Science.gov

Sample records for targeted nanogel delivery

  1. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  2. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  3. Galactose-functionalized multi-responsive nanogels for hepatoma-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shaofeng; Gao, Shan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Chun; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery.We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using

  4. Multifunctional quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid nanogel for targeted imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wen, Lang; Song, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2014-09-01

    A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs can be simultaneously loaded in a QD-polypeptide nanogel. In vitro drug release of drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogels varies strongly with temperature, pH, and competitors. A drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogel with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif exhibited efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in αvβ3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In contrast, non-targeted QD-polypeptide nanogels revealed minimal binding and uptake in HeLa cells. Compared with the original QDs, the QD-polypeptide nanogels showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity for both HeLa cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the targeted QD-polypeptide nanogel was lower for normal NIH 3T3 cells than that for HeLa cancer cells. These results demonstrate that the integration of imaging and drug delivery functions in a single QD-polypeptide nanogel has the potential for application in cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy.A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron

  5. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Core-Shell Nanogels for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag-nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA-crosslinked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers feasible for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  6. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution.

  7. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  8. Pravastatin chitosan nanogels-loaded erythrocytes as a new delivery strategy for targeting liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I.; Badran, Mohamed M.; AlQahtani, Saeed A.; Alanazi, Fars K.; Attia, Sabry M.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanogels (CNG) are developed as one of the most promising carriers for cancer targeting. However, these carriers are rapidly eliminated from circulation by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which limits their application. Therefore, erythrocytes (ER) loaded CNG as multifunctional carrier may overcome the massive elimination of nanocarriers by RES. In this study, erythrocytes loaded pravastatin–chitosan nanogels (PR–CNG–ER) were utilized as a novel drug carrier to target liver cancer. Thus, PR–CNG formula was developed in nanosize, with good entrapment efficiency, drug loading and sustained release over 48 h. Then, PR–CNG loaded into ER were prepared by hypotonic preswelling technique. The resulting PR–CNG–ER showed 36.85% of entrapment efficiency, 66.82% of cell recovery and release consistent to that of hemoglobin over 48 h. Moreover, PR–CNG–ER exhibited negative zeta potential, increasing of hemolysis percent, marked phosphatidylserine exposure and stomatocytes shape compared to control unloaded erythrocytes. PR–CNG–ER reduced cells viability of HepG2 cells line by 28% compared to unloaded erythrocytes (UER). These results concluded that PR–CNG–ER are promising drug carriers to target liver cancer. PMID:26903771

  9. Dual responsive nanogels for intracellular doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Hamed; Khoee, Sepideh

    2016-09-10

    Nanosized polymeric delivery systems that encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific intracellular stimulus are of promising interest for cancer therapy. Here, we demonstrated a simple and fast synthetic protocol of redox-responsive nanogels with high drug encapsulation efficiency and stability. The prepared nanogels displayed narrow size distributions and versatility of surface modification. The polymer precursor of these nanogels is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. The nanogels were prepared through a lock-in strategy in aqueous media via self cross-linking of PDS groups. By changing polymer concentration, we could control the size of nanogels in range of 80-115nm. The formed nanogels presented high doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation efficiency (70% (w/w)) and displayed pH and redox-controlled drug release triggered by conditions mimicking the reducible intracellular environment. The nanogels displayed an excellent cytocompatibility and were effectively endocytosed by A2780CP ovarian cancer cells, which make them promising nanomaterials for the efficient intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27444549

  10. Redox-Sensitive and Intrinsically Fluorescent Photoclick Hyaluronic Acid Nanogels for Traceable and Targeted Delivery of Cytochrome c to Breast Tumor in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Yu, Lin; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-24

    In spite of their high specificity and potency, few protein therapeutics are applied in clinical cancer therapy owing to a lack of safe and efficacious delivery systems. Here, we report that redox-sensitive and intrinsically fluorescent photoclick hyaluronic acid nanogels (HA-NGs) show highly efficient loading and breast tumor-targeted delivery of cytochrome c (CC). HA-NGs were obtained from hyaluronic acid-graft-oligo(ethylene glycol)-tetrazole (HA-OEG-Tet) via inverse nanoprecipitation and catalyst-free photoclick cross-linking with l-cystine dimethacrylamide (MA-Cys-MA). HA-NGs exhibited a superb CC loading content of up to 40.6 wt %, intrinsic fluorescence (λem = 510 nm), and a small size of ca. 170 nm. Notably, CC-loaded nanogels (CC-NGs) showed a fast glutathione-responsive protein release behavior. Importantly, released CC maintained its bioactivity. MTT assays revealed that CC-NGs were highly potent with a low IC50 of 3.07 μM to CD44+ MCF-7 human breast tumor cells. Confocal microscopy observed efficient and selective internalization of fluorescent HA-NGs into MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, HA-NGs exhibited also effective breast tumor penetration. The therapeutic results demonstrated that CC-NGs effectively inhibited the growth of MCF-7 breast tumor xenografts at a particularly low dose of 80 or 160 nmol CC equiv./kg. Moreover, CC-NGs did not cause any change in mice body weight, corroborating their low systemic side effects. Redox-sensitive and intrinsically fluorescent photoclick hyaluronic acid nanogels have appeared as a "smart" protein delivery nanoplatform enabling safe, efficacious, traceable, and targeted cancer protein therapy in vivo. PMID:27509045

  11. Poly(ethylene glycol)-co-methacrylamide-co-acrylic acid based nanogels for delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parveen; Behl, Gautam; Sikka, Manisha; Chhikara, Aruna; Chopra, Madhu

    2016-10-01

    Polymeric nanogels have been widely explored for their potential application as delivery carriers for cancer therapeutics. The ability of nanogels to encapsulate therapeutics by simple diffusion mechanism and the ease of their fabrication to impart target specificity in addition to their ability to get internalized into target cells make them good candidates for drug delivery. The present study aims to investigate the applicability of poly(ethylene glycol)-co-methacrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PMA)-based nanogels as a viable option for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The nanogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization in an inverse mini-emulsion and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. DOX was physically incorporated into the nanogels (PMA-DOX) and the mechanism of its in vitro release was studied. TEM experiment revealed spherical morphology of nanogels and the hydrodynamic diameter of the neat nanogels was in the range of 160 ± 46.95 nm. The size of the nanogels increased from 235.1 ± 28.46 to 403.7 ± 89.89 nm with the increase in drug loading capacity from 4.68 ± 0.03 to 13.71 ± 0.01%. The sustained release of DOX was observed upto 80 h and the release rate decreased with increased loading capacity following anomalous release mechanism as indicated by the value of diffusion exponent (n = 0.64-0.75) obtained from Korsmeyer-Peppas equation. Further, cytotoxicity evaluation of PMA-DOX nanogels on HeLa cells resulted in relatively higher efficacy (IC50~5.88 μg/mL) as compared to free DOX (IC50~7.24 μg/mL) thus demonstrating that the preparation is potentially a promising drug delivery carrier.

  12. Click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels: emerging platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Chen, Jing; Deng, Chao; Suuronen, Erik J; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have emerged as versatile and viable platforms for sustained protein release, targeted drug delivery, and tissue engineering due to excellent biocompatibility, a microporous structure with tunable porosity and pore size, and dimensions spanning from human organs, cells to viruses. In the past decade, remarkable advances in hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have been achieved with click chemistry. It is a most promising strategy to prepare gels with varying dimensions owing to its high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions. In particular, the recent development of copper-free click chemistry such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, radical mediated thiol-ene chemistry, Diels-Alder reaction, tetrazole-alkene photo-click chemistry, and oxime reaction renders it possible to form hydrogels, microgels and nanogels without the use of potentially toxic catalysts or immunogenic enzymes that are commonly required. Notably, unlike other chemical approaches, click chemistry owing to its unique bioorthogonal feature does not interfere with encapsulated bioactives such as living cells, proteins and drugs and furthermore allows versatile preparation of micropatterned biomimetic hydrogels, functional microgels and nanogels. In this review, recent exciting developments in click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels, as well as their biomedical applications such as controlled protein and drug release, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine are presented and discussed. PMID:24674460

  13. Effects of different polysaccharides on the formation of egg yolk LDL complex nanogels for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyong; Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-11-20

    Five polysaccharides, pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), gum arabic, carrageenan and alginate, were studied to form complex nanogels with egg yolk low density lipoprotein (LDL). All nanogels were smaller than 85nm with high negative zeta potential, while LDL/carrageenan and LDL/alginate nanogels exhibited more heterogeneous size distribution. Fourier transform infrared spectrum suggested that hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were involved to form nanogels. Overall, significant expansion of nanogels was observed after encapsulation of curcumin, being studied as a model lipophilic nutrient. Fluorescence spectra evidenced that LDL provided non-polar microenvironment for curcumin and polysaccharides played an important role in the encapsulation process. All nanogels showed sustained release of curcumin under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Furthermore, nanoscale, smooth and spherical ultrafine dry powders of nanogels were obtained by innovative nano spray drying technology. Our study indicated that LDL/polysaccharides may serve as potential oral delivery systems for lipophilic nutrients.

  14. Effects of different polysaccharides on the formation of egg yolk LDL complex nanogels for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyong; Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-11-20

    Five polysaccharides, pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), gum arabic, carrageenan and alginate, were studied to form complex nanogels with egg yolk low density lipoprotein (LDL). All nanogels were smaller than 85nm with high negative zeta potential, while LDL/carrageenan and LDL/alginate nanogels exhibited more heterogeneous size distribution. Fourier transform infrared spectrum suggested that hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were involved to form nanogels. Overall, significant expansion of nanogels was observed after encapsulation of curcumin, being studied as a model lipophilic nutrient. Fluorescence spectra evidenced that LDL provided non-polar microenvironment for curcumin and polysaccharides played an important role in the encapsulation process. All nanogels showed sustained release of curcumin under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Furthermore, nanoscale, smooth and spherical ultrafine dry powders of nanogels were obtained by innovative nano spray drying technology. Our study indicated that LDL/polysaccharides may serve as potential oral delivery systems for lipophilic nutrients. PMID:27561504

  15. ICAM-1 Targeted Nanogels Loaded with Dexamethasone Alleviate Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Coll Ferrer, M. Carme; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Zern, Blaine J.; Composto, Russell J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Eckmann, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme dextran nanogels (NG) have great potential in vitro as a drug delivery platform, combining simple chemistry with rapid uptake and cargo release in target cells with “stealth” properties and low toxicity. In this work, we study for the first time the potential of targeted NG as a drug delivery platform in vivo to alleviate acute pulmonary inflammation in animal model of LPS-induced lung injury. NG are targeted to the endothelium via conjugation with an antibody (Ab) directed to Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM-NG), whereas IgG conjugated NG (IgG-NG) are used for control formulations. The amount of Ab conjugated to the NG and distribution in the body after intravenous (IV) injection have been quantitatively analyzed using a tracer isotope-labeled [125I]IgG. As a proof of concept, Ab-NG are loaded with dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory therapeutic, and the drug uptake and release kinetics are measured by HPLC. In vivo studies in mice showed that: i) ICAM-NG accumulates in mouse lungs (∼120% ID/g vs ∼15% ID/g of IgG-NG); and, ii) DEX encapsulated in ICAM-NG, but not in IgG-NG practically blocks LPS-induced overexpression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules including ICAM-1 in the pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25019304

  16. Microfluidic Directed Synthesis of Alginate Nanogels with Tunable Pore Size for Efficient Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bazban-Shotorbani, Salime; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Jacob, Karl I

    2016-05-17

    Alginate is a biopolymer with favorable pH-sensitive properties for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. However, conventional alginate nanogels have limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency because of drug leaching during bead preparation and burst release in high pH values. These shortcomings originate from large pore size of the nanogels. In this work, we proposed an on-chip hydrodynamic flow focusing approach for synthesis of alginate nanogels with adjustable pore size to achieve fine-tunable release profile of the encapsulated bioactive agents. It is demonstrated that the microstructure of nanogels can be controlled through adjusting flow ratio and mixing time directed on microfluidic platforms consisting of cross-junction microchannels. In this study, the average pore size of alginate nanogels (i.e., average molecular weight between cross-links, Mc) was related to synthesis parameters. Mc was calculated from equations based on equilibrium swelling theory and proposed methods to modify the theory for pH-sensitive nanogels. In the equations we derived, size and compactness of nanogels are key factors, which can be adjusted by controlling the flow ratio. It was found that increase in flow ratio increases the size of nanogels and decreases their compactness. The size of on-chip generated nanogels for flow ratio of 0.02-0.2 was measured to be in the range of 68-138 nm. Moreover, a method based on the Mie theory was implemented to estimate the aggregation number (Nagg) of polymer chains inside the nanogels as an indicator of compactness. According to the size and compactness results along with equations of modified swelling theory, Mc obtained to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 kDa. The proposed method could be considered as a promising approach for efficient polypeptides encapsulation and their sustained release. PMID:26938744

  17. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  18. Nanogels as potential nanomedicine carrier for treatment of cancer: A mini review of the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Govind; Yadav, Khushwant S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanogels are being explored as drug delivery agents for targeting cancer due to their easy tailoring properties and ability to efficiently encapsulate therapeutics of diverse nature through simple mechanisms. Nanogels are proficiently internalized by the target cells, avoid accumulating in nontarget tissues thereby lower the therapeutic dosage and minimize harmful side effects. However, there is an urgent need for relevant clinical data from nanogels so as to allow translation of the nanogel concept into a viable therapeutic application for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights some of the recent progress in nanogels as a carrier in the field of nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer. The present review critically analyzes the use of extracellular pH targeting for nanogels, siRNA delivery, PEGylated nanogels, multi-responsive nanogels and intracellular delivery of nanogels for improved therapy of cancer. PMID:27013905

  19. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung.

