin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blecha, V.</p> <p></p> <p>A new Bouguer anomaly map of western part of southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> margin has been compiled. Densities of rock samples from main geological units (Precambrian base- ment, Mesozoic sediments, Tertiary volcanites) have been measured and used for grav- ity modeling. Regional gravity map indicates decrease of thickness of continental crust from volcanites of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Trap Series towards the coast of the Gulf of Aden. Most remarkable feature in the map of residual anomalies is a positive anomaly over the Dhala graben. The Dhala graben is a prominent geological structure in the area of study trending parallel to the Red Sea axis. Gravity modeling on a profile across the Dhala graben presumes intrusive plutonic rocks beneath the graben. There are two other areas in the southwestern tip of Arabia, which have essentially the same struc- tural position as the Dhala graben: the Jabal Tirf volcanic rift zone in the southern Saudi Arabia and Jabal Hufash extensional zone in northern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. All three areas extend along the line trending parallel to the Red Sea axis with length of about 500 km. The line coincides with the axis of Afar (Danakil) depression after Arabia is shifted and rotated back to Africa. These facts imply conclusion that the Oligocene - Early Miocene magmatic activity on the Jabal Tirf - Dhala lineament is related to the same original deep tectonic zone, forming present-day Afar depression and still active.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26496867','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26496867"><span id="translatedtitle">ISSR-based analysis of genetic diversity among sorghum landraces growing in some parts of Saudi Arabia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Basahi, Mohammed</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) analysis was used to determine the genetic diversity among 15 genotypes of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] growing in some parts of Saudi Arabia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A total of 92 alleles were amplified, with an average of 13 ISSR alleles per primer. Cluster analysis divided the 15 genotypes into two main groups. Group A consisted of five genotypes with white grains from Jazan and Abha with a similarity coefficient range of 0.527 to 0.818. Group B was comprised of 10 genotypes; two genotypes from Al-Qassim were clearly delimited from the remaining eight samples with a coefficient range from 0.709 to 0.490. The eight genotypes were divided into two clusters; one was comprised of landraces with dark grains from Abha in Saudi Arabia and Ab in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with a similarity coefficient range between 0.563 and 0.781, and the other cluster was differentiated into three white-colored-grain genotypes and one colored-grain genotype; all samples from North <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> had a similarity coefficient range from 0.454 to 0.800. The current results encourage further collection and authentication of sorghum landraces in the gene banks of Saudi Arabia.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25107656','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25107656"><span id="translatedtitle">Chikungunya outbreak in Al-Hudaydah, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, 2011: epidemiological characterization and key lessons learned for early detection and control.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Malik, Mamunur Rahman; Mnzava, Abraham; Mohareb, Emad; Zayed, Alia; Al Kohlani, Abdulhakeem; Thabet, Ahmed A K; El Bushra, Hassan</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Little is known about the occurrence of chikungunya fever in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization (WHO). In January 2011, the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MoPH&P) of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> reported to WHO an increasing number of "dengue-like" acute febrile illnesses of unknown origin from one of its coastal governorates. An epidemiological investigation was conducted in Al-Hudaydah governorate between 23 and 26 January 2011 by a joint team of WHO, the MoPH&P of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit (NAMRU-3) in Cairo, Egypt. The investigation led to the detection of an outbreak of chikungunya in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> which was the first time ever from any of the 22 countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of WHO. Appropriate public health control measures were strengthened following the investigation, and the outbreak was contained. This paper provides a short description of the outbreak and its epidemiological characteristics and highlights the important lessons that were learned for early detection and control of chikungunya in countries where competent vectors for transmission of the virus exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27478699','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27478699"><span id="translatedtitle">Different patterns of pfcrt and pfmdr1 polymorphism in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Tehama region, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Jasari, Adel; Sady, Hany; Dawaki, Salwa S; Elyana, Fatin N; Al-Areeqi, Mona A; Nasr, Nabil A; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Subramaniam, Lahvanya R; Azzani, Meram; Ithoi, Init; Lau, Yee Ling; Surin, Johari</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction. Despite the efforts of the malaria control programme, malaria morbidity is still a common health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with 60% of the population at risk. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for 99% of malaria cases. The emergence in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> of parasite resistance to chloroquine (CQ) prompted the adoption of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in 2009, which involves the use of artesunate plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS + SP). However, CQ was retained as the drug of choice for vivax malaria. To assess the impact of the change in the malaria treatment policy five years after its introduction, the present study investigated the mutations in the CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes. Method. A molecular investigation of 10 codons of pfcrt (72-76, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371) and five codons of pfmdr1 (86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246) was conducted on P. falciparum isolates from districts with the highest malaria endemicity in the Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates in Tehama region, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A total of 86 positive cases of falciparum monoinfection were investigated for the presence of mutations related to CQ and other antimalarials using a PCR-RFLP assay. Results. There was a wide prevalence of pfcrt gene mutations with the pfcrt 76T CQ resistance marker being predominant (97.7%). The prevalence of other pfcrt mutations varied from high (75E: 88%) to moderate (74I: 79.1%, 220S: 69.8%, 271E and 371I: 53.5%) or low (326S: 36%, 72S: 10.5%). Mutated pfcrt 72-76 amino acids haplotypes were highly prevalent (98.8%). Among these, the CVIET classic, old-world African/Southeast Asian haplotype was the most predominant, and was mostly found in the isolates from the Khamis Bani Saad district of Al-Mahwit (93.1%) and the AdDahi district of Hodeidah (88.9%). However, it was only found in 26.3% of the isolates from the Bajil district of Hodeidah. Surprisingly, the SVMNT new-world South American haplotype was exclusively detected in 9</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511391R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511391R"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal history of the Pan-African basement under the Jurassic Marib-Shabwa Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rice, A. Hugh N.; Schneider, David; Veeningen, Resi; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Pan-African tectonism within the Arabian Nubian Shield in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is very poorly known. New drill-cores from the Marib-Shabwa Basin (Habban oil field) from central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> penetrated 600 m into the pre-Jurassic crystalline basement, providing a unique opportunity to extend our understanding of Pan-African events in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The cores were obtained some 80 km NE of the exposure limit of the Al Bayda Terrane, which lies SE of Sana'a. This terrane, which has no direct correlative in the ANS further north in Saudi Arabia, comprises deformed greenschist facies acid to basic volcanic rocks later witnessing acid to basic magmatism and has been previously interpreted as a Pan-African island arc complex with a basement component. Ophiolite fragments are common, both within the terrane and at its margins (sutures). To the north lies the Abas Gneiss Terrane and to the south the Al Mahfid Gneiss Terrane; both consist of older pre-Pan-African crystalline basement rocks. Geochemistry of a red, undeformed granite from the drill core indicates an A-type composition. LA-ICPMS U-Pb analysis of granite zircons gave two concordant age populations: 628.3 ± 3.1 Ma (large & small zircons) and 604.9 ± 2.0 Ma (intermediate sized zircons). The former age is interpreted as the time of crystallization, within the range of other A-type Younger Granites in the ANS, and the latter age as constraining lower temperature dissolution-reprecipitation of zircon, due to hydrothermal fluids or melt remobilization. Nd Tdm model ages for two granite samples from the drill core both gave ages of 1.24 Ga, within the range of the Al Bayda Terrane (1.2-2.5 Ga) and outside the range of the adjacent Palaeoproterozoic gneissic terranes (1.7-2.3 Ga, Abas Gneiss Terrane; 1.8-3.0 Ga, Al Mahfid Gneiss Terrane). Thus it seems certain that the Al Bayda Terrane extends at least 80 km to the NE of its present surface exposure. Rb-Sr biotite ages from the granite indicate closure through ~300°C at 593 Ma, indicating fast</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4950566','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4950566"><span id="translatedtitle">Different patterns of pfcrt and pfmdr1 polymorphism in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Tehama region, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Jasari, Adel; Sady, Hany; Dawaki, Salwa S.; Elyana, Fatin N.; Al-Areeqi, Mona A.; Nasr, Nabil A.; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Subramaniam, Lahvanya R.; Azzani, Meram; Ithoi, Init; Lau, Yee Ling; Surin, Johari</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction. Despite the efforts of the malaria control programme, malaria morbidity is still a common health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, with 60% of the population at risk. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for 99% of malaria cases. The emergence in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> of parasite resistance to chloroquine (CQ) prompted the adoption of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in 2009, which involves the use of artesunate plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS + SP). However, CQ was retained as the drug of choice for vivax malaria. To assess the impact of the change in the malaria treatment policy five years after its introduction, the present study investigated the mutations in the CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes. Method. A molecular investigation of 10 codons of pfcrt (72–76, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371) and five codons of pfmdr1 (86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246) was conducted on P. falciparum isolates from districts with the highest malaria endemicity in the Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates in Tehama region, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A total of 86 positive cases of falciparum monoinfection were investigated for the presence of mutations related to CQ and other antimalarials using a PCR-RFLP assay. Results. There was a wide prevalence of pfcrt gene mutations with the pfcrt 76T CQ resistance marker being predominant (97.7%). The prevalence of other pfcrt mutations varied from high (75E: 88%) to moderate (74I: 79.1%, 220S: 69.8%, 271E and 371I: 53.5%) or low (326S: 36%, 72S: 10.5%). Mutated pfcrt 72–76 amino acids haplotypes were highly prevalent (98.8%). Among these, the CVIET classic, old-world African/Southeast Asian haplotype was the most predominant, and was mostly found in the isolates from the Khamis Bani Saad district of Al-Mahwit (93.1%) and the AdDahi district of Hodeidah (88.9%). However, it was only found in 26.3% of the isolates from the Bajil district of Hodeidah. Surprisingly, the SVMNT new-world South American haplotype was exclusively detected</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Systems+AND+Government&pg=2&id=EJ1044805','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Systems+AND+Government&pg=2&id=EJ1044805"><span id="translatedtitle">Education <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaked, Haim</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In recent years, several <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Israel have labeled themselves "Education <span class="hlt">Cities</span>," concentrating on education as their central theme. Employing qualitative techniques, this article aims to describe, define, and conceptualize this phenomenon as it is being realized in three such <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Findings show that Education <span class="hlt">Cities</span> differ from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27540129','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27540129"><span id="translatedtitle">Vouchers in Fragile States: Reducing Barriers to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Pakistan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boddam-Whetham, Luke; Gul, Xaher; Al-Kobati, Eman; Gorter, Anna C</p> <p>2016-08-11</p> <p>In conflict-affected states, vouchers have reduced barriers to reproductive health services and have enabled health programs to use targeted subsidies to increase uptake of specific health services. Vouchers can also be used to channel funds to public- and private-service providers and improve service quality. The Yamaan Foundation for Health and Social Development in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the Marie Stopes Society (MSS) in Pakistan-both working with Options Consultancy Services-have developed voucher programs that subsidize voluntary access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and permanent methods (PMs) of family planning in their respective fragile countries. The programs focus on LARCs and PMs because these methods are particularly difficult for poor women to access due to their cost and to provider biases against offering them. Using estimates of expected voluntary uptake of LARCs and PMs for 2014 based on contraceptive prevalence rates, and comparing these with uptake of LARCs and PMs through the voucher programs, we show the substantial increase in service utilization that vouchers can enable by contributing to an expanded method choice. In the governorate of Lahj, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, vouchers for family planning led to an estimated 38% increase in 2014 over the expected use of LARCs and PMs (720 vs. 521 expected). We applied the same approach in 13 districts of Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and Sindh provinces in Pakistan. Our calculations suggest that vouchers enabled 10 times more women than expected to choose LARCs and PMs in 2014 in those areas of Pakistan (73,639 vs. 6,455 expected). Voucher programs can promote and maintain access to family planning services where existing health systems are hampered. Vouchers are a flexible financing approach that enable expansion of contraceptive choice and the inclusion of the private sector in service delivery to the poor. They can keep financial resources flowing where the public sector is prevented from offering services</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Tectp.650....3S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Tectp.650....3S"><span id="translatedtitle">Lithospheric mantle evolution in the Afro-Arabian domain: Insights from Bir Ali mantle xenoliths (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sgualdo, P.; Aviado, K.; Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Bryce, J. G.; Graham, D. W.; Natali, C.; Siena, F.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations of an extensive sampling of mantle xenoliths from the Neogene-Quaternary Bir Ali diatreme (southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) indicate that the underlying lithospheric mantle consists predominantly of medium- to fine-grained (often foliated) spinel-peridotites (85-90%) and spinel-pyroxenites (10-15%) showing thermobarometric estimates in the P-T range of 0.9-2.0 GPa and 900-1150 °C. Peridotites, including lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites delineate continuous chemical, modal and mineralogical variations compatible with large extractions of basic melts occurring since the late Proterozoic (~ 2 Ga, according to Lu-Hf model ages). Pyroxenites may represent intrusions of subalkaline basic melts interacting and equilibrated with the host peridotite. Subsequent metasomatism has led to modal changes, with evidence of reaction patches and clinopyroxene and spinel destabilization, as well as formation of new phases (glass, amphibole and feldspar). These changes are accompanied by enrichment of the most incompatible elements and isotopic compositions. 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51419 to 0.51209 (εNd from + 30.3 to - 10.5), 176Hf/177Hf from 0.28459 to 0.28239 (εHf from + 64.4 to - 13.6), and 208Pb/204Pb from 36.85 to 41.56, thus extending from the depleted mantle (DM) towards the enriched OIB mantle (EM and HIMU) components. 3He/4He (R/RA) ratios vary from 7.2 to 7.9 with He concentrations co-varying with the most incompatible element enrichment, in parallel with metasomatic effects. These metasomatic events, particularly effective in harzburgites and dunites, are attributable to the variable interaction with alkaline basic melts related to the general extensional and rifting regime affecting the East Africa-Arabian domain during the Cenozoic. In this respect, Bir Ali mantle xenoliths resemble those occurring along the Arabian margins and the East Africa Rift system, similarly affected by alkaline metasomatism, whereas they are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4990166','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4990166"><span id="translatedtitle">Vouchers in Fragile States: Reducing Barriers to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Pakistan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boddam-Whetham, Luke; Gul, Xaher; Al-Kobati, Eman; Gorter, Anna C</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT In conflict-affected states, vouchers have reduced barriers to reproductive health services and have enabled health programs to use targeted subsidies to increase uptake of specific health services. Vouchers can also be used to channel funds to public- and private-service providers and improve service quality. The Yamaan Foundation for Health and Social Development in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the Marie Stopes Society (MSS) in Pakistan—both working with Options Consultancy Services—have developed voucher programs that subsidize voluntary access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and permanent methods (PMs) of family planning in their respective fragile countries. The programs focus on LARCs and PMs because these methods are particularly difficult for poor women to access due to their cost and to provider biases against offering them. Using estimates of expected voluntary uptake of LARCs and PMs for 2014 based on contraceptive prevalence rates, and comparing these with uptake of LARCs and PMs through the voucher programs, we show the substantial increase in service utilization that vouchers can enable by contributing to an expanded method choice. In the governorate of Lahj, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, vouchers for family planning led to an estimated 38% increase in 2014 over the expected use of LARCs and PMs (720 vs. 521 expected). We applied the same approach in 13 districts of Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and Sindh provinces in Pakistan. Our calculations suggest that vouchers enabled 10 times more women than expected to choose LARCs and PMs in 2014 in those areas of Pakistan (73,639 vs. 6,455 expected). Voucher programs can promote and maintain access to family planning services where existing health systems are hampered. Vouchers are a flexible financing approach that enable expansion of contraceptive choice and the inclusion of the private sector in service delivery to the poor. They can keep financial resources flowing where the public sector is prevented from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22413173','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22413173"><span id="translatedtitle">Water demand management in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Jordan: addressing power and interests.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zeitoun, Mark; Allan, Tony; Al Aulaqi, Nasser; Jabarin, Amer; Laamrani, Hammou</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the extent to which entrenched interests of stakeholder groups both maintain water use practice, and may be confronted. The focus is on the agricultural sectors of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Jordan, where water resource policymakers face resistance in their attempts to reduce water use to environmentally sustainable levels through implementation of water demand management (WDM) activities. Some farmers in both countries that have invested in irrigated production of high-value crops (such as qat and bananas) benefit from a political economy that encourages increased rather than reduced water consumption. The resultant over-exploitation of water resources affects groups in unequal measures. Stakeholder analysis demonstrates that the more ‘powerful’ groups (chiefly the large landowners and the political elites, as well as the ministries of irrigation over which they exert influence) are generally opposed to reform in water use, while the proponents of WDM (e.g. water resource managers, environmental ministries and NGOs, and the international donor community) are found to have minimal influence over water use policy and decisionmaking. Efforts and ideas attempted by this latter group to challenge the status quo are classified here as either (a) influencing or (b) challenging the power asymmetry, and the merits and limits of both approaches are discussed. The interpretation of evidence suggests current practice is likely to endure, but may be more effectively challenged if a long-term approach is taken with an awareness of opportunities generated by windows of opportunity and the participation of ‘overlap groups’. PMID:22413173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24452045','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24452045"><span id="translatedtitle">The path towards universal health coverage in the Arab uprising countries Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saleh, Shadi S; Alameddine, Mohamad S; Natafgi, Nabil M; Mataria, Awad; Sabri, Belgacem; Nasher, Jamal; Zeiton, Moez; Ahmad, Shaimaa; Siddiqi, Sameen</p> <p>2014-01-25</p> <p>The constitutions of many countries in the Arab world clearly highlight the role of governments in guaranteeing provision of health care as a right for all citizens. However, citizens still have inequitable health-care systems. One component of such inequity relates to restricted financial access to health-care services. The recent uprisings in the Arab world, commonly referred to as the Arab spring, created a sociopolitical momentum that should be used to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). At present, many countries of the Arab spring are considering health coverage as a priority in dialogues for new constitutions and national policy agendas. UHC is also the focus of advocacy campaigns of a number of non-governmental organisations and media outlets. As part of the health in the Arab world Series in The Lancet, this report has three overarching objectives. First, we present selected experiences of other countries that had similar social and political changes, and how these events affected their path towards UHC. Second, we present a brief overview of the development of health-care systems in the Arab world with regard to health-care coverage and financing, with a focus on Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Third, we aim to integrate historical lessons with present contexts in a roadmap for action that addresses the challenges and opportunities for progression towards UHC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/127690','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/127690"><span id="translatedtitle">Offshore Socotra, Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Potential for a new hydrocarbon province?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Richardson, S.M.; Bott, W.F.; Birse, T.C.R.</p> <p>1995-08-01</p> <p>A new plate reconstruction has enabled the Island of Socotra, currently located in the Gulf of Aden adjacent to the Somalian coast, to be confidently restored to its original spatial position, adjacent to the southern Omani coastline. New studies integrated with these plate reconstructions, have confirmed the presence of an untested Mesozoic graben, which trends across the Socotra platform. Fieldwork carried out in the region now enables a SE extension of the prolific Lower Cretaceous Qishn `play` (delinated in the Masilah Basin, onshore <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) to be postulated offshore into the Gulf of Aden. Following the award of offshore acreage adjacent to the Island of Socotra, exploration studies have confirmed the presence of the Qishn `play` both on the Island of Socotra, and offshore in the one available basin-margin control well. This work has also identified two additional plays: the Shuabia-equivalent carbonates, which are prolific producing reservoirs in central Oman; and the Permo-Triassic clastics, which may provide a new reservoir target for the region. Fieldwork has also identified Jurassic siliclastics outcropping on the Island, which may provide further reservoir potential. Ongoing multidisciplinary studies, integrating the results of a detailed geophysical interpretation with high resolution structural-stratigraphic studies, have confirmed the presence of large structures within an undrilled Mesozoic rift-basin, which will be tested during 1995.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25553691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25553691"><span id="translatedtitle">Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts from Conyza bonariensis growing in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thabit, Riyadh Abdulmajid Saleh; Cheng, Xiang-Rong; Tang, Xue; Sun, Jin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Le, Guo-Wei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study aims to examine the antioxidant and antibacterial activities and phenolic contents of Conyza bonariensis growing in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The whole plants of C. bonariensis were ultrasonically extracted by ethanol. The antioxidant activity of the extract was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and β-carotene bleaching (BCB). The effectiveness of the extract on the growth inhibition of some indicators of foodborne illness bacteria were investigated by agar well diffusion assay. The total phenols (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total tannins (TT), and total anthocyanins (TA) were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, aluminium chloride method, Folin and Ciocalteu method, and pH-differential method, respectively. The extract of C. bonariensis possessed TP 144.1 mg/g, TF 143 mg/g, TT 0.99mg/g, and TA 0.97mg 100g, with 94.57% inhibition of DPPH and 92.47% inhibition of BCB, and strong inhibitory effects against tested bacteria, which was approximate to those of peel extract of Punica granatum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25553691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25553691"><span id="translatedtitle">Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts from Conyza bonariensis growing in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thabit, Riyadh Abdulmajid Saleh; Cheng, Xiang-Rong; Tang, Xue; Sun, Jin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Le, Guo-Wei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study aims to examine the antioxidant and antibacterial activities and phenolic contents of Conyza bonariensis growing in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The whole plants of C. bonariensis were ultrasonically extracted by ethanol. The antioxidant activity of the extract was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and β-carotene bleaching (BCB). The effectiveness of the extract on the growth inhibition of some indicators of foodborne illness bacteria were investigated by agar well diffusion assay. The total phenols (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total tannins (TT), and total anthocyanins (TA) were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, aluminium chloride method, Folin and Ciocalteu method, and pH-differential method, respectively. The extract of C. bonariensis possessed TP 144.1 mg/g, TF 143 mg/g, TT 0.99mg/g, and TA 0.97mg 100g, with 94.57% inhibition of DPPH and 92.47% inhibition of BCB, and strong inhibitory effects against tested bacteria, which was approximate to those of peel extract of Punica granatum. PMID:25553691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3490896','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3490896"><span id="translatedtitle">Emotional abuse towards children by schoolteachers in Aden Governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: A cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Emotional abuse is central to other forms of abuse. The primary objective of this paper was to estimate the prevalence of emotional abuse among pupils in basic education schools and the risk factors associated with it in Aden governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Methods Four districts were randomly selected from across the governorate of Aden, 2 schools were selected at random in each district, and then 1066 pupils were randomly selected from the 8 schools. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences ver.15. Mean, standard deviation and chi square were used for descriptive statistics. Univariate and Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations between emotional abuse with pupils/parents characteristics. Results Pupils reported high rates of emotional abuse 55.2% at least once in their school lifetime. Male pupils had higher prevalence of emotional abuse 72.6% than females 26.1%. Teachers constituted the highest proportion of perpetrators 45.6%. Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) showed statistically significant association between emotional abuse and pupils' gender, family type and father education: 9.94 (7.19-13.74), 1.40 (1.02-1.91), .58 (.39-.86) respectively. Conclusion Emotional child abuse was highly prevalent in pupils in basic school education. Pupils' gender, family type and father education were the main risk factors associated with emotional abuse. PMID:22888950</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882958','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882958"><span id="translatedtitle">Physical abuse in basic-education schools in Aden governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a cross-sectional study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ba-Saddik, A S; Hattab, A S</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Physical abuse in school has lifelong consequences affecting child health and educational achievements. A study was designed to assess the prevalence of physical abuse experienced by pupils in basic-education schools in Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and to examine the risk factors associated with it. A cross-sectional study covering 1066 pupils in 7th-9th grades from 8 schools in different districts of Aden governorate were randomly selected. Answering an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, 55.7% of pupils reported physical abuse at least once in their school lifetime (73.2% of males versus 26.6% of females). Teachers were the main perpetrators (45.4%). A statistically significant association was found between physical abuse and sex, age group, family type and father's education. Significant predictors of physical abuse on multivariate regression were male sex (OR=7.89) and extended family type (OR=1.36). Physical abuse in basic-education schools requires serious consideration by educational authorities, families and the community at large.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22768704','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22768704"><span id="translatedtitle">Costs associated with tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> for patients and public health services.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Othman, G Q; Ibrahim, M I M; Raja'a, Y A</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>This study determined the costs associated with tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment for the public health services and patients in Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Data were collected prospectively from 320 pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB patients (160 each) who were followed until completion of treatment. Direct medical and nonmedical costs and indirect costs were calculated. The proportionate cost to the patients for pulmonary TB and extrapulmonary TB was 76.1% arid 89.4% respectively of the total for treatment. The mean cost to patients for pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB treatment was US$ 108.4 and US$ 328.0 respectively. The mean cost per patient to the health services for pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB treatment was US$ 34.0 and US$ 38.8 respectively. For pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB, drug treatment represented 59.3% and 77.9% respectively of the total cost to the health services. The greatest proportionate cost to patients for pulmonary TB treatment was time away from work (67.5% of the total cost), and for extrapulmonary TB was laboratory and X-ray costs (55.5%) followed by transportation (28.6%).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22413173','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22413173"><span id="translatedtitle">Water demand management in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Jordan: addressing power and interests.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zeitoun, Mark; Allan, Tony; Al Aulaqi, Nasser; Jabarin, Amer; Laamrani, Hammou</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the extent to which entrenched interests of stakeholder groups both maintain water use practice, and may be confronted. The focus is on the agricultural sectors of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Jordan, where water resource policymakers face resistance in their attempts to reduce water use to environmentally sustainable levels through implementation of water demand management (WDM) activities. Some farmers in both countries that have invested in irrigated production of high-value crops (such as qat and bananas) benefit from a political economy that encourages increased rather than reduced water consumption. The resultant over-exploitation of water resources affects groups in unequal measures. Stakeholder analysis demonstrates that the more ‘powerful’ groups (chiefly the large landowners and the political elites, as well as the ministries of irrigation over which they exert influence) are generally opposed to reform in water use, while the proponents of WDM (e.g. water resource managers, environmental ministries and NGOs, and the international donor community) are found to have minimal influence over water use policy and decisionmaking. Efforts and ideas attempted by this latter group to challenge the status quo are classified here as either (a) influencing or (b) challenging the power asymmetry, and the merits and limits of both approaches are discussed. The interpretation of evidence suggests current practice is likely to endure, but may be more effectively challenged if a long-term approach is taken with an awareness of opportunities generated by windows of opportunity and the participation of ‘overlap groups’.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20967567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20967567"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk assessment of the introduction of Rift Valley fever from the Horn of Africa to <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> via legal trade of small ruminants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdo-Salem, Shaif; Waret-Szkuta, Agnès; Roger, François; Olive, Marie-Marie; Saeed, Khalid; Chevalier, Véronique</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis of increasing global importance. Occurring since 1930 across Africa, it was detected for the first time in Saudi Arabia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in September 2000, leading to human deaths and major losses in livestock populations. Assuming the virus has not survived in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> or has been circulating at a low level, authors qualitatively assessed the likelihood of "re-introduction" of RVF into <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> through the legal importation of small ruminants from the Horn of Africa. The overall probability of introduction was assessed very low to medium, increasing during festival periods and higher when considering a direct transmission exposure as compared to a vectorial transmission exposure. The uncertainty was considered to be medium underlining important gaps in information that need to be fulfilled in the region. Options to reduce the risk are proposed and discussed, including possible improvements of the current Yemeni quarantine system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023657','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023657"><span id="translatedtitle">The Precambrian terranes of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and their correlation with those of Saudi Arabia and Somalia: Implications for the accretion of Gondwana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Windley, B.F.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Stoeser, D.B.; Al-Khirbash, S.; Ba-Bttat, M. A. O.; Al-Ghotbah, A.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Most of the basement of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> consists of early Precambrian continental high-grade terranes and Neoproterozoic low-grade island arcs that were accreted together to form an arc-continent collage during the Pan-African orogeny (Windley et al., 1996; Whitehouse et al., 1998; Whitehouse et al., in press). The suture zones between the arc and gneiss terranes are major crustal- scale tectonic boundaries. The terranes are situated east of the Nabitah suture and of the collage of low-grade, mainly island arc terranes of the Arabian Shield, but they have been reworked by a Neoproterozoic event associated with island arc accretion. Further east in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are mostly unconformable, very weakly deformed and very low-grade or unmetamorphosed sediments. Thus <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> provides key information on the broad zone of Neoproterozoic reworking associated with the collisional boundary between western and eastern Gondwana. </p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23906615','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23906615"><span id="translatedtitle">Mutant Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter in Hodeidah, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: association with parasitologic indices and treatment-seeking behaviors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Farag, Hoda F; Allam, Amal F; Shawky, Sherine M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Malaria still represents a major health problem in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, particularly in Hodeidah, despite continuing efforts to eliminate it. With the absence of clinically proven vaccines, chemotherapy with antimalarials is still greatly needed. Chloroquine (CQ) has been popular as the drug of choice for malaria control. However, Plasmodium falciparum resistance to CQ has been one of the main obstacles in malaria control and elimination. Although CQ is no longer the recommended antimalarial chemotherapy, it has remained the number one over-the-counter antimalarial drug in many endemic areas, including <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and is still used for self-medication. In addition, promising reports on CQ efficacy reversal in many African countries brought it again into the scene. This has led to a growing interest in the possibility of its re-introduction, particularly with the concerns raised about the parasite resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the present study aimed at analyzing the CQ-associated pfcrt 76T mutation in P. falciparum isolates from patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Hodeidah, west of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The association of treatment-seeking behaviors and antimalarial drug use with the pfcrt 76T mutant allele was also studied. It was revealed that there is still a sustained high frequency of this molecular marker among parasite isolates associated with younger age, decreased parasite density and the presence of gametocytes in blood. Delay in seeking treatment and frequent use of antimalarials were the behaviors significantly associated with the presence of the pfcrt 76T mutant allele among patients reporting a history of malaria treatment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513861A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513861A"><span id="translatedtitle">Crustal structure of the rifted volcanic margins and uplifted plateau of Western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> from receiver function analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Tiberi, Christel; Leroy, Sylvie; Stuart, Graham; Keir, Derek; Sholan, Jamal; Khanbari, Khaled; Al-Ganad, Ismeal; Basuyau, Clemence</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We analyse P-wave receiver functions across the western Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea continental margins in Western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to constrain crustal thickness, internal crustal structure, and bulk seismic velocity characteristics in order to address the role of magmatism, faulting and mechanical crustal thinning during continental breakup. We analyse teleseismic data from 21 stations forming the temporary Young Conjugate Margins Laboratory (YOCMAL) network together with GFZ and Yemeni permanent stations. Analysis of computed receiver functions shows that (1) the thickness of unextended crust on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> plateau is ~35 km; (2) this thins to ~22 km in coastal areas and reaches less than 14 km on the Red Sea coast, where presence of a high velocity lower crust (HVLC) is evident. The average Vp/Vs ratio for the western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Plateau is 1.79, increasing to ~1.92 near the Red Sea coast and decreasing to 1.68 for those stations located on or near the granitic rocks. Thinning of the crust, and by inference extension, occurs over a ~130 km wide transition zone from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden coasts to the edges of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> plateau. Thinning of continental crust is particularly localized in a <30-km-wide zone near the coastline, spatially co-incident with addition of magmatic underplate to the lower crust, above which at the surface we observe the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs)_and thickened Oligo-Miocene syn-rift basaltic flows. Our results strongly suggest the presence of high velocity mafic intrusions in the lower crust, which are likely either synrift magmatic intrusion into continental lower-crust or alternatively depleted upper mantle underplated to the base of the crust during the eruption of the SDRs. Our results also point toward a regional breakup history in which the onset of rifting was synchronous along the western Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea volcanic margins followed by a second phase of extension along the Red Sea margin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193.1673A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193.1673A"><span id="translatedtitle">Crustal structure of the rifted volcanic margins and uplifted plateau of Western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> from receiver function analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Tiberi, Christel; Leroy, Sylvie; Stuart, Graham W.; Keir, Derek; Sholan, Jamal; Khanbari, Khaled; Al-Ganad, Ismael; Basuyau, Clémence</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>We analyse P-wave receiver functions across the western Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea continental margins in Western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to constrain crustal thickness, internal crustal structure and the bulk seismic velocity characteristics in order to address the role of magmatism, faulting and mechanical crustal thinning during continental breakup. We analyse teleseismic data from 21 stations forming the temporary Young Conjugate Margins Laboratory (YOCMAL) network together with GFZ and Yemeni permanent stations. Analysis of computed receiver functions shows that (1) the thickness of unextended crust on the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> plateau is ˜35 km; (2) this thins to ˜22 km in coastal areas and reaches less than 14 km on the Red Sea coast, where presence of a high-velocity lower crust is evident. The average Vp/Vs ratio for the western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Plateau is 1.79, increasing to ˜1.92 near the Red Sea coast and decreasing to 1.68 for those stations located on or near the granitic rocks. Thinning of the crust, and by inference extension, occurs over a ˜130-km-wide transition zone from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden coasts to the edges of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> plateau. Thinning of continental crust is particularly localized in a <30-km-wide zone near the coastline, spatially co-incident with addition of magmatic underplate to the lower crust, above which on the surface we observe the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) and thickened Oligo-Miocene syn-rift basaltic flows. Our results strongly suggest the presence of high-velocity mafic intrusions in the lower crust, which are likely either synrift magmatic intrusion into continental lower crust or alternatively depleted upper mantle underplated to the base of the crust during the eruption of the SDRs. Our results also point towards a regional breakup history in which the onset of rifting was synchronous along the western Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea volcanic margins followed by a second phase of extension along the Red Sea margin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016HydJ..tmp...90T&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016HydJ..tmp...90T&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Groundwater abstraction management in Sana'a Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a local community approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taher, Taha M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Overexploitation of groundwater resources in Sana'a Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, is causing severe water shortages associated water quality degradation. Groundwater abstraction is five times higher than natural recharge and the water-level decline is about 4-8 m/year. About 90 % of the groundwater resource is used for agricultural activities. The situation is further aggravated by the absence of a proper water-management approach for the Basin. Water scarcity in the Wadi As-Ssirr catchment, the study area, is the most severe and this area has the highest well density (average 6.8 wells/km2) compared with other wadi catchments. A local scheme of groundwater abstraction redistribution is proposed, involving the retirement of a substantial number of wells. The scheme encourages participation of the local community via collective actions to reduce the groundwater overexploitation, and ultimately leads to a locally acceptable, manageable groundwater abstraction pattern. The proposed method suggests using 587 wells rather than 1,359, thus reducing the well density to 2.9 wells/km2. Three scenarios are suggested, involving different reductions to the well yields and/or the number of pumping hours for both dry and wet seasons. The third scenario is selected as a first trial for the communities to action; the resulting predicted reduction, by 2,371,999 m3, is about 6 % of the estimated annual demand. Initially, the groundwater abstraction volume should not be changed significantly until there are protective measures in place, such as improved irrigation efficiency, with the aim of increasing the income of farmers and reducing water use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4441229','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4441229"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Infection Control among Dental Students at Sana’a University, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Halboub, Esam Saleh; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control procedures among senior dental students. