Science.gov

Sample records for tampa bay fl

  1. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of 27°51′18″ north latitude and...

  2. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of 27°51′18″ north latitude and...

  3. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of 27°51′18″ north latitude and...

  4. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  5. Validating a Biogeochemical Watershed Disturbance and Climate Change Proxy: Tampa Bay. FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwing, P. T.; Martinez, E.; Pyrtle, A. J.; Haynes, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Tampa Bay estuary and watershed have been impacted in the past century by residential and industrial development activities that have resulted in pollutant release via runoff and wastewater discharges. Mangrove forest loss, mining activities, accidental spills and nutrient loading have also decreased water quality in this aquatic environment. The primary goal of this project is to provide historical water quality and climate information by determining biogeochemical properties of oyster shells and sediments collected from various locations throughout the Tampa Bay region including ancient Native American shell mounds. Biogeochemical properties of shells collected from these middens will provide insight regarding historical water quality of Tampa Bay. It is expected that a pristine, pre-Columbian baseline may be revealed from the midden shells, and changes in the biogeochemical record may be demonstrated over the recent past from the industrial age to modern day on a seasonal and yearly scale. In order to achieve the goal of this project, midden shells and sediments will be collected and compared from three stations in Tampa Bay that range from undisturbed to severely impacted; Emerson Point, Weedon Island, and Bayboro Harbor, respectively. Water and sediment samples have also been examined to provide additional information regarding radiogeochemical properties of the three study sites. Sediments will be dated using gamma spectrometry techniques (U/Th series). Standard ICP-OES methods are being utilized to determine concentrations of trace, minor and major elements in the oyster and sediment samples. This project is part of a larger on-going investigation. If successful, this investigation will ultimately yield a high-resolution tool for establishing the history of terrestrial land use and climate change.

  6. Assessment of estuarine water-quality indicators using MODIS medium-resolution bands: initial results from Tampa Bay, FL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, Chuanmin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Clayton, Tonya D.; ,; Brock, John C.; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2004-01-01

    Using Tampa Bay, FL as an example, we explored the potential for using MODIS medium-resolution bands (250- and 500-m data at 469-, 555-, and 645-nm) for estuarine monitoring. Field surveys during 21–22 October 2003 showed that Tampa Bay has Case-II waters, in that for the salinity range of 24–32 psu, (a) chlorophyll concentration (11 to 23 mg m−3), (b) colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient at 400 nm (0.9 to 2.5 m−1), and (c) total suspended sediment concentration (TSS: 2 to 11 mg L−1) often do not co-vary. CDOM is the only constituent that showed a linear, inverse relationship with surface salinity, although the slope of the relationship changed with location within the bay. The MODIS medium-resolution bands, although designed for land use, are 4–5 times more sensitive than Landsat-7/ETM+ data and are comparable to or higher than those of CZCS. Several approaches were used to derive synoptic maps of water constituents from concurrent MODIS medium-resolution data. We found that application of various atmospheric-correction algorithms yielded no significant differences, due primarily to uncertainties in the sensor radiometric calibration and other sensor artifacts. However, where each scene could be groundtruthed, simple regressions between in situ observations of constituents and at-sensor radiances provided reasonable synoptic maps. We address the need for improvements of sensor calibration/characterization, atmospheric correction, and bio-optical algorithms to make operational and quantitative use of these medium-resolution bands.

  7. Effects of ghost shrimp on zinc and cadmium in sediments from Tampa Bay, FL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klerks, P.L.; Felder, D.L.; Strasser, K.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects that ghost shrimp have on the distribution of metals in sediment. We measured levels of HNO3-extractable zinc and cadmium in surface sediment, in ghost shrimp burrow walls and in sediment ejected by the ghost shrimp from their burrows, at five sandy intertidal sites in Tampa Bay. Ghost shrimp densities and their rate of sediment ejection were also quantified, as were sediment organic content and silt + clay content. Densities of ghost shrimp (Sergio trilobata and Lepidophthalmus louisianensis) averaged 33/m2 at our sites, and they ejected sediment at an average rate of 28 g/burrow/day. Levels of both Zn and Cd were significantly higher in burrow walls than in surface sediments. Sediment ejected by the shrimp from their burrows had elevated levels of Zn (relative to surface sediments) at one of the sites. Sediment organic content and silt + clay content were higher in burrow-wall sediments than in ejected sediment, which in turn tended to have values above those of surface sediments. Differences in levels of HNO3-extractable Zn and Cd among sediment types may be a consequence of these sediments differing in other physiochemical characteristics, though the differences in metal levels remained statistically significant for some sites after correcting for differences in organic content and silt + clay content. We conclude that the presence of ghost shrimp burrows contributes to spatial heterogeneity of sedimentary metal levels, while the ghost shrimp bioturbation results in a significant flux of metals to the sediment surface and is expected to decrease heterogeneity of metal levels in sedimentary depth profiles.

  8. Tampa Bay: Chapter N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Larry; Spear, Kathryn; Cross, Lindsay; Baumstark, René; Moyer, Ryan; Thatcher, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida’s largest open-water estuary and encompasses an area of approximately 1036 km2 (400 mi2) (Burgan and Engle, 2006; TBNEP, 2006). The Bay’s watershed drains 5,698 km2 (2,200 mi2) of land and includes freshwater from the Hillsborough River to the north east, the Alafia and Little Manatee rivers to the east, and the Manatee River to the south (Figure 1). Freshwater inflow also enters the bay from the Lake Tarpon Canal, from small tidal tributaries, and from watershed runoff. Outflow travels from the upper bay segments (Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay) into Middle and Lower Tampa Bay. Southwestern portions of the water shed flow through Boca Ciega Bay into the Intracoastal Waterway and through the Southwest Channel and Passage Key Inlet into the Gulf of Mexico. The average depth in most of Tampa Bay is only 3.4 m (11 ft); however, 129 km (80 mi) of shipping channels with a maximum depth of 13.1 m (43 ft) have been dredged over time and are regularly maintained. These channels help to support the three ports within the bay, as well as commercial and recreational boat traffic.

  9. 76 FR 65378 - Safety Zone; The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg, Florida during The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks... place in St. Petersburg, Florida. The fireworks will be launched from Spa Beach. The fireworks will... zone encompasses certain waters of Tampa Bay in the vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg,...

  10. 77 FR 14471 - Safety Zone; Festival of States 2012 Night Parade Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Festival of States 2012 Night Parade Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay... Festival of States 2012 Night Parade Fireworks Display on Thursday, March 22, 2012. The safety zone is... this temporary final rule, call or email Marine Science Technician Second Class Chad R....

  11. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Providing a web-based digital information management system of information for scientists and the public, including a system that supports the work of those officials who must make decisions that affect the state of the bay. The Tampa Bay Study is in its sixth year and will continue through September 2007. This paper presents a non-inclusive summary of key findings associated with the six primary project components listed above. Component 4 (above) is described in detail in the following chapter 13. More information on the Tampa Bay Study is available from our on-line digital information system for the Tampa Bay Study at http://gulfsci.usgs.gov.

  12. Tampa Bay environmental atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Kunneke, J.T.; Palik, T.F.

    1984-12-01

    Biological and water resource data for Tampa Bay were compiled and mapped at a scale of 1:24,000. This atlas consists of (1) composited information overlain on 18 biological and 20 water resource base maps and (2) an accompanying map narrative. Subjects mapped on the water resource maps are contours of the mean middepth specific conductivity which can be converted to salinity; bathymetry, sediments, tidal currents, the freshwater/saltwater interface, dredge spoil disposal sites; locations of industrial and municipal point source discharges, tide stations, and water quality sampling stations. The point source discharge locations show permitted capacity and the water quality sampling stations show 5-year averages for chlorophyll, conductivity, turbidity, temperature, and total nitrogen. The subjects shown on the biological resource maps are clam and oyster beds, shellfish harvest areas, colonial bird nesting sites, manatee habitat, seagrass beds and artificial reefs. Spawning seasons, nursery habitats, and adult habitats are identified for major fish species. The atlas will provide useful information for coastal planning and management in Tampa Bay.

  13. Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services webpage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public website describing research on the large-scale physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of coastal wetlands and estuaries, with emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico. Hyperlinks direct users to mapped ecosystem services of interest and value to Tampa Bay area residents, and i...

  14. 77 FR 3031 - Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties, approximately 3.407 acres, at the Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in federal grant assurances. The release of property will allow the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority to dispose of the property for other than aeronautical purposes. The......

  15. Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, G.; Greening, H.S.; Yates, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida,USA, is a shallow,subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bay’s living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of sea grasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds.

  16. Influence of Watershed Characteristics on Wetland Hydrology (Tampa, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The availability of oxygen in wetland soils is a major driver of rate changes for several important ecological functions (e.g. nutrient processing, carbon sequestration) that the Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Research Program (TB-ESRP) is quantifying to estimate ecosystem services...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study combines the expertise of federal, state, and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for integrated research projects in other coastal ecosystems in the nation. The Tampa Bay Study focuses on the scientific needs of the Bay, as identified by resource managers.

  18. St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida (27.5N, 82.5W) and its surrounding waterways were captured in partial sunglint. An extremely complex pattern of surface currents is displayed by differential reflecvtions of sunlight caused by diffrerences in surface roughness and slicks. A high concentration of boatwakes can be seen under the bridge connecting St. Petersburg and Sarasota. Marinas along the waterfront, major roads, airports and other details are easily seen.

  19. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Historical and Prehistorical Record of Tampa Bay Environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edgar, Terry

    2005-01-01

    To study how Tampa Bay, Florida, has changed over time, the prehistorical conditions and natural variations in the bay environment are being evaluated. These variations can be tracked by examining the sediments that have accumulated in and around the bay. The prehistorical record, which pre-dates settlers' arrival in the Tampa Bay area around 1850, provides a baseline with which to compare and evaluate the magnitude and effects of sea-level, climate, biological, geochemical, and man-made changes. These data also are valuable for planning and conducting projects aimed at restoring wetlands and other estuarine habitats to their original state. In addition, the data provide a basis for judging efforts to improve the health of the bay.

  20. Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Gerold; Greening, Holly; Yates, Kimberly K.; Wolanski, Eric; McLusky, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, is a shallow, subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bay’s living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of seagrasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds. Over the past three decades, nitrogen controls involving sources such as wastewater treatment plants, stormwater conveyance systems, fertilizer manufacturing and shipping operations, and power plants have been undertaken to meet these and other management objectives. Cumulatively, these controls have resulted in a 60% reduction in annual total nitrogen (TN) loads relative to earlier worse-case (latter 1970s) conditions. As a result, annual water-clarity and chlorophyll a targets are currently met in most years, and seagrass cover measured in 2008 was the highest recorded since 1950. Factors that have contributed to the observed improvements in Tampa Bay over the past several decades include the following: (1) Development of numeric, science-based water-quality targets to meet a long-term goal of restoring seagrass acreage to 1950s levels. Empirical and mechanistic models found that annual average chlorophyll a concentrations were a primary manageable factor affecting light attenuation. The models also quantified relationships between TN loads, chlorophyll a concentrations, light attenuation, and fluctuations in seagrass cover. The availability of long-term monitoring data, and a systematic process for using the data to evaluate the effectiveness of management actions, has allowed managers to track progress and

  1. Prioritization of Ecosystem Services Research: Tampa Bay Demonstration Project.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project (TBESDP) is a component of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Ecosystem Services Research Program. The principal objectives of TBESDP are (1) to quantify the ecosystem services of the Tampa Bay watershed, (2) to deter...

  2. Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Pilot Phase 2 web site

    EPA Science Inventory

    The value of nature's benefits is difficult to consider in environmental decision-making since ecosystem goods and services are usually not well measured or quantified in economic terms. The Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council, the U.S. Environmental Pr...

  3. Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photo of the Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida (28.0N, 82.5W) is one of a pair (see STS049-92-017) to compare the differences between color film and color infrared film. In the color image above, the scene appears as it would to the human eye. The city of St. Petersburg can be seen even though there is atmospheric haze obscuring the image. Color infrared film filters out the haze and portrays vegetation as shades of red or pink.

  4. Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photo of the Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida (28.0N, 82.5W) is one of a pair (see STS049-97-020) to compare the differences between color film and color infrared film. In the color image above, the scene appears as it would to the human eye. The city of St. Petersburg can be seen even though there is atmospheric haze obscuring the image. Color infrared film filters out the haze and portrays vegetation as shades of red or pink.

  5. Nitrogen Deposition to the Tampa Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poor, N.; Tate, P.; Begum, M.; Evans, M.; Campbell, S.; Bhethanabotla, V.; Bollinger, C.; Ball, A.

    2003-12-01

    An earlier estimate of the direct deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay was ~7 kg-N/ha/yr and included the wet deposition of rainfall nitrate and ammonium and the dry deposition of nitric acid, ammonia, nitrate and ammonium. Rainfall and ambient air concentration measurements were made at an urban site within 50 m of Tampa Bay. Rainfall samples were obtained daily from a wet-only precipitation collector, which was part of the NADP AIRMoN. Ambient air concentrations of gases and fine particles were determined from an annular denuder system, operated at 10 l/min for 24-hr/day on a 1-in-6 day schedule, and dry deposition velocities were calculated with the NOAA buoy model using over water meteorological data. This estimate is revised upward to ~8 kg-N/ha/yr and includes corrections for nitric acid collection inefficiencies, the addition of coarse particle nitrate based on mircoorfice impactor measurements, and improved fine and coarse particle deposition velocity estimates from an integrated NOAA buoy/Williams model. With gas, fine aerosol and coarse particle measurements made at a peri-suburban site coupled with deposition velocities from a resistance model, and rainfall concentration measurements from a rural NADP NTN site in Sarasota County, the estimated total nitrogen deposition to the surface of the watershed is ~16 kg-N/ha/yr. The ratios of dry to wet deposition rates are ~1:1 over water and ~4:1 over land.

  6. Topobathymetric data for Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyler, D.; Zawada, D.G.; Nayegandi, A.; Brock, J.C.; Crane, M.P.; Yates, K.K.; Smith, K.E.L.

    2007-01-01

    Topobathymetric data (“topobathy”) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) to provide a single product useful for inundation mapping and a variety of other applications. These data were developed using one topographic and two bathymetric datasets collected at different dates. Topography was obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED). Bathymetry was provided by NOAA's GEOphysical DAta System (GEODAS). For several nearshore areas within the bay GEODAS data were replaced with high resolution bathymetry acquired by NASA's Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL). These data and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web site: http://gisdata.usgs.gov/website/topobathy/. Data from EAARL and NED were collected under the auspices of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science Tampa Bay Study (http://gulfsci.usgs.gov/).

  7. Integrating science and resource management in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; Greening, Holly; Morrison, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    Tampa Bay is recognized internationally for its remarkable progress towards recovery since it was pronounced "dead" in the late 1970s. Due to significant efforts by local governments, industries and private citizens throughout the watershed, water clarity in Tampa Bay is now equal to what it was in 1950, when population in the watershed was less than one-quarter of what it is today. Seagrass extent has increased by more than 8,000 acres since the mid-1980s, and fish and wildlife populations are increasing. Central to this successful turn-around has been the Tampa Bay resource management community's long-term commitment to development and implementation of strong science-based management strategies. Research institutions and agencies, including Eckerd College, the Florida Wildlife Commission Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Mote Marine Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Southwest Florida Water Management District, University of South Florida, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey, local and State governments, and private companies contribute significantly to the scientific basis of our understanding of Tampa Bay's structure and ecological function. Resource management agencies, including the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council's Agency on Bay Management, the Southwest Florida Water Management District's Surface Water Improvement and Management Program, and the Tampa Bay Estuary Program, depend upon this scientific basis to develop and implement regional adaptive management programs. The importance of integrating science with management has become fully recognized by scientists and managers throughout the region, State and Nation. Scientific studies conducted in Tampa Bay over the past 10–15 years are increasingly diverse and complex, and resource management programs reflect our increased knowledge of geology, hydrology and hydrodynamics, ecology and restoration techniques. However, a synthesis of this

  8. Tampa Bay Study Data and Information Management System (DIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, N. T.; Johnston, J. B.; Yates, K.; Smith, K. E.

    2005-05-01

    Providing easy access to data and information is an essential component of both science and management. The Tampa Bay Data and Information Management System (DIMS) catalogs and publicizes data and products which are generated through the Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study. The publicly accessible interface consists of a Web site (http://gulfsci.usgs.gov), a digital library, and an interactive map server (IMS). The Tampa Bay Study Web site contains information from scientists involved in the study, and is also the portal site for the digital library and IMS. Study information is highlighted on the Web site according to the estuarine component: geology and geomorphology, water and sediment quality, ecosystem structure and function, and hydrodynamics. The Tampa Bay Digital Library is a web-based clearinghouse for digital products on Tampa Bay, including documents, maps, spatial and tabular data sets, presentations, etc. New developments to the digital library include new search features, 150 new products over the past year, and partnerships to expand the offering of science products. The IMS is a Web-based geographic information system (GIS) used to store, analyze and display data pertaining to Tampa Bay. Upgrades to the IMS have improved performance and speed, as well as increased the number of data sets available for mapping. The Tampa Bay DIMS is a dynamic entity and will continue to evolve with the study. Beginning in 2005, the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Model will have a more prominent presence within the DIMS. The Web site will feature model projects and plans; the digital library will host model products and data sets; the IMS will display spatial model data sets and analyses. These tools will be used to increase communication of USGS efforts in Tampa Bay to the public, local managers, and scientists.

  9. Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project Website: Phase II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project models the impact of human development and natural stressors on the economic, aesthetic and cultural value of local ecosystems. By linking ecological structures, functions, and condition to the ecosystem services valued by h...

  10. 75 FR 35080 - Tampa Bay Refuges, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... around Tarpon and Indian Keys, and the use of internal combustion engines within this zone is prohibited... the Federal Register on December 3, 2004 (69 FR 70276). For more about the process, please see that... in the Federal Register on April 24, 2009 (74 FR 18744). We held two meetings to present the...

  11. Water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, June 1972-May 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, Carole L.; Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, was initiated in 1970 to provide background information to evaluate the effects of widening and deepening the ship channel to the port of Tampa. This report provides results of water-quality sampling in the bay from 1972 to 1976, prior to dredging. Measurements of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, biochemical oxygen demand, and total organic carbon were made as well as measurements for several nutrient, metal, and pesticide parameters. Many parameters were measured at as many as three points in the vertical. These data indicate that Tampa Bay is well-mixed vertically with little density stratification. Time histories of average temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance and nutrient values within four subareas of Tampa Bay are given to reveal seasonal or other trends during the period of record. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, nutrient, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and metal data are also presented as areal distributions. Nutrient concentrations were generally higher in Hillsborough Bay than in other sub-areas of Tampa Bay. Biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and total organic nitrogen distribution patterns show regions of highest concentrations to be along bay shorelines near population centers. Of the metals analyzed, all were present in concentrations of less than 1 milligram per liter. (USGS)

  12. Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, George; Crane, Mike; Steinwand, Dan

    2005-08-01

    Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of urbanization and associated land use and land cover change in the Tampa Bay area. To reduce processing time and complete the modeling process within an acceptable period, the model is recoded and ported to a Beowulf cluster. The parallel-processing computer system accomplishes the massive amount of computation the modeling simulation requires. SLEUTH calibration process for the Tampa Bay urban growth simulation spends only 10 h CPU time. The model predicts future land use/cover change trends for Tampa Bay from 1992 to 2025. Urban extent is predicted to double in the Tampa Bay watershed between 1992 and 2025. Results show an upward trend of urbanization at the expense of a decline of 58% and 80% in agriculture and forested lands, respectively.

  13. Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Steinwand, D.

    2005-01-01

    Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of urbanization and associated land use and land cover change in the Tampa Bay area. To reduce processing time and complete the modeling process within an acceptable period, the model is recoded and ported to a Beowulf cluster. The parallel-processing computer system accomplishes the massive amount of computation the modeling simulation requires. SLEUTH calibration process for the Tampa Bay urban growth simulation spends only 10 h CPU time. The model predicts future land use/cover change trends for Tampa Bay from 1992 to 2025. Urban extent is predicted to double in the Tampa Bay watershed between 1992 and 2025. Results show an upward trend of urbanization at the expense of a decline of 58% and 80% in agriculture and forested lands, respectively. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Holocene Infilling History of Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Cronin, T.; Willard, D.

    2007-05-01

    Tampa Bay is a shallow, sediment-starved estuary located along the central Florida Gulf coast. Based upon sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, and geochronologic analyses of 120 sediment cores and 190 surface sediment samples, karst-controlled basins located in the mid to upper estuary were found to contain a continuous sedimentary record documenting the Holocene sea-level rise and infilling history. The basal unit sampled in cores consists of organic-rich and/or carbonate-rich sediments containing freshwater fauna. Interpreted as lake deposits, the surficial sediments of these units were dated at approximately 8-9 ka suggesting that isolated sinkhole lakes occupied the region prior to being flooded by the Holocene sea-level rise. Overlying the lake deposits, dm-scale, organic-rich muds containing brackish water fauna, represent the transition from fresh to marine conditions as sea level flooded the region. The flooding surface itself is generally undefined, but sometimes represented by a mm-scale layer of shell fragments likely representing a lag deposit. Age dates bracketing this layer show that flooding occurred approximately 6-7 ka. Overlying sediments consist of 3-4 m of organic-rich, sandy muds with typical estuarine fauna. Age dates from the base of this unit indicate estuarine conditions became established approximately 5.5-6 ka. The modern expression of karst basins is a series of shallow, bathymetric depressions, likely reflecting the historically slow rate (0.030-0.065 cm/yr) of fine- grained sediment accumulation. These shallow depressions continue to function as fine-grained sediment sinks, but are now rapidly filling as the rate of accumulation has dramatically increased by approximately one order-of-magnitude (0.16-0.32 cm/yr) within the past 100 years, likely due to human activities.

  15. 78 FR 19192 - Nexiant, LLC, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (August 16, 2012)), has continued the Regulations in effect under the IEEPA... Bureau of Industry and Security Nexiant, LLC, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying.... Until October 18, 2022, Nexiant, LLC (``Nexiant''), with a last known address at: 2531 West...

  16. Biological interference of optical backscatterance sensors in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Optical backscatterance (OBS, D&A Instruments, Inc.1 1 Use of brand, firm, or trade names in this paper is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey.) sensors for measuring suspended-solids concentrations have been deployed in Tampa Bay to monitor resuspension of bottom sediments. This paper describes biological factors that affected the OBS sensors deployed in Tampa Bay and discusses deployment strategies that minimize biological interference. Phytoplankton may interfere with the OBS sensors when the suspended-solids concentration is near or below the sensor response threshold. Fish swimming in front of the OBS sensors caused spikes in the OBS sensor output, so the median average was more appropriate than the mean average. An algal slime on the OBS sensors caused excessive backscatterance that dominated the backscatterance from suspended material. Because of the fouling problem, deployments were limited to less than a week, and OBS sensors were cleaned daily, if possible. Calibration of OBS sensors with water samples collected from Tampa Bay was satisfactory when biological interference was not significant. When properly deployed, the OBS sensors can successfully monitor sediment resuspension in Tampa Bay and similar subtropical estuaries. ?? 1993.

  17. Tampa Bay Water Clarity Model (TBWCM): As a Predictive Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay Water Clarity Model was developed as a predictive tool for estimating the impact of changing nutrient loads on water clarity as measured by secchi depth. The model combines a physical mixing model with an irradiance model and nutrient cycling model. A 10 segment bi...

  18. The ecology of Tampa Bay, Florida: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.R. III; Estevez, E.D.

    1988-09-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida's largest open-water estuary and one of the most highly urbanized. This report summarizes and synthesizes many years of scientific investigation into Tampa Bay's geology, hydrology and hydrography, water chemistry, and biotic components. The estuary is a phytoplankton-based system, with mangroves being the second most important primary producer. Benthic organisms are abundant and diverse, although in parts of the bay the benthos consists of a relatively few opportunistic and pollution indicator species. The estuary provides habitat for the juveniles and adults of a number of commercial and recreational fishery species. Significant changes occurring as a result of urbanization and industrialization include significant declines in intertidal wetlands and seagrass meadows, changes in circulation and flushing, and degradation of water quality. Important management issues include dredge and fill operations, restoration of fisheries, increasing freshwater flow to the bay, and eutrophication. 257 refs., 85 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Risk Assessment of Hurricane Storm Surge for Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States and many other coastal areas around the world. Risk assessment of current and future hurricane storm surge provides the basis for risk mitigation and related decision making. This study investigates the hurricane surge risk for Tampa Bay, located on the central west coast of Florida. Although fewer storms have made landfall in the central west Florida than in regions farther west in the Gulf of Mexico and the east coast of U.S., Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge due to its geophysical features. It is surrounded by low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. Also, edge waves trapped on the west Florida shelf can propagate along the coastline and affect the sea level outside the area of a forced storm surge; Tampa Bay may be affected by storms traversing some distance outside the Bay. Moreover, when the propagation speed of the edge wave is close to that of a storm moving parallel to the coast, resonance may occur and the water elevation in the Bay may be greatly enhanced. Therefore, Tampa Bay is vulnerable to storms with a broad spectrum of characteristics. We apply a model-based risk assessment method to carry out the investigation. To estimate the current surge risk, we apply a statistical/deterministic hurricane model to generate a set of 1500 storms for the Tampa area, under the observed current climate (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) estimated from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis. To study the effect of climate change, we use four climate models, CNRM-CM3, ECHAM, GFDL-CM2.0, and MIROC3.2, respectively, to drive the hurricane model to generate four sets of 1500 Tampa storms under current climate conditions (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) and another four under future climate conditions of the IPCC-AR4 A1B emission scenario (represented by 2081-2100 statistics). Then, we apply two hydrodynamic models, the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model and the Sea

  20. 33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with 47 CFR 80.331 on VHF-FM channel 13 at the following broadcast/reporting points: (1) Prior to... nature of any hazardous conditions as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (d) Nothing in this section shall... (RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, including...

  1. 33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with 47 CFR 80.331 on VHF-FM channel 13 at the following broadcast/reporting points: (1) Prior to... nature of any hazardous conditions as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (d) Nothing in this section shall... (RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, including...

  2. 33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with 47 CFR 80.331 on VHF-FM channel 13 at the following broadcast/reporting points: (1) Prior to... nature of any hazardous conditions as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (d) Nothing in this section shall... (RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, including...

  3. 33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with 47 CFR 80.331 on VHF-FM channel 13 at the following broadcast/reporting points: (1) Prior to... nature of any hazardous conditions as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (d) Nothing in this section shall... (RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, including...

  4. 33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with 47 CFR 80.331 on VHF-FM channel 13 at the following broadcast/reporting points: (1) Prior to... nature of any hazardous conditions as defined by 33 CFR 160.203. (d) Nothing in this section shall... (RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, including...

  5. 33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” and proceeds north ending at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “3” and “4”. The safety zone starts again at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “7” and “8” and proceeds north through Hillsborough Cut “C”, Port Sutton Entrance...

  6. 33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” and proceeds north ending at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “3” and “4”. The safety zone starts again at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “7” and “8” and proceeds north through Hillsborough Cut “C”, Port Sutton Entrance...

  7. 33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” and proceeds north ending at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “3” and “4”. The safety zone starts again at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “7” and “8” and proceeds north through Hillsborough Cut “C”, Port Sutton Entrance...

  8. 33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” and proceeds north ending at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “3” and “4”. The safety zone starts again at Gadsden Point Cut Lighted Buoys “7” and “8” and proceeds north through Hillsborough Cut “C”, Port Sutton Entrance...

  9. Below-cloud ammonia scavenging in convective thunderstorms at a coastal research site in Tampa, FL, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizak, Constance A.; Campbell, Scott W.; Luther, Mark E.; Carnahan, Robert P.; Murphy, Robert J.; Poor, Noreen D.

    Sequential sampling of ammonium in wet deposition was conducted at a coastal research site in Tampa, Florida to determine and model the intra-storm variability of ammonium deposition to the Tampa Bay Estuary. Ammonium concentrations decreased with increasing precipitation depth according to an inverse power-law relationship of the form, C=aD, where D is the cumulative rainfall and a and b are fitted parameters. These results show that during a precipitation event, the majority of ammonium is delivered to Tampa Bay during the initial stages of the storm. An aqueous-phase accumulation model was used to predict sequential ammonium concentrations at the Gandy Bridge site with reasonable agreement. A relationship between precipitation intensity and scavenging coefficient will facilitate the calculation of dry and wet deposition of ammonia to the Tampa Bay Estuary. The scavenging coefficients calculated with the Tampa Bay model compared well with those predicted with the Asman model.

  10. Design of a basinwide monitoring program for the Tampa Bay estuary. Final technical pub

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, R.J.; Weisberg, S.B.; Frithsen, J.B.

    1992-10-30

    The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (TBNEP) is developing a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) to recommend management actions for protecting the Tampa Bay estuary. The purpose of the document is to facilitate development of the monitoring program by assisting the TBNEP to define the objectives of a monitoring program for Tampa Bay identifying indicators and a sampling design that are appropriate to those objectives, and identifying how existing Tampa Bay monitoring programs can be incorporated and modified (if necessary) to meet the monitoring objectives.