  20. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung. PMID:26307350

  1. Nanogel-based immunologically stealth vaccine targets macrophages in the medulla of lymph node and induces potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Daisuke; Harada, Naozumi; Hayashi, Tae; Tahara, Yoshiro; Momose, Fumiyasu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2014-09-23

    Because existing therapeutic cancer vaccines provide only a limited clinical benefit, a different vaccination strategy is necessary to improve vaccine efficacy. We developed a nanoparticulate cancer vaccine by encapsulating a synthetic long peptide antigen within an immunologically inert nanoparticulate hydrogel (nanogel) of cholesteryl pullulan (CHP). After subcutaneous injection to mice, the nanogel-based vaccine was efficiently transported to the draining lymph node, and was preferentially engulfed by medullary macrophages but was not sensed by other macrophages and dendritic cells (so-called "immunologically stealth mode"). Although the function of medullary macrophages in T cell immunity has been unexplored so far, these macrophages effectively cross-primed the vaccine-specific CD8(+) T cells in the presence of a Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist as an adjuvant. The nanogel-based vaccine significantly inhibited in vivo tumor growth in the prophylactic and therapeutic settings, compared to another vaccine formulation using a conventional delivery system, incomplete Freund's adjuvant. We also revealed that lymph node macrophages were highly responsive to TLR stimulation, which may underlie the potency of the macrophage-oriented, nanogel-based vaccine. These results indicate that targeting medullary macrophages using the immunologically stealth nanoparticulate delivery system is an effective vaccine strategy.

  2. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination.

  3. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel ('nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination. PMID:20562880

  4. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel (`nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination.

  5. Amphiphilic cationic nanogels as brain-targeted carriers for activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Senanayake, T; Rivera, K; Gorantla, S; Poluektova, LY; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Progress in AIDS treatment shifted emphasis towards limiting adverse effects of antiviral drugs while improving the treatment of hard-to-reach viral reservoirs. Many therapeutic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have a limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased NRTI levels induced various complications during the therapy, including neurotoxicity, due to the NRTI toxicity to mitochondria. Here, we describe an innovative design of biodegradable cationic cholesterol-ε-polylysine nanogel carriers for delivery of triphosphorylated NRTIs that demonstrated high anti-HIV activity along with low neurotoxicity, warranting minimal side effects following systemic administration. Efficient CNS targeting was achieved by nanogel modification with brain-specific peptide vectors. Novel dual and triple-drug nanoformulations, analogous to therapeutic NRTI cocktails, displayed equal or higher antiviral activity in HIV-infected macrophages compared to free drugs. Our results suggest potential alternative approach to HIV-1 treatment focused on the effective nanodrug delivery to viral reservoirs in the CNS and reduced neurotoxicity. PMID:25559020

  6. Modular ‘Click-in-Emulsion’ Bone-Targeted Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Daniel A.; Levi, Yair; Pelet, Jeisa M.; Doloff, Joshua C.; Wallas, Jasmine; Pratt, George W.; Jiang, Shan; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Schroeder, Josh E.; Chyan, Yieu; Zurenko, Christopher; Querbes, William; Manzano, Miguel; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    A new class of nanogel demonstrates modular biodistribution and affinity for bone. Nanogels, 67 nm in diameter and synthesized via an astoichiometric click-chemistry-inemulsion method, controllably display residual, free click-able functional groups. Functionalization with a bisphosphonate ligand results in significant binding to bone on the inner walls of marrow cavities, liver avoidance, and anti-osteoporotic effects. PMID:23280931

  7. Polysaccharide based nanogels in the drug delivery system: Application as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents.

    PubMed

    Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2016-11-01

    Polysaccharide-based nanoparticles have fascinated attention as a vesicle of different pharmaceutical agents due to their unique multi-functional groups in addition to their physicochemical properties, including biocompatibility and biodegradability. The existence of multi-functional groups on the polysaccharide backbone permits facile chemical or biochemical modification to synthesize polysaccharide based nanoparticles with miscellaneous structures. Polysaccharide-based nanogels have high water content, large surface area for multivalent bioconjugation, tunable size, and interior network for the incorporation of different pharmaceutical agents. These unique properties offer great potential for the utilization of polysaccharide-based nanogels in the drug delivery systems. Hence, this review describes chemistry of certain common polysaccharides, several methodologies used to synthesize polysaccharide nanoparticles and primarily focused on the polysaccharide (or polysaccharide derivative) based nanogels as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents. PMID:27524098

  8. Polypeptide nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores: Synthesis, characterization and implications for anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Oh; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Desale, Swapnil; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanogels have gained considerable attention as a potential platform for drug delivery applications. Here we describe the design and synthesis of novel polypeptide-based nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores. Diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid), hydrophobically modified with L-phenylalanine methyl ester moieties was used for controlled template synthesis of nanogels with small size (ca. 70 nm in diameter) and narrow particle size distribution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies using coumarin C153 indicated the existence of hydrophobic domains in the ionic cores of the nanogels. Stable doxorubicin-loaded nanogels were prepared at high drug capacity (30 w/w%). We show that nanogels are enzymatically-degradable leading to accelerated drug release under simulated lysosomal acidic pH. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nanogel-based formulation of doxorubicin is well tolerated and exhibit an improved antitumor activity compared to a free doxorubicin in an ovarian tumor xenograft mouse model. Our results signify the point to a potential of these biodegradable nanogels as attractive carriers for delivery of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23998716

  9. Stimulus responsive nanogel with innate near IR fluorescent capability for drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vineeth M; Shenoy, Sachin J; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-10-01

    A brighter, non toxic and biocompatible optical imaging agent is one of the major quests of biomedical research. Here in, we report a photoluminescent comacromer [PEG-poly(propylene fumarate)-citric acid-glycine] and novel stimulus (pH) responsive nanogel endowed with excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (EDF) for combined drug delivery and bioimaging applications. The comacromer when excited at different wavelengths in visible region from 400nm to 640nm exhibits fluorescent emissions from 510nm to 718nm in aqueous condition. It has high Stokes shift (120nm), fluorescent lifetime (7 nanoseconds) and quantum yield (50%). The nanogel, C-PLM-NG, prepared with this photoluminescent comacromer and N,N-dimethyl amino ethylmethacrylate (DMEMA) has spherical morphology with particle size around 100nm and 180nm at pH 7.4 (physiological) and 5.5 (intracellular acidic condition of cancer cells) respectively. The studies on fluorescence characteristics of C-PLM NG in aqueous condition reveal large red-shift with emissions from 523nm to 700nm for excitations from 460nm to 600nm ascertaining the EDF characteristics. Imaging the near IR emission with excitation at 535nm was accomplished using cut-off filters. The nanogel undergoes pH responsive swelling and releases around 50% doxorubicin (DOX) at pH 5.5 in comparison with 15% observed at pH 7.4. The studies on in vitro cytotoxicity with MTT assay and hemolysis revealed that the present nanogel is non-toxic. The DOX-loaded C-PLM-NG encapsulated in Hela cells induces lysis of cancer cells. The inherent EDF characteristics associated with C-PLM NG enable cellular imaging of Hela cells. The studies on biodistribution and clearance mechanism of C-PLM-NG from the body of mice reveal bioimaging capability and safety of the present nanogel. This is the first report on a polymeric nanogel with innate near IR emissions for bioimaging applications.

  10. Self-Assembled Modified Soy Protein/Dextran Nanogel Induced by Ultrasonication as a Delivery Vehicle for Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangzhong; Lin, Weiqin; Chen, Guangbin; Qiu, Riji

    2016-01-01

    A simple and green approach was developed to produce a novel nanogel via self-assembly of modified soy protein and dextran, to efficiently deliver riboflavin. First, modified soy protein was prepared by heating denaturation at 60 °C for 30 min or Alcalase hydrolysis for 40 min. Second, modified soy protein was mixed with dextran and ultrasonicated for 70 min so as to assemble nanogels. The modified soy protein-dextran nanogels were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ζ-potential studies to confirm the formation of NGs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the NGs to be spherical with core-shell structures, in the range of 32-40 nm size. The nanogels were stable against various environmental conditions. Furthermore, the particle size of the nanogels hardly changed with the incorporation of riboflavin. The encapsulation efficiency of nanogels was found to be up to 65.9% at a riboflavin concentration of 250 μg/mL. The nanogels exhibited a faster release in simulated intestine fluid (SIF) compared with simulated gastric fluid (SGF). From the results obtained it can be concluded that modified soy protein-dextran nanogels can be considered a promising carrier for drugs and other bioactive molecule delivery purposes. PMID:26999081

  11. Designing Nanogel Carriers for Antibacterial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, M. Carme Coll; Dastgheyb, Sana; Hickok, Noreen J.; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel and simple synthesis route to create nanosized (~ 5 nm) silver nanoparticles (NP) embedded in a biocompatible nanogel (NG) comprised of degradable, natural polymers, namely, dextran and lysozyme. In this study, we prepare hybrid nanogels with varying lysozyme content, evaluate their potential to reduce Ag NPs in situ (UV-Vis, cryo-TEM, TGA and FTIR) and determine their antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Lysozyme enhances nucleation and stabilization of Ag NPs while limiting their growth. As lysozyme concentration increases, larger nanogels with greater loading of smaller Ag NPs are obtained. The antibacterial properties of hybrid NGs depend upon nanogel type and bacterial conditions. Hybrid nanogels with the largest Ag NPs show the lowest minimum inhibition concentration (MIC). However, the greatest bacterial killing efficiency (up to 100%) occurs within one hour if the bacteria are exposed to hybrid nanogels with smaller Ag NPs while agitating the medium. These results suggest that nanogel properties as well as antibacterial activity can be tuned by varying lysozyme content. By targeting drug delivery (e.g., ligand grafted surface), these nanogels can be used to prevent biofilm formation and control infection without the complications (i.e., over exposure) associated with classical antibiotic delivery platforms. PMID:24434534

  12. An Enzyme-Responsive Nanogel Carrier Based on PAMAM Dendrimers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Luo, Yiyang; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2016-08-10

    G4 PAMAM dendrimer molecules were modified via covalently conjugating RGDC, RAADyC, and PEG chains on the periphery (Mac-1), by which a nanogel drug carrier with enzyme-sensitivity (NG-1) was constructed through an oxidation reaction by using NaIO4 to initiate the chemical cross-link of the functional groups on the periphery of dendrimers. Mac-1 and NG-1 both had a spherelike shape with a relatively uniform size of 20 nm for Mac-1 and 50 nm for NG-1 as evidenced by TEM, SEM, and DLS measurements. NG-1 showed much higher drug loading capacity as compared with that of Mac-1 although the cavities in the dendritic structure were used to encapsulate drug molecules as reported in many literatures. In addition, the size of NG-1 with embedded doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) decreased significantly to 15 nm in the presence of elastase, which indicated the decomposition of the nanogel triggered by enzyme, leading to drug release in a sustained manner in vitro. The NG-1 carrier was noncytotoxic and biocompatible, and it achieved the same cytotoxicity as free DOX when the drug molecules were loaded inside. From confocal images, the penetrative process of DOX from nanogel could be clearly observed in 8 h. Such a dendrimer-based nanogel may be a potential nanocarrier for drug delivery in cancer therapy. PMID:27420576

  13. Design and engineering of nanogels for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali Mohan; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash

    2011-01-01

    Here, we provide a comprehensive insight into current advances in the use of nanogel-mediated chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Nanogels are composed of cross-linked three-dimensional polymer chain networks that are formed via covalent linkages or self-assembly processes. The porosity between the cross-linked networks of nanogels not only provides an ideal reservoir for loading drugs, oligonucleotides and imaging agents, but also protects them from environmental degradation and hazards. Here, we focus mainly on novel synthetic strategies and key considerations in the design of nanogel-based drug delivery systems for controlled and targeted cancer therapeutic applications. PMID:21414419

  14. Bio-inspired pulmonary surfactant-modified nanogels: A promising siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Braeckmans, Kevin; Stuart, Marc C A; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-05-28

    Inhalation therapy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising approach in the treatment of pulmonary disorders. However, clinical translation is severely limited by the lack of suitable delivery platforms. In this study, we aim to address this limitation by designing a novel bioinspired hybrid nanoparticle with a core-shell nanoarchitecture, consisting of a siRNA-loaded dextran nanogel (siNG) core and a pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf®) outer shell. The decoration of siNGs with a surfactant shell enhances the colloidal stability and prevents siRNA release in the presence of competing polyanions, which are abundantly present in biofluids. Additionally, the impact of the surfactant shell on the biological efficacy of the siNGs is determined in lung cancer cells. The presence of the surfactants substantially reduces the cellular uptake of siNGs. Remarkably, the lowered intracellular dose does not impede the gene silencing effect, suggesting a crucial role of the pulmonary surfactant in the intracellular processing of the nanoparticles. In order to surmount the observed reduction in cellular dose, folate is incorporated as a targeting ligand in the pulmonary surfactant shell to incite receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter substantially enhances both cellular uptake and gene silencing potential, achieving efficient knockdown at siRNA concentrations in the low nanomolar range.