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 145 4th- and 5th-year dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, Sana’a University, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The self-administered questionnaire was comprised of 20 open- and close-ended items regarding barrier techniques, vaccination status, infection control practices, and awareness. Data were analyzed with a Chi-square test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The response rate was 72% (145 out of 204 potential respondents). Overall, 71.7% of the students had been vaccinated for hepatitis B and only 9.5% were tested for post-hepatitis B virus immunization serology. While the vast majority (96.6%) reported always wearing gloves for all dental procedures, the use of face masks and eyewear were reported by only 53.8% and 14.0% of students, respectively, with no significant difference between genders and year of study (P > 0.05). A significantly higher percentage of 5th-year students (58.9%) showed positive attitudes toward the treatment of patients with infectious diseases, as compared to only 31.0% of 4th year students (P < 0.01). A great number of students (62%) reported non-sterile occupational percutaneous and mucous injuries while treating their patients. Conclusions: These unsatisfactory findings highlight the necessity of continued infection control education in order to improve knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control among dental students at Sana’a University. PMID:26028896</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149099','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149099"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of a tool for measuring non-profit advocacy efforts in India, Uganda and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lalwani, Tanya; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; McOwen, Jordan; Gordis, Deborah J; Bowen, Lisa A; Bernson, Jeff</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>To improve maternal and child health, the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood (WRA) implemented an innovative policy advocacy project in India, Uganda and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> from 2009 to 2011. PATH assisted WRA in designing an approach to measure the short- and long-term results of WRA's advocacy efforts.Expert rating instruments have been widely used since 1970s to track country-level program efforts focusing on family planning, maternal and neonatal health, and HIV/AIDS. This article assesses and establishes the strength and applicability of an expert rating tool, the Maternal Health Policy Score (MHPS), in measuring and guiding a non-profit's advocacy efforts.The tool was assessed using five criteria: validity of results, reproducibility of results, acceptability to respondents, internal consistency and cost. The tool proved effective for measuring improvements in the policy environment at both the national and subnational levels that the non-profit intended to effect and useful for identifying strong and weak policy domains. The results are reproducible, though ensuring fidelity in implementation during different rounds of data collection may be difficult. The acceptability of the tool was high among respondents, and also among users of the information.MHPS provides a quick, low-cost method to measure overall changes in the policy environment, giving advocacy organizations and grant makers timely information to gauge the influence of their work and take corrective action. WRA demonstrated the use of MHPS at multiple points in the project: at the onset of a project to identify and strategize around policy domains that need attention, during and at the end of the project to monitor progress made and redirect efforts. PMID:25149099</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geolg..19..175S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geolg..19..175S"><span id="translatedtitle">A middle Eocene mesoeucrocodylian (Crocodyliformes) from the Kaninah Formation, Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stevens, Nancy J.; Hill, Robert V.; Al-Wosabi, Mohammed; Schulp, Anne; As-Saruri, Mustafa; Al-Nimey, Fuad; Jolley, Lea Ann; Schulp-Stuip, Yvonne; O'Connor, Patrick</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>During the Cenozoic, the Arabian Plate separated from continental Africa and assumed a closer geographical relationship with Eurasia. As such, the vertebrate fossil record of the Arabian Peninsula has great potential for documenting faunal interchanges that occurred as a result of such tectonic events, with a shift from a primarily Afro-Arabian fauna in the Palaeogene to a more cosmopolitan fauna in the Neogene. Understanding of the sequence and timing of this faunal interchange has long been hampered by a lack of palaeontological data. Recently recovered fossils from the Middle Eocene Kaninah Formation of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> constitute the earliest Palaeogene record of continental vertebrates from the Arabian Peninsula, thereby offering a rare glimpse at the region's post- -Cretaceous fauna. Here we describe fossil materials from the Kaninah Formation, a collection of dental and postcranial elements representing a mesoeucrocodylian crocodyliform of unclear affinities. The specimen exhibits ziphodont tooth morphology along with a biserial paravertebral shield and polygonal gastral osteoderms, consistent with certain mesoeucrocodylians (e.g., ziphodontan notosuchians). Yet the associated fragmentary anterior caudal vertebra, although badly abraded, preserves morphology suggestive of procoely. This vertebral type in combination with the dental and osteoderm morphology is much more taxonomically restrictive and consistent with the suite of characters exhibited by atoposaurids, a finding that would significantly extend that clade through the Cretaceous/Palaeogene boundary. Alternatively, given the relative paucity of information from the region during the Palaeogene, the combination of characteristics of the Kaninah crocodyliform may reflect a novel or poorly known form exhibiting previously unrecognised character mosaicism. We take a conservative approach, and refer the Kaninah specimen to Mesoeucrocodylia, Atoposauridae (?) pending discovery of more complete material. New fossils</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JVGR..249...95M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JVGR..249...95M"><span id="translatedtitle">Geothermal prospecting by geochemical methods in the Quaternary volcanic province of Dhamar (central <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Minissale, Angelo; Vaselli, Orlando; Mattash, Mohamed; Montegrossi, Giordano; Tassi, Franco; Ad-Dukhain, Abdulsalam; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Al-Sabri, Ali; Al-Kohlani, Taha</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper deals with geothermal prospecting carried out in the Quaternary volcanic field of Dhamar, which is located almost in the centre of the main Oligo-Miocene basaltic trap plateau of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. By applying geochemical and thermometric techniques in domestic wells producing water from the shallow unconfined aquifer in the area, which is prevalently hosted inside the Quaternary volcano-clastic material, a closed thermal anomaly associated with the Quaternary volcanic activity was well delineated. Although the aquifer(s) has a Ca-Na-HCO3 composition, that is typical of shallow groundwater, there are several chemical anomalies in the hotter central area compared to typical aquifers: i) the pH is lower and, consequently, the calculated partial pressure of CO2 in solution is higher, ii) the electrical conductivity is higher, iii) the total salinity is higher and iv) the fluoride ion concentration is higher. Such chemical anomalies in the hotter part of the aquifer do not seem to be generated by the rising and/or mixing of deep hydrothermal components rising into the shallow aquifer, but rather produced by enhanced water-rock interaction processes resulting from the higher temperature of the aquifer and its greater acidity. By applying some speculative calculations, based on the likely temperature of rainfall in the area and the depth and temperature of individual wells, the local thermal gradients in the area have been calculated. The thermal gradient varies from less than the average Earth gradient at the periphery of the delimitated thermal anomaly, to more than 250 °C/km, within an extensive area (exceeding 200 km2) where the gradient is greater than 100/120 °C/km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149099','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149099"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of a tool for measuring non-profit advocacy efforts in India, Uganda and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lalwani, Tanya; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; McOwen, Jordan; Gordis, Deborah J; Bowen, Lisa A; Bernson, Jeff</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>To improve maternal and child health, the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood (WRA) implemented an innovative policy advocacy project in India, Uganda and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> from 2009 to 2011. PATH assisted WRA in designing an approach to measure the short- and long-term results of WRA's advocacy efforts.Expert rating instruments have been widely used since 1970s to track country-level program efforts focusing on family planning, maternal and neonatal health, and HIV/AIDS. This article assesses and establishes the strength and applicability of an expert rating tool, the Maternal Health Policy Score (MHPS), in measuring and guiding a non-profit's advocacy efforts.The tool was assessed using five criteria: validity of results, reproducibility of results, acceptability to respondents, internal consistency and cost. The tool proved effective for measuring improvements in the policy environment at both the national and subnational levels that the non-profit intended to effect and useful for identifying strong and weak policy domains. The results are reproducible, though ensuring fidelity in implementation during different rounds of data collection may be difficult. The acceptability of the tool was high among respondents, and also among users of the information.MHPS provides a quick, low-cost method to measure overall changes in the policy environment, giving advocacy organizations and grant makers timely information to gauge the influence of their work and take corrective action. WRA demonstrated the use of MHPS at multiple points in the project: at the onset of a project to identify and strategize around policy domains that need attention, during and at the end of the project to monitor progress made and redirect efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HydJ...24.1593T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HydJ...24.1593T"><span id="translatedtitle">Groundwater abstraction management in Sana'a Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a local community approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taher, Taha M.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Overexploitation of groundwater resources in Sana'a Basin, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, is causing severe water shortages associated water quality degradation. Groundwater abstraction is five times higher than natural recharge and the water-level decline is about 4-8 m/year. About 90 % of the groundwater resource is used for agricultural activities. The situation is further aggravated by the absence of a proper water-management approach for the Basin. Water scarcity in the Wadi As-Ssirr catchment, the study area, is the most severe and this area has the highest well density (average 6.8 wells/km2) compared with other wadi catchments. A local scheme of groundwater abstraction redistribution is proposed, involving the retirement of a substantial number of wells. The scheme encourages participation of the local community via collective actions to reduce the groundwater overexploitation, and ultimately leads to a locally acceptable, manageable groundwater abstraction pattern. The proposed method suggests using 587 wells rather than 1,359, thus reducing the well density to 2.9 wells/km2. Three scenarios are suggested, involving different reductions to the well yields and/or the number of pumping hours for both dry and wet seasons. The third scenario is selected as a first trial for the communities to action; the resulting predicted reduction, by 2,371,999 m3, is about 6 % of the estimated annual demand. Initially, the groundwater abstraction volume should not be changed significantly until there are protective measures in place, such as improved irrigation efficiency, with the aim of increasing the income of farmers and reducing water use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515810','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515810"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinicoepidemiologic pattern of cutaneous leishmaniasis and molecular characterization of its causative agent in Hajjah governorate, northwest of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mogalli, Nabil M; El Hossary, Shabaan S; Khatri, Mishri Lal; Mukred, Abdualdaim M; Kassem, Hala A; El Sawaf, Bahira M; Ramadan, Nadia F</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>The clinicoepidemiologic profile of 143 cases (93 males and 50 females) with cutaneous leishmaniasis from 18 villages of Hajjah governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> was studied. Dry-type lesions were seen in 98.6% and wet-type lesions in 1.4% of patients. Lesions were localized in all cases with different morphological patterns. Microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained slit smears revealed amastigotes in 74.1% of patients with dry-type lesions and 0% in patients with wet-type lesions. The burden of the parasites in the lesions was high indicating active transmission of the disease. Most cases were from villages with moderate altitude range (8001-1600m). All age groups were affected, but most cases were seen in ages from 5 to 15 years. Leishmania species identification was done for all cases by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The biopsic material was scraped from both Giemsa-stained and methanol-fixed smears. The molecular characterization of Leishmania species revealed Leishmania tropica as the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Hajjah, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The risk factors associated with the transmission of the disease and recommendations for improving case detection were discussed. PMID:27515810</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27051422','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27051422"><span id="translatedtitle">Parasitaemia and Its Relation to Hematological Parameters and Liver Function among Patients Malaria in Abs, Hajjah, Northwest <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Salahy, Mohamed; Shnawa, Bushra; Abed, Gamal; Mandour, Ahmed; Al-Ezzi, Ali</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the most common infection in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The present study aims to investigate changes in hematological and hepatic function indices of P. falciparum infected individuals. This study included 67 suspected falciparum malarial patients attended in clinics and rural Abs Hospital (Tehama, Hajjah), <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, from October 2013 to April 2014. The diagnosis of malaria was confirmed by thick and thin film with Giemsa staining of malaria parasite. Hematological parameters and serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and bilirubin (total and direct) as test indicators of liver function were studied. Patients with parasitaemia tended to have significantly lower hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, lymphocytes, and platelets, compared with healthy normal subjects. Neutrophils levels were significantly higher in cases of falciparum malaria in comparison to healthy normal subjects. Serums AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin (total and direct) in falciparum malaria patients were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than those of falciparum malaria of free individuals. Hematological and liver dysfunctions measured parameters were seen associated with moderate and severe parasitaemia infection. This study concludes that hematological and hepatic dysfunction parameters could be indicator of malaria in endemic regions. PMID:27051422</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27282094','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27282094"><span id="translatedtitle">Current knowledge of sand fly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae) of northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and how it relates to leishmaniasis transmission.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El Sawaf, Bahira M; Kassem, Hala A; Mogalli, Nabil M; El Hossary, Shabaan S; Ramadan, Nadia F</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>This report presents the results of the first entomological survey of the sand fly fauna in northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Sand flies were collected using sticky paper traps and CDC light traps from Hajjah governorate, a cutaneous leishmaniasis focus due to Leishmania tropica. Six Phlebotomus species: P. alexandri, P. arabicus. P. bergeroti, P. orientalis, P. papatasi, P. sergenti and ten Sergentomyia species: S. africana, S. antennata, S. christophersi, S. dolichopa, S. dreyfussi, S. fallax, S. multidens, S. taizi, S. tiberiadis, S. yusafi were identified. P. alexandri was the most predominant Phlebotomus species and P. papatasi was a scarce species. S. fallax was the principal Sergentomyia species and S. dolichopa was the least species encountered. The diversity of the sand fly fauna within and among three altitudinal ranges using Simpson index and Jaccard's diversity coefficient respectively were measured. High species diversity was found in all altitude ranges. There seemed to be more association between sand fly fauna in higher altitudes with fauna from moderate altitudes. Sand fly seasonal activity showed a mono-modal trend in the lowland and a confluent bimodal trend in the highlands. Leishmania DNA could not be detected from 150 Phlebotomus females using PCR-RFLP. A possible zoonotic cutaneous transmission cycle due to Leishmania tropica in northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> would involve P. arabicus as the sand fly vector and the rock hyrax as the reservoir host. The vector competence for P. alexandri as a vector of visceral leishmaniasis in Hajjah governorate is discussed. PMID:27282094</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3074763','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3074763"><span id="translatedtitle">Qualitative study on the Community Perception of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) Implementation in Lahej, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Basaleem, Huda O; Amin, Rahmah M</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: This qualitative study was aimed at exploring the perceptions of community leaders and mothers about health services and community actions pertaining to child health in Lahej, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> since the Implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) in 2003. Methods: Face-to-face, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with six community leaders and seven mothers in 2007 in the three districts of Lahej Governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, that are implementing IMCI. Results: Neither group was aware of IMCI, but had “positive perception to the services.” Community leaders expressed “uncertainty about the role of health committees and community participation,” and said, “people can contribute in different ways” and “health authorities must play a more active role.” The mothers emphasised, “poor livelihood and environmental conditions” and “salient counselling messages not received.” Conclusion: The pressing needs for effective community-IMCI is obvious owing to the appalling toll on child health of unfavourable livelihood and environmental conditions and disorganised community initiatives. Thus, for effective IMCI implementation, governmental support needs to be strengthened. PMID:21509274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284504','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284504"><span id="translatedtitle">Can environmental and socioeconomic factors explain the recent emergence of Rift Valley fever in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, 2000-2001?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdo-Salem, Shaif; Tran, Annelise; Grosbois, Vladimir; Gerbier, Guillaume; Al-Qadasi, Mansoor; Saeed, Khalid; Etter, Eric; Thiry, Etienne; Roger, François; Chevalier, Véronique</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a major vector-borne zoonosis first identified on the African continent in the early 1900s. In 2000, RVF was reported for the first time in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. In this study, we provide a descriptive analysis of the period 1999-2007 in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, taking into account the environmental and socioeconomic factors likely to have been involved in the emergence of RVF in the country. We characterize each year in the study period by the environmental conditions (linked to vegetation indexes), the festival calendar, and economic data. We then use a principal component analysis to synthesize the different variables, assess whether the year 2000 was atypical compared with other years in the study period, and, if that was the case, in what respect. Our results show that 2000 presented above-normal vegetation index values, which reflect important precipitation, for both the two rainy seasons (the first between March and May; the second between July and October). These environmental conditions, ones favorable to mosquito vector populations, coincided that year with a late (March) starting date of the Eid al-Kabeer festival, which corresponds to a period with high host (cattle, sheep, goats) densities. According to these criteria, 2000 was an atypical year. These conclusions suggest that it is important to consider social variables in addition to environmental ones when assessing the risk of RVF emergence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4880650','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4880650"><span id="translatedtitle">Pattern of malignancies in children <15 years of age reported in Hadhramout Cancer Registry, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> between 2002 and 2014</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jawass, Mazin A.; Al-Ezzi, Jalil I.; Gouth, Hanan S. Bin; Bahwal, Saleh A.; Bamatraf, Fawzia F.; Ba’amer, Abubakir A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: To describe the patterns of childhood cancers in Hadhramout Sector, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> between January 2002 and December 2014. Methods: This descriptive retrospective study was based on secondary data from Hadhramout Cancer Registry, Hadhramout, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. All Yemeni children under age of 15 years, who were diagnosed with cancer were included. The International Childhood Cancer Classification system was used to categorize cancer types. Results: A total of 406 childhood cancers of both gender <15 years of age were reported. These represented 8.5% of all cases registered. The mean age was 7.34 ± 4.18 years. There were 240 males (59.1%) and 166 females (40.9%) with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Calculated incidence of cancer in children in this population is 1.9 per 100,000. The predominant age group was 5-9 years (35%) followed by 10-14 years (33.7%), and 0-4 years group (31%). The most common group of malignancies were hematological malignancies accounting for 47% of cases, followed by nervous system malignancies (15%). The most frequently reported cancer types were lymphoma (24%), leukemia (23%), carcinoma (13.1%), and central nervous system (CNS) tumors (11.6%). Conclusions: There is a lower frequency of childhood cancer in Hadhramout Sector when compared with developed countries. The most common cancers among children were lymphoma, leukemia, carcinoma, and CNS tumors. PMID:27146613</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4804037','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4804037"><span id="translatedtitle">Parasitaemia and Its Relation to Hematological Parameters and Liver Function among Patients Malaria in Abs, Hajjah, Northwest <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Salahy, Mohamed; Shnawa, Bushra; Abed, Gamal; Mandour, Ahmed</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the most common infection in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The present study aims to investigate changes in hematological and hepatic function indices of P. falciparum infected individuals. This study included 67 suspected falciparum malarial patients attended in clinics and rural Abs Hospital (Tehama, Hajjah), <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, from October 2013 to April 2014. The diagnosis of malaria was confirmed by thick and thin film with Giemsa staining of malaria parasite. Hematological parameters and serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and bilirubin (total and direct) as test indicators of liver function were studied. Patients with parasitaemia tended to have significantly lower hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, lymphocytes, and platelets, compared with healthy normal subjects. Neutrophils levels were significantly higher in cases of falciparum malaria in comparison to healthy normal subjects. Serums AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin (total and direct) in falciparum malaria patients were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than those of falciparum malaria of free individuals. Hematological and liver dysfunctions measured parameters were seen associated with moderate and severe parasitaemia infection. This study concludes that hematological and hepatic dysfunction parameters could be indicator of malaria in endemic regions. PMID:27051422</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27282094','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27282094"><span id="translatedtitle">Current knowledge of sand fly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae) of northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and how it relates to leishmaniasis transmission.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El Sawaf, Bahira M; Kassem, Hala A; Mogalli, Nabil M; El Hossary, Shabaan S; Ramadan, Nadia F</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>This report presents the results of the first entomological survey of the sand fly fauna in northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Sand flies were collected using sticky paper traps and CDC light traps from Hajjah governorate, a cutaneous leishmaniasis focus due to Leishmania tropica. Six Phlebotomus species: P. alexandri, P. arabicus. P. bergeroti, P. orientalis, P. papatasi, P. sergenti and ten Sergentomyia species: S. africana, S. antennata, S. christophersi, S. dolichopa, S. dreyfussi, S. fallax, S. multidens, S. taizi, S. tiberiadis, S. yusafi were identified. P. alexandri was the most predominant Phlebotomus species and P. papatasi was a scarce species. S. fallax was the principal Sergentomyia species and S. dolichopa was the least species encountered. The diversity of the sand fly fauna within and among three altitudinal ranges using Simpson index and Jaccard's diversity coefficient respectively were measured. High species diversity was found in all altitude ranges. There seemed to be more association between sand fly fauna in higher altitudes with fauna from moderate altitudes. Sand fly seasonal activity showed a mono-modal trend in the lowland and a confluent bimodal trend in the highlands. Leishmania DNA could not be detected from 150 Phlebotomus females using PCR-RFLP. A possible zoonotic cutaneous transmission cycle due to Leishmania tropica in northwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> would involve P. arabicus as the sand fly vector and the rock hyrax as the reservoir host. The vector competence for P. alexandri as a vector of visceral leishmaniasis in Hajjah governorate is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED541829','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yemen&pg=2&id=ED541829"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving the Quality of Basic Education for the Future Youth of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Post Arab Spring. Global Economy & Development. Working Paper 59</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yuki, Takako; Kameyama, Yuriko</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper looks at the issue of the quality of education in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. It uses micro-data from TIMSS and from surveys conducted in underserved rural areas, as well as macro-level policy information from the System Assessment for Better Education Results (SABER) database. The analysis indicates that the availability of teachers and resources at…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED425885.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED425885.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Basic Education for Girls in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Country Case Study and Analysis. Mid-Decade Review of Progress towards Education for All.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beatty, Sharon</p> <p></p> <p>In 1995, the International Consultative Forum on Education for All (EFA) commissioned case studies in developing countries as part of a mid-decade review of progress in expanding access to basic education. This paper examines provision of basic education (grades 1-9) in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, focusing on obstacles to girls' education in rural areas. The report…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4554R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.4554R"><span id="translatedtitle">The thermal state of the Arabian plate derived from heat flow measurements in Oman and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rolandone, Frederique; Lucazeau, Francis; Leroy, Sylvie; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Jorand, Rachel; Goutorbe, Bruno; Bouquerel, Hélène</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The dynamics of the Afar plume and the rifting of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden affect the present-day thermal regime of the Arabian plate. However, the Arabian plate is a Precambrian shield covered on its eastern part by a Phanerozoic platform and its thermal regime, before the plume and rifting activities, should be similar to that of other Precambrian shields with a thick and stable lithosphere. The first heat flow measurements in the shield, in Saudi Arabia, yielded low values (35-44 mW/m2), similar to the typical shields values. Recent heat flow measurements in Jordan indicate higher values (56-66 mW/m2). As part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory), we have conducted heat flow measurements in southern and northern Oman to obtain 10 new heat flux values in the eastern Arabian plate. We also derived 20 heat flux values in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Oman by processing thermal data from oil exploration wells. The surface heat flux in these different locations is uniformly low (45 mW/m2). The heat production in samples from the Dhofar and Socotra Precambrian basement is also low (0.7 µW/m3). Differences in heat flow between the eastern (60 mW/m2) and the western (45 mW/m2) parts of Arabia reflect differences in crustal heat production as well as a higher mantle heat flux in the west. We have calculated a steady state geotherm for the Arabian platform that intersects the isentropic temperature profile at a depth of about 150 km, consistent with the seismic observations. Seismic tomography studies of the mantle beneath Arabia also show this east-west contrast. Seismic studies have shown that the lithosphere is rather thin, 100 km or less below the shield and 150 km below the platform. The lithospheric thickness for the Arabian plate is 150 km, and the progressive thinning near the Red Sea, caused by the thermal erosion of the plume material, is too recent to be detected at the surface. The Afar plume mostly affects the base of the Arabian lithosphere along</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3765182','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3765182"><span id="translatedtitle">Physicians’ perceptions of medical representative visits in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a qualitative study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p> their prescribing decision, they welcome representatives to visit them and consider receiving free samples, gifts and various kinds of support as a normal practice. The findings provided insight into possible target areas for educational interventions concerning pharmaceutical marketing. Such a finding will provide the basis for policymakers in the public and private health sector in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to develop a suitable policy and regulations in terms of drug promotion. PMID:23962304</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/misr/gallery/mexico_haze','SCIGOV-ASDC'); return false;" href="https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/misr/gallery/mexico_haze"><span id="translatedtitle">Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/">Atmospheric Science Data Center </a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-18</p> <p>... Two small brighter patches within the hazy area indicate low fog. In the left-hand panel, the <span class="hlt">city</span> basin appears significantly clearer, but ... very high altitudes, in contrast to the low-lying haze and fog near Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>. When the stereo retrieval determines that a location is ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Salvador&pg=2&id=EJ907802','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Salvador&pg=2&id=EJ907802"><span id="translatedtitle">Atypical <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>DiJulio, Betsy</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary <span class="hlt">city</span>" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical <span class="hlt">cities</span> challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=city+AND+game&pg=7&id=EJ599036','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=city+AND+game&pg=7&id=EJ599036"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Play.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Today, fewer <span class="hlt">city</span> blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build <span class="hlt">cities</span> that are safe play havens. (MLH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1460354','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1460354"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic variation and phylogeography of central Asian and other house mice, including a major new mitochondrial lineage in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Prager, E M; Orrego, C; Sage, R D</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and flanking tRNAs were sequenced from 76 mice collected at 60 localities extending from Egypt through Turkey, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nepal to eastern Asia. Segments of the Y chromosome and of a processed p53 pseudogene (Psip53) were amplified from many of these mice and from others collected elsewhere in Eurasia and North Africa. The 251 mtDNA types, including 54 new ones reported here, now identified from commensal house mice (Mus musculus group) by sequencing this segment can be organized into four major lineages-domesticus, musculus, castaneus, and a new lineage found in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Evolutionary tree analysis suggested the domesticus mtDNAs as the sister group to the other three commensal mtDNA lineages and the Yemeni mtDNAs as the next oldest lineage. Using this tree and the phylogeographic approach, we derived a new model for the origin and radiation of commensal house mice whose main features are an origin in west-central Asia (within the present-day range of M. domesticus) and the sequential spreading of mice first to the southern Arabian Peninsula, thence eastward and northward into south-central Asia, and later from south-central Asia to north-central Asia (and thence into most of northern Eurasia) and to southeastern Asia. Y chromosomes with and without an 18-bp deletion in the Zfy-2 gene were detected among mice from Iran and Afghanistan, while only undeleted Ys were found in Turkey, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, Pakistan, and Nepal. Polymorphism for the presence of a Psip53 was observed in Georgia, Iran, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Sequencing of a 128-bp Psip53 segment from 79 commensal mice revealed 12 variable sites and implicated >/=14 alleles. The allele that appeared to be phylogenetically ancestral was widespread, and the greatest diversity was observed in Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nepal. Two mice provided evidence for a second Psip53 locus in some commensal populations. PMID:9755213</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002E%26PSL.198..289U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002E%26PSL.198..289U"><span id="translatedtitle">Matching conjugate volcanic rifted margins: 40Ar/ 39Ar chrono-stratigraphy of pre- and syn-rift bimodal flood volcanism in Ethiopia and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ukstins, Ingrid A.; Renne, Paul R.; Wolfenden, Ellen; Baker, Joel; Ayalew, Dereje; Menzies, Martin</p> <p>2002-05-01</p> <p>40Ar/ 39Ar dating of mineral separates and whole-rock samples of rhyolitic ignimbrites and basaltic lavas from the pre- and syn-rift flood volcanic units of northern Ethiopia provides a temporal link between the Ethiopian and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> conjugate rifted volcanic margins. Sixteen new 40Ar/ 39Ar dates confirm that basaltic flood volcanism in Ethiopia was contemporaneous with flood volcanism on the conjugate margin in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The new data also establish that flood volcanism initiated prior to 30.9 Ma in Ethiopia and may predate initiation of similar magmatic activity in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> by ˜0.2-2.0 Myr. Rhyolitic volcanism in Ethiopia commenced at 30.2 Ma, contemporaneous with the first rhyolitic ignimbrite unit in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> at ˜30 Ma. Accurate and precise 40Ar/ 39Ar dates on initial rhyolitic ignimbrite eruptions suggest that silicic flood volcanism in Afro-Arabia post-dates the Oligocene Oi2 global cooling event, ruling out a causative link between these explosive silicic eruptions (with individual volumes ≥200 km 3) and climatic cooling which produced the first major expansion of the Antarctic ice sheets. Ethiopian volcanism shows a progressive and systematic younging from north to south along the escarpment and parallel to the rifted margin, from pre-rift flood volcanics in the north to syn-rift northern Main Ethiopian Rift volcanism in the south. A dramatic decrease in volcanic activity in Ethiopia between 25 and 20 Ma correlates with a prominent break-up unconformity in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (26-19 Ma), both of which mark the transition from pre- to syn-rift volcanism (˜25-26 Ma) triggered by the separation of Africa and Arabia. The architecture of the Ethiopian margin is characterized by accumulation and preservation of syn-rift volcanism, while the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> margin was shaped by denudational unloading and magmatic starvation as the Arabian plate rifted away from the Afar plume. A second magmatic hiatus and angular unconformity in the northern Main Ethiopian Rift is evident at 10.6-3.2 Ma, and is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515811"><span id="translatedtitle">School-based prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associated risk factors in rural communities of Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Al-Eryani, Samira M; Saif-Ali, Reyadh; Mahdy, Mohammed A K</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is a developing country overwhelmed with a triad of poverty, diseases and social conflicts. Moreover, the majority of its population live in rural communities and suffer from intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs). Therefore, the present school-based, cross-sectional survey aimed to detect the prevalence of such infections and associated risk factors among schoolchildren in the rural communities of Bani Alharith, Hamdan and Bani Hushaysh districts of Sana'a, north of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Socio-demographic data and certain behavioral risk factors as well as stool samples were collected from 1218 schoolchildren from ten randomly schools in the study area. Fresh stool samples were examined for parasites by direct saline and iodine preparations and after concentration with formol-ether technique. The overall prevalence of IPIs was 54.8%, with a higher frequency of protozoal than helminthic infections (37.6 vs. 17.2%, respectively). Parasite species recovered were Entameba histolytica (21.5%), Giardia lamblia (16.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (8.3%), Hymenolepis nana (5.3%), Schistosoma mansoni (2.6%), Trichuris trichiura (0.5%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%). Univariate analysis showed that the male gender and illiteracy of fathers and/or mothers were the socio-demographic factors significantly associated with higher infection rates. The illiteracy of mothers was also confirmed as an independent risk factor by multivariable analysis. On the other hand, not washing hands before eating, not washing fruits and vegetables before consumption, eating uncovered food and not clipping fingernails were the risk behaviors significantly associated with higher infection rates, with the last three ones being confirmed as independent risk factors. Therefore, control measures should include regular treatment of protozoal infections and deworming of schoolchildren, promotion of hygiene in rural schools through health education programs, regular inspection of schoolchildren for personal hygiene</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515811"><span id="translatedtitle">School-based prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associated risk factors in rural communities of Sana'a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Al-Eryani, Samira M; Saif-Ali, Reyadh; Mahdy, Mohammed A K</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Yemen</span> is a developing country overwhelmed with a triad of poverty, diseases and social conflicts. Moreover, the majority of its population live in rural communities and suffer from intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs). Therefore, the present school-based, cross-sectional survey aimed to detect the prevalence of such infections and associated risk factors among schoolchildren in the rural communities of Bani Alharith, Hamdan and Bani Hushaysh districts of Sana'a, north of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Socio-demographic data and certain behavioral risk factors as well as stool samples were collected from 1218 schoolchildren from ten randomly schools in the study area. Fresh stool samples were examined for parasites by direct saline and iodine preparations and after concentration with formol-ether technique. The overall prevalence of IPIs was 54.8%, with a higher frequency of protozoal than helminthic infections (37.6 vs. 17.2%, respectively). Parasite species recovered were Entameba histolytica (21.5%), Giardia lamblia (16.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (8.3%), Hymenolepis nana (5.3%), Schistosoma mansoni (2.6%), Trichuris trichiura (0.5%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%). Univariate analysis showed that the male gender and illiteracy of fathers and/or mothers were the socio-demographic factors significantly associated with higher infection rates. The illiteracy of mothers was also confirmed as an independent risk factor by multivariable analysis. On the other hand, not washing hands before eating, not washing fruits and vegetables before consumption, eating uncovered food and not clipping fingernails were the risk behaviors significantly associated with higher infection rates, with the last three ones being confirmed as independent risk factors. Therefore, control measures should include regular treatment of protozoal infections and deworming of schoolchildren, promotion of hygiene in rural schools through health education programs, regular inspection of schoolchildren for personal hygiene</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019397','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019397"><span id="translatedtitle">A brief Oligocene period of flood volcanism in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: Implications for the duration and rate of continental flood volcanism at the Afro-Arabian triple junction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Baker, J.; Snee, L.; Menzies, M.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>40Ar39Ar dating of mineral separates and whole-rock (WR) samples has established that basaltic continental flood volcanism (CFV) began between 30.9 and 29.2 Ma in northwestern and southwestern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, respectively. Rhyolitic volcanism commenced at 29.3-29.0 Ma throughout <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Lower basaltic lavas were erupted every 10-100 kyr, whereas upper bimodal volcanic units were erupted every 100-500 kyr, which reflects generation of rhyolitic magmas from basalts that resided for longer periods in lithospheric magma chambers than during the early phase of exclusively mafic magmatism. The youngest dated flood volcanic units were erupted between 26.9 and 26.5 Ma throughout <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The duration of preserved CFV defined by 40Ar/39Ar dating (4.4 myr) contrasts with the wide range of WR K-Ar dates previously obtained in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (> 50 myr). 40Ar/39Ar step-heating studies of WR samples has shown that this discrepancy is due to the disturbed Ar systematics of volcanic samples. Most samples have experienced post-crystallization loss of radiogenic Ar and/or contain excess Ar, with only ca. 25% of the WR K-Ar dates within 1-2 myr of true crystallization ages. WR K-Ar data can be screened for reliability using the radiogenic Ar yield and 40K/36Ar ratio, which reflect the Ar retentivity of the sample, the likelihood that alteration has disturbed a sample's Ar systematics, and the susceptibility of the sample to a finite amount of Ar loss or the presence of a finite amount of excess Ar. Examination of existing WR K-Ar data in the Ethiopian part of this flood volcanic province, using these parameters, suggests that much of these data are also misleading. Two phases of flood volcanism are inferred in Ethiopia and Eritrea at 38-30 Ma and ca. 20 Ma. The older phase is equivalent to that in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and is consistent with the progression in basal volcanic ages obtained in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> moving from north to south. The younger phase is related to the onset of upper crustal extension and incipient Red Sea</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510564K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510564K"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of the Afar plume on the deep structure of Aden and Red Sea margins - Insight from teleseismic tomography in western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Korostelev, Félicie; Basuyau, Clémence; Leroy, Sylvie; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Keir, Derek; Stuart, Graham; Rolandone, Frédérique; Ganad, Ismail Al; Khanbari, Khaled</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Continental rupture processes under mantle plume influence are still poorly known although extensively studied. The Afar plume has been largely investigated in Ethiopia to study early stages of continental break-up. Here we imaged the lithospheric structure of western continental <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> to evaluate the role of the Afar plume on the evolution of the continental margin and its extent towards the East. A part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory) permitted the deployment of twenty-three broadband stations in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (from 2009 to 2010). Using a classical teleseismic tomography (Aki et al., 1974) on these stations together with a permanent GFZ station, we image the relative velocity variations of P-waves in the crust and lithosphere down to 300 km depth, with a maximum lateral resolution of about ~20 km. The model thus obtained shows (1) a dramatic and localized thinning of the crust in the vicinity of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden (2) the presence of magmatic underplating related to seaward dipping reflectors under those two volcanic margins (3) two granitic syn-rift intrusions on the border of the great escarpment (4) a low velocity anomaly in which with evidence of partial melting, just below thick Oligocene trapps series and other volcanic events (from 15 Ma to present). This low velocity anomaly could correspond to an abnormally hot mantle and could be responsible for dynamic topography and recent magmatism in western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. (5) Finally, we infer the presence of hot material under the Southwestern corner of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> that could be related to Miocene volcanism in Jabal an Nar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/127369','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/127369"><span id="translatedtitle">Tectonic controls on the quality and distribution of Syn- to Post-Rift reservoir sands in the Southern Red Sea, offshore Western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carter, J.M.L.</p> <p>1995-08-01</p> <p>Previous geophysical and drilling results in the southern Red Sea, and the presence of numerous oil seeps, indicate that the syn- to post-rift section is prospective for oil and gas. The relatively high geothermal gradient offshore western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> makes intra-salt and post-salt reservoir sands the only viable exploration targets. The quality and distribution of the reservoir sands remains one of the main unknown risk factors, An improved understanding of the controls on deposition of these sands is achieved by use of LandSat data, which provide evidence of a regional tectonic framework involving NE/SW-trending oceanic transform faults which are expressed onshore as strike-slip features, in some cases representing reactivated Precambrian lineaments. These faults are thought to have played two fundamental roles in the Neogene to Recent evolution of the southern Red Sea - firstly by directing clastic input from the rising <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Highlands into offshore depocentres, and secondly by influencing the location of salt diapirs sourced by Upper Miocene evaporates. By considering these factors, together with the pattern of heat flow from the developing oceanic rift of the southern Red Sea, it is possible to delineate areas of offshore western <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> where reservoir characteristics are likely to be most favourable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000053849&hterms=Archaeology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DArchaeology','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000053849&hterms=Archaeology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DArchaeology"><span id="translatedtitle">Possible Ancient Anthrosols Near Lost <span class="hlt">City</span> of Ubar Site in Oman</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Blom, Ronald G.; Crippen, Robert E.; Owen, Jana K.; Zarins, Juris</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>During mapping for the Wadi al Jubal Archaeological Project in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, USGS Geologists Overstreet and Grolier mapped "anthrosols of pre-Islaniic age" east of the Marib dam site (15D 24M N, 45D 18M E). These soils were the result of agriculture supported by irrigation enabled by water impounded by the dam, areas which were abandoned after dam failure. During analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite images of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Oman for the Mahra Archaeological Project, we noted that these anthrosols had a distinctive image expression. Based on other remote sensing research and laboratory spectroscopy, we think that the distinctive image signature is due to low reflectivity in Landsat band 7 resulting from relatively high concentrations of gypsum in the anthrosols. Many anthrosol sites were noted, most, but not all, of them previously documented. Undocumented possible anthrosol sites include an area east of Shisr in Oman, the archaeological site discovered by us to be responsible for some features of the "Lost <span class="hlt">City</span> of Ubar" legends. Included in legendary accounts of the Ubar region are reports of fertile oases, and "areas that have known the plow". Based on demonstrated reliability of aspects of carefully interpreted legendary accounts, we postulate that we may have located the area of desert agriculture that may have existed to support the frankincense caravansary of Ubar. The possible anthrosol area is located at approximately 18D 10M N, 53D 54M E, and will be the subject of study in a future expedition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ems..confE.376S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ems..confE.376S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> 2020+</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>This research initiative <span class="hlt">CITY</span> 2020+ assesses the risks and opportunities for residents in urban built environments under projected demographic and climate change for the year 2020 and beyond, using the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Aachen as a case study. <span class="hlt">CITY</span> 2020+ develops scenarios, options and tools for planning and developing sustainable future <span class="hlt">city</span> structures. We investigate how urban environment, political structure and residential behavior can best be adapted, with attention to the interactions among structural, political, and sociological configurations and with their consequences on human health. Demographers project that in the EU-25-States by 2050, approximately 30% of the population will be over age 65. Also by 2050, average tem¬peratures are projected to rise by 1 to 2 K. Combined, Europe can expect enhanced thermal stress and higher levels of particulate matter. <span class="hlt">CITY</span> 2020+ amongst other sub-projects includes research project dealing with (1) a micro-scale assessment of blockages to low-level cold-air drainage flow into the <span class="hlt">city</span> centre by vegetation and building structures, (2) a detailed analysis of the change of probability density functions related to the occurrence of heat waves during summer and the spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island (UHI) (3) a meso-scale analysis of particulate matter (PM) concentrations depending on topography, local meteorological conditions and synoptic-scale weather patterns. First results will be presented specifically from sub-projects related to vegetation barriers within cold air drainage, the assessment of the UHI and the temporal and spatial pattern of PM loadings in the <span class="hlt">city</span> centre. The analysis of the cold air drainage flow is investigated in two consecutive years with a clearing of vegetation stands in the beginning of the second year early in 2010. The spatial pattern of the UHI and its possible enhancement by climate change is addressed employing a unique setup using GPS devices and temperature probes fixed to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absorbency&id=EJ409615','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absorbency&id=EJ409615"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Geology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Markle, Sandra</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>This article provides information on the evolution of the building material, concrete, and suggests hands-on activities that allow students to experience concrete's qualities, test the heat absorbency of various ground surface materials, discover how an area's geology changes, and search for <span class="hlt">city</span> fossils. A reproducible activity sheet is included.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1997DSRII..44.1293D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1997DSRII..44.1293D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Benthic respiration and standing stock on two contrasting continental margins in the western Indian Ocean: the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>-Somali upwelling region and the margin off Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duineveld, G. C. A.; De Wilde, P. A. W. J.; Berghuis, E. M.; Kok, A.; Tahey, T.; Kromkamp, J.</p> <p></p> <p>During the Netherlands Indian Ocean Project (NIOP, 1992-1993) sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) was measured on two continental margins in the Indian Ocean with different productivity: the productive upwelling region off <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>-Somalia and the supposedly less productive Kenyan margin, which lacks upwelling. The two margins also differ in terms of river input (Kenya) and the more severe oxygen minimum in the Arabian Sea. Simultaneously with SCOC, distributions of benthic biomass and phytodetritus were studied. Our expectation was that benthic processes in the upwelling margin of the Arabian Sea would be relatively enhanced as a result of the higher productivity. On the Kenyan margin, SCOC (range l-36 mmol m -2 d -1) showed a clear decrease with increasing water depth, and little temporal variation was detected between June and December. Highest SCOC values of this study were recorded at 50 m depth off Kenya, with a maximum of 36 mmol m -2 d -1 in the northernmost part. On the margin off <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>-Somalia, SCOC was on average lower and showed little downslope variation, 1.8-5.7 mmol m -2 d -1, notably during upwelling, when the zone between 70 and 1700 m was covered with low O 2 water (10-50 μM). After cessation of upwelling, SCOC at 60 m depth off <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> increased from 5.7 to 17.6 mmol m -2 d -1 concurrently with an increase of the near-bottom O 2 concentration (from 11 to 153 μM), suggesting a close coupling between SCOC and O 2 concentration. This was demonstrated in shipboard cores in which the O 2 concentration in the overlying water was raised after the cores were first incubated under in situ conditions (17 μM O 2). This induced an immediate and pronounced increase of SCOC. Conversely, at deeper stations permanently within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), SCOC showed little variation between monsoon periods. Hence, organic carbon degradation in sediments on a large part of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> slope appears hampered by the oxygen deficiency of the overlying water</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011JSG....33..519L&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011JSG....33..519L&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Scaling and geometric properties of extensional fracture systems in the proterozoic basement of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Tectonic interpretation and fluid flow implications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Le Garzic, Edouard; de L'Hamaide, Thibaut; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; Sausse, Judith; de Urreiztieta, Marc; Hauville, Benoît; Champanhet, Jean-Michel</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Multi-scale mappings of fracture systems in the crystalline basement of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> are presented. Fracture datasets are described through statistical analyses of direction, length, spacing, density, and spatial distribution. Results are combined with field observations and can be directly used to model the geometry of the fracture networks in analog basement rocks, from multi-kilometric to decametric scales. The fractured reservoir analog is defined with a dual porosity model in which tectonic and joint systems correspond to the basement reservoir "backbone" and "matrix" respectively. These two end-members reveal contrasting geometrical, reservoir, and scaling properties. In tectonic systems, multi-scale geometries are "self-similar", the fracture network shows fractal behavior (power-law length distribution and clustered spacing), and fault zones show hierarchical organization of geometrical parameters such as length, thickness, and spacing. In joint systems, the fracture network is scale dependent with exponential length distribution, and shows anti-clustered spacing. However, these two end-members have both well-connected properties, with fault zones acting as main drain and joint systems acting as the fluid supply.