  11. High resolution seismic stratigraphy of Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Tihansky, A.B.; Hine, A.C.; Locker, S.D.; Doyle, L.D. . Dept. of Marine Science)

    1993-03-01

    Tampa Bay is one of two large embayments that interrupt the broad, regional nature of the carbonate ramp of the west coast of the Florida carbonate platform. It is believed to have formed as a result of preferential dissolution of the Cenozoic limestones beneath it. Highly reactive freshwater systems became hydrologically focused in the bay region as the surface and groundwater systems established themselves during sea-level lowstands. This weakening of the underlying limestone resulted in extensive karstification, including warping, subsidence, sinkhole and spring formation. Over 120 miles of high resolution seismic reflection data were collected within Tampa Bay. This record has been tied into 170 core borings taken from within the bay. This investigation has found three major seismic stratigraphic sequences beneath the bay. The lowermost sequence is probably of Miocene age. Its surface is highly irregular due to erosion and dissolution and exhibits a great deal of vertical relief as well as gentler undulations or warping. Much of the middle sequence consists of low angle clinoforms that gently downlap and fill in the underlying karst features. The uppermost sequence is a discontinuous unit comprised of horizontal to low angle clinoforms that are local in their extent. The recent drainage and sedimentation patterns within the bay area are related to the underlying structure controlled by the Miocene karst activity.

  12. Gulf of Mexico integrated science - Tampa Bay study, the impact of groundwater and contaminants on Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the recreational and economic value of coastal bays and estuaries, these ecosystems are often among our most 'troubled' natural environments. Urbanization, agriculture, mining, and shipping are just a few activities that can have a profound and lasting impact on the coastal zone. In order to maintain a healthy coastal ecosystem, it is crucial to develop reasonable management practices around expert scientific information. We still have much to learn about the quantity and quality of groundwater being discharged into Tampa Bay, Florida. We also need to improve our knowledge of a wide range of contaminants entering the bay and must be able to determine where they accumulate in seafloor sediments. Such buried contaminants can potentially be harmful to biota if they are released to the water column. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and research partners from the University of South Florida (USF), the University of Florida (UF), and the Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI) are mapping sources of groundwater, measuring groundwater flow into Tampa Bay, and assessing the impact of contaminants and sediments on bay water quality and ecosystem health.

  13. Colored dissolved organic matter in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Z.; Hu, C.; Conmy, R.N.; Muller-Karger, F.; Swarzenski, P.

    2007-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorophyll and total suspended solids in Tampa Bay and its adjacent rivers were examined in June and October of 2004. Except in Old Tampa Bay (OTB), the spatial distribution of CDOM showed a conservative relationship with salinity in June, 2004 (aCDOM(400) = − 0.19 × salinity + 6.78, R2 = 0.98, n = 17, salinity range = 1.1–32.5) with little variations in absorption spectral slope and fluorescence efficiency. This indicates that CDOM distribution was dominated by mixing. In October, 2004, CDOM distribution was nonconservative with an average absorption coefficient (aCDOM(400), ∼ 7.76 m-1) about seven times higher than that in June (∼ 1.11 m-1). The nonconservative behavior was caused largely by CDOM removal at intermediate salinities (e.g., aCDOM(400) removal > 15% at salinity ∼ 13.0), which likely resulted from photobleaching due to stronger stratification. The spatial and seasonal distributions of CDOM in Tampa Bay showed that the two largest rivers, the Alafia River (AR) and Hillsborough River (HR) were dominant CDOM sources to most of the bay. In OTB, however, CDOM showed distinctive differences: lower absorption coefficient, higher absorption spectral slopes, and lower ratios of CDOM absorption to DOC and higher fluorescence efficiency. These differences may have stemmed from (1) changes in CDOM composition by more intensive photobleaching due to the longer residence time of water mass in OTB; (2) other sources of CDOM than the HR/AR inputs, such as local creeks, streams, groundwater, and/or bottom re-suspension. Average CDOM absorption in Tampa Bay at 443 nm, aCDOM(443), was about five times higher in June and about ten times higher in October than phytoplankton pigment absorption, aph(443), indicating that blue light attenuation in the water column was dominated by CDOM rather than by phytoplankton absorption throughout the

  14. Export of Atmospherically Derived Nitrogen in the Tampa Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollman, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Several approaches are used to place bounds on likely fluxes of nitrogen to Tampa Bay, Florida that ultimately are derived from atmospheric deposition to the watershed. One approach compares ion ratios of total N and Cl in a number of north Florida watersheds to ratios in atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric deposition ion ratios were calculated based on wet deposition measured at NADP/NTN sites in north and central Florida and dry deposition estimates developed by Poor et al. (2003). Two key assumptions are inherent in the analysis: Cl is conservative (no sources other than atmospheric deposition contribute significantly to riverine Cl fluxes; nor are there significant sinks for Cl within the watershed other than surface runoff and groundwater recharge), and the only source of nitrogen is atmospheric deposition. This approach thus defines a minimum degree of N retention. Samples with K concentrations greater than 15 microequivalents per liter were screened to remove agricultural influences on nutrient export, resulting in average N retention estimates ranging from 41 to 81%. The data base analyzed included 22 different stream stations in Florida that are part of the USGS NASQAN stream water chemistry data base. Other approaches are based on simplified watershed mass balances computed from NASQAN flow and water quality measurements and atmospheric fluxes based on NADP wet deposition fluxes and dry deposition fluxes developed by Poor et al. (2003). For systems where atmospheric inputs of chloride balance riverine export (within +/- 20%), preliminary estimates of minimum N retention based on this approach range from 5 to 94% and likely reflect the limited hydrologic data available to estimate annual fluxes. The third approach is based on a critical examination of existing nutrient budgets for Tampa Bay, and defining the maximum contribution to indirect N loading to Tampa Bay from atmospheric deposition.

  15. Observation of sediment resuspension in Old Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Equipment and methodology have been developed to monitor sediment resuspension at two sites in Old Tampa Bay. Velocities are measured with electromagnetic current meters and suspended solids and turbidity are monitored with optical backscatterance sensors. In late November 1989, a vertical array of instrument pairs was deployed from a permanent platform at a deep-water site, and a submersible instrument package with a single pair of instruments was deployed at a shallow-water site. Wind waves caused resuspension at the shallow-water site, but not at the deeper platform site, and spring tidal currents did not cause resuspension at either site.

  16. Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Dufore, C.; Smiley, N.; Jackson, C.; Halley, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 165.1 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1 μatm for pCO2. Average range of diurnal variation for system parameters in Tampa Bay was 73% to 93% of the seasonal range of variability for dissolved oxygen and pH. All system parameters measured in Florida Bay showed distinct variation over diurnal time-scales. However, clear diurnal trends were less evident. The average range of diurnal variability in Florida Bay was 62.8 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 130.4 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.13 for pH, 0.053 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 139.8 μatm for pCO2. The average range of diurnal variation was 14% to 102% of the seasonal ranges for these parameters. Diurnal variability in system parameters was most influenced by primary productivity and respiration of benthic communities in Tampa Bay, and by precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate in Florida Bay. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability may impart significant error in calculations of annual carbon and oxygen budgets. These observations reinforce the need for higher temporal resolution measurements of oxygen and carbon system parameters in coastal ecosystems.

  17. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Data Information Management System (DIMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, James

    2004-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that combines the expertise of federal, state and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for the application of integrated research projects in other estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico. Efficient information and data distribution for the Tampa Bay Study has required the development of a Data Information Management System (DIMS). This information system is being used as an outreach management tool, providing information to scientists, decision makers and the public on the coastal resources of the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES AND ESTIMATION OF EMISSION PROFILES FROM HIGHLY TIME-RESOLVED POLLUTANT MEASUREMENTS IN TAMPA, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-min intervals for sequential 1-month periods at each of two sites (Sydney and "Dairy") in the Tampa Bay area during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aeros...

  19. 78 FR 19195 - RH International, LLC, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629, Respondent, Mohammad Reza (a/k...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ..., the most recent being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699, August 16, 2012), has continued the... Bureau of Industry and Security RH International, LLC, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629...; Order Denying Export Privileges A. Denial of Export Privileges of RH International, LLC On October...

  20. 78 FR 19194 - P&P Computers, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (August 16, 2012)), has continued the Regulations in effect... Bureau of Industry and Security P&P Computers, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying... Division, P&P Computers (``P&P'') was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic...

  1. Integrated Approaches to Estuarine Use and Protection: Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Case Study.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay region faces projected stress from climate change, contaminants, nutrients, and of human development on a natural ecosystem that is valued (economically, aesthetically and culturally) in its present state. With fast-paced population increases, conversion and develop...

  2. Sediment quality assessment studies of Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Long, E.R.; Thursby, G.; Sloane, G.M.; Wolfe, D.A.

    1996-07-01

    A survey of the toxicity of sediments throughout the Tampa Bay estuary was performed as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program. The objectives of the survey were to determine the spatial extent and severity of toxicity and to identify relationships between chemical contamination and toxicity. Three independent toxicity tests were performed: a 10-d amphipod survival test of the whole sediments with Ampelisca abdita, a sea urchin fertilization test of sediment pore water with Arbacia punctulata, and a 5-min Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence test with solvent extracts of the sediments. Seventy-three percent of the 165 undiluted sediment pore-water samples were significantly toxic in the amphipod tests. The causes of toxicity were not determined. However, concentrations of numerous trace metals, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ammonia were highly correlated with pore-water toxicity. Concentrations of many substances, especially total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), endrin, total PCBs, certain PAHs, lead, and zinc, occurred at concentrations in the toxic samples that equaled or exceeded concentrations that have been previously associated with sediment toxicity.

  3. Paragenesis of ``box-work geodes'', Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Richard N.; Upchurch, Sam B.; Rosenzweig, Abraham

    1981-12-01

    An unusual suite of silicified rocks was excavated during a recent harbour-deepening project in Tampa Bay, Florida. These rocks, which we have termed "box-work geodes", are composed of convoluted, intersecting silica walls enclosing cavities which are either voids or filled with relatively pure monoclinic palygorskite. The "box-work geodes" are interpreted as having formed in shallow lagoonal environments, similar to the Coorong Lagoon of South Australia. Synaeresis of syngenetic palygorskite was followed by opal deposition and case hardening of the material. Subsequent chemical deposition of chalcedony, megacrystalline quartz, barite, and calcite on the void facing walls indicates an open chemical system. The existence of opal saturated lagoons, as inferred from the "box-work geodes", suggests that much of the replacement chert, porcelanite, and silicified fossils in the Tertiary deposits of peninsular Florida formed in the shallow subsurface. Subsequent weathering of carbonates and clays not encapsulated in the box works has resulted in formation of a green montmorillonite residual clay bed.

  4. Lessons Learned from the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) and Implications for Nitrogen Management of Tampa Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from air quality modeling and field measurements made as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) along with related scientific literature were reviewed to provide an improved estimate of atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition to Tampa Bay, to...

  5. 33 CFR 80.810 - Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL. 80.810 Section 80.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.810 Cape San...

  6. 33 CFR 80.810 - Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL. 80.810 Section 80.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.810 Cape San...

  7. Tidal Mixing Box Submodel for Tampa Bay: Calibration of Tidal Exchange Flows with the Parameter Estimation Tool (PEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the mid-1990s the Tampa Bay Estuary Program proposed a nutrient reduction strategy focused on improving water clarity to promote seagrass expansion within Tampa Bay. A System Dynamics Model is being developed to evaluate spatially and temporally explicit impacts of nutrient r...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study: Watershed and Estuary Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, and its environs have experienced phenomenal urban growth and significant changes in land-use practices over the past 50 years. This trend is expected to continue, with human activity intensifying and affecting a wider geographic region. Urbanization creates impervious surfaces, which increase stormwater runoff and contribute to greater amounts of chemicals flowing into coastal waters. Man-made structures including bridges, a gas pipeline, desalination plant, ports, navigation channels, and extensive sea walls have been built and will continue to be maintained and modified. This task of the Tampa Bay Study aims to provide a better understanding of these and other man-made impacts on the Tampa Bay region.

  9. Tampa Bay coastal wetlands: nineteenth to twentieth century tidal marsh-to-mangrove conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, mangroves dominate the tidal wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida, but an examination of historic navigation charts revealed dominance of tidal marshes with a mangrove fringe in the 1870s. This study's objective was to conduct a new assessment of wetland change in Tampa Bay by digitizing nineteenth century topographic and public land surveys and comparing these to modern coastal features at four locations. We differentiate between wetland loss, wetland gain through marine transgression, and a wetland conversion from marsh to mangrove. Wetland loss was greatest at study sites to the east and north. Expansion of the intertidal zone through marine transgression, across adjacent low-lying land, was documented primarily near the mouth of the bay. Generally, the bay-wide marsh-to-mangrove ratio reversed from 86:14 to 25:75 in 125 years. Conversion of marsh to mangrove wetlands averaged 72 % at the four sites, ranging from 52 % at Old Tampa Bay to 95 % at Feather Sound. In addition to latitudinal influences, intact wetlands and areas with greater freshwater influence exhibited a lower rate of marsh-to-mangrove conversion. Two sources for nineteenth century coastal landscape were in close agreement, providing an unprecedented view of historic conditions in Tampa Bay.

  10. Data bases for use in fish and wildlife mitigation planning in Tampa Bay, Florida: Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, W.K.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the history, objectives, activities, and results of a 3-year cooperative project by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Tampa Port Authority (TPA) to improve the data base available for making decisions regarding port development and wildlife habitat management in Tampa Bay. In addition, the report describes situations in which the study methods, results, and products might be used to improve management and development decisions regarding fish and wildlife resources in the bay. Individual projects which have generated separate products such as maps, booklets, and reports are described.

  11. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Characterization of Tidal Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIvor, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Tidal wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida, consist of mangrove forests and salt marshes. Wetlands buffer storm surges, provide fish and wildlife habitat, and enhance water quality through the removal of water-borne nutrients and contaminants. Substantial areas of both mangroves and salt marshes have been lost to agricultural, residential, and industrial development in this urban estuary. Wetlands researchers are characterizing the biological components of tidal wetlands and examining the physical factors such as salinity, tidal flushing, and sediment deposition that control the composition of tidal wetland habitats. Wetlands restoration is a priority of resource managers in Tampa Bay. Baseline studies such as these are needed for successful restoration planning and evaluation.

  12. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1987-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of construction of causeways, islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flows in large parts of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference, hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual transport of both water and a dissolved constituent for the physical conditions that existed in Tampa Bay during 1880 and 1972 and for the conditions that are likely to exist in 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to hindcast water- and constituent-transport changes caused by construction in the bay between 1880 and 1972. The model was used also to forecast changes that can be expected to occur as a result of a major Federal dredging project scheduled for completion in 1985. The model forecasted transport changes caused by the Federal dredging project to be much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes caused by construction in Tampa Bay between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb transport were computed to occur over only 8 or 9 square miles of the bay's 390-square-mile surface area between 1972 and 1985. The model computed that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 58 square miles of the bay. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual transport were computed to occur over 58 square miles of the bay between 1972 and 1985. According to the model simulation, construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 167 square miles. Computations reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 20 interconnected circulatory features that range in diameter from 1 to 6 miles. Dredging- and construction

  13. Potential impacts and management implications of climate change on Tampa Bay estuary critical coastal habitats.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Edward T; Greening, Holly S

    2014-02-01

    The Tampa Bay estuary is a unique and valued ecosystem that currently thrives between subtropical and temperate climates along Florida's west-central coast. The watershed is considered urbanized (42 % lands developed); however, a suite of critical coastal habitats still persists. Current management efforts are focused toward restoring the historic balance of these habitat types to a benchmark 1950s period. We have modeled the anticipated changes to a suite of habitats within the Tampa Bay estuary using the sea level affecting marshes model under various sea level rise (SLR) scenarios. Modeled changes to the distribution and coverage of mangrove habitats within the estuary are expected to dominate the overall proportions of future critical coastal habitats. Modeled losses in salt marsh, salt barren, and coastal freshwater wetlands by 2100 will significantly affect the progress achieved in "Restoring the Balance" of these habitat types over recent periods. Future land management and acquisition priorities within the Tampa Bay estuary should consider the impending effects of both continued urbanization within the watershed and climate change. This requires the recognition that: (1) the Tampa Bay estuary is trending towards a mangrove-dominated system; (2) the current management paradigm of "Restoring the Balance" may no longer provide realistic, attainable goals; (3) restoration that creates habitat mosaics will prove more resilient in the future; and (4) establishing subtidal and upslope "refugia" may be a future strategy in this urbanized estuary to allow sensitive habitat types (e.g., seagrass and salt barren) to persist under anticipated climate change and SLR impacts.

  14. Potential Impacts and Management Implications of Climate Change on Tampa Bay Estuary Critical Coastal Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Edward T.; Greening, Holly S.

    2014-02-01

    The Tampa Bay estuary is a unique and valued ecosystem that currently thrives between subtropical and temperate climates along Florida's west-central coast. The watershed is considered urbanized (42 % lands developed); however, a suite of critical coastal habitats still persists. Current management efforts are focused toward restoring the historic balance of these habitat types to a benchmark 1950s period. We have modeled the anticipated changes to a suite of habitats within the Tampa Bay estuary using the sea level affecting marshes model under various sea level rise (SLR) scenarios. Modeled changes to the distribution and coverage of mangrove habitats within the estuary are expected to dominate the overall proportions of future critical coastal habitats. Modeled losses in salt marsh, salt barren, and coastal freshwater wetlands by 2100 will significantly affect the progress achieved in "Restoring the Balance" of these habitat types over recent periods. Future land management and acquisition priorities within the Tampa Bay estuary should consider the impending effects of both continued urbanization within the watershed and climate change. This requires the recognition that: (1) the Tampa Bay estuary is trending towards a mangrove-dominated system; (2) the current management paradigm of "Restoring the Balance" may no longer provide realistic, attainable goals; (3) restoration that creates habitat mosaics will prove more resilient in the future; and (4) establishing subtidal and upslope "refugia" may be a future strategy in this urbanized estuary to allow sensitive habitat types (e.g., seagrass and salt barren) to persist under anticipated climate change and SLR impacts.

  15. 33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in the following areas: (1) For inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” north... anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port Sutton the safety zone includes, in addition to the area...

  16. 33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in the following areas: (1) For inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” north... anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port Sutton the safety zone includes, in addition to the area...

  17. 33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in the following areas: (1) For inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” north... anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port Sutton the safety zone includes, in addition to the area...

  18. 33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in the following areas: (1) For inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” north... anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port Sutton the safety zone includes, in addition to the area...

  19. 33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in the following areas: (1) For inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut “F” Channel from Lighted Buoys “3F” and “4F” north... anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port Sutton the safety zone includes, in addition to the area...

  20. Appearance and water quality of turbidity plumes produced by dredging in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.; Michaelis, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Turbidity plumes in Tampa Bay, Florida, produced during ship-channel dredging operations from February 1977 to August 1978, were monitored in order to document plume appearance and water quality, evaluate plume influence on the characteristics of Tampa Bay water, and provide a data base for comparison with other areas that have similar sediment, dredge, placement, containment, and tide conditions. The plumes investigated originated from the operation of one hopper dredge and three cutterhead-pipeline dredges. Composition of bottom sediment was found to vary from 85 percent sand and shell fragments to 60 percent silt and clay. Placement methods for dredged sediment included beach nourishment, stationary submerged discharge, oscillating surface discharge, and construction of emergent dikes. Tidal currents ranged from slack water to flow velocities of 0.60 meter per second. Plumes were monitored simultaneously by (1) oblique and vertical 35-millimeter aerial photography and (2) water-quality sampling to determine water clarity and concentrations of nutrients, metals, pesticides, and industrial compounds. Forty-nine photographs depict plumes ranging in length from a few tens of meters to several kilometers and ranging in turbidity level from <10 to 200,000 nephelometric turbidity units. The most visible turbidity plumes were produced by surface discharge of material with high sand content into unconfined placement areas during times of strong tidal currents. The least visible turbidity plumes were produced by discharge of material with high silt and clay content into areas enclosed by floating turbidity barriers during times of weak tidal currents. Beach nourishment from hopper-dredge unloading operations also produced plumes of low visibility. Primary turbidity plumes were produced directly by dredging and placement operations; secondary plumes were produced indirectly by resuspension of previously deposited material. Secondary plumes were formed both by erosion, in

  1. Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.; Kroeger, K.D.; Baskaran, M.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River/estuary — a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined riverine inputs still remain ungauged. Consequently, groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange in the discharging coastal rivers, as well as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) within the bay, are still unresolved components of this system's water and material budgets. Based on known inputs and sinks, there exists an excess of 226Ra in the water column of Tampa Bay, which can be evaluated in terms of a submarine groundwater contribution to the bay proper. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess 226Ra ranged from 2.2 to 14.5 L m− 2 day− 1, depending on whether the estuarine residence time was calculated using 224Ra/xs228Ra isotope ratios, or whether a long term, averaged model-derived estuarine residence time was used. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 1.6 to 10.3 m3 m− 1 day− 1. Activities of 222Rn were also elevated in surface water and shallow groundwater of the bay, as well as in the Alafia River estuary, where upstream activities as high as 250 dpm L− 1 indicate enhanced groundwater/surface water exchange, facilitated by an active spring vent. From average nutrient concentrations of 39 shallow, brackish, groundwater samples, rates of nutrient loading into Tampa Bay by SGD rates were estimated, and these ranged from 0.2 to 1.4 × 105 mol day− 1 (PO43−), 0.9–6.2 × 105 mol day− 1 (SiO4−), 0.7–5.0 × 105 mol day− 1 (dissolved organic nitrogen, DON), and 0.2–1.4 × 106 mol day− 1 (total dissolved nitrogen, TDN). Such nutrient loading estimates, when compared

  2. Understanding a Century of Change in an Estuary: Tampa Bay. Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, C. J.; Yates, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    During the 20th century, Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida changed from a largely pristine subtropical estuary to a busy waterway with commercial ports and extensive coastal urbanization. The estuary has been physically altered through dredging and construction and its biogeochemical, sedimentary and hydrological balances have been changed. Environmental indicators show that the health of the estuary has been significantly impacted. Long-term restoration and conservation efforts in the next decades will need to be made in the presence of sustained population expansion, increased use of water resources, developments of ports, bay-wide dredging, construction of pipelines, and increased large ship traffic. The Tampa Bay integrated modeling program has helped rationalize, and organize our understanding of the ways that the ecosystem has changed and we have simulated the bay as it was at the ends of the 19th and 20th centuries. This involves submodels of hydrodynamics, hydrology, wave climate, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes. A key element in this research is the recognition by the USGS Integrated Science Study that estuarine systems function as a dynamic interplay among biologic, geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and chemical processes. Integrated modeling also relies heavily on synthesis modeling of historical and modern data for the estuary and the Tampa Bay study has included a major collection program for physical data between 2004 and 2006. An important part of the integrated modeling program has been public outreach including training in the development of submodels by state agencies, universities and community groups. The present paper reviews the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Models with conclusions about some of the major anthropogenic impacts. Examples include restoration projects based on the predictions of submodels developed by local agencies for wetland habitats around the Bay and studies by port authorities using submodels of short

  3. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study: Examining the Impact of Urbanization on Seafloor Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    Seafloor habitats, such as seagrass beds, provide essential habitat for fish and marine mammals. For many years, the study of seagrass vitality has been a priority for scientists and resource managers working in Tampa Bay. Seafloor habitats are extremely sensitive to changes in water quality. Like a canary in a coal mine, seagrass can serve as an ecological indicator of estuary health. Between the 1940s and the 1970s, seagrass gradually died in Tampa Bay. This loss has been attributed to a rise in urbanization and an increase in nutrient loading into the bay. Better treatment of industrial wastewater and runoff beginning in the 1980s resulted in the continuous recovery of seagrass beds. However, in the mid-1990s, the recovery began to level off in areas where good water quality was expected to support continued seagrass recovery, demonstrating that nutrient loading may be only one factor impacting seagrass health. Researchers now are trying to determine what might be affecting the recovery of seagrass in these areas. Currently, little is understood about the effects that other aspects of urbanization and natural change, such as groundwater and sediment quality, might have on seagrass vitality. This segment of the Tampa Bay integrated science study is intended to identify, quantify, and develop models that illustrate the impact that urbanization may have on seafloor habitat distribution, health, and restoration.

  4. Ammonia Flux at the Air-Water Interface of Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizak, C. A.; Poor, N. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent nitrogen deposition research in the Tampa Bay Estuary indicates that ammonia deposition dominates the total dry nitrogen flux to the bay. Gaseous plus aerosol ammonia contribute approximately 450 tons per year or 60% of the total nitrogen deposition of 760 tons per year to the estuary. Research data also indicate that during the summer months, Tampa Bay may act as a source for atmospheric ammonia as water temperature and ammonium concentrations increase. Ammonia flux estimates will be derived from thirty days of daily summer air and water sampling at the Gandy Bridge air monitoring site located adjacent to Tampa Bay. Ammonia concentrations were measured at two heights with a URG, Inc. dual-pump annular denuder system (ADS), and water grab samples from two depths were analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. Hourly relative humidity, air and water temperature, pH and salinity were recorded at this site, and hourly wind speed and direction were obtained from the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County. Rainwater samples were obtained with a University of Michigan sequential rainwater collector and analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. The direction and magnitude for the ammonia flux will be calculated with a modified NOAA buoy model from measurements of wind speed, air and water temperature, air and water ammonia and ammonium concentrations, relative humidity, water pH and salinity. The results of this research will be used to improve the NOAA Buoy model, and to compare observed with modeled ammonia gradients.

  5. 33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake, Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon..., Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon Island, and Crystal River, Florida. (a) Location. The following areas, denoted by coordinates fixed using the North American Datum of 1983 (World Geodetic System 1984),...

  6. 33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake, Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon..., Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon Island, and Crystal River, Florida. (a) Location. The following areas, denoted by coordinates fixed using the North American Datum of 1983 (World Geodetic System 1984),...

  7. 33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake, Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon..., Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon Island, and Crystal River, Florida. (a) Location. The following areas, denoted by coordinates fixed using the North American Datum of 1983 (World Geodetic System 1984),...

  8. 33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake, Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon..., Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon Island, and Crystal River, Florida. (a) Location. The following areas, denoted by coordinates fixed using the North American Datum of 1983 (World Geodetic System 1984),...

  9. 33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake, Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon..., Old Port Tampa, Big Bend, Weedon Island, and Crystal River, Florida. (a) Location. The following areas, denoted by coordinates fixed using the North American Datum of 1983 (World Geodetic System 1984),...

  10. Assessment of the interconnection between Tampa Bay and the Floridan aquifer, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Factors that control interflow between Tampa Bay and the Floridan aquifer are assessed, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with emphasis on the impact of harbor improvement. Hydrogeologic units underlying the 350-square-mile bay include the surficial-sand aquifer, upper sand and clay confining bed, and limestone of the Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer and upper confining bed have been eroded away in several areas along the northern coast of the bay to directly expose the Floridan aquifer to saltwater. There also, the top of the aquifer is, has been, or will be exposed to saltwater in numerous channels dredged in the bay. Saltwater-freshwater relations indicate that the degree of bay-aquifer interconnection decreases from north to south. Saltwater intrusion is occurring along the coast of Tampa Bay, as indicated by reduction or reversal of potentiometric-surface gradients and increasing chloride concentrations in coastal monitoring wells. A computer model of ground-water flow developed for a 97-square-mile area was interrogated under five options of channelization and pumping. Model results indicate that the total impact of channelization upon bay-aquifer interconnection are expected to be small and may be imperceptible when considered over the long term with other unknown changes in climate and development. (USGS)

  11. 77 FR 51470 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, St. Petersburg/Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, St... bridges in St. Petersburg and Tampa, Florida. The deviations are necessary to allow for the safe... Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and...

  12. Ecosystem responses to long-term nutrient management in an urban estuary: Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greening, H.; Janicki, A.; Sherwood, E. T.; Pribble, R.; Johansson, J. O. R.

    2014-12-01

    In subtropical Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, we evaluated restoration trajectories before and after nutrient management strategies were implemented using long-term trends in nutrient loading, water quality, primary production, and seagrass extent. Following citizen demands for action, reduction in wastewater nutrient loading of approximately 90% in the late 1970s lowered external total nitrogen (TN) loading by more than 50% within three years. Continuing nutrient management actions from public and private sectors were associated with a steadily declining TN load rate and with concomitant reduction in chlorophyll-a concentrations and ambient nutrient concentrations since the mid-1980s, despite an increase of more than 1 M people living within the Tampa Bay metropolitan area. Water quality (chlorophyll-a concentration, water clarity as indicated by Secchi disk depth, total nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen) and seagrass coverage are approaching conditions observed in the 1950s, before the large increases in human population in the watershed. Following recovery from an extreme weather event in 1997-1998, water clarity increased significantly and seagrass is expanding at a rate significantly different than before the event, suggesting a feedback mechanism as observed in other systems. Key elements supporting the nutrient management strategy and concomitant ecosystem recovery in Tampa Bay include: 1) active community involvement, including agreement about quantifiable restoration goals; 2) regulatory and voluntary reduction in nutrient loadings from point, atmospheric, and nonpoint sources; 3) long-term water quality and seagrass extent monitoring; and 4) a commitment from public and private sectors to work together to attain restoration goals. A shift from a turbid, phytoplankton-based system to a clear water, seagrass-based system that began in the 1980s following comprehensive nutrient loading reductions has resulted in a present-day Tampa Bay which looks and

  13. Tampa Bay as a model estuary for examining the impact of human activities on biogeochemical processes: an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Baskaran, Mark; Henderson, Carl S.; Yates, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Tampa Bay is a shallow, Y-shaped coastal embayment that is located along the center of the Florida Platform – an expansive accumulation of Cretaceous–Tertiary shallow-water carbonates and evaporites that were periodically exposed during glacio–eustatic sea level fluctuations. As a consequence, extensive karstification likely had a controlling impact on the geologic evolution of Tampa Bay. Despite its large aerial size (∼ 1000 km2), Tampa Bay is relatively shallow (mean depth = 4 m) and its watershed (6700 km2) is among the smallest in the Gulf of Mexico. About 85% of all freshwater inflow (mean = 63 m3 s-1) to the bay is carried by four principal tributaries (Orlando et al., 1993). Groundwater makes up an important component of baseflow of these coastal streams and may also be important in delivering nutrients and other constituents to the bay proper by submarine groundwater discharge.