  15. Bio-inspired pulmonary surfactant-modified nanogels: A promising siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Braeckmans, Kevin; Stuart, Marc C A; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-05-28

    Inhalation therapy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising approach in the treatment of pulmonary disorders. However, clinical translation is severely limited by the lack of suitable delivery platforms. In this study, we aim to address this limitation by designing a novel bioinspired hybrid nanoparticle with a core-shell nanoarchitecture, consisting of a siRNA-loaded dextran nanogel (siNG) core and a pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf®) outer shell. The decoration of siNGs with a surfactant shell enhances the colloidal stability and prevents siRNA release in the presence of competing polyanions, which are abundantly present in biofluids. Additionally, the impact of the surfactant shell on the biological efficacy of the siNGs is determined in lung cancer cells. The presence of the surfactants substantially reduces the cellular uptake of siNGs. Remarkably, the lowered intracellular dose does not impede the gene silencing effect, suggesting a crucial role of the pulmonary surfactant in the intracellular processing of the nanoparticles. In order to surmount the observed reduction in cellular dose, folate is incorporated as a targeting ligand in the pulmonary surfactant shell to incite receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter substantially enhances both cellular uptake and gene silencing potential, achieving efficient knockdown at siRNA concentrations in the low nanomolar range. PMID:25791835

  16. Stimulus responsive nanogel with innate near IR fluorescent capability for drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vineeth M; Shenoy, Sachin J; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-10-01

    A brighter, non toxic and biocompatible optical imaging agent is one of the major quests of biomedical research. Here in, we report a photoluminescent comacromer [PEG-poly(propylene fumarate)-citric acid-glycine] and novel stimulus (pH) responsive nanogel endowed with excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (EDF) for combined drug delivery and bioimaging applications. The comacromer when excited at different wavelengths in visible region from 400nm to 640nm exhibits fluorescent emissions from 510nm to 718nm in aqueous condition. It has high Stokes shift (120nm), fluorescent lifetime (7 nanoseconds) and quantum yield (50%). The nanogel, C-PLM-NG, prepared with this photoluminescent comacromer and N,N-dimethyl amino ethylmethacrylate (DMEMA) has spherical morphology with particle size around 100nm and 180nm at pH 7.4 (physiological) and 5.5 (intracellular acidic condition of cancer cells) respectively. The studies on fluorescence characteristics of C-PLM NG in aqueous condition reveal large red-shift with emissions from 523nm to 700nm for excitations from 460nm to 600nm ascertaining the EDF characteristics. Imaging the near IR emission with excitation at 535nm was accomplished using cut-off filters. The nanogel undergoes pH responsive swelling and releases around 50% doxorubicin (DOX) at pH 5.5 in comparison with 15% observed at pH 7.4. The studies on in vitro cytotoxicity with MTT assay and hemolysis revealed that the present nanogel is non-toxic. The DOX-loaded C-PLM-NG encapsulated in Hela cells induces lysis of cancer cells. The inherent EDF characteristics associated with C-PLM NG enable cellular imaging of Hela cells. The studies on biodistribution and clearance mechanism of C-PLM-NG from the body of mice reveal bioimaging capability and safety of the present nanogel. This is the first report on a polymeric nanogel with innate near IR emissions for bioimaging applications. PMID:27262258

  17. Skin permeating nanogel for the cutaneous co-delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Punit; Desai, Pinaki; Patel, Apurva; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective drug delivery system for the simultaneous topical delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs, spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP). To achieve this primary goal we have developed a skin permeating nanogel system (SPN) containing surface modified polymeric bilayered nanoparticles along with a gelling agent. Poly-(lactide-co-glycolic acid) and chitosan were used to prepare bilayered nanoparticles (NPS) and the surface was modified with oleic acid (NPSO). Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and Carbopol with the desired viscosity were utilized to prepare the nanogels. The nanogel system was further investigated for in vitro skin permeation, drug release and stability studies. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and psoriatic plaque like model were used to assess the effectiveness of SPN. Dispersion of NPSO in HPMC (SPN) produced a stable and uniform dispersion. In vitro permeation studies revealed increase in deposition of SP for the SP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in the epidermis and dermis by 8.5 and 9.5 folds, respectively than SP-gel. Further, the deposition of KP for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in epidermis and dermis was 9.75 and 11.55 folds higher, respectively than KP-gel. Similarly the amount of KP permeated for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN was increased by 9.92 folds than KP-gel. The ear thickness in ACD model and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23; PASI score and TEWL values in psoriatic plaque like model were significantly less (p<0.001) for SPN compared to control gel. Our results suggest that SP+KP-SPN have significant potential for the percutaneous delivery of SP and KP to the deeper skin layers for treatment of various skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:22118820

  18. Radiation Engineering of Multifunctional Nanogels.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, C; Spadaro, G; Jonsson, M

    2016-10-01

    Nanogels combine the favourable properties of hydrogels with those of colloids. They can be soft and conformable, stimuli-responsive and highly permeable, and can expose a large surface with functional groups for conjugation to small and large molecules, and even macromolecules. They are among the very few systems that can be generated and used as aqueous dispersions. Nanogels are emerging materials for targeted drug delivery and bio-imaging, but they have also shown potential for water purification and in catalysis. The possibility of manufacturing nanogels with a simple process and at relatively low cost is a key criterion for their continued development and successful application. This paper highlights the most important structural features of nanogels related to their distinctive properties, and briefly presents the most common manufacturing strategies. It then focuses on synthetic approaches that are based on the irradiation of dilute aqueous polymer solutions using high-energy photons or electron beams. The reactions constituting the basis for nanogel formation and the approaches for controlling particle size and functionality are discussed in the context of a qualitative analysis of the kinetics of the various reactions. PMID:27645331

  19. Radiation Engineering of Multifunctional Nanogels.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, C; Spadaro, G; Jonsson, M

    2016-10-01

    Nanogels combine the favourable properties of hydrogels with those of colloids. They can be soft and conformable, stimuli-responsive and highly permeable, and can expose a large surface with functional groups for conjugation to small and large molecules, and even macromolecules. They are among the very few systems that can be generated and used as aqueous dispersions. Nanogels are emerging materials for targeted drug delivery and bio-imaging, but they have also shown potential for water purification and in catalysis. The possibility of manufacturing nanogels with a simple process and at relatively low cost is a key criterion for their continued development and successful application. This paper highlights the most important structural features of nanogels related to their distinctive properties, and briefly presents the most common manufacturing strategies. It then focuses on synthetic approaches that are based on the irradiation of dilute aqueous polymer solutions using high-energy photons or electron beams. The reactions constituting the basis for nanogel formation and the approaches for controlling particle size and functionality are discussed in the context of a qualitative analysis of the kinetics of the various reactions.

  20. Poly-α,β-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-α,β-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  1. A hybrid hydrogel biomaterial by nanogel engineering: bottom-up design with nanogel and liposome building blocks to develop a multidrug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yurina; Moritani, Yuki; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2012-11-01

    New hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels crosslinked with both nanogels and nanogel-coated liposome complexes are obtained by Michael addition of the acryloyl group of a cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) nanogel to the thiol group of pentaerythritol tetra(mercaptoethyl) polyoxyethylene. The nanogel-coated liposome complex is stably retained after gelation and the complexes are well dispersed in the hybrid gel. Microrheological measurements show that the strength and gelation time of the hybrid hydrogel can be controlled by changing the liposome:nanogel ratio. The hydrogel is gradually degraded by hydrolysis under physiological conditions. In this process, the nanogel is released first, followed by the nanogel-coated liposomes. Hybrid hydrogels that can incorporate various molecules into the nanogel and liposomes, and release them in a two-step controllable manner, represent a new functional scaffold capable of delivering multiple drugs, proteins or DNA.

  2. Novel nanogels as drug delivery systems for poorly soluble anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Jinli; Yang, Xingguo; Li, Lingbing

    2011-04-01

    Two types of novel nanogels were prepared using shell cross-linking of Pluronic F127 micelles with polyethylenimine (PEI) (F127/PEI nanogel), and penetrating network of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA) in Pluronic F127 micelles (F127/PBCA nanogel). Poorly soluble anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX) and 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), were used as model drugs and incorporated into nanogels. The results obtained from FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed that the drugs were molecularly dispersed in the nanogels. DLS measurements demonstrated that the nanogel size distribution was narrow with average diameter less than 200 nm. TEM images indicated that the nanogels were spherical in shape and had smooth surfaces. The drug-loaded nanogels showed sustained release profiles compared with the free drugs as revealed by in vitro release experiments. Cytotoxicity tests showed that the cytotoxicity of drug-loaded nanogels against cancer cell in vitro was much higher than that of the free drug. The data demonstrate that these novel nanogels improved stability towards dilution, increased solubility and showed better cellular uptake by cells compared with free drug.

  3. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  4. pH-Triggered Magnetic-Chitosan Nanogels (MCNs) For Doxorubicin Delivery: Physically vs. Chemically Cross Linking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sadighian, Somayeh; Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan; Rostamizadeh, Kobra; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the impact of cross linking strategy on the characteristics of magnetic chitosan nanogels (MCNs) as targeted drug delivery system for doxorubicin. Methods: Sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glutaraldehyde were used as physical (electrostatic) and chemical (covalent binding) cross-linker agents, respectively. MCNs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the formation of spherical nanostructures with the final average particle size of around 35-40 nm. Results: The finding proved the superparamagnetic properties of the MCNs with relatively high-magnetization values which indicate that the MCNs were enough sensitive to external magnetic fields as a magnetic drug carrier. To understand the differences between the drug delivery properties of chemically and physically cross linked MCNs, the drug release studies were also conducted. Altogether, the results of this study clearly indicate that, however, both MCNs exhibited sustained drug release behaviour, the chemically cross linked MCNs provided enhanced controlled drug release characteristics in comparison to physically cross linked MCNs. Besides, according to the drug release behaviour of MCNs in buffer solutions in two different medium with the pH values of 5.3 and 7.4, it was clear that both nanoparticles exhibited pH sensitivity where the extent of drug release in the acidic media was significantly higher than neutral media. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemically cross linked MCNs may serve as an ideal carrier for stimuli-triggered and controlled anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25789228

  5. Positive/negative surface charge of chitosan based nanogels and its potential influence on oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Mengxue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    To develop insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes, two insulin-loaded nanogels with opposite zeta potential (-15.94 ± 0.449 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) and +17.15 ± 0.492 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+)) were obtained. Ex vivo results showed that the nanogels with opposite surface charge exhibited different adhesion and permeation in specific intestinal segments. There was no significant differences in adhesion and permeation in rat duodenum, but in rat jejunum, insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) exhibited enhanced adhesion and permeation, which were about 3 folds (adhesion) and 1.7 folds (permeation) higher than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+). These results demonstrated that the surface charge property of nanogels determined the absorption sites of CMCS/CS-NGs in small intestine. In vivo study, the blood glucose level in insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) group had 3 mmol/L lower than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+) group during 1h to 11h after the oral administration, which demonstrated that negative insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs had a better management of blood glucose than positive ones. PMID:26572423

  6. Development of a hybrid dextrin hydrogel encapsulating dextrin nanogel as protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Molinos, Maria; Carvalho, Vera; Silva, Dina M; Gama, Francisco M

    2012-02-13

    Dextrin, a glucose polymer with low molecular weight, was used to develop a fully resorbable hydrogel, without using chemical initiators. Dextrin was first oxidized (oDex) with sodium periodate and then cross-linked with adipic acid dihidrazide, a nontoxic cross-linking molecule. Furthermore, a new bidimensional composite hydrogel, made of oxidized dextrin incorporating dextrin nanogels (oDex-nanogel), was also developed. The oDex hydrogels showed good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, allowing the proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts 3T3 cultured on top of the gel. The gelation time may be controlled selecting the concentrations of the polymer and reticulating agent. Both the oDex and oDex-nanogel hydrogels are biodegradable and present a 3-D network with a continuous porous structure. The obtained hybrid hydrogel enables the release of the dextrin nanogel over an extended period of time, paralleling the mass loss curve due to the degradation of the material. The dextrin nanogel allowed the efficient incorporation of interleukin-10 and insulin in the oDex hydrogel, providing a sophisticated system of controlled release. The new hydrogels present promising properties as an injectable carrier of bioactive molecules. Both proteins and poorly water-soluble low-molecular-weight drugs are efficiently encapsulated in the nanogel, which performs as a controlled release system entrapped in the hydrogel matrix. PMID:22288730

  7. Multi-functional core-shell hybrid nanogels for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-12-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 ± 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems. PMID:21944827

  8. Enhanced in vitro transdermal delivery of caffeine using a temperature- and pH-sensitive nanogel, poly(NIPAM-co-AAc).

    PubMed

    Abu Samah, Nor H; Heard, Charles M

    2013-09-10

    Temperature- and pH-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (polyNIPAM) copolymerised with 5% (w/v) of acrylic acid (AAc), termed as poly(NIPAM-co-AAc) nanogel was investigated as a novel multi-responsive topical drug delivery carrier, using caffeine as a model permeant. The role of a pH modulator (citric acid) on the nanogel system was also studied. The loading was carried out in deionised water at two different temperatures, which were 2-4°C and 25°C (room temperature, RT) over 3 days. The loading of caffeine into the poly(NIPAM-co-AAc) nanogel was found to be significantly higher at 2-4°C than at RT (p=0.0072). As for the control nanogel (polyNIPAM), a similar pattern of loading level can be observed (p=0.0005). This enhanced loading at low temperatures could be attributed to the hydrophilic behaviour of the polyNIPAM network in response to temperatures lower than its lower critical solution temperature (LCST). In vitro diffusion studies across epidermis porcine skin were carried out at 32°C for the saturated solution of caffeine as well as caffeine-loaded poly(NIPAM-co-AAc) and polyNIPAM nanogels. The in vitro permeation data of caffeine-loaded poly(NIPAM-co-AAc) at 2-4°C were shown to enhance the delivery of the loaded caffeine across the epidermis in comparison to the saturated solution of caffeine, by 3.5 orders of magnitude. Additionally, the study demonstrated that the effect of pH modulator on the release of loaded permeant was insignificant.