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4170549','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4170549"><span id="translatedtitle">Oral hygiene and gingival health status of children with Down syndrome in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: A cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Sufyani, Ghadah A.; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Ghashm, Abdulmalik A.; Al-Soneidar, Walid A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The objective of the present study was to assess the oral hygiene and gingival health status among Yemeni children with Down syndrome. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 101 children with Down syndrome attending special needs schools in Sana’a, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The calculus index (CI), plaque index (PI), and the gingival index (GI) were used to assess oral hygiene and gingival health status. Results: All subjects had gingivitis; the mean CI, PI, and GI scores were 0.58 ± 0.61, 1.45 ± 0.57, and 1.54 ± 0.64, respectively, with no significant difference found across gender. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that the best predictors in the descending order for CI were age and mother's education, and the best predictors for PI were IQ level, age, and father's education. Having severe mental retardation, older age, less educated parents were the most important predictors for poor gingival health status. Conclusions: These findings show that children with Down syndrome have poor oral hygiene and high levels of periodontal diseases. Hence, appropriate oral health education should be tailored to the needs of these children with the support of their teachers and parents. PMID:25254190</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897911','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897911"><span id="translatedtitle">Female Genital Mutilation: A Literature Review of the Current Status of Legislation and Policies in 27 African Countries and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Muthumbi, Jane; Svanemyr, Joar; Scolaro, Elisa; Temmerman, Marleen; Say, Lale</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>This article discusses the results of a literature review that has assessed the impact of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) legislation in 28 countries (27 in Africa and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) where FGM is concentrated. Evidence on the impact of FGM legislation was available on prevalence of FGM; changes in societal attitudes and perceptions of FGM; knowledge and awareness of FGM legislation and consequences, and the impact on medicalization. While the majority of countries have adopted legal frameworks prohibiting FGM, these measures have been ineffective in preventing and/or in accelerating the abandonment of the practice. Anti-FGM laws have had an impact on prevalence in only two countries where strict enforcement of legal measures has been complemented by robust monitoring, coupled with robust advocacy efforts in communities. Owing to poor enforcement and lax penalties, legal measures have had a limited impact on medicalization. Similarly, legal frameworks have had a limited impact on societal attitudes and perceptions of FGM, with evidence suggesting rigid enforcement of FGM laws has in some instances been counterproductive. Although evidence suggests legislation has not influenced the decline in FGM in the majority of countries, legal frameworks are nevertheless key components of a comprehensive response to the elimination and abandonment of the practice, and need to be complemented by measures that address the underlying socio-cultural norms that are the root of this practice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JARS....7.3527M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JARS....7.3527M"><span id="translatedtitle">Vegetation mapping from high-resolution satellite images in the heterogeneous arid environments of Socotra Island (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malatesta, Luca; Attorre, Fabio; Altobelli, Alfredo; Adeeb, Ahmed; De Sanctis, Michele; Taleb, Nadim M.; Scholte, Paul T.; Vitale, Marcello</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Socotra Island (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>), a global biodiversity hotspot, is characterized by high geomorphological and biological diversity. In this study, we present a high-resolution vegetation map of the island based on combining vegetation analysis and classification with remote sensing. Two different image classification approaches were tested to assess the most accurate one in mapping the vegetation mosaic of Socotra. Spectral signatures of the vegetation classes were obtained through a Gaussian mixture distribution model, and a sequential maximum a posteriori (SMAP) classification was applied to account for the heterogeneity and the complex spatial pattern of the arid vegetation. This approach was compared to the traditional maximum likelihood (ML) classification. Satellite data were represented by a RapidEye image with 5 m pixel resolution and five spectral bands. Classified vegetation relevés were used to obtain the training and evaluation sets for the main plant communities. Postclassification sorting was performed to adjust the classification through various rule-based operations. Twenty-eight classes were mapped, and SMAP, with an accuracy of 87%, proved to be more effective than ML (accuracy: 66%). The resulting map will represent an important instrument for the elaboration of conservation strategies and the sustainable use of natural resources in the island.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15093026','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15093026"><span id="translatedtitle">Distribution and relationships of selected trace metals in molluscs and associated sediments from the Gulf of Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Szefer, P; Ali, A A; Ba-Haroon, A A; Rajeh, A A; Gełdon, J; Nabrzyski, M</p> <p>1999-09-01</p> <p>Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mn and Fe in the soft tissue of Turbo coronatus, Acanthopleura haddoni, Ostrea cucullata and Pitar sp., as well as in associated surface sediments (bulk and bioavailable metal concentrations) from the Gulf of Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Large differences between size-classes of molluscs in metal concentrations were recorded. Significant spatial differences in metal concentrations in both the soft tissue of the molluscs and associated sediments studied were mostly identified. Statistically significant correlations (p<0.01) between concentrations of selected metals were observed. A slope of the linear regression is significantly higher than unity for Fe (9.91) and Cd (3.45) in A. haddoni and for Ni (4.15) in T. coronatus, suggesting that the bioavailability of these metals is disproportionally increased with a degree of enrichment of the sediments in Fe, Cd and Ni, respectively. A slope constant approximating to unity (1.14) for Cu in A. haddoni relative to its concentration in sediment extract implies that bioavailability of this metal proportionally increased with growing concentrations of its labile forms in the associated sediment. The degree of contamination of Gulf of Aden waters by the metals studied is discussed and the potential ability of molluscs, especially A. haddoni and T. coronatus, as biomonitors of metallic pollutants is postulated. PMID:15093026</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008EnGeo..55..653A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008EnGeo..55..653A"><span id="translatedtitle">Heavy metal concentrations in marine green, brown, and red seaweeds from coastal waters of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, the Gulf of Aden</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al-Shwafi, Nabil A.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.</p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the concentration levels of heavy metals in different species of the main three marine algal divisions from the Gulf of Aden coastal waters, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The divisions included Chlorophyta—green plants ( Halimeda tuna, Rhizoclonium kochiamum, Caldophora koiei, Enteromorpha compressa, and Caulerpa racemosa species), Phaeophyta—brown seaweeds ( Padina boryana, Turbinaria elatensis, Sargassum binderi, Cystoseira myrica, and Sargassum boveanum species), and Rhodophyta—red seaweeds ( Hypnea cornuta, Champia parvula, Galaxaura marginate, Laurencia paniculata, Gracilaria foliifere, and species). The heavy metals, which included cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and vanadium (V) were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAs). The concentrations of heavy metals in all algal species are in the order of Fe >> Cu > Mn > Cr > Zn > Ni > Pb > Cd > V > Co. The results also showed that the uptake of heavy metals by different marine algal divisions was in the order of Chlorophyta > Phaeophyta > Rhodophyta. These heavy metals were several order of magnitude higher than the concentrations of the same metals in seawater. This indicates that marine alga progressively uptake heavy metals from seawater.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12266718','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12266718"><span id="translatedtitle">Labour emigration and economic development in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic: an investigation of the case of employment in the building sector in San'a.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meyer, G</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>This study is concerned with the extent to which temporary labor migration benefits the country of origin, particularly with regard to the acquisition of skills abroad and their subsequent use following return. The focus is on the impact on the construction industry in the capital of the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Arab Republic, San'a, and the data were obtained during the course of interviews undertaken in 1982 with 2,500 construction workers. The regions of origin of construction workers and their experience abroad are analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1000175.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1000175.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning <span class="hlt">Cities</span> as Healthy Green <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: Building Sustainable Opportunity <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kearns, Peter</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper discusses a new generation of learning <span class="hlt">cities</span> we have called EcCoWell <span class="hlt">cities</span> (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9021Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9021Z"><span id="translatedtitle">The preliminary results of larger foraminifera analysis from the Paleocene-Early Eocene of Southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, based on museums collections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zakrevskaya, E.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The recent work is based on collections, which were sampled in 1980-th by soviet geologists and preserving now in funds of Vernadsky State Geological Museum. They include litological samples with larger foraminifera (LF) and separated tests of LF from Paleogene of Atag area and Hadramaut plateau (Souternn <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>). The planctonic foraminifera are very rare in considered samples. According to lithological and foraminiferal composition all samples (about 100 numbers) are divided into three parts. The first one includes the LF tests, washed from sandy marls and shales of wells. The second unit represented by bioclastic limestones, partly silicified and dolomitized and rare marls, collected from the exposed sections. These units belong to Umm er Radhuma formation, which in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> dated by Paleocene-Eocene (Pignatti et al., 1998) or only Eocene (Ismail and Boukhary, 2008). The third, Lower Eocene unit in collections (Jeza formation) represented mainly by non carbonatic, gypsiferous argillaceous papery shales and marls. The most lower, marly part of section is opened by wells. The LF assemblages from marls of wells include the next rotaliids in lower part: Lokhartia lobulata Sander, L. haimei spirahordata Sander, L. cf. conditi Smout, Rotalia sp., Diktiokathina sp. The rests of Saudia tests are rare. In upper part Kathina erki (Sirel), Rotalia dukhani Smout and first small nummulites are marked. The lasts belong to Nummulites deserti group, having smaller protoconch and more compressed spire. Due to absence of true Eocene forms we consider these assemblages as paleocenic. The next association, represented by abundant Lockhartia sp., Lockhartia diversa Smout, Sakesaria sp. and rare Daviesina khatyahi Smout, Operculina cf. ornata Hott. and established in hard limestones of Umm er Radhuma formation, identified as transitional from Paleocene to Eocene (Lower Ilerdian). In marls and shales, alternated with limestones in upper part of this formation the middle Ilerdian assemblage</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4629572','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4629572"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of several methods of sires evaluation for total milk yield in a herd of Holstein cows in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Samarai, F.R.; Abdulrahman, Y.K.; Mohammed, F.A.; Al-Zaidi, F.H.; Al-Anbari, N.N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A total of 956 lactation records of Holstein cows kept at Kaa Albon station, Imuran Governorate, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> during the period from 1991 to 2003 were used to investigate the effect of some genetic and non-genetic factors (Sire, parity, season of calving, year of calving and age at first calving as covariate) on the Total Milk Yield (TMY), Lactation Length (LL), and Dry Period (DP). Components of variance for the random effects (mixed model) were estimated by Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) methodology. Sires were evaluated for the TMY by three methods, Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) using Harvey program, Transmitting Ability (TA) according to the Least Square Means of sire progeny (TALSM) and according to Means (TAM). Results showed that TMY and DP were affected significantly (P < 0.01) by all factors except season of calving and age at first calving, while LL was affected significantly (P< 0.01) only by year of calving and parity. The averages of the TMY, LL, and DP were 3919.66 kg, 298.28 days, and 114.13 days respectively. The corresponding estimates of heritability (h2) were 0.35, 0.06, and 0.14 respectively. The highest and lowest BLUP values of sires for the TMY were – 542.44 kg and 402.14 kg, while the corresponding estimates for TALSM and TAM were – 470.38, 380.88 kg and – 370.12, 388.50 kg respectively. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients among BLUP, TALSM and TAM ranged from 0.81 to 0.67. These results provide evidence that the selection of sires will improve the TMY in this herd because of the wide differences in genetic poetical among sires, and a moderate estimation of heritability. PMID:26623356</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011RaPC...80..710A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011RaPC...80..710A"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in rocks and soils in the environments of Juban town in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abd El-mageed, A. I.; El-Kamel, A. H.; Abbady, A.; Harb, S.; Youssef, A. M. M.; Saleh, I. I.</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>The natural radioactivities of 40K, 226Ra, and 232Th and the fallout of 137Cs in rock and soil samples collected around Juban town in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (south west of Asia) were measured. Concentrations of radionuclides in samples were determined by gamma-ray spectrometer using HPGe detector with specially designed shield. The average radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K were determined expressed in Bq/kg. The results show that these radionuclides were present in concentrations of (53.6±4, 127±6.7, and 1742.8±62 Bq/kg), (55±4, 121±6.6, and 2341±78 Bq/kg), (212.8±8.7, 109 ±5.5, and 32.4±4.7 Bq/kg), and (32.1±3, 22.3±2.9 and 190.9±15 Bq/kg) for granite, gneiss, siltstone, and sandstone rocks, respectively. For soil the corresponding values were 44.4±4.5, 58.2±5.1, and 822.7±31 Bq/kg. Low deposits of 137Cs were noted in investigation area, where the activity concentrations ranged from 0.1±0.1 to 23.2±1.2 Bq/kg. Also the radiological hazard of the natural radionuclides content, radium equivalent activity, total dose rates, external hazard index, and gamma activity concentration index of the (rocks/soils) samples in the area under consideration were calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261609','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261609"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrating multiple fish biomarkers and risk assessment as indicators of metal pollution along the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Republic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Omar, Wael A; Saleh, Yousef S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The marine environment of the Red Sea coast of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Republic is subjected to increasing anthropogenic activities. The present field study assesses the impacts of metal pollutants on two common marine fish species; Pomadasys hasta and Lutjanus russellii collected from a reference site in comparison to two polluted sites along the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Republic. Concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in fish vital organs, metal pollution index (MPI), indicative biochemical parameters of liver functions (alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) and kidney functions (urea and creatinine) as well as histopathological changes in gills, liver and kidney of both fish species are integrated as biomarkers of metal pollution. These biomarkers showed species-specific and/or site-specific response. The hazard index (HI) was used as an indicator of human health risks associated with fish consumption. The detected low HI values in most cases doesn't neglect the fact that the cumulative risk effects for metals together give an alarming sign and that the health of fish consumers is endangered around polluted sites. The levels of ALT, AST and urea in plasma of both fish species collected from the polluted sites showed significant increase in comparison to those of reference site. Histopathological alterations and evident damage were observed in tissues of fish collected from the polluted sites. The investigated set of biomarkers proved to be efficient and reliable in biomonitoring the pollution status along different pollution gradients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15006749','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15006749"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Fact Sheet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This fact sheet explains the Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> offer? What has Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> accomplished? What is Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> International? and Where can I find more information?</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5022389','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5022389"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of prematurely lost primary teeth in 5–10-year-old children in Thamar <span class="hlt">city</span>, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: A cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Murshid, Sakhr A.; Al-Labani, Mohammed A.; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Rodis, Omar M. M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: The premature loss of primary teeth is a potential risk factor for poor arch length development. Adequate arch length is important to the progression of the permanent teeth. Poor arch length can lead to crowding, ectopic eruption, or impaction of these teeth. This study is designed to assess the prevalence of premature loss of primary teeth in the 5-10-year-old age group. Materials and Methods: The study group included 185 children, that is, 91 boys and 94 girls. The dental examination was conducted by an experienced examiner under sufficient artificial light. Data including patient age and missing teeth were collected. Descriptive statistics were applied for data analysis, and from the results, Chi-square tests were used at a level of significance of 5% (P < 0.05). Results: We observed a 40.54% prevalence of premature loss of primary teeth with no statistically significant difference between genders. The lower left primary second molar was the most commonly absent tooth in the dental arch (13.5%). Conclusion: The status of premature loss of primary teeth was high in the study group. Implementation of efficient educational and preventive programs to promote oral health would help children maintain a healthy primary dentition and eventually prevent the disturbances in the future development of normal occlusion. Early detection and management of the space problems associated with the early loss of primary teeth would help in reducing malocclusion problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5022389','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5022389"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of prematurely lost primary teeth in 5–10-year-old children in Thamar <span class="hlt">city</span>, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: A cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Murshid, Sakhr A.; Al-Labani, Mohammed A.; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Rodis, Omar M. M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: The premature loss of primary teeth is a potential risk factor for poor arch length development. Adequate arch length is important to the progression of the permanent teeth. Poor arch length can lead to crowding, ectopic eruption, or impaction of these teeth. This study is designed to assess the prevalence of premature loss of primary teeth in the 5-10-year-old age group. Materials and Methods: The study group included 185 children, that is, 91 boys and 94 girls. The dental examination was conducted by an experienced examiner under sufficient artificial light. Data including patient age and missing teeth were collected. Descriptive statistics were applied for data analysis, and from the results, Chi-square tests were used at a level of significance of 5% (P < 0.05). Results: We observed a 40.54% prevalence of premature loss of primary teeth with no statistically significant difference between genders. The lower left primary second molar was the most commonly absent tooth in the dental arch (13.5%). Conclusion: The status of premature loss of primary teeth was high in the study group. Implementation of efficient educational and preventive programs to promote oral health would help children maintain a healthy primary dentition and eventually prevent the disturbances in the future development of normal occlusion. Early detection and management of the space problems associated with the early loss of primary teeth would help in reducing malocclusion problems. PMID:27652244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAfES.115..121L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAfES.115..121L"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the Qishn sandstone reservoir, Masila Basin-<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, using an integrated petrophysical and seismic structural approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lashin, Aref; Marta, Ebrahim Bin; Khamis, Mohamed</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>This study presents an integrated petrophysical and seismic structural analysis that is carried out to evaluate the reservoir properties of Qishn sandstone as well as the entrapment style of the hydrocarbons at Sharyoof field, Sayun-Masila Basin that is located at the east central of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The reservoir rocks are dominated by clean porous and permeable sandstones zones usually intercalated with some clay stone interbeds. As identified from well logs, Qishn sandstone is classified into subunits (S1A, S1B, S1C and S2) with different reservoir characteristics and hydrocarbon potentiality. A number of qualitative and quantitative well logging analyses are used to characterize the different subunits of the Qishn reservoir and identify its hydrocarbon potentiality. Dia-porosity, M-N, Pickett, Buckles plots, petrophysical analogs and lateral distribution maps are used in the analysis. Shale volume, lithology, porosity, and fluid saturation are among the most important deduced parameters. The analysis revealed that S1A and S1C are the main hydrocarbon-bearing units. More specifically, S1A unit is the best, as it attains the most prolific hydrocarbon saturations (oil saturation "SH″ up to 65) and reservoir characteristics. An average petrophysical ranges of 4-21%, 16-23%, 11-19%, 0-65%, are detected for S1A unit, regarding shale volume, total and effective porosity, and hydrocarbon saturation, respectively. Meanwhile, S1B unit exhibits less reservoir characteristics (Vsh>30%, ϕEff<15% and SH< 15%). The lateral distribution maps revealed that most of the hydrocarbons (for S1A and S1C units) are indicated at the middle of the study area as NE-SW oriented closures. The analysis and interpretation of seismic data had clarified that the structure of study area is represented by a big middle horst bounded by a group of step-like normal faults at the extreme boundaries (faulted anticlinal-structure). In conclusion, the entrapment of the encountered hydrocarbon at Sharyoof oil</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004MinPe..82..105L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004MinPe..82..105L"><span id="translatedtitle">The carbonatite-marble dykes of Abyan Province, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Republic: the mixing of mantle and crustal carbonate materials revealed by isotope and trace element analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Le Bas, M. J.; Ba-Bttat, M. A. O.; Taylor, R. N.; Milton, J. A.; Windley, B. F.; Evins, P. M.</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>Dykes of carbonate rocks, that cut gneisses in the Lowder-Mudiah area of southern <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, consist of dolomite and/or calcite with or without apatite, barite and monazite. Petrographic observations, mineralogical, XRF and ICP-MS analyses reveal that some of the carbonate rocks are derived from sedimentary protoliths, whereas others are magmatic calcio- and magnesio-carbonatites some of which are mineralized with barite-monazite. The interbanded occurrence and apparent contemporary emplacement of these different rock types within individual dykes, backed by Sr Nd isotope evidence, are interpreted to show that intrusion of mantle-derived carbonatite magma was accompanied by mobilization of crustal marbles. That took place some 840 Ma ago but the REE-mineralization is dated at ca. 400 Ma.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936431.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936431.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Jerusalem: <span class="hlt">City</span> of Dreams, <span class="hlt">City</span> of Sorrows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ricks, Thomas</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Jerusalem is more than an intriguing global historical <span class="hlt">city</span>; it is a classroom for liberal learning and international understanding. It had never been a <span class="hlt">city</span> of one language, one religion and one culture. Looking at the origins of Jerusalem's name indicates its international and multicultural nature. While Israelis designate Jerusalem as their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913596','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913596"><span id="translatedtitle">What Is Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>This Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/b2202-g/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/b2202-g/"><span id="translatedtitle">Madbi Amran/Qishn total petroleum system of the Ma'Rib-Al Jawf/Shabwah, and Masila-Jeza basins, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Since the first discovery of petroleum in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> in 1984, several recent advances have been made in the understanding of that countrys geologic history and petroleum systems. The total petroleum resource endowment for the combined petroleum provinces within <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, as estimated in the recent U.S. Geological Survey world assessment, ranks 51st in the world, exclusive of the United States, at 9.8 BBOE, which includes cumulative production and remaining reserves, as well as a mean estimate of undiscovered resources. Such undiscovered petroleum resources are about 2.7 billion barrels of oil, 17 trillion cubic feet (2.8 billion barrels of oil equivalent) of natural gas and 1 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. A single total petroleum system, the Jurassic Madbi Amran/Qishn, dominates petroleum generation and production; it was formed in response to a Late Jurassic rifting event related to the separation of the Arabian Peninsula from the Gondwana supercontinent. This rifting resulted in the development of two petroleum-bearing sedimentary basins: (1) the western MaRibAl Jawf / Shabwah basin, and (2) the eastern Masila-Jeza basin. In both basins, petroleum source rocks of the Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Madbi Formation generated hydrocarbons during Late Cretaceous time that migrated, mostly vertically, into Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs. In the western MaRibAl Jawf / Shabwah basin, the petroleum system is largely confined to syn-rift deposits, with reservoirs ranging from deep-water turbidites to continental clastics buried beneath a thick Upper Jurassic (Tithonian) salt. The salt initially deformed in Early Cretaceous time, and continued halokinesis resulted in salt diapirism and associated salt withdrawal during extension. The eastern Masila-Jeza basin contained similar early syn-rift deposits but received less clastic sediment during the Jurassic; however, no salt formed because the basin remained open to ocean circulation in the Late Jurassic. Thus, Madbi Formation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750025385','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750025385"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping of lithologic and structural units using multispectral imagery. [Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent areas (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Saudi Arabia)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kronberg, P. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 MSS imagery covering the Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent regions (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and Saudi Arabi) was applied to the mapping of lithologic and structural units of the test area at a scale 1:1,000,000. Results of the geological evaluation of the ERTS-1 imagery of the Afar have proven the usefullness of this type of satellite data for regional geological mapping. Evaluation of the ERTS images also resulted in new aspects of the structural setting and tectonic development of the Afar-Triangle, where three large rift systems, the oceanic rifts of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden and the continental East African rift system, seem to meet each other. Surface structures mapped by ERTS do not indicate that the oceanic rift of the Gulf of Aden (Sheba Ridge) continues into the area of continental crust west of the Gulf of Tadjura. ERTS data show that the Wonji fault belt of the African rift system does not enter or cut through the central Afar. The Aysha-Horst is not a Horst but an autochthonous spur of the Somali Plateau.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25023770','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25023770"><span id="translatedtitle">Childhood very severe pneumonia and meningitis-related hospitalization and death in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, before and after introduction of H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Banajeh, S M; Ashoor, O; Al-Magramy, A S</p> <p>2014-07-08</p> <p>Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was included in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> immunization programme in 2005. This study compared the rates of very severe pneumonia and all-cause meningitis hospitalization and death, before and after introduction of conjugate Hib vaccine, and reports the results of the 2010 bacterial meningitis surveillance. A retrospective analysis was made of data collected for 2000-2010 for all children aged 2-60 months in the main children's hospital in Sana'a. Compared with the pre-Hib vaccination period, the post-Hib period showed significant and impressive reductions in the rates of hospitalization and death for all-cause meningitis. However, hospitalization and death for very severe pneumonia improved only modestly, and there was evidence of a decreasing but non-significant trend indicting that very severe pneumonia was a non-specific endpoint with multi-etiologies (both viral and bacterial). Very severe pneumonia remains the leading cause of severe morbidity and death for young children, particularly those aged < 12 months.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25380631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25380631"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of metal contamination in water, sediment, and tissues of Arius thalassinus fish from the Red Sea coast of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> and the potential human risk assessment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saleh, Yousef S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Heavy metal pollution is one of the most serious environmental issues globally. To evaluate the metal pollution in the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Republic, the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd in water, sediment, and some vital organs of sea catfish, Arius thalassinus collected from polluted and unpolluted sites, were determined. The risk of these metals to humans through fish consumption was then assessed. The results showed that the concentration order of metals in water, sediment, and fish tissues were Fe > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cd. The levels of studied metals in water, sediment, and fish tissues were significantly higher in the polluted site than those of the unpolluted site, with few exceptions. Linear correlation incorporating paired variables (water-sediment, water-fish, and fish-fish) exhibited several significant correlations indicating a common metal pollution. The risk assessment performed revealed that fish consumption was safe for consumers. This field investigation provides a baseline data on metal pollution in this region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Tectp.607...32B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Tectp.607...32B"><span id="translatedtitle">Pre-existing oblique transfer zones and transfer/transform relationships in continental margins: New insights from the southeastern Gulf of Aden, Socotra Island, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bellahsen, N.; Leroy, S.; Autin, J.; Razin, P.; d'Acremont, E.; Sloan, H.; Pik, R.; Ahmed, A.; Khanbari, K.</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Transfer zones are ubiquitous features in continental rifts and margins, as are transform faults in oceanic lithosphere. Here, we present a structural study of the Hadibo Transfer Zone (HTZ), located in Socotra Island (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) in the southeastern Gulf of Aden. There, we interpret this continental transfer fault zone to represent a reactivated pre-existing structure. Its trend is oblique to the direction of divergence and it has been active from the early up to the latest stages of rifting. One of the main oceanic fracture zones (FZ), the Hadibo-Sharbithat FZ, is aligned with and appears to be an extension of the HTZ and is probably genetically linked to it. Comparing this setting with observations from other Afro-Arabian rifts as well as with passive margins worldwide, it appears that many continental transfer zones are reactivated pre-existing structures, oblique to divergence. We therefore establish a classification system for oceanic FZ based upon their relationship with syn-rift structures. Type 1 FZ form at syn-rift structures and are late syn-rift to early syn-OCT. Type 2 FZ form during the OCT formation and Type 3 FZ form within the oceanic domain, after the oceanic spreading onset. The latter are controlled by far-field forces, magmatic processes, spreading rates, and oceanic crust rheology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21313888','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21313888"><span id="translatedtitle">Remote sensing and GIS application for assessment of land suitability potential for agriculture in the IBB governorate, the Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Mashreki, Mohammd Hezam; Akhir, Juhari Bin Mat; Abd Rahim, Sahibin; Desa, Kadderi Md; Rahman, Zulfahmi Ali</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>In the present study, an assessment of land suitability potential for agriculture in the study area of IBB governorate, Republic of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> has been conducted through close examination of the indicators of land characteristics and qualities. The objective of this study is to evaluate the available land resource and produce the potential map of the study area. Remote sensing data help in mapping land resources, especially in mountainous areas where accessibility is limited. Satellite imagery data used for this study includes data from multi-temporal Landsat TM which dated June 2001. The parameters taken into consideration were 16 thematic maps i.e., slope, DEM, rainfall, soil, land use, land degradation as well as land characteristics maps. Satellite image of the study area has been classified for land use, land degradation and soil maps preparation, while topo sheet and ancillary data have been used for slope and DEM maps and soil properties determination. The land potential of the study area was categorized as very high, high, moderate, low and very low by adopting the logical criteria. These categories were arrived at by integrating the various layers with corresponding weights in a Geographical Information System (GIS). The study demonstrates that the study area can be categorized into spatially distributed agriculture potential zones based on the soil properties, terrain characteristics and analyzing present land use. This approach has the potential as a useful tool for guiding policy decision on sustainable land resource management.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1538.photos.119340p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1538.photos.119340p/"><span id="translatedtitle">26. '<span class="hlt">CITY</span> HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York <span class="hlt">City</span> Department ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>26. '<span class="hlt">CITY</span> HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York <span class="hlt">City</span> Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the <span class="hlt">City</span> of New York under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Tetrahedron&pg=2&id=EJ325676','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Tetrahedron&pg=2&id=EJ325676"><span id="translatedtitle">Build a <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reynolds, Jean A.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A week-long build-a-<span class="hlt">city</span> project is described which lets students become familiar with the history of the five Platonic solids (tetrahedron, octahedron, hexahedron, isosahedron, dodecahedron) and then use these solids to create a <span class="hlt">city</span> using posterboard and construction paper. (MNS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/misr/gallery/utah_salt_lake_city','SCIGOV-ASDC'); return false;" href="https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/misr/gallery/utah_salt_lake_city"><span id="translatedtitle">Utah: Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/">Atmospheric Science Data Center </a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-05-15</p> <p>... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+today&pg=2&id=EJ143587','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+today&pg=2&id=EJ143587"><span id="translatedtitle">The Industrial <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mohl, Raymond</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>This article, the sixth installment in Environment's "Looking Back" series, traces the woes of America's industrialized <span class="hlt">cities</span> to the movement that developed <span class="hlt">cities</span> primarily as centers for industrial enterprise rather than as places for people to live. Today's social ills, from pollution to poverty, developed from that movement. (BT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardware+AND+input+AND+output&pg=4&id=ED048777','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardware+AND+input+AND+output&pg=4&id=ED048777"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CITY</span> III Operator's Manual.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">CITY</span> III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the <span class="hlt">CITY</span> III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001411&hterms=capital+familias+mexicanas&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchany%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcapital%2Bfamilias%2Bmexicanas','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001411&hterms=capital+familias+mexicanas&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchany%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcapital%2Bfamilias%2Bmexicanas"><span id="translatedtitle">Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Utah</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The <span class="hlt">city</span> is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The <span class="hlt">city</span> was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the <span class="hlt">city</span>. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the <span class="hlt">city</span>. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED555624.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED555624.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Innovation and the <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kleiman, Neil; Forman, Adam; Ko, Jae; Giles, David; Bowles, Jonathan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>With Washington trapped in budget battles and partisan gridlock, <span class="hlt">cities</span> have emerged as the best source of government innovation. Nowhere is this more visible than in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>. Since taking office in 2002, Mayor Bloomberg has introduced a steady stream of innovative policies, from a competition to recruit a new applied sciences campus and a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crystals&pg=2&id=EJ866720','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crystals&pg=2&id=EJ866720"><span id="translatedtitle">Walkout in Crystal <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barrios, Greg</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>When students take action, they create change that extends far beyond the classroom. In this article, the author, who was a former teacher from Crystal <span class="hlt">City</span>, Texas, remembers the student walkout that helped launch the Latino civil rights movement 40 years ago. The Crystal <span class="hlt">City</span> student walkout remains a high point in the history of student activism…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4063360','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4063360"><span id="translatedtitle">Inequality and <span class="hlt">City</span> Size*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baum-Snow, Nathaniel; Pavan, Ronni</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Between 1979 and 2007 a strong positive monotonic relationship between wage inequality and <span class="hlt">city</span> size has developed. This paper investigates the links between this emergent <span class="hlt">city</span> size inequality premium and the contemporaneous nationwide increase in wage inequality. After controlling for the skill composition of the workforce across <span class="hlt">cities</span> of different sizes, we show that at least 23 percent of the overall increase in the variance of log hourly wages in the United States from 1979 to 2007 is explained by the more rapid growth in the variance of log wages in larger locations relative to smaller locations. This influence occurred throughout the wage distribution and was most prevalent during the 1990s. More rapid growth in within skill group inequality in larger <span class="hlt">cities</span> has been by far the most important force driving these <span class="hlt">city</span> size specific patterns in the data. Differences in the industrial composition of <span class="hlt">cities</span> of different sizes explain up to one-third of this <span class="hlt">city</span> size effect. These results suggest an important role for agglomeration economies in generating changes in the wage structure during the study period. PMID:24954958</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179988"><span id="translatedtitle">Great <span class="hlt">cities</span> look small.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P H</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Great <span class="hlt">cities</span> connect people; failed <span class="hlt">cities</span> isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a <span class="hlt">city</span>. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and <span class="hlt">city</span>-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-<span class="hlt">city</span> transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535402','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535402"><span id="translatedtitle">Great <span class="hlt">cities</span> look small</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P. H.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Great <span class="hlt">cities</span> connect people; failed <span class="hlt">cities</span> isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a <span class="hlt">city</span>. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and <span class="hlt">city</span>-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-<span class="hlt">city</span> transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21584984','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21584984"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimisation of <span class="hlt">city</span> size.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laurila, Hannu</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Club theoretical analysis of migration between asymmetrical <span class="hlt">cities</span> shows that centralised policy intervention is necessary to ensure the efficient allocation of people between <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Administrative and economic measures are compared as policy instruments of central government. These instruments are found to differ in their effects on residential allocation and welfare. In particular, a lump-sum tax-transfer programme pools the welfare-creating potentials of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, thus affecting the efficiency condition. Therefore, lump-sum tax-transfers are superior to both quantity rationing and Pigouvian taxes, and they also activate, rather than stabilise, migration. PMID:21584984</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001417&hterms=Urban+Sprawl&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528Urban%2BSprawl%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001417&hterms=Urban+Sprawl&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528Urban%2BSprawl%2529"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Lights of Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Growth in 'mega-<span class="hlt">cities</span>' is altering the landscape and the atmosphere in such a way as to curtail normal photosynthesis. By using data from The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System, researchers have been able to look at urban sprawl by monitoring the emission of light from <span class="hlt">cities</span> at night. By overlaying these 'light maps' onto other data such as soil and vegetation maps, the research shows that urbanization can have a variable but measurable impact on photosynthetic productivity. For more information, read Bright Lights, Big <span class="hlt">City</span> Image by the NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+cities&pg=4&id=EJ507384','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+cities&pg=4&id=EJ507384"><span id="translatedtitle">The Sustainable <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gangloff, Deborah</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Focuses on methods to make <span class="hlt">cities</span> more sustainable through the processes of energy efficiency, pollution and waste reduction, capture of natural processes, and the merger of ecological, economic, and social factors. (LZ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014OEng....4..398K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014OEng....4..398K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> sewer collectors biocorrosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ksiażek, Mariusz</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This paper presents the biocorrosion of <span class="hlt">city</span> sewer collectors impregnated with special polymer sulphur binders, polymerized sulphur, which is applied as the industrial waste material. The <span class="hlt">city</span> sewer collectors are settled with a colony of soil bacteria which have corrosive effects on its structure. Chemoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria utilize the residues of halites (carbamide) which migrate in the <span class="hlt">city</span> sewer collectors, due to the damaged dampproofing of the roadway and produce nitrogen salts. Chemoorganotrophic bacteria utilize the traces of organic substrates and produce a number of organic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, citric, oxalic and other). The activity of microorganisms so enables the origination of primary and secondary salts which affect physical properties of concretes in <span class="hlt">city</span> sewer collectors unfavourably.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Easter&pg=4&id=EJ030390','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Easter&pg=4&id=EJ030390"><span id="translatedtitle">Cincinnati; Our Convention <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Borchin, Anna</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the <span class="hlt">city</span> are briefly described. (NH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12179396','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12179396"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Cities</span> in peril, Mahgreb].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Naciri, M</p> <p>1994-10-01</p> <p>The urban population has surpassed 50% in the Maghreb: first in Tunisia, followed by Algeria and Morocco. This phenomenon has greatly affected the distribution of power and the forms of its exercise in the political, social, and economic domain. The old <span class="hlt">city</span> social strata are becoming extinct while <span class="hlt">city</span> management is falling more and more under the control of cadres originally from rural areas. Urbanization is occurring at a slower pace than in other developing countries, however. In Morocco, the small- and medium-sized towns are growing at a faster rate than the <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Their lack of infrastructure and services, like those that exist in the periphery of large <span class="hlt">cities</span>, preoccupies the small- and medium-sized towns. The urban explosion is much more contained than its management is adapting. Legal and illegal housing will dominate the Moroccan <span class="hlt">city</span> in the future. In the last decade, Moroccan authorities have tried to establish mechanisms to integrate populations in slums and illegal housing with the urban space. The Tunisians are also working on this. In Algeria, the rigid, urban formal management leaves no room to develop any type of housing. The problem of housing is even more grave here than the other 2 countries. Structural adjustment policies promote selling rather than renting houses. The government is not involved in social and health services. Algeria has a 2-tier society: a minority involved in the private sector and the majority who depends on the collapsing public sector which cannot meet the great needs of the poor. Persons with college degrees are unemployed in Algeria. One no longer knows how to build towns with the traditional medinas. The transportation system is falling apart in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> dump liquid and solid wastes directly into the sea or the wadis. The major risk of maghrebian <span class="hlt">cities</span> lies in socioeconomic inequalities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.124....1C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.124....1C"><span id="translatedtitle">The coralline red alga Lithophyllum kotschyanum f. affine as proxy of climate variability in the <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> coast, Gulf of Aden (NW Indian Ocean)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Caragnano, A.; Basso, D.; Jacob, D. E.; Storz, D.; Rodondi, G.; Benzoni, F.; Dutrieux, E.