  14. Defining fish nursery habitats: an application of otolith elemental fingerprinting in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ley, Janet A.; McIvor, Carole C.; Peebles, Ernst B; Rolls, Holly; Cooper, Suzanne T.

    2009-01-01

    Fishing in Tampa Bay enhances the quality of life of the area's residents and visitors. However, people's desire to settle along the Bay's shorelines and tributaries has been detrimental to the very habitat believed to be crucial to prime target fishery species. Common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) are part of the suite of estuarine fishes that 1) are economically or ecologically prominent, and 2) have complex life cycles involving movement between open coastal waters and estuarine nursery habitats, including nursery habitats that are located within upstream, low-salinity portions of the Bay?s tidal tributaries. We are using an emerging microchemical technique -- elemental fingerprinting of fish otoliths -- to determine the degree to which specific estuarine locations contribute to adult fished populations in Tampa Bay. In ongoing monitoring surveys, over 1,000 young-of-the-year common snook and red drum have already been collected from selected Tampa Bay tributaries. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we are currently processing a subsample of these archived otoliths to identify location-specific fingerprints based on elemental microchemistry. We will then analyze older fish from the local fishery in order to match them to their probable nursery areas, as defined by young-of-the-year otoliths. We expect to find that some particularly favorable nursery locations contribute disproportionately to the fished population. In contrast, other nursery areas may be degraded, or act as 'sinks', thereby decreasing their contribution to the fish population. Habitat managers can direct strategic efforts to protect any nursery locations that are found to be of prime importance in contributing to adult stocks.

  15. Fish and wildlife mitigation options for port development in Tampa Bay: results of a workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, Gregor T.; Andrews, Austin K.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.

    1985-01-01

    This report records the results of a workshop held September 25-27, 1983, in Tampa, Florida. The organization of the report closely follows the organization of the workshop itself. The workshop began with a definition of objectives and several presentations providing general background. The context and objectives of the workshop are covered in the INTRODUCTION. A summary of the results of two group discussions is presented in the WORKSHOP RESULTS section. One group identified ways to conduct or locate port development activities in Tampa Bay so as to lessen their adverse impacts; the other group identified ways to compensate for unavoidable impacts by creating or improving important fish and wildlife habitats. Finally, the DISCUSSION section contains the authors' synthesis of more general comments made throughout the workshop, especially during the closing session.

  16. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated navigation area encompasses all waters in Biscayne Bay...

  17. Detection of turbidity dynamics in Tampa Bay, Florida using multispectral imagery from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, A. E.; Higer, A. L.; Goodwin, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    In 1970, Congress authorized the deepening of the Tampa Bay channel (Rivers and Harbors Act of 1970) from 34 to 44 feet. In order to determine the effects of this deepening on circulation, water quality, and biota, during and after the construction, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tampa Port Authority, has collected data and developed a digital simulation model of the bay. In addition to data collected using conventional tools, use is being made of data collected from ERTS-1. Return beam vidicon (RBV) multispectral data were collected, while a shell dredging barge was operating in the bay, and used for turbidity recognition and unique spectral signatures representative of type and amount of material in suspension. A three-dimensional concept of the dynamics of the plume was achieved by superimposing the parts of the plume recognized in each RBV band. This provides a background for automatic computer processing of ERTS data and three-dimensional modeling of turbidity plumes.

  18. Hydrologic data from urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Michaelis, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrologic data are being collected in 10 urbanized watersheds located in the Tampa Bay area, Florida. The gaged watersheds have impervious areas that range from 19 percent for a residential watershed in north Tampa to nearly 100 percent for a downtown Tampa watershed. Land-use types, including roads, residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, recreational , and open space, have been determined for each watershed. Rainfall and storm runoff data collected since 1971 for one site and since 1975 for six other sites through September 1976, have been processed. These data are recorded at 5-minute intervals and are stored in the U. S. Geological Survey WATSTORE unit values file. Daily rainfall at 12 sites and daily pan evaporation at one site have been stored in the WATSTORE daily values file. Chemical and biological analyses of storm runoff for six sites, base flow for seven sites, and analyses of bottom material for seven sites are also stored in the WATSTORE water-quality files. Rainfall and storm runoff for selected storms, daily rainfall, and daily pan-evaporation data are summarized in this report. Water-quality analyses of all water-quality samples also are listed. (Woodard-USGS).

  19. Cease Fire Tampa Bay: a three-tiered approach to firearm injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Kallenborn, J Celeste; Gonzales, Kathie; Crane, Nancy B; Pesce, Karen; Swan, Sherry; Flint, Lewis; Shimberg, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Cease Fire Tampa Bay is a multifaceted, broad-based community effort working to increase awareness of firearm injuries and provide an opportunity for the people of the southwest-central Florida region to eliminate unwanted firearms. Three approaches to develop this program were implemented; a six-county gun buy-back program, firearm safety education for school-aged children and community education programs. The program has been successful in removing 6,981 unwanted guns from the streets, and has reached thousands of children and families in the region. This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of the program.

  20. Cease Fire Tampa Bay: a three-tiered approach to firearm injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Kallenborn, J Celeste; Gonzales, Kathie; Crane, Nancy B; Pesce, Karen; Swan, Sherry; Flint, Lewis; Shimberg, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Cease Fire Tampa Bay is a multifaceted, broad-based community effort working to increase awareness of firearm injuries and provide an opportunity for the people of the southwest-central Florida region to eliminate unwanted firearms. Three approaches to develop this program were implemented; a six-county gun buy-back program, firearm safety education for school-aged children and community education programs. The program has been successful in removing 6,981 unwanted guns from the streets, and has reached thousands of children and families in the region. This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of the program. PMID:16515152

  1. Assessments of urban growth in the Tampa Bay watershed using remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2005-01-01

    Urban development has expanded rapidly in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida over the past century. A major effect associated with this population trend is transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly impervious urban land. This research utilizes an innovative approach for mapping urban extent and its changes through determining impervious surfaces from Landsat satellite remote sensing data. By 2002, areas with subpixel impervious surface greater than 10% accounted for approximately 1800 km2, or 27 percent of the total watershed area. The impervious surface area increases approximately three-fold from 1991 to 2002. The resulting imperviousness data are used with a defined suite of geospatial data sets to simulate historical urban development and predict future urban and suburban extent, density, and growth patterns using SLEUTH model. Also examined is the increasingly important influence that urbanization and its associated imperviousness extent have on the individual drainage basins of the Tampa Bay watershed. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wind generated wave resuspension of sediment in Old Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Levesque, Victor A.; ,

    1991-01-01

    Vertical profiles of velocity and suspended-solids concentration were measured at a scientific instrumentation platform in Old Tampa Bay during the passage of a cold front in March 1990. Strong sustained winds behind the front increased wave activity in the bay, which resulted in resuspension of bottom sediments. The concentration of suspended solids, however, did not correlate with either wave height or mean velocity. A model of wave-current interaction was used to calculate the bottom shear stress, which proved to correlate well with suspended-solids concentration. This analysis shows the importance of considering wave-current interaction when studying sediment resuspension and near-bed transport processes in shallow estuaries.

  3. Orlando, FL, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

  4. SURVEY OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA FROM TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA: ASSOCIATIONS OF INTERNAL DEFENSE MEASUREMENTS WITH CONTAMINANT BURDENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oysters from 16 sites in Tampa Bay, Florida, were collected during a 6-week period in winter 1993 and analyzed for both biological characteristics and tissue chemical concentrations. Using previous sediment contamination and toxicity data, oyster tissues from the selected sites w...

  5. Sediment Pore Water Ammonium Concentrations in Old Tampa Bay as Determined by the Diffusive Equilibration in Thin Films (DET) Technique

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased nitrogen loading, associated with rapid human population growth, was thought to be a major driver of Tampa Bay water quality degradation in the decades immediately after the Second World War. Improvements in wastewater treatment in the early 1980s led to marked reductio...

  6. A Siliciclastic-Infilled Sedimentary Basin Within a Large Carbonate Platform, Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthard, B. C.; Hine, A. C.; Locker, S. D.; Duncan, D. S.; Morton, R. A.; Hansen, M. E.; Edgar, N. T.

    2002-12-01

    A seismic stratigraphic framework based on over 800 km of seismic reflection data collected within the Tampa Bay estuary and approximately 200 boreholes in and around the estuary shows three separate subsurface regions. In the north-central portion of the bay there is an irregular east-west oriented subsurface trough in the Miocene limestone that reaches depths of 30 m below the seafloor (mbsf). This trough contains steeply dipping clinoforms that indicate it has been filled from the south and east and borehole data show that these clinoforms are siliciclastic sediments. South of the trough in the center of Tampa Bay there is a broad carbonate bedrock high. This area is characterized by less than two meters of siliciclastic sediment cover as well as small-scale shallow karst features (10's m in width and up to 10 m in relief). In the southern portion of the Bay the seismic reflection data shows the Miocene limestone has large-scale warping as well as larger-scale karst features (100's m in width and 30+ m in relief) creating another deep basin (up to 40 mbsf) that has been filled by siliciclastics from the south and the east. The sedimentary basin underlying the modern estuary reveals that accommodation space can form within the center of large carbonate platforms and that this accommodation space may be filled by remobilized siliciclastics. Based upon the age of the underlying limestones, and recent work in south Florida by others, we propose that the Tampa Basin was filled during multiple Late Neogene and Quaternary sea-level fluctuations. Additionally, we speculate that the observed multiple buried sinkholes, and sag-and-warp deformation indicate spatially selective subsurface collapse probably initiated by deep-seated dissolution produced by karst processes. Overlying stratigraphic units subsided as a result of solution collapse, creating a surficial topographic low. This surficial basin may have controlled subsequent non-marine, estuarine and even open marine

  7. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL...) Enforcement period. This rule will be in enforced annually on Columbus Day weekend, starting at 12:01 p.m....

  8. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL...) Enforcement period. This rule will be in enforced annually on Columbus Day weekend, starting at 12:01 p.m....

  9. 33 CFR 100.718 - Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. 100.718 Section 100.718 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area is established...

  10. 33 CFR 100.718 - Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. 100.718 Section 100.718 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area is established...

  11. 33 CFR 100.718 - Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. 100.718 Section 100.718 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area is established...

  12. 33 CFR 100.718 - Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. 100.718 Section 100.718 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area is established...

  13. 33 CFR 100.718 - Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. 100.718 Section 100.718 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Suncoast Kilo Run; Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area is established...

  14. Submarine groundwater discharge to Tampa Bay: nutrient fluxes and biogeochemistry of the coastal aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroeger, Kevin D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Greenwood, Wm. Jason; Reich, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    To separately quantify the roles of fresh and saline submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), relative to that of rivers, in transporting nutrients to Tampa Bay, Florida, we used three approaches (Darcy's Law calculations, a watershed water budget, and a 222Rn mass-balance) to estimate rate of SGD from the Pinellas peninsula. Groundwater samples were collected in 69 locations in the coastal aquifer to examine biogeochemical conditions, nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry, and salinity structure. Salinity structure was also examined using stationary electrical resistivity measurements. The coastal aquifer along the Pinellas peninsula was chemically reducing in all locations sampled, and that condition influences nitrogen (N) form and mobility of N and PO43−. Concentrations of NH4+, PO43− and ratio of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) to PO43− were all related to measured oxidation/reduction potential (pε) of the groundwater. Ratio of DIN: PO43− was below Redfield ratio in both fresh and saline groundwater. Nitrogen occurred almost exclusively in reduced forms, NH4+ and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), suggesting that anthropogenic N is exported from the watershed in those forms. In comparison to other SGD studies, rate of PO43− flux in the seepage zone (μM m− 2 d− 1) in Tampa Bay was higher than previous estimates, likely due to 1) high watershed population density, 2) chemically reducing conditions, and 3) high ion concentrations in fresh groundwater. Estimates of freshwater groundwater flux indicate that the ratio of groundwater discharge to stream flow is ∼ 20 to 50%, and that the magnitudes of both the total dissolved nitrogen and PO43− loads due to fresh SGD are ∼ 40 to 100% of loads carried by streams. Estimates of SGD based on radon inventories in near-shore waters were 2 to 5 times greater than the estimates of freshwater groundwater discharge, suggesting that brackish and saline SGD is also an important process in Tampa Bay and results

  15. Identification of sources and estimation of emission profiles from highly time-resolved pollutant measurements in Tampa, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Ondov, John M.; Poor, Noreen; Landis, Matthew S.; Stevens, Robert K.

    Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-min intervals for sequential 1-month periods at each of two sites (Sydney and "Dairy") in the Tampa Bay area during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler-II (SEAS-II). More than 500 samples, believed to be affected by plumes from local utility and industrial sources, were selected for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometric analyses for elemental markers (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, As, Ni, Zn and Cd) based on excursions in SO 2 and NO x measurements. Correlation of short-term excursions in metals and SO 2, and surface wind directions observed between May 23 and 26th, 2002, revealed the influence of an animal feed supplements production facility (AFS), 17 km upwind at a station angle of 81°, for which emissions had not previously been detected by standard monitoring methods. Emission "profiles" for this source were developed, separately, from the time series data and by using principle components analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). In addition, a local dust component was evident in Al and Fe concentration profiles during periods of elevated wind speeds and was resolved by PCA/PMF. Similarly, large but brief 1.5-h excursions in Zn (maximum, 403 ng m -3), Cd, and Pb on May 17th were correlated with winds from the direction of an incinerator (station angle, 250°) 17 km from Sydney. Lastly, large excursions in As concentrations (maximum, 86 ng m -3) observed (May 4th and 5th at Sydney and November 2nd and 3rd at the Dairy) were used to locate previously unrecognized sources, tentatively associated with combustion/production of pressure-treated lumber. Profiles developed directly from the time series data were in the range of those derived from PCA-PMF (AFS); and those for the incinerator, with previously published values.

  16. A severe red tide (Tampa Bay, 2005) causes an anomalous decrease in biological sound.

    PubMed

    Indeck, Katherine L; Simard, Peter; Gowans, Shannon; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan; Mann, David A

    2015-09-01

    Although harmful algal blooms (HABs) are known to cause morbidity and mortality in marine organisms, their sublethal effects are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to compare ambient noise levels during a severe HAB event in Tampa Bay, Florida, to those during non-HAB periods. Passive acoustic monitoring was conducted using bottom-mounted autonomous acoustic recorders during a severe HAB in summer 2005, and in summers 2006, 2011 and 2012 (non-severe HAB years). Ambient noise levels were significantly higher during the non-HAB years due to an abundance of snapping shrimp (Alpheidae) sounds and fish chorusing. The difference of sound intensity between the study years is most likely attributable to effects of the HAB on the abundance and/or behaviour of fish and snapping shrimp as a result of mortality and stress-induced behavioural modifications.

  17. A severe red tide (Tampa Bay, 2005) causes an anomalous decrease in biological sound.

    PubMed

    Indeck, Katherine L; Simard, Peter; Gowans, Shannon; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan; Mann, David A

    2015-09-01

    Although harmful algal blooms (HABs) are known to cause morbidity and mortality in marine organisms, their sublethal effects are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to compare ambient noise levels during a severe HAB event in Tampa Bay, Florida, to those during non-HAB periods. Passive acoustic monitoring was conducted using bottom-mounted autonomous acoustic recorders during a severe HAB in summer 2005, and in summers 2006, 2011 and 2012 (non-severe HAB years). Ambient noise levels were significantly higher during the non-HAB years due to an abundance of snapping shrimp (Alpheidae) sounds and fish chorusing. The difference of sound intensity between the study years is most likely attributable to effects of the HAB on the abundance and/or behaviour of fish and snapping shrimp as a result of mortality and stress-induced behavioural modifications. PMID:26473055

  18. A severe red tide (Tampa Bay, 2005) causes an anomalous decrease in biological sound

    PubMed Central

    Indeck, Katherine L.; Simard, Peter; Gowans, Shannon; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan; Mann, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Although harmful algal blooms (HABs) are known to cause morbidity and mortality in marine organisms, their sublethal effects are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to compare ambient noise levels during a severe HAB event in Tampa Bay, Florida, to those during non-HAB periods. Passive acoustic monitoring was conducted using bottom-mounted autonomous acoustic recorders during a severe HAB in summer 2005, and in summers 2006, 2011 and 2012 (non-severe HAB years). Ambient noise levels were significantly higher during the non-HAB years due to an abundance of snapping shrimp (Alpheidae) sounds and fish chorusing. The difference of sound intensity between the study years is most likely attributable to effects of the HAB on the abundance and/or behaviour of fish and snapping shrimp as a result of mortality and stress-induced behavioural modifications. PMID:26473055

  19. Atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poor, Noreen; Tremblay, Raphael; Kay, Heidi; Bhethanabotla, Venkat; Swartz, Erick; Luther, Mark; Campbell, Scott

    2004-11-01

    Sampling of 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the Gandy Bridge monitoring site between May and August 2002 provided preliminary ambient air concentrations and dry deposition rates for Tampa Bay. The HiC-IOGAPS dramatically improved the recovery of lower molecular weight gas and particle PAHs, as evidenced by the recoveries of PAHs in back-up denuders and filter packs. Total PAH (gas+particle) concentrations ranged from 80 to 190 ng m-3. Concentrations of naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were consistently higher than concentrations of the remaining 10 PAHs. Assuming an unidirectional flux of these compounds from air to water, the estimated total (gas+particle) dry deposition flux was 11.5 μg m-2 d-1, or 6.7 μg m-2 d-1 if naphthalene is excluded.

  20. Development of a seamless multisource topographic/bathymetric elevation model of Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, D.; Wilson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many applications of geospatial data in coastal environments require knowledge of the nearshore topography and bathymetry. However, because existing topographic and bathymetric data have been collected independently for different purposes, it has been difficult to use them together at the land/water interface owing to differences in format, projection, resolution, accuracy, and datums. As a first step toward solving the problems of integrating diverse coastal datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are collaborating on a joint demonstration project to merge their data for the Tampa Bay region of Florida. The best available topographic and bathymetric data were extracted from the USGS National Elevation Dataset and the NOAA hydrographic survey database, respectively. Before being merged, the topographic and bathymetric datasets were processed with standard geographic information system tools to place them in a common horizontal reference frame. Also, a key part of the preprocessing was transformation to a common vertical reference through the use of VDatum, a new tool created by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey for vertical datum conversions. The final merged product is a seamless topographic/bathymetric model covering the Tampa Bay region at a grid spacing of 1 arc-second. Topographic LIDAR data were processed and merged with the bathymetry to demonstrate the incorporation of recent third party data sources for several test areas. A primary application of a merged topographic/bathymetric elevation model is for user-defined shoreline delineation, in which the user decides on the tidal condition (for example, low or high water) to be superimposed on the elevation data to determine the spatial position of the water line. Such a use of merged topographic/bathymetric data could lead to the development of a shoreline zone, which could reduce redundant mapping efforts by federal, state, and local agencies

  1. A landscape based, systems dynamic model for assessing impacts of urban development on water quality for sustainable seagrass growth in Tampa Bay, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an integrated assessment model to predict potential unintended consequences of urban development on the sustainability of seagrasses and preservation of ecosystem services, such as catchable fish, in Tampa Bay. Ecosystem services are those ecological functions and pro...

  2. Contaminant profiles for surface water, sediment, flora and fauna associated with the mangrove fringe along middle and lower East Tampa Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminant concentrations are reported for surface water, sediment, seagrass, mangroves, Florida Crown conch, blue crabs and fish collected during 2010-2011 from the mangrove fringe along eastern Tampa Bay. Concentrations of trace metals, chlorinated pesticides, atrazine, total ...

  3. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Habitat Loss in the Mobile, Galveston, and Tampa Bay Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Morgan; Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico has experienced dramatic wetland habitat area losses over the last two centuries. These losses not only damage species diversity, but contribute to water quality, flood control, and aspects of the Gulf coast economy. Overall wetland losses since the 1950s were examined using land cover/land use (LCLU) change analysis in three Gulf coast watershed regions: Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay, and Tampa Bay. Two primary causes of this loss, LCLU change and climate change, were then assessed using LCLU maps, U.S. census population data, and available current and historical climate data from NOAA. Sea level rise, precipitation, and temperature effects were addressed, with emphasis on analysis of the effects of sea level rise on salt marsh degradation. Ecological impacts of wetland loss, including fishery depletion, eutrophication, and hypoxia were addressed using existing literature and data available from NOAA. These ecological consequences in turn have had an affect on the Gulf coast economy, which was analyzed using fishery data and addressing public health impacts of changes in the environment caused by wetland habitat loss. While recent federal and state efforts to reduce wetland habitat loss have been relatively successful, this study implies a need for more aggressive action in the Gulf coast area, as the effects of wetland loss reach far beyond individual wetland systems themselves to the Gulf of Mexico as a whole.

  4. Potential Relationships Between Urban Development and the Trophic Status of Tampa Bay Tributaries and Lake Thonotosassa, Further the Potential Effect on Public Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MorenoMadrinan, Max J.; Allhamdan, Mohammad; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maury

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of remote sensing to monitor the relationships between the urban development and water quality in Tampa Bay and the tributaries. It examines the changes in land cover/land use (LU/LC) and the affects that this change has on the water quality of Tampa Bay, Lake Thonotosassa and the tributaries, and that shows the ways that these changes can be estimated with remote sensing.

  5. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill...

  6. BENTHIC-PELAGIC PROCESSES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication caused by excess nutrients can exacerbate hypoxia by increasing bottom water and sediment respiration. However, in shallow sub-tropical estuaries, the euphotic zone often extends below the pycnocline allowing oxygen fluxes in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA. Measurements we...

  7. BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL, USA: ROLE OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND DETRIAL CARBON SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterioplankton Dynamics in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA: Role of Phytoplankton and Detrital Carbon Sources (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ER...

  8. SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION MONITORING IN ESCAMBIA-PENSACOLA BAY SYSTEM, FL ERF 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring in Escambia-Pensacola Bay System, FL (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R850).

    Submerg...

  9. Combined geophysical and geochemical tracer techniques to assess rates and impact of submarine groundwater discharge into Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarzenski, P. W.; Baskaran, M.; Reich, C.; Greenwood, J.

    2006-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that water and constituent transport by submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be ecologically important within some coastal environments. However, the nature of this discharge, which can exhibit tremendously temporal and spatial heterogeneity, renders SGD most often difficult to identify and quantify. U/Th series geochemical tracers and new geophysical tools have been developed that now can yield system-wide information on SGD rates and processes. The objective of this study was to apply naturally- occurring Ra and Rn isotopes to derive SGD rates bay wide, and then examine to the geologic controls on SGD in this system with streaming and time series resistivity measurements. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess Ra-226 ranged from 2 to 14 L per square-m per d. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 2 to 10 cubic-m per d per m of shoreline. High-resolution time series and streaming resistivity measurements confirm that SGD within Tampa Bay can be separated into a near-shore and mid-bay component that involve different water masses and unique mixing processes. SGD-derived nutrient loading estimates in Tampa bay will be compared to similar riverine estimates.

  10. Albino mutation rates in red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle L.) as a bioassay of contamination history in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, C.E.; Travis, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of a viviparous estuarine tree species, Rhizophora mangle, to historic sublethal mutagenic stress across a fine spatial scale by comparing the frequency of trees producing albino propagules in historically contaminated (n=4) and uncontaminated (n=11) forests in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Data from uncontaminated forests were used to provide estimates of background mutation rates. We also determined whether other fitness parameters were negatively correlated with mutagenic stress (e.g., degree of outcrossing and numbers of reproducing trees km-1). Contaminated sites in Tampa Bay had significantly higher frequencies of trees that were heterozygous for albinism per 1000 total reproducing trees (FHT) than uncontaminated forests (mean ?? SE: 11.4 ?? 4.3 vs 4.3 ?? 0.73, P 25 yrs of subsequent recruitment and tree replacement may have allowed an initial elevation in the FHT to decay. Patterns of FHT were not explained by distance from the bay mouth or the degree of urbanization. However, there was a significant positive relationship between tree size and FHT (r=0.83, P<0.018), which suggests that forests with older or larger trees provide a more lasting record of cumulative mutagenic stress. No other fitness parameters correlated with FHT. There was a difference in FHT between two latitudes, as determined by comparing Tampa Bay with literature values for Puerto Rico. The sensitivity of this bioassay for the effects of mutagens will facilitate future monitoring of contamination events and comparisons of bay-wide recovery in future decades. Development of a database of FHT values for a range of subtropical and tropical estuaries is underway that will provide a baseline against which to compare mutational consequences of global change. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  11. An analysis of urban development and its environmental impact on the Tampa Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Su, J.

    2007-01-01

    Urbanization has transformed natural landscapes into anthropogenic impervious surfaces. Urban land use has become a major driving force for land cover and land use change in the Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida. This study investigates urban land use change and its impact on the watershed. The spatial and temporal changes, as well as the development density of urban land use are determined by analyzing the impervious surface distribution using Landsat satellite imagery. Population distribution and density are extracted from the 2000 census data. Non-point source pollution parameters used for measuring water quality are analyzed for the sub-drainage basins of Hillsborough County. The relationships between 2002 urban land use, population distribution and their environmental influences are explored using regression analysis against various non-point source pollutant loadings in these sub-drainage basins. The results suggest that strong associations existed between most pollutant loadings and the extent of impervious surface within each sub-drainage basin in 2002. Population density also exhibits apparent correlations with loading rates of several pollutants. Spatial variations of selected non-point source pollutant loadings are also assessed. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations Between Ultrafine Particles and Co-Pollutant Concentrations in the Tampa Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ushang; Watson, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) are ubiquitous in urban air and have been recognized as a risk to human health. The aim of this study was to measure the relationships among ultrafine particles and other ambient air pollutants and meteorological factors in the Tampa Bay Area. This study measured continuous UFPs, black carbon, oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter having an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less (PM10), relative humidity, wind speed, and ambient temperature during January to March 2014. Moreover, the study compared the relationship between UFPs and various co-pollutants daily, including during morning rush hour periods. This study found a moderate correlation among UFPs and black carbon, NO(x), NO2, and NO during hourly continuous measurements and rush hour periods, and a low level of correlation among UFPs and CO, O3, SO2, PM10, relative humidity, wind speed, and ambient temperature. This study indicates that co-pollutants should not be used as a surrogate to assess the human health risk from ultrafine particles exposure. PMID:27263179

  13. 77 FR 19001 - Foreign-Trade Zone 79-Tampa, FL; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Henderson Way, Plant City (Hillsborough County). The ASF allows for the possible exemption of one magnet...) Board (the Board) by the City of Tampa, grantee of FTZ 79, requesting authority to reorganize and expand the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170,...

  14. Discharge, water-quality characteristics, and nutrient loads from McKay Bay, Delaney Creek, and East Bay, Tampa, Florida, 1991-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Y.E.; Levesque, V.A.; Fritz, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment in Tampa Bay has caused a decline in water quality in the estuary. Efforts to reduce the nutrient loading to Tampa Bay have resulted in improvement in water quality from 1981 to 1991. However, Tampa Bay still is onsidered enriched with nutrients. Water quality in East Bay (located at the northeastern part of Hillsborough Bay, which is an embayment in Tampa Bay) is not improving at the same rate as the rest of the bay. East Bay is the center of shipping activity in Tampa Bay and the seventh largest port in the United States. One of the primary cargoes is phosphate ore and related products such as fertilizer. The potential for nutrient loading to East Bay from shipping activities is high and has not previously been measured. Nitrogen and phosphorus loads from East Bay to Hillsborough Bay were measured during selected time periods during June 1992 through May 1993; these data were used to estimate seasonal and annual loads. These loads were evaluated to determine whether the loss of fertilizer products from shipping activities resulted in increased nutrient loading to Hillsborough Bay. Discharge was measured, and water-quality samples were collected at the head of East Bay (exiting McKay Bay), and at the mouth of East Bay. Discharge and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations for the period June 1992 through May 1993 were used to compute loads. Discharges from McKay Bay, Delaney Creek, and East Bay are highly variable because of the effect of tide. Flow patterns during discharge measurements generally were unidirectional in McKay Bay and Delaney Creek, but more complex, bidirectional patterns were observed at the mouth of East Bay. Tidally affected discharge data were digitally filtered with the Godin filter to remove the effects of tide so that residual, or net, discharge could be determined. Daily mean discharge from McKay Bay ranged from -1,900 to 2,420 cubic feet per second; from Delaney Creek, -3.8 to 162 cubic feet per second; and from East

  15. Influence of air mass origin on the wet deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay, Florida—An eight-year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Hillary; Smith, Ronald; Mizak, Connie; Poor, Noreen

    Rainfall delivers on the average ˜10% of the total annual nitrogen load directly to Tampa Bay, based on precipitation monitoring at a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN) site located adjacent to Tampa Bay in urban Tampa. We coupled the chemical analyses for 606 daily precipitation samples collected from 1996 to 2004 with corresponding air mass trajectory information to investigate if wet-deposited nitrogen originated from near versus removed source regions. Air mass trajectories were obtained using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, and were classified into six trajectory categories by the direction of their approach to Tampa Bay. Rainfall nitrate and ammonium concentrations were significantly lower for over-water air mass trajectories than for over-land trajectories as expected, but contributed to 40% of the total wet-deposited nitrogen, a likely consequence of the higher frequency of rain events for these trajectories. Average rainfall nitrate concentrations were significantly higher for air masses that stagnated over the urbanized bay region. We estimated that local sources contributed 1kgNha-1yr-1 or 25% of the total inorganic nitrogen wet-deposited to Tampa Bay.