  9. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) formed nanogels with branched poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI) for inhibition of cytotoxicity in human MSCs as a gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han Na; Park, Ji Sun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Keun-Hong

    2015-05-20

    Specific vehicles are necessary for safe and efficient gene transfection into cells. Nano-type hydrogels (nanogel) comprising carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) complexed with branched type cationic poly(ethleneimine) (bPEI) were used as gene delivery vehicles. When complexes of CMC and bPEI were used in vitro, CMC showed nano-gel type properties, as shown by the results of a viscosity test, and bPEI showed low cytotoxicity comparing to bPEI alone. Together, these properties are shown to maintain high gene transfection efficiency. In viability experiments using three types of adult stem cells, cell viability varied depending on the branch form of PEI and whether or not it is in a complex with CMC. The gene delivery efficacy showed that the CMC nanogel complexed with bPEI (CMC-bPEI) showed more uptaking and gene transfection ability in hMSCs comparing to bPEI alone. In osteogenesis, the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA showed more easy internalization than bPEI alone complexed with OSX pDNA in hMSCs. Specific genes and proteins related in osteogenic differentiation were expressed in hMSCs when the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA was used.

  10. Water soluble folate-chitosan nanogels crosslinked by genipin.

    PubMed

    Pujana, Maite Arteche; Pérez-Álvarez, Leyre; Iturbe, L Carlos Cesteros; Katime, Issa

    2014-01-30

    Folate-chitosan conjugates were prepared by a concurrent functionalization and crosslinking reaction with the natural crosslinker genipin. Genipin molecule was employed simultaneously as crosslinker agent and spacer molecule in order to allow the functionalization with folic acid for active tumor targeting. The reaction was carried out in reverse microemulsion which provided colloidal size and monodisperse particle size distribution. The water solubility of the obtained folate-genipin-chitosan nanogels was studied as function of the pH of the medium and all nanoparticles were totally dispersible at physiological pH. The enzymatic degradability of the nanogels in a lysozyme solution was evaluated at acidic and physiological pH. QELS analyses of the swelling behavior of the nanogels with the pH did not show a clear pH-sensitivity. However, the study on the loading and release capacity of 5-fluorouracil revealed an interesting pH-responsive behavior of the nanogels that makes them promising as nanodevices for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  11. Magnetic and pH dual responsive core-shell hybrid nanogels: a single nano-object for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjeea, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-01-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 {+-} 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems.

  12. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  13. Recent advances of thermally responsive nanogels for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Xu, Hongjiang; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Thermally responsive nanogel drug delivery systems (TRNDDS) have been widely investigated as a new strategy for active targeting tumor therapy, as these can accumulate on the tumor site and/or release the payload at the desired site by structure changes rapidly once stimulated by temperature changes. In this review, we discuss the evolution of TRNDDS and future perspectives for antitumor drug and gene delivery. With further understanding of the specificity of tumor site at the cellular and molecular level, in parallel with the development of nanomaterial design and preparation, TRNDDS show great potential for tumor targeting therapy. PMID:26478174

  14. In Vivo GFP Knockdown by Cationic Nanogel-siRNA Polyplexes

    PubMed Central

    Shrivats, Arun R.; Mishina, Yuji; Averick, Saadyah; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to treat diseases and elucidate target gene function. Prior to clinical implementation, however, challenges including the safe, efficient and targeted delivery of siRNA must be addressed. Here, we report cationic nanogel nanostructured polymers (NSPs) prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for in vitro and in vivo siRNA delivery in mammalian models. Outcomes from siRNA protection studies suggested that nanogel NSPs reduce enzymatic degradation of siRNA within polyplexes. Further, the methylation of siRNA may enhance nuclease resistance without compromising gene knockdown potency. NSP-mediated RNAi treatments against Gapdh significantly reduced GAPDH enzyme activity in mammalian cell culture models supplemented with 10% serum. Moreover, nanogel NSP-mediated siRNA delivery significantly inhibited in vivo GFP expression in a mouse model. GFP knockdown was siRNA sequence-dependent and facilitated by nanogel NSP carriers. Continued testing of NSP/siRNA compositions in disease models may produce important new therapeutic options for patient care. PMID:27280121

  15. Nanogels fabricated from bovine serum albumin and chitosan via self-assembly for delivery of anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Xu, Shasha; Xiong, Wenfei; Pei, Yaqiong; Li, Bin; Chen, Yijie

    2016-10-01

    In this study, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chitosan (CS) were used to prepare BSA-CS nanogels by a simple green self-assembly technique. Then the nanogels were successfully used to entrap doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with an entrapment ratio of 46.3%, aiming to realize the slow-release effect and lower the cytotoxicity of DOX. The IC50 values of DOX-loaded BSA-CS (DOX-BSA-CS) and free DOX obtained by MTT assay in SGC7901 cells were 0.22 and 0.05μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity of DOX significantly decreased within 24h after encapsulation by the nanogels, indicating that the loaded drug could slowly release within 24h and the BSA-CS was a good slow release system. The cellular uptake experiments indicated DOX-BSA-CS diffused faster into the cancer cell than the bare drug. The flow cytometry and TUNEL assay proved DOX-BSA-CS could induce a larger apoptosis proportion of gastric cancer cells 7901 than the bare drug and it is promising to be used for curing gastric cancer. PMID:27262260

  16. A novel dual-responsive core-crosslinked magnetic-gold nanogel for triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Arsalani, Nasser; Entezami, Ali Akbar

    2016-11-01

    A facial approach was reported to prepare a novel dual-responsive core-crosslinked nanogel and investigated for the triggered methotrexate (MTX) release. Nanogels with core-shell architecture were synthesized by decoration of Au/Fe3O4 core/shell NPs using poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly((N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-maleic acid (PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-HEMA)-MA) for crosslinking and autoreduction processes. The second block containing amino groups and maleate groups as the inner shell was used for the reduction of HAuCl4 (auric cation) in the presence of Fe3O4 NPs and as a crosslinker agent, respectively. Furthermore, to improve the long-term dispersibility of the nanogels, poly(ethylene glycol) was preferred as outer shell even under high ionic strength. After that, NIPAAm was polymerized from the vinyl double bonds for fabricating the thermo and pH-responsive core-crosslinked nanogels. MTX (an anti-cancer agent) was successfully loaded (the loading capacity of 37%) into the nanogels by both ionic interaction and entrapment in polymeric network in the inner shell. The triggered MTX release ability of the synthesized nanocarriers was proved through the comparison of in-vitro drug release at simulated physiological condition and tumor tissue environment. MTT assay showed that MTX-loaded nanocarriers revealed high antitumor activity in MCF7 cell line after incubation following 24 and 48h. It was concluded that the developed nanogels have many promising qualities as an efficient carrier for the targeted MTX delivery to cancer tissues. PMID:27524039

  17. Magnetically Guided Protein Transduction by Hybrid Nanogel Chaperones with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Riku; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Katagiri, Kiyofumi; Mukai, Sada-Atsu; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-09-12

    Protein pharmaceuticals show great therapeutic promise, but effective intracellular delivery remains challenging. To address the need for efficient protein transduction systems, we used a magnetic nanogel chaperone (MC): a hybrid of a polysaccharide nanogel, a protein carrier with molecular chaperone-like properties, and iron oxide nanoparticles, enabling magnetically guided delivery. The MC complexed with model proteins, such as BSA and insulin, and was not cytotoxic. Cargo proteins were delivered to the target HeLa cell cytosol using a magnetic field to promote movement of the protein complex toward the cells. Delivery was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Delivered β-galactosidase, inactive within the MC complex, became enzymatically active within cells to convert a prodrug. Thus, cargo proteins were released from MC complexes through exchange interactions with cytosolic proteins. The MC is a promising tool for realizing the therapeutic potential of proteins. PMID:27295070

  18. Preparation, characterization and biological evaluation of curcumin loaded alginate aldehyde-gelatin nanogels.

    PubMed

    P R, Sarika; James, Nirmala Rachel; P R, Anil Kumar; Raj, Deepa K

    2016-11-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenol exhibits chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities towards cancer. In order to improve the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy, curcumin is encapsulated in alginate aldehyde-gelatin (Alg Ald-Gel) nanogels. Alginate aldehyde-gelatin nanogels are prepared by inverse miniemulsion technique. Physicochemical properties of the curcumin loaded nanogels are evaluated by, Dynamic light scattering (DLS), NMR spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Curcumin loaded nanogels show hydrodynamic diameter of 431±8nm and a zeta potential of -36±4mV. The prepared nanogels exhibit an encapsulation efficiency of 72±2%. In vitro drug release studies show a controlled release of curcumin from nanogels over a period of 48h. Hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility of the nanogels are evaluated. Bare nanogels are cytocompatible and curcumin loaded nanogels induce anticancer activity towards MCF-7 cells. In vitro cellular uptake of the curcumin loaded nanogels using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirms the uptake of nanogels in MCF-7 cells. Hence, the developed nanogel system can be a suitable candidate for curcumin delivery to cancer cells. PMID:27524019

  19. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies on chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan ternary nanogel prepared by in situ ionic gelation technique--a tool for controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Amos Olusegun; Issah, Sureya; Kola-Mustapha, Adeola Tawakalitu

    2015-07-25

    The chemical potentials of drug-polymer electrostatic interaction have been utilized to develop a novel ternary chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan nanogel as controlled transdermal delivery tool for ibuprofen. The ternary nanogels were prepared by a combination of electrostatic nanoassembly and ionic gelation techniques. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between ibuprofen and chitosan were confirmed with FTIR, while DSC, TGA and SEM confirmed the physical state, thermal and morphological characteristics, respectively. The ex vivo delivery of ibuprofen onto and across the skin was evaluated based on system specific drug release parameters such as steady state permeation rate, permeability coefficient, permeability enhancement ratio, skin/gel partition coefficient, diffusion coefficient, lag time and release rate constant and mechanisms of release were determined using mathematical models. Interaction between ibuprofen and chitosan produced new spherical eutectic nanoconjugates with remarkable decrease in particle size of ibuprofen from 4580 (length-to-breadth aspect ratio) to a minimum of 14.15 nm (324-times), and thermally stable amorphous characteristics. The nanogels exhibited significant elastic and pseudoplastic characteristics dictated by the concentration of chitosan with maximum swelling capacity of 775% w/w at 6.55 mM chitosan compared with 281.16 and 506.50% for plain gellan and control ibuprofen hydrogel, respectively. Chitosan enhanced the skin penetration, permeability and the rate of transdermal release of ibuprofen by a factor of 4, dictated by the extent of ibuprofen-chitosan ionic interaction and its concentration. The major mechanism of ibuprofen release through the pig skin was drug diffusion however drug partition and matrix erosion also occurred. It was evident that ternary nanogels are novel formulations with potential application in controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

  20. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  1. Design, characterization and in vitro evaluation of novel shell crosslinked poly(butylene adipate)-co-N-succinyl chitosan nanogels containing loteprednol etabonate: A new system for therapeutic effect enhancement via controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Farzaneh Hashemi; Khoee, Sepideh

    2015-09-18

    This study reports on the development of a novel mucoadhesive and biocompatible shell-crosslinked nanogel system based on poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) and N-succinyl chitosan (S-Cs) by coupling reaction with a new formulation method. For this purpose, two different molecular weights of dendrimerized PBA with amine terminated functional groups were synthesized separately and characterized well by FT-IR, (1)HNMR and GPC. The PBA nanoparticles containing loteprednol etabonate (LPE) prepared by O/W emulsion technique were reacted immediately with modified carboxylated chitosan via carbodiimide chemistry. TEM photographs of the nanoparticles and crosslinked nanoparticles displayed a spherical morphology closely corresponding to the results obtained by DLS. On The other hand, biodegradability, biocompatibility and bioadhesiveness of the prepared nanoparticles were also studied. It is concluded that the core-shell structured nanogels can be used as novel ocular drug delivery systems with appropriate loading capacity for slightly water soluble LPE as an anti-inflammatory drug.

  2. Chemically crosslinked nanogels of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (l-histidine substituted) synthesized via metal ion coordinated self-assembly for delivery of methotrexate: Cytocompatibility, cellular delivery and antitumor activity in resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Abolmaali, Samira Sadat; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Dinarvand, Rasoul

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled nanogels were engineered by forming Zn(2+)-coordinated micellar templates of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (PEG-g-PEI), chemical crosslinking and subsequent removal of the metal ion. Creation of stable micellar templates is a crucial step for preparing the nanogels. To this aim, imidazole moieties were introduced to the polymer by Fmoc-l-histidine using carbodiimide chemistry. It was hypothesized the nanogels loaded with methotrexate (MTX), a chemotherapeutic agent, circumvent impaired carrier activity in HepG2 cells (MTX-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma). So, the nanogels were post-loaded with MTX and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FTIR, dynamic light scattering-zeta potential, atomic force microscopy, and drug release experiments. Cellular uptake and the antitumor activity of MTX-loaded nanogels were investigated by flow cytometry and MTT assay. Discrete, spherical and uniform nanogels, with sizes about 77-83 nm and a relatively high drug loading (54 ± 4% w/w), showed a low polydispersity and neutral surface charges. The MTX-loaded nanogels, unlike empty nanogels, lowered viability of HepG2 cells; the nanogels demonstrated cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis comparably higher than MTX as free drug that was shown to be through i) cellular uptake of the nanogels by clathrin-mediated transport and ii) endosomolytic activity of the nanogels in HepG2 cells. These findings indicate the potential antitumor application of this preparation, which has to be investigated in-vivo. PMID:26952497

  3. Preparation and characterisation of gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels via inverse miniemulsion technique.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels designed by a nanoreactor concept using inverse miniemulsion technique were reported. Stable separate miniemulsions were prepared from gelatin (Gel) and gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). These emulsions were intermixed under sonication to obtain cross-linked nanogels. During fusion, cross-linking occurred between aldehyde groups of GAA and amino groups of gelatin. The concentration of the surfactant and weight fraction of water in the inverse miniemulsion was optimised so as to yield nanogels with controlled particle size. Properties of the nanogels were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, particle size analysis and XRD. Surface morphology of the nanogels was established by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM and particle size analysis confirmed that nanogels possess spherical morphology with an average diameter of 151 ± 6 nm. Hemolysis property of the nanogels was examined and the results indicated that the nanogels were hemocompatible. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanogels towards MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay and the nanogels showed nontoxic behaviour towards the cells. All these studies confirm that these nanogels are potential candidates in applications such as drug and gene delivery.