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Recent investigations have shown the potential of red coralline algae as paleoclimatic archive. A previously unexplored subfamily of coralline algae, the Lithophylloideae, was investigated from the Gulf of Aden (Balhaf, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>). Seasonal changes in Mg/Ca, Li/Ca and Ba/Ca composition of Lithophyllum kotschyanum f. affine were investigated by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). For the first time in coralline algae, the Li/Ca composition was analyzed and showed a highly significant and positive correlation with Mg/Ca and SST. Monthly algal Mg/Ca and Li/Ca variations indicate a positive correlation with sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS), although low growth rates decrease the resolution of the algal record. Albeit no or weak positive correlation between monthly algal Ba/Ca and local SST was found, fluctuations in Ba/Ca suggest the seasonal influence of nutrient-rich deep waters introduced by upwelling, and record an increase of sedimentation at the sampling site likely due to an intensified land use in the area. The Mg/Ca age model shows an average algal extension rate of 1.15 mm yr-1, and reveals multiple intra-annual banding (previously unreported in the genus Lithophyllum) together with carposporangia formation in late February-early March, when temperature begins to increase. The concentration of MgCO3 in the thallus of L. kotschyanum f. affine is 20 mol% (1 SE), confirming that within the genus, the species sampled in warmer regions contain higher mol% MgCO3. The concentrations of LiCO3 and BaCO3 are 8 μmol% (0.7 SE) and 0.5 μmol% (0.03 SE), respectively. Despite the limitations from low-growth rate and species-specific vital effect, coralline algae confirm their utility in climate and oceanographic reconstruction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25758898','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25758898"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and associated factors of hepatitis C virus infection among renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis in three health centers in Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>: a cross sectional study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aman, Khadija; Al-Dubai, Sami AbdoRadman; Aman, Reema; Hawash, Aamenah; Alshagga, Mustafa; Kassim, Saba</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We aimed to assess the prevalence and factors associated with positive anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies among patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) in three centers in Aden, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. The data from 219 patients and their records over the period between 2000-2013, was extracted and analyzed. The mean ± SD age of the patients was 47.08 ± 13.9 years; 74.4% of them were married and 14.6% were employed. The prevalence of validated anti-HCV-positive cases was 40.2% (95%CI 33.64%-46.73%). The mean ± SD duration on HD of all the patients was 35.09 ± 38 months. On bivariate analysis, the duration on HD and attending more than one center for HD associated significantly with anti-HCV positivity (P <0.05). On multivariate fully adjusted Poisson regression modelling, controlled for age, Patients attending more than one center and those who underwent HD for longer durations were more likely to be positive for anti- HCV antibodies [P = 0.004, adjusted prevalence rate ratio (APRR) = 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-2.88; P = 0.0005, APRR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02. In this study sample, the prevalence of HCV was significant. Patients attending more than one center and those who underwent HD for longer durations were found to be more likely to contract HCV. Enhancing existing infection control measures and allocating more resources to HD centers therefore warrants consideration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15025166','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15025166"><span id="translatedtitle">Trace metals in the brown mussel Perna perna from the coastal waters off <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> (Gulf of Aden): how concentrations are affected by weight, sex, and seasonal cycle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sokolowski, A; Bawazir, A S; Wolowicz, M</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The effects of seasonal cycle, sex of individuals, and changes of soft tissues weight on accumulated trace metal concentrations (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were examined in the brown mussel Perna perna collected monthly from a natural rocky habitat in the coastal waters off <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, the Gulf of Aden, for a period of ten months. Basic hydrological parameters were recorded simultaneously. All metals analyzed displayed seasonal fluctuations with different temporal patterns and variable amplitudes. Similar seasonal cycles were observed for Cu, Mn, and Pb with an increase in accumulated concentration during the rainy period (NE monsoon), and a decrease thereafter. The concentrations of Cu, Mn, and partially Pb appeared to be related to environmental changes, the concentration of Pb possibly also being related to changes in body weight. Accumulated concentrations of Cu and Mn thus seem to reflect actual metal bioavailability in the ecosystem quite efficiently. The tissue levels of Fe and Cd changed inversely to fluctuations in body weight with additional variation due to monsoon-related environmental changes. The behaviors of Fe and Cd are therefore driven by seasonally changing body weight with a considerable contribution of external factors including fluctuations in hydrological conditions and metal exposure. The Zn concentrations tended to increase gradually throughout most of the year regardless of its concentration in the environment. Zinc is considered to be mainly regulated by physiological mechanisms in the mussel, making its accumulated metal concentration independent to some degree of environmental levels. Significant differences in trace metal concentrations between sexes (in favour of females) might have resulted from more intense formation of reproductive tissues and metal accumulation in sexual products of females during the prespawning and spawning periods. PMID:15025166</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PIAHS.372..189E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PIAHS.372..189E"><span id="translatedtitle">Sinking coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Erkens, G.; Bucx, T.; Dam, R.; de Lange, G.; Lambert, J.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>In many coastal and delta <span class="hlt">cities</span> land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh <span class="hlt">City</span>, Bangkok and numerous other coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs for (infra)structure. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. As subsidence is often spatially variable and can be caused by multiple processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta <span class="hlt">cities</span> needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes? What is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues)? Where are the vulnerable areas? What are the impacts and risks? How can adverse impacts be mitigated or compensated for? Who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-<span class="hlt">cities</span>: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh <span class="hlt">City</span>, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1059170.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1059170.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning <span class="hlt">Cities</span> on the Move</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kearns, Peter</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The modern Learning <span class="hlt">City</span> concept emerged from the work of OECD on lifelong learning with streams of Learning <span class="hlt">Cities</span> and Educating <span class="hlt">Cities</span> having much in common but having little contact with each other. While the early development of Learning <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the West has not been sustained, the present situation is marked by the dynamic development of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H31L..04E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H31L..04E"><span id="translatedtitle">Sinking Coastal <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Erkens, G.; Stuurman, R.; De Lange, G.; Bucx, T.; Lambert, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>In many coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh <span class="hlt">City</span>, Bangkok and numerous other coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> will continue to sink, even below sea level. The ever increasing industrial and domestic demand for water in these <span class="hlt">cities</span> results in excessive groundwater extraction, causing severe subsidence. In addition, coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by climate-induced sea level rise. Land subsidence results in two types damage: foremost it increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. Secondly, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs of roads and transportation networks, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. To survey the extent of groundwater associated subsidence, we conducted a quick-assessment of subsidence in a series of mega-<span class="hlt">cities</span> (Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh <span class="hlt">City</span>, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok). For each <span class="hlt">city</span> research questions included: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are predictions, where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and what governmental bodies are involved and responsible to act? Using the assessment, this paper discusses subsidence modelling and measurement results from the selected <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The focus is on the importance of delayed settlement after increases in hydraulic heads, the role of the subsurface composition for subsidence rates and best practice solutions for subsiding <span class="hlt">cities</span>. For the latter, urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544062','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544062"><span id="translatedtitle">Universities scale like <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Raan, Anthony F J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic <span class="hlt">city</span> characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all <span class="hlt">cities</span>, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the <span class="hlt">city</span>, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of <span class="hlt">cities</span> cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001314&hterms=map+china&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmap%2Bchina','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001314&hterms=map+china&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmap%2Bchina"><span id="translatedtitle">Earth's <span class="hlt">City</span> Lights</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>This image of Earth's <span class="hlt">city</span> lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth's surface. The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) <span class="hlt">Cities</span> tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of <span class="hlt">city</span> centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region. Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya. The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big <span class="hlt">City</span> describes how NASA scientists use <span class="hlt">city</span> light data to map urbanization. Image by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, based on DMSP data</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24503484','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24503484"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrafine particles in <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual <span class="hlt">cities</span>, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian <span class="hlt">cities</span> is about four-times larger than that in European <span class="hlt">cities</span> but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts. PMID:24503484</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020080944','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020080944"><span id="translatedtitle">Finding the Lost <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Nicholas Clapp, a filmmaker and archeology enthusiast, had accumulated extensive information concerning Ubar, the fabled lost <span class="hlt">city</span> of ancient Arabia. When he was unable to identify its exact location, however, he turned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for assistance in applying orbital remote sensing techniques. JPL scientists searched NASA's shuttle imaging radar, as well as Landsat and SPOT images and discovered ancient caravan tracks. This enabled them to prepare a map of the trails, which converged at a place known as Ash Shisr. An expedition was formed, which found structures and artifacts from a <span class="hlt">city</span> that predates previous area civilization by a thousand years. Although it will take time to validate the <span class="hlt">city</span> as Ubar, the discovery is a monumental archeological triumph.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24503484','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24503484"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrafine particles in <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual <span class="hlt">cities</span>, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian <span class="hlt">cities</span> is about four-times larger than that in European <span class="hlt">cities</span> but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199420','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199420"><span id="translatedtitle">Building functional <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Henderson, J Vernon; Venables, Anthony J; Regan, Tanner; Samsonov, Ilia</p> <p>2016-05-20</p> <p>The literature views many African <span class="hlt">cities</span> as dysfunctional with a hodgepodge of land uses and poor "connectivity." One driver of inefficient land uses is construction decisions for highly durable buildings made under weak institutions. In a novel approach, we model the dynamics of urban land use with both formal and slum dwellings and ongoing urban redevelopment to higher building heights in the formal sector as a <span class="hlt">city</span> grows. We analyze the evolution of Nairobi using a unique high-spatial resolution data set. The analysis suggests insufficient building volume through most of the <span class="hlt">city</span> and large slum areas with low housing volumes near the center, where corrupted institutions deter conversion to formal sector usage. PMID:27199420</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258904','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258904"><span id="translatedtitle">Reproducing in <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mace, Ruth</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>Reproducing in <span class="hlt">cities</span> has always been costly, leading to lower fertility (that is, lower birth rates) in urban than in rural areas. Historically, although <span class="hlt">cities</span> provided job opportunities, initially residents incurred the penalty of higher infant mortality, but as mortality rates fell at the end of the 19th century, European birth rates began to plummet. Fertility decline in Africa only started recently and has been dramatic in some <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Here it is argued that both historical and evolutionary demographers are interpreting fertility declines across the globe in terms of the relative costs of child rearing, which increase to allow children to outcompete their peers. Now largely free from the fear of early death, postindustrial societies may create an environment that generates runaway parental investment, which will continue to drive fertility ever lower.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254510','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254510"><span id="translatedtitle">Inner <span class="hlt">City</span> Asthma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Togias, Alkis</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>SYNOPSIS The inner <span class="hlt">city</span> has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner <span class="hlt">city</span>, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1868344','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1868344"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation, and Complications in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Living at High vs Low Altitudes in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Huthi, Mohamed Ali; Ahmed Raja'a, Yahia; Al-Noami, Mohammed; Rahman, Abdul Rashid Abdul</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Background A comparative retrospective study was performed to compare the distribution of risk factors and complications in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) at high-altitude vs low-altitude areas in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. Methods The records of 768 patients from Sana'a (high altitude) and Aden (low altitude) were reviewed. Risk factors assessed were age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and reported history and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complications of ACS of interest were heart failure, arrhythmias, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and death. Results The mean age of ACS patients at high altitude was significantly lower than those at low altitude (55.3 years [SD = 8.2] vs 56.8 years [SD = 7.1]; P = .007). History of hyperlipidemia was significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (49.2% vs 38.3%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.563; P = .002). Reported history of CAD was also significantly higher at higher altitudes (16.7% vs 9.4%; OR = 1.933; P = .003). Previous history of diabetes mellitus and tobacco smoking was slightly higher with borderline significance. Hypertension and reported family history of CAD were comparable among high- and low-altitude patients. In terms of in-hospital complications, CVAs were significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (7.8% vs 4.4%; P = .0001). Heart failure, arrhythmias, and death rates were comparable in both groups of patients. Wall motion abnormalities were comparable, whereas the ejection fraction was lower in the high-altitude patients (49.8% [SD = 16.08] vs 54.8% [SD = 16.23]; P = .0001). Conclusions ACS occurs at a younger age at high altitudes. Patients who live in high-altitude regions are also more likely to have hyperlipidemia and a previous history of CAD. Stroke and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) occur more commonly in high-altitude ACS patients. High altitude may generally be a risk factor for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pigs&pg=4&id=EJ805230','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pigs&pg=4&id=EJ805230"><span id="translatedtitle">The Plains <span class="hlt">City</span> Story</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains <span class="hlt">City</span> school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220401','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220401"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Tools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-12-19</p> <p>The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> offers a large collection of Web-based tools on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. These calculators, interactive maps, and data searches can assist fleets, fuels providers, and other transportation decision makers in their efforts to reduce petroleum use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+green+AND+space&pg=2&id=EJ255595','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+green+AND+space&pg=2&id=EJ255595"><span id="translatedtitle">Making <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Green.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Goldstein, Neil B.; Engel, Jane</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Describes several examples of urban parks and the renewal of <span class="hlt">city</span> open spaces. Community groups interested in getting funding from government or private sources must cope with budget restrictions by making effective, innovative use of available money. Government agencies with funds allocated for urban improvements are mentioned. (AM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=size+AND+range+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ941667','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=size+AND+range+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ941667"><span id="translatedtitle">Big-<span class="hlt">City</span> Rules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gordon, Dan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>When it comes to implementing innovative classroom technology programs, urban school districts face significant challenges stemming from their big-<span class="hlt">city</span> status. These range from large bureaucracies, to scalability, to how to meet the needs of a more diverse group of students. Because of their size, urban districts tend to have greater distance…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7028557','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7028557"><span id="translatedtitle">Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> aerosol study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Falcon, Y.I. ); Ramirez, C.R. )</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> is located in a valley at high elevation (2,268 m) and is subject to atmospheric inversion related problems similar to those found in Denver, Colorado. In addition, Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> has a tropical climate (latitude 19{degrees} 25 minutes N), and therefore has more sunlight available for production of photochemical smog. There are approximately 9.5 million people spread in a 1,500 km{sup 2} (25 sq. mi) urban area, and more than two million automobiles (D.G.P.T. 1979) which use leaded gasoline. Furthermore, Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> is the principal industrial center in the country with more than 131,000 industries. The growth of the <span class="hlt">city</span> has led to a serious air pollution problem, and there is concern over the possible pollutant effects on human health. The authors discuss work done to characterize the chemical composition of the aerosol. It is shown that many of the organic compounds which have been detected in urban aerosols are carcinogens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Digital+AND+learning+AND+companies&pg=5&id=EJ764688','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Digital+AND+learning+AND+companies&pg=5&id=EJ764688"><span id="translatedtitle">Accepted into Education <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Asquith, Christina</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Qatar's Education <span class="hlt">City</span>, perhaps the world's most diverse campus, is almost entirely unknown in the United States, but represents the next step in the globalization of American higher education--international franchising. Aided by technology such as online libraries, distance learning and streaming video, U.S. universities offer--and charge tuition…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+today&pg=4&id=EJ297325','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pollution+AND+today&pg=4&id=EJ297325"><span id="translatedtitle">India's <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in Crisis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bryjak, George J.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Indian <span class="hlt">cities</span> are growing rapidly due to natural increase and migration from rural areas. This has caused huge pollution problems and has resulted in overcrowded schools and hospitals. Conflict between religious groups has increased; so has crime. India is modernizing, but not fast enough. (CS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED020963.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED020963.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CITIES</span> ARE CHANGING.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>RAVITZ, MEL</p> <p></p> <p>THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL CHANGES IN LARGE <span class="hlt">CITIES</span> ARE DISCUSSED. POPULATION GROWTH IN THE LAST FEW YEARS HAS OCCURRED PRIMARILY IN THE SUBURBS. URBAN RENEWAL HAS REALIGNED AND RELOCATED THE RACES AND THE SOCIAL CLASSES, AND FREEWAY CONSTRUCTION HAS CREATED INTERURBAN STRIPS. CASUALTIES OF THESE CHANGES ARE CROWDING THE MIDDLE NEIGHBORHOODS…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22sherlock+holmes%22&pg=3&id=EJ254325','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22sherlock+holmes%22&pg=3&id=EJ254325"><span id="translatedtitle">Nature in the <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ferbert, Mary Lou</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Describes a science program developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, "Nature in the <span class="hlt">City</span>," in which students and teachers learn together about the natural community surrounding their school. Includes program's rationale, list of "adventures," and methods. Discusses strategies of Sherlock Holmes'"adventure" focusing on animal tracks…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bee&pg=5&id=ED434020','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bee&pg=5&id=ED434020"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Bees [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Williams&pg=5&id=EJ889744','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Williams&pg=5&id=EJ889744"><span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">City</span>, New Challenges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Matthews, Frank</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>After eight years at the helm of the <span class="hlt">City</span> College of New York, where Dr. Gregory Williams grew enrollment at the minority-serving institution by 60 percent, instituted more rigorous admissions standards and launched the college's first capital campaign that raised more than $300 million, last fall he became the 27th president of the University of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+forest&pg=5&id=EJ476630','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+forest&pg=5&id=EJ476630"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Kids Go Green.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Taylor, Tricia</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Describes Outward Bound Urban Resources Initiative, a six-week summer course whose goal is to work with urban youth to develop solutions for local environmental problems. Among the activities described include converting <span class="hlt">city</span> lots into parks, neighborhood cleanup, and tree planting. (MDH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=photography+AND+facts&pg=2&id=ED434018','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=photography+AND+facts&pg=2&id=ED434018"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Ants [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=insect+AND+characteristics&pg=3&id=ED434021','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=insect+AND+characteristics&pg=3&id=ED434021"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Beetles [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rooftop+AND+gardens&id=EJ121439','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rooftop+AND+gardens&id=EJ121439"><span id="translatedtitle">The New <span class="hlt">City</span> Commons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Crossland, Janice</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cities</span> throughout the country are sponsoring family projects that convert vacant lots and rooftops to productive neighborhood gardens. It is hoped that utilization of these otherwide wasted areas will provide extra food for low income families, as well as promote community spirit and organization. (MA)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614606E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614606E"><span id="translatedtitle">Sinking coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>In many coastal and delta <span class="hlt">cities</span> land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh <span class="hlt">City</span>, Bangkok and numerous other coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=candy&pg=5&id=EJ787775','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=candy&pg=5&id=EJ787775"><span id="translatedtitle">New York <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Education Battles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Meyer, Peter</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>When Bloomberg gave his first State of the <span class="hlt">City</span> address, in January, 2002, he announced his intention to seek mayoral control of the schools and abolish the infamous New York <span class="hlt">City</span> Board of Education, which he called "a rinky-dink candy store." He joined a long list of New York mayors, educators, and business leaders who believed that the <span class="hlt">city</span>'s…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA06289&hterms=yard&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dyard','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA06289&hterms=yard&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dyard"><span id="translatedtitle">Martian <span class="hlt">City</span> Map</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p><p/> 30 May 2004 Seasonal frost can enhance the view from orbit of polar polygonal patterns on the surface of Mars. Sometimes these patterns look something like a <span class="hlt">city</span> map, or the view from above a <span class="hlt">city</span> lit-up at night. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the south polar region near 80.7oS, 70.6oW. Polar polygons on Mars are generally believed, though not proven, to be the result of freeze/thaw cycles of ice occurring within the upper few meters (several yards) of the martian subsurface. The image shown here covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22574474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22574474"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards HIV/AIDS among students of health institutes in Sana'a <span class="hlt">city</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Rabeei, N A; Dallak, A M; Al-Awadi, F G</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Students of health-related subjects have an important role in national strategies on HIV/AIDS prevention. This study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards HIV/AIDS among students at health institutes in Sana'a <span class="hlt">city</span>, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on 600 students selected by cluster sampling. Students had a moderate level of HIV/AIDS knowledge (an average of 67.6% were correct on all items). Nevertheless, 82.3% knew that HIV could be transmitted by sexual intercourse without a condom, 87.5% from syringes, 71.8% from infected blood and 80.7% from mother to child. Misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted (e.g. hugging and kissing or sharing food, swimming pools and classrooms) were found among 41.5% of the students. Attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS showed that 59.8% of students were accepting and positive. There was a common opinion among respondents that HIV-infected persons needed to be punished (65.5%) and isolated (41.0%); however, 86.8% were willing to care for an HIV-infected person. PMID:22574474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001394&hterms=Gardens&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DGardens','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001394&hterms=Gardens&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DGardens"><span id="translatedtitle">Garden <span class="hlt">City</span>, Kansas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Center pivot irrigation systems create red circles of healthy vegetation in this image of croplands near Garden <span class="hlt">City</span>, Kansas. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on September 25, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using near infrared, red, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2608484','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2608484"><span id="translatedtitle">Asthma in inner <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>LeNoir, M. A.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>While the management of asthma has improved over the past two decades, the incidence of asthma in the inner <span class="hlt">city</span> has not. The inner <span class="hlt">city</span>, comprising a disproportionate number of people who live close to or below the poverty line, shows increased rates of morbidity and mortality from asthma. African Americans and Hispanic Americans are two to six times more likely to die from asthma than their white counterparts. When federally funded programs have targeted reducing morbidity and mortality in children from these populations, they have succeeded, but in a national study only 18 states had initiatives targeting asthma in low-income populations. This is tantamount to a public health crisis. Patients are not always properly diagnosed and are often without a regular source of health care, and symptoms are seen only in an acute context. Living conditions for the inner-<span class="hlt">city</span> child have significant allergen triggers associated with house dust, cockroaches, cigarette smoke, chemical pollutants, and particulate matter. Viral infections, such as those caused by respiratory syncytial virus, are worse in crowded living conditions. The desirability of an increased public awareness of the seriousness of the disease and the need for chronic health care are issues that should be raised, through culturally relevant public means and in the knowledge that visual information is most effective. Physicians must understand the proper use of rescue and controller drugs, and asthma education must expand beyond doctors and nurses in their offices. The National Medical Association is committed to doing this aggressively, and community organizations, alliances, and coalitions must also aggressively follow. Public agencies must be lobbied to set high standards for proper asthma care and resources. With organizations acting in concert, the mortality and morbidity from asthma can be substantially prevented in the inner <span class="hlt">city</span>. PMID:12653387</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535413','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535413"><span id="translatedtitle">Human diffusion and <span class="hlt">city</span> influence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cities</span> are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all <span class="hlt">cities</span> are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify <span class="hlt">city</span> influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the <span class="hlt">cities</span> attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a <span class="hlt">city</span> to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a <span class="hlt">city-to-city</span> network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179991','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179991"><span id="translatedtitle">Human diffusion and <span class="hlt">city</span> influence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cities</span> are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all <span class="hlt">cities</span> are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify <span class="hlt">city</span> influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the <span class="hlt">cities</span> attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a <span class="hlt">city</span> to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a <span class="hlt">city-to-city</span> network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179991','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179991"><span id="translatedtitle">Human diffusion and <span class="hlt">city</span> influence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cities</span> are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all <span class="hlt">cities</span> are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify <span class="hlt">city</span> influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the <span class="hlt">cities</span> attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a <span class="hlt">city</span> to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a <span class="hlt">city-to-city</span> network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069312','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069312"><span id="translatedtitle">Is a healthy <span class="hlt">city</span> also an age-friendly <span class="hlt">city</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jackisch, Josephine; Zamaro, Gianna; Green, Geoff; Huber, Manfred</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Healthy Ageing is an important focus of the European Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Network and has been supported by WHO since 2003 as a key strategic topic, since 2010 in cooperation with the Global Network of Age-friendly <span class="hlt">Cities</span> and Communities. Based on the methodology of realist evaluation, this article synthesizes qualitative evidence from 33 structured case studies (CS) from 32 WHO European Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, 72 annual reports from Network <span class="hlt">cities</span> and 71 quantitative responses to a General Evaluation Questionnaire. <span class="hlt">City</span> cases are assigned to three clusters containing the eight domains of an age-friendly <span class="hlt">city</span> proposed by WHO's Global Age-friendly <span class="hlt">City</span> Guide published in 2007. The analysis of <span class="hlt">city</span>'s practice and efforts in this article takes stock of how <span class="hlt">cities</span> have developed the institutional prerequisites and processes necessary for implementing age-friendly strategies, programmes and projects. A content analysis of the CS maps activities across age-friendly domains and illustrates how <span class="hlt">cities</span> contribute to improving the social and physical environments of older people and enhance the health and social services provided by municipalities and their partners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.3715U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.3715U"><span id="translatedtitle">Micromorphology of two prehistoric ritual burials from <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, and considerations on methodological aspects of sampling the burial matrix - work in progress</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Usai, Maria-Raimonda; Brothwell, Don; Buckley, Stephen; Ai-Thour, Kalid; Canti, Matthew</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Introduction In the central area of <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, two burial sites placed high in the crevices of vertical cliff face of Cretaceous sandstone (Tawilah Group) provided evidence of human remains and yielded burial soils. Radiocarbon dating indicated c.2500-2900 years BP for the burials. In other local comparable sites the deep horizontal crevices yielded Bronze Age human remains, in exceptional state of preservation Questions: What was the nature of the burial matrix? Are other human influences superimposed on the soils derived from it? Is it simply decomposed crevice rock, scraped together at the time of burial, or the result of a more complex burial practice? Such questions are also relevant to a variety of other burials of different periods and world regions. Methods Seven matrix samples from Cliff Burials (A) Talan (Layers 4,10,12,14,18,20 and 22, from top to bottom) and (B) Shiban Kawkaban (Layer 1 and 9) were analysed with micromorphology, supplemented by SEM microprobe, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Cliff Burial Site Talan. The presence of cholesterol was confirmed in the lower sample. The second layer contained darker earth with fibrous plant material. A hard calcareous upper capping contrasted with the other levels of matrix, and it displayed a highly birefingent material with a significant component of uric acid. The other levels had variable organic content and plant inclusions, and possibly pollen. In Layer 10, aromatic acids indicative of balsam and sugar markers suggested plant gum. Cholesterol was the major sterol in Layers 10 and 22, but whilst in Layer 10 its oxidation products were present and cholestanol was abundant as normally in soils, it was only a minor component of Layer 22 where, rather, a significant amount of coprostanol indicated faecal input, and cholesterol oxidation products were absent. Cliff Burial Site Shiban Kawkaban. Although no stratification was visible to the naked eye, variation was observed at a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22131070','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22131070"><span id="translatedtitle">An analysis framework for characterizing and explaining development of EIA legislation in developing countries-Illustrated for Georgia, Ghana and <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kolhoff, Arend J.; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Runhaar, Hens A.C.</p> <p>2013-01-15</p> <p>Actors in the field of international development co-operation supporting the development of EIA legislation in developing countries often do not achieve the results envisaged. The performance of EIA in these countries often remains weak. One reason, we assume, is that often those actors support the establishment of overly ambitious EIA legislation that cannot achieve its objectives in the light of constraining contexts. To provide more effective support we need to better understand the enabling and constraining contextual factors that influence the development of EIA legislation and to which support actors should align itself. In this article a new analysis framework for classifying, characterizing and explaining the development of EIA legislation is described, measured in terms of ambition levels. Ambitions are defined as intentions the EIA authorities aim to fulfill, expressed in formal EIA legislation. Three country cases, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>, Georgia and Ghana are used to illustrate the usefulness of our framework and as a first test to refine the framework. We have formulated the following five hypotheses that complement and refine our analysis framework. One, EIA legislation may develop multilinearly in terms of ambition levels. Two, ambitions in EIA legislation seem to be influenced to a great extent by the power and capacity of, on the one hand, the environmental authorities supporting EIA and, on the other hand, the sector authorities hindering the development of EIA. Three, the political system is the most important context factor influencing the rules of policy-making and the power of the different actors involved. Four, the importance of context factors on the development of ambitions is dependent on the phase of EIA system development. Five, some ambitions seem to be influenced by particular factors; for instance the ambitions for the object of study seem to be influenced by the level of environmental awareness of the sector ministries and parliament. The analysis</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3937786','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3937786"><span id="translatedtitle">Large <span class="hlt">cities</span> are less green</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Oliveira, Erneson A.; Andrade, José S.; Makse, Hernán A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We study how urban quality evolves as a result of carbon dioxide emissions as urban agglomerations grow. We employ a bottom-up approach combining two unprecedented microscopic data on population and carbon dioxide emissions in the continental US. We first aggregate settlements that are close to each other into <span class="hlt">cities</span> using the <span class="hlt">City</span> Clustering Algorithm (CCA) defining <span class="hlt">cities</span> beyond the administrative boundaries. Then, we use data on CO2 emissions at a fine geographic scale to determine the total emissions of each <span class="hlt">city</span>. We find a superlinear scaling behavior, expressed by a power-law, between CO2 emissions and <span class="hlt">city</span> population with average allometric exponent β = 1.46 across all <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the US. This result suggests that the high productivity of large <span class="hlt">cities</span> is done at the expense of a proportionally larger amount of emissions compared to small <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Furthermore, our results are substantially different from those obtained by the standard administrative definition of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, i.e. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Specifically, MSAs display isometric scaling emissions and we argue that this discrepancy is due to the overestimation of MSA areas. The results suggest that allometric studies based on administrative boundaries to define <span class="hlt">cities</span> may suffer from endogeneity bias. PMID:24577263</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24577263','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24577263"><span id="translatedtitle">Large <span class="hlt">cities</span> are less green.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oliveira, Erneson A; Andrade, José S; Makse, Hernán A</p> <p>2014-02-28</p> <p>We study how urban quality evolves as a result of carbon dioxide emissions as urban agglomerations grow. We employ a bottom-up approach combining two unprecedented microscopic data on population and carbon dioxide emissions in the continental US. We first aggregate settlements that are close to each other into <span class="hlt">cities</span> using the <span class="hlt">City</span> Clustering Algorithm (CCA) defining <span class="hlt">cities</span> beyond the administrative boundaries. Then, we use data on CO2 emissions at a fine geographic scale to determine the total emissions of each <span class="hlt">city</span>. We find a superlinear scaling behavior, expressed by a power-law, between CO2 emissions and <span class="hlt">city</span> population with average allometric exponent β = 1.46 across all <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the US. This result suggests that the high productivity of large <span class="hlt">cities</span> is done at the expense of a proportionally larger amount of emissions compared to small <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Furthermore, our results are substantially different from those obtained by the standard administrative definition of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, i.e. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Specifically, MSAs display isometric scaling emissions and we argue that this discrepancy is due to the overestimation of MSA areas. The results suggest that allometric studies based on administrative boundaries to define <span class="hlt">cities</span> may suffer from endogeneity bias.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E4235O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E4235O"><span id="translatedtitle">Large <span class="hlt">cities</span> are less green</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oliveira, Erneson A.; Andrade, José S.; Makse, Hernán A.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>We study how urban quality evolves as a result of carbon dioxide emissions as urban agglomerations grow. We employ a bottom-up approach combining two unprecedented microscopic data on population and carbon dioxide emissions in the continental US. We first aggregate settlements that are close to each other into <span class="hlt">cities</span> using the <span class="hlt">City</span> Clustering Algorithm (CCA) defining <span class="hlt">cities</span> beyond the administrative boundaries. Then, we use data on CO2 emissions at a fine geographic scale to determine the total emissions of each <span class="hlt">city</span>. We find a superlinear scaling behavior, expressed by a power-law, between CO2 emissions and <span class="hlt">city</span> population with average allometric exponent β = 1.46 across all <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the US. This result suggests that the high productivity of large <span class="hlt">cities</span> is done at the expense of a proportionally larger amount of emissions compared to small <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Furthermore, our results are substantially different from those obtained by the standard administrative definition of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, i.e. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Specifically, MSAs display isometric scaling emissions and we argue that this discrepancy is due to the overestimation of MSA areas. The results suggest that allometric studies based on administrative boundaries to define <span class="hlt">cities</span> may suffer from endogeneity bias.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287008"><span id="translatedtitle">Securing water for the <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Satterthwaite, D</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Many <span class="hlt">cities</span> in developing countries have grown so much that they can no longer provide adequate, sustainable water. Over pumping in Dakar and Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> has forced those <span class="hlt">cities</span> to obtain water from ever more distant sources. In Dakar, the result has been saltwater intrusion. Overpumping has caused Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> to sink, in some areas by as much as 9 m, resulting in serious damage to buildings and sewage and drainage pipes. Other <span class="hlt">cities</span> facing similar water problems are coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Peru (e.g., Lima), La Rioja and Catamarca in Argentina, <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Northern Mexico, and <span class="hlt">cities</span> in dry areas of Africa. For some <span class="hlt">cities</span>, the problem is not so much ever more distant water supplies but insufficient funds to expand supplies. Bangkok and Jakarta both face saltwater intrusion into their overdrawn aquifers. Even through agriculture is the dominant user of water in most countries, demand concentrated in a small area exhausts local and regional sources and pollutes rivers, lakes, and coasts with untreated human and industrial waste. Most <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Africa and Asia do not have a sewerage system. Further, most <span class="hlt">cities</span> do not have the drains to deal with storm water and external floodwater, causing frequent, seasonal flooding. The resulting stagnant water provides breeding grounds for insect vectors of diseases (e.g., malaria). The problems in most <span class="hlt">cities</span> are a result of poor management, not lack of water. Reducing leaks in existing piped distribution systems from the usual 60% loss of water to leaks to 12% would increase the available water 2-fold. Another way to address water shortages would be commercial, industrial, and recreational use of minimally treated waste water, such as is the case in Madras and Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>. Political solutions are needed to resolve inadequate water supply and waste management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPRS...71...12G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPRS...71...12G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span>GML - Interoperable semantic 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gröger, Gerhard; Plümer, Lutz</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">City</span>GML is the international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for the representation and exchange of 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models. It defines the three-dimensional geometry, topology, semantics and appearance of the most relevant topographic objects in urban or regional contexts. These definitions are provided in different, well-defined Levels-of-Detail (multiresolution model). The focus of <span class="hlt">City</span>GML is on the semantical aspects of 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models, its structures, taxonomies and aggregations, allowing users to employ virtual 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models for advanced analysis and visualization tasks in a variety of application domains such as urban planning, indoor/outdoor pedestrian navigation, environmental simulations, cultural heritage, or facility management. This is in contrast to purely geometrical/graphical models such as KML, VRML, or X3D, which do not provide sufficient semantics. <span class="hlt">City</span>GML is based on the Geography Markup Language (GML), which provides a standardized geometry model. Due to this model and its well-defined semantics and structures, <span class="hlt">City</span>GML facilitates interoperable data exchange in the context of geo web services and spatial data infrastructures. Since its standardization in 2008, <span class="hlt">City</span>GML has become used on a worldwide scale: tools from notable companies in the geospatial field provide <span class="hlt">City</span>GML interfaces. Many applications and projects use this standard. <span class="hlt">City</span>GML is also having a strong impact on science: numerous approaches use <span class="hlt">City</span>GML, particularly its semantics, for disaster management, emergency responses, or energy-related applications as well as for visualizations, or they contribute to <span class="hlt">City</span>GML, improving its consistency and validity, or use <span class="hlt">City</span>GML, particularly its different Levels-of-Detail, as a source or target for generalizations. This paper gives an overview of <span class="hlt">City</span>GML, its underlying concepts, its Levels-of-Detail, how to extend it, its applications, its likely future development, and the role it plays in scientific research. Furthermore, its</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4277074','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4277074"><span id="translatedtitle">Constructing <span class="hlt">cities</span>, deconstructing scaling laws</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arcaute, Elsa; Hatna, Erez; Ferguson, Peter; Youn, Hyejin; Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cities</span> can be characterized and modelled through different urban measures. Consistency within these observables is crucial in order to advance towards a science of <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Bettencourt et al. have proposed that many of these urban measures can be predicted through universal scaling laws. We develop a framework to consistently define <span class="hlt">cities</span>, using commuting to work and population density thresholds, and construct thousands of realizations of systems of <span class="hlt">cities</span> with different boundaries for England and Wales. These serve as a laboratory for the scaling analysis of a large set of urban indicators. The analysis shows that population size alone does not provide us enough information to describe or predict the state of a <span class="hlt">city</span> as previously proposed, indicating that the expected scaling laws are not corroborated. We found that most urban indicators scale linearly with <span class="hlt">city</span> size, regardless of the definition of the urban boundaries. However, when nonlinear correlations are present, the exponent fluctuates considerably. PMID:25411405</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4115448','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4115448"><span id="translatedtitle">The dynamics of <span class="hlt">city</span> formation*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines <span class="hlt">city</span> formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new <span class="hlt">cities</span> required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets <span class="hlt">cities</span> form sequentially, without the population swings in existing <span class="hlt">cities</span> that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium <span class="hlt">city</span> size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of <span class="hlt">cities</span> with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS047-94-010&hterms=paris+france&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dparis%252C%2Bfrance','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS047-94-010&hterms=paris+france&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dparis%252C%2Bfrance"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> of Paris, France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This highly detailed view of the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Paris 49.0N, 0.0E) shows a varied land use pattern in great detail. Several airports are clearly seen such as the two major international airports of Orly and Le Bourget. Paris was founded in pre-Roman times on an island in the Seine River and continued as a Roman outpost. The easily defensible location was one of the keys to growth. Other factors include easy access by river and the productive hinterland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/201456','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/201456"><span id="translatedtitle">Digging the <span class="hlt">city</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Paulson, S.L.