  16. Development, Evaluation, and Application of Sediment Quality Targets for Assessing and Managing Contaminated Sediments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Carr, R.S.; Eckenrod, D.; Greening, H.; Grabe, S.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Janicki, S.; Janicki, T.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Long, E.R.; Pribble, R.; Sloane, G.; Smorong, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Tampa Bay is a large, urban estuary that is located in west central Florida. Although water quality conditions represent an important concern in this estuary, information from numerous sources indicates that sediment contamination also has the potential to adversely affect aquatic organisms, aquatic-dependent wildlife, and human health. As such, protecting relatively uncontaminated areas of the bay from contamination and reducing the amount of toxic chemicals in contaminated sediments have been identified as high-priority sediment management objectives for Tampa Bay. To address concerns related to sediment contamination in the bay, an ecosystem-based framework for assessing and managing sediment quality conditions was developed that included identification of sediment quality issues and concerns, development of ecosystem goals and objectives, selection of ecosystem health indicators, establishment of metrics and targets for key indicators, and incorporation of key indicators, metrics, and targets into watershed management plans and decision-making processes. This paper describes the process that was used to select and evaluate numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for assessing and managing contaminated sediments. These SQTs included measures of sediment chemistry, whole-sediment and pore-water toxicity, and benthic invertebrate community structure. In addition, the paper describes how the SQTs were used to develop site-specific concentration-response models that describe how the frequency of adverse biological effects changes with increasing concentrations of chemicals of potential concern. Finally, a key application of the SQTs for defining sediment management areas is discussed.

  17. Historical contamination of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, and heavy metals in Mississippi River Delta, Galveston Bay and Tampa Bay sediment cores.

    PubMed

    Santschi, P H; Presley, B J; Wade, T L; Garcia-Romero, B; Baskaran, M

    2001-07-01

    Profiles of trace contaminant concentrations in sediment columns can be a natural archive from which pollutant inputs into coastal areas can be reconstructed. Reconstruction of historical inputs of anthropogenic chemicals is important for improving management strategies and evaluating the success of recent pollution controls measures. Here we report a reconstruction of historical contamination into three coastal sites along the US Gulf Coast: Mississippi River Delta, Galveston Bay and Tampa Bay. Within the watersheds of these areas are extensive agricultural lands as well as more than 50% of the chemical and refinery capacity of the USA. Despite this pollution potential, relatively low concentrations of trace metals and trace organic contaminants were found in one core from each of the three sites. Concentrations and fluxes of most trace metals found in surface sediments at these three sites, when normalized to Al, are typical for uncontaminated Gulf Coast sediments. Hydrophobic trace organic contaminants that are anthropogenic (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, DDTs, and polychlorinated biphenyls) are found in sediments from all locations. The presence in surface sediments from the Mississippi River Delta of low level trace contaminants such as DDTs, which were banned in the early 1970's, indicate that they are still washed out from cultivated soils. It appears that the DDTs profile in that sediment core was produced by a combination of erosion processes of riverine and other sedimentary deposits during floods. Most of the pollutant profiles indicate that present-day conditions have improved from the more contaminated conditions in the 1950-1970's, before the advent of the Clean Water Act. PMID:11488356

  18. The distribution and abundance of Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring isopod of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) habitat within Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the distribution, abundance, and demography of a wood boring isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866, within the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., in eight sites within Tampa Bay, Florida. Sphaeroma terebrans in Tampa Bay displayed reproductive activity year-round and bay-wide synchrony in their density pattern. On average approximately 60% (range: 25%-86%) of the intertidal aerial roots surveyed were occupied by S. terebrans. Although infestation levels by S. terebrans in Tampa Bay were similar to that of more tropical regions, the distribution of S. terebrans was not continuous throughout the study sites. A substantially higher occurrence and density of S. terebrans was found in the northern compared to more southern study sites within the Bay. Additionally, some seemingly suitable areas of the bay (i.e., Pinellas Point, Skyway, Fort Desoto) were actually unoccupied on some dates. Although sites differed in the frequency with which roots were attacked, the density of burrows and isopods in an occupied root was similar, with most attacked roots containing 3-5 burrows. The results of a transplantation experiment indicated that neither abiotic factors nor substrate quality limit the burrowing capabilities or survival of adult S. terebrans in the areas where they are absent. Instead, dispersal limitation, linked with differential juvenile survival, most likely controls isopod distribution and abundance within Tampa Bay.

  19. Geologic structure and hydrodynamics of Egmont Channel: an anomalous inlet at the mouth of Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, G. A.; Naar, D. F.; Hine, A. C.; Tebbens, S. F.; Donahue, B. T.; Brooks, G. R.; Wilson, R.

    2002-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetry surveys of Egmont Channel were conducted in 1999 and 2001 using a Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam bathymetric system. These data were supplemented with other bathymetry data, seismic profiles, underwater scuba observations, and current velocity data, in order to investigate the geologic and hydrodynamic characteristics of Egmont Channel, which is the main shipping channel for Tampa Bay. The cross sectional area (17,964 m2) and the tidal prism (6x108 m3) for Egmont Channel derived in this study are larger than theoretically predicted. The tidal prism is two orders of magnitude greater than previously calculated. This result indicates the current velocities near the deepest part of the channel, referred to herein as Egmont Deep (~30 m), are faster than the rest of the Tampa Bay and the large cross sectional area is most likely due to the large tidal prisms associated with storm events. Currents measured at Egmont Deep and the Sunshine Skyway Bridge (~11 km away) with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, have a high correlation (97%) indicating the current velocities at Sunshine Skyway Bridge can be used as a proxy for current velocities at Egmont Deep. Seismic profile data indicate that both the mouth of Tampa Bay and the bay proper contain many stratigraphic depressions. Egmont Deep is located at one of these depressions. Bathymetry and seismic data indicate that the main ebb jet for Tampa Bay is deflected northward by a local stratigraphic high underlying Egmont Key. This deflection appears to cause the asymmetry of Egmont Channel. The repeated high-resolution multibeam bathymetric surveys document sediment bedform migration. Large subaqueous dunes in the north and western portions of Egmont Channel have moved at least 13 m in a WNW direction over 24 months. Medium-sized dunes are superimposed on the large dunes. Smaller sandwaves appear intermittently in Egmont Deep, which is bounded to the north by a linear steep scarp (~38°) and by

  20. Red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) reproduction and seedling colonization after Hurricane Charley: Comparisons of Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, C.E.; Milbrandt, E.C.; Travis, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Reproductive aspects of life history are known to be important in recovery following disturbance in many plant species although this has not been well studied in mangroves. Hurricane Charley devastated large areas of mangroves in Charlotte Harbor, Florida, in August 2004. We surveyed 6 forests in Charlotte Harbor (2002, 2003, and 2005) and 16 in Tampa Bay, Florida (2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005) for total numbers of reproducing trees and trees heterozygotic for albinism that produce both normal and albino propagules. Tree size (estimated height and diameter at breast height) was also recorded for sentinel heterozygotic trees. Total number of reproducing trees km-1 was used as an index of reproductive output of the population, and deviation from the 3:1 (normal:albino propagules) ratio on heterozygotic trees expected with 100% selfing was used to estimate outcrossing. Numbers of Rhizophora mangle reproducing trees km-1 of shoreline in Charlotte Harbor were reduced by an order of magnitude following Hurricane Charley, while numbers of reproducing trees in Tampa Bay were similar to those of previous years. Reduced reproduction in Charlotte Harbor was accompanied by fewer new recruits in plots on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. Numbers of new recruits after the storm also tended to be fewer in plots where canopy loss was greater. More new recruits occurred in sites that had higher densities of pre-storm Rhizophora seedlings and greater relative dominance by Rhizophora. Outcrossing of sentinel trees was 2.5 times greater in Charlotte Harbor (mean site-1 = 33.6 ?? 6.7%; with 17% of forest sites completely selfing) than in Tampa Bay (mean site-1 = 13.4 ?? 4.7%; with 40% of sites completely selfing), although the implications for seedling recruitment of this difference are not known. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  1. Validation of MODIS FLH and In Situ Chlorophyll a from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Andrew; MorenoMadrinan, Max J.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a (chla) is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chl-a inaccurate. Measurement of suninduced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum may, provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms or compared their accuracy against bluegreen ratio algorithms . In an unprecedented analysis using a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data set from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer against a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout this large optically complex estuarine system. . Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chla concentration estimation using FLH over the standard chla estimate from the blue-green OC3M algorithm. Additionally, a systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the FLH product responds to varying conditions in the estuary and correlations are conducted to see how the relationships between satellite FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a change with depth, distance from shore, from structures like bridges, and nutrient concentrations and turbidity. Such analysis illustrates that the correlations between

  2. An analysis of urban thermal characteristics and associated land cover in Tampa Bay and Las Vegas using Landsat satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing data from both Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 systems were utilized to assess urban area thermal characteristics in Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida, and the Las Vegas valley of southern Nevada. To quantitatively determine urban land use extents and development densities, sub-pixel impervious surface areas were mapped for both areas. The urban-rural boundaries and urban development densities were defined by selecting certain imperviousness threshold values and Landsat thermal bands were used to investigate urban surface thermal patterns. Analysis results suggest that urban surface thermal characteristics and patterns can be identified through qualitatively based urban land use and development density data. Results show the urban area of the Tampa Bay watershed has a daytime heating effect (heat-source), whereas the urban surface in Las Vegas has a daytime cooling effect (heat-sink). These thermal effects strongly correlated with urban development densities where higher percent imperviousness is usually associated with higher surface temperature. Using vegetation canopy coverage information, the spatial and temporal distributions of urban impervious surface and associated thermal characteristics are demonstrated to be very useful sources in quantifying urban land use, development intensity, and urban thermal patterns. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. AVIRIS calibration and application in coastal oceanic environments - Tracers of soluble and particulate constituents of the Tampa Bay coastal plume

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, K.L.; Steward, R.G.; Chen, R.F.; Hawes, S.; Lee, Z.; Davis, C.O. Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor, MI )

    1993-03-01

    AVIRIS is a testbed for future spacecraft sensors (such as HIRIS and MODIS) planned for the Earth Observing System. Model-derived absorption coefficients at 415 nm, a(415), and back-scattering coefficients at 671 nm, b[sub b] (671) for Tampa Bay waters were used to create images from AVIRIS data of the dissolved component of a(415) due to gelbstoff, a[sub g] (415), and salinity. Images of a[sub g] (415), salinity, and b[sub b] (671) were used to depict the distribution of dissolved and particulate constituents, respectively, for Tampa Bay plume during late, ebb-tidal conditions. Salinity covaried with a[sub g] (415), which provided a means of mapping salinity from the a[sub g] (415) imagery. The concentration of suspended particles, as inferred from b[sub g] (671), was extremely variable in the shallow regions where waves and currents interacted. Pollutants covarying with fresh water or suspended sediments can be mapped from a[sub g] (415) and b[sub b] (671) images, respectively. 22 refs.

  4. AVIRIS calibration and application in coastal oceanic environments - Tracers of soluble and particulate constituents of the Tampa Bay coastal plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Steward, R. G.; Chen, R. F.; Hawes, S.; Lee, Z.; Davis, C. O.

    1993-01-01

    AVIRIS is a testbed for future spacecraft sensors (such as HIRIS and MODIS) planned for the Earth Observing System. Model-derived absorption coefficients at 415 nm, a(415), and back-scattering coefficients at 671 nm, b sub b (671) for Tampa Bay waters were used to create images from AVIRIS data of the dissolved component of a(415) due to gelbstoff, a sub g (415), and salinity. Images of a sub g (415), salinity, and b sub b (671) were used to depict the distribution of dissolved and particulate constituents, respectively, for Tampa Bay plume during late, ebb-tidal conditions. Salinity covaried with a sub g (415), which provided a means of mapping salinity from the a sub g (415) imagery. The concentration of suspended particles, as inferred from b sub g (671), was extremely variable in the shallow regions where waves and currents interacted. Pollutants covarying with fresh water or suspended sediments can be mapped from a sub g (415) and b sub b (671) images, respectively.

  5. Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

  6. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the following coordinates: latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°52′00.672″ N., longitude 82°28′51.196″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′28.859″ N., longitude 82°28′10.412″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′01.067″ N., longitude 2°27′45.355″ W.,...

  7. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the following coordinates: latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°52′00.672″ N., longitude 82°28′51.196″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′28.859″ N., longitude 82°28′10.412″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′01.067″ N., longitude 2°27′45.355″ W.,...

  8. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the following coordinates: latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°52′00.672″ N., longitude 82°28′51.196″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′28.859″ N., longitude 82°28′10.412″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′01.067″ N., longitude 2°27′45.355″ W.,...

  9. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the following coordinates: latitude 27°51′52.901″ N., longitude 82°29′18.329″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°52′00.672″ N., longitude 82°28′51.196″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′28.859″ N., longitude 82°28′10.412″ W., thence directly to latitude 27°51′01.067″ N., longitude 2°27′45.355″ W.,...

  10. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  11. 33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the John F. Kennedy Bridge. The regulated area includes the following in their entirety: Hillsborough Cut “D” Channel, Seddon Channel, and the Hillsborough River south of the John F. Kennedy...

  12. Application of Bacteroides fragilis phage as an alternative indicator of sewage pollution in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, M.R.; Rose, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional fecal coliform bacterial indicators have been found to be severely limited in determining the significance and sources of fecal contamination in ambient waters of tropical and subtropical regions. The bacteriophages that infect Bacteroides fragilis have been suggested as better fecal indicators and at least one type may be human specific. In this study, the phages that infect B. fragilis host RYC2056 (RYC), including phage B56-3, and host ATCC 51477-HSP40 (HSP), including the human specific phage B40-8, were evaluated in the drainage basins of Tampa Bay, 7 samples (n = 62), or 11%, tested positive for the presence of phages infecting the host HSP, whereas 28 samples, or 45%, tested positive using the host RYC. A survival study was also done to compare the persistence of phages B56-3 and B40-8 to MS2 coliphage in seawater at various temperatures. The decay rates for MS2 were 0.239 log 10 d-1 at 10??C, but increased to 0.896 at 20??C and 2.62 log10 d-1 at 30??C. The two B. fragilis phages persisted much longer in the seawater compared to the coliphage and showed little variation between the temperatures. All sewage influents sampled from area wastewater treatment plants contained phages that infected the two B. fragilis hosts at levels from 1.2 ?? 104 to 1.11 ?? 10 5 pfu 100 ml-1 for host RYC and 67 to 350 pfu 100 ml -1 for host HSP. Of the 7 chlorinated effluent samples tested, 3 were positive for the presence of the phage using the host RYC and the phage enrichment method, with levels estimated to be <10 pfu 100 ml-1. No phages were detected using the host HSP in the treated sewage effluent. Coliphages were found in 3 of the 7 effluent samples at a range of 30 to 1.2 ?? 103 pfu 100 ml-1. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  13. 78 FR 57061 - Special Local Regulation; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL in the Federal Register (78 FR 40079). We received no comments ] on... event consists of approximately 100 participants launching 30 self-propelled flying objects from a...

  14. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus...

  15. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus...

  16. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus...

  17. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus...

  18. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne... HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus...

  19. A FIVE YEAR RECORD OF PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENT PATTERNS IN ESCAMBIA/PENSACOLA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton pigments were monitored quarterly at over 50 stations in Escambia/Pensacola Bay System (Pensacola, FL) from spring of 1996 to fall 2000. HPLC accessory pigments were used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure. HPLC data suggest a dominance of blue-green a...

  20. Magnitude and frequency of flooding on small urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, M.A.; Woodham, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrologic data collected on nine small urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida and a method for estimating peak discharges in the study area are described. The watersheds have mixed land use and range in size from 0.34 to 3.45 square miles. Watershed soils, land use, and storm-drainage system data are described. Urban development ranged from a sparsely populated area with open-ditch storm sewers and 19% impervious area to a completely sewered watershed with 61% impervious cover. The U.S. Geological Survey natural-basin and urban-watershed models were calibrated for the nine watersheds using 5-minute interval rainfall data from the Tampa, Florida, National Weather Service rain gage to simulate annual peak discharge for the period 1906-52. A log-Pearson Type III frequency analysis of the simulated annual maximum discharge was used to determine the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood discharges for each watershed. Flood discharges were related in a multiple-linear regression to drainage area, channel slope, detention storage area, and an urban-development factor determined by the extent of curb and gutter street drainage and storm-sewer system. The average standard error for the regional relations ranged from + or - 32 to + or - 42%. (USGS)

  1. Digital recovery of 19th century surveys in Tampa Bay, Florida: Topographic charts and Public Land Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.; Gleim, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of historic data to a digital setting adresses the need for data integration through time, bridging technical gaps and differences. The goal of this study was to evaluate a marsh-to-mangrove conversion spanning 125 years and the implications for present coastal-resource management (Yates and others, 2011; Raabe and others, 2012). The U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Fla., georectified and digitized 1870s T-sheets at four Tampa Bay locations that still supported coastal wetlands in 2000 (table 1). Nineteenth century Public Land Surveys of Township and Range lines were also digitized for each site, as a secondary data source to verify historic landscape features (table 2).

  2. ANNUAL CYCLE OF PERIPHYTON, ZOOPLANKTON, AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS ALONG A 5 STATION TRANSECT OF ESCAMBIA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton, zooplankton and water quality parameters were monitored monthly along a 5-station transect in Escambia Bay (Pensacola, FL) from fall 1999 to fall 2000. To provide insight into nutrient processing in Escambia Bay and effects of grazers on phytoplankton community st...

  3. Late Holocene estuarine-inner shelf interactions; is there evidence of an estuarine retreat path for Tampa Bay, Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donahue, B.T.; Hine, A.C.; Tebbens, S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if and how a large, modern estuarine system, situated in the middle of an ancient carbonate platform, has affected its adjacent inner shelf both in the past during the last, post-glacial sea-level rise and during the present. An additional purpose was to determine if and how this inner shelf seaward of a major estuary differed from the inner shelves located just to the north and south but seaward of barrier-island shorelines. Through side-scan sonar mosaicking, bathymetric studies, and ground-truthing using surface grab samples as well as diver observations, two large submarine sand plains were mapped - one being the modern ebb-tidal delta and the other interpreted to be a relict ebb-tidal delta formed earlier in the Holocene. The most seaward portion of the inner shelf studied consists of a field of lobate, bathymetrically elevated, fine-sand accumulations, which were interpreted to be sediment-starved 3D dunes surrounded by small 2D dunes composed of coarse molluscan shell gravel. Additionally, exposed limestone hardbottoms supporting living benthic communities were found as well. This modern shelf sedimentary environment is situated on a large, buried shelf valley, which extends eastward beneath the modern Tampa Bay estuary. These observations plus the absence of an incised shelf valley having surficial bathymetric expression, and the absence of sand bodies normally associated with back-tracking estuarine systems indicate that there was no cross-shelf estuarine retreat path formed during the last rise in sea level. Instead, the modern Tampa Bay formed within a mid-platform, low-relief depression, which was flooded by rising marine waters late in the Holocene. With continued sea-level rise in the late Holocene, this early embayment was translated eastward or landward to its present position, whereby a larger ebb-tidal delta prograded out onto the inner shelf. Extensive linear sand ridges, common to the inner shelves to

  4. Coupling of surge and waves for an Ivan-like hurricane impacting the Tampa Bay, Florida region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan

    2010-12-01

    The interactions between waves and storm surge are investigated using an unstructured grid, coupled wave-surge model forced by a hypothetical Ivan-like hurricane impacting the Tampa Bay, Florida region. The waves derived from the unstructured version of the third-generation wave model simulating waves nearshore. The surge derives from the unstructured Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model, to which wave-induced forces (based on radiation stress theory) are added to the traditional forces by winds and atmospheric pressure. Dependent upon complex bathymetry and geometry, the wave-induced forces result in an additional 0.3˜0.5 m of surge relative to an uncoupled, surge-only simulation, and the increase in coastal sea level by the storm surge adds some 1.0˜1.5 m to the significant wave heights nearshore. Such strong interactions through coupling suggest that waves should not be omitted in hurricane storm surge simulations, especially because the forces by waves on coastal structures are perhaps the most damaging of the hurricane related forces.

  5. Exposure and inequality for select urban air pollutants in the Tampa Bay area.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haofei; Stuart, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution exposure has been linked to numerous adverse health effects, with some disadvantaged subgroups disproportionately burdened. The objective of this work was to characterize distributions of emissions and concentrations of a few important urban air toxics at high spatiotemporal resolution in order to assess exposure and inequality. Benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde were the focus pollutants, with oxides of nitrogen (NOx) estimated for comparisons. Primary pollutant emissions were estimated for the full spectrum of source types in the Tampa area using a hybrid approach that is most detailed for major roadways and includes hourly variations in vehicle speed. Resultant pollutant concentrations were calculated using the CALPUFF dispersion model, and combined with CMAQ model output to account for secondary formation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Census demographic data were applied to estimate residential pollution exposures and inequality among population subgroups. Estimated concentrations of benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and NOx were generally higher in urban areas and lower in rural areas. Exposures to these pollutants were disproportionately high for subgroups characterized as black, Hispanic and low income (annual household income less than $20,000). For formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, the patterns of concentration and exposure were largely reversed. Results suggest that disparities in exposure depend on pollutant type. PMID:26895157

  6. Assessment of Mesoscale Dynamical Downscaling Model (MM5) for Regional Climate Simulation in the Tampa Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.; Graham, W. D.; Hernandez, J.; Martinez, C. J.; Jones, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    This research analyzes the temporal and spatial variability of historic precipitation in Tampa Bay region and evaluates the ability of the mesoscale downscaling model (MM5, Grell et al., 1994), to reproduce this variability. The long term goal of this effort is to evaluate the utility of using MM5 to downscale GCM forecasts and climate change scenarios for improving water management decisions in the Tampa Bay region. Cumulative probability distributions were constructed using observed daily and monthly rainfall at each station, and the spatial correlations between the 53 stations were analyzed for each month using covariance and variogram analysis for both observed data and MM5 predictions. MM5 was run to predict precipitation at 9x9 and 27x27 km2 spatial resolutions and 6-hour temporal resolution over the 23 year period from 1986 to 2008 using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set as initial and boundary conditions. The raw precipitation predictions were then bias-corrected at each observation station using the cumulative probability distribution mapping approach (Wood et al., 2002). Daily and monthly precipitation totals were estimated over the Alafia and Hillsborough River watersheds using the bias-corrected point precipitation and observed variogram functions. MM5 performance was assessed by cross-validating predicted daily and monthly point and total watershed precipitation for each month. Variograms from the bias-corrected daily precipitation predictions in general indicated that MM5 overestimates the strength of the spatial correlation and underestimates the variance of precipitation compared to the observed data, especially in the summer months when convective storms dominate. The simulations for each month reproduced the daily mean point precipitation values with an average error of -0.0641 in (Jul.) to 0.0214 in (Oct.) with an average RMSE of 0.6834 in (Mar.) to 0.9449 in (Sep.) over the 53 rain stations. Monthly mean point precipitation values were

  7. Water-quality characteristics of urban runoff and estimates of annual loads in the Tampa Bay area, Florida, 1975-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, M.A.; Giovannelli, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall, runoff, and water quality data were collected at nine urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area from 1975 to 1980. Watershed drainage area ranged from 0.34 to 0.45 sq mi. Land use was mixed. Development ranged from a mostly residential watershed with a 19% impervious surface, to a commercial-residential watershed with a 61% impervious surface. Average biochemical oxygen demand concentrations of base flow at two sites and of stormwater runoff at five sites exceeded treated sewage effluent standards. Average coliform concentrations of stormwater runoff at all sites were several orders of magnitude greater than standards for Florida Class III receiving water (for recreation or propagation and management of fish and wildlife). Average concentrations of lead and zinc in stormwater runoff were consistently higher than Class III standards. Stormwater-runoff loads and base-flow concentrations of biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, total organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, and lead were related to runoff volume, land use, urban development, and antecedent daily rainfall by multiple linear regression. Stormwater-runoff volume was related to pervious area, hydraulically connected impervious surfaces, storm rainfall, and soil-infiltration index. Base-flow daily discharge was related to drainage area and antecedent daily rainfall. The flow regression equations of this report were used to compute 1979 water-year loads of biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, total organic nitrogen, total phosphorus , and total lead for the nine Tampa Bay area urban watersheds. (Lantz-PTT)

  8. 76 FR 68101 - Safety Zone; Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks... Spa Beach in St. Petersburg, Florida during the Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display on... November 11, 2011, Creative Pyrotechnics is sponsoring the Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011...

  9. Ecosystem development after mangrove creation: plant-soil change across a twenty-year chronosequence in Tampa Bay, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a global scale, the loss of mangroves has been high (~1-2% loss per year in recent decades). Recognizing the important ecosystem services supported by mangroves, restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to replace those services lost after mangr...

  10. Mangrove soil and vegetation change after tidal wetland creation: a 20-year chronosequence in Tampa Bay, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mangrove restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to compensate for mangrove loss (which has been high in recent decades: ~30-50% global loss). However, ecosystem development and functionality following mangrove restoration and creation is poorly u...

  11. High-resolution Land Cover Datasets, Composite Curve Numbers, and Storm Water Retention in the Tampa Bay, FL region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Policy makers need to understand how land cover change alters storm water regimes, yet existing methods do not fully utilize newly available datasets to quantify storm water changes at a landscape-scale. Here, we use high-resolution, remotely-sensed land cover, imperviousness, an...

  12. Bathymetry and vegetation in isolated marsh and cypress wetlands in the northern Tampa Bay Area, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Herndon, Donald C.

    2005-01-01

    Wetland bathymetry and vegetation mapping are two commonly used lines of evidence for assessing the hydrologic and ecologic status of expansive coastal and riverine wetlands. For small isolated freshwater wetlands, however, bathymetric data coupled with vegetation assessments are generally scarce, despite the prevalence of isolated wetlands in many regions of the United States and the recognized importance of topography as a control on inundation patterns and vegetation distribution. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida, bathymetry was mapped and vegetation was assessed in five marsh and five cypress wetlands. These 10 isolated wetlands were grouped into three categories based on the effects of ground-water withdrawals from regional municipal well fields: natural (no effect), impaired (drier than natural), and augmented (wetlands with artificially augmented water levels). Delineation of the wetland perimeter was a critical component for estimating wetland-surface area and stored water volume. The wetland perimeter was delineated by the presence of Serenoa repens (the 'palmetto fringe') at 9 of the 10 sites. At the 10th site, where the palmetto fringe was absent, hydric-soils indicators were used to delineate the perimeter. Bathymetric data were collected using one or more techniques, depending on the physical characteristics of each wetland. Wetland stage was measured hourly using continuous stage recorders. Wetland vegetation was assessed semiannually for 2 1/2 years in fixed plots located at three distinct elevations. Vegetation assessments were used to determine the community composition and the relative abundance of obligate, facultative wet, and facultative species at each elevation. Bathymetry maps were generated, and stage-area and stage-volume relations were developed for all 10 wetlands. Bathymetric data sets containing a high density of data points collected at frequent and regular spatial intervals provided the most useful stage

  13. Evaluation of indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene topical spot-on formulations to control flea populations in naturally infested dogs and cats in private residences in Tampa FL. USA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two different spot-on topical flea products to control flea infestations on naturally infested dogs and cats in Tampa, FL USA. Methods Thirty-two dogs and 3 cats with natural flea infestations living in 18 homes were treated topically with a 19.53% w/w spot-on formulation of indoxacarb. Another thirty dogs and 2 cats living in 19 different homes were treated topically with either fipronil (9.8% w/w)/(s)-methoprene (8.89% w/w) or fipronil (9.8% w/w)/(s)-methoprene (11.8% w/w), respectively. All products were applied according to label directions by study investigators on day 0 and again between days 28 and 30. Flea populations on pets were assessed using visual area counts and premise flea infestations were assessed using intermittent-light flea traps on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28–30, 40–45, and 54–60. Results A single application of the indoxacarb or fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations reduced flea populations on pets by 97.8% and 85.5%, respectively within 7 days. One month (28–30 days) after treatment the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations reduced on-animal flea burdens by 95.0% and 49.5%, respectively. Following two monthly applications of either the indoxacarb or fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations, pet flea burdens were reduced by 99.1% and 54.8%, respectively, by days 54 – 60. At the end of the two month study, 77.1% and 15.6% of the dogs and cats in the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene treatment groups, respectively were flea free. Flea numbers in the indoor-premises were markedly reduced in both treatment groups by days 54–60, with 97.7% and 84.6% reductions in intermittent-light flea trap counts in the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene treatment groups, respectively. Conclusions This in-home investigation conducted during the summer of 2013 in subtropical Tampa, FL, is the first published U.S field investigation of the indoxacarb topical

  14. 76 FR 76044 - Safety Zone; Power Line Replacement, West Bay, Panama City, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Power Line Replacement, West Bay, Panama... establishing a temporary safety zone for a portion of West Bay Creek and West Bay, to include all waters between the Highway 79 Fixed Bridge and the mouth of West Bay Creek out to buoy markers 27 and 28 of...