  4. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery. PMID:27713328

  5. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  6. Targeting delivery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Dunnett, Stephen B; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to halt the neurodegenerative process and to stimulate the protection, repair, and regeneration of dopaminergic neurons, remain a vital but unmet clinical need. Targeting the delivery of current and new therapeutics directly to the diseased brain region (in particular the nigrostriatal pathway) could result in greater improvements in the motor functions that characterise PD. Here, we highlight some of the opportunities and challenges facing the development of the next generation of therapies for patients with PD. PMID:27312875

  7. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface. PMID:26697736

  8. Nanogel scavengers for drugs: Local anesthetic uptake by thermoresponsive nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Sivakumaran, Daryl; Stefanescu, Cristina; Lawlor, Michael W.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of functional nanogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for effectively scavenging compounds (here, the model drug bupivacaine) is demonstrated using an in vitro cell-based assay. Nanogels containing higher loadings of acidic functional groups or more core-localized functional group distributions bound more bupivacaine, while nanogel size had no significant effect on drug binding. Increasing the dose of nanogel applied also facilitated more bupivacaine binding for all nanogel compositions tested. Binding was driven predominantly by acid-base interactions between the nanogels (anionic) and bupivacaine (cationic) at physiological pH, although both non-specific absorption and hydrophobic partitioning also contributed to drug scavenging. Nanogels exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to multiple cell types and were well-tolerated in vivo via peritoneal injections, although larger nanogels caused limited splenic toxicity at higher concentrations. The cell-based assay described herein is found to facilitate more robust drug uptake measurements for nanogels than conventional centrifugation-based assays, in which nanogels can be compressed (and thus drug released) during the measurement. PMID:22244983

  9. Heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meifang; Li, Minghui; Wang, Guangtian; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Daming; Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Qun

    2014-09-01

    The efficacious delivery of drugs to the heart is an important treatment strategy for various heart diseases. Nanocarriers have shown increasing promise in targeted drug delivery systems. The success of nanocarriers for delivering drugs to therapeutic sites in the heart mainly depends on specific target sites, appropriate drug delivery carriers and effective targeting ligands. Successful targeted drug delivery suggests the specific deposition of a drug in the heart with minimal effects on other organs after administration. This review discusses the pathological manifestations, pathogenesis, therapeutic limitations and new therapeutic advances in various heart diseases. In particular, we summarize the recent advances in heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems, including dendrimers, liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates, microparticles, nanostents, nanoparticles, micelles and microbubbles. Current clinical trials, the commercial market and future perspective are further discussed in the conclusions.

  10. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  11. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications.

  12. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications. PMID:25563951

  13. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  14. Combination of Nanogel Polyethylene glycol-Polyethylenimine and 6 (hydroxymethyl)-1,4-anthracenedione as an Anticancer Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Chanran; Shi, Aibin; Battina, Srinivas K; Pyle, Marla; Rana, Sandeep; Hua, Duy H.; Tamura, Masaaki; Troyer, Deryl

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles have many potential applications. Polyethylene glycol-polyethylenimine (PEG-PEI) nanogels have been used to deliver nucleic acids and oligonucleotides into cells. We first synthesized various nanogels with altering ratios of CH2O:CH2N (methylene protons) in PEG-PEI and tested their cytotoxicity using a rodent pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line (Pan 02). Results indicate that the nanogel PEG-PEI with lower methylene protons ratio (4:1) exhibited a strong cytotoxicity over the higher methylene protons ratio (~6.8:1). We then incorporated a newly synthesized anti-cancer drug, 6-(hydroxymethyl)-1,4-anthracenedione (AQ) analogue (AQ10) into nanogel PEG-PEI with higher methylene protons ratio (~6.8:1) and tested the effect of AQ10 encapsulated nanogel PEG-PEI (AQ10-nanogel PEG-PEI) and AQ10 dissolved in DMSO on Pan 02 cell growth. Our results showed that, Pan 02 cells treated with AQ10-nanogel PEG-PEI was three to four times more effective in cell growth attenuation than the cells treated with AQ10 alone. Nanogel PEG-PEI apparently acts as a drug delivery agent by penetrating the cell membrane and carrying the anti-cancer drug AQ10 into the cells, so that they become more susceptible to the drug even at a lower dose. These results suggest that AQ10-nanogel PEG-PEI is a potentially effective anti-cancer agent in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:18572646

  15. Janus nanogels of PEGylated Taxol and PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Wang, Huaimin; Zhu, Meifeng; Ding, Dan; Li, Dongxia; Yin, Zhinan; Wang, Lianyong; Yang, Zhimou

    2013-09-01

    Nanogels are promising carriers for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for cancer therapy. We report in this study on a Janus nanogel system formed by mixing a prodrug of Taxol (PEGylated Taxol) and a copolymer of PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The Janus nanogels have good stability over months in aqueous solutions and the freeze-dried powder of nanogels can be re-dispersed instantly in aqueous solutions. The Janus nanogels show an enhanced inhibition effect on tumor growth in a mice breast cancer model probably due to the enhanced uptake of the nano-sized materials by the EPR effect. What is more, the nanogels can also serve as physical carriers to co-deliver other anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin to further improve the anti-cancer efficacy. The results obtained from H&E staining and TUNEL assay also support the observation of tumor growth inhibition. These results suggest the potential of this novel delivery system for cancer therapy.Nanogels are promising carriers for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for cancer therapy. We report in this study on a Janus nanogel system formed by mixing a prodrug of Taxol (PEGylated Taxol) and a copolymer of PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The Janus nanogels have good stability over months in aqueous solutions and the freeze-dried powder of nanogels can be re-dispersed instantly in aqueous solutions. The Janus nanogels show an enhanced inhibition effect on tumor growth in a mice breast cancer model probably due to the enhanced uptake of the nano-sized materials by the EPR effect. What is more, the nanogels can also serve as physical carriers to co-deliver other anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin to further improve the anti-cancer efficacy. The results obtained from H&E staining and TUNEL assay also support the observation of tumor growth inhibition. These results suggest the potential of this novel delivery system for cancer therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and characterization of compounds, dynamic time sweep, H

  16. Magnetizable implants for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Zachary Graham

    The capability to deliver high effective dosages to specific sites in the human body has become the holy grail of drug delivery research. Drugs with proven effectiveness under in vitro investigation often reach a major roadblock under in vivo testing due to a lack of an effective delivery strategy. In addition, many clinical scenarios require delivery of agents that are therapeutic at the desired delivery point, but otherwise systemically toxic. This project proposes a method for targeted drug delivery by applying high magnetic field gradients within the body to an injected superparamagnetic colloidal fluid carrying a drug, with the aid of modest uniform magnetic field. The design involves patterning of endovascular implants, such as coronary stents, with soft magnetic coatings capable of applying high local magnetic field gradients within the body. Examination of the feasibility of the design has been focused around the treatment of coronary restenosis following angioplasty. Drug-eluting stents, which have debuted in hospitals over the past two years, have thus far reduced restenosis rates to below 10%. Our local drug delivery system is a viable alternative or enhancement to drug-eluting stents, offering increased clinician control of dose size, the ability to treat a site repeatedly, and a wide array of applications for treatment of other pathologies. The theoretical models, parallel plate and pipe flow analysis, and cell culture models presented give insight into the use of micron and sub-micron scale magnetic particles for site-specific delivery of pharmaceuticals and magnetically labeled cells.

  17. Synthesis of surfactant-free hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanogels for controlled release of insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Shi, Xiaodi; Liu, Tianqun; Lu, Xihua; Qiu, Gao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-10-20

    A facile controlled-release nanogels delivery system has been developed by using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hybrid nanogels as encapsulation shell materials, which were synthesized by surfactant-free polymerization in aqueous solution. The effects of reaction time and cross-linker concentration on the size of the nanogels have been studied. The results showed that in a certain range, the particle size decreased with increasing reaction time and increasing concentration of cross-linker. Meanwhile, at the feeding ratio 0.05/1 of HPMC/methacrylic acid (MAA), the LCST of prepared nanogels at pH=6 was close to the body temperature, which can be used as sustained insulin delivery system. Besides, the HPMC nanogels loaded with insulin had a high drug loading of 21.3% and a high entrapment efficiency of 95.7%. The release behavior of the insulin nanogels can be adjusted by pH and temperature which will have potential applications in controlled release delivery system. PMID:27474648

  18. Bioresorbable polymersomes for targeted delivery of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Matthew A; Hillmyer, Marc A; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2013-04-17

    Nontoxic bioresorbable polymersomes have been developed that efficiently and site-selectively tether targeting peptides under mild conditions with no toxic catalysts. The binding and release properties of these polymersomes have been evaluated when targeting DLD-1 human colon cancer cells overexpressing the α(5)β(1) integrin. The delivery efficacy to these cells is markedly improved over commonly used RGD targeting peptides by use of an α(5)β(1)-specific targeting peptide, PR_b. Release profiles in buffered solution from pH 7.4 to 4.5 were evaluated and compared to release after binding to cells, and enzymatic degradation was identified as a major cause of rapid payload release in the cell. Intracellular trafficking and release were imaged via confocal microscopy in live cells and colocalization with organelles was evaluated quantitatively over time. Finally, the anticancer drug cisplatin was encapsulated in the PR_b functionalized polymersomes and the presence of PR_b greatly improved delivery efficacy, with increased cisplatin-induced losses to targeted DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability. When delivered to CACO-2 model human epithelial cells expressing low levels of α(5)β(1) integrin, low toxicity was maintained, suggesting that targeting was specific to α(5)β(1) overexpressing cells. These results demonstrate that PR_b-functionalized bioresorbable polymersomes may be an attractive route to minimizing the dose-limiting side effects associated with existing approaches to cisplatin chemotherapy.

  19. Polyamide Nanogels from Generally Recognized as Safe Components and Their Toxicity in Mouse Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Priyaa; Molla, Mijanur Rahaman; Cui, Wei; Canakci, Mine; Osborne, Barbara; Mager, Jesse; Thayumanavan, S

    2015-11-01

    Safe delivery systems that can not only encapsulate hydrophobic drug molecules, but also release them in response to specific triggers are important in several therapeutic and biomedical applications. In this paper, we have designed a nanogel based on molecules that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). We have shown that the resultant polymeric nanogels exhibit responsive molecular release and also show high in vitro cellular viability on HEK 293T, HeLa, MCF 7, and A549 cell lines. The toxicity of these nanogels was further evaluated with a highly sensitive assay using mouse preimplantation embryo development, where blastocysts were formed after 4 days of in vitro culture, and live pups were born when morulae/early blastocysts were transferred to the uteri of surrogate recipients. Our results indicate that these nanogels are nontoxic during mammalian development and do not alter normal growth or early embryo success rate. PMID:26367020

  20. Polyamide Nanogels from GRAS Components and Their Toxicity in Mouse Pre-implantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Priyaa; Molla, Mijanur Rahaman; Cui, Wei; Canakci, Mine; Osborne, Barbara; Mager, Jesse; Thayumanavan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Safe delivery systems that can not only encapsulate hydrophobic drug molecules, but also release them in response to specific triggers, are important in several therapeutic and biomedical applications. In this paper, we have designed a nanogel based on molecules that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). We have shown that the resultant polymeric nanogels exhibit responsive molecular release, and also show high in vitro cellular viability on HEK 293T, HeLa, MCF 7 and A549 cell lines. The toxicity of these nanogels was further evaluated with a highly sensitive assay using mouse preimplantation embryo development, where blastocysts were formed after four days of in vitro culture and live pups were born when morulae/early blastocysts were transferred to the uteri of surrogate recipients. Our results indicate that these nanogels are non-toxic during mammalian development and do not alter normal growth or early embryo success rate. PMID:26367020

  1. Targeting of Synthetic Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Safe, efficient, and specific delivery of therapeutic genes remains an important bottleneck for the development of gene therapy. Synthetic, nonviral systems have a unique pharmaceutical profile with potential advantages for certain applications. Targeting of the synthetic vector improves the specificity of gene medicines through a modulation of the carriers' biodistribution, thus creating a dose differential between healthy tissue and the target site. The biodistribution of current carrier systems is being influenced to a large extent by intrinsic physicochemical characteristics, such as charge and size. Consequently, such nonspecific interactions can interfere with specific targeting, for example, by ligands. Therefore, a carrier complex should ideally be inert, that is, free from intrinsic properties that would bias its distribution away from the target site. Strategies such as coating of DNA carrier complexes with hydrophilic polymers have been used to mask some of these intrinsic targeting effects and avoid nonspecific interactions. Preexisting endogenous ligand-receptor interactions have frequently been used for targeting to certain cell types or tumours. Recently exogenous ligands have been derived from microorganisms or, like antibodies or phage-derived peptides, developed de novo. In animal models, such synthetic vectors have targeted remote sites such as a tumour. Furthermore, the therapeutic proof of the concept has been demonstrated for fitting combinations of synthetic vectors and therapeutic gene. PMID:12721518

  2. Colloidal microgels in drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal microgels have recently received attention as environmentally responsive systems and now are increasingly used in applications as carriers for therapeutic drugs and diagnostic agents. Synthetic microgels consist of a crosslinked polymer network that provides a depot for loaded drugs, protection against environmental hazards and template for post-synthetic modification or vectorization of the drug carriers. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent attempts to develop new microgel formulations for oral drug delivery, to design metal-containing microgels for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and to advance approaches including the systemic administration of microgels. Novel nanogel drug delivery systems developed in the authors’ laboratory are discussed in details including aspects of their synthesis, vectorization and recent applications for encapsulation of low molecular weight drugs or formulation of biological macromolecules. The findings reviewed here are encouraging for further development of the nanogels as intelligent drug carriers with such features as targeted delivery and triggered drug release. PMID:17168773

  3. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  4. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.