</p> <p>1996-02-01</p> <p>For <span class="hlt">city</span> dwellers and commuters, major construction and repair projects by underground utilities have traditionally meant torn-up streets, detours, snarled traffic, flaring tempers and other urban headaches. For store and business owners, utility projects also have frequently been harmful to the bottom line. Customer parking often is curtailed and deliveries are missed because of street excavations, and business hours may even have to be cut because of interruptions in utility service. But natural gas utilities in major <span class="hlt">cities</span> across the country are working hard to change that reality. Their effort has two major focuses: community-relations programs that anticipate problems and ease tensions between the utility and local residents and business owners, and new technologies that drastically limit the amount of excavation that needs to be done in repairing or replacing gas distribution lines. The paper describes a case study in the community-relations side of the equation which involved a recent project by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) in the congested streets of San Francisco`s famed Chinatown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=co-leadership&pg=5&id=ED065915','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=co-leadership&pg=5&id=ED065915"><span id="translatedtitle">Big <span class="hlt">City</span> Education: Its Challenge to Governance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Haskew, Laurence D.</p> <p></p> <p>This chapter traces the migration from farms to <span class="hlt">cities</span> and the later movement from <span class="hlt">cities</span> to suburbs and discusses the impact of the resulting big <span class="hlt">city</span> environment on the governance of big <span class="hlt">city</span> education. The author (1) suggests how local, State, and Federal governments can improve big <span class="hlt">city</span> education; (2) discusses ways of planning for the future…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED458325.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED458325.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Kid-Friendly <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Report Card, 2001.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Polansky, Lee S., Ed.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This report examines the health and wellbeing of children in the United States' largest <span class="hlt">cities</span>, covering every <span class="hlt">city</span> with a population of 100,000 or more, as well as the largest <span class="hlt">cities</span> in states without any <span class="hlt">cities</span> of this size. Research shows that many <span class="hlt">cities</span> are becoming more child-friendly, with better access to good education, jobs, and health…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EPJST.214..481B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EPJST.214..481B"><span id="translatedtitle">Smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> of the future</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Batty, M.; Axhausen, K. W.; Giannotti, F.; Pozdnoukhov, A.; Bazzani, A.; Wachowicz, M.; Ouzounis, G.; Portugali, Y.</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Here we sketch the rudiments of what constitutes a smart <span class="hlt">city</span> which we define as a <span class="hlt">city</span> in which ICT is merged with traditional infrastructures, coordinated and integrated using new digital technologies. We first sketch our vision defining seven goals which concern: developing a new understanding of urban problems; effective and feasible ways to coordinate urban technologies; models and methods for using urban data across spatial and temporal scales; developing new technologies for communication and dissemination; developing new forms of urban governance and organisation; defining critical problems relating to <span class="hlt">cities</span>, transport, and energy; and identifying risk, uncertainty, and hazards in the smart <span class="hlt">city</span>. To this, we add six research challenges: to relate the infrastructure of smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> to their operational functioning and planning through management, control and optimisation; to explore the notion of the <span class="hlt">city</span> as a laboratory for innovation; to provide portfolios of urban simulation which inform future designs; to develop technologies that ensure equity, fairness and realise a better quality of <span class="hlt">city</span> life; to develop technologies that ensure informed participation and create shared knowledge for democratic <span class="hlt">city</span> governance; and to ensure greater and more effective mobility and access to opportunities for urban populations. We begin by defining the state of the art, explaining the science of smart <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We define six scenarios based on new <span class="hlt">cities</span> badging themselves as smart, older <span class="hlt">cities</span> regenerating themselves as smart, the development of science parks, tech <span class="hlt">cities</span>, and technopoles focused on high technologies, the development of urban services using contemporary ICT, the use of ICT to develop new urban intelligence functions, and the development of online and mobile forms of participation. Seven project areas are then proposed: Integrated Databases for the Smart <span class="hlt">City</span>, Sensing, Networking and the Impact of New Social Media, Modelling Network Performance</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03464&hterms=salt+properties&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsalt%2Bproperties','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03464&hterms=salt+properties&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsalt%2Bproperties"><span id="translatedtitle">Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Utah</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> at several venues within the <span class="hlt">city</span>, in nearby <span class="hlt">cities</span>, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.<p/>This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.<p/>ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.<p/>The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED127063.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED127063.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Social Planning for Small <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Meyers, James</p> <p></p> <p>Derived mainly from publications by the League of California <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, this guide to social planning for small <span class="hlt">cities</span> presents the following: (1) social planning definitions; (2) a checklist of social planning concerns (provision for: adequate income and economic opportunity; optimal environmental conditions for basic material needs; optimal health…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED294293.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED294293.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">New York <span class="hlt">City</span>: Musically Speaking.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aiex, Nola Kortner</p> <p></p> <p>New York <span class="hlt">City</span> as a subject has fascinated generations of artists, writers, and musicians. However, the glamorous image of the <span class="hlt">city</span> has changed over the years, and in the 1960s, popular music, in particular, began to reflect a utopia/dystopia dichotomy in relation to New York. During the past twenty years, six popular singer-songwriters who have…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096313.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096313.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Chicago, Illinois: The Windy <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McIntosh, Phyllis</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Once famous mainly for stockyards and steel mills, Chicago now boasts more top-rated five-star restaurants than any other <span class="hlt">city</span> in the United States and has been voted by various publications as one of the "Top 10 U.S. Destinations," one of the "Best Walking <span class="hlt">Cities</span>" in the United States, and one of the "Ten Best Places to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IREdu..59..425M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IREdu..59..425M"><span id="translatedtitle">Educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Latin America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Messina, Graciela; Valdés-Cotera, Raúl</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>This article considers the development of educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> from a political perspective, illustrating in detail the diversity of organisations and individuals involved and the challenges they are facing. Bearing in mind that educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> were established from the 1990s onwards in Europe and spread to other continents from there, the purpose of this article is to demonstrate how this proposal was adopted in Latin America. After discussing the basic aims of educating <span class="hlt">cities</span>, the paper focuses on the Latin American experience, giving examples of existing projects within the educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> initiative. The authors are particularly interested in the contrast between the political intentions of educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> on the one hand and the social, economic, political and cultural world on the other hand. They observe that in this context there is a danger of the individual being forgotten, which contradicts the actual intention of the educating <span class="hlt">city</span> concept. They also discuss the problem of who should carry out the realisation of educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> and how the various stakeholders might coordinate their actions. Contemplating new directions at the end of their paper, the authors sum up a number of guidelines and offer recommendations for action in developing educating <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Exodus&pg=6&id=EJ562112','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Exodus&pg=6&id=EJ562112"><span id="translatedtitle">Broken <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: Liberalism's Urban Legacy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hayward, Steven</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Argues how the nation's inner-<span class="hlt">city</span> population exodus and economic decay is a result of modern liberal social policy. Three failures of liberalism regarding inner <span class="hlt">cities</span> are examined: the failure to nurture the sources of economic growth; the failure to understand urban neighborhoods; and the failure to appreciate the importance of a strong moral…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Commerce+AND+risks&pg=3&id=ED187604','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Commerce+AND+risks&pg=3&id=ED187604"><span id="translatedtitle">The Future of American <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mulhern, John J., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains the proceedings of a conference dealing with the issues that face U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span> today. Convened in October of 1979, the conference was sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. The document contains addresses and comments by six authorities on the current fiscal situation of large <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The presentation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=article+AND+solar+AND+energy&pg=4&id=EJ734877','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=article+AND+solar+AND+energy&pg=4&id=EJ734877"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge Infrastructures for Solar <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vanderburg, Willem H.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The evolution of contemporary <span class="hlt">cities</span> into solar <span class="hlt">cities</span> will be affected by the decisions of countless specialists according to an established intellectual and professional division of labor. These specialists belong to groups responsible for advancing and applying a body of knowledge, and jointly, these bodies of knowledge make up a knowledge…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22latin+america%22&pg=6&id=EJ1038638','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22latin+america%22&pg=6&id=EJ1038638"><span id="translatedtitle">Educating <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in Latin America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Messina, Graciela; Valdés-Cotera, Raúl</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This article considers the development of educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> from a political perspective, illustrating in detail the diversity of organisations and individuals involved and the challenges they are facing. Bearing in mind that educating <span class="hlt">cities</span> were established from the 1990s onwards in Europe and spread to other continents from there, the purpose of…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plant+AND+newspaper+AND+article&pg=2&id=ED238754','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plant+AND+newspaper+AND+article&pg=2&id=ED238754"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Planning Unit: Grade 6.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dalton, William Edward</p> <p></p> <p>Described is a project designed to make government lessons and economics more appealing to sixth-grade students by having them set up and run a model <span class="hlt">city</span>. General preparation procedures and set-up of the project, specific lesson plans, additional activities, and project evaluation are examined. An actual 3-dimensional model <span class="hlt">city</span> was set up on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.685a2005C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.685a2005C"><span id="translatedtitle">Archaeoastronomy and Calendar <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Campion, Nicholas</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The use of astronomy for collective purposes, both religious and political, is apparent in the earliest astronomical records, from the evidence for Palaeolithic lunar calendars to megalithic monuments and Mesopotamian celestial-omen reports. This paper will consider the application of the heavens to the organisation of the ‘Cosmic State’, the human polity modelled on the assumption of a close relationship between society on the one hand and planetary and stellar patterns on the other. I will also examine the foundation of Baghdad within the tradition of celestial town planning and argue that the <span class="hlt">city</span> may be seen as a ‘talisman’, designed to connect heaven to Earth and ensure peace, stability and political success by harmonising time and space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1308727','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1308727"><span id="translatedtitle">Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: a guide to the literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kenzer, M</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The author reviews the literature on attempts by <span class="hlt">city</span> governments, international agencies, and nongovernmental and community organizations to improve <span class="hlt">city</span> life around the world through Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> projects. PMID:10968770</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol5-sec372-221.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol5-sec372-221.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 372.221 - Twin <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>....-Tenn. (3) Davenport, Iowa, and Rock Island and Moline, Ill. (4) Delmar, Del-Md. (5) Harrison, Ohio-West Harrison, Ind. (6) Junction <span class="hlt">City</span>, Ark.-La. (7) Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span>, Mo.-Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span>, Kans. (8) Minneapolis-St....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12343008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12343008"><span id="translatedtitle">The big, bad <span class="hlt">city</span>: mega-<span class="hlt">city</span> myth?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Richardson, H W</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>This paper raises the question of whether or not the virtues of big <span class="hlt">city</span> size were exaggerated in the literature which appeared in the 1970s with respect to developing country megacities. It examines negative externalities (especially pollution), the capital costs associated with megacity growth, the productivity advantages of large <span class="hlt">cities</span>, the role of spatial restructuring towards a policentric pattern as a relief to core <span class="hlt">city</span> congestion, and the problems of metropolitan management (including the appropriate institutional framework). The adoption of constructive policy actions could handle the following problems: that the declining rates of megacity growth may reflect declining productivity advantages; that capital costs of urbanization increase strongly with <span class="hlt">city</span> size; that there are diseconomies of scale in urban management; that negative externalities may be more severe in developing country megacities in physical but not in imputed monetary damage terms; and that policentric evolution may be hampered by the wrong type of government intervention. PMID:12343008</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EPJB...50..221S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EPJB...50..221S"><span id="translatedtitle">The backbone of a <span class="hlt">city</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scellato, S.; Cardillo, A.; Latora, V.; Porta, S.</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>Recent studies have revealed the importance of centrality measures to analyze various spatial factors affecting human life in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Here we show how it is possible to extract the backbone of a <span class="hlt">city</span> by deriving spanning trees based on edge betweenness and edge information. By using as sample cases the <span class="hlt">cities</span> of Bologna and San Francisco, we show how the obtained trees are radically different from those based on edge lengths, and allow an extended comprehension of the “skeleton” of most important routes that so much affects pedestrian/vehicular flows, retail commerce vitality, land-use separation, urban crime and collective dynamical behaviours.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199416"><span id="translatedtitle">The ecological future of <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McDonnell, Mark J; MacGregor-Fors, Ian</p> <p>2016-05-20</p> <p>The discipline of urban ecology arose in the 1990s, primarily motivated by a widespread interest in documenting the distribution and abundance of animals and plants in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Today, urban ecologists have greatly expanded their scope of study to include ecological and socioeconomic processes, urban management, planning, and design, with the goal of addressing issues of sustainability, environmental quality, and human well-being within <span class="hlt">cities</span> and towns. As the global pace of urbanization continues to intensify, urban ecology provides the ecological and social data, as well as the principles, concepts and tools, to create livable <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199416"><span id="translatedtitle">The ecological future of <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McDonnell, Mark J; MacGregor-Fors, Ian</p> <p>2016-05-20</p> <p>The discipline of urban ecology arose in the 1990s, primarily motivated by a widespread interest in documenting the distribution and abundance of animals and plants in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Today, urban ecologists have greatly expanded their scope of study to include ecological and socioeconomic processes, urban management, planning, and design, with the goal of addressing issues of sustainability, environmental quality, and human well-being within <span class="hlt">cities</span> and towns. As the global pace of urbanization continues to intensify, urban ecology provides the ecological and social data, as well as the principles, concepts and tools, to create livable <span class="hlt">cities</span>. PMID:27199416</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatGe...9..264P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatGe...9..264P"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Cities</span> lead on climate change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pancost, Richard D.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The need to mitigate climate change opens up a key role for <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Bristol's year as a Green Capital led to great strides forward, but it also revealed that a creative and determined partnership across cultural divides will be necessary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tax+AND+law&pg=5&id=EJ270415','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tax+AND+law&pg=5&id=EJ270415"><span id="translatedtitle">New Federalism, Taxes, and <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaplan, Marshall</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Discusses how recent changes in federal policies have adversely affected <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Modifications of the state block grant system, tax laws, reductions in federal support for welfare programs, and a massive federal debt have all hurt urban economies. (AM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book..769A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book..769A"><span id="translatedtitle">Layout of Ancient Maya <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aylesworth, Grant R.</p> <p></p> <p>Although there is little doubt that the ancient Maya of Mesoamerica laid their <span class="hlt">cities</span> out based, in part, on astronomical considerations, the proliferation of "cosmograms" in contemporary scholarly discourse has complicated matters for the acceptance of rigorous archaeoastronomical research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Deer&id=EJ862787','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Deer&id=EJ862787"><span id="translatedtitle">Deer Tracks in the <span class="hlt">City</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Quigley, Cassie Fay; Beeman-Cadwallader, Nicole; Riggs, Morgan; Rodriguez, Antonia; Buck, Gayle</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>"Why would a deer print be in the <span class="hlt">city</span>?" wondered a student. She had noticed the track near a grocery store that morning with her mother. She was familiar with deer and had noticed their prints on a trip to a local museum; however, she had never seen a deer in the <span class="hlt">city</span> before this experience. As she retold the story to her classmates, her question…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3257243','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3257243"><span id="translatedtitle">Network Structure and <span class="hlt">City</span> Size</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Levinson, David</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Network structure varies across <span class="hlt">cities</span>. This variation may yield important knowledge about how the internal structure of the <span class="hlt">city</span> affects its performance. This paper systematically compares a set of surface transportation network structure variables (connectivity, hierarchy, circuity, treeness, entropy, accessibility) across the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. A set of scaling parameters are discovered to show how network size and structure vary with <span class="hlt">city</span> size. These results suggest that larger <span class="hlt">cities</span> are physically more inter-connected. Hypotheses are presented as to why this might obtain. This paper then consistently measures and ranks access to jobs across 50 US metropolitan areas. It uses that accessibility measure, along with network structure variables and <span class="hlt">city</span> size to help explain journey-to-work time and auto mode share in those <span class="hlt">cities</span>. A 1 percent increase in accessibility reduces average metropolitan commute times by about 90 seconds each way. A 1 percent increase in network connectivity reduces commute time by 0.1 percent. A 1 percent increase in accessibility results in a 0.0575 percent drop in auto mode share, while a 1 percent increase in treeness reduces auto mode share by 0.061 percent. Use of accessibility and network structure measures is important for planning and evaluating the performance of network investments and land use changes. PMID:22253764</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Urban+AND+Sprawl&pg=3&id=EJ270417','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Urban+AND+Sprawl&pg=3&id=EJ270417"><span id="translatedtitle">Achieving Energy Independence by Reviving America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Goldstein, Neil; Winterer, Amey</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Discusses how it is in our nation's energy interest that <span class="hlt">cities</span> and <span class="hlt">city</span> living prosper and that movement of people out of <span class="hlt">cities</span> and into nonurban areas be reversed. However, national energy policy itself favors suburban sprawl-type development and works against <span class="hlt">city</span> revival. (AM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=city+AND+planning&pg=5&id=EJ892346','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=city+AND+planning&pg=5&id=EJ892346"><span id="translatedtitle">Sustainable Development of the Learning <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Juceviciene, Palmira</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Kaunas is the second largest <span class="hlt">city</span> in Lithuania and has strong links with its large rural hinterland. Working from the ideas and examples in "Learning <span class="hlt">Cities</span> for a Learning Century," (Longworth, 1999) and through contact with other <span class="hlt">cities</span> that have already implemented lifelong learning concepts, the <span class="hlt">city</span> has, since 2001, started out on the journey…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4386478','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4386478"><span id="translatedtitle">The Copper Balance of <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kral, Ulrich; Lin, Chih-Yi; Kellner, Katharina; Ma, Hwong-wen; Brunner, Paul H</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Material management faces a dual challenge: on the one hand satisfying large and increasing demands for goods and on the other hand accommodating wastes and emissions in sinks. Hence, the characterization of material flows and stocks is relevant for both improving resource efficiency and environmental protection. This article focuses on the urban scale, a dimension rarely investigated in past metal flow studies. We compare the copper (Cu) metabolism of two <span class="hlt">cities</span> in different economic states, namely, Vienna (Europe) and Taipei (Asia). Substance flow analysis is used to calculate urban Cu balances in a comprehensive and transparent form. The main difference between Cu in the two <span class="hlt">cities</span> appears to be the stock: Vienna seems close to saturation with 180 kilograms per capita (kg/cap) and a growth rate of 2% per year. In contrast, the Taipei stock of 30 kg/cap grows rapidly by 26% per year. Even though most Cu is recycled in both <span class="hlt">cities</span>, bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration represents an unused Cu potential accounting for 1% to 5% of annual demand. Nonpoint emissions are predominant; up to 50% of the loadings into the sewer system are from nonpoint sources. The results of this research are instrumental for the design of the Cu metabolism in each <span class="hlt">city</span>. The outcomes serve as a base for identification and recovery of recyclables as well as for directing nonrecyclables to appropriate sinks, avoiding sensitive environmental pathways. The methodology applied is well suited for <span class="hlt">city</span> benchmarking if sufficient data are available. PMID:25866460</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22042539','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22042539"><span id="translatedtitle">Prioritizing obesity in the <span class="hlt">city</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dean, Jennifer Asanin; Elliott, Susan J</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>A decade ago, the World Health Organization declared obesity to be a global epidemic. Accordingly, there is a growing body of research examining how "obesogenic environments" contribute to the increasing prevalence of obesity. Using the ANGELO Framework, this research explores the role of municipal policies and practices in constructing obesogenic environments in two Southern Ontario <span class="hlt">cities</span> in order to examine how socio-cultural and political environments shape excess body weight. Data was collected from municipal policy documents, public health websites, and key informants in Hamilton and Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Results indicate that while the <span class="hlt">cities</span> took different approaches to dealing with obesity, they both reflected the <span class="hlt">cities</span>' overall prioritizing of health. Additionally, the findings reveal the pervasiveness of values and attitudes held in the socio-cultural environment in further shaping (and being shaped by) political as well as economic and physical environments in the <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The importance of explicitly acknowledging the official discourse of the <span class="hlt">city</span>, which this study demonstrates to be a significant factor in constructing obesogenic environments, is highlighted. Theoretical contributions and policy implications are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812813V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812813V"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> scale pollen concentration variability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van der Molen, Michiel; van Vliet, Arnold; Krol, Maarten</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Pollen are emitted in the atmosphere both in the country-side and in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Yet the majority of the population is exposed to pollen in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Allergic reactions may be induced by short-term exposure to pollen. This raises the question how variable pollen concentration in <span class="hlt">cities</span> are in temporally and spatially, and how much of the pollen in <span class="hlt">cities</span> are actually produced in the urban region itself. We built a high resolution (1 × 1 km) pollen dispersion model based on WRF-Chem to study a <span class="hlt">city</span>'s pollen budget and the spatial and temporal variability in concentration. It shows that the concentrations are highly variable, as a result of source distribution, wind direction and boundary layer mixing, as well as the release rate as a function of temperature, turbulence intensity and humidity. Hay Fever Forecasts based on such high resolution emission and physical dispersion modelling surpass traditional hay fever warning methods based on temperature sum methods. The model gives new insights in concentration variability, personal and community level exposure and prevention. The model will be developped into a new forecast tool to serve allergic people to minimize their exposure and reduce nuisance, coast of medication and sick leave. This is an innovative approach in hay fever warning systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1223496','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1223496"><span id="translatedtitle">Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> Hydro Generation Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ammons, Tom B.</p> <p>2015-10-31</p> <p>Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> owns and operates its own municipal power system which currently includes several hydroelectric facilities. This project was to update the efficiency and capacity of current hydro production due to increased water flow demands that could pass through existing generation facilities. During 2006-2012, this project completed efficiency evaluation as it related to its main objective by completing a feasibility study, undergoing necessary <span class="hlt">City</span> Council approvals and required federal environmental reviews. As a result of Phase 1 of the project, a feasibility study was conducted to determine feasibility of hydro and solar portions of the original proposal. The results indicated that the existing Hydro plant which was constructed in the 1960’s was running at approximately 77% efficiency or less. Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> proposes that the efficiency calculations be refined to determine the economic feasibility of improving or replacing the existing equipment with new high efficiency equipment design specifically for the site. Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> completed the Feasibility Assessment of this project, and determined that the Upper Hydro that supplies the main culinary water to the <span class="hlt">city</span> was feasible to continue with. Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> Council provided their approval of feasibility assessment’s results. The Upper Hydro Project include removal of the existing powerhouse equipment and controls and demolition of a section of concrete encased penstock, replacement of penstock just upstream of the turbine inlet, turbine bypass, turbine shut-off and bypass valves, turbine and generator package, control equipment, assembly, start-up, commissioning, Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), and the replacement of a section of conductors to the step-up transformer. Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> increased the existing 575 KW turbine and generator with an 825 KW turbine and generator. Following the results of the feasibility assessment Brigham <span class="hlt">City</span> pursued required environmental reviews with the DOE and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25937591','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25937591"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> planning as preventive medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Corburn, Jason</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The health and well-being of rapidly growing urban populations is a global health issue. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the global north and south are faced with rising health inequities - or avoidable differences in health determinants and outcomes based on place, social status and ethnicity. This commentary suggests that focusing only on treatment interventions in <span class="hlt">cities</span> is likely to fail because populations will be forced to go back into the urban living and working conditions that likely made them sick in the first place. <span class="hlt">City</span> planning as preventive medicine includes taking a relational and systems approach to urban health, requiring health assessments for all urban policy making, promoting neighborhood health centers as engines of community economic development and gathering place-based health indicator data to track progress and adapt interventions over time as conditions change.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100039481','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100039481"><span id="translatedtitle">Star <span class="hlt">City</span>, Russia Medical Operations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chandler, Michael R.; Senter, Cedric H.; Roden, Sean K.; Gilmore, Stevan; Powers, William E.; Alexander, David J.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Since the beginning of the NASA/Mir missions, NASA has had astronauts in training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), also known as Star <span class="hlt">City</span>, with crewmembers currently there to train for the International Space Station missions. Agreements have been reached with all International Partners that allow the crewmember's parent agency to provide a flight surgeon to oversee crewmember health and safety during training away from home. NASA Medical Operations through the Bioastronautics Contract employs flight surgeons to provide medical support for U.S. crewmembers and their support staff. This poster presentation reviews the aspects of NASA medical operations at Star <span class="hlt">City</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=jane+AND+addams&pg=3&id=EJ480818','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=jane+AND+addams&pg=3&id=EJ480818"><span id="translatedtitle">Youth and the <span class="hlt">City</span> Streets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Husby, Lynn; Brendtro, Larry</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This "Voices of Pioneers" section of the journal highlights the work of Jane Addams, who founded the settlement house movement in America with the establishment of Hull House in Chicago in 1899. Presents excerpts from Addams' book "The Spirit of Youth and the <span class="hlt">City</span> Streets (1909)" to illustrate her views on guns, stealing, rebellion, and drugs. (NB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Charles+AND+bukowski&id=EJ196448','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Charles+AND+bukowski&id=EJ196448"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Lights in Modern Times.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Toole, Patricia</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">City</span> Lights Books of San Francisco has served as a literary meeting place, as a bookstore that concentrates on serious literature--especially poetry, as a publisher of significant voices such as those of Allen Ginsberg and Charles Bukowski, and as an institution with a political conscience. (JMD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069314"><span id="translatedtitle">Policymaking in European healthy <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Leeuw, Evelyne; Green, Geoff; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>This paper assesses policy development in, with and for Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the European Region of the World Health Organization. Materials for the assessment were sourced through case studies, a questionnaire and statistical databases. They were compiled in a realist synthesis methodology, applying theory-based evaluation principles. Non-response analyses were applied to ascertain the degree of representatives of the high response rates for the entire network of Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in Europe. Further measures of reliability and validity were applied, and it was found that our material was indicative of the entire network. European Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> are successful in developing local health policy across many sectors within and outside government. They were also successful in addressing 'wicked' problems around equity, governance and participation in themes such as Healthy Urban Planning. It appears that strong local leadership for policy change is driven by international collaboration and the stewardship of the World Health Organization. The processes enacted by WHO, structuring membership of the Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> Network (designation) and the guidance on particular themes, are identified as being important for the success of local policy development. PMID:26069314</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2086R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2086R"><span id="translatedtitle">Heritage contribution in sustainable <span class="hlt">city</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rostami, R.; Khoshnava, S. M.; Lamit, H.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The concept of sustainability has been an integral part of development work since the late 1970s. Sustainability is no longer a buzzword but a reality that must be addressed by <span class="hlt">cities</span> all over the world. Increasing empirical evidence indicates that <span class="hlt">city</span> sustainability is not just related to technical issues, such as carbon emissions, energy consumption and waste management, or on the economic aspects of urban regeneration and growth, but also it covers social well-being of different groups living within increasingly cosmopolitan towns and <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Heritage is seen as a major component of quality of life, features that give a <span class="hlt">city</span> its unique character and provide the sense of belonging that lies at the core of cultural identity. In other words, heritage by providing important social and psychological benefits enrich human life with meanings and emotions, and raise quality of life as a key component of sustainability. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to examine the role that built cultural heritage can play within sustainable urban development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water+AND+bugs&id=ED434019','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water+AND+bugs&id=ED434019"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Aquatic Insects [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096319.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096319.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Miami, Florida: The Magic <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McIntosh, Phyllis</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>With its subtropical climate and intimate ties to Latin America, Miami is like no other <span class="hlt">city</span> in the United States. More than 65 percent of its population is Hispanic, and Spanish is the most commonly heard language. Situated at the southern tip of the 500-mile-long Florida peninsula, Miami is the largest urban area in the southeastern United…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26069314"><span id="translatedtitle">Policymaking in European healthy <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Leeuw, Evelyne; Green, Geoff; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>This paper assesses policy development in, with and for Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the European Region of the World Health Organization. Materials for the assessment were sourced through case studies, a questionnaire and statistical databases. They were compiled in a realist synthesis methodology, applying theory-based evaluation principles. Non-response analyses were applied to ascertain the degree of representatives of the high response rates for the entire network of Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in Europe. Further measures of reliability and validity were applied, and it was found that our material was indicative of the entire network. European Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> are successful in developing local health policy across many sectors within and outside government. They were also successful in addressing 'wicked' problems around equity, governance and participation in themes such as Healthy Urban Planning. It appears that strong local leadership for policy change is driven by international collaboration and the stewardship of the World Health Organization. The processes enacted by WHO, structuring membership of the Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> Network (designation) and the guidance on particular themes, are identified as being important for the success of local policy development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=competition+AND+reading+AND+primary&pg=3&id=ED284234','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=competition+AND+reading+AND+primary&pg=3&id=ED284234"><span id="translatedtitle">The Literature of <span class="hlt">City</span> Magazines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wiley, Rob</p> <p></p> <p>The research literature on <span class="hlt">city</span> magazines can be divided into five primary sources: books on magazines, popular magazines/journals and newspapers, business magazines, scholarly journals, and unpublished theses. "The New Yorker," founded in 1925 specifically for a sophisticated, metropolitan audience, is considered a precursor of the current glossy…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Alvin+AND+toffler&pg=4&id=ED028615','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Alvin+AND+toffler&pg=4&id=ED028615"><span id="translatedtitle">The Schoolhouse in the <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Toffler, Alvin, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>A conference entitled "The Schoolhouse in the <span class="hlt">City</span>" was convened at Stanford University, July 10-14, 1967. Sponsored by Stanford's School Planning Laboratory and supported by Educational Facilities Laboratories and the U. S. Office of Education, the conference brought together as speakers leading figures in local, state, and federal government,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=firefly&id=ED434026','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=firefly&id=ED434026"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Ladybugs & Fireflies [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon, including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eroding&pg=4&id=EJ782699','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eroding&pg=4&id=EJ782699"><span id="translatedtitle">Building Inclusive <span class="hlt">Cities</span> and Communities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Freiler, Christa</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Canada prides itself on being an inclusive country. Immigrants from all over the world arrive in Canada's <span class="hlt">cities</span> with their families because they feel welcome and safe. According to research, engagement towards social inclusion increased among Canadians during the last 30 last years. These changing values resulted in the creation of official…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940021197','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940021197"><span id="translatedtitle">Project WISH: The Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Oz, Hayrani; Dunne, Jim; Butchar, Stan; George, Tommy; Hellstrom, Rob; Kringen, Tricia; Owens, George; Perrea, Mike; Semeraro, Paul; Thorndike, Phil</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Phase 3 of Project WISH saw the evolution of the Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span> (E-<span class="hlt">City</span>) from a collection of specialized independent analyses and ideas to a working structural design integrated with major support systems and analyses. Emphasis was placed on comparing and contrasting the closed and open cycle gas core nuclear rocket engines to further determine the optimum propulsive system for the E-<span class="hlt">City</span>. Power and thermal control requirements were then defined and the question of how to meet these requirements was addressed. Software was developed to automate the mission/system/configuration analysis so changes dictated by various subsystem constraints could be managed efficiently and analyzed interactively. In addition, the liquid hydrogen propellant tank was statically designed for minimum mass and shape optimization using a finite element modeling package called SDRC I-DEAS. Spoke and shaft cross-sectional areas were optimized on ASTROS (Automated Structural Optimization System) for mass minimization. A structural dynamic analysis of the optimal structure also conducted using ASTROS enabled a study of the modes, frequencies, displacements, and accelerations of the E-<span class="hlt">City</span>. Finally, the attitude control system design began with an initial mass moment of inertia analysis and was then designed and optimized using linear quadratic regulator control theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plot&pg=7&id=EJ969948','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plot&pg=7&id=EJ969948"><span id="translatedtitle">Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span> Plots Next Steps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Finkel, Ed</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span> (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fruit+AND+fly+AND+fruit+AND+fly&id=ED434024','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fruit+AND+fly+AND+fruit+AND+fly&id=ED434024"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Flies & Mosquitoes [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon, including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1039461','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1039461"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>This fact sheet provides contact information for program staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> program, as well as contact information for the nearly 100 local Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalitions across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220044','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220044"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now Vol. 17, No. 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-24</p> <p>Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition successes across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219653','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219653"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now Vol. 16.1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition successes across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014PhRvE..90c2810K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014PhRvE..90c2810K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Empirical synchronized flow in oversaturated <span class="hlt">city</span> traffic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kerner, Boris S.; Hemmerle, Peter; Koller, Micha; Hermanns, Gerhard; Klenov, Sergey L.; Rehborn, Hubert; Schreckenberg, Michael</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Based on a study of anonymized GPS probe vehicle traces measured by personal navigation devices in vehicles randomly distributed in <span class="hlt">city</span> traffic, empirical synchronized flow in oversaturated <span class="hlt">city</span> traffic has been revealed. It turns out that real oversaturated <span class="hlt">city</span> traffic resulting from speed breakdown in a <span class="hlt">city</span> in most cases can be considered random spatiotemporal alternations between sequences of moving queues and synchronized flow patterns in which the moving queues do not occur.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-16/pdf/2012-9061.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-16/pdf/2012-9061.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 22523 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show; Atlantic Ocean, Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-16</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2012 Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show; Atlantic Ocean... proposes establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD. This..., 2012, the Town of Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> will host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD....</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 100.919 - International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. 100.919 Section 100.919 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established to include...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 100.919 - International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. 100.919 Section 100.919 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established to include...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec100-919.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 100.919 - International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false International Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. 100.919 Section 100.919 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Bay <span class="hlt">City</span> River Roar, Bay <span class="hlt">City</span>, MI. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established to include...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=America%27s+AND+next+AND+president&pg=5&id=ED301615','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=America%27s+AND+next+AND+president&pg=5&id=ED301615"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Children in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: A 52-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>United States Conference of Mayors, Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>A survey of officials in 52 <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the United States gathered information on the conditions and issues relating to urban children, on how <span class="hlt">city</span> governments are structured to respond to those needs, and on <span class="hlt">city</span> programs and initiatives which benefit children. Information provided by the <span class="hlt">cities</span> was supplemented by data from the Bureau of the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-05/pdf/2011-8028.