  15. A hybrid approach to estimate chromophoric dissolved organic matter in turbid estuaries from satellite measurements: a case study for Tampa Bay.

    PubMed

    Le, Chengfeng; Hu, Chuanmin

    2013-08-12

    Remote sensing of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from satellite measurements for estuaries has been problematic due to optical complexity of estuarine waters and uncertainties in satellite-derived remote sensing reflectance (Rrs, sr(-1)). Here we demonstrate a hybrid approach to combine empirical and semi-analytical algorithms to derive CDOM absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(g)(443), m(-1)) in a turbid estuary (Tampa Bay) from MODIS Aqua (MODISA) and SeaWiFS measurements. The approach first used a validated empirical algorithm and a modified quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) to derive chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla, mg m(-3)) and particulate backscattering coefficient at 443 nm (b(bp)(443), m(-1)), respectively, from which phytoplankton pigment and non-algal particulate absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(ph)(443) and a(d)(443), m(-1)) were derived with pre-determined bio-optical relationships. Then, the modified QAA was used to estimate the total absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(t)(443), m(-1)). Finally, a(g)(443) was estimated as (a(t)(443) - a(ph)(443) - a(d)(443) - a(w)(443)) where a(w)(443) is the absorption coefficient of pure water (a constant). Using data collected from 71 field stations and 33 near-concurrent satellite-field matchup data pairs covering a large dynamic range (0.3 - 8 m(-1)), the approach showed ~23% RMS uncertainties in retrieving a(g)(443) when in situ Rrs data (N = 71) were used. The same approach applied to satellite Rrs yielded much higher uncertainties of a(g)(443) (~85%) due to large errors in the satellite-retrieved Rrs(443). When the Rrs(443) was derived from the satellite-retrieved Rrs(550) and then used in the hybrid approach, uncertainties in the retrieved a(g)(443) reduced to ~30% (N = 33). Application of the approach to MODISA and SeaWiFS data led to a 15-year time series of monthly mean a(g)(443) distributions in Tampa Bay between 1998 and 2012. This time series showed significant seasonal and annual

  16. Late Holocene sea-level rise in Tampa Bay: Integrated reconstruction using biomarkers, pollen, organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, and diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soelen, E. E.; Lammertsma, E. I.; Cremer, H.; Donders, T. H.; Sangiorgi, F.; Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Reichart, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of organic geochemical, micropaleontological and palynological proxies was applied to sediments from Southwest Florida, to study the Holocene environmental changes associated with sea-level rise. Sediments were recovered from Hillsborough Bay, part of Tampa Bay, and studied using biomarkers, pollen, organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts and diatoms. Analyses show that the site flooded around 7.5 ka as a consequence of Holocene transgression, progressively turning a fresh/brackish marl-marsh into a shallow, restricted marine environment. Immediately after the marine transgression started, limited water circulation and high amounts of runoff caused stratification of the water column. A shift in dinocysts and diatom assemblages to more marine species, increasing concentrations of marine biomarkers and a shift in the Diol Index indicate increasing salinity between 7.5 ka and the present, which is likely a consequence of progressing sea-level rise. Reconstructed sea surface temperatures for the past 4 kyrs are between 25 and 26 ° C, and indicate stable temperatures during the Late Holocene. A sharp increase in sedimentation rate in the top ˜50 cm of the core is attributed to human impact. The results are in agreement with parallel studies from the area, but this study further refines the environmental reconstructions having the advantage of simultaneously investigating changes in the terrestrial and marine environment.

  17. Contaminant profiles for surface water, sediment, flora and fauna associated with the mangrove fringe along middle and lower eastern Tampa Bay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; Russell, M J

    2015-06-15

    Contaminant concentrations are reported for surface water, sediment, flora and fauna collected during 2010-2011 from the mangrove fringe along eastern Tampa Bay, Florida. Concentrations of trace metals, chlorinated pesticides, atrazine, total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls were species-, chemical- and location-specific. Contaminants in sediments did not exceed proposed individual sediment quality guidelines. Most sediment quality assessment quotients were less than one indicating the likelihood of no inhibitory effect based on chemical measurements alone. Faunal species typically contained more contaminants than plant species; seagrass usually contained more chemicals than mangroves. Bioconcentration factors for marine angiosperms were usually less than 10 and ranged between 1 and 31. Mercury concentrations (ppm) in blue crabs and fish did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fish tissue criterion of 0.3 and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration action level of 1.0. In contrast, total mercury concentrations in faunal species often exceeded guideline values for wildlife consumers of aquatic biota.

  18. Energy-water nexus analysis of enhanced water supply scenarios: a regional comparison of Tampa Bay, Florida, and San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Mo, Weiwei; Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-05-20

    Increased water demand and scarce freshwater resources have forced communities to seek nontraditional water sources. These challenges are exacerbated in coastal communities, where population growth rates and densities in the United States are the highest. To understand the current management dilemma between constrained surface and groundwater sources and potential new water sources, Tampa Bay, Florida (TB), and San Diego, California (SD), were studied through 2030 accounting for changes in population, water demand, and electricity grid mix. These locations were chosen on the basis of their similar populations, land areas, economies, and water consumption characters as well as their coastal locations and rising contradictions between water demand and supply. Three scenarios were evaluated for each study area: (1) maximization of traditional supplies; (2) maximization of seawater desalination; and (3) maximization of nonpotable water reclamation. Three types of impacts were assessed: embodied energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and energy cost. SD was found to have higher embodied energy and energy cost but lower GHG emission than TB in most of its water infrastructure systems because of the differences between the electricity grid mixes and water resources of the two regions. Maximizing water reclamation was found to be better than increasing either traditional supplies or seawater desalination in both regions in terms of the three impact categories. The results further imply the importance of assessing the energy-water nexus when pursuing demand-side control targets or goals as well to ensure that the potentially most economical options are considered.

  19. Salinity characteristics and distribution and effects of alternative plans for freshwater withdrawal, Little Manatee River estuary and adjacent areas of Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario

    1985-01-01

    The Little Manatee River, a coastal stream that empties into Tampa Bay, Florida, may be used as a source of freshwater. Reduction of streamflow will result in upstream movement of saltwater in the stream. Data on streamflow, tide stage, and specific conductance describe the salinity distribution of the estuary. Vertical conductivity profiles indicate that the river is vertically homogeneous during low flow. The maximum upstream location of the saltwater-freshwater interface (800 micromhos) in the river was described by multiple regression analysis involving mean daily streamflow and high-high tide. The coefficient of determination is 0.94 with a root mean square error of + or - 0.4 mile. The location on the river where the estuarine system ends and the riverine system begins is at about 9.9 miles above the reference station at Shell Point. Duration analysis of conductivity indicates that the maximum upstream location of the interface exceeded 9.7 miles about 17 percent of the days for the period of study. Reduction by 50 percent of streamflow for the 90day, 2-year and 20-year recurrence-interval low flow would relocate the maximum intrusion of the interface at the 2-year and 20-year flows upstream by 0.7 and 0.2 mile, respectively. (USGS)

  20. Energy-water nexus analysis of enhanced water supply scenarios: a regional comparison of Tampa Bay, Florida, and San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Mo, Weiwei; Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-05-20

    Increased water demand and scarce freshwater resources have forced communities to seek nontraditional water sources. These challenges are exacerbated in coastal communities, where population growth rates and densities in the United States are the highest. To understand the current management dilemma between constrained surface and groundwater sources and potential new water sources, Tampa Bay, Florida (TB), and San Diego, California (SD), were studied through 2030 accounting for changes in population, water demand, and electricity grid mix. These locations were chosen on the basis of their similar populations, land areas, economies, and water consumption characters as well as their coastal locations and rising contradictions between water demand and supply. Three scenarios were evaluated for each study area: (1) maximization of traditional supplies; (2) maximization of seawater desalination; and (3) maximization of nonpotable water reclamation. Three types of impacts were assessed: embodied energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and energy cost. SD was found to have higher embodied energy and energy cost but lower GHG emission than TB in most of its water infrastructure systems because of the differences between the electricity grid mixes and water resources of the two regions. Maximizing water reclamation was found to be better than increasing either traditional supplies or seawater desalination in both regions in terms of the three impact categories. The results further imply the importance of assessing the energy-water nexus when pursuing demand-side control targets or goals as well to ensure that the potentially most economical options are considered. PMID:24730467

  1. Contaminant profiles for surface water, sediment, flora and fauna associated with the mangrove fringe along middle and lower eastern Tampa Bay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; Russell, M J

    2015-06-15

    Contaminant concentrations are reported for surface water, sediment, flora and fauna collected during 2010-2011 from the mangrove fringe along eastern Tampa Bay, Florida. Concentrations of trace metals, chlorinated pesticides, atrazine, total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls were species-, chemical- and location-specific. Contaminants in sediments did not exceed proposed individual sediment quality guidelines. Most sediment quality assessment quotients were less than one indicating the likelihood of no inhibitory effect based on chemical measurements alone. Faunal species typically contained more contaminants than plant species; seagrass usually contained more chemicals than mangroves. Bioconcentration factors for marine angiosperms were usually less than 10 and ranged between 1 and 31. Mercury concentrations (ppm) in blue crabs and fish did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fish tissue criterion of 0.3 and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration action level of 1.0. In contrast, total mercury concentrations in faunal species often exceeded guideline values for wildlife consumers of aquatic biota. PMID:25931177

  2. Short-term variability of suspended sediment and phytoplankton in Tampa Bay, Florida: Observations from a coastal oceanographic tower and ocean color satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Luther, Mark E.

    2010-09-01

    We examined short-term phytoplankton and sediment dynamics in Tampa Bay with data collected between 8 December 2004 and 17 January 2005 from optical, oceanographic, and meteorological sensors mounted on a coastal oceanographic tower and from satellite remote sensing. Baseline phytoplankton (chlorophyll- a, Chl) and sediment concentrations (particle backscattering coefficient at 532 nm, bbp(532)) were of the order of 3.7 mg m -3 and 0.07 m -1, respectively, during the study period. Both showed large fluctuations dominated by semidiurnal and diurnal frequencies associated with tidal forcing. Three strong wind events (hourly averaged wind speed >8.0 m s -1) generated critical bottom shear stress of >0.2 Pa and suspended bottom sediments that were clearly observed in concurrent MODIS satellite imagery. In addition, strong tidal current or swells could also suspend sediments in the lower Bay. Sediments remained suspended in the water column for 2-3 days after the wind events. Moderate Chl increases were observed after sediment resuspension with a lag time of ˜1-2 days, probably due to release of bottom nutrients and optimal light conditions associated with sediment resuspension and settling. Two large increases in Chl with one Chl > 12.0 mg m -3 over ˜2 days, were observed at neap tides. For the study site and period, because of the high temporal variability in phytoplankton and sediment concentrations, a monthly snapshot can be different by -50% to 200% from the monthly "mean" chlorophyll and sediment conditions. The combination of high-frequency observations from automated sensors and synoptic satellite imagery, when available, is an excellent complement to limited field surveys to study and monitor water quality parameters in estuarine environments.

  3. An historical perspective on eutrophication in the Pensacola Bay Estuary, FL, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, we provide a brief description of the Pensacola Bay estuary, examining the available historical data for evidence of trends in eutrophication within the estuary. Common to many industrialized estuaries, Pensacola Bay has been subjected to unregulated point source...

  4. The effect of discharge and water quality of the Alafia River, Hillsborough River, and the Tampa Bypass Canal on nutrient loading to Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Y.E.; Levesque, V.A.; Woodham, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    Techniques to measure discharge and nutrient loads in the tidally affected portions of two major rivers tributary to Tampa Bay, the Alafia River and the Hillsborough River, were developed and tested. Discharge, water quality, and total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads for the period April 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992, were evaluated and compared with discharge,water quality, and loads at long-term, nontidal gages in the basins. Long-term discharge and water-quality characteristics at selected sites in the Alafia river and Hillsborough River basins were evaluated. A long-term, decreasing trend in annual-mean discharge was observed for discharges at the Alafia River, Sulphur Springs, and Hillsborough River. Low-flow and high-flow characteristics in the Alafia River and Hillsborough River have changed as well. The decreasing trend in the Alafia River discharges is not due to deficient rainfall but probably is due to decreased ground-water inflow to the river because of long-term declines in the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Daily-mean discharges at the mouth of the Alafia River were more variable than discharges at the long-term gage upstream. Daily-mean discharge near the mouth of the river was negative at times, indicating a net loss of water from the river. Daily-mean discharge from the Hillsborough River was minimal from Apil to May 1991, and from late September 1991 to March 1992. During these periods, discharge from Sulphur Springs was a major source of freshwater to the tidally affected reach of the river. Concentrations of total phosphorus and orthophosphorus in the Alafia River above Lithia Springs were the greatest in the 1960's and have generally declined since then. Total nitrogen concentrations have been declining since about 1981. However, increases in nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentrations are occurring in Lithia Springs, a second-magnitude spring that flows into the Alafia River. Specific conductance of water

  5. 77 FR 56772 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... History and Information The Coast Guard published a NPRM in the Federal Register on July 10, 2012 (77 FR...; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast...

  6. 76 FR 53824 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ..., Miami, FL in the Federal Register (76 FR 24840). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public... Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place on Sunday... swim portion of the triathlon. Discussion of Rule On October 30, 2011, Paramount Productions, LLC...

  7. 77 FR 75550 - Special Local Regulations; 2013 Orange Bowl Paddle Championship, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; 2013 Orange Bowl Paddle... in Miami, FL during the 2013 Orange Bowl Paddle Championship. The event will take place on January...

  8. Fresh Water Inflow and Oyster Productivity in Apalachicola Bay, FL (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apalachicola Bay lies at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, where seasonally variable freshwater inflows and shifting winds support an unusually productive and commercially important oyster fishery. While there is concern that upstream water withdrawals may impact the fishery,...

  9. BENTHIC SUSPENSION FEEDERS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: PRELIMINARY STUDIES CONCERNING IMPACTS ON PHYTOPLANKTON THROUGH GRAZING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultural eutrophication in coastal habitats has become a crucial problem for resource managers and policymakers and a critical area of research in ecological science. Models of eutrophication have been developed for some coastal habitats (e.g., Chesapeake Bay), but research on ma...

  10. EFFECTS OF HURRICANE IVAN ON WATER QUALITY IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pensacola Bay was in the strong NE quadrant of Hurricane Ivan when it made landfall on September 16, 2004 as a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. We present data describing the timeline and maximum height of the storm surge, the extent of flooding of coastal land, ...

  11. 76 FR 49301 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... (NPRM) entitled USCG-2011-0044 in the Federal Register (76 FR 24837). We received no comments on the... establishing a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA will be... Bank and the Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge. All vessels within the RNA are: required to transit the...

  12. 76 FR 24837 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... Guard proposes to establish a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA would be enforced annually on the Saturday and Sunday of the second week in...

  13. 76 FR 16636 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs, Lee County, FL; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... refuges for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of the CCP by writing via U.S. mail to: Mr..., Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs for the next 15 years. Background The National Wildlife Refuge System.... The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for...

  14. NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY (PENSACOLA BAY, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton nutrient limitation was studied in a sub-estuary of lower Pensacola Bay using several techniques. Results for <5 um and . 5 um phytoplankton were similar. Nutrient-addition bioassays indicated year-round nutrient limitation, in contrast to seasonal patterns often ...

  15. EFFECTS OF ZOOPLANKTON GRAZING ON PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of microheterotroph and meso-zooplankton grazing in nutrient enriched natural waters of Escambia Bay have been conducted for the past two years. These studies include experimental scale (1 l, 8 l, and 80 l) and lab/field comparisons. Sites for these studies include oligoh...

  16. 77 FR 21446 - Safety Zone; Volvo Ocean Racing Youth Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Volvo Ocean Racing Youth Regatta, Biscayne... establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida during the Volvo Ocean... a safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Miami, Florida encompassed...

  17. BENTHIC SUSPENSION FEEDERS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: PRELIMINARY STUDIES CONCERNING IMPACTS ON PHYTOPLANKTON THROUGH GRAZING (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultural eutrophication in coastal habitats has become a crucial problem for resource managers and policymakers and a critical area of research in ecological science. Models of eutrophication have been developed for some coastal habitats (e.g., Chesapeake Bay), but research on ma...

  18. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties,...

  19. Creating a monthly time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer, Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida, January 2000-December 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie M.; Fouad, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    In Florida’s karst terrain, where groundwater and surface waters interact, a mapping time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer offers a versatile metric for assessing the hydrologic condition of both the aquifer and overlying streams and wetlands. Long-term groundwater monitoring data were used to generate a monthly time series of potentiometric surfaces in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a 573-square-mile area of west-central Florida between January 2000 and December 2009. Recorded groundwater elevations were collated for 260 groundwater monitoring wells in the Northern Tampa Bay area, and a continuous time series of daily observations was created for 197 of the wells by estimating missing daily values through regression relations with other monitoring wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevation in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a decade. The mapping time series gives spatial and temporal coherence to groundwater monitoring data collected continuously over the decade by three different organizations, but at various frequencies. Further, the mapping time series describes the potentiometric surface beneath parts of six regionally important stream watersheds and 11 municipal well fields that collectively withdraw about 90 million gallons per day from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Monthly semivariogram models were developed using monthly average groundwater levels at wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevations and to quantify the uncertainty in the interpolated elevations. Drawdown of the potentiometric surface within well fields was likely the cause of a characteristic decrease and then increase in the observed semivariance with increasing lag distance. This characteristic made use of the hole effect model appropriate for describing the monthly semivariograms and the interpolated surfaces. Spatial variance reflected in the monthly

  20. Linking land use change to recreational fishery valuation with a spatially explicit behavior model: A case study from Tampa Bay, FL USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drawing a link between habitat change and production and delivery of ecosystem services is a priority in coastal estuarine ecosystems. This link is needed to fully understand how human communities can influence ecosystem sustainability. Mechanistic modeling tools are highly fun...

  1. Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water and Finished Water of Community Water Systems in the Northern Tampa Bay Area, Florida, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Berndt, Marian P.; Crandall, Christy A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS's) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, a Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) was conducted in the unconfined and semiconfined portions of the Upper Floridan aquifer system during 2002-04. SWQAs are two-phased sampling activities, wherein phase 1 was designed to evaluate the occurrence of 258 anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) in ground water used as source water for 30 of the largest-producing community water system (CWS) wells in the northern Tampa Bay area, Florida. The 258 AOCs included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and other anthropogenic organic compounds (OAOCs). Phase 2 was designed to monitor concentrations in the source water and also the finished water of CWSs for compounds most frequently detected during phase 1. During phase 1 of the SWQA study, 31 of the 258 AOCs were detected in source-water samples collected from CWS wells at low concentrations (less than 1.0 microgram per liter (ug/L)). Twelve AOCs were detected in at least 10 percent of samples. Concentrations from 16 of the 31 detected AOCs were about 2 to 5 orders of magnitude below human-health benchmarks indicating that concentrations were unlikely to be of potential human-health concern. The potential human-health relevance for the remaining 15 detected unregulated AOCs could not be evaluated because no human-health benchmarks were available for these compounds. Hydrogeology, population, and land use were examined to evaluate the effects of these variables on the source water monitored. Approximately three times as many detections of VOCs (27) and pesticides (34) occurred in unconfined areas than in the semiconfined areas (8 VOCs, 14 pesticides). In contrast, 1 OAOC was detected in unconfined areas, and 13 OAOCs were detected in semiconfined areas with 9 of the OAOC detections occurring in samples from two wells located near septic systems. Analyses of population and land use indicated that the number of

  2. BAY REGION ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT (BRACE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) was formed in 1991 to assist the community in developing a comprehensive plan to restore and protect Tampa Bay. The ecological indicator of the health of the Bay is the coverage of seagrasses, historically in decline, which are important to...

  3. The Validity CHLOROPHYLL-α Estimation by Sun Induced Fluorescence in Estuarine Waters: AN Analysis of Long-Term (2003-2011) Water Data from Tampa Bay, Florida (usa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Madriñán, M. J.; Fischer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a inaccurate. Measurement of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, may provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite baseline algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms using a comprehensive long term in situ data set. In an unprecedented analysis of a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) against chlorophyll-a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions within the estuary including water depth, distance from shore and structures and eight water quality parameters. From the 39 station for which data was derived, 22 stations showed significant correlations when the FLH product was matched with in situ chlorophyll-α data. The correlations (r2) for indvudual stations within Tampa Bay ranged between 0.67 (n=28, p<0.01) and -0.457 (n=12, p=.016), indicating that for some

  4. The Validity Chlorophyll-a Estimation by Sun Induced Fluorescence in Estuarine Waters: An Analysis of Long-term (2003-2011) Water Quality Data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno-Madrinan, Max Jacobo; Fischer, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a inaccurate. Measurement of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, may provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite baseline algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms using a comprehensive long term in situ data set. In an unprecedented analysis of a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) against chlorophyll ]a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions within the estuary including water depth, distance from shore and structures and eight water quality parameters. From the 39 station for which data was derived, 22 stations showed significant correlations when the FLH product was matched with in situ chlorophyll-alpha data. The correlations (r2) for individual stations within Tampa Bay ranged between 0.67 (n=28, pless than 0.01) and-0.457 (n=12, p=.016), indicating that

  5. Seasonal variations on the residence times and partitioning of short-lived radionuclides (234Th, 7Be and 210Pb) and depositional fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, Tampa Bay has been impacted heavily by a wide range of anthropogenic perturbations that may include, agricultural-, shipping-, phosphate mining/distribution-related activities, as well as a burgeoning coastal population. Due to the presence of U-rich underlying sediments, elevated activities of U- and Th-series daughter products may be naturally released into this system. This region is also known for summer thunderstorms and corresponding increases in precipitation and surface water runoff. Only limited work has been conducted on the partitioning of particle-reactive radionuclides (such as 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th) in such a dynamic coastal system. We investigated both the removal residence time and partitioning of these radionuclides between filter-retained particulate matter (≥ 0.5 μm) and the filtrate ( Our results indicate that the partitioning of 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th between filtrate and filter-retained phase is controlled foremost by enhanced bottom resuspension events during summer thunderstorms. As a consequence, no significant relationship exists between the distribution coefficients (Kd values) of these isotopes and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Relatively faster recycling rates of atmospheric water vapor derived from the ocean results in lower atmospheric depositional fluxes of 210Pb to the study site than predicted. The relationship between 7Be and 210Pb in bulk (wet + dry) deposition is compared to their respective water column activities. The residence times of particulate and dissolved 234Th, 7Be and 210Pb, as well the distribution coefficients of these radionuclides, are then compared to values reported in other coastal systems.

  6. Mercury and selenium in blood and epidermis of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Sarasota Bay, FL: interaction and relevance to life history and hematologic parameters.

    PubMed

    Woshner, Victoria; Knott, Katrina; Wells, Randall; Willetto, Carla; Swor, Rhonda; O'Hara, Todd

    2008-09-01

    Blood and epidermal biopsies from free-ranging Tursiops truncatus captured and released during either summer or winter health assessments in Sarasota Bay, FL, were evaluated for concentrations of mercury, selenium, stable isotopes (d(13)C and d(15)N), and blood glutathione peroxidase activity in conjunction with routine hematology and serum chemistry panels. Major objectives were to: 1) quantify and describe relationships among mercury, selenium, glutathione peroxidase, and stable isotopes of C and N in blood and epidermis; 2) elucidate major parameters that influence blood mercury and glutathione peroxidase activity; 3) relate measures of tissue mercury, selenium, and glutathione peroxidase to specific ecological, hematological, morphological, or life history parameters, including season, sex, age, and trophic level. Mercury in both tissues examined is almost exclusively methylmercury. Epidermal concentrations of mercury and selenium reflect their respective amounts in blood, albeit at several times blood concentrations of mercury. The strong association between blood mercury and serum selenium, in conjunction with a lack of significant correlation between blood mercury and glutathione peroxidase, implies that a substantial proportion of blood mercury is affiliated with another selenium-containing moiety or is related to recent dietary intakes (e.g., trophic level, intensive fish consumption). Circulating blood mercury may be described in terms of serum selenium concentration, along with interaction terms among serum selenium, blood d(15)N, and age. Current selenium concentrations in Sarasota Bay dolphins appear adequate for maintenance of blood glutathione peroxidase activity. However, dolphins evidently are subject to seasonal exacerbation of oxidative stress, which might render them more vulnerable to toxic effects of mercury. PMID:19165553

  7. Tampa Bay International Business Summit Keynote Speech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, Christina

    2011-01-01

    A keynote speech outlining the importance of collaboration and diversity in the workplace. The 20-minute speech describes NASA's challenges and accomplishments over the years and what lies ahead. Topics include: diversity and inclusion principles, international cooperation, Kennedy Space Center planning and development, opportunities for cooperation, and NASA's vision for exploration.

  8. View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Part ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Part of Building No. 28 is visible to the right. Building No. 249 is to the left of Building No. 28 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  9. View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 28 is small structure in center background. Part of Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is visible to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  10. View facing south of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing south of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 28 is to the left - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  11. Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Rhode

    2003-12-31

    Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NO{sub x} formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent soot-blowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate

  12. Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Rhode

    2004-09-30

    Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NOx formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent sootblowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around

  13. Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Rhode

    2004-03-31

    Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NOx formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing co-funding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent sootblowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around

  14. Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Rhode

    2002-09-30

    Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NO{sub x} formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent soot-blowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, online, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce {sub x} emissions and improve heat rate

  15. Aircraft Observations of the Tampa Urban Plume during BRACE: Transport, Photochemical, and Depositional Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, W.; Arnold, J.; Watson, T.; Gunter, L.; Wellman, D.; Dasgupta, P.; Li, J.; Riemer, D.

    2003-12-01

    Staff from NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory conducted airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosols in the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) using the NOAA Twin Otter. The Twin Otter flew more than 90 hours in 21 flights in and around the Tampa metropolitan region in May, 2002, at altitudes of 60-3000 m MSL. Flights were conducted over rural and suburban areas, over the centers of Tampa and St. Petersburg, and over Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. The overall objective of the aircraft measurements in BRACE was to study the emission, transport, and photochemical transformations of nitrogen and other ozone precursors in the Tampa area. Continuous instrumentation was used to measure NO, NOX, NOY, HNO3, CO, SO2, O3, CH2O, and H2O2. A semi-continuous GC technique with luminol detection was used to measure PAN. Filter packs were used to make integrated measurements of nitric acid and inorganic aerosols in both fine and bulk aerosol size fractions. Stainless steel grab cans were filled during flight for post-flight analysis of NMHCs by GC/FID/MS. The urban plume was sampled under a variety of meteorological regimes, as it was advected by the prevailing winds over the Florida peninsula (with continuing input of natural and anthropogenic precursors along the advection path) and, in other cases, over the Gulf of Mexico, where additional chemical inputs were negligible and the plume was relatively unaffected by turbulent deposition processes. Case studies will be used to compare and contrast the photochemical processes in the plume under these different regimes. The observed relationships and variations of trace gas concentrations will be used to determine the efficiency of ozone production, as well as instances of NOX or VOC limitation. Sampling the plume at varying downwind distances, over both land and water, allows the determination of overall rates of photochemical ozone production, NOX and SOX oxidation, and estimates of depositional losses of

  16. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1952 architectural drawings by Strategic Air Command, MacDill Air Force Base) BASE LAYOUT, 1952 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  17. Tampa Federal Offender Rehabilitation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallant, Kyle M.; And Others

    Vocational rehabilitation counselors were assigned on a full-time basis to the Federal Probation Office in Tampa, Florida, to work with probationers and releasees as soon as the case files were received in the probation office. This 3-year project was part of a cooperative research program conducted in seven states. A total of 247 offenders…

  18. A digital model of the Floridan Aquifer, north of Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, A.F.; Mallory, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    A regional ground-water model of the Floridan aquifer was constructed for an 875-square-mile portion of the rapidly developing area north of Tampa Bay. The digital model was calibrated by comparing observed (March 1974 and May 1975) and computed potentiometric heads. A good comparison was obtained by adjusting leakance and transmissivity. Differences between the computed and measured potentiometric surface were generally less than 3 feet, with a maximum error of 15 feet. The calibrated model may be used as a predictive tool. For example, the model could be used to evaluate the regional effects of increased ground-water withdrawal on the Florida aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  20. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  1. 33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...°, 1,750 yards from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 125°, 2,050 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 180°, 1,725 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 222°, 2,180 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing...

  2. 33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...°, 1,750 yards from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 125°, 2,050 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 180°, 1,725 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing 222°, 2,180 yards, from Cut “F” Range Front Light; thence to a point bearing...

  3. Estimating benefits in a recovering estuary: Tampa Bay, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration and preservation of riparian forests and coastal marshes provides nutrient removal and other biochemical and physical functions which may preclude, reduce, or delay the need for additional water treatment, while also protecting human health. We examined the ecosystem ...

  4. 33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vessels desiring to enter the safety zone must obtain authorization from the Captain of the Port St..., master, agent or person in charge of a vessel or barge, loaded with LPG shall report, at a minimum,...

  5. Dye trace and bacteriological testing of sinkholes: Sulphur Springs, Tampa, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, R. E.