  5. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. PMID:24881520

  6. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  7. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  8. Progress in Aptamer-Mediated Drug Delivery Vehicles for Cancer Targeting and Its Implications in Addressing Chemotherapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Huang, He; Dong, Shiwu; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are novel oligonucleotides with flexible three-dimensional configurations that recognize and bind to their cognate targets, including tumor surface receptors, in a high-affinity and highly specific manner. Because of their unique intrinsic properties, a variety of aptamer-mediated nanovehicles have been developed to directionally transport anti-cancer drugs to tumor sites to minimize systemic cytotoxicity and to enhance permeation by these tumoricidal agents. Despite advances in the selection and synthesis of aptamers and in the conjugation and self-assembly of nanotechnologies, current chemotherapy and drug delivery systems face great challenges. These challenges are due to the limitations of aptamers and vehicles and because of complicated tumor mechanisms, including heterogeneity, anti-cancer drug resistance, and hypoxia-induced aberrances. In this review, we will summarize current approaches utilizing tumor surface hallmarks and aptamers and their roles and mechanisms in therapeutic nanovehicles targeting tumors. Delivery forms include nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanogels, aptamer-drug conjugates, and novel molecular trains. Moreover, the obstacles posed by the aforementioned issues will be highlighted, and possible solutions will be acknowledged. Furthermore, future perspectives will be presented, including cutting-edge integration with RNA interference nanotechnology and personalized chemotherapy, which will facilitate innovative approaches to aptamer-based therapeutics. PMID:25057317

  9. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Jena, Prasanna K.; Behera, Sumita; Lockey, Richard F.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    A major problem associated with therapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to a specific site of the body without causing nonspecific toxicity. Development of magnetic nanoparticles and techniques for their safe transport and concentration in specific sites in the body would constitute a powerful tool for gene/drug therapy in vivo. Furthermore, drug delivery in vitro could improve further if the drugs were modified with antibodies, proteins or ligands. For in vivo experiments, magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with plasmid DNA expressing GFP and then coated with chitosan. These particles were injected into mice through tail vein and directed to heart and kidney by means of external magnets of 25 gauss or 2kA –kA/m. These particles were concentrated in the lungs, heart, and kidney of mice and the expression of GFP in these sites were monitored. The expression of GFP in specific locations was visualized by whole-body fluorescent imaging and the concentration of these particles in the designated body locations was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In another model system, we used atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and Carcino Embryonic Antigen (CEA) antibodies coupled to the chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles to target cells in vitro. The present work demonstrates that a simple external magnetic field is all that is necessary to target a drug to a specific site inside the body without the need to functionalize the nanoparticles. However, the option to use magnetic targeting with external magnets on functionalized nanoparticles could prove as a more efficient means of drug delivery. PMID:19446653

  10. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  11. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-01-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [18F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [18F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  12. Hypoxia-targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Perche, F; Biswas, S; Wang, T; Zhu, L; Torchilin, V P

    2014-03-24

    Altered vasculature and the resultant chaotic tumor blood flow lead to the appearance in fast-growing tumors of regions with gradients of oxygen tension and acute hypoxia (less than 1.4% oxygen). Due to its roles in tumorigenesis and resistance to therapy, hypoxia represents a problem in cancer therapy. Insufficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the hypoxic regions in solid tumors is recognized as one of the causes of resistance to therapy. This led to the development of hypoxia imaging agents, and the use of hypoxia-activated anticancer prodrugs. Here we show the first example of the hypoxia-induced siRNA uptake and silencing using a nanocarrier consisting of polyethyleneglycol 2000, azobenzene, polyethyleneimine (PEI)(1.8 kDa), and 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) units (the nanocarrier is referred to as PAPD), where azobenzene imparts hypoxia sensitivity and specificity. We report hypoxia-activated green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing in vitro and its downregulation in GFP-expressing tumors after intravenous administration. The proposed nanoformulation represents a novel tumor-environment-responsive modality for cancer targeting and siRNA delivery. PMID:24554550

  13. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2016-07-01

    Due to the ability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed. PMID:27471668

  14. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes.

  15. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  16. Bio-responsive chitin-poly(L-lactic acid) composite nanogels for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, T R; Sanoj Rejinold, N; Ashwin Kumar, N; Jayakumar, R

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancer and its treatment has been considered a therapeutic challenge. Doxorubicin (Dox) is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment for liver cancer. However, the efficacy of Dox therapy is restricted by the dose-dependent toxic side effects. To overcome the cardiotoxicity of Dox as well as the current problems of conventional modality treatment of HCC, we developed a locally injectable, biodegradable, and pH sensitive composite nanogels for site specific delivery. Both control and Dox loaded composite nanogel systems were analyzed by DLS, SEM, FTIR and TG/DTA. The size ranges of the control composite nanogels and their drug loaded counterparts were found to be 90±20 and 270±20 nm, respectively. The control chitin-PLA CNGs and Dox-chitin-PLA CNGs showed higher swelling and degradation in acidic pH. Drug entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were carried out and showed a higher drug release at acidic pH compared to neutral pH. Cellular internalization of the nanogel systems was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the composite nanogels was analyzed toward HepG2 (human liver cancer) cell lines. Furthermore, the results of in vitro hemolytic assay and coagulation assay substantiate the blood compatibility of the system. Overall Dox-chitin-PLA CNGs system could be a promising anticancer drug delivery system for liver cancer therapy. PMID:24129331

  17. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  18. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  19. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  20. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  1. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  2. Dendrimeric micelles for controlled drug release and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Ashootosh V.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the developments in dendrimer-based micelles for drug delivery. Dendrimers, the perfectly branched monodisperse macromolecules, have certain structural advantages that make them attractive candidates as drug carriers for controlled release or targeted delivery. As polymeric micelle-based approaches precede the work in dendrimers, these are also discussed briefly. The review concludes with a perspective on possible applications of biaryl-based dendrimeric micelles that exhibit environment-dependent conformations, in drug delivery. PMID:16053329

  3. Shell-crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanogels for live monitoring of hyaluronidase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Chong, Youhoon; Mok, Hyejung

    2014-06-01

    A hyaluronidase (HAdase) has been noticed as a potential drug target as well as prognostic marker because of its close associations with tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Accordingly, precise monitoring of HAdase activity in vivo seems to be crucial not only for the evaluation of HAdase activity but also for non-invasive molecular imaging. In our study, we propose a new organic, near-infrared fluorescence imaging probe, indocyanine green (ICG)-based stimuli-responsive fluorescence probe for selective imaging of HAdases with appreciable signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios in serum and in vivo. Shell-crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels (sc-nanogels) are generated via a reducible covalent linkage which incorporate ICG derivatives. The ICG-embeded HA nanogels via shell-crosslinking have preferable properties for ideal selective imaging and detection of HAdase activity in vivo. The sc-nanogels exhibit prominent chemical stability against external light, greatly control background signals in serum, and small size compared to use of self-assembled ICG-based carriers. Collapsed ICG in the hydrogel core is selectively disentangled by HAdase treatment for selective near-infrared imaging without unwanted background signal. The newly designed sc-nanogels may have great potential to serve as probes for improved selective imaging of HAdase-associated diseases in clinics as well as HAdase-activity screening in vivo. PMID:24505028

  4. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging

  5. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Muqing; Duval, Kayla; Guo, Xing; Chen, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this article, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (passive targeting, active targeting and physical targeting), compare methods of action, advantages, limitations, and the current stage of research. For the most commonly used nanoparticle carriers, fabrication methods are also reviewed. This is followed by a review of computational simulations and models on nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:27398083

  6. Fabrication and characterization of sol-gel based nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Reeta

    Nanogels are cross linked polymeric sol-gel based nanoparticles that offer an interior network for incorporation and protection of biomolecules, exhibiting unique advantages for polymer based delivery systems. We have successfully synthesized stable sol-gel nanoparticles by means of [a] silicification reactions using cationic peptides like polylysine as gelating agents, and [b] lyophilization of sol-gels. Macromolecules such as Hemoglobin and Glucose Oxidase and small molecules such as Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and antibiotics were encapsulated within the nanogels. We have used transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and spectroscopy to perform a physicochemical characterization of the nanogels resulting from the two approaches. Our studies have indicated that the nanogel encapsulated proteins and small molecules remain intact, stable and functional. A Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Nitric Oxide (NO) generating drug carrier was synthesized using these nanogels and the effect of generation of H2O2 from Glucose Oxidase encapsulated nanogels and NO from SNP encapsulated nanogels was tested on E.coli. The results show that the nanoparticles exert antimicrobial activity against E.Coli, in addition NO generating nanogels potentiated H2O2 generating nanogels induced killing. These data suggest that these NO and H2O2 releasing nanogels have the potential to serve as a novel class of antimicrobials for the treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria. The unique properties of these protein/drug incorporated nanogels raise the prospect of fine tailoring to specific applications such as drug delivery and bio imaging.

  7. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  8. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

  9. Surface modulatable nanocapsids for targeting and tracking toward nanotheranostic delivery.

    PubMed

    Stark, Marie; Cheng, R Holland

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticle diagnostics and therapeutics (nanotheranostics) have significantly advanced cancer detection and treatment. However, many nanotheranostics are ineffective due to defects in tumor localization and bioavailability. An engineered Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) nanocapsid is a proposed platform for targeted cancer-cell delivery. Self-assembling from HEV capsid subunits, nanocapsids retain the capacity to enter cells and resist proteolytic/acidic conditions, but lack infectious viral elements. The nanocapsid surface was modified for chemical activation to confer tumor-specific targeting and detection, immune-response manipulation and controlled theranostic delivery. Nanotheranostic molecules can be packaged in the hollow nanocapsid shell during in vitro assembly. Complementing the adapted stability and cell-entry characteristics of the HEV capsid, a modified nanocapsid serves as a tunable tumor-targeting platform for nanotheronostic delivery. PMID:27610752

  10. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  11. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  12. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  13. Cell-Specific Aptamer-Mediated Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are in vitro-selected small, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can specifically recognize their target on the basis of their unique 3-dimensional structures. Recent advances in the development of escort aptamers to deliver and enhance the efficacy of other therapeutic agents have drawn enthusiasm in exploiting cell-type-specific aptamers as drug delivery vehicles. This review mainly focuses on the recent developments of aptamer-mediated targeted delivery systems. We also place particular emphasis on aptamers evolved against cell membrane receptors and possibilities for translation to clinical applications. PMID:21182455

  14. Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

  15. Galactose engineered solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashay; Kesharwani, Prashant; Garg, Neeraj K; Jain, Atul; Jain, Som Akshay; Jain, Amit Kumar; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Ghanghoria, Raksha; Tyagi, Rajeev Kumar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation reports the preparation, optimization, and characterization of surface engineered solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) encapsulated with doxorubicin (DOX). Salient features such as biocompatibility, controlled release, target competency, potential of penetration, improved physical stability, low cost and ease of scaling-up make SLNs viable alternative to liposomes for effective drug delivery. Galactosylation of SLNs instructs some gratifying characteristic, which leads to the evolution of promising delivery vehicles. The impendence of lectin receptors on different cell surfaces makes the galactosylated carriers admirable for targeted delivery of drugs to ameliorate their therapeutic index. Active participation of some lectin receptors in immune responses to antigen overlaid the application of galactosylated carriers in delivery of antigen and immunotherapy for treatment of maladies like cancer. These advantages revealed the promising potential of galactosylated carriers in each perspective of drug delivery. The developed DOX loaded galactosylated SLNs formulation was found to have particle size 239 ± 2.40 nm, PDI 0.307 ± 0.004, entrapment efficiency 72.3 ± 0.9%. Higher cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and nuclear localization of galactosylated SLNs against A549 cells revealed higher efficiency of the formulation. In a nutshell, the galactosylation strategy with SLNs could be a promising approach in improving the delivery of DOX for cancer therapy. PMID:26142628

  16. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoop, M; Mushtaq, F; Hurter, C; Chen, X-Z; Nelson, B J; Pané, S