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-05/pdf/2011-8028.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 18753 - <span class="hlt">City</span> of Springfield, Illinois, <span class="hlt">City</span> Water, Light and Power; Notice of Filing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-05</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission <span class="hlt">City</span> of Springfield, Illinois, <span class="hlt">City</span> Water, Light and Power; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 24, 2011, The <span class="hlt">City</span> of Springfield, Illinois, <span class="hlt">City</span> Water, Light and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780013071','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780013071"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">city</span> and its need for technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Berkowitz, B. L.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>An experimental program has been undertaken to explore the process of identifying and transferring newer technology for the benefit of the <span class="hlt">city</span>. This paper describes the nature of the problems involved in the experiment, some of the areas of supposed commonality with other <span class="hlt">cities</span> and some of the prerequisites for any <span class="hlt">city</span> to become involved with technological innovation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED384539.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED384539.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Politics of <span class="hlt">City</span> Planning Simulations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kolson, Kenneth</p> <p></p> <p>This research paper presents an analysis of the computer simulation, Sim<span class="hlt">City</span>, used for an urban <span class="hlt">city</span> planning class. The data were gathered by actual use of the simulation and an electronic mail network was employed to secure impressions from users of the simulation. Sim<span class="hlt">City</span> (developed by Maxis) provides the player with rules of human factors,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED417253.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED417253.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Project RICE (Responsive Inner <span class="hlt">City</span> Education).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mattai, P. Rudy</p> <p></p> <p>Project RICE (Responsive Inner <span class="hlt">City</span> Education) prepared a cadre of 36 teachers drawn from majority and minority populations in 3 inner-<span class="hlt">city</span> schools in Buffalo (New York) to complement mastery of subject matter with appropriate pedagogical styles. The project was designed to test the hypothesis that minority students in inner-<span class="hlt">city</span> schools do not…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED539429.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED539429.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Making <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Skilled. Civic Bulletin No. 40</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glaeser, Edward L.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Throughout history, <span class="hlt">cities</span> that have been centers of great learning have usually also taken their place as economic powerhouses. Here in America, economists have long noticed that educated <span class="hlt">cities</span>--that is, <span class="hlt">cities</span> with a greater percentage of knowledgeable and skilled residents--have fared better economically than their unskilled counterparts, but…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5361571','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5361571"><span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of <span class="hlt">cities</span> with rapid transit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Siregar, F.M.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>This study identifies the characteristics of <span class="hlt">cities</span> and urban areas associated with rapid transit systems as part of the urban multimodal transportation system. This is addressed by studying the characteristics of global <span class="hlt">cities</span> that have utilized rapid transit (100 <span class="hlt">cities</span> in 1986) and a global sample of <span class="hlt">cities</span> that have not (100 <span class="hlt">cities</span>). Data are collected on eighteen variables which include population size, growth rate, density of the central <span class="hlt">city</span> and metropolitan area, automobile registrations per 1,000 population, <span class="hlt">city</span> bus riderships, existence of a tramway system in the <span class="hlt">city</span>, number of large banks located in the <span class="hlt">city</span>, the country's economy, and whether it is a capital <span class="hlt">city</span>. The research found that two of the most important <span class="hlt">city</span> characteristics associated with rapid transit utilization are <span class="hlt">city</span> population size and level of automobile ownership. The larger the population size and the higher the number of automobiles per 1,000 population, the greater the occurrence of rapid-transit systems. Also, rapid transit systems world wide are growing in number, and the largest growth of rapid transit ridership is being generated by rapid transit systems in developing countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rocks+AND+new+AND+york+AND+city&id=ED442914','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rocks+AND+new+AND+york+AND+city&id=ED442914"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Schools: Lessons from New York.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ravitch, Diane, Ed.; Viteritti, Joseph P., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This book presents a collection of essays by researchers and educators that examine the largest school system in the U.S.--the New York <span class="hlt">City</span> school system. There are 5 parts with 15 chapters. Part 1, "Education in the <span class="hlt">City</span>," includes: (1) "Schooling in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>: The Socioeconomic Context" (Emanuel Tobier) and (2) "Public Schools That Work"…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220406','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220406"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now, Vol. 18, No. 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-01-19</p> <p>This is version 18.2 of Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now, the official biannual newsletter of the Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> program. Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> is an initiative designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative and renewable fuels, fuel economy improvements, idle-reduction measures, and new technologies, as they emerge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=smart+AND+cities&id=EJ935729','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=smart+AND+cities&id=EJ935729"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating Smart-er <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: An Overview</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The following offers an overview of what it means for <span class="hlt">cities</span> to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) <span class="hlt">Cities</span>. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512285P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512285P"><span id="translatedtitle">Transfer/transform relationships in continental rifts and margins and their control on syn- and post-rift denudation: the case of the southeastern Gulf of Aden, Socotra Island, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pik, Raphael; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie; Denele, Yoann; Razin, Philippe; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Khanbari, Khaled</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Transfer zones are ubiquist features in continental rifts and margins, as well as transform faults in oceanic lithosphere. Here, we present the structural study of such a structure (the Hadibo Transfer Zone, HTZ) from the southeastern Gulf of Aden, in Socotra Island, <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>. There, from field data, the HTZ is interpreted as being reactivated, obliquely to divergence, since early rifting stages. Then, from a short review of transfer/transform fault zone geometries worldwide, we derive a classification in terms of relative importance (1st, 2nd, 3rd order), geometry, and location. We suggest that the HTZ is a 1st order transfer fault zone as it controls the initiation of a 1st order oceanic transform fault zone. We then investigate the denudation history of the region surrounding the HTZ in order to highlight the interplay of normal and transfer/transform tectonic structures in the course of rift evolution. Samples belong from two distinct East and West domains of the Socotra Island, separated by the (HTZ). Tectonic denudation started during the Priabonian-Rupelian along flat normal faults and removed all the overlying sedimentary formations, allowing basement exhumation up to the surface (~ 1.2 - 1.6 km of exhumation). Forward t-T modelling of the data requires a slightly earlier date and shorter period for development of rifting in the E-Socotra domain (38 - 34 Ma), compared to the W-Socotra domain (34 - 25 Ma), which suggests that the HTZ was already active at that time. A second major event of basement cooling and exhumation (additional ~ 0.7 - 1 km), starting at about ~ 20 Ma, has only been recorded on the E-Socotra domain. This second denudation phase significantly post-dates local rifting period but appears synchronous with Ocean Continent Transition (OCT: 20 - 17.6 Ma). This late syn-OCT uplift is maximum close to the HTZ, in the wedge of hangingwall delimited by this transfer system and the steep north-dipping normal faults that accommodated the vertical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930020555','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930020555"><span id="translatedtitle">Project WISH: The Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Project WISH (Wandering Interplanetary Space Harbor) is a three-year design effort currently being conducted at The Ohio State University. Its goal is the design of a space oasis to be used in the exploration of the solar system during the midtwenty-first century. This spacecraft, named Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span>, is to conduct and provide support for missions to other planetary bodies with the purpose of exploration, scientific study, and colonization. It is to sustain a crew of between 500 and 1000 people at a time, and be capable of traveling from a nominal orbit to the planets in reasonably short flight times. Such a ship obviously presents many technical and design challenges, some of which were examined through the course of Project WISH. This year, Phase 2 (1990-1991) of Project WISH was carried out. The basic design of the Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span> resulting from Phase 1 (1989-1990) was taken and improved upon through more detailed analysis and revision. At the core of this year's study were orbital mechanics, propulsion, attitude control, and human factors. Throughout the year, these areas were examined and information was compiled on their technologies, performances, and relationships. Then, using the data obtained through these studies, two specific missions were designed: an envelope mission from a nominal orbit of 4 AU to Saturn and a single point design for a specific mission from the Earth to Mars. The latter was designed in view of the special interest that Mars is attracting for near-future space exploration. The mission to Saturn has all the first six planets within its flight envelope in less than or equal to a 3-year flight time at any time upon demand, and it has Uranus in its flight envelope most of the time upon demand. These mission studies provided data on the approximate size, weight, number of engines, and other important design values that would be required for the Emerald <span class="hlt">City</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1215228','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1215228"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span>-Level Energy Decision Making. Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Aznar, Alexandra; Day, Megan; Doris, Elizabeth; Mathur, Shivani; Donohoo-Vallett, Paul</p> <p>2015-07-08</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Cities</span>-LEAP technical report, <span class="hlt">City</span>-Level Energy Decision Making: Data Use in Energy Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation in U.S. <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, explores how a sample of <span class="hlt">cities</span> incorporates data into making energy-related decisions. This report provides the foundation for forthcoming components of the <span class="hlt">Cities</span>-LEAP project that will help <span class="hlt">cities</span> improve energy decision making by mapping specific <span class="hlt">city</span> energy or climate policies and actions to measurable impacts and results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=weiler&pg=7&id=EJ382952','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=weiler&pg=7&id=EJ382952"><span id="translatedtitle">Building a <span class="hlt">City</span>: A Spin Off Project. Part II of Students Discovering <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weiler, Adele</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Discusses "Students Discovering <span class="hlt">Cities</span>" and related activities, explaining how the program evolved into a <span class="hlt">city</span> planning project for fourth graders in West Jordan, Utah. Describes the final stage of the project in which students "built" their <span class="hlt">city</span> inside the school gymnasium, complete with streets, lights, cardboard buildings, and green spaces.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sandbox&id=EJ1089821','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sandbox&id=EJ1089821"><span id="translatedtitle">Gods of the <span class="hlt">City</span>? Reflecting on <span class="hlt">City</span> Building Games as an Early Introduction to Urban Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bereitschaft, Bradley</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>For millions of gamers and students alike, <span class="hlt">city</span> building games (CBGs) like Sim<span class="hlt">City</span> and the more recent <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: Skylines present a compelling initial introduction to the world of urban planning and development. As such, these games have great potential to shape players' understanding and expectations of real urban patterns and processes. In this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED449244.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED449244.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, 2000: A 25-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lowe, Eugene T.</p> <p></p> <p>To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span> during the year 2000, the U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed 25 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> whose mayors were members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. The survey sought information and estimates from each <span class="hlt">city</span> on emergency food supplies and services, the causes of hunger and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1052558','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1052558"><span id="translatedtitle">Elizabeth <span class="hlt">City</span> State University: Elizabeth <span class="hlt">City</span>, North Carolina (Data)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p>Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.</p> <p>1985-09-25</p> <p>The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network operated from July 1985 through December 1996. Funded by DOE, the six-station network provided 5-minute averaged measurements of direct normal, global, and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance. The data were processed at NREL to improve the assessment of the solar radiation resources in the southeastern United States. Historical HBCU data available online include quality assessed 5-min data, monthly reports, and plots. In January 1997 the HBCU sites became part of the CONFRRM solar monitoring network and data from the two remaining active stations, Bluefield State College and Elizabeth <span class="hlt">City</span> State University, are collected by the NREL Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714874W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714874W"><span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainties in <span class="hlt">city</span> greenhouse gas inventories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wattenbach, Martin; Redweik, Richard; Luedtke, Stefan; Deng-Beck, Chang; Ross, Lutz; Nagel, Claus</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In 1993 mayors from 50 <span class="hlt">cities</span> in 20 countries gathered at the UN in New York under the umbrella of the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) to issue a declaration aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from <span class="hlt">cities</span>. By today 465 <span class="hlt">cities</span> report their GHG emissions in ICLEIs carbonn <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Climate Registry (cCR) . Many <span class="hlt">cities</span> worldwide are on the route to implement the combined new standard for <span class="hlt">city</span>-based GHG accounting and reporting, named the Global Protocol for Community-Scale GHG Emissions (GPC). These extensive data sources offer the unique chance to better understand, manage and reduce <span class="hlt">city</span> GHG emissions. However, many <span class="hlt">cities</span> are already reporting or have reported their GHG emission in non GPC conform tools. This heterogeneous data source raises the question on how these data could be potentially transferred to a GPC conform level. For the transfer process it is very important to understand and quantify the potential losses of information and increase or decrease in uncertainty due to class conversions and associated recalculations of GHG data. Here we compare existing GHG reports from different sources based on the use of different tools. We look at data from the carbonn Registry by ICLEI, the CDP, C40 and the Ecoregion tool. Using examples of existing data form <span class="hlt">cities</span> in Europe we demonstrate potential information losses and inconsistencies leading to increased uncertainty. We also illustrate the potential mapping schemes for the data structures and identify uncertainties from using alternative mappings. In conclusion it is essential to develop consistent data structures in order to allow the use of <span class="hlt">city</span> GHG data for time series analysis and <span class="hlt">city</span> intercomparison.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014NatCC...4..343K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014NatCC...4..343K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Low-carbon infrastructure strategies for <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kennedy, C. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hoornweg, D.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to avert potentially disastrous global climate change requires substantial redevelopment of infrastructure systems. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> are recognized as key actors for leading such climate change mitigation efforts. We have studied the greenhouse gas inventories and underlying characteristics of 22 global <span class="hlt">cities</span>. These <span class="hlt">cities</span> differ in terms of their climates, income, levels of industrial activity, urban form and existing carbon intensity of electricity supply. Here we show how these differences in <span class="hlt">city</span> characteristics lead to wide variations in the type of strategies that can be used for reducing emissions. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> experiencing greater than ~1,500 heating degree days (below an 18 °C base), for example, will review building construction and retrofitting for cold climates. Electrification of infrastructure technologies is effective for <span class="hlt">cities</span> where the carbon intensity of the grid is lower than ~600 tCO2e GWh-1 whereas transportation strategies will differ between low urban density (<~6,000 persons km-2) and high urban density (>~6,000 persons km-2) <span class="hlt">cities</span>. As nation states negotiate targets and develop policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, attention to the specific characteristics of their <span class="hlt">cities</span> will broaden and improve their suite of options. Beyond carbon pricing, markets and taxation, governments may develop policies and target spending towards low-carbon urban infrastructure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prague&pg=3&id=EJ642081','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prague&pg=3&id=EJ642081"><span id="translatedtitle">Prague: The <span class="hlt">City</span> Is the Museum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Meilach, Dona Z.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the <span class="hlt">city</span>. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the <span class="hlt">city</span> from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED525207.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED525207.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Toward 2025 in the Massillon <span class="hlt">City</span> Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Neill, Adrienne</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Fred Blosser, Superintendent of Massillon <span class="hlt">City</span> Schools, asked Adrienne O'Neill, Ed.D., President of the Stark Education Partnership, to conduct a study of curriculum, instruction, and professional development in the Massillon <span class="hlt">City</span> Schools. A white paper was requested that would contain a critical analysis of curriculum, instruction, professional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gamut+OR+CIELab+OR+CIEXYZ+OR+SRGB+OR+CIELUV&pg=5&id=EJ745610','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gamut+OR+CIELab+OR+CIEXYZ+OR+SRGB+OR+CIELUV&pg=5&id=EJ745610"><span id="translatedtitle">Transforming New York <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Public Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bartholomew, Barbara</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>In 2002, Michael Bloomberg, New York <span class="hlt">City</span>'s newly elected mayor, hoped to fix his <span class="hlt">city</span>'s public schools, which were widely perceived as plagued by a gamut of problems that ranged from low test scores to patronage-riddled schools and districts. A special bill approved by the New York State Legislature made Bloomberg solely accountable to the New…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED044458.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED044458.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Public Education in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Landes, Rosalind</p> <p></p> <p>One of the major concerns of the First National <span class="hlt">City</span> Bank's Public Affairs Committee is the cost and quality of urban education. The Bank's Regional Economics Section inquired into various aspects of public education in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>. While the study is considered as a tentative exploration of a complex subject, questions concerning businessmen…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4708983','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4708983"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban Scaling of <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the Netherlands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>van Raan, Anthony F. J.; van der Meulen, Gerwin; Goedhart, Willem</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the socioeconomic scaling behavior of all <span class="hlt">cities</span> with more than 50,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands and found significant superlinear scaling of the gross urban product with population size. Of these <span class="hlt">cities</span>, 22 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> have urban agglomerations and urban areas defined by the Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics. For these major <span class="hlt">cities</span> we investigated the superlinear scaling for three separate modalities: the <span class="hlt">cities</span> defined as municipalities, their urban agglomerations and their urban areas. We find superlinearity with power-law exponents of around 1.15. But remarkably, both types of agglomerations underperform if we compare for the same size of population an agglomeration with a <span class="hlt">city</span> as a municipality. In other words, an urban system as one formal municipality performs better as compared to an urban agglomeration with the same population size. This effect is larger for the second type of agglomerations, the urban areas. We think this finding has important implications for urban policy, in particular municipal reorganizations. A residual analysis suggests that <span class="hlt">cities</span> with a municipal reorganization recently and in the past decades have a higher probability to perform better than <span class="hlt">cities</span> without municipal restructuring. PMID:26751785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220878','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220878"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now Vol. 17, No. 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-23</p> <p>The Fall 2013 issue of the biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, and articles on Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition successes across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1053742','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1053742"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> 2010 Annual Metrics Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Johnson, C.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED520203.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED520203.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A School Voucher Program for Baltimore <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lips, Dan</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Baltimore <span class="hlt">City</span>'s public school system is in crisis. Academically, the school system fails on any number of measures. The <span class="hlt">city</span>'s graduation rate is barely above 50 percent and students continually lag well behind state averages on standardized tests. Adding to these problems is the school system's current fiscal crisis, created by years of fiscal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=115131&keyword=proton&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68435042&CFTOKEN=82762675','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=115131&keyword=proton&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68435042&CFTOKEN=82762675"><span id="translatedtitle">FUEL CELL BUS DEMONSTRATION IN MEXICO <span class="hlt">CITY</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report discusses the performance of a cull-size, zero-emission, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel-cell-powered transit bus in the atmospheric environment of Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>. To address the air quality problems caused by vehicle emissions in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>, a seminar on clean vehic...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Greenhouse+AND+Gases&pg=3&id=EJ734876','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Greenhouse+AND+Gases&pg=3&id=EJ734876"><span id="translatedtitle">Can <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Sustain Life in the Greenhouse?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Byrne, John; Hughes, Kristen; Toly, Noah; Wang, Young-Doo</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Data from the Global Environmental Monitoring System indicate that pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and total suspended particulate routinely appear in the lower atmosphere of major <span class="hlt">cities</span> at concentrations well above health guidelines set by the World Health Organization. As well, <span class="hlt">cities</span> are major contributors to the build-up of greenhouse…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=creep&pg=6&id=ED192357','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=creep&pg=6&id=ED192357"><span id="translatedtitle">The Press is Failing the <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Mott, John</p> <p></p> <p>The failure of today's newspapers to provide creative leadership in successfully integrating our <span class="hlt">cities</span> is tragic. White racism has become a critical factor in the neglect of our <span class="hlt">cities</span>, as has the reluctance of some newspeople to involve themselves more deeply in efforts to explain today's urban crisis. Much of the journalism profession's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220868','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220868"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now, Vol. 18, No. 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-30</p> <p>The Spring 2014 edition of the semi-annual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, and articles on Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition successes across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=amoroso&id=EJ134445','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=amoroso&id=EJ134445"><span id="translatedtitle">Safety in the <span class="hlt">City</span> Public School System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Amoroso, Louis J.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Describes the organization and operation of the Office of School Safety, the department responsible for maintaining order and security in the New York <span class="hlt">City</span> public schools. (Available from Security World Publishing Company, Inc., P.O. Box 272, Culver <span class="hlt">City</span>, CA 90230; $14.00 annually) (JG)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=feminism+AND+politics+AND+elections&id=EJ138593','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=feminism+AND+politics+AND+elections&id=EJ138593"><span id="translatedtitle">Election of Women to <span class="hlt">City</span> Councils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Karnig, Albert K.; Walter, Oliver B.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The authors discuss the results of a survey which collected data on female candidacy for <span class="hlt">city</span> council offices and on election victories. Questionnaires were mailed to 838 U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span> with a population of 25,000 or more. (Author/RM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1232684','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1232684"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now Vol. 19, No. 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-12-18</p> <p>Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Now is the official bi-annual newsletter of Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, an initiative designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative and renewable fuels, fuel economy improvements, idle-reduction measures, and new technologies, as they emerge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sanitation+AND+urban&pg=2&id=EJ157587','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sanitation+AND+urban&pg=2&id=EJ157587"><span id="translatedtitle">Bicentennial Bandwagon: The Role of the <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kohut, Sylvester, Jr.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>To answer critics of the Bicentennial who are wary of studying too much past history and ignoring problems facing <span class="hlt">cities</span> today, the author suggests areas which can be studies which are relevant to both the past and present. For example, major <span class="hlt">cities</span> still experience age-old problems of fire, sanitation, traffic control, crime, and public works.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26751785','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26751785"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban Scaling of <span class="hlt">Cities</span> in the Netherlands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Raan, Anthony F J; van der Meulen, Gerwin; Goedhart, Willem</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the socioeconomic scaling behavior of all <span class="hlt">cities</span> with more than 50,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands and found significant superlinear scaling of the gross urban product with population size. Of these <span class="hlt">cities</span>, 22 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> have urban agglomerations and urban areas defined by the Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics. For these major <span class="hlt">cities</span> we investigated the superlinear scaling for three separate modalities: the <span class="hlt">cities</span> defined as municipalities, their urban agglomerations and their urban areas. We find superlinearity with power-law exponents of around 1.15. But remarkably, both types of agglomerations underperform if we compare for the same size of population an agglomeration with a <span class="hlt">city</span> as a municipality. In other words, an urban system as one formal municipality performs better as compared to an urban agglomeration with the same population size. This effect is larger for the second type of agglomerations, the urban areas. We think this finding has important implications for urban policy, in particular municipal reorganizations. A residual analysis suggests that <span class="hlt">cities</span> with a municipal reorganization recently and in the past decades have a higher probability to perform better than <span class="hlt">cities</span> without municipal restructuring. PMID:26751785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Collado&id=ED229462','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Collado&id=ED229462"><span id="translatedtitle">Hispanic Diversity in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gurak, Douglas T.; And Others</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>This issue of the Hispanic Research Center's journal contains four articles which focus on various aspects of the Hispanic community in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>. In the first article, Douglas T. Gurak and Lloyd H. Rogler use data from censuses, ethnographic accounts, and public documents to profile New York <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Hispanic population. They review the…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+forest&pg=2&id=ED355104','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+forest&pg=2&id=ED355104"><span id="translatedtitle">Growing Greener <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: Environmental Education Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Forestry Association, Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>This environmental education guide, developed by American Forests, includes five lessons created to help teachers use "Growing Greener <span class="hlt">Cities</span>," a tree-planting handbook. The lessons are designed to teach students the role trees and forests play in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Lesson one begins with an introduction, several preparatory exercises to orient students to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=DEBATE&id=EJ984564','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=DEBATE&id=EJ984564"><span id="translatedtitle">Literacy as Social Action in <span class="hlt">City</span> Debate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cridland-Hughes, Susan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study examines critical literacy and the intersections of oral, aural, written, and performative literate practices in <span class="hlt">City</span> Debate, an afterschool program dedicated to providing debate instruction to students in a major Southeastern <span class="hlt">city</span>. Previous research into definitions and beliefs about literacy in an urban debate program over its twenty…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ793900.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ793900.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The "Inner <span class="hlt">City</span>" Is My Blues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Davis, Danne E.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author shares that what she knows about the inner <span class="hlt">city</span> does not stem from the location of her childhood. Rather, she knows about the inner <span class="hlt">city</span> through the vernacular of her peers who use it to entitle courses; name proposals, scholarly presentations, and research foci; refer to practicum settings where numerous prospective…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED062617.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED062617.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Gaming Techniques for <span class="hlt">City</span> Planning: A Bibliography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thornton, Barbara</p> <p></p> <p>A bibliography which attempts to pull together gaming literature from various fields for the use of <span class="hlt">city</span> planners is presented. It contains samples from fields related to <span class="hlt">city</span> planning, especially administration and education. It includes references to simulation, decision-making theory, etc. (Author/CK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=place+AND+life+AND+image&id=EJ994653','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=place+AND+life+AND+image&id=EJ994653"><span id="translatedtitle">Colleges as Shining <span class="hlt">Cities</span> on a Hill</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Townsend, Kathleen Kennedy</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author proposes that the notion of America be reintroduced as the "shining <span class="hlt">city</span> on a hill," that abiding image from American history. The image of the shining <span class="hlt">city</span> on a hill captures the imagination because it reflects the abiding truth that people become fully human in society, not outside of it. People need one another to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Quality+AND+of+AND+life&pg=3&id=EJ997579','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Quality+AND+of+AND+life&pg=3&id=EJ997579"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Life: Rankings (Livability) versus Perceptions (Satisfaction)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>I investigate the relationship between the popular Mercer <span class="hlt">city</span> ranking (livability) and survey data (satisfactions). Livability aims to capture "objective" quality of life such as infrastructure. Survey items capture "subjective" quality of life such as satisfaction with <span class="hlt">city</span>. The relationship between objective measures of quality of life and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1060606','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1060606"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> 2011 Annual Metrics Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Johnson, C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=botanist&pg=3&id=ED222327','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=botanist&pg=3&id=ED222327"><span id="translatedtitle">Nature in the <span class="hlt">City</span>. Adventure Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ferbert, Mary Lou</p> <p></p> <p>"Nature in the <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a program designed to introduce young <span class="hlt">city</span> dwellers to the wealth of nature that thrives in their urban world. The goal is not to produce botanists or zoologists, but to build attitudes and values as children increase their awareness, understanding, and appreciation of nature. Although the natural communities within cities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231791','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231791"><span id="translatedtitle">Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Low Carbon <span class="hlt">Cities</span> (BEST <span class="hlt">Cities</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>BEST-<span class="hlt">Cities</span> is designed to provide <span class="hlt">city</span> authorities with strategies they can follow to reduce <span class="hlt">city</span>-wide carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions. The tool quickly assesses local energy use and energy-related CO2 emissions across nine sectors (i.e., industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space), giving officials a comprehensive perspective on their local carbon performance. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> can also use the tool to benchmark their energy and emissions performance to other <span class="hlt">cities</span> inside and outside China, and identify those sectors with the greatest energy saving and emissions reduction potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009etbw.book..112M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009etbw.book..112M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Cities</span> as a Collaborative Educational Environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Müller, Daniel Nehme; de Oliveira, Otto Lopes Braitback; Remião, Joelma Adriana Abrão; Silveira, Paloma Dias; Martins, Márcio André Rodrigues; Axt, Margarete</p> <p></p> <p>The CIVITAS (Virtual <span class="hlt">Cities</span> with Technologies for Learning and Simulating) project presents a research, teaching and extension approach directed to the construction of <span class="hlt">cities</span> imagined by students in the first years of elementary school, with an emphasis to the fourth grade. The teacher ventures on a deviation from the official curriculum proposed to reflect upon the invention of <span class="hlt">cities</span> along with the children. Within this context, the game Città is introduced as an environment that allows the creation of digital real/virtual/imagined <span class="hlt">cities</span>, and enables different forms of interaction among the students through networked computers. The cooperative situations, made possible by the access to the game, are tools for teachers and students to think about the information that operate as general rules and words of order with the invention of the <span class="hlt">city</span>/knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12348129','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12348129"><span id="translatedtitle">The exploding <span class="hlt">cities</span> of the developing world.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Linden, E</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Some problems posed by the rapid urbanization of the developing world are reviewed. The author suggests that the fate of these rapidly growing <span class="hlt">cities</span> will determine the fate of both nations and regions. He notes that rather than continuing to swell the megacities, such as Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>, recent demographic trends have been favoring secondary <span class="hlt">cities</span>, which are facing increasing problems with proportionally fewer resources at their disposal. The problems of disease in crowded urban environments are discussed. The author presents examples of <span class="hlt">cities</span> with declining services and quality of life, such as Kinshasa, as well as examples of more successful <span class="hlt">city</span> development, such as Curitiba. Prospects for the successful resolution of urban problems are assessed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25232053','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25232053"><span id="translatedtitle">Universal predictability of mobility patterns in <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yan, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Chen; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wang, Wen-Xu</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Despite the long history of modelling human mobility, we continue to lack a highly accurate approach with low data requirements for predicting mobility patterns in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Here, we present a population-weighted opportunities model without any adjustable parameters to capture the underlying driving force accounting for human mobility patterns at the <span class="hlt">city</span> scale. We use various mobility data collected from a number of <span class="hlt">cities</span> with different characteristics to demonstrate the predictive power of our model. We find that insofar as the spatial distribution of population is available, our model offers universal prediction of mobility patterns in good agreement with real observations, including distance distribution, destination travel constraints and flux. By contrast, the models that succeed in modelling mobility patterns in countries are not applicable in <span class="hlt">cities</span>, which suggests that there is a diversity of human mobility at different spatial scales. Our model has potential applications in many fields relevant to mobility behaviour in <span class="hlt">cities</span>, without relying on previous mobility measurements. PMID:25232053</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1136197','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1136197"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> of Tallahassee Innovative Energy Initiatives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wilder, Todd; Moragne, Corliss L.</p> <p>2014-06-25</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">City</span> of Tallahassee's Innovative Energy Initiatives program sought, first, to evaluate customer response and acceptance to in-home Smart Meter-enabled technologies that allow customers intelligent control of their energy usage. Additionally, this project is in furtherance of the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Tallahassee's ongoing efforts to expand and enhance the <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Smart Grid capacity and give consumers more tools with which to effectively manage their energy consumption. This enhancement would become possible by establishing an "operations or command center" environment that would be designed as a dual use facility for the <span class="hlt">City</span>'s employees - field and network staff - and systems responsible for a Smart Grid network. A command center would also support the <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Office of Electric Delivery and Energy Reliability's objective to overcome barriers to the deployment of new technologies that will ensure a truly modern and robust grid capable of meeting the demands of the 2151 century.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC41B0552M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC41B0552M"><span id="translatedtitle">Green <span class="hlt">cities</span>, smart people and climate change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mansouri Kouhestani, F.; Byrne, J. M.; Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Harrison, T.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Climate change will require substantial changes to urban environments. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> are huge sources of greenhouse gases. Further, <span class="hlt">cities</span> will suffer tremendously under climate change due to heat stresses, urban flooding, energy and water supply and demand changes, transportation problems, resource supply and demand and a host of other trials and tribulations. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> that evolve most quickly and efficiently to deal with climate change will likely take advantage of the changes to create enjoyable, healthy and safer living spaces for families and communities. Technology will provide much of the capability to both mitigate and adapt our <span class="hlt">cities</span> BUT education and coordination of citizen and community lifestyle likely offers equal opportunities to make our <span class="hlt">cities</span> more sustainable and more enjoyable places to live. This work is the first phase of a major project evaluating urban mitigation and adaptation policies, programs and technologies. All options are considered, from changes in engineering, planning and management; and including a range of citizen and population-based lifestyle practices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2168N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2168N"><span id="translatedtitle">Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart <span class="hlt">city</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nor, N. M.; Wahap, N. A.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a <span class="hlt">city</span>'s system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a <span class="hlt">city</span> and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart <span class="hlt">city</span> is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart <span class="hlt">city</span> concept.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122131p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122131p/"><span id="translatedtitle">9. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>9. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ORIGINAL COMPETITION DRAWING (GENERAL PERSPECTIVE) - 1896 FROM THE OFFICE OF THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ENGINEER, BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK. - Binghamton <span class="hlt">City</span> Hall, Collier Street, Binghamton, Broome County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122132p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122132p/"><span id="translatedtitle">10. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>10. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ORIGINAL COMPETITION DRAWING OF A LONGITUDINAL SECTION - 1896 FROM THE OFFICE OF THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ENGINEER, BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK. - Binghamton <span class="hlt">City</span> Hall, Collier Street, Binghamton, Broome County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122135p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny0457.photos.122135p/"><span id="translatedtitle">13. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>13. Historic American Buildings Survey, BINGHAMTON <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL, PHOTOCOPY OF ORIGINAL COMPETITION DRAWING OF FIRST FLOOR PLAN - 1896 FROM THE OFFICE OF THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ENGINEER, BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK. - Binghamton <span class="hlt">City</span> Hall, Collier Street, Binghamton, Broome County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1261.photos.322344p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1261.photos.322344p/"><span id="translatedtitle">Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES <span class="hlt">CITY</span> HALL FIRST FLOOR DOORS TO THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> CLERK AND TAX & PERMIT DIVISION OFFICES, FACING NORTH. - Los Angeles <span class="hlt">City</span> Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161133.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161133.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Smart <span class="hlt">City</span> Planning Can Cut Deadly Diseases, Improve Air Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161133.html Smart <span class="hlt">City</span> Planning Can Cut Deadly Diseases, Improve Air Quality Study ... three quarters of this population living in <span class="hlt">cities</span>, <span class="hlt">city</span> planning must be part of a comprehensive solution to ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0209.photos.085810p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0209.photos.085810p/"><span id="translatedtitle">9. Historic American Buildings Survey 'NEW JAIL FOR THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>9. Historic American Buildings Survey 'NEW JAIL FOR THE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND' Undated Line Engraving - Original in Maryland Historical Society - Baltimore <span class="hlt">City</span> Jail, 801 Van Buren & East Madison Streets, Baltimore, Independent <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365055p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365055p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span>, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span>, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18272, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Salt Lake County, UT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365052p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365052p/"><span id="translatedtitle">200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span>, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span>, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST OF "MAIN' STREET. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18273, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Salt Lake County, UT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27447307','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27447307"><span id="translatedtitle">The Uses of Big Data in <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bettencourt, Luís M A</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>There is much enthusiasm currently about the possibilities created by new and more extensive sources of data to better understand and manage <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Here, I explore how big data can be useful in urban planning by formalizing the planning process as a general computational problem. I show that, under general conditions, new sources of data coordinated with urban policy can be applied following fundamental principles of engineering to achieve new solutions to important age-old urban problems. I also show that comprehensive urban planning is computationally intractable (i.e., practically impossible) in large <span class="hlt">cities</span>, regardless of the amounts of data available. This dilemma between the need for planning and coordination and its impossibility in detail is resolved by the recognition that <span class="hlt">cities</span> are first and foremost self-organizing social networks embedded in space and enabled by urban infrastructure and services. As such, the primary role of big data in <span class="hlt">cities</span> is to facilitate information flows and mechanisms of learning and coordination by heterogeneous individuals. However, processes of self-organization in <span class="hlt">cities</span>, as well as of service improvement and expansion, must rely on general principles that enforce necessary conditions for <span class="hlt">cities</span> to operate and evolve. Such ideas are the core of a developing scientific theory of <span class="hlt">cities</span>, which is itself enabled by the growing availability of quantitative data on thousands of <span class="hlt">cities</span> worldwide, across different geographies and levels of development. These three uses of data and information technologies in <span class="hlt">cities</span> constitute then the necessary pillars for more successful urban policy and management that encourages, and does not stifle, the fundamental role of <span class="hlt">cities</span> as engines of development and innovation in human societies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6448978','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6448978"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span> Plant, Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span>, Missouri</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span> Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ISPAn.II4...59P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ISPAn.II4...59P"><span id="translatedtitle">Services Oriented Smart <span class="hlt">City</span> Platform Based On 3d <span class="hlt">City</span> Model Visualization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Prandi, F.; Soave, M.; Devigili, F.; Andreolli, M.; De Amicis, R.