    1993-12-01

    This paper summarizes over four years of studies and testing of a sinkhole/spring system in north Tampa. Sulphur Springs Pool delivers an average of 95 million l/d to the Hillsborough River, which is tributary to Tampa Bay. In 1986, owing to increasingly erratic bacterial levels at the natural bathing area adjacent to Sulphur Springs, the Hillsborough County Health Department closed the pool for swimming. The City of Tampa, Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission, and the United States Geological Survey have gathered data in an attempt to better understand the system and possible sources of contamination. The Sulphur Springs Action League is a civic group in the area, which has an objective of reopening the pool for recreational purposes. Environmental Engineering Consultants, Inc. provided pro bono technical assistance and expertise in assisting the Action League with its goal. The Action League obtained a grant from SWFWMD to outfit underwater divers for sinkhole exploration as well as water quality and dye trace analysis. The main suspects for bacterial contamination of the pool were two significant sinkholes located 1950 and 2300 m north of the spring. A series of dye tests and water-quality tests were performed. It was estimated that the underground velocity of water was between 90 100 m/h. Using a dye trace, bacteria testing, and travel time estimating, a new source of contamination was found in a Department of Transportation (DOT) stormwater retention basin in which a sinkhole had opened up and was receiving stormwater. The two significant sinkholes received stormwater from commercial and residential areas, and this stormwater brings a large amount of bacteria into the sinkhole, which funnels into the underground system and induces a bacteria spike at Sulphur Springs pool that exceeds the bathing water standards. The City of Tampa has constructed an experimental initial flush capture basin

  6. Near Road Tree Cover in the Tampa, FL EnviroAtlas Community Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through EnviroAtlas, EPA and its partners seek to effectively measure and communicate the type, quality, and extent of services that humans receive from ecosystems so that their true value can be considered in decision-making. One of the ecosystem services examined in the communi...

  7. 77 FR 50926 - Security Zones; Certain Dangerous Cargo Vessels, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security CDC Certain Dangerous Cargo FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of... waterways. For the same reason discussed above, under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) the Coast Guard finds that good..., which, due to their ] political, economic, social, or religious significance, may render...

  8. 78 FR 14649 - Amendment of Class B Airspace Description; Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... surveillance radar (ASR) antenna'' to ``Point of Origin.'' In addition, the description is edited throughout to... established as a ``Terminal Control Area (TCA)'' on September 20, 1990 (55 FR 19226, May 8, 1990). In 1993, as part of the Airspace Reclassification Final Rule (56 FR 65638, December 17, 1991), the term...

  9. 77 FR 65623 - Security Zones; USCGC WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning Ceremony, Ybor Channel; Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; USCGC WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning... around the USCGC WILLIAM FLORES immediately before and during its Commissioning Ceremony that will...

  10. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric..., Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, and Orlando...

  11. Organic Composition of Size-Segregated Aerosols Sampled During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using non-rotating Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, FL, USA. Daily samples were collected 12 m above ground at a flow rate of 30 lpm throughout the month of May 2002. Aluminum foil discs were used to sample aerosol size fractions with aerodynamic cut diameter of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.17 and 0.093 um. Samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Low detection limits were achieved using a HP Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) and large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolution was obtained using a 60 m long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. A quantification method was built for over 90 organic compounds chosen as source markers including straight/iso/anteiso alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed. Also, results will be compared with samples acquired in different environments including the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, GA, USA.

  12. PRELIMINARY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  13. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  14. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  15. Hydrogeology of the Sulphur Springs area, Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.W.; Mills, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Sulfur Springs area includes about 56 square miles in west-central Hillsborough County, Florida. The north-central part of the city of Tampa is highly urbanized; the north-west part of the area is rural or undeveloped. The area has numerous sinkholes, two of which are used as retention basins for urban storm runoff. An intermittent stream discharges into a sinkhole that is hydraulically connected with the Floridian aquifer. A well-developed cavity system occurs in the upper part of the aquifer in the southwestern and southeastern parts of the area. Groundwater velocities of 4,200 to 9,200 feet per day were determined from dye tests conducted in a sinkhole area north of Sulfur Springs. Sulfur Springs provides the city of Tampa a supplemental water supply of 20 million gallons per day. Periodically, the spring pool is closed to swimming because of the high bacteria counts in the water. The source of bacteria appears to be an internally drained sinkhole area north of the spring. In 1980, groundwater use in the study area, excluding withdrawals from Sulphur Springs, was 7.2 million gallons per day, largely for public water supplies. The city of Tampa pumped an average of 48.5 million gallons per day from the Tampa Dam Reservoir on the Hillsborough River. (USGS)

  16. 75 FR 33804 - Update to Notice of Financial Institutions for Which the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ..., 1992 issue of the Federal Register (57 FR 29491). For further information concerning the identification... Florida-- Naples FL 5/28/2010 Southwest. 10243 Bank of Florida--Tampa Tampa FL 5/28/2010 10244 Granite Community Granite Bay CA 5/28/2010 Bank, NA. 10245 Sun West Bank......... Las Vegas NV 5/28/2010...

  17. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735 Section 80.735 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A...

  18. 33 CFR 80.740 - Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.740 Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL. A line drawn from the microwave tower charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°48.8′...

  19. 33 CFR 80.740 - Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.740 Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL. A line drawn from the microwave tower charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°48.8′...

  20. 33 CFR 80.740 - Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.740 Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL. A line drawn from the microwave tower charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°48.8′...

  1. 33 CFR 80.740 - Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.740 Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL. A line drawn from the microwave tower charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°48.8′...

  2. 33 CFR 80.740 - Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.740 Long Key, FL to Cape Sable, FL. A line drawn from the microwave tower charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°48.8′...

  3. 76 FR 23189 - Safety Zone; Pensacola Bay; Pensacola, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... 17'19.73'' W, 30 20'11.12'' N 087 17'20.31'' W, 30 20'41.51'' N 087 15'01.15'' W, and 30 20'11.76'' N 087 15'01.18'' W creating a box, referred to as the ``Show Box''. This action is necessary for the... 17'19.73'' W, 30 20'11.12' N 087 17'20.31'' W, 30 20'41.51'' N 087 15'01.15'' W, and 30 20'11.76''...

  4. Tampa's Splendid Little War: Local History and the Cuban War of Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mormino, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a look at the local culture of Tampa, Florida at the turn of the century and how it responded to a massive influx of troops waiting for action during the Spanish-American War. At that time, Tampa was a multiethnic city that included many Cuban-, Spanish-, and African-Americans. (MJP)

  5. Three magnetic reversals recorded in an 80-m organic-rich core from a sinkhole east of Tampa, FL

    SciTech Connect

    McCartan, L.; Rubin, M. ); Liddicoat, J.C. ); Bond, P.A.; Osmond, J.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Preliminary analysis of a continuous 80-m core from a phosphate mines at Bartow, Fla., indicates as many as three magnetically reversed and five normal sections and five upward-fining depositional sequences. The paleomagnetic data are based on analysis of 16 samples; 100 additional samples have been taken for more detailed analysis. The authors estimate the maximum age to be 1.1--2.6 Ma. The core is composed of massive to faintly laminated beds of black to dark-brown, organic-rich, fine quartz sand and silt, kaolinitic and organic clay, and peat, Only the top meter is within the 40 Ka range of [sup 14]C; a sample at 8.5 m yielded an age estimate close to 350,000 years, the limit of the open-system U/Th dating technique. Rates of deposition are 2--7.5 cm/1,000 years, which is much slower than rates in late Quaternary lakes elsewhere in Florida. There is no clear relation between the magnetic stratigraphy and the depositional stratigraphy. The authors assume that most of the sand was derived from dissolved limestone around the sinkhole, but some of the sand as well as the silt and clay may be windborne. Textural variations may be coincident with differences in rainfall, and this concept will be investigated through pollen analysis of approximately 800 samples. The one sample examined so far is from the bottom of the core, and it has an equivocal biostratigraphic age. The high grass pollen content indicates a drier climate than at present; it is from a long interval of peat with sand, which is typically windborne in dry climates.

  6. 77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory Information... delegates, official parties, dignitaries, the public, and surrounding waterways. For the same reason..., economic, social, or religious ] significance, may render them particularly attractive targets of...

  7. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N., longitude...

  8. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N. longitude...

  9. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N., longitude...

  10. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N. longitude...

  11. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  12. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  13. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  14. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  15. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  16. 33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80.805 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A south-north line drawn from the Econfina River Light to the...

  17. 33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80.805 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A south-north line drawn from the Econfina River Light to the...

  18. System design of a photovoltaic flat-panel applications experiment at Busch Gardens, Tampa, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The detailed system design for a photovoltaic roof shingle module installation at Busch Gardens, Tampa, FL, (also known as the Dark Continent) is discussed. This installation of 4312 shingle solar cell modules of a second-generation design, which was developed under this contract, produces 29.5 kW of peak output at 237 Vdc under Standard Operating Conditions (SOC) with an NOCT at 61/sup 0/C. With a total gross roof area of 330.7 m/sup 2/, this installation yields an areal specific power output of 89.2 watt/m/sup 2/ at SOC. The system which uses an improved, low loss direct-coupled, line-commutated inverter controlled to operate the solar array maximum power operating point, delivers 208Y/120 volt, 3 phase ac in parallel with the Busch Gardens distribution network. The calculated annual ac energy m/sup 2/. The resulting overall system conversion efficiency of 9.2% is considered high for a system using large area circular solar cells.

  19. James Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Hudson Bay and James Bay, Canada     View Larger ... Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. The false-color image at right is a composite of red band data ...

  20. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station IGCC project: Project status

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, J.E.; Carlson, M.R.; Hurd, R.; Pless, D.E.; Grant, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round II award. The Polk Power Station uses oxygen-blown, entrained-flow IGCC technology licensed from Texaco Development Corporation to demonstrate significant reductions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions when compared to existing and future conventional coal-fired power plants. In addition, this project demonstrates the technical feasibility of commercial scale IGCC and Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) technology. The Polk Power Station achieved ``first fire`` of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. Since that time, significant advances have occurred in the operation of the entire IGCC train. This paper addresses the operating experiences which occurred in the start-up and shakedown phase of the plant. Also, with the plant being declared in commercial operation as of September 30, 1996, the paper discusses the challenges encountered in the early phases of commercial operation. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit in the first quarter of 1997 and beyond, as well as plans for future alternate fuel test burns, are detailed. The presentation features an up-to-the-minute update on actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall Unit capacity, heat rate, and availability. In addition, the current status of the start-up activities for the HGCU portion of the plant is discussed.

  1. FL V1.3

    2009-08-03

    A library of utility classes for computer vision. Contains implementations of various well-known image processing techniques, such as interest point operators and region descriptors. Includes interfaces to various libraries for image and video I/O, as well as an interface to LAPACK/BLAS. FL was developed at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) and released under an open source license. Version 1.2 was a maintenance release provided by SNL under the LGPL license. Version 1.3 is amore » maintenance release, containing the following changes: - Improved image format handling. Now handles strided and planar memory layouts and a wider range of pixel formats. - Improved image file I/O, including better support for metadata, a wider range of stored pixel types, and a couple of new file formats. - Improvements to DOG and SIFT, and efficiency improvements in low-level convolution. - Improvements to networking, including a generic TCP listener. - Various improvements to numerical processing. The HISTORY file included in the distribution contains a more detailed description of the changes.« less

  2. FL V1.3

    SciTech Connect

    Rothganger, Frederick

    2009-08-03

    A library of utility classes for computer vision. Contains implementations of various well-known image processing techniques, such as interest point operators and region descriptors. Includes interfaces to various libraries for image and video I/O, as well as an interface to LAPACK/BLAS. FL was developed at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) and released under an open source license. Version 1.2 was a maintenance release provided by SNL under the LGPL license. Version 1.3 is a maintenance release, containing the following changes: - Improved image format handling. Now handles strided and planar memory layouts and a wider range of pixel formats. - Improved image file I/O, including better support for metadata, a wider range of stored pixel types, and a couple of new file formats. - Improvements to DOG and SIFT, and efficiency improvements in low-level convolution. - Improvements to networking, including a generic TCP listener. - Various improvements to numerical processing. The HISTORY file included in the distribution contains a more detailed description of the changes.

  3. Public health assessment for Stauffer Chemical Company/Tampa, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, Region 4. Cerclis No. FLD004092532. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Stauffer Chemical Co. (Tampa Plant) site is a former pesticide formulating and packaging operation in Tampa, Florida. Past disposal practices have contaminated on-site air, soil, surface water, sediments, and ground water. We classify this site as an indeterminate public health hazard. Neither the Environmental Protection Agency nor Stauffer have fully delineated the vertical and lateral extent of contamination in the Floridan aquifer. The one on-site caretaker has been exposed to contaminants via inhalation and incidental soil ingestion. Future workers may also be exposed to contaminants. The available data, however, do not indicate that these exposures would cause adverse health effects. The data are inadequate, however, to assess the risk for the 5-50 people who eat fish from the nearby Tampa Bypass Canal.

  4. 78 FR 48763 - Florida Disaster #FL-00090

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00090 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  5. 78 FR 41290 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Sanibel, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... Sanibel Island Heliport, Sanibel, FL. (78 FR 34557). After publication, the FAA found typographical errors... Sanibel Island Heliport, Sanibel, FL, as published in the Federal Register of June 10, 2013 (78 FR 34557), FR Doc. 2013-13107, is corrected to read: * * * * * ASO FL E5 Sanibel, FL Sanibel Island Heliport,...

  6. Estuarine Biotope Mosaics and Habitat Management Goals: An Application in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many types of anthropogenic stress to estuaries lead to destruction and conversion of habitats, thus altering habitat landscapes and changing the “arena” in which the life history interactions of native fauna take place. This can lead to decreased populations of valued fauna, an...

  7. Estuarine Biotope Mosaics and Habitat Management Goals: An Application in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many types of anthropogenic stress to estuaries lead to destruction and conversion of habitats, thus altering habitat landscapes and changing the “arena” in which the life history interactions of native fauna take place. This can lead to decreased populations of valued fauna, a...

  8. Habitat and Recreational Fishing Opportunity in Tampa Bay: Linking Ecological and Ecosystem Services to Human Beneficiaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating value of estuarine habitat to human beneficiaries requires that we understand how habitat alteration impacts function through both production and delivery of ecosystem goods and services (EGS). Here we expand on the habitat valuation technique of Bell (1997) with an es...

  9. Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Although of less importance than the other three factors, a low-lying topographical position benefited the hydrologic condition of several of the study wetlands (S-68 Cypress and W-12 Cypress) both before and after the reductions in groundwater withdrawals. Compared to wetlands in a higher topographical position, those in a lower position had longer hydroperiods because of their greater ability to receive more runoff from higher elevation wetlands and to establish surface-water connections to other isolated wetlands and surface-water bodies through low-lying surface-water channels during wet conditions. In addition, wetlands in low-lying areas benefited from groundwater inflow when groundwater levels were higher than wetland water levels.

  10. Adaptation of a Weighted Regression Approach to Evaluate Water Quality Trends in Tampa Bay, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of long-term monitoring data can improve resolution of temporal and spatial changes in water quality. In many cases, the fact that changes have occurred is no longer a matter of debate. However, the relatively simple methods that have been used to ev...

  11. 76 FR 44531 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Chillounge Night St. Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request..., call or e-mail Marine Science Technician First Class Jo A. Hoover, Sector St. Petersburg Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 813-228-2191, e-mail Jo.A.Hoover@uscg.mil . If you have questions...

  12. Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Low permeability sediments and the absence of karst features underlying the wetlands had a positive influence on the wetland recovery following the reductions in groundwater withdrawals. In these settings, intact low permeability subsurface layers help maintain water within and beneath the wetland, and limit the downward leakage potential to the Upper Floridan aquifer. For wetlands in these settings

  13. 76 FR 68098 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Chillounge Night St. Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ...: If you have questions on this temporary final rule, call or email Marine Science Technician First... Register (76 FR 44531). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and... under ADDRESSES. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation...

  14. Hydrologic Connections and Landscape Metrics to Advance Ecosystem Goods and Services in Tampa Bay Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the hydrological characteristics of coastal wetlands across land use gradients ranging from natural to urban to agricultural is important for significantly enhancing our ability to utilize environmental data in interpreting ecosystem condition and processes. Here we...

  15. Surface Elevation Change And Vertical Accretion In Created Mangroves In Tampa Bay, Florida, Usa

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mangroves protect coastlines, provide faunal habitat, and store large quantities of carbon (C). In South Florida and other parts of the Gulf of Mexico, large wetland areas, including mangrove forests, have been removed, degraded, or damaged. Wetland creation efforts have been use...

  16. 33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80.805 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.805 Rock Island,...

  17. 33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80.805 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.805 Rock Island,...

  18. 33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80.805 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.805 Rock Island,...

  19. 33 CFR 80.748 - Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island... Sanibel Island, FL. (a) A line drawn across Big Marco Pass parallel to the general trend of the seaward, highwater shoreline. (b) A line drawn from the northwesternmost extremity of Coconut Island 000°T...

  20. 33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island... Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside lines specifically described provided in this section, the 72... Islands. (b) A north-south line drawn through Steinhatchee River Light 21. (c) A line drawn...

  1. 33 CFR 80.750 - Sanibel Island, FL to St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sanibel Island, FL to St... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.750 Sanibel Island, FL to..., between Captiva Island and Sanibel Island, and lines drawn across Redfish and Captiva Passes parallel...

  2. 33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island... Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside lines specifically described provided in this section, the 72... Islands. (b) A north-south line drawn through Steinhatchee River Light 21. (c) A line drawn...

  3. 33 CFR 80.750 - Sanibel Island, FL to St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sanibel Island, FL to St... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.750 Sanibel Island, FL to..., between Captiva Island and Sanibel Island, and lines drawn across Redfish and Captiva Passes parallel...

  4. 33 CFR 80.748 - Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island... Sanibel Island, FL. (a) A line drawn across Big Marco Pass parallel to the general trend of the seaward, highwater shoreline. (b) A line drawn from the northwesternmost extremity of Coconut Island 000°T...

  5. 33 CFR 80.748 - Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island... Sanibel Island, FL. (a) A line drawn across Big Marco Pass parallel to the general trend of the seaward, highwater shoreline. (b) A line drawn from the northwesternmost extremity of Coconut Island 000°T...

  6. 33 CFR 80.748 - Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island... Sanibel Island, FL. (a) A line drawn across Big Marco Pass parallel to the general trend of the seaward, highwater shoreline. (b) A line drawn from the northwesternmost extremity of Coconut Island 000°T...

  7. 33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island... Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside lines specifically described provided in this section, the 72... Islands. (b) A north-south line drawn through Steinhatchee River Light 21. (c) A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.748 - Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Romano, FL to Sanibel Island... Sanibel Island, FL. (a) A line drawn across Big Marco Pass parallel to the general trend of the seaward, highwater shoreline. (b) A line drawn from the northwesternmost extremity of Coconut Island 000°T...

  9. 33 CFR 80.750 - Sanibel Island, FL to St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sanibel Island, FL to St... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.750 Sanibel Island, FL to..., between Captiva Island and Sanibel Island, and lines drawn across Redfish and Captiva Passes parallel...

  10. 33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island... Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside lines specifically described provided in this section, the 72... Islands. (b) A north-south line drawn through Steinhatchee River Light 21. (c) A line drawn...

  11. 33 CFR 80.750 - Sanibel Island, FL to St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sanibel Island, FL to St... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.750 Sanibel Island, FL to..., between Captiva Island and Sanibel Island, and lines drawn across Redfish and Captiva Passes parallel...

  12. 33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island... Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside lines specifically described provided in this section, the 72... Islands. (b) A north-south line drawn through Steinhatchee River Light 21. (c) A line drawn...

  13. 33 CFR 80.750 - Sanibel Island, FL to St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sanibel Island, FL to St... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Gulf Coast § 80.750 Sanibel Island, FL to..., between Captiva Island and Sanibel Island, and lines drawn across Redfish and Captiva Passes parallel...

  14. 2. VIEW OF BISCAYNE BAY, SHOWING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BOATHOUSE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF BISCAYNE BAY, SHOWING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BOATHOUSE AND YACHT CLUB (NOTE: THE ORIGINAL PRINT FROM WHICH THIS PHOTOCOPY WAS MADE HAD BEEN REVERSED) - Ralph M. Munroe House, Boathouse, 3485 Main Highway (Coconut Grove), Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL

  15. Rethinking "Turner v. Keefe": The Parallel Mobilization of African-American and White Teachers in Tampa, Florida, 1936-1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    In 1941, members of the local unit of the Florida State Teachers Association (FSTA) met in Tampa to plan a lawsuit against Hillsborough County's school board for paying African-American teachers less than white teachers. Hilda Turner, who taught history and economics at Tampa's historically black high school, agreed to serve as plaintiff; she was…

  16. CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE ORGANIC SPECIES MEASURED IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS DURING THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY ( TACS )

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was completed to assess environmental exposures for a group of asthmatic children (n = 9) under the age of six and living in Tampa, Florida. Concentrations of particulate organic species are reported from residential indoor, residential...

  17. 77 FR 42352 - Florida Disaster #FL-00072

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00072 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Escobar, Office of...

  18. 77 FR 66083 - Florida Disaster # FL-00076

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00076 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of...

  19. Tampa's Well-being: A Demonstration of ORD's Human Well-being Index (web content for the Tampa Bay Ecosystem services website)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems provide services to humans that support our well-being. Well-being is not only our health but also our quality of life. We rely upon the services provided by nature to help maintain good health and a high quality of life, including clean water, clean air, food and recr...

  20. James Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  First Views of James Bay, Canada     View Larger ... for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, ...

  1. 33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area. 165.752 Section 165.752 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  2. 33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area. 165.752 Section 165.752 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  3. 33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area. 165.752 Section 165.752 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  4. 33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area. 165.752 Section 165.752 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  5. 33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area. 165.752 Section 165.752 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  6. FGD gypsum application: Impacts on soil P from city parks in the Tampa area

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling excessive P loss from agricultural fields has become a major issue in recent years. However, managed city parks may also contribute to P loss. Thus, a study was conducted at three different city parks located in the Tampa Area to evaluate the use of FGD gypsum as an amendment to reduce w...

  7. 77 FR 71734 - Proposed Modification of the Miami, FL, Class B Airspace Area; and the Ft Lauderdale, FL, Class C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Modification of the Miami, FL, Class B Airspace... the Class B airspace at Miami, FL, and the Class C airspace at Ft Lauderdale, FL. The purpose of these..., January 28, 2013, will be held at the Wings Over Miami Air Museum, Kendall-Tamiami Executive...

  8. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Broad Creek, Broad River, Rodgers River First Bay, Chatham River, Huston River, to the shoreline at... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and Marco... parallel to the general trend of the shoreline. (e) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 92 Bridge...

  9. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Broad Creek, Broad River, Rodgers River First Bay, Chatham River, Huston River, to the shoreline at... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and Marco... parallel to the general trend of the shoreline. (e) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 92 Bridge...

  10. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Broad Creek, Broad River, Rodgers River First Bay, Chatham River, Huston River, to the shoreline at... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and Marco... parallel to the general trend of the shoreline. (e) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 92 Bridge...

  11. Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Narragansett Bay, situated on the eastern side of Rhode Island, comprises about 15% of the State’s total area. Ninety-five percent of the Bay’s surface area is in Rhode Island with the remainder in southeastern Massachusetts; 60% of the Bay’s watershed is in Massachusetts. At the...

  12. James Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  First Light over James Bay     View Larger Image MISR "First light", 16:40 UTC, 24 February 2000 . This is the first image of Earth's ... the line of flight. At the top of the image, the dark-to-light transition captures the opening of the MISR cover. Progressing southward, ...

  13. James Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Green Summer and Icy Winter in James Bay     View Larger Image ... winter. The left-hand image was acquired on August 9, 2000 (Terra orbit 3427), and the right-hand image is from January 16, 2001 (Terra ...

  14. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, preliminary public design report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    This preliminary Public Design Report (PDR) provides design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. This project is partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program under the provisions of Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Tampa Electric Company, novated on March 5,1992. The project is highlighted by the inclusion of a new hot gas cleanup system. DOE`s project management is based at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in West Virginia. This report is preliminary, and the information contained herein is subject to revision. Definitive information will be available in the final PDR, which will be published at the completion of detailed engineering.

  15. Analysis of Environmental Data and Landscape Characterization on Multiple WetlandTypes Using Water Level Loggers and GIS Techniques in Tampa, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better characterize the relationships between both adjacent hydrology/ precipitation and nutrient processing with groundwater level fluctuations, continuous water level data are being collected across three dominant wetland types, each with varied landscape characteristics. Th...

  16. Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K05424, Seelye Stevenson Value & Knecht, March 1975. TRANSFER AISLE NORTH DOOR,ARCHITECTURAL NORTH ELEVATION AND MISC. DETAILS. Sheet 78 of 207 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K05424, Seelye Stevenson Value & Knecht, March 1975. TRANSFER AISLE NORTH DOOR, ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Sheet 79 of 207 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. 33 CFR 80.757 - Suncoast Keys, FL to Horseshoe Point, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply on the bays, bayous, creeks, and marinas from the Suncoast Keys to Horseshoe Point. (b) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 44 Bridge over the Salt River. (c) A north-south line drawn...

  19. 33 CFR 80.757 - Suncoast Keys, FL to Horseshoe Point, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apply on the bays, bayous, creeks, and marinas from the Suncoast Keys to Horseshoe Point. (b) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 44 Bridge over the Salt River. (c) A north-south line drawn...

  20. 33 CFR 80.730 - Miami Harbor, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami Harbor, FL. 80.730 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.730 Miami Harbor, FL. A line drawn across the seaward extremity of the Miami Harbor Government Cut Jetties....

  1. 78 FR 38828 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Captiva, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... airspace at Upper Captiva Island Heliport, Captiva, FL, (78 FR 33967). Subsequent to publication, the FAA... Register of June 6, 2013, (78 FR 33967), FR Doc. 2013-13105, is delayed from June 27, 2013, to August 22... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Captiva, FL...

  2. 75 FR 43 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Sarasota, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... FR 46898), Docket No. FAA-2009-0652; Airspace Docket 09-ASO-21. The FAA uses the direct final... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Sarasota, FL AGENCY... that modifies the Class E airspace at Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, Sarasota, FL. This...

  3. VIEW OF HB1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HB-1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM (VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS ARE VISIBLE IN THE CENTER), FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Teachers' Role, Learners' Gender Differences, and FL Anxiety among Seventh-Grade Students Studying English as a FL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between foreign language (FL) anxiety and achievement in that language. The role of the FL teacher as perceived by the learners was also tested. Participants were 67 seventh-grade students. They were administered an anxiety questionnaire, a Hebrew reading comprehension test, an English reading comprehension…

  5. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

  6. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.; Shafer, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the construction phase for the new Polk Power Station, Unit {number_sign}1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology for power generation. The unit will utilize oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle technology, to provide nominal net 26OMW of generation. As part of the environmental features of this process, the sulfur species in the coal will be recovered as a commercial grade sulfuric acid by-product. The sulfur will be removed from the synthesis gas utilizing a cold gas clean-up system (CGCU).

  7. Modeling photosynthetically active radiation in water of Tampa Bay, Florida, with emphasis on the geometry of incident irradiance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; McPherson, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    A model is developed that uses a simplified geometric description of incident direct solar beam and diffuse skylight. The model incorporates effects of solar elevation angle and cloudiness on the amount of in-air photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) that passes through the air-water interface and on K0 in waters of relatively low turbidity. The value of K0 was estimated to vary as much as 41% on a clear summer day due to changes in solar elevation angle. The model was used to make estimates of the depth to which sea-grasses might receive adequate light for survival for a range of values of K0. -from Authors

  8. It's worth how much?!? Incorporating valuation metrics into long-term goals in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The establishment of science-based long-term environmental management goals is just the first step in what is typically a decades-long process to restore estuarine and coastal ecosystems. In addition to adequate monitoring and reporting, maintaining public interest, financial sup...

  9. Functional Characteristics of Bacterial Communities in Periphyton Colonized in Tampa Bay Estuaries Receiving Runoff from Different Landscapes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periphyton (algae, microorganisms, diatoms, and the matrix they construct) accumulate on surfaces in aquatic ecosystems and have been used as ecological indicators because their characteristics are sensitive to changes in physical and chemical water quality parameters. Diatom com...

  10. Taxonomic Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Periphyton Colonized in Tampa Bay Estuaries Receiving Runoff from Different Landscapes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical, physical, and biological properties of periphyton (algae, cyanobacteria, and other microorganisms attached to surfaces) formed in aquatic ecosystems are often used as ecological indicators of anthropogenic disturbances from the landscape. Little attention has been paid ...

  11. An Integrative Approach to Ecosystem Goods and Services – Putting the Pieces Together for the Tampa Bay Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem goods and services production, delivery, and use by humans involve multiple systems working together at various different spatial and temporal scales. Assessments of ecosystem goods and services and their benefits to current and or future human populations in any given ...

  12. Hydrogeology, estimated impact, and regional well monitoring of effects of subsurface wastewater injection, Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.