    2016-07-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. PMID:27297037

  17. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  18. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  19. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  20. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  1. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  2. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  3. RAFT-mediated Control of Nanogel Structure and Reactivity: Chemical, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Monomer-dispersed Nanogel Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examines how nanogel structure correlates with photopolymerization and key polymer properties upon addition of nanogels with latent reactivity into a monomer dispersant to produce polymer/polymer composites. Methods Two nanogels that retained RAFT functionality based on the synthetic approach were prepared to have different branching densities. These reactive nanogels were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 0–40 wt%. Reaction kinetics, volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress associated with the photopolymerization of nanogel-modified formulations were measured in real time with mechanical properties of the polymers also evaluated. The basic structure of RAFT-derived nanogel particles was examined by the preparation of a separate nanogel constructed with degradable disulfide crosslinking groups. The model nanogel molecular weight and polydispersity were compared before and after degradation. Results Despite the controlled radical synthetic approach, the nanogels, which are composed of multiple interconnected, short primary chains presented relatively high polydispersity. Through addition of the reactive nanogels to a monomer that both infiltrates and disperses the nanogels, the photopolymerization rate was moderately reduced with the increase of nanogel loading levels. Volumetric shrinkage decreased proportionally with nanogel concentration; however, a greater than proportional reduction of polymerization-induced stress was observed. Mechanical properties, such as flexural strength, storage modulus were maintained at the same levels as the control resin for nanogel systems up to 40 wt%. Significance This study demonstrated that beyond the use of RAFT functionality to produce discrete nano-polymeric structures, the residual chain end groups are important to maintain reactivity and mechanical properties of nanogel-modified resin materials. PMID:25205366

  4. 'Smart' non-viral delivery systems for targeted delivery of RNAi to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joanne M; Hibbitts, Alan; Barlow, James; Kelly, Ciara; Sivadas, Neeraj; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of RNAi offers a potentially exciting new therapeutic paradigm for respiratory diseases. However, effective delivery remains a key requirement for their translation into the clinic and has been a major factor in the limited clinical success seen to date. Inhalation offers tissue-specific targeting of the RNAi to treat respiratory diseases and a diminished risk of off-target effects. In order to deliver RNAi directly to the respiratory tract via inhalation, 'smart' non-viral carriers are required to protect the RNAi during delivery/aerosolization and enhance cell-specific uptake to target cells. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering, and specifically non-viral siRNA delivery platforms, for delivery via inhalation. This includes developments in inhaler device engineering and particle engineering, including manufacturing methods and excipients used in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering that underpin the development of smart, cell type-specific delivery systems to target siRNA to respiratory epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages. PMID:23323781

  5. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  6. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  7. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  8. Convection-enhanced delivery: targeted toxin treatment of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Sherr, Gregory T

    2006-04-15

    Historically, malignant gliomas are perhaps the most difficult intracranial neoplasms to treat. Surgery, radiation therapy, and traditional chemotherapy have not been able to significantly alter the course of this disease. By definition, these tumors are located in the protected space of the cranial vault, where the blood-brain barrier prevents most therapies from gaining access. Because of the difficulty in treating this disease, new, innovative treatments and alternative delivery techniques for those therapies are needed. Targeted toxins are fusion proteins that represent a novel medical treatment for these cancers that is under development. However, the efficacy of these agents is dependent on the method of delivery to the tumor. The administration of targeted toxins requires image-guided placement of catheters, either within the tumor or into the adjacent infiltrated brain, and positive pressure infusion. The term that has been applied to this microinfusion technique is convection-enhanced delivery (CED). This infusion method was first attempted via direct intratumoral infusion in nude mouse flank tumor models of human malignant glioma. After significant development of this delivery technique in animal models, the successful demonstration of in vivo efficacy of targeted toxins in Phase I and II clinical trials was reported. Currently, ongoing targeted toxin trials are being conducted at academic health centers to define the best clinical practice for CED. This work involves refining the details of delivery such as infusion rate, duration of treatment, and drug dosing. The early results of CED of targeted toxins supports their continued investigation, as few other treatment modalities have produced durable results in the fight against gliomas.

  9. Tetraspecific ligand for tumor-targeted delivery of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D; Liu, Rihe

    2014-07-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in Escherichia coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various 'smart' biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  10. Tetraspecific Ligand for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in E. coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various ‘smart’ biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  11. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  12. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  13. The role of acoustofluidics in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Zhang, Xunli; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of acoustic systems in clinical and therapeutic applications, acoustically driven microbubbles have gained a prominent role as powerful tools to carry, transfer, direct, and target drug molecules in cells, tissues, and tumors in the expanding fields of targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. The aim of the present study is to establish a biocompatible acoustic microfluidic system and to demonstrate the generation of an acoustic field and its effects on microbubbles and biological cells in the microfluidic system. The acoustic field creates non-linear oscillations of the microbubble-clusters, which results in generation of shear stress on cells in such microsystems. This effectively helps in delivering extracellular probes in living cells by sonoporation. The sonoporation is investigated under the combined effects of acoustic stress and hydrodynamic stress during targeted drug and gene delivery. PMID:26339329

  14. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  15. Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinrong; Clay, Nicholas; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Recently, several simulation and in vitro experimental studies reported that particle shape plays a pivotal role in the targeted delivery of molecules. To better understand these findings and subsequently expedite the use of particles in biomedical applications, this review paper summarizes the methods to prepare non-spherical nano- and micro-scaled particles. In addition, this review covers studies reporting the effects of particle shape on the loading, delivery and release of encapsulated bioactive cargos. Finally, it discusses future directions to further improve the properties of non-spherical particles. PMID:25838583

  16. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  17. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) nanogels for tracing and delivering genes to human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yang, Han Na; Woo, Dae Gyun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Keun-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Drugs, proteins, and cells can be macro- and micro-encapsulated by unique materials that respond to specific stimuli. The phases and hydrophobic interactions of these materials are reversibly altered by environmental stimuli such as pH and temperature. These changes can lead to self-assembly of the materials, which enables controlled drug release and safe gene delivery into cells and tissues. The fate of stem cells delivered by such methods is of great interest. The formation of transgenic tissues requires genes to be delivered safely into stem cells. A cell tracing vehicle and a gene delivery carrier were simultaneously introduced into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A thermo-sensitive hydrogel, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (p(NiPAAm-co-AAc)), was created to generate self-assembled nanoparticles with nanogel characteristics. Hydrophobic interactions mediated the binding of the carboxyl group on the outside of p(NiPAAm-co-AAc) with the amine group of iron oxide. Nanogels carrying iron oxide and a fluorescent dye were complexed with specific genes. These nanogels could be internalized by hMSCs, and the transplantation of these cells into mice was monitored by in vivo imaging. Self-assembled p(NiPAAm-co-dAAc) nanogels complexed with green fluorescent protein were highly expressed in hMSCs and are a potential material for gene delivery. PMID:23937912

  18. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  19. Bispecific digoxigenin-binding antibodies for targeted payload delivery

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Silke; Haas, Alexander K.; Daub, Karin; Croasdale, Rebecca; Stracke, Jan; Lau, Wilma; Georges, Guy; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Lammens, Alfred; Scheuer, Werner; Hoffmann, Eike; Mundigl, Olaf; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that bind cell-surface targets as well as digoxigenin (Dig) were generated for targeted payload delivery. Targeting moieties are IgGs that bind the tumor antigens Her2, IGF1R, CD22, or LeY. A Dig-binding single-chain Fv was attached in disulfide-stabilized form to C termini of CH3 domains of targeting antibodies. Bispecific molecules were expressed in mammalian cells and purified in the same manner as unmodified IgGs. They are stable without aggregation propensity and retain binding specificity/affinity to cell-surface antigens and Dig. Digoxigeninylated payloads were generated that retain full functionality and can be complexed to bispecific antibodies in a defined 2∶1 ratio. Payloads include small compounds (Dig-Cy5, Dig-Doxorubicin) and proteins (Dig-GFP). Complexed payloads are targeted by the bispecifics to cancer cells and because these complexes are stable in serum, they can be applied for targeted delivery. Because Dig bispecifics also effectively capture digoxigeninylated compounds under physiological conditions, separate administration of uncharged Dig bispecifics followed by application of Dig payload is sufficient to achieve antibody-mediated targeting in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21536919

  20. Functionalized nanogels carrying an anticancer microRNA for glioblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Shatsberg, Zohar; Zhang, Xuejiao; Ofek, Paula; Malhotra, Shashwat; Krivitsky, Adva; Scomparin, Anna; Tiram, Galia; Calderón, Marcelo; Haag, Rainer; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive forms of all cancers. The median survival with current standard-of-care radiation and chemotherapy is about 14months. GBM is difficult to treat due to heterogeneity in cancer cell population. MicroRNA-based drugs have rapidly become a vast and burgeoning field due to the ability of a microRNA (miRNA) to target many genes involved in key cellular pathways. However, in vivo delivery of miRNA remains a crucial challenge for its therapeutic success. To bypass this shortcoming, we designed polymeric nanogels (NGs), which are based on a polyglycerol-scaffold, as a new strategy of miRNA delivery for GBM therapy. We focused on miR-34a, which is known for its key role in important oncogenic pathways and its tumor suppression ability in GBM and other cancers. We evaluated the capability of six NG derivatives to complex with miR-34a, neutralize its negative charge and deliver active miRNA to the cell cytoplasm. Human U-87 MG GBM cells treated with our NG-miR-34a nano-polyplexes showed remarkable downregulation of miR-34a target genes, which play key roles in the regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and induce inhibition of cells proliferation and migration. Administration of NG-miR-34a nano-polyplexes to human U-87 MG GBM-bearing SCID mice significantly inhibited tumor growth as opposed to treatment with NG-negative control miR polyplex or saline. The comparison between different polyplexes highlighted the key features for the rational design of polymeric delivery systems for oligonucleotides. Taken together, we expect that this new therapeutic approach will pave the way for safe and efficient therapies for GBM. PMID:27569663

  1. Ocular Drug Delivery - New Strategies for Targeting Anterior and Posterior Segments of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, Joana F; Veiga, Francisco; Silva, Amelia M; Souto, Eliana B

    2016-01-01

    The ocular delivery of drugs encounters several limitations because of the dynamic and static barriers of the human's eye anatomy and physiology. The poor bioavailability of drugs are mainly related to the topical administration, i.e. eye drops which is the most common drug dosage form for the treatment of eye pathologies. Precorneal factors and drug limitations related to its solubility and susceptibility for physicochemical degradation could be the main reasons for the poor permeation and uptake in the ocular mucosa. Pathologies affecting the anterior and posterior segment of the eye are thereafter difficult to be treated and, given the chronic and degenerative nature of some of these injuries, it is crucial to improve drugs therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology-based delivery systems could be a suitable approach to overcome these limitations. Some of the most important colloidal systems are highlighted in this review, such as the use of mucoadhesive polymers, prodrugs, nanogels, liposomes, microemulsions, lipid and polymeric nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, dendrimers and nanocrystals, along with their clinical and therapeutic relevance for the administration of drugs for ocular delivery. PMID:26675225

  2. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  3. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  4. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are drug-delivery systems composed of both solid and liquid lipids as a core matrix. It was shown that NLCs reveal some advantages for drug therapy over conventional carriers, including increased solubility, the ability to enhance storage stability, improved permeability and bioavailability, reduced adverse effect, prolonged half-life, and tissue-targeted delivery. NLCs have attracted increasing attention in recent years. This review describes recent developments in drug delivery using NLCs strategies. The structures, preparation techniques, and physicochemical characterization of NLCs are systematically elucidated in this review. The potential of NLCs to be used for different administration routes is highlighted. Special attention is paid to parenteral injection and topical delivery since these are the most common routes for investigating NLCs. Relevant issues for the introduction of NLCs to market, including pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications, are discussed. The related patents of NLCs for drug delivery are also reviewed. Finally, the future development and current obstacles needing to be resolved are elucidated. PMID:22946628

  5. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

  6. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. PMID:26974603

  7. The Platin-X series: activation, targeting, and delivery.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer platinum (Pt) complexes have long been considered to be one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Yet there remains the hunt for the "magic bullet" which can satisfy the requirements of an effective chemotherapeutic drug formulation. Pt(iv) complexes are kinetically more inert than the Pt(ii) congeners and offer the opportunity to append additional functional groups/ligands for prodrug activation, tumor targeting, or drug delivery. The ultimate aim of functionalization is to enhance the tumor selective action and attenuate systemic toxicity of the drugs. Moreover, an increase in cellular accumulation to surmount the resistance of the tumor against the drugs is also of paramount importance in drug development and discovery. In this review, we will address the attempts made in our lab to develop Pt(iv) prodrugs that can be activated and delivered using targeted nanotechnology-based delivery platforms. PMID:27493131

  8. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A.; Robinet, Eric; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    ``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental procedures, additional SEM and TEM images of particles, complete UV-Vis and PL-monitored characterization of the breakdown of

  9. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol.