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>The rapid technological evolution, which is characterizing all the disciplines involved within the wide concept of smart <span class="hlt">cities</span>, is becoming a key factor to trigger true user-driven innovation. However to fully develop the Smart <span class="hlt">City</span> concept to a wide geographical target, it is required an infrastructure that allows the integration of heterogeneous geographical information and sensor networks into a common technological ground. In this context 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models will play an increasingly important role in our daily lives and become an essential part of the modern <span class="hlt">city</span> information infrastructure (Spatial Data Infrastructure). The work presented in this paper describes an innovative Services Oriented Architecture software platform aimed at providing smartcities services on top of 3D urban models. 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models are the basis of many applications and can became the platform for integrating <span class="hlt">city</span> information within the Smart-Cites context. In particular the paper will investigate how the efficient visualisation of 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models using different levels of detail (LODs) is one of the pivotal technological challenge to support Smart-<span class="hlt">Cities</span> applications. The goal is to provide to the final user realistic and abstract 3D representations of the urban environment and the possibility to interact with a massive amounts of semantic information contained into the geospatial 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> model. The proposed solution, using OCG standards and a custom service to provide 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> models, lets the users to consume the services and interact with the 3D model via Web in a more effective way.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986WRR....22..845M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986WRR....22..845M"><span id="translatedtitle">Daily Water Use in Nine <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maidment, David R.; Miaou, Shaw-Pin</p> <p>1986-06-01</p> <p>Transfer functions are used to model the short-term response of daily municipal water use to rainfall and air temperature variations. Daily water use data from nine <span class="hlt">cities</span> are studied, three <span class="hlt">cities</span> each from Florida, Pennsylvania, and Texas. The dynamic response of water use to rainfall and air temperature is similar across the <span class="hlt">cities</span> within each State; in addition the responses of the Texas and Florida <span class="hlt">cities</span> are very similar to one another while the response of the Pennsylvania <span class="hlt">cities</span> is more sensitive to air temperature and less to rainfall. There is little impact of <span class="hlt">city</span> size on the response functions. The response of water use to rainfall depends first on the occurrence of rainfall and second on its magnitude. The occurrence of a rainfall more than 0.05 in./day (0.13 cm/day) causes a drop in the seasonal component of water use one day later that averages 38% for the Texas <span class="hlt">cities</span>, 42% for the Florida <span class="hlt">cities</span>, and 7% for the Pennsylvania <span class="hlt">cities</span>. In Austin, Texas, a spatially averaged rainfall series shows a clearer relationship with water use than does rainfall data from a single gage. There is a nonlinear response of water use to air temperature changes with no response for daily maximum air temperatures between 40° and 70°F (4-21°C) an increase in water use with air temperature beyond 70°F; above 85°-90°F (29°-32°C) water use increases 3-5 times more per degree than below that limit in Texas and Florida. The model resulting from these studies can be used for daily water use forecasting and water conservation analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6500023','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6500023"><span id="translatedtitle">Global politics in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wulf, D; Willson, P D</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>At the 1984 United Nations International Conference on Population held in August, delegates from 149 countries affirmed that population dynamics are an intrinsic part of development and that all people, including adolescents, have a right to family planning information and services. Despite concern for continued US support for population activities, the US delegation in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> clearly emphasized its government's commitment to increased funding. The conference also accepted by acclamation the Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> Declaration on Population and Development drafted by 29 countries which stresses the importance of increased funding for population policy, the urgent need to improve women's status and the concern for the effects of the deepening economic crisis, Legal abortion and voluntary sterilization as fertility determinants were ignored. The meeting put to rest any notion that population and development activities are competing spheres of action. In contrast to its 1974 position, the US emphasized entrepreneurial initiative within a free-market system as a stimulus to economic development. The status of women was a major issue brought up by the delegations of Zimbabwe and Australia. The crucial but uncertain issue of funding was addressed by most country represehntatives and most developed countries pledged at least continued if not increased funding for development programs. Most discussion on the abortion issue was almost universally based on repudiation of the procedure as a family planning method. The role of the US in the abortion issue is discussed. The US criticized 2 international agencies that provide most of family planning services to which the US provides funding but which are promoting abortion through affiliates. The US affirmed it would not participate in or assist abortion promotion as a birth control method. The nature and scope of the current economic world crisis caused profound differences between the US and most developing countries' delegations</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-09/pdf/2012-27352.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-09/pdf/2012-27352.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 67276 - <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Sanctions Regulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-11-09</p> <p>... issued Executive Order 13611 (77 FR 29533, May 18, 2012) (``E.O. 13611''), invoking the authority of.... 2461 note); Pub. L. 110-96, 121 Stat. 1011 (50 U.S.C. 1705 note); E.O. 13611, 77 FR 29533, May 18, 2012... Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to take pursuant to Executive Order 13611 of May 16, 2012 (77...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book.1935V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book.1935V"><span id="translatedtitle">Folk Astronomy and Calendars in <span class="hlt">Yemen</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Varisco, Daniel Martin</p> <p></p> <p>A rich folk tradition of star lore evolved in the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, especially during the Islamic era. Some of this lore was recorded in Yemeni Arabic texts, especially during the 13th and 14th centuries. Among the calendars in use are solar, lunar, and stellar varieties. The most significant folk calendars are the system of agricultural marker stars, often correlated with the 28 lunar stations, and the Pleiades conjunction calendar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3187673','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3187673"><span id="translatedtitle">Cossidae of the Socotra Archipelago (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Borth, Robert; Ivinskis, Povilas; Saldaitis, Aidas; Yakovlev, Roman</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Abstract The faunistic composition of the family Cossidae (Lepidoptera) of the Socotra Archipelago is revised. Five species are recognized, including two new species (Mormogystia brandstetteri and Meharia hackeri), and dubious identifications and records are discussed. Adults and genitalia are illustrated and bionomic details, DNA barcodes and a synonymic checklist for Socotran cossids are provided. A review of their distribution reveals that at least 80 percent of Socotra’s cossids are unique to the archipelago, which is renowned for its endemism. A checklist listing all the species from generas Meharia, Mormogystia, Aethalopteryx, Azygophleps, as well as the synonymy and distribution is provided. PMID:21998527</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982crr..rept.....M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982crr..rept.....M"><span id="translatedtitle">Putting renewable energy to work in <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McPerson, B.; Mara, G.; Courier, K.; Finneran, K.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of the book is to supply <span class="hlt">city</span> officials with information needed to develop local policies that encourage the use of energy conservation and renewable energy technologies. The basic assumptions are that <span class="hlt">city</span> energy officials need technical information, that urban energy managers must be conscious of the constraints and opportunities posed by existing conditions and that no urban program can afford to overlook the links between energy and housing, employment, and economic development. Part One contains guidelines to help local energy officials assess their own urban energy contexts. Parts Two and Three indicate how different energy technologies might fit within different <span class="hlt">city</span> contexts or neighborhoods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750012790','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750012790"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">city</span> invests in its future</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baker, J. N.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Events occurring during the past four years which led to the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Burbank's decision to acquire an energy source adequate for the <span class="hlt">city</span>'s present and future power requirements are discussed. The community reaction to this unprecedented move is also covered. Burbank's long-range plans for the development of geothermal energy are outlined as well as the challenges which confront a public utility in implementing its projected goals. There are several advantages accurring to the <span class="hlt">city</span> which in the opinion of the Burbank <span class="hlt">City</span> Council and the administration justify this venture. The need for a cooperative climate which will enable all electrical utilities to better meet their obligations to the public, which is their prime responsibility before all other considerations, is analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/964605','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/964605"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Annual Metrics Report 2008</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Johnson, C.; Bergeron, P.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>This report summarizes the Department of Energy's Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition accomplishments in 2008, including petroleum displacement data, membership, funding, sales of alternative fuel blends, deployment of AFVs and HEVs, idle reduction initiatives, and fuel economy activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/992801','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/992801"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Johnson, C.</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Document provides Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3836595','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3836595"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding the <span class="hlt">City</span> Size Wage Gap*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baum-Snow, Nathaniel; Pavan, Ronni</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we decompose <span class="hlt">city</span> size wage premia into various components. We base these decompositions on an estimated on-the-job search model that incorporates latent ability, search frictions, firm-worker match quality, human capital accumulation and endogenous migration between large, medium and small <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Counterfactual simulations of the model indicate that variation in returns to experience and differences in wage intercepts across location type are the most important mechanisms contributing to observed <span class="hlt">city</span> size wage premia. Variation in returns to experience is more important for generating wage premia between large and small locations while differences in wage intercepts are more important for generating wage premia betwen medium and small locations. Sorting on unobserved ability within education group and differences in labor market search frictions and distributions of firm-worker match quality contribute little to observed <span class="hlt">city</span> size wage premia. These conclusions hold for separate samples of high school and college graduates. PMID:24273347</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6687960','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6687960"><span id="translatedtitle">Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>James, R.T.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas <span class="hlt">City</span> Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drinking+AND+water&pg=3&id=EJ666447','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drinking+AND+water&pg=3&id=EJ666447"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, Water, and a Metropolitan University.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chamberlin, Gary D.; Anderson, Joel E.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Describes how the University of Arkansas helped the <span class="hlt">cities</span> of Little Rock and North Little Rock to resolve a difficult and longstanding conflict over water rates and the provision of drinking water. (EV)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr.IV4..131P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr.IV4..131P"><span id="translatedtitle">Voluntary Noise Mapping for Smart <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Poslončec-Petrić, V.; Vuković, V.; Frangeš, S.; Bačić, Ž.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>One of the main concept objectives of smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> is to create a quality living environment that is long-term sustainable and economically justified. In that context, modern <span class="hlt">cities</span> are aware of the exposure to various forms of physical and non-physical pollution that needs to be remediated, eliminated or reduced. To achieve that it is necessary to quality determine the sources and reasons of each pollution. The most prominent examples of physical pollution that affects the quality of life of citizens in <span class="hlt">cities</span> are light and noise pollution. Noise pollution or noise, is mostly the consequence of road and rail traffic in <span class="hlt">cities</span> and it directly affects the health of citizens. Traffic control, reduction of peak congestion, dispersion and traffic redirection or building protective barriers, are ways that <span class="hlt">cities</span> use to reduce the amount of noise or its effects. To make these measures efficient it is necessary to obtain the information related to the level of noise in certain areas, streets, <span class="hlt">cities</span>. To achieve this, smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> use noise mapping. The <span class="hlt">city</span> of Zagreb since 2012, participates in the i-SCOPE project (interoperable Smart <span class="hlt">City</span> services trough Open Platform for urban Ecosystems). i-SCOPE delivers an open platform on top of which it develops, three "smart <span class="hlt">city</span>" services: optimization of energy consumption through a service for accurate assessment of solar energy potential and energy loss at building level, environmental monitoring through a real-time environmental noise mapping service leveraging citizen's involvement will who act as distributed sensors <span class="hlt">city</span>-wide measuring noise levels through an application on their mobile phones and improved inclusion and personal mobility of aging and diversely able citizens through an accurate personal routing service. The students of Faculty of Geodesy University of Zagreb, who enrolled in the course Thematic Cartography, were actively involved in the voluntary data acquisition in order to monitor the noise in real time</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.2380E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.2380E"><span id="translatedtitle">MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span>: A Multi-Risk Platform</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Euchner, F.; Mignan, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> (the MATRIX Common IT sYstem) is the computational platform that is being developed in the course of the New Multi-Hazard and Multi-Risk Assessment Methods for Europe (MATRIX) project. MATRIX aims to develop multi-type hazard and risk assessment and mitigation tools suited to the European context. The core of MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> is a risk engine of a novel type that is based on a sequential simulation approach, which allows to quantify interactions and other time-dependent processes at the hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk levels. For risk estimation in realistic scenarios, data availability is crucial. To overcome this limitation, MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> provides a component called Virtual <span class="hlt">City</span>. It is a collection of heuristic databases, which provides a generic approach to quantifying multi-type hazard and risk when data coverage is poor, and for sensitivity analysis. MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> results are intended to provide a "big picture" of the expected impact of multi-type hazard and risk modelling (as opposed to static modelling), thus being a valuable tool for decision support. MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> development uses a modern software engineering approach (test-driven development, continuous integration). The architecture is flexible, so that new perils, new models and large datasets can be accommodated easily. However, it should be noted that hazard computation is not part of MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span>. Hazard footprints have to be provided as input data, as well as exposure and vulnerability. The data model used in MATRIX <span class="hlt">City</span> is an enhancement of the Natural hazards' Risk Markup Language (NRML). An XML serialization of this data model, which is a GML (Geographic Markup Language) application schema, is used for data interchange.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1028032','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1028032"><span id="translatedtitle">What is Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span>? October 2011 (Brochure)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Brochure describes the Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> program and includes the contact information for its 85 coalitions. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> is a government-industry partnership that reduces petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> contributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local decisions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In nearly 100 coalitions, government agencies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span>. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of petroleum, developing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality. Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> deploys technologies and practices developed by VTP. These include idle-reduction equipment, electric-drive vehicles, fuel economy measures, and renewable and alternative fuels, such as natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), electricity, hydrogen, biofuels, and biogas. Idle-reduction equipment is targeted primarily to buses and heavy-duty trucks, which use more than 2 billion gallons of fuel every year in the United States while idling. Clean <span class="hlt">Cities</span> fuel economy measures include public education on vehicle choice and fuel-efficient driving practices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22317715','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22317715"><span id="translatedtitle">Mobility and accessibility in historic <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carvalho, Ana Carla; Paschoalin, Rachel Filgueiras; Castañon, José Alberto</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The historic <span class="hlt">cities</span> of Brazil, despite its colonial structure, don't fail to go through transformations that affect contemporary <span class="hlt">cities</span>, which is the main source of problems, leading to new approaches to urban issues such as mobility and accessibility. The uncontrolled growth of tourism in the historic <span class="hlt">cities</span> can be considered as a big problem, because at the same time, they have committed to the conservation of its built heritage and demand control of the activities that occur in their areas without harm. Then, a permanent dialogue between conservatives and planners could be accomplished by joining the various sectoral policies. The study of urban mobility in historical sites was in fact the focus of this work because of their peculiarities, such as its specific characteristics of urban structure, morphology and occupation. In fact, the development of tourism in historic centers generates specific demands, such as adaptation to new uses of the houses, intensive movement of people and vehicles, illegal parking, among others. Beyond threatening the <span class="hlt">city</span> preservation, does not provide mobility and accessibility to tourists, because these <span class="hlt">cities</span> were not designed for the tourism conditions and needs of contemporary life. Characteristic features of Brazilian baroque <span class="hlt">cities</span>, such as topography , the narrow streets, narrow or nonexistent sidewalks, steep turns and ramps strong, are not suitable for heavy vehicles, traffic and pedestrian circulation. Thus, studies concerning conservation urban integrated are aimed at an approach to interaction between historic preservation of the environment with the dynamic socio-economic of the local. PMID:22317715</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1038512','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1038512"><span id="translatedtitle">Indoor Radon Measurements in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bogard, James S; Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> is one of the most populated <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the world with almost 22 million inhabitants, located at an altitude of 2200 m. The old <span class="hlt">city</span> was founded on an ancient lake and the zone is known by its high seismicity; indoor radon determination is an important public health issue. In this paper the data of indoor radon levels in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span>, measured independently by two research groups, both using Nuclear Track Detector systems but different methodologies, are correlated. The measurements were done during similar exposure periods of time, at family houses from the political administrative regions of the <span class="hlt">city</span>. The results indicate a correlation coefficient between the two sets of data of R = 0.886. Most of the differences between the two sets of data are inherent to houses having extreme (very high or very low indoor radon) included in the statistics of each group. The total average indoor radon found in Mexico <span class="hlt">City</span> considering the two methods was 87 Bq m{sup -3}.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=douglas+AND+long&pg=7&id=EJ663943','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=douglas+AND+long&pg=7&id=EJ663943"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-Serving <span class="hlt">City</span> Managers: Why Do They Stay?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Watson, Douglas J.; Hassett, Wendy L.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Responses from 107 <span class="hlt">city</span> managers with more than 20 years of experience indicate that long-serving <span class="hlt">city</span> managers are usually in smaller <span class="hlt">cities</span> that are homogenous and politically stable. Most are white males with above-average education levels, who have support from elected officials and commitments to the <span class="hlt">cities</span> they serve. (Contains 28…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936423.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936423.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Study Abroad and the <span class="hlt">City</span>: Mapping Urban Identity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Blair, Scott</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Study abroad by U.S. students, despite recent growth into non-western and rural destinations, often remains focused on <span class="hlt">cities</span>, often very large and highly urbanized ones. While the destination <span class="hlt">cities</span> for study abroad are located across the globe, European <span class="hlt">cities</span> remain predominant, and thus, this article focuses on study abroad in one <span class="hlt">city</span>. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED120179.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED120179.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">City</span> College Advisory Service and Workshop Center for Open Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>City Univ. of New York, NY. City Coll. Workshop Center for Open Education.</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">City</span> College Advisory Service and Workshop Center for Open Education, located on the main campus of <span class="hlt">City</span> College in New York <span class="hlt">City</span>, is a free facility for all participants in the school process--teachers, principals, supervisors, paraprofessionals, parents, and graduate/undergraduate students in the New York <span class="hlt">City</span> area. It is sponsored by the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4785974','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4785974"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of social structures within <span class="hlt">cities</span> of very different sizes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Grindrod, P.; Lee, T. E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>People make a <span class="hlt">city</span>, making each <span class="hlt">city</span> as unique as the combination of its inhabitants. However, some <span class="hlt">cities</span> are similar and some <span class="hlt">cities</span> are inimitable. We examine the social structure of 10 different <span class="hlt">cities</span> using Twitter data. Each <span class="hlt">city</span> is decomposed to its communities. We show that in many cases one <span class="hlt">city</span> can be thought of as an amalgamation of communities from another <span class="hlt">city</span>. For example, we find the social network of Manchester is very similar to the social network of a virtual <span class="hlt">city</span> of the same size, where the virtual <span class="hlt">city</span> is composed of communities from the Bristol network. However, we cannot create Bristol from Manchester since Bristol contains communities with a social structure that are not present in Manchester. Some <span class="hlt">cities</span>, such as Leeds, are outliers. That is, Leeds contains a particularly wide range of communities, meaning we cannot build a similar <span class="hlt">city</span> from communities outside of Leeds. Comparing communities from different <span class="hlt">cities</span>, and building virtual <span class="hlt">cities</span> that are comparable to real <span class="hlt">cities</span>, is a novel approach to understand social networks. This has implications when using social media to inform or advise residents of a <span class="hlt">city</span>. PMID:26998323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365053p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0699.photos.365053p/"><span id="translatedtitle">250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 83, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 8-3, SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span> CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE <span class="hlt">CITY</span>, UT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH - REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18271, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span> Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake <span class="hlt">City</span>, Salt Lake County, UT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287487"><span id="translatedtitle">Farmers flock to coastal <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, M; Mulley, S</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>China's rural-urban migration flows, particularly into Shanghai, Guangdong province, Beijing, and coastal areas, present challenges for urban development. The impact on rural and urban areas and suggestions for minimizing undesirable consequences were discussed. Professor Zhang Qingwu, deputy director of the Population Research Institute of Xiamen University in Fujian province, believes that the large migrating populations and those without residence cards pose problems for heavily populated <span class="hlt">cities</span>: they strain resources (housing, water and electricity supplies, transportation, telecommunication, environmental hygiene, food supplies, and educational facilities). Crime increases. Municipal departments must increase their administrative load in service sectors. The general idea is that rural-to-urban migration reflects social progress and adds to a productive work force. Flexible policies are recommended. In Guangdong province, where migrants arrived from Sichuan and Hunan provinces, counties from the latter two provinces have established offices for supervising their former residents. Employment adjustment can be anticipated when the major flock of migrants arrive after the Lantern Festival. Professor Gui Shixun of the Population Research Institute of East China Normal University and advisor to the State Family Planning Commission recommends that development strategies incorporate planning for imbalances between local population and migrant urban workers. In some areas, women represent the bulk of migrants, while in other areas men do. Cultural development should be stressed, with investments also improved in telecommunications, traffic and transportation, education, and hygiene. Professor Jiang Zhixue recommends shifting from labor-intensive enterprises to technology-intensive enterprises and a better trained work force. Other schemes, such as the purchase by migrants of residence cards in Xiamen, would entitle migrants to the same rights and obligations as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12312642','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12312642"><span id="translatedtitle">Development, primacy, and systems of <span class="hlt">cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El-shakhs, S</p> <p>1972-10-01</p> <p>The relationship between the evolutionary changes in the <span class="hlt">city</span> size distribution of nationally defined urban systems and the process of socioeconomic development is examined. Attention is directed to the problems of defining and measuring changes in <span class="hlt">city</span> size distributions, using the results to test empirically the relationship of such changes to the development process. Existing theoretical structures and empirical generalizations which have tried to explain or to describe, respectively, the hierarchical relationships of <span class="hlt">cities</span> are represented by central place theory and rank size relationships. The problem is not that deviations exist but that an adequate definition is lacking of urban systems on the 1 hand, and a universal measure of <span class="hlt">city</span> size distribution, which could be applied to any system irrespective of its level of development, on the other. The problem of measuring changes in <span class="hlt">city</span> size distributions is further compounded by the lack of sufficient reliable information about different systems of <span class="hlt">cities</span> for the purposes of empirical comparative analysis. Changes in <span class="hlt">city</span> size distributions have thus far been viewed largely within the framework of classic equilibrium theory. A more differentiated continuum of the development process should replace the bioplar continuum of underdeveloped developed countries in relating changes in <span class="hlt">city</span> size distribution with development. Implicit in this distinction is the view that processes which influence spatial organization during the early formative stages of development are inherently different from those operating during the more advanced stages. 2 approaches were used to examine the relationship between national levels of development and primacy: a comparative analysis of a large number of countries at a given point in time; and a historical analysis of a limited sample of 2 advanced countries, the US and Great Britain. The 75 countries included in this study cover a wide range of characteristics. The study found a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ISPAr.XL7.1395R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ISPAr.XL7.1395R"><span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">City</span> Landscape Heritage Using Lidar Data and 3d-<span class="hlt">City</span> Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rubinowicz, P.; Czynska, K.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In contemporary town planning protection of urban landscape is a significant issue. It regards especially those <span class="hlt">cities</span>, where urban structures are the result of ages of evolution and layering of historical development process. Specific panoramas and other strategic views with historic <span class="hlt">city</span> dominants can be an important part of the cultural heritage and genius loci. Other hand, protection of such expositions introduces limitations for future based <span class="hlt">city</span> development. Digital Earth observation techniques creates new possibilities for more accurate urban studies, monitoring of urbanization processes and measuring of <span class="hlt">city</span> landscape parameters. The paper examines possibilities of application of Lidar data and digital 3D-<span class="hlt">city</span> models for: a) evaluation of strategic <span class="hlt">city</span> views, b) mapping landscape absorption limits, and c) determination protection zones, where the urbanization and buildings height should be limited. In reference to this goal, the paper introduces a method of computational analysis of the <span class="hlt">city</span> landscape called Visual Protection Surface (VPS). The method allows to emulate a virtual surface above the <span class="hlt">city</span> including protection of a selected strategic views. The surface defines maximum height of buildings in such a way, that no new facility can be seen in any of selected views. The research includes also analyses of the quality of simulations according the form and precision of the input data: airborne Lidar / DSM model and more advanced 3D-<span class="hlt">city</span> models (incl. semantic of the geometry, like in <span class="hlt">City</span>GML format). The outcome can be a support for professional planning of tall building development. Application of VPS method have been prepared by a computer program developed by the authors (C++). Simulations were carried out on an example of the <span class="hlt">city</span> of Dresden.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED088265.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED088265.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Education of Inner <span class="hlt">City</span> Handicapped Children, Case Studies in Five <span class="hlt">Cities</span>. Volume I, Final Report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abram, Robert E.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Reported was an evaluation of the education of inner <span class="hlt">city</span> (IC) handicapped children in five <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Focused on were an assessment of present education programs, a comparison of services provided IC children with services provided non-inner <span class="hlt">city</span> (NIC) children, a determination of needs unique to handicapped children in inner <span class="hlt">city</span> areas, formulation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12343049','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12343049"><span id="translatedtitle">Exodus to <span class="hlt">cities</span> and quality of life.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, K</p> <p>1990-08-15</p> <p>Concerns about deterioration of the quality of life in mega-<span class="hlt">cities</span> in India, thought to be due to in-migration, are shown to be misplaced in this essay. Not only is the deterioration due merely to rising expectations, but its causes are problems on a national level. It is true that population growth in the 12 largest <span class="hlt">cities</span> in India, 3.35%, is more rapid than growth rates in the country as a whole, 2.22%. Bangalore is growing the fastest, 5.68% annually, but generally Indian <span class="hlt">cities</span> are growing less rapidly that many other Asian <span class="hlt">cities</span>, e.g. Dacca, 7.37%. Urbanization to the extent of 60.70% of the population is in fact necessary for development. The primary reason for in-migration is employment for men, and marriage accompanying employed husbands for women. Contrary to common opinion, the educational status of in- migrants is higher than that of the region, and female literacy is higher in <span class="hlt">cities</span> than in the rest of the state, e.g., 61% for Bombay, vs. 35% in Maharashtra State. The occupational status is frequently high: production, transport equipment operator, laborer, professional, technical executive managerial, sales and service. Furthermore, as urbanization proceeds, construction laborers and service workers are in demand. Quality of life defined by infant and maternal mortality is higher in <span class="hlt">cities</span> than in the surrounding rural area. This quality of life is the reason why people migrate to the <span class="hlt">city</span>. Unfortunately, frustrations are also rising as expectations for improved housing, water, air, transportation and consumer-durables rise faster than they can be supplied. PMID:12343049</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24669838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24669838"><span id="translatedtitle">On the Internet of Things, smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> and the WHO Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Al-Shorbaji, Najeeb M</p> <p>2014-03-27</p> <p>This article gives a brief overview of the Internet of Things (IoT) for <span class="hlt">cities</span>, offering examples of IoT-powered 21st century smart <span class="hlt">cities</span>, including the experience of the Spanish <span class="hlt">city</span> of Barcelona in implementing its own IoT-driven services to improve the quality of life of its people through measures that promote an eco-friendly, sustainable environment. The potential benefits as well as the challenges associated with IoT for <span class="hlt">cities</span> are discussed. Much of the 'big data' that are continuously generated by IoT sensors, devices, systems and services are geo-tagged or geo-located. The importance of having robust, intelligent geospatial analytics systems in place to process and make sense of such data in real time cannot therefore be overestimated. The authors argue that IoT-powered smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> stand better chances of becoming healthier <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Network and associated national networks have hundreds of member <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the world that could benefit from, and harness the power of, IoT to improve the health and well-being of their local populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-31/pdf/2013-12888.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-31/pdf/2013-12888.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 32556 - Safety Zone; 2013 Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-31</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2013 Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show, Atlantic Ocean... establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Ocean... Atlantic Ocean in Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD. In recent years, there have been unfortunate instances of jets and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8374.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-13/pdf/2010-8374.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 18778 - Safety Zone; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show 2010, Atlantic Ocean, Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-13</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show 2010, Atlantic Ocean... proposes establishing a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, Maryland... the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners and the public from the hazards associated with air show...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-16/pdf/2010-23177.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-16/pdf/2010-23177.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 56467 - Safety Zone; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Beachfront Air Show, Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, NJ</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-09-16</p> <p>... zone in an area of the Atlantic Ocean, Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, NJ. The temporary safety zone will restrict vessel traffic from a portion of the Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Beachfront Air Show, which is an aerial demonstration to be held over the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The temporary safety zone is necessary...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-31/pdf/2011-13329.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-31/pdf/2011-13329.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 31235 - Safety Zone; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-05-31</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span> Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Ocean... establish a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Ocean <span class="hlt">City</span>, MD to support the... Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the hazards associated with air show events. DATES: This rule...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3987056','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3987056"><span id="translatedtitle">On the Internet of Things, smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> and the WHO Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article gives a brief overview of the Internet of Things (IoT) for <span class="hlt">cities</span>, offering examples of IoT-powered 21st century smart <span class="hlt">cities</span>, including the experience of the Spanish <span class="hlt">city</span> of Barcelona in implementing its own IoT-driven services to improve the quality of life of its people through measures that promote an eco-friendly, sustainable environment. The potential benefits as well as the challenges associated with IoT for <span class="hlt">cities</span> are discussed. Much of the 'big data' that are continuously generated by IoT sensors, devices, systems and services are geo-tagged or geo-located. The importance of having robust, intelligent geospatial analytics systems in place to process and make sense of such data in real time cannot therefore be overestimated. The authors argue that IoT-powered smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> stand better chances of becoming healthier <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Network and associated national networks have hundreds of member <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the world that could benefit from, and harness the power of, IoT to improve the health and well-being of their local populations. PMID:24669838</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr62W2....3F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr62W2....3F"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Enrichment of a 3D <span class="hlt">City</span> Model with Various <span class="hlt">City</span>GML Modules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Floros, G.; Dimopoulou, E.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Recent developments in the massive 3D acquisition area made possible the generation of dense and precise 3D data, ranging from the representation of a simple building to a whole <span class="hlt">city</span>. Nowadays, increasing urbanization, rapid growth of urban areas, and subsequently development of mega <span class="hlt">cities</span>, are among the most important changes occurring worldwide. Therefore, developing techniques to manage these <span class="hlt">cities</span> seems quite necessary. The aim of this paper is to investigate the enrichment of a 3D <span class="hlt">City</span> Model with additional attributes, via appropriate <span class="hlt">City</span>GML Modules. The paper focuses on addressing the challenging issues that derive from a complex virtual 3D <span class="hlt">city</span> modeling. More specifically, the paper investigates a complex built-up area, presenting and analyzing its constituting structures. Within this framework, the following <span class="hlt">City</span>GML modules are investigated: Bridge, Transportation Complex, <span class="hlt">City</span>Furniture, Land Use and Vegetation. To this purpose, the BIM-Standard software Trimble SketchUp and the data conversion tool FME are used. The processes of both modeling and converting are analyzed in detail. General conclusions and future research considerations are presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24669838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24669838"><span id="translatedtitle">On the Internet of Things, smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> and the WHO Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Al-Shorbaji, Najeeb M</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article gives a brief overview of the Internet of Things (IoT) for <span class="hlt">cities</span>, offering examples of IoT-powered 21st century smart <span class="hlt">cities</span>, including the experience of the Spanish <span class="hlt">city</span> of Barcelona in implementing its own IoT-driven services to improve the quality of life of its people through measures that promote an eco-friendly, sustainable environment. The potential benefits as well as the challenges associated with IoT for <span class="hlt">cities</span> are discussed. Much of the 'big data' that are continuously generated by IoT sensors, devices, systems and services are geo-tagged or geo-located. The importance of having robust, intelligent geospatial analytics systems in place to process and make sense of such data in real time cannot therefore be overestimated. The authors argue that IoT-powered smart <span class="hlt">cities</span> stand better chances of becoming healthier <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Network and associated national networks have hundreds of member <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the world that could benefit from, and harness the power of, IoT to improve the health and well-being of their local populations. PMID:24669838</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED124227.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED124227.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Chicago <span class="hlt">City</span>-Wide Institute of the <span class="hlt">City</span> Colleges of Chicago.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chicago City Colleges, IL. Chicago City-Wide Inst.</p> <p></p> <p>This document describes the Chicago <span class="hlt">City</span>-Wide Institute, a non-campus college established in 1974 as the ninth administrative unit of the <span class="hlt">City</span> Colleges of Chicago. The basic mission of the Institute is to develop and operate programs at the college level for adults who cannot or choose not to go to a traditional college campus. The Institute also…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Carbon+AND+footprint&pg=3&id=EJ734878','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Carbon+AND+footprint&pg=3&id=EJ734878"><span id="translatedtitle">The Solar <span class="hlt">City</span> Daegu 2050 Project: Visions for a Sustainable <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kim, Jong-dall; Han, Dong-hi; Na, Jung-gyu</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The Solar <span class="hlt">City</span> Daegu 2050 Project (SCD 2050) represents a comprehensive model for shaping the future of this <span class="hlt">city</span> of 2.5 million residents with a mixed industrial and services economic base. Its specific aims are as follows: realization of a carbon footprint consistent with standards of global sustainability and equity; the development of a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homelessness+AND+united+AND+states&pg=5&id=ED335430','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homelessness+AND+united+AND+states&pg=5&id=ED335430"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: 1990. A 30-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Waxman, Laura DeKoven; Reyes, Lilia M.</p> <p></p> <p>To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in urban America during 1990, the U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed the 30 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> whose mayors are members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. This report summarizes survey findings. The survey sought information from each <span class="hlt">city</span> on the following questions: (1) the demand for emergency…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homelessness+AND+united+AND+states&pg=5&id=ED343984','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homelessness+AND+united+AND+states&pg=5&id=ED343984"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>: 1991. A 28-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Waxman, Laura DeKoven</p> <p></p> <p>To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in urban America during 1991, The U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed 28 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> whose mayors are members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. The survey sought information and estimates from each <span class="hlt">city</span> on: (1) the demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter and the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED471937.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED471937.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, 2002: A 25-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lowe, Eugene T.</p> <p></p> <p>To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span> during 2002, 25 major <span class="hlt">cities</span> completed surveys regarding demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter and capacity of local agencies to meet the demand; causes of hunger and homelessness and demographics of populations experiencing these problems; exemplary programs or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED463348.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED463348.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>, 2001: A 27-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lowe, Eugene T.</p> <p></p> <p>To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span> during 2001, data were collected from 27 <span class="hlt">cities</span> on demands for emergency food assistance and shelter and the capacity of local agencies to meet that demand; causes of hunger and homelessness and demographics of populations experiencing them; exemplary responses; availability of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=governance&id=EJ980972','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=governance&id=EJ980972"><span id="translatedtitle">Developing a <span class="hlt">City</span> Governance Index: Based on Surveys in Five Major Chinese <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yong, Guo; Wenhao, Cheng</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This article explores the establishment of a <span class="hlt">City</span> Governance Index to evaluate the levels of governance of <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We identified seven key dimensions of governance and then divided each of them into four stages: input, mechanism, result and effect. Each dimension/stage mix is correlated with indicators that can be measured with both objective and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-07/pdf/2013-13519.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-07/pdf/2013-13519.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 34300 - Safety Zone; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta, Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>, AZ</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-06-07</p> <p>...The Coast Guard is proposing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the Colorado River in Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>, Arizona for the Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta on August 10, 2013. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew, spectators, participating vessels, and other vessels and users of the waterway. Persons and vessels would be prohibited from......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-06-19/pdf/2012-14845.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-06-19/pdf/2012-14845.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 36439 - Safety Zone; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>, AZ</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-06-19</p> <p>.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-01/pdf/2011-16539.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-01/pdf/2011-16539.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 38568 - Safety Zone; Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta, Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>, AZ</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the Colorado River in Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span>, Arizona for the Bullhead <span class="hlt">City</span> Regatta on August 13, 2011. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew, spectators, participating vessels, and other vessels and users of the waterway. Persons and vessels would be prohibited from......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=united+AND+states+AND+homelessness&pg=6&id=ED296018','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=united+AND+states+AND+homelessness&pg=6&id=ED296018"><span id="translatedtitle">A Status Report on Homeless Families in America's <span class="hlt">Cities</span>. A 29-<span class="hlt">City</span> Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Waxman, Laura DeKoven; Reyes, Lilia M.</p> <p></p> <p>This survey assesses the status of homelessness among families in <span class="hlt">cities</span>. The data were collected from <span class="hlt">city</span> officials during April 1987. The findings include the following: (1) the number of homeless families increased by 31 percent during the last two years; (2) families represented one-third of the homeless and a single parent headed two-thirds…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231791-benchmarking-energy-saving-tool-low-carbon-cities-best-cities','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231791-benchmarking-energy-saving-tool-low-carbon-cities-best-cities"><span id="translatedtitle">Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Low Carbon <span class="hlt">Cities</span> (BEST <span class="hlt">Cities</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href=""></a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>BEST-<span class="hlt">Cities</span> is designed to provide <span class="hlt">city</span> authorities with strategies they can follow to reduce <span class="hlt">city</span>-wide carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions. The tool quickly assesses local energy use and energy-related CO2 emissions across nine sectors (i.e., industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space), giving officials a comprehensive perspective on their local carbon performance. <span class="hlt">Cities</span> can also use the toolmore » to benchmark their energy and emissions performance to other <span class="hlt">cities</span> inside and outside China, and identify those sectors with the greatest energy saving and emissions reduction potential.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14..790M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14..790M"><span id="translatedtitle">Air pollution assessment on <span class="hlt">city</span> of Tirana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mandija, F.; Zoga, P.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Air pollution is one of the hot topics on nowadays studies. This problem is often encountered on urban centers, especially on metropolitan areas. These areas are usually characterized by densely population, heavy traffic rates and the presence of many industrial plants on their suburbs. Problems regarding to air pollution on these areas are more evident over metropolitan areas in developing countries. Air pollution is mostly related to health effects, especially in outdoor environments. These effects regards primarily on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Air pollution assessment on a specific area requires not only the estimation of pollutant concentrations in that area, but also determination of their principal sources as well as prediction of eventual scenarios on the area under investigation. This study is focused on air pollution assessment on the <span class="hlt">city</span> of Tirana, which is the major urban centre and the capital <span class="hlt">city</span> of Albania. This <span class="hlt">city</span> has about one million inhabitants. During the last 20 years, its population has grown about four fold, and it is still growing. Because of Albania is a developing country, its capital <span class="hlt">city</span> is involved on serious environmental problems. Considering these facts, we have conducted continuous monitoring campaigns on several sites of Tirana. These monitoring campaigns consist on measurement of several pollutant gases (SO2, CO, CO2, NOx, etc.) and particulate matter over a period of 20 months. In this paper there are obtained diurnal and annual variations of pollutant concentrations, there is modeled their spatial distributions over the area of the <span class="hlt">city</span>, and there are estimated the potential contributions of principal sources like traffic and industrial plants. During the entire monitoring campaign there are recorded also meteorological parameters, like temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, precipitations, etc. In this way we have tried to obtain the correlations between pollutant</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22518881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22518881"><span id="translatedtitle">Shrinking <span class="hlt">cities</span>: urban challenges of globalization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina; Audirac, Ivonne; Fol, Sylvie; Cunningham-Sabot, Emmanuèle</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Urban shrinkage is not a new phenomenon. It has been documented in a large literature analyzing the social and economic issues that have led to population flight, resulting, in the worse cases, in the eventual abandonment of blocks of housing and neighbourhoods. Analysis of urban shrinkage should take into account the new realization that this phenomenon is now global and multidimensional — but also little understood in all its manifestations. Thus, as the world's population increasingly becomes urban, orthodox views of urban decline need redefinition. The symposium includes articles from 10 urban analysts working on 30 <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the globe. These analysts belong to the Shrinking <span class="hlt">Cities</span> International Research Network (SCIRN), whose collaborative work aims to understand different types of <span class="hlt">city</span> shrinkage and the role that different approaches, policies and strategies have played in the regeneration of these <span class="hlt">cities</span>. In this way the symposium will inform both a rich diversity of analytical perspectives and country-based studies of the challenges faced by shrinking <span class="hlt">cities</span>. It will also disseminate SCIRN's research results from the last 3 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22518881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22518881"><span id="translatedtitle">Shrinking <span class="hlt">cities</span>: urban challenges of globalization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina; Audirac, Ivonne; Fol, Sylvie; Cunningham-Sabot, Emmanuèle</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Urban shrinkage is not a new phenomenon. It has been documented in a large literature analyzing the social and economic issues that have led to population flight, resulting, in the worse cases, in the eventual abandonment of blocks of housing and neighbourhoods. Analysis of urban shrinkage should take into account the new realization that this phenomenon is now global and multidimensional — but also little understood in all its manifestations. Thus, as the world's population increasingly becomes urban, orthodox views of urban decline need redefinition. The symposium includes articles from 10 urban analysts working on 30 <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the globe. These analysts belong to the Shrinking <span class="hlt">Cities</span> International Research Network (SCIRN), whose collaborative work aims to understand different types of <span class="hlt">city</span> shrinkage and the role that different approaches, policies and strategies have played in the regeneration of these <span class="hlt">cities</span>. In this way the symposium will inform both a rich diversity of analytical perspectives and country-based studies of the challenges faced by shrinking <span class="hlt">cities</span>. It will also disseminate SCIRN's research results from the last 3 years. PMID:22518881</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title15-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title15-vol2-part740-appNo-.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title15-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title15-vol2-part740-appNo-.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 740 - Country Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... Federal Register citations affecting Supplement No. 1 to Part 740, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... Kingdom United States Uruguay Vanuatu Vatican <span class="hlt">City</span> Venezuela Western Sahara <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> Zambia Zimbabwe Country... Turkmenistan X X Ukraine X United Arab Emirates X X Uzbekistan X X Vietnam X X <span class="hlt">Yemen</span> X X Country Group E...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4500559','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4500559"><span id="translatedtitle">Do Global <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Enable Global Views? Using Twitter to Quantify the Level of Geographical Awareness of U.S. <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Han, Su Yeon; Tsou, Ming-Hsiang; Clarke, Keith C.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Dynamic social media content, such as Twitter messages, can be used to examine individuals’ beliefs and perceptions. By analyzing Twitter messages, this study examines how Twitter users exchanged and recognized toponyms (<span class="hlt">city</span> names) for different <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the United States. The frequency and variety of <span class="hlt">city</span> names found in their online conversations were used to identify the unique spatiotemporal patterns of “geographical awareness” for Twitter users. A new analytic method, Knowledge Discovery in Cyberspace for Geographical Awareness (KDCGA), is introduced to help identify the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of geographic awareness among social media conversations. Twitter data were collected across 50 U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Thousands of <span class="hlt">city</span> names around the world were extracted from a large volume of Twitter messages (over 5 million tweets) by using the Twitter Application Programming Interface (APIs) and Python language computer programs. The percentages of distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names (<span class="hlt">cities</span> located in distant states or other countries far away from the locations of Twitter users) were used to estimate the level of global geographical awareness for Twitter users in each U.S. <span class="hlt">city</span>. A Global awareness index (GAI) was developed to quantify the level of geographical awareness of Twitter users from within the same <span class="hlt">city</span>. Our findings are that: (1) the level of geographical awareness varies depending on when and where Twitter messages are posted, yet Twitter users from big <span class="hlt">cities</span> are more aware of the names of international <span class="hlt">cities</span> or distant US <span class="hlt">cities</span> than users from mid-size <span class="hlt">cities</span>; (2) Twitter users have an increased awareness of other <span class="hlt">city</span> names far away from their home <span class="hlt">city</span> during holiday seasons; and (3) Twitter users are more aware of nearby <span class="hlt">city</span> names than distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names, and more aware of big <span class="hlt">city</span> names rather than small <span class="hlt">city</span> names. PMID:26167942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26167942','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26167942"><span id="translatedtitle">Do Global <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Enable Global Views? Using Twitter to Quantify the Level of Geographical Awareness of U.S. <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Han, Su Yeon; Tsou, Ming-Hsiang; Clarke, Keith C</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Dynamic social media content, such as Twitter messages, can be used to examine individuals' beliefs and perceptions. By analyzing Twitter messages, this study examines how Twitter users exchanged and recognized toponyms (<span class="hlt">city</span> names) for different <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the United States. The frequency and variety of <span class="hlt">city</span> names found in their online conversations were used to identify the unique spatiotemporal patterns of "geographical awareness" for Twitter users. A new analytic method, Knowledge Discovery in Cyberspace for Geographical Awareness (KDCGA), is introduced to help identify the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of geographic awareness among social media conversations. Twitter data were collected across 50 U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Thousands of <span class="hlt">city</span> names around the world were extracted from a large volume of Twitter messages (over 5 million tweets) by using the Twitter Application Programming Interface (APIs) and Python language computer programs. The percentages of distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names (<span class="hlt">cities</span> located in distant states or other countries far away from the locations of Twitter users) were used to estimate the level of global geographical awareness for Twitter users in each U.S. <span class="hlt">city</span>. A Global awareness index (GAI) was developed to quantify the level of geographical awareness of Twitter users from within the same <span class="hlt">city</span>. Our findings are that: (1) the level of geographical awareness varies depending on when and where Twitter messages are posted, yet Twitter users from big <span class="hlt">cities</span> are more aware of the names of international <span class="hlt">cities</span> or distant US <span class="hlt">cities</span> than users from mid-size <span class="hlt">cities</span>; (2) Twitter users have an increased awareness of other <span class="hlt">city</span> names far away from their home <span class="hlt">city</span> during holiday seasons; and (3) Twitter users are more aware of nearby <span class="hlt">city</span> names than distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names, and more aware of big <span class="hlt">city</span> names rather than small <span class="hlt">city</span> names.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26167942','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26167942"><span id="translatedtitle">Do Global <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Enable Global Views? Using Twitter to Quantify the Level of Geographical Awareness of U.S. <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Han, Su Yeon; Tsou, Ming-Hsiang; Clarke, Keith C</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Dynamic social media content, such as Twitter messages, can be used to examine individuals' beliefs and perceptions. By analyzing Twitter messages, this study examines how Twitter users exchanged and recognized toponyms (<span class="hlt">city</span> names) for different <span class="hlt">cities</span> in the United States. The frequency and variety of <span class="hlt">city</span> names found in their online conversations were used to identify the unique spatiotemporal patterns of "geographical awareness" for Twitter users. A new analytic method, Knowledge Discovery in Cyberspace for Geographical Awareness (KDCGA), is introduced to help identify the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of geographic awareness among social media conversations. Twitter data were collected across 50 U.S. <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Thousands of <span class="hlt">city</span> names around the world were extracted from a large volume of Twitter messages (over 5 million tweets) by using the Twitter Application Programming Interface (APIs) and Python language computer programs. The percentages of distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names (<span class="hlt">cities</span> located in distant states or other countries far away from the locations of Twitter users) were used to estimate the level of global geographical awareness for Twitter users in each U.S. <span class="hlt">city</span>. A Global awareness index (GAI) was developed to quantify the level of geographical awareness of Twitter users from within the same <span class="hlt">city</span>. Our findings are that: (1) the level of geographical awareness varies depending on when and where Twitter messages are posted, yet Twitter users from big <span class="hlt">cities</span> are more aware of the names of international <span class="hlt">cities</span> or distant US <span class="hlt">cities</span> than users from mid-size <span class="hlt">cities</span>; (2) Twitter users have an increased awareness of other <span class="hlt">city</span> names far away from their home <span class="hlt">city</span> during holiday seasons; and (3) Twitter users are more aware of nearby <span class="hlt">city</span> names than distant <span class="hlt">city</span> names, and more aware of big <span class="hlt">city</span> names rather than small <span class="hlt">city</span> names. PMID:26167942</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27336728','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27336728"><span id="translatedtitle">How to Study the <span class="hlt">City</span> on Instagram.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boy, John D; Uitermark, Justus</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We introduce Instagram as a data source for use by scholars in urban studies and neighboring disciplines and propose ways to operationalize key concepts in the study of <span class="hlt">cities</span>. These data can help shed light on segregation, the formation of subcultures, strategies of distinction, and status hierarchies in the <span class="hlt">city</span>. Drawing on two datasets of geotagged Instagram posts from Amsterdam and Copenhagen collected over a twelve-week period, we present a proof of concept for how to explore and visualize sociospatial patterns and divisions in these two <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We take advantage of both the social and the geographic aspects of the data, using network analysis to identify distinct groups of users and metrics of unevenness and diversity to identify socio-spatial divisions. We also discuss some of the limitations of these data and methods and suggest ways in which they can complement established quantitative and qualitative approaches in urban scholarship.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/205297','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/205297"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> of Chicago Brownfield case study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gordon, K.J.; Anderson, S.W.; Albano, J.M.</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>Dealing with complex environmental issues frequently inhibits redevelopment of industrial sites in urban settings. In 1993, the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Chicago (<span class="hlt">City</span>) Department of Planning and Development, Department of Buildings, and Mayor`s Office joined the Department of Environment to investigate reuse of former industrial/commercial properties (brownfields) suspected of environmental or industrial contamination. The collective result is the Brownfield Program, a three-pronged initiative: Brownfield Pilot Program, Brownfield Forum, and Brownfield Research. Black and Veatch Waste Science, Inc. (Waste Science) carried the Brownfield Program forward by performing a Phase 1 environmental site assessment for the <span class="hlt">City</span> on one of five pilot sites. Waste Science subsequently completed a Phase 2 environmental site assessment and Phase 3 site remediation at the site. Waste oil and PCB-contaminated soil was removed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27336728','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27336728"><span id="translatedtitle">How to Study the <span class="hlt">City</span> on Instagram.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boy, John D; Uitermark, Justus</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We introduce Instagram as a data source for use by scholars in urban studies and neighboring disciplines and propose ways to operationalize key concepts in the study of <span class="hlt">cities</span>. These data can help shed light on segregation, the formation of subcultures, strategies of distinction, and status hierarchies in the <span class="hlt">city</span>. Drawing on two datasets of geotagged Instagram posts from Amsterdam and Copenhagen collected over a twelve-week period, we present a proof of concept for how to explore and visualize sociospatial patterns and divisions in these two <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We take advantage of both the social and the geographic aspects of the data, using network analysis to identify distinct groups of users and metrics of unevenness and diversity to identify socio-spatial divisions. We also discuss some of the limitations of these data and methods and suggest ways in which they can complement established quantitative and qualitative approaches in urban scholarship. PMID:27336728</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4919013','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4919013"><span id="translatedtitle">How to Study the <span class="hlt">City</span> on Instagram</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Uitermark, Justus</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We introduce Instagram as a data source for use by scholars in urban studies and neighboring disciplines and propose ways to operationalize key concepts in the study of <span class="hlt">cities</span>. These data can help shed light on segregation, the formation of subcultures, strategies of distinction, and status hierarchies in the <span class="hlt">city</span>. Drawing on two datasets of geotagged Instagram posts from Amsterdam and Copenhagen collected over a twelve-week period, we present a proof of concept for how to explore and visualize sociospatial patterns and divisions in these two <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We take advantage of both the social and the geographic aspects of the data, using network analysis to identify distinct groups of users and metrics of unevenness and diversity to identify socio-spatial divisions. We also discuss some of the limitations of these data and methods and suggest ways in which they can complement established quantitative and qualitative approaches in urban scholarship. PMID:27336728</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11780107','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11780107"><span id="translatedtitle">Did Nile flooding sink two ancient <span class="hlt">cities</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Said, Rushdi</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The discovery of the two <span class="hlt">cities</span> of Herakleion and East Canopus under the waters of the Bay of Abu Qir (east of Alexandria, Egypt) stirred worldwide attention when it was first announced in the summer of 2000. Their disappearance some 1,250 years ago has been ascribed by Stanley, Goddio and Schnepp to a strong Nile flood that caused riverbank failure and the destruction of the two <span class="hlt">cities</span>, rather than to the action of earthquakes, as was first proposed when the ruins were discovered. But I believe that this interpretation is flawed, because no flood could have reached the Abu Qir Bay at the time of the disappearance of the two <span class="hlt">cities</span>, as the Canopic branch of the Nile, along whose banks they were situated, had dried to a trickle more than 200 years earlier. PMID:11780107</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982STIN...8327472M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982STIN...8327472M"><span id="translatedtitle">Putting renewable energy to work in <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mara, G.</p> <p>1982-06-01</p> <p>Guidelines are provided to help local energy officials assess their own urban energy contexts, and indications are given of how different energy technologies might fit within different <span class="hlt">city</span> contexts or neighborhoods. Applications discussed include domestic hot water, heating and cooling of buildings, and community heating and cooling systems. Electricity, industrial process heat and fuels from revewable resources are included. Incremental planning as a way of making the best use of scarce resources is discussed, and the conservation and renewable options are overviewed. Land use for energy programs is discussed, and the kind of information needed on the <span class="hlt">city</span>'s existing building stock is given. Information needed on energy supply and distribution is also discussed. Socioeconomic factors of the <span class="hlt">city</span>'s energy and situation and related action are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21542205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21542205"><span id="translatedtitle">LGBTQs in the <span class="hlt">city</span>, queering urban space.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Doderer, Yvonne P</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Since the 1960s, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) culture has developed in big <span class="hlt">cities</span> and metropolises everywhere (not only in the West, but also in Asia, Latin America and indeed Africa). This essay examines how <span class="hlt">cities</span> provide the spatial conditions necessary for the formation of such emancipatory movements based on identity politics and strategies which transcend binary gender dualism. The starting point of this investigation is my thesis that only urban life enables LGBTQ individuals to live their lives fully, realize their (sexual) identities, and furthermore organize themselves collectively, become publicly visible, and appropriate urban, societal and political spaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS039-85-029&hterms=recreation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Drecreation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS039-85-029&hterms=recreation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Drecreation"><span id="translatedtitle">Oklahoma <span class="hlt">City</span>, Canadian River, OK, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>This view of Oklahoma <span class="hlt">City</span>, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the <span class="hlt">city</span> and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21542205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21542205"><span id="translatedtitle">LGBTQs in the <span class="hlt">city</span>, queering urban space.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Doderer, Yvonne P</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Since the 1960s, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) culture has developed in big <span class="hlt">cities</span> and metropolises everywhere (not only in the West, but also in Asia, Latin America and indeed Africa). This essay examines how <span class="hlt">cities</span> provide the spatial conditions necessary for the formation of such emancipatory movements based on identity politics and strategies which transcend binary gender dualism. The starting point of this investigation is my thesis that only urban life enables LGBTQ individuals to live their lives fully, realize their (sexual) identities, and furthermore organize themselves collectively, become publicly visible, and appropriate urban, societal and political spaces. PMID:21542205</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/773961','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/773961"><span id="translatedtitle">The vision of a smart <span class="hlt">city</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hall, R.E.; Bowerman, B.; Braverman, J.; Taylor, J.; Todosow, H.; Von Wimmersperg, U.</p> <p>2000-09-28</p> <p>The vision of ''Smart <span class="hlt">Cities</span>'' is the urban center of the future, made safe, secure environmentally green, and efficient because all structures--whether for power, water, transportation, etc. are designed, constructed, and maintained making use of advanced, integrated materials, sensors, electronics, and networks which are interfaced with computerized systems comprised of databases, tracking, and decision-making algorithms. This paper discusses a current initiative being led by the Brookhaven National Laboratory to create a research, development and deployment agenda that advances this vision. This is anchored in the application of new technology to current urban center issues while looking 20 years into the future and conceptualizing a <span class="hlt">city</span> framework that may exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6540918','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6540918"><span id="translatedtitle">Philadelphia-Atlantic <span class="hlt">City</span>: highballing the highrollers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kizzia, T.</p> <p>1980-12-08</p> <p>An existing 65 mi rail corridor from Philadelphia, Pa., to Atlantic <span class="hlt">City</span>, N.J., is being studied for redevelopment. The French Compagnie General d'Electricite wants to develop this route for a high speed electric system. Trains would cover the distance in 40 minutes, with top speeds hitting 125 mph. Potential ridership includes casino visitors to Atlantic <span class="hlt">City</span> and commuters into Philadelphia. The status of the project and its future are outlined. Several other foreign companies are interested in developing some rail lines in the U.S. Congress is taking steps to encourage these private investments in the U.S. rail system. (1 photo)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25216789','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25216789"><span id="translatedtitle">Empowerment for Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> and communities in Korea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moon, Ji Young; Nam, Eun Woo; Dhakal, Sarita</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> project started in 1998 in Korea. Around the world, public health and healthy <span class="hlt">cities</span> are becoming bigger and bigger priorities. Capacity mapping is an important tool for improving a country's health status. This study aims to review the initiation of the Korean "Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span>" project. Korea follows a bottom-up approach for the development of Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> policies and has implemented plans accordingly. Korea has created a unique program through Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>; it has developed a Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> act, indicators for evaluating the program, a health impact assessment program, an award system, and a domestic networking system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25216789','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25216789"><span id="translatedtitle">Empowerment for Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> and communities in Korea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moon, Ji Young; Nam, Eun Woo; Dhakal, Sarita</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span> project started in 1998 in Korea. Around the world, public health and healthy <span class="hlt">cities</span> are becoming bigger and bigger priorities. Capacity mapping is an important tool for improving a country's health status. This study aims to review the initiation of the Korean "Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span>" project. Korea follows a bottom-up approach for the development of Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> policies and has implemented plans accordingly. Korea has created a unique program through Healthy <span class="hlt">Cities</span>; it has developed a Healthy <span class="hlt">City</span> act, indicators for evaluating the program, a health impact assessment program, an award system, and a domestic networking system. PMID:25216789</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26356976','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26356976"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Forensics: Using Visual Elements to Predict Non-Visual <span class="hlt">City</span> Attributes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arietta, Sean M; Efros, Alexei A; Ramamoorthi, Ravi; Agrawala, Maneesh</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We present a method for automatically identifying and validating predictive relationships between the visual appearance of a <span class="hlt">city</span> and its non-visual attributes (e.g. crime statistics, housing prices, population density etc.). Given a set of street-level images and (location, <span class="hlt">city</span>-attribute-value) pairs of measurements, we first identify visual elements in the images that are discriminative of the attribute. We then train a predictor by learning a set of weights over these elements using non-linear Support Vector Regression. To perform these operations efficiently, we implement a scalable distributed processing framework that speeds up the main computational bottleneck (extracting visual elements) by an order of magnitude. This speedup allows us to investigate a variety of <span class="hlt">city</span> attributes across 6 different American <span class="hlt">cities</span>. We find that indeed there is a predictive relationship between visual elements and a number of <span class="hlt">city</span> attributes including violent crime rates, theft rates, housing prices, population density, tree presence, graffiti presence, and the perception of danger. We also test human performance for predicting theft based on street-level images and show that our predictor outperforms this baseline with 33% higher accuracy on average. Finally, we present three prototype applications that use our system to (1) define the visual boundary of <span class="hlt">city</span> neighborhoods, (2) generate walking directions that avoid or seek out exposure to <span class="hlt">city</span> attributes, and (3) validate user-specified visual elements for prediction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24722889','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24722889"><span id="translatedtitle">Living in a network of scaling <span class="hlt">cities</span> and finite resources.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qubbaj, Murad R; Shutters, Shade T; Muneepeerakul, Rachata</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Many urban phenomena exhibit remarkable regularity in the form of nonlinear scaling behaviors, but their implications on a system of networked <span class="hlt">cities</span> has never been investigated. Such knowledge is crucial for our ability to harness the complexity of urban processes to further sustainability science. In this paper, we develop a dynamical modeling framework that embeds population-resource dynamics-a generalized Lotka-Volterra system with modifications to incorporate the urban scaling behaviors-in complex networks in which <span class="hlt">cities</span> may be linked to the resources of other <span class="hlt">cities</span> and people may migrate in pursuit of higher welfare. We find that isolated <span class="hlt">cities</span> (i.e., no migration) are susceptible to collapse if they do not have access to adequate resources. Links to other <span class="hlt">cities</span> may help <span class="hlt">cities</span> that would otherwise collapse due to insufficient resources. The effects of inter-<span class="hlt">city</span> links, however, can vary due to the interplay between the nonlinear scaling behaviors and network structure. The long-term population level of a <span class="hlt">city</span> is, in many settings, largely a function of the <span class="hlt">city</span>'s access to resources over which the <span class="hlt">city</span> has little or no competition. Nonetheless, careful investigation of dynamics is required to gain mechanistic understanding of a particular <span class="hlt">city</span>-resource network because <span class="hlt">cities</span> and resources may collapse and the scaling behaviors may influence the effects of inter-<span class="hlt">city</span> links, thereby distorting what topological metrics really measure. PMID:24722889</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-20/pdf/2010-9009.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-20/pdf/2010-9009.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20672 - Additional Identifying Information Associated With Persons Whose Property and Interests in...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-20</p> <p>..., <span class="hlt">Yemen</span>; Diplomatic Passport 000021986 (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>); alt. Diplomatic Passport A011892 (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>); alt. Diplomatic Passport A009829 (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>); National ID No. 1417576 (<span class="hlt">Yemen</span>) issued 7 Jan 1996; Passport 00514146...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ecosystem+AND+health&pg=5&id=EJ846552','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ecosystem+AND+health&pg=5&id=EJ846552"><span id="translatedtitle">OneCleveland: Connecting the Digital <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gonick, Lev; Junnar, Priya</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A new urban landscape characterizes <span class="hlt">cities</span> around the globe, eclipsing the smokestacks of the 19th century and skyscrapers of the 20th century, yet the topography of the 21st century digital cityscape is almost invisible. In sharp contrast to the limits of interaction imposed by geography, architecture, and physical distances characteristic of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Caterpillars&pg=4&id=ED434022','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Caterpillars&pg=4&id=ED434022"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Butterflies and Moths [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16355790','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16355790"><span id="translatedtitle">[Landscape ecological planning of Jiaozuo <span class="hlt">city</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Wei; Fang, Chuanglin; Li, Hongwei</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>With the application of the principles of landscape ecology and the techniques of geographic information systems, the landscape of Jiaozuo <span class="hlt">city</span> was divided into six types, i. e., farmland, garden plot, woodland, residential and industrial area, waters, and others. The landscape diversity, dominance, fragmentation, and isolation indexes were calculated by models and GIS to analyze the spatial patterns of these landscape types. Based on the optimization of landscape spatial patterns, a pattern for developing a rational and natural ecosystem in Jiaozuo <span class="hlt">city</span> was proposed, i. e., keeping four or five large natural patches, planning small artificial green patches, linking the large and small patches by various corridors to ensure the ecosystem inside the <span class="hlt">city</span> to circulate well, combining residential areas properly to form a urban troop with Jiaozuo town as the center and with seven surrounding towns joined through highways to form a network <span class="hlt">city</span> pattern. After doing these, urban built-up areas could be linked each other, and inlayed in a natural ecological matrix. This pattern could strengthen the ecological connection, raise the stability of the ecosystem, and maintain the balance of urban ecological system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=scorpion&id=ED434027','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=scorpion&id=ED434027"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: Spiders and Scorpions [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED555640.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED555640.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Innovation and the <span class="hlt">City</span>. Part II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Forman, Adam; Giles, David; Kleiman, Neil; Ko, Jae</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>As <span class="hlt">cities</span> across the country and globe continue to generate new solutions to a wide variety of vexing problems, sharing information about what works and what doesn't has become more important than ever. Yet, outside of a few prominent policies, the vast majority of successful municipal experiments never reach a national audience or, for that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4540171','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4540171"><span id="translatedtitle">Determinants of urban sprawl in European <span class="hlt">cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alvanides, Seraphim; Garrod, Guy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper provides empirical evidence that helps to answer several key questions relating to the extent of urban sprawl in Europe. Building on the monocentric <span class="hlt">city</span> model, this study uses existing data sources to derive a set of panel data for 282 European <span class="hlt">cities</span> at three time points (1990, 2000 and 2006). Two indices of urban sprawl are calculated that, respectively, reflect changes in artificial area and the levels of urban fragmentation for each <span class="hlt">city</span>. These are supplemented by a set of data on various economic and geographical variables that might explain the variation of the two indices. Using a Hausman-Taylor estimator and random regressors to control for the possible correlation between explanatory variables and unobservable <span class="hlt">city</span>-level effects, we find that the fundamental conclusions of the standard monocentric model are valid in the European context for both indices. Although the variables generated by the monocentric model explain a large part of the variation of artificial area, their explanatory power for modelling the fragmentation index is relatively low. PMID:26321770</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Solana&id=EJ1072453','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Solana&id=EJ1072453"><span id="translatedtitle">Adolescents' Sedentary Behaviors in Two European <span class="hlt">Cities</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aibar Solana, Alberto; Bois, Julien E.; Zaragoza, Javier; Bru, Noëlle; Paillard, Thierry; Generelo, Eduardo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine and compare the correlates of objective sedentary behavior (SB) and nonschool self-reported SB in adolescents from 2 midsized <span class="hlt">cities</span>, 1 in France (Tarbes) and 1 in Spain (Huesca). Stability of objective SB and nonschool self-reported SB were also assessed at different time points during 1 academic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED069594.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED069594.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching About Life in the <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wisniewski, Richard, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of this yearbook is to examine key aspects of American urban society, to identify issues that are central to all social studies instruction about the <span class="hlt">city</span>, and to present specific ideas on how teachers can teach about these issues both inside and outside the classroom. Fifteen social scientists and educators contributed articles to the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED517507.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED517507.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Building New York <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Innovation Economy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Grady, Jim; Bowles, Jonathan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Academic research institutions have long been important economic anchors for New York <span class="hlt">City</span>. They provide thousands of jobs and serve as a magnet for talented students and faculty, who inject hundreds of millions of dollars into the local economy through federal research grants. Yet, even though New York's concentration of top-fight scientific…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=african+AND+british&pg=5&id=EJ814236','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=african+AND+british&pg=5&id=EJ814236"><span id="translatedtitle">Educational Aspirations in Inner <span class="hlt">City</span> Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Strand, Steve; Winston, Joe</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This research aimed to assess the nature and level of pupils' educational aspirations and to elucidate the factors that influence these aspirations. A sample of five inner <span class="hlt">city</span> comprehensive secondary schools were selected by their local authority because of poor pupil attendance, below-average examination results and low rates of continuing in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=emigration&pg=7&id=EJ132040','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=emigration&pg=7&id=EJ132040"><span id="translatedtitle">How the Racial Composition of <span class="hlt">Cities</span> Changes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Long, Larry H.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Uses available data on components of population change (natural increase and net migration to answer whether the increasing percent black in central <span class="hlt">cities</span> of urban areas is due to an increase in blacks, black immigration, or white emigration to suburbs. [Available from Land Economics, c/o University of Wisconsin, Social Science Building, Madison,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED031805.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED031805.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Concept of a Model <span class="hlt">City</span> Complex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Giammatteo, Michael C.</p> <p></p> <p>The model <span class="hlt">cities</span> concept calls for an educational complex which includes the nonschool educational institutions and facilities of the community as well as actual school facilities. Such an educational complex would require a wider administrative base than the school yet smaller than the municipal government. Examples of nonschool educational…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=technology+AND+Tourism&id=EJ965643','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=technology+AND+Tourism&id=EJ965643"><span id="translatedtitle">Innovative Degree Programs Matched to <span class="hlt">City</span> Strengths</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sukhatme, Uday</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In recent years, IUPUI has steadily acquired a considerable national reputation as an up-and-coming university. Some of the reasons for this recognition include the RISE Initiative and the large number of innovative degree programs recently started at IUPUI based on campus strengths and the priorities of the <span class="hlt">city</span> of Indianapolis. Some specific…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936453.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ936453.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">When the <span class="hlt">City</span> Is Your Classroom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Riggio, Milla Cozart; Sapolis, Lisa G.; Chen, Xiangming</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Students who attend Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, have elected to spend their university years in one of America's most distinguished small cosmopolitan <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Over the last two decades as the world has become rapidly urbanized, Hartford has become a critically contested site where economic poverty, environmental degradation,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355382.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355382.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Reducing Adverse Impact: One <span class="hlt">City</span>'s Efforts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Prewitt, Jeff</p> <p></p> <p>Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the <span class="hlt">City</span> of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken: intense…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dhaka&pg=2&id=EJ469564','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dhaka&pg=2&id=EJ469564"><span id="translatedtitle">Waste Management in Greater Dhaka <span class="hlt">City</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rahman, M. H.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This study focuses on the environmental degradation of Greater Dhaka <span class="hlt">City</span> (GDC) resulting from pollution created by the indiscriminate disposal of industrial wastes, open dumping of solid wastes, inadequate treatment and disposal of domestic sewage, and unplanned disposal of leachate from agricultural land. Measures to protect the GDC environment…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol5-sec372-221.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol5-sec372-221.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 372.221 - Twin <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... commercial zones, utilizing the general population-mileage formula as set forth in § 372.241, each of the following combinations of <span class="hlt">cities</span> shall be considered as a single municipality: (a) Having a population equal to the sum of their combined populations, and (b) Having boundaries comprised of their...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED119977.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED119977.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Faculty Mentoring of Undergraduates at <span class="hlt">City</span> College.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reitz, Edward S.</p> <p></p> <p>In an effort to meet the diverse interests of the students and to move away from a rigidly structured curriculum, the Civil Engineering Department at the <span class="hlt">City</span> College of New York has offered the civil engineering student an elective program that incorporates engineering and science electives as well as liberal arts electives. It was readily…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Federal+AND+Trade+AND+Commission&pg=7&id=ED178924','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Federal+AND+Trade+AND+Commission&pg=7&id=ED178924"><span id="translatedtitle">The Evolution of One-Newspaper <span class="hlt">Cities</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rosse, James N.</p> <p></p> <p>This is one of several papers presented at a Federal Trade Commission Symposium on Media Concentration. It analyzes trends in the development of one-newspaper <span class="hlt">cities</span>. Some of the trends noted are that face-to-face competition has declined considerably over the last five decades, going from 90% of the circulation in 1923 to 30% of the circulation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405586.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405586.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">City</span> Children in African Children's Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuntz, Patricia S.</p> <p></p> <p>A descriptive study identified titles and features of children's books set in an African <span class="hlt">city</span>. Data were collected from various reviews of children's literature for titles published since 1980. In addition, the Cooperative Children's Book Center's log list of acquired titles for Africa from 1990 to 1996 was reviewed. Results showed that authors…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Termites&pg=2&id=ED434025','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Termites&pg=2&id=ED434025"><span id="translatedtitle">Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>: House and Backyard Insects [Videotape].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>1998</p> <p></p> <p>"Bug <span class="hlt">City</span>" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ext&pg=3&id=EJ018917','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ext&pg=3&id=EJ018917"><span id="translatedtitle">4-H for Central <span class="hlt">City</span> Minorities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Paige, Joseph C.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Joseph C. Paige is the Dean of Community Education and Director of Cooperative Extension Service of the only urban Land-Grant College, Federal <span class="hlt">City</span> College, in Washington, D.C. Here he is interviewed about 4-H with children of poor ethnic groups in the District of Columbia. (NL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alcohol+AND+society&id=EJ1000349','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alcohol+AND+society&id=EJ1000349"><span id="translatedtitle">The Alcoholism Situation in a Northern <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martynov, M. Iu.; Martynova, D. Iu.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Alcohol abuse in Russia has been increasing in recent years, especially in northern regions, as has the incidence of alcohol-related disease rates. A survey was conducted in Surgut (the Khanty-Mansi autonomous okrug) that determined the factors lending to the prevalence of alcohol abuse among the population of the northern <span class="hlt">city</span> and assessed the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wildlife+AND+conservation&pg=4&id=EJ013803','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wildlife+AND+conservation&pg=4&id=EJ013803"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental Science for the Inner <span class="hlt">City</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaminski, Darrell L.</p> <p>1969-01-01</p> <p>Presents the objectives, activities, materials, and procedure of a six-week summer course in environmental science for inner-<span class="hlt">city</span> students at the Horace Mann Junior High School, Omaha, Nebraska. Included in this program are studies of the wildlife, conservation, and natural science of the Eastern Nebraska region. (LC)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.osti.gov/nle"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/NLElogo31.png" alt="National Library of Energy" height="31" width="79"></a> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> </body> </html>