    1981-01-01

    Six proposed injection sites are located in Pinellas County, Fla., and the city of St. Petersburg. Projected maximum injection rate, if all sites become operational, will be about 40 million gallons per day. The injection zone at the proposed sites is in a consistently dolomitized section of the Avon Park Limestone in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer. The injection zone contains saline ground water that has a chloride concentration of 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Pressure and velocity changes were computed at selected regional locations in the upper and lower parts of the Floridan aquifer. Results of the model computations suggest that the regional impact after 20 years of injection will be small. Three locations are proposed for regional monitoring of subsurface injection. They are in the vicinity of the intersection of highways U.S. 19 and U.S. 60 in Pinellas County, Sun City in Hillsborough County, and the intersection of Sheldon Road and Gunn Highway in Hillsborough County. (USGS)

  13. Preparing for a New Century of Learning: Technology, Education, and the Internet. ICTE Tampa 1999: International Conference on Technology and Education Proceedings (17th, Tampa, Florida, October 10-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The overarching focus of the International Conference on Technology and Education (ICTE) Tampa 1999 conference was "Preparing for a New Century of Learning: Technology, Education, and the Internet." Twelve themes supported this focus: "Implementation in the Classroom"; "Educational Tools"; "Information Technology and Educational Policy";…

  14. Sinkhole development resulting from ground-water withdrawal in the Tampa area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinclair, William C.

    1982-01-01

    The area of municipal well fields on the Gulf Coastal Plain north of tampa, Fla., is densely pitted with natural sinkholes and sinkhole lakes that have resulted from collapse of surficial sand and clay into solution cavities in the underlying carbonate rocks of the Floridan aquifer. Although solution of the underlying rocks is the ultimate cause of sinkholes, some have been induced by abrupt changes in ground-water levels caused by pumping. Declines in water levels cause loss of support to the bedrock roofs over cavities and to surficial material overlying openings in the top of bedrock. The volume of calcium, magnesium , and carbonate (the constituents of limestone and dolomite) in solution in the water withdrawn from four well fields near Tampa totaled about 240,000 cubic feet in 1978. Most induced solution takes place at the limestone surface however, and the area of induced recharge is so extensive that the effect of induced limestone solution on sinkhole development is negligible. Alinement of established sinkholes along joint patterns in the bedrock suggests that a well along these lineations might have direct hydraulic connection with a zone of incipient sinkholes. Therefore, pumping of large-capacity wells along such lineations would increase the probability of sinkhole development. Although sinkholes generally form abruptly in the study area, local changes such as vegetative stress, ponding of rainfall, misalinement of structures, and turbidity in well water are all indications that percollapse subsidence may be taking place. (USGS)

  15. Diversity reception of COMSTAR SHF beacons with the Tampa triad, 1978 - 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D.; Tang, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The results of 19 GHz downlink rain attenuation diversity measurements in Tampa over a 29 month period (1978-1980), and the results of a 20 GHz diversity study during the summer of 1981, using the remaining COMSTAR beacon are presented. At 19 GHz, site separations of 11, 16, and 20 km were used, with reception at high elevation angle (about 57 deg). At 29 GHz, only the 16 km baseline was employed, with elevation angle about 32 deg. Almost identical long term performance of the two longer baselines indicates that for separations above about 15 km diversity improvement was not sensitive to baseline length or direction. Diversity improvement at 29 GHz with the 16 km baseline was similar to that predicted by scaling the 19 GHz results of the previous seasons. Also discussed are the type of attenuation distributions and typical fade durations to be found under persistent convective conditions. For rain climates like Tampa's, site diversity in some form will be required for high reliability SHF satellite links. The diversity data may be helpful in designing schemes for resource sharing among numbers of links.

  16. Geropsychology Post-Doctoral Training in Public Sector Service Delivery: The USF/Tampa VA Fellowship Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinari, Victor; Chiriboga, David A.; Schonfeld, Lawrence; Haley, William E.; Schinka, John A.; Hyer, Kathy; Dupree, Larry W.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for geropsychologists who are specialists in practice, research, education, and advocacy for older adults. The combined USF/Tampa VA geropsychology fellowship program focuses on the training of three post-doctoral Fellows each year in public sector service delivery across diverse long term care (LTC) and primary care…

  17. Legacy of the Ancient World: An Educational Guide. Understanding Ancient Culture through Art at the Tampa Museum of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, R. Lynn

    Among the many contributions made by Ancient Greeks and Romans to contemporary life, are those which influence art, architecture, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, theater, athletics, religion, and the founding of democracy. The Tampa Museum of Art's classical collection offers a unique opportunity to learn about Ancient Greeks and…

  18. 77 FR 50085 - Rookery Bay, FL and Kachemak Bay, AK National Estuarine Research Reserve Management Plan Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... including climate change and harvested species, such as salmon and shellfish. The reserve will continue..., education, training and stewardship functions to address high priority issues including land use changes... in stewardship, incompatible use by visitors, and ecological impacts of catastrophic change...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Atmospheric Deposition in the Pensacola Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, J. M.; Landing, W. M.; Cleveland, S. D.; Gosnell, K. J.; Bagui, S.

    2009-12-01

    Event based atmospheric deposition of mercury, trace metals and major ions has been monitored in the Pensacola Bay (Florida) watershed over the last three years at three locations to evaluate the temporal and spatial patterns in atmospheric wet deposition. A goal of this project is to evaluate the contribution of local sources (coal fired power plant and paper mill) to atmospheric deposition of mercury. There were no significant differences in the rainfall mercury flux among the three Pensacola Bay sites or between these sites and nearby Mercury Deposition Network monitoring sites along the Gulf Coast. Mercury deposition during the summer months is higher than other months due to higher concentrations in rainfall throughout the region. Correlation of mercury with other elements and major ions suggest that coal combustion is a significant source of mercury to the region, and may account for between 25 and 54% of the mercury deposited. Deposition of constituents like H+, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium, are much higher in Pensacola Bay that at NADP sites. Chloride and sodium fluxes are higher because Pensacola Bay sites are closer to the Gulf of Mexico which is a source of sea salt aerosols. Acid rain constituents, H+, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium are most likely higher at Pensacola Bay sites than NADP sites because Pensacola Bay sites are much closer to emission sources of these constituents, particularly the two Florida NADP sites FL14 and FL23 which are located in rural counties far from major industrial activities.

  20. 77 FR 60302 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The..., 2012. The event consists of 30 participants launching self-propelled flying machines from a 30ft ramp..., Miami, Florida. The event consists of 30 participants launching self- propelled flying machines from...

  1. PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROLS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enrichment of estuaries and coastal waters can contribute to hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) by increasing primary production and biological oxygen demand. Other factors, however, contribute to hypoxia and affect the susceptibility of coastal waters to hypoxia. Hypoxia fo...

  2. 77 FR 55693 - Safety Zone; Miami Paddle Challenge, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... our analyses based on 13 of these statutes or executive orders. 1. Regulatory Planning and Review This... Planning and Review, as supplemented by Executive Order 13563, Improving Regulation and Regulatory...

  3. 77 FR 40541 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking GICW Gulf... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may.... Construction of the water main and the required use of turbidity silt curtains pose significant safety...

  4. 77 FR 62437 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) entitled USCG-2012-0191 in the Federal Register (73 FR 2012... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day...

  5. 77 FR 43554 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day...

  6. 76 FR 73996 - Special Local Regulations; Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Orange Bowl International..., Florida during the Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta, a series of sailboat races. The Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta is scheduled to take place from Tuesday, December 27, 2011 through Friday,...

  7. 77 FR 4247 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    .... Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Miami International Boat Show Operations Manager has requested temporary modifications to the operating... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

  8. 78 FR 4070 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Miami International Boat Show Operations Manager has requested temporary modifications to the... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

  9. 77 FR 69388 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking GICW Gulf Intracoastal Waterway COTP Captain of the Port LLNR Light List Number TFR Temporary Final Rule A. Regulatory History and Information The Coast Guard published a NPRM in the Federal Register on July 10, 2012 (77 FR 40541),...

  10. 78 FR 40079 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag...

  11. 78 FR 54599 - Safety Zone; 2013 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... during the 2013 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place...

  12. 76 FR 24840 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... during the 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to...

  13. 77 FR 63720 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and... the Federal Register (77 FR 2012- 18455). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public... during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place...

  14. 77 FR 44522 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... Park, in Miami, Florida during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami...

  15. 78 FR 54585 - Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... place on September 29, 2013. Approximately 2,100 participants are anticipated to participate in the swim... a regulated area that will encompass the swim area. Non- participant persons and vessels will...

  16. Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

  17. Decreasing Congestive Heart Failure Readmission Rates Within 30 Days at the Tampa VA.

    PubMed

    Messina, William

    2016-01-01

    High hospital readmission rates contribute to the problem of escalating costs and fragmented quality in the US health care system. This article describes the implementation of a home telehealth (HT) performance improvement project with subsequent cost-avoidance savings. The HT project was designed to potentiate communication between and among patients, clinicians, and administrative staff, in addition to reducing readmissions for patients with congestive heart failure at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Pre- and post-HT implementation comparisons were made of readmission rates, costs, and veteran satisfaction from the same 4-month periods in 2012 and 2013. The application of telehealth and phone care initiatives reduced the congestive heart failure hospital readmission rate by 5%, decreased costs, and improved veteran satisfaction with overall care experience.

  18. DYNAMICS OF A SUBTIDAL SEAGRASS LANDSCAPE: SEASONAL AND ANNUAL CHANGE IN RELATION TO WATER DEPTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial heterogeneity of a subtidal marine landscape and the areal extent of both monospecific and mixed patches of seagrass species were studied in Tampa Bay, FL. Specifically, we examined the temporal dynamics of seagrass distribution and its relationship to water depth an...

  19. Bioinvasion in a Brazilian Bay: Filling Gaps in the Knowledge of Southwestern Atlantic Biota

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Barbara L.; Julio, Luciana M.; Junqueira, Andrea O. R.; Ferreira-Silva, Maria A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Biological invasions are a major cause of global species change. Nevertheless, knowledge about the distribution and ecology of introduced species is regionally biased, and many gaps in knowledge exist for most developing countries. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the zoobenthos on the hard substratum of the Ilha Grande Bay, a survey was conducted on both natural and artificial substrata at three depths and seven sites. The species recorded were classified as native, cryptogenic or introduced. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the prevalence of introduced species in these communities and to compare the distribution of species on natural and artificial substrata of this bay to identify possible discrepancies in habitat use. Of the 61 species, 25 were cryptogenic, 10 were introduced and 26 were native. Similar numbers of introduced species were found on both natural and artificial substrata, though the community composition was significantly different between them. We also compared the species composition of the Ilha Grande Bay survey to other inventories taken around the world. The highest similarities were found between the Ilha Grande Bay inventory and the Atlantic coastal region (Tampa Bay, USA and the Gulf of Mexico), American Samoa and Pearl Harbor (USA) inventories. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first published comprehensive list of hard substratum sessile marine invertebrate species in a Brazilian bay. The high percentage of cryptogenic species reveals gaps in both zoological records and information on introduced species for the Brazilian coast. The introduced species successfully colonized different sites in the Ilha Grande Bay, including both natural and artificial substrata. In addition, we find that artificial structures may not be good surrogates for natural rocky shores and may represent an ecological threat. Comparisons with other inventories suggest a history of broad-scale invasion, though more

  20. 33 CFR 110.78 - Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.78 Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. (a) Area 1. Beginning at a point bearing 126°, 3,000 feet from the fixed green Sturgeon Bay Canal Leading Light...

  1. 33 CFR 110.78 - Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.78 Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. (a) Area 1. Beginning at a point bearing 126°, 3,000 feet from the fixed green Sturgeon Bay Canal Leading Light...

  2. 33 CFR 110.78 - Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.78 Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. (a) Area 1. Beginning at a point bearing 126°, 3,000 feet from the fixed green Sturgeon Bay Canal Leading Light...

  3. 33 CFR 110.78 - Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.78 Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. (a) Area 1. Beginning at a point bearing 126°, 3,000 feet from the fixed green Sturgeon Bay Canal Leading Light...

  4. 33 CFR 110.78 - Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.78 Sturgeon Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. (a) Area 1. Beginning at a point bearing 126°, 3,000 feet from the fixed green Sturgeon Bay Canal Leading Light...

  5. Estimating vegetation coverage in St. Joseph Bay, Florida with an airborne multispectral scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savastano, K. J.; Faller, K. H.; Iverson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A four-channel multispectral scanner (MSS) carried aboard an aircraft was used to collect data along several flight paths over St. Joseph Bay, FL. Various classifications of benthic features were defined from the results of ground-truth observations. The classes were statistically correlated with MSS channel signal intensity using multivariate methods. Application of the classification measures to the MSS data set allowed computer construction of a detailed map of benthic features of the bay. Various densities of segrasses, various bottom types, and algal coverage were distinguished from water of various depths. The areal vegetation coverage of St. Joseph Bay was not significantly different from the results of a survey conducted six years previously, suggesting that seagrasses are a very stable feature of the bay bottom.

  6. 78 FR 72011 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Umatilla, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Umatilla Municipal Airport, Umatilla, FL (78 FR 52425). After publication, the FAA found that the... Register of August 23, 2013, (78 FR 52425), FR Doc. 2013-20512, are corrected as follows: PART 71 0 1. On... the geographic coordinates in the airspace description of a final rule, published in the...

  7. 24. SATURN V Fl ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SATURN V F-l ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND 1A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 77 FR 34210 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... E airspace at Orlando, FL (77 FR 16783). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  9. 78 FR 33967 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Captiva, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Captiva, FL (78 FR 14474). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  10. 77 FR 45241 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Apopka, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by... Apopka, FL ] (77 FR 30439) Docket No. FAA-2012-0249. Interested parties were invited to participate in... rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does...

  11. 78 FR 25384 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Immokalee, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... establish Class E airspace at Immokalee, FL (78 FR 6262) Docket No. FAA-2012-1051. Interested parties were...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  12. 77 FR 34209 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Tallahassee, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    .... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2... Tallahassee, FL area (77 FR 21508). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory...

  13. 77 FR 1012 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Inverness, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    .... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2..., FL (76 FR 66871) Docket No. FAA-2011-0540. Interested parties were invited to participate in this... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory...

  14. 76 FR 35966 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Merritt Island Airport, Cocoa, FL (75 FR 21266) Docket No. FAA-2011-0070. Interested parties were invited... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  15. 77 FR 10960 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL AGENCY... of Snake Creek Bridge, mile 0.5, across Snake Creek, in Islamorada, Florida. The regulation is set... Sheriff's Office has requested a temporary modification to the operating schedule of Snake Creek Bridge...

  16. 78 FR 34557 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Sanibel, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... Sanibel, FL (78 FR 14473). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  17. 76 FR 68117 - Television Broadcasting Services; Panama City, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Panama City, FL AGENCY: Federal Communications... Television Licensee, LLC (``Gray''), the licensee of WJHG-TV, channel 7, Panama City, Florida, requesting the... the Congressional review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73...

  18. 78 FR 52425 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Umatilla, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Umatilla, FL (78 FR 33265) Docket No. FAA-2013-0002. Interested parties were invited to participate in this... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation...

  19. SPECIAL FLES ISSUE OF "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AARONS, ALFRED C.

    HOPEFUL OF SEEKING MUCH-NEEDED SOLUTIONS TO FLES PROBLEMS, "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER" DEVOTED ITS FALL 1965 ISSUE TO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. HIGHLIGHTED ARE ARTICLES (1) BY FILOMENA AND GUILLERMO DEL OLMO ON A 6-PHASED APPROACH TO THE TEACHING OF STRUCTURE THAT MIGHT HELP SOLVE THE…

  20. TIFS/FL5 - 2nd Asheville deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    TIFS/FL5 - 2nd Asheville deployment. People in photograph include: Charlie Peacock, Randy Bailey, Paul Deppe, Mike Reagan, Mike Norman, Rob Rivera, Paul Schifferle, Russ Parrish, Trey Auther, Lou Glaab, Dave McLuer, Mike Parrag, and Lynda Kramer.

  1. 75 FR 1803 - Lower Florida Keys Refuges, Monroe County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ..., Big Pine Key, FL 33043. You may also access and download the document from the Service's Web site... process through a notice in the Federal Register on May 9, 2003 (68 FR 25058). The Lower Florida Keys..., Florida. These are a collection of low-lying, subtropical islands between the Gulf of Mexico and...

  2. 75 FR 57847 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Homestead, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ..., FL (75 FR 26148) Docket No. FAA-2010-0429. Interested parties were invited to participate in this... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR..., 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14...

  3. Study of Rayleigh-backscattering induced coherence collapse in an asymmetric DFB FL sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Ma, Lina; Hu, Zhengliang; Feng, Ying; Yang, Huayong

    2016-09-01

    Rayleigh-back scattering induced coherence collapse of an asymmetric distributed feedback fiber laser (DFB FL) sensor is investigated using a composite cavity model. The coherence collapse threshold condition of the asymmetric DFB FL sensor is measured. The DFB FL sensor shows different dynamic behaviors in different pump configurations. According to the asymmetric behavior to the external optical feedback, a novel method to find the actual phase shift position of the asymmetric DFB FL sensor is presented.

  4. Chesapeake Bay study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives and scope of the Chesapeake Bay study are discussed. The physical, chemical, biological, political, and social phenomena of concern to the Chesapeake Bay area are included in the study. The construction of a model of the bay which will provide a means of accurately studying the interaction of the ecological factors is described. The application of the study by management organizations for development, enhancement, conservation, preservation, and restoration of the resources is examined.

  5. Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Particle Tracking Analysis in the Area Contributing Recharge to a Public-Supply Well near Tampa, Florida, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandall, Christy A.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Katz, Brian G.; Metz, Patricia A.; McBride, W. Scott; Berndt, Marian P.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow ground water in the north-central Tampa Bay region, Florida, is affected by elevated nitrate concentrations, the presence of volatile organic compounds, and pesticides as a result of groundwater development and intensive urban land use. The region relies primarily on groundwater for drinking-water supplies. Sustainability of groundwater quality for public supply requires monitoring and understanding of the mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination. A single public-supply well was selected for intensive study based on the need to evaluate the dominant processes affecting the vulnerability of public-supply wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the City of Temple Terrace near Tampa, Florida, and the presence of a variety of chemical constituents in water from the well. A network of 29 monitoring wells was installed, and water and sediment samples were collected within the area contributing recharge to the selected public-supply well to support a detailed analysis of physical and chemical conditions and processes affecting the water chemistry in the well. A three-dimensional, steady-state groundwater flow model was developed to evaluate the age of groundwater reaching the well and to test hypotheses on the vulnerability of the well to nonpoint source input of nitrate. Particle tracking data were used to calculate environmental tracer concentrations of tritium and sulfur hexafluoride and to calibrate traveltimes and compute flow paths and advective travel times in the model area. The traveltime of particles reaching the selected public-supply well ranged from less than 1 day to 127.0 years, with a median of 13.1 years; nearly 45 percent of the simulated particle ages were less than about 10 years. Nitrate concentrations, derived primarily from residential/commercial fertilizer use and atmospheric deposition, were highest (2.4 and 6.11 milligrams per liter as nitrogen, median and maximum, respectively) in shallow

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 88-020-1908, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Kullman, G.J.; Sanderson, W.T.

    1988-06-01

    In response to a request from the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, an investigation was made of complaints among workers of chemical odors and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat in the MHH Building 104. A questionnaire was completed by 67% of the 61 employees in this building. The most-frequent complaints included headaches, sinus problems, and stuffy indoor air in addition to the other complaints noted above. Two distinct odors were noted in these areas, one of which was linked to the carpet and carpet glue used. The second odor, a musty smell, was not entirely pinned down, but may have resulted from an inadequate ventilation system. None of the gases or vapors sampled were above any of the occupational limits. The authors conclude that low-level indoor air pollutants from building materials and the suboptimal ventilation system may explain symptoms reported by workers. The authors recommend that changes should be made in the ventilation system, and replacing carpet and carpet glue in some areas should be considered. Water leaks should be repaired promptly, and water-damaged materials should be sanitized or replaced.

  7. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  8. CASCO BAY PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Casco Bay lies at the heart of Maine's most populated area. The health of its waters, wetlands, and wildlife depend in large part on the activities of the quarter-million residents who live in its watershed. Less than 30 years ago, portions of Casco Bay were off-limits to recr...

  9. Bay Mills' Bold Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    It's a long, long way from Bay Mills Community College, near the shores of frigid Lake Superior, to Detroit. But distance, time and demographics aside, the school and the city are united by Bay Mills' status as the nation's only tribally controlled college that authorizes quasi-public schools, known officially as public school academies. And it's…

  10. Capture locations and growth rates of Atlantic sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Eyler, S.M.; Mangold, M.F.; Spells, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Little information exists on temporal and spatial distributions of wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus in the Chesapeake Bay. Approximately 3,300 hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon comprised of two size groups were released into the Nanticoke River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, on 8 July 1996. During January 1996-May 2000, 1099 Atlantic sturgeon were captured incidentally (i.e., bycatch) by commercial watermen in the Chesapeake Bay, including 420 hatchery-reared individuals. Wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon were captured primarily in pound nets and gill nets. Biologists tagged each fish and recorded weight, length, and location of capture. Although two adults greater than 2000 mm fork length (FL) were captured in Maryland waters, wild sturgeon were primarily juveniles from Maryland and Virginia waters (415 and 259 individuals below 1000 mm FL, respectively). A growth rate of 0.565 mm/d (N = 15, SE = 0.081) was estimated for wild individuals (487-944 mm TL at release) at liberty from 30 to 622 d. The average growth of the group of hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon raised at 10??C exceeded that of the group raised at 17??C. Our distributional data based on capture locations are biased by fishery dependence and gear selectivity. These data are informative to managers, however, because commercial effort is widely distributed in the Chesapeake Bay, and little distributional data were available before this study.

  11. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of mercury and major ions to the Pensacola Bay (Florida) watershed: spatial, seasonal, and inter-annual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, J. M.; Landing, W. M.; Nolek, S. D.; Gosnell, K.; Bagui, S. S.; Bagui, S. C.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric deposition was measured at three sites in the Pensacola Bay watershed, Florida, between November 2004 and December 2007. Mercury deposition in the Pensacola Bay watershed was similar to that from nearby Mercury Deposition Network sites along the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Mercury deposition during the summer months is higher than other months due to higher concentrations in rainfall throughout the region. Deposition of constituents like H+, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium, were much higher in Pensacola Bay that at National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites. Chloride and sodium fluxes are higher because Pensacola Bay sites are closer to the Gulf of Mexico which is a source of sea salt aerosols. Acid rain constituents, H+, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium are most likely higher at Pensacola Bay sites because these sites are much closer to emission sources of these constituents than NADP sites, particularly two Florida NADP sites, FL14 and FL23, which are located in rural counties far from major industrial activities.

  13. Expression of FSHD-related DUX4-FL alters proteostasis and induces TDP-43 aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Sachiko; Beermann, Mary Lou; Boyce, Frederick M; Miller, Jeffrey Boone

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pathogenesis in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) appears to be due to aberrant expression, particularly in skeletal muscle nuclei, of the full-length isoform of DUX4 (DUX4-FL). Expression of DUX4-FL is known to alter gene expression and to be cytotoxic, but cell responses to DUX4-FL are not fully understood. Our study was designed to identify cellular mechanisms of pathogenesis caused by DUX4-FL expression. Methods We used human myogenic cell cultures to analyze the effects of DUX4-FL when it was expressed either from its endogenous promoter in FSHD cells or by exogenous expression using BacMam vectors. We focused on determining the effects of DUX4-FL on protein ubiquitination and turnover and on aggregation of TDP-43. Results Human FSHD myotubes with endogenous DUX4-FL expression showed both altered nuclear and cytoplasmic distributions of ubiquitinated proteins and aggregation of TDP-43 in DUX4-FL-expressing nuclei. Similar changes were found upon exogenous expression of DUX4-FL, but were not seen upon expression of the non-toxic short isoform DUX4-S. DUX4-FL expression also inhibited protein turnover in a model system and increased the amounts of insoluble ubiquitinated proteins and insoluble TDP-43. Finally, inhibition of the ubiquitin–proteasome system with MG132 produced TDP-43 aggregation similar to DUX4-FL expression. Interpretations Our results identify DUX4-FL-induced inhibition of protein turnover and aggregation of TDP-43, which are pathological changes also found in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and inclusion body myopathy, as potential pathological mechanisms in FSHD. PMID:25750920

  14. Positional Cloning of a Bombyx Wingless Locus flügellos (fl) Reveals a Crucial Role for fringe That Is Specific for Wing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tomoko Matsuoka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kojima, Tetsuya; Mita, Kazuei; Banno, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2008-01-01

    Mutations at the flügellos (fl) locus in Bombyx mori produce wingless pupae and moths because of the repressed response of wing discs to ecdysteroid. Four recessive fl alleles occurred spontaneously and were mapped at 13.0 of the silkworm genetic linkage group 10. By positional cloning, we confirmed that the gene responsible for fl is fringe (fng) encoding Fng glycosyltransferase, which is involved in regulating the Notch signaling pathway. In four different fl alleles, we detected a large deletion of the fng gene in flk and nonsense mutations in fl, flo, and fln. In the wild-type (WT) silkworm, fng is expressed actively in the wing discs, brain, and reproductive organs from the fourth to final instars but barely in the other tissues tested. In situ hybridization showed that fng mRNA is expressed in the dorsal layer of the WT wing discs. The wingless (wg) mRNA, a downstream marker of Fng-mediated Notch signaling, is localized at the dorsoventral boundary in the WT wing discs but repressed markedly in the fl wing discs. Although null mutants of Drosophila fng result in postembryonic lethality, loss of fng function in Bombyx affects only wing morphogenesis, suggesting different essential roles for fng in tissue differentiation among insects. PMID:18505883

  15. Module bay with directed flow

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  16. 33 CFR 167.102 - In the approaches to Narragansett Bay, RI, and Buzzards Bay, MA: Narragansett Bay approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to Narragansett Bay, RI, and Buzzards Bay, MA: Narragansett Bay approach. 167.102 Section 167.102 Navigation and....102 In the approaches to Narragansett Bay, RI, and Buzzards Bay, MA: Narragansett Bay approach. (a)...

  17. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  18. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and..., Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. (a) Location. All waters of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River,...

  20. 78 FR 55241 - Foreign-Trade Zone 79-Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C-Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Register inviting public comment (78 FR 38922, 6/28/2013). The FTZ staff examiner reviewed the application... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 79--Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C--Cutrale Citrus... to the existing activation limit of FTZ 79, on behalf of Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc....

  1. 78 FR 38922 - Foreign-Trade Zone 79-Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C-Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 79--Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C--Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc., Application for Additional Subzone Sites An application has been submitted to...

  2. Weapons bay acoustic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. L.; Shimovetz, R. M.

    1994-09-01

    An aircraft weapons bay exposed to freestream flow experiences an intense aeroacoustic environment in and around the bay. Experience has taught that the intensity of this environment can be severe enough to result in damage to a store, its internal equipment, or the structure of the weapons bay itself. To ensure that stores and sensitive internal equipment can withstand this hazardous environment and successfully complete the mission, they must be qualified to the most severe sound pressure levels anticipated for the mission. If the qualification test levels are too high, the store and its internal equipment will be over designed, resulting in unnecessary costs and possible performance penalties. If the qualification levels are below those experienced in flight, the store or its internal equipment may catastrophically fail during performance of the mission. Thus, it is desirable that the expected levels in weapons bays be accurately predicted. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and the future of weapons bay acoustic environments. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and

  3. Mobile Bay turbidity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.; Schroeder, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The termination of studies carried on for almost three years in the Mobile Bay area and adjacent continental shelf are reported. The initial results concentrating on the shelf and lower bay were presented in the interim report. The continued scope of work was designed to attempt a refinement of the mathematical model, assess the effectiveness of optical measurement of suspended particulate material and disseminate the acquired information. The optical characteristics of particulate solutions are affected by density gradients within the medium, density of the suspended particles, particle size, particle shape, particle quality, albedo, and the angle of refracted light. Several of these are discussed in detail.

  4. 78 FR 38554 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Live Oak, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... management of instrument flight rules (IFR) operations within the Live Oak, FL, airspace area. This action also updates the geographic coordinates of Suwannee Hospital Emergency Heliport and Suwannee County... amend Class E airspace at Live Oak, FL (78 FR 6258) Docket No. FAA-2013-0001. Interested parties...

  5. 78 FR 33965 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Immokalee-Big Cypress Airfield, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ..., establishes Class E airspace at Big Cypress Airfield, Immokalee, FL (78 FR 25384). Subsequent to publication..., 2013 (78 FR 25384) FR Doc. 2013-10214, is corrected to read ``. . . Immokalee-Big Cypress, FL''; and in... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Immokalee-Big...

  6. 33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area. 334.525 Section 334.525 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part...

  7. 77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ..., Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to establish a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean... over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville Beach, FL. In recent years, there have been...

  8. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  9. 77 FR 28243 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Beach, FL, as published in the Federal Register of April 11, 2012 (77 FR 21662) (FR Doc. 2012-8558) is.... FAA-2012-0099, Airspace Docket No. 12- ASO-11, published on April 11, 2012 (77 FR 21662), amends Class... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL...

  10. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  11. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  12. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  13. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  14. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  15. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  16. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  17. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  18. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  19. 33 CFR 80.720 - St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. 80.720 Section 80.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from St. Simons Light to the northernmost tank...

  20. 33 CFR 80.720 - St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. 80.720 Section 80.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from St. Simons Light to the northernmost tank...

  1. 33 CFR 80.720 - St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. 80.720 Section 80.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from St. Simons Light to the northernmost tank...

  2. 33 CFR 80.720 - St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. 80.720 Section 80.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from St. Simons Light to the northernmost tank...

  3. 33 CFR 80.720 - St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. 80.720 Section 80.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Island, GA to Amelia Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from St. Simons Light to the northernmost tank...

  4. Preclinical pharmacology of FL442, a novel nonsteroidal androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Huhtala, Tuulia; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Küblbeck, Jenni; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Palvimo, Jorma J; Raunio, Hannu; Närvänen, Ale; Peräkylä, Mikael; Juvonen, Risto O; Honkakoski, Paavo; Laatikainen, Reino; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-04-25

    The preclinical profiles of two most potent compounds of our recently published cycloalkane[d]isoxazole pharmacophore-based androgen receptor (AR) modulators, FL442 (4-(3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile) and its nitro analog FL425 (3-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydrobenzo[d]isoxazole), were explored to evaluate their druggability for the treatment of AR dependent prostate cancer. The studies revealed that both compounds are selective to AR over other closely related steroid hormone receptors and that FL442 exhibits equal inhibition efficiency towards the androgen-responsive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line as the most widely used antiandrogen bicalutamide and the more recently discovered enzalutamide. Notably, FL442 maintains antiandrogenic activity with enzalutamide-activated AR mutant F876L. In contrast to bicalutamide, FL442 does not stimulate the VCaP prostate cancer cells which express elevated levels of the AR. Distribution analyses showed that [(14)CN]FL442 accumulates strongly in the mouse prostate. In spite of its low plasma concentration obtained by intraperitoneal administration, FL442 significantly inhibited LNCaP xenograft tumor growth. These findings provide a preclinical proof for FL442 as a promising AR targeted candidate for a further optimization.

  5. 76 FR 55553 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Eglin AFB, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... Airspace in the Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), FL airspace area. The Destin Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) has... airport. This action also corrects the geographic coordinates of Eglin AFB, Duke Field, and Hulbert Field... D airspace in the Eglin AFB, FL area (76 FR 38580) Docket No. FAA-2011-0087. Subsequent...

  6. 33 CFR 100.728 - Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. 100.728 Section 100.728 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.728 Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. (a) Regulated..., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved in the Hurricane Offshore...

  7. 33 CFR 100.728 - Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. 100.728 Section 100.728 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.728 Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. (a) Regulated..., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved in the Hurricane Offshore...

  8. 33 CFR 100.728 - Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. 100.728 Section 100.728 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.728 Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. (a) Regulated..., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved in the Hurricane Offshore...

  9. 33 CFR 100.728 - Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. 100.728 Section 100.728 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.728 Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. (a) Regulated..., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved in the Hurricane Offshore...

  10. 33 CFR 100.728 - Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. 100.728 Section 100.728 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.728 Special Local Regulations; Hurricane Offshore Classic, St. Petersburg, FL. (a) Regulated..., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved in the Hurricane Offshore...

  11. 76 FR 74843 - Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... advised that its release request is designed to clarify the airport property and to correct ambiguities in... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL AGENCY... properties, namely approximately 200 acres at the Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL, from the...

  12. FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, overcomes irinotecan and topotecan resistance in human tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhong, Kai; Smith, Nicholas; Prey, Joshua; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan and topotecan are the only camptothecin analogues approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. However, inherent and/or acquired irinotecan and topotecan resistance is a challenging issue in clinical practice. In this report, we showed that FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, effectively obliterated human xenograft tumors that acquire irinotecan and topotecan resistance. Consistent with this finding, Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that FL118 rapidly clears from circulation, while effectively accumulating in tumors with a long elimination half-life. Consistent with our previous studies on irinotecan, FL118 exhibited ≥25 fold more effectiveness than topotecan at inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation; we further showed that although topotecan can inhibit the expression of survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2, its effectiveness is about 10-100 fold weaker than FL118. Lastly, in contrast to both SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) and topotecan are substrates of the efflux pump proteins P-gp/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP, FL118 is not a substrate of P-gp and ABCG2. Consistently, sildenafil, a multiple efflux pump inhibitor, sensitized SN-38 much more than these of the ABCG2-selective inhibitor KO143 in growth inhibition of SW620 and HCT-8 cells. In contrast, both inhibitors showed no effect on FL118 efficacy. Given that both P-gp and ABCG2 express in SW620 and HCT-8 cells and FL118 is not a substrate for P-gp and ABCG2, this suggests that FL118 appears to bypass multiple efflux pump protein-induced resistance, which may contribute to FL118 overcoming irinotecan and topotecan resistance in vivo. These new findings provide renewed perspectives for further development of FL118 for clinical applications. PMID:26692923

  13. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Floridan Aquifer System Near Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Katz, Brian G.; Crandall, Christy A.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Temple Terrace, Florida, northeast of Tampa. The well selected for study typically produces water at the rate of 700 gallons per minute from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents nitrate, arsenic, uranium, radon-222, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although all were detected at concentrations less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Temple Terrace: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) short-circuiting of contaminated water through sinkholes; (3) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer; and (4) pumping stress. Although the public-supply well is completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer, it produces water with concentrations of nitrate, VOCs, and the natural contaminant radon that are intermediate between the typical composition of water from the Upper Floridan aquifer and that of the overlying surficial aquifer system. Mixing calculations show that the water produced by the public-supply well could consist of upwards of 50 percent water from the surficial aquifer system mixed with water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Anthropogenically affected water from the surficial aquifer system travels rapidly to depth through sinkholes that must be directly connected to the cavernous zone intersected by the public-supply well (and several other production wells in the region). Such solution features serve as fast pathways to the well and circumvent the natural attenuation of nitrate and

  14. Pine Island Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Birth of a Large Iceberg in Pine Island Bay, Antarctica     View ... iceberg (42 kilometers x 17 kilometers) broke off Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica (75°S latitude, 102°W longitude) sometime ...

  15. Yaquina Bay Topobathy DEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.EPA contracted with the U.S.ACE to obtain intertidal and subtidal bathymetric soundings of Yaquina Bay between Poole Slough and the South Beach Marina in 2002. These data were compiled with U.S.ACE subtidal soundings from 1999, 1998, 2000 and National Ocean Service soundi...

  16. Chesapeake Bay Critters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay-Atha, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    When students enter the author's classroom on the first day of school, they are greeted with live crabs scuttling around in large bins. The crabs are her way of grabbing students' attention and launching the unit on the Chesapeake Bay watershed. She chooses to start the year with this unit because, despite the fact that the Potomac River can be…

  17. Infants Fed a Lower Calorie Formula With 2′FL Show Growth and 2′FL Uptake Like Breast-Fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marriage, Barbara J.; Buck, Rachael H.; Goehring, Karen C.; Oliver, Jeffery S.; Williams, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the growth and tolerance of infants fed infant formulas with a caloric density closer to human milk (HM) supplemented with human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and to study uptake of the HMOs. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled, growth and tolerance study was conducted in healthy, singleton infants (birth weight ≥2490 g), who were enrolled by day of life (DOL) 5. Formula-fed infants were randomized to 1 of 3 formulas with a caloric density of 64.3 kcal/dL. Each formula contained galactooligosaccharides, and the 2 experimental formulas contained varying levels (0.2 and 1.0 g/L) of the HMO 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL). The 3 formula groups were compared with an HM-fed reference group. Infants were exclusively fed either formula (n = 189) or HM (n = 65) from enrollment to 119 DOL. 2′FL was measured in the blood and urine collected from a subset of infants at DOL 42 and 119, and in HM collected from breast-feeding mothers at DOL 42. Results: There were no significant differences among any groups for weight, length, or head circumference growth during the 4-month study period. All of the formulas were well tolerated and comparable for average stool consistency, number of stools per day, and percent of feedings associated with spitting up or vomit. 2′FL was present in the plasma and urine of infants fed 2′FL, and there were no significant differences in 2′FL uptake relative to the concentration fed. Conclusions: This is the first report of infants fed 2′FL-fortified formulas with a caloric density similar to HM. Growth and 2′FL uptake were similar to those of HM-fed infants. PMID:26154029

  18. Crustal models for the Melville Bay and Northern Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbernd, Tabea; Jokat, Wilfried; Heyde, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    The Baffin Bay between Greenland and Baffin Island (Canada) opened during the separation of Greenland and Canada in the Palaeocene and Eocene. The Melville Bay is situated in its northeastern part. The crustal composition of Northern and Southern Baffin Bay has been studied in detail: Southern Baffin Bay is underlain by oceanic crust with volcanic margins, while the margins of northern Baffin Bay are characterized by serpentinized mantle material. In contrast, the nature of crust in the deep, central Baffin Bay and the Melville Bay was still unclear due to a lack of deep seismic sounding lines. In 2010 a joint geophysical experiment in the Greenlandic part of Baffin Bay acquired seismic, magnetic and gravity data. We present three velocity and density models derived from seismic refraction and gravity data. Two of the three profiles are located within the Melville Bay and extend in a SW - NE direction from the deep sea area of central Baffin Bay to the shelf area of the Melville Bay. The third profile crosses the northern profile in the Melville Bay and extends in a N - S direction into the Northern Baffin Bay. The profiles in the Melville Bay can be divided in three crustal sections. The deep-sea area reveals a 3.5 - 7 km thick, 2-layered oceanic crust with increasing thickness towards the shelf and up to 6 km thick sediments. The crust is underlain by serpentinized upper mantle with velocities of 7.6 - 7.8 kms-1. A transition zone, which is affected by volcanism, connects the oceanic crust with stretched continental crust underneath the Melville Bay. Basement highs and deep sediment basins characterize the stretched and rifted continental crust. The Melville Bay Graben, the deepest rift basin in the Melville Bay, contains up to 10 km thick, possibly metamorphosed sediments with unusually high velocities of up to 4.9 kms1. Well-constrained reflections of the crust-mantle boundary can be found in many seismic sections indicating a maximum crustal thickness of ~ 26

  19. Hill Receives 2003 F.L. Scarf Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthew Hill was awarded the F.L. Scarf Award for his thesis titled Transport phenomena of anomalous cosmic rays during the recovery phase of solar cycle 22. He will be formally presented the award during the AGU 2003 Fall Meeting, which will be held 8-12 December in San Francisco, California, The award is given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar-planetary science. Matthew received his B.S. in physics, with high honors, from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1996. He was then granted a Distinguished Research Fellowship for graduate studies in the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland, College Park. Supervised by Douglas C. Hamilton, Matthew earned his M.S. in 1998 and his Ph.D. in physics in 2001. He is currently a research associate at the University of Maryland, where he continues his heliospheric research on the transport of anomalous cosmic rays using particle measurements from the Voyager deep-space probes. Last year, he also joined investigations involving the imaging of magnetospheric neutral atoms with instruments aboard the IMAGE spacecraft.

  20. Spontaneous fission of the superheavy nucleus 286Fl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus 286Fl experimentally determined is log10Tfexp(s ) =-0.632 . We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. Spherical shapes are assumed. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about η =0.5 the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger η it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay, and α decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane (R ,η ) , where R is the separation distance of the fission fragments and η is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deformation coordinates (R ,η ) and the radius of the light fragment, R2, exponentially or linearly decreasing with R is compared with the simpler one, in which R2=constant and with a linearly decreasing or linearly increasing R2. The latter is closer to the reality and reminds us about the α or cluster preformation at the nuclear surface.

  1. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF A PROPOSED DESALINATION FACILITY AND FRESH WATER DIVERSIONS ON RESIDUAL SALINITY AND CIRCULATION IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA. (R825197)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  3. Predicting the Effects of Water Quality on the Growth of Thalassia testudinum in Tampa Bay with a Dynamic Simile-Based Model Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a seagrass growth (SGG) model that is coupled to a water quality (WQ) model that includes the effects of phytoplankton (chlorophyll), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended solids (TSS) on water clarity. Phytoplankton growth was adjusted daily for PAR (...

  4. Application of Watershed Deposition Tool to Estimate from CMAQ Simulations of the Atmospheric Deposition of Nitrogen to Tampa Bay and Its Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has developed Watershed Deposition Tool (WDT) to calculate from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model output the nitrogen, sulfur, and mercury deposition rates to watersheds and their sub-basins. The CMAQ model simulates from first principles the transport, ...

  5. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (a) The danger zone. Shoreward of a line beginning at latitude 27°49′27.38″, longitude 82°29′35.83″; thence to latitude 27°49′20.14″, longitude 82°29′42.78″; thence to latitude 27°48′44.82″, longitude 82°31′10.0″; thence to latitude 27°49′09.35″, longitude 82°32′24.56″; thence to latitude...

  6. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  7. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  8. Flooded area and plant zonation in isolated wetlands in well fields in the Northern Tampa Bay Region, Florida, following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    WAP scores and weighted average scores for wetland vegetation were generally consistent with the results of the flooded area analysis. The WAP scores and weighted average scores were higher overall and did not decline with time at four wetlands in well fields (W-33, W-56, Starkey N, and Starkey 108) during the years following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates. These four wetlands also had increases in the extent and duration of the flooded area during the post-reduction period. Scores for trees were more consistent than scores for shrubs and groundcover. WAP scores remained relatively low or generally declined at five well-field wetlands (Q-1, W-17, W-41, Starkey D, and Starkey E) during the years following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates, and weighted average scores either declined over time or remained low. These five wetlands either did not have an increase in the extent and duration of the flooded area, or if there was an increase, it was small.

  9. Impacts of Hazardous Air Pollutants Emitted from Phosphate Fertilizer Production Plants on their Ambient Concentration Levels in the Tampa Bay Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentrations and distribution of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) metals emitted from four phosphate fertilizer plants in Central Florida, as well as their environmental and health impacts, were assessed. The dominant HAP metals emitted from the stacks of these plants were M...

  10. Bayes and the Law

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Norman; Neil, Martin; Berger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although the last forty years has seen considerable growth in the use of statistics in legal proceedings, it is primarily classical statistical methods rather than Bayesian methods that have been used. Yet the Bayesian approach avoids many of the problems of classical statistics and is also well suited to a broader range of problems. This paper reviews the potential and actual use of Bayes in the law and explains the main reasons for its lack of impact on legal practice. These include misconceptions by the legal community about Bayes’ theorem, over-reliance on the use of the likelihood ratio and the lack of adoption of modern computational methods. We argue that Bayesian Networks (BNs), which automatically produce the necessary Bayesian calculations, provide an opportunity to address most concerns about using Bayes in the law. PMID:27398389

  11. Nagoya, Ise Bay, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This view of Nagoya, Ise Bay and nearby Kyoto, on the main island of Honshu, Japan (35.0N, 137.0E) combines in a single photo both the political, cultural and educational centers of early Japan as well as one of the main educational and business centers of modern Japan. Besides being a business, cultural and educational center, Nagoya is near the geographic center of the Japanese home islands.

  12. 33 CFR 334.778 - Pensacola Bay and waters contiguous to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., motorized, and/or rowed or self-propelled), private and commercial fishing vessels, other commercial vessels... within the above described area, or within 500 feet of any quay, pier, wharf, or levee along the...

  13. NUTRIENT FLUX AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL, A NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY INVITED SEMINAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    (Abstract). Presented at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, 30 April 2001, Port Aransas, TX. 1 p. (ERL,GB R841).

    Nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface is an integral component of estuarine dynamics, and the benthos may represent a significant source ...

  14. 77 FR 15600 - Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix; Saint Andrew Bay; Panama City, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand... crews, vessels, and persons on navigable waters during the Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix high... received an application for a Marine Event Permit on January 31, 2011 from Super Boat International,...

  15. 33 CFR 334.778 - Pensacola Bay and waters contiguous to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Lagoon at Point 1, Latitude 30°19′42″ N., Longitude 87°21′06″ W., proceed southeasterly to Point 2, Latitude 30°19′27″ N., Longitude 87°21′03″ W.; thence, northeasterly, paralleling the shoreline at a minimum distance of 500 feet offshore, to Point 3, Latitude 30°19′48″ N., Longitude 87°19′35″ W.;...

  16. PHYTOPLANKTON-AND DETRITUS-BASED FOOD WEBS IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIERS: LESSONS FROM PENSACOLA BAY FL, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A central theme in estuarine ecology is understanding the connection between riverine delivery of nutrients and organic matter and how these materials are processed within the estuary. Key to this understanding is the ability to quantify the importance of detrital carbon in suppo...

  17. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Hillsborough Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of the construction of islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flow in most of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual water transport for physical conditions in Hillsborough Bay and the northeastern part of Middle Tampa Bay during 1880, 1972, and 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to evaluate cumulative water-transport changes resulting from construction in the study area between 1880 and 1972. The model also was used to evaluate water-transport changes as a result of a major Federal dredging project completed in 1985. The model indicates that transport changes resulting from the Federal dredging project are much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes resulting from construction between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb water transport were computed to occur over only about 8 square miles of the 65-square-mile study area between 1972 and 1985. Model results indicate that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over about 23 square miles. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual water transport were computed to occur over only 17 square miles between 1972 and 1985. Between 1880 and 1972, changes of similar magnitude were computed to occur over an area of 45 square miles. Model results also reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 8 interconnected circulatory features in 1880 and as many as 15 in 1985. Dredging- and construction-caused changes in number, size, position, shape, and intensity of the circulatory features increase tide

  18. 76 FR 68439 - BCX Tank Superfund Site; Jacksonville, Duval County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... AGENCY BCX Tank Superfund Site; Jacksonville, Duval County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Tank Superfund Site located in Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida for publication. DATES: The Agency... name BCX Tank Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  19. 78 FR 729 - Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... concerning a previous Removal Action at the Ellman Battery Superfund Site located in Orlando, Orange...

  20. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  1. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  2. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  3. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  4. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  5. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  6. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  7. Chesapeake bay nonpoint source programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current programs to ameliorate nonpoint sources of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay that have been developed by the four jurisdictions in cooperation with other agencies, the achievements to date in terms of pollutant removal, and recommendations for future directions of the Bay Program over the next several years.

  8. Learning on the Big Bay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philp, Michael J.

    1978-01-01

    Anne Arundel Community College uses the Chesapeake Bay for a flexible ocean engineering technology program which includes mechanical, electrical, and environmental options for transfer and/or vocational students, and adult education programs covering such subjects as sailing, Bay history, boat building, scuba-diving, and marine biology. (RT)

  9. The Bayes Inference Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    The authors are developing a computer application, called the Bayes Inference Engine, to provide the means to make inferences about models of physical reality within a Bayesian framework. The construction of complex nonlinear models is achieved by a fully object-oriented design. The models are represented by a data-flow diagram that may be manipulated by the analyst through a graphical programming environment. Maximum a posteriori solutions are achieved using a general, gradient-based optimization algorithm. The application incorporates a new technique of estimating and visualizing the uncertainties in specific aspects of the model.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia and the fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire in acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Swinkels-Meewisse, E J C M; Swinkels, R A H M; Verbeek, A L M; Vlaeyen, J W S; Oostendorp, R A B

    2003-02-01

    The transition from acute to chronic low back pain (LBP) is influenced by many interacting factors. Pain-related fear, as measured by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), is one of these factors. The objectives of this study were to investigate, in a population with acute LBP, the reliability of TSK and FABQ through evaluation of the internal consistency, the test-retest reliability, and the concurrent validity between TSK and FABQ. One hundred and Seventy-Six patients suffering LBP for no longer than 4 weeks completed a Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS), the TSK, the FABQ, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Each patient completed the VAS, TSK, and FABQ twice within 24 h. Internal consistency of TSK and FABQ scores range from alpha=0.70 to 0.83. Test-retest reliability ranges from r(s)=0.64 to 0.80 (P<0.01). Concurrent validity is moderate, ranging from r(s) =0.33 to 0.59 (P<0.01). It may be concluded that in a population with acute LBP, both the TSK and the FABQ are reliable measures of pain-related fear. In the clinical setting they may provide the practitioner a means of identifying pain-related fear in a patient with acute LBP. PMID:12586559

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-88-311-0000, Office of Disability Determination, The Howard Building, Tampa, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, P.; Lushniak, B.

    1989-01-01

    In response to a request from the Area Manager of the Office of Disability Determination, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Howard Building, Tampa, Florida. Particular concern was voiced with regard to eye irritation, headaches, and fatigue with a possible connection to water leakage into the offices and pigeon nesting areas above suspended ceilings. Studies indicated no carbon-monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, or formaldehyde concentration in the building. Carbon dioxide levels of 1000 parts per million or above were recorded which were indicative of inadequate air exchange between a building and the outdoors. An area was found along the south wall of the building with gross contamination by bird droppings and other debris. Rainwater leakage above the areas where the birds had nested washed the excrement and debris down over the office walls. As much as 2 inches of bird droppings were found on some suspended tiles. The crawl space above the first floor was observed to have health and safety hazards. Some of the symptoms were likely allergic rhinitis while others may have resulted from a lack of fresh outdoor air. Specific measures should be taken to safely remove the bird debris, prevent additional bird inhabitation, improve drainage of condensate water, and provide an outdoor air-supply system.

  12. 33 CFR 165.1197 - Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. 165.1197 Section 165.1197 Navigation and... Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1197 Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1197 - Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. 165.1197 Section 165.1197 Navigation and... Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1197 Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo...

  14. 76 FR 54380 - Safety Zone; Suttons Bay Labor Day Fireworks, Suttons Bay, Grand Traverse Bay, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Suttons Bay Labor Day Fireworks, Suttons... Commerce will conduct a fireworks display to celebrate Labor Day. The celebration will take place next to... associated with the Suttons Bay Labor Day Fireworks, the Captain of the Port, Sector Sault Sainte Marie...

  15. 33 CFR 162.125 - Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: The Corps of Engineers also has regulations dealing with these areas in 33 CFR Part 207. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay... Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. (a) In the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal: (1) No vessel...

  16. 33 CFR 162.125 - Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: The Corps of Engineers also has regulations dealing with these areas in 33 CFR Part 207. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay... Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. (a) In the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal: (1) No vessel...

  17. 33 CFR 162.125 - Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: The Corps of Engineers also has regulations dealing with these areas in 33 CFR Part 207. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay... Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. (a) In the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal: (1) No vessel...

  18. 33 CFR 162.125 - Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: The Corps of Engineers also has regulations dealing with these areas in 33 CFR Part 207. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay... Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. (a) In the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal: (1) No vessel...

  19. Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of…

  20. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  1. Bay of Fundy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The highest tides on Earth occur in the Minas Basin, the eastern extremity of the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, where the tide range can reach 16 meters when the various factors affecting the tides are in phase. The primary cause of the immense tides of Fundy is a resonance of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine system. The system is effectively bounded at this outer end by the edge of the continental shelf with its approximately 40:1 increase in depth. The system has a natural period of approximately 13 hours, which is close to the 12h25m period of the dominant lunar tide of the Atlantic Ocean. Like a father pushing his daughter on a swing, the gentle Atlantic tidal pulse pushes the waters of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine basin at nearly the optimum frequency to cause a large to-and-fro oscillation. The greatest slosh occurs at the head (northeast end) of the system. The high tide image (top) was acquired April 20, 2001, and the low tide image (bottom) was acquired September 30, 2002. The images cover an area of 16.5 by 21 km, and are centered near 64 degrees west longitude and 45.5 degrees north latitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active

  2. Eutrophication in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulanowicz, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using remote sensing to acquire fast reliable data on the nutrient problem in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem are discussed. Pollution effects to phytoplankton blooms during late summer and early fall months are also considered.

  3. Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia for Heart Turkish Version Study: cross-cultural adaptation, exploratory factor analysis, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Serap; Savci, Sema; Keskinoğlu, Pembe; Akdeniz, Bahri; Özpelit, Ebru; Özcan Kahraman, Buse; Karadibak, Didem; Sevinc, Can

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with cardiac problems avoid physical activity and exercise because they expect to feel shortness of breath, dizziness, or chest pain. Assessing kinesiophobia related to heart problems is important in terms of cardiac rehabilitation. The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia Swedish Version for the Heart (TSK-SV Heart) is reliable and has been validated for cardiac diseases in the Swedish population. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability, parallel-form validity, and exploratory factor analysis of the TSK for the Heart Turkish Version (TSK Heart Turkish Version) for evaluating kinesiophobia in patients with heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods This cross-sectional study involved translation, back translation, and cross-cultural adaptation (localization). Forty-three pulmonary arterial hypertension and 32 heart failure patients were evaluated using the TSK Heart Turkish Version. The 17-item scale, originally composed for the Swedish population, has four factors: perceived danger for heart problem, avoidance of exercise, fear of injury, and dysfunctional self. Cronbach’s alpha (internal consistency) and exploratory factor analysis were used to assess the questionnaire’s reliability. Results of the patients in the 6-minute walk test, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and Nottingham Health Profile were analyzed by Pearson’s correlation analysis with the TSK Heart Turkish Version to indicate the convergent validity. Results Cronbach’s alpha for the TSK Heart Turkish Version was 0.75, indicating acceptable internal consistency. Although exploratory factor analysis showed a different subgroup distribution than the original questionnaire, the model was acceptable for the four-factor model hypothesis. Therefore, the questionnaire was rated as reliable. Conclusion These results supported the reliability of the TSK Heart Turkish Version. Since the acceptable four-factor model fits the subgroups and

  4. High Speed Optical Observations of Cataclysmic Variables: FL Ceti, BY Cam, and DQ Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Gomez, S.; Robinson, E. L.; Andronov, I. L.; Gonzalez, R. I.

    2013-01-01

    We present photometric data on three cataclysmic variables. Broad-band CCD observations of FL Ceti, BY Cam, and DQ Her were obtained with 1-3s integrations at the Otto Struve, 2.1m, Telescope of McDonald Observatory. High speed optical photometry reveals details in these cataclysmic variables not possible using longer time integrations. In FL Ceti, the shortest period eclipsing polar known, the eclipse of two separate well localized accretion regions is resolved. In BY Cam and DQ Her, the spin period of the white dwarf is revealed. We discuss model constrains provided by these observations.

  5. 77 FR 42425 - Amendment of Air Traffic Service (ATS) Routes in the Vicinity of Vero Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp..., FL, 183 radials; Ormond Beach; Craig, FL; Alma, GA; Dublin, GA; Athens, GA; INT Athens, GA, 340...

  6. 75 FR 20364 - Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property..., identified as Key Largo Beacon Annex Site, Key Largo, FL to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department...

  7. Lighting up Protons with MorphFl, a Fluorescein-Morpholine Dyad: An Experiment for the Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tyson A.; Spangler, Michael; Burdette, Shawn C.

    2011-01-01

    A two-period organic laboratory experiment that includes fluorescence sensing is presented. The pH-sensitive sensor MorphFl is prepared using a Mannich reaction between a fluorescein derivative and the iminium ion of morpholine. During the first laboratory, students prepare MorphFl. The second session begins with characterizing the sensor using…

  8. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ)-further validation including a confirmatory factor analysis and a comparison with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Olsson, Gunnar L; Melin, Lennart

    2009-08-01

    Acceptance of pain and distress has lately appeared as an important factor in determining peoples' ability to restore functioning in the presence of chronic pain. Although treatments based on cognitive behaviour therapy are beginning to incorporate acceptance strategies, there is still a lack of reliable and valid instruments to assess relevant processes in such interventions. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) was originally constructed as part of the development of an acceptance oriented treatment approach for pain patients. A revised 20-item version of the instrument with two subscales has shown adequate reliability and validity. In the present study, a Swedish translation of CPAQ was evaluated with 611 participants reporting chronic pain and symptoms of whiplash associated disorders. This study sought to further assess the psychometric properties of the instrument and to investigate its relation to another important measure of pain adjustment, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Due to low intercorrelations with other items, item 16 was excluded. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported the previously suggested two-factor solution. Furthermore, the internal consistencies were good for the subscales (activities engagement and pain willingness) as well as the total scale. Hierarchical regression analyses illustrated strong relations with criteria variables (e.g. disability and life satisfaction). In general, the activities engagement subscale contributed more than pain willingness to the prediction of criteria variables. Furthermore, results illustrated that CPAQ explained more variance than the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia in pain intensity, disability, life satisfaction, and depression.

  9. 78 FR 13339 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement with 2238 NW. 86th Street Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by...

  10. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida...

  11. 75 FR 53694 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement... costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site located in Davie, Broward County... Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site by one of the following methods: http://www.regulations.gov :...

  12. 76 FR 63919 - City of South Daytona, FL; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of South Daytona, FL; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on October 5, 2011, pursuant to Rule 207(a)(2) of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of...

  13. 78 FR 67209 - Florida Disaster #FL-00094 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00094 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...: 07/31/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  14. 33 CFR 165.711 - Safety Zone: Port Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Port Everglades... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS....711 Safety Zone: Port Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, FL. (a) Regulated area. A moving safety zone...

  15. 75 FR 39555 - Environmental Impact Statement; Fort Hamer Bridge, Manatee County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Information on service for... SECURITY Coast Guard Environmental Impact Statement; Fort Hamer Bridge, Manatee County, FL AGENCY: Coast... the Manatee River in Manatee County, Florida. The proposed location for the Fort Hamer Bridge is...

  16. Complete genome sequence of Edwardsiella tarda (isolate FL95-01)recovered from channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe isolated from fish, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals, including humans. This is a report of the complete and annotated genome of E. tarda isolate FL95-01, recovered from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)....

  17. 75 FR 45012 - Turnberry Bank, Aventura, FL; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Turnberry Bank, Aventura, FL; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice is... Receiver for Turnberry Bank, Aventura, Florida (OTS No. 08087), on July 16, 2010. Dated: July 23, 2010....

  18. 78 FR 79061 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Key West International Airport, Key West, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice; Key West International Airport, Key West, FL... Key West International Airport under the provisions of the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act and...: This notice announces that the FAA finds that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted for the Key...

  19. 77 FR 55787 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Clay County, FL, and Incorporated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... rulemaking at 76 FR 62006, proposing flood elevation determinations along one or more flooding sources in... Clay County, FL, and Incorporated Areas AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Clay County, Florida, and...

  20. 33 CFR 334.525 - Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.525 Atlantic Ocean off John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part 329... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off John...