  10. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  11. Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Targeted Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xianbo; Ali, Zeeshan; Li, Song; He, Nongyue

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are a special kind of nanomaterials and widely used in biomedical technology applications. Currently they are popularly customized for disease detection and treatment, particularly as drug carriers in drug targeted delivery systems, as a therapeutic in hyperthermia (treating tumors with heat), and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to their biocompatibility and superparamagnetic properties, MNPs as next generation drug carriers have great attraction. Although the potential benefits of MNPs are considerable, any potential toxicity associated with these MNPs should be identified distinctly. The drug loading capability and the biomedical properties of MNPs generated by different surface coatings are the most sensitive parameters in toxicity. A lot of organic and inorganic materials are utilized as coating materials for surface functionalization and reducing toxicity of MNPs. pH or temperature sensitivity materials are widely used to manage drug loading and targeted release. In addition, MNPs can be controlled and directed to the desired pathological region by using external magnetic files (EMF). The realization of targeted drug delivery has decreased the dosage and improved the efficiency of drugs, which results in reduced side effects to normal tissues. This review discussed the possible organ toxicities of MNPs and their current advances as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:26328305

  12. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  13. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  14. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas J; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-17

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  15. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  16. Multifunctional TK-VLPs nanocarrier for tumor-targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yachao; Mu, Yu; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Hui; Yang, Shuman; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Hunan; Xiao, Cuihong; Peng, Haisheng; Zhou, Yulong; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-04-11

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have been exploited for various biomedical applications, such as the monitoring, prevention, diagnosis and therapy of disease. In this study, a novel multifunctional VLPs nanocarrier (TK-VLPs) was prepared and used for tumor-targeted delivery. The SPR and cell uptake results indicated that the TK peptide is a "bi-functional ligand" with high affinity for Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells through the integrin α6β1 and integrin αvβ3 receptors. The results of the direct immunofluorescence, SDS-PAGE and western blot assays demonstrated that the TK-VLPs were successfully prepared using the baculovirus expression system. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and the flow cytometry analysis validated that the TK-VLPs could target to Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells. An in vivo study further confirmed that the TK-VLPs could target and efficiently deliver fluorescein to tumor cells and the tumor vasculature in mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. TK-VLPs-DOX displayed a uniform, spherical shape and an average size of approximately 28nm. The results of the cell uptake and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TK-VLPs-DOX could enhance the selectivity for colorectal cancer cells. Together, our studies provide strong evidence that TK-VLPs could target colon tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis with enhanced permeability and retention effects, suggesting that the TK-VLPs are a multifunctional nanocarrier with potential applications in a colon tumor-targeted drug delivery system. PMID:26915810

  17. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  18. Visualization of real-time degradation of pH-responsive polyglycerol nanogels via atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Marcel; Steinhilber, Dirk; Haag, Rainer; von Klitzing, Regine

    2014-12-01

    Polyglycerol nanogels (nPG) have a huge impact in biomedical applications as drug deliverer due to their high biocompability. For such nPG nanogels, particle degradation is widely used as drug delivery method. The knowledge of this degradation process is limited up to date. In this communication, a real time visualization of such a degradation process is presented for pH-responsive nPG nanogels via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient and in liquid conditions. The particle height plays a major role in the degradation process and decays exponentially in the beginning of this process. The particle width increases during the process indicating a "decross-linking" step of the particles into their starting monomers. Measurements under ambient conditions confirm this assumption and provide further insight in the "decross-linking" step of the nanogels into individual dendritic particles. The present work gives a detailed insight in the particle degradation process, which is essential for further progress for the development of new drug delivery systems.

  19. Nanogel-based PspA intranasal vaccine prevents invasive disease and nasal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  20. Nanogel-Based PspA Intranasal Vaccine Prevents Invasive Disease and Nasal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E.; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  1. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    PubMed

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-01

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  2. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens.

  3. Physical and chemical stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems: targeted delivery and main routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana R; Santos, Gory; Barata, Pedro; Oliveira, Rita; Lopes, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    In the area of drug delivery, novel tools and technological approaches have captured the attention of researchers in order to improve the performance of conventional therapeutics and patient compliance to pharmacological therapy. Stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems (DDS) appear as a promising approach to control and target drug delivery. When these DDS are administered, the drug release is activated and then modulated through some action or external input and facilitated by the energy supplied externally. The stimuli responsible to activate the drug release can be classified into three types according to their nature or the type of energy applied: physical (e.g. magnetic field, electric field, ultrasound, temperature and osmotic pressure); chemical (e.g. pH, ionic strength and glucose); and biological (enzymes and endogenous receptors). The present review gives an overview of the most significant physical and chemical stimuliresponsive DDS and elucidates about their current and relevant applications in controlled and targeted drug delivery attending different routes of administration.

  4. Tumor targeting and microenvironment-responsive nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Kuang, Yuyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-07-01

    A tumor targeting nanoparticle system has been successfully developed to response to the lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe) and upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are modified with activatable cell-penetrating peptide (designated as dtACPP) that's dual-triggered by the lowered pHe and MMP2. In dtACPP, the internalization function of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is quenched by a pH-sensitive masking peptide, linking by a MMP2 substrate. The masking peptide is negatively charged to quench the cationic CPP well after systemic administration. Hence, dtACPP-modified nanoparticles possesses passive tumor targetability via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Once reaching the tumor microenvironment, the pre-existing attraction would be eliminated due to the lowered pHe, accompanying the linker cleaved by MMP2, dtACPP would be activated to expose CPP to drive the nanoparticles' internalization into the intratumoral cells. The studies of plasmid DNA loading, toxicity assessment, cellular uptake, tumor targeting delivery, and gene transfection demonstrate that dtACPP-modified nanoparticle system is a potential candidate for tumor targeting gene delivery.

  5. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; O'Neill, John D; Dorrello, N Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-09-15

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  6. Chlorotoxin labeled magnetic nanovectors for targeted gene delivery to glioma.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-24

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA-bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers.

  7. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  8. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  9. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  10. Biodegradable Particulate Carrier Formulation and Tuning for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles have the potential to reform the drug development landscape by improving drug solubility, changing undesirable pharmacokinetics, realizing the benefits of new molecules arising from genomic and proteomic research, and increasing drug localization in target organs and tissues; i.e., drug targeting. This review provides an overview of the in vivo fate of biodegradable particulate carriers following administration via several routes, as well as how the patient's health state, disease pathophysiology and particle physicochemical properties affect such fates. It also discusses some of the widely used biodegradable polymers, their in vivo biochemical degradation, methods of nanoparticle formulation from such polymers and finally, how such methods could be tailored to achieve targeted delivery to specified tissues both passively and actively.

  11. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed.

  12. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  13. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization. PMID:25375342

  14. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization.

  15. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-10-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical

  16. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  17. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  18. Polymeric protective agents for nanoparticles in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard

    2016-08-30

    Surface modification/functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric protective agents is an issue of great importance and actuality for drug delivery and targeting. Improving the blood circulation half-life of surface-protected nanocarriers is closely related to the elimination of main biological barriers and limiting factors (protein absorption and opsonization), due to the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system. For passive or active targeted delivery, in biomedical area, surface-functionalized NPs with tissue-recognition ligands were designed and optimized as a result of modern research techniques. Also, multi-functionalized nanostructures are characterized by enhanced bioavailability, efficacy, targeted localization, active cellular uptake, and low side effects. Surface-protected NPs are obtained from biocompatible, biodegradable and less toxic natural polymers (dextran, β-cyclodextrin, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, gelatin) or synthetic polymers, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(alkyl cyanoacrylates). PEGylation is one of the most important functionalization methods providing steric stabilization, long circulating and 'stealth' properties for both polymeric and inorganic-based nanosystems. In addition, for their antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor effects, cutting-edge researches in the field of pharmaceutical nanobiotechnology highlighted the importance of noble metal (platinum, gold, silver) NPs decorated with biopolymers. PMID:26972379

  19. Enhanced solubility and targeted delivery of curcumin by lipopeptide micelles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ju; Wu, Wenlan; Lai, Danyu; Li, Junbo; Fang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    A lipopeptide (LP)-containing KKGRGDS as the hydrophilic heads and lauric acid (C12) as the hydrophobic tails has been designed and prepared by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis technique. LP can self-assemble into spherical micelles with the size of ~30 nm in PBS (phosphate buffer saline) (pH 7.4). Curcumin-loaded LP micelles were prepared in order to increase the water solubility, sustain the releasing rate, and improve the tumor targeted delivery of curcumin. Water solubility, cytotoxicity, in vitro release behavior, and intracellular uptake of curcumin-loaded LP micelles were investigated. The results showed that LP micelles can increase the water solubility of curcumin 1.1 × 10(3) times and sustain the release of curcumin in a low rate. Curcumin-loaded LP micelles showed much higher cell inhibition than free curcumin on human cervix carcinoma (HeLa) and HepG2 cells. When incubating these curcumin-loaded micelles with HeLa and COS7 cells, due to the over-expression of integrins on cancer cells, the micelles can efficiently use the tumor-targeting function of RGD (functionalized peptide sequences: Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence to deliver the drug into HeLa cells, and better efficiency of the self-assembled LP micelles for curcumin delivery than crude curcumin was also confirmed by LCSM (laser confocal scanning microscope) assays. Combined with the enhanced solubility and higher cell inhibition, LP micelles reported in this study may be promising in clinical application for targeted curcumin delivery.

  20. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ηm, which increase to 60–80 ηm upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ηm) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression

  1. Design and Application of Nanogel-Based Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailing, Eric Alan

    Crosslinked polymer networks have wide application in biomaterials, from soft hydrogel scaffolds for cell culture and tissue engineering to glassy, high modulus dental restoratives. Composite materials formed with nanogels as a means for tuning network structure on the nanoscale have been reported, but no investigation into nanogels as the primary network component has been explored to this point. This thesis was dedicated to studying network formation from the direct polymerization of nanogels and investigating applications for these unique materials. Covalently crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from polymerizable nanogels without the use of reactive small monomers or oligomers. Network properties were controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the nanogel, allowing for materials to be designed from nanostructured macromolecular precursors. Nanogels were synthesized from a thermally initiated solution free radical polymerization of a monomethacrylate, a dimethacrylate, and a thiol-based chain transfer agent. Monomers with a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were copolymerized, and polymerizable groups were introduced through an alcohol-isocyanate click reaction. Nanogels were dispersible in water up to 75 wt%, including nanogels that contained a relatively high fraction of a conventionally water-insoluble component. Nanogels with molecular weights that ranged from 10's to 100's of kDa and hydrodynamic radii between 4 and 10 nm were obtained. Macroscopic crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from the photopolymerization of methacrylate-functionalized nanogels in inert solvent, which was typically water. The nanogel composition and internal branching density affected both covalent and non-covalent interparticle interactions, which dictated the final mechanical properties of the networks. Nanogels with progressively disparate hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were synthesized to explore the potential for creating

  2. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical

  3. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  4. Cancer Nanomedicine: From Targeted Delivery to Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of a variety of diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as large surface-to volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate a variety of drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, gives them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make nanoparticles a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This article highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using nanoparticles as drug-delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. PMID:25656384

  5. Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarriers as promising targeted drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiya; Xu, Yurui; Asghar, Sajid; Chen, Minglei; Zou, Lang; Eltayeb, Sulieman; Huo, Meirong; Ping, Qineng; Xiao, Yanyu

    2015-01-01

    Among the materials for preparing the polymeric nanocarriers, poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA), a polymer with medium length alkyl side chain, is of lower toxicity and proper degradation time. Therefore, PBCA has recently been regarded as a kind of widely used, biocompatible, biodegradable, low-toxic drug carrier. This review highlights the use of PBCA-based nanocarriers (PBCA-NCs) as targeting drug delivery systems and presents the methods of preparation, the surface modification and the advantages and limitations of PBCA-NCs. The drugs loaded in PBCA-NCs are summarized according to the treatment of diseases, and the different therapeutic applications and the most recent developments of PBCA-NCs are also discussed, which provides useful guidance on the targeting research of PBCA-NCs.

  6. Complexation of copper(II) with chitosan nanogels: toward control of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Fabrice; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2013-02-15

    Pure chitosan nanogels were produced, used to adsorb copper(II), and their antimicrobial activities were assessed. The complexation of copper(II) with chitosan solutions and dispersions was studied using UV-vis spectrometry. The adsorption capacity of chitosan nanogels was comparable to that of chitosan solutions, but copper(II)-loaded nanogels were more stable (i.e. no flocculation was observed while chitosan solutions showed macroscopic gelation at high copper concentration) and were easier to handle (i.e. no increase in viscosity). Adsorption isotherms of copper(II) onto chitosan were established and the impact of the pH on copper(II) release was investigated. The formation of a copper(II)-chitosan complex strongly depended on pH. Hence, release of copper(II) can be triggered by a decrease in pH (i.e. the protonation of chitosan amino groups). Furthermore, chitosan nanohydrogels were shown to be a suitable substrate for chitosan hydrolytic enzymes. Finally, a strong synergistic effect between chitosan and copper in inhibiting Fusarium graminearum growth was observed. The suitability of these copper(II)-chitosan colloids as a new generation of copper-based bio-pesticides, i.e. as a bio-compatible, bio-active and pH-sensitive delivery system, is discussed.

  7. Controlled curcumin release via conjugation into PBAE nanogels enhances mitochondrial protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prachi; Jordan, Carolyn T; Mitov, Mihail I; Butterfield, D Allan; Hilt, J Zach; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-09-25

    Mitochondria are considered to be the "power plants" of the cell, but can also initiate and execute cell death, stimulated by oxidative stress (OS). OS induced mitochondrial dysfunction is characterized by a loss in oxygen consumption and reduced ATP production. Curcumin, as a potential therapeutic, has been explored as a candidate for mitochondrial OS suppression, but rapid metabolism and aqueous insolubility has prevented it from being effective. Further, efficient delivery of curcumin via the incorporation into nanocarriers has again been limited due to low drug loading capacities and/or significant burst release, resulting in acute cytotoxicity. Hence, to increase the therapeutic potential and reduce the toxic effects of curcumin, curcumin conjugated poly(β-amino ester) nanogels (CNGs) were synthesized using Michael addition chemistry. This approach provided easy control over the nanogel size, with CNGs showing a uniform release of active curcumin over 48h with no burst release. This controlled release system significantly increased the safety limit for curcumin, with a ten fold increase in the cytotoxic threshold, as compared to free curcumin. Further, real-time mitochondrial response analysis with the Seahorse XF96 showed effective and prolonged suppression of H2O2 induced mitochondrial oxidative stress upon pre-treating endothelial cells with CNGs and this potential of nanogels was studied at different pre-treatment times prior to H2O2 exposure. PMID:27492022

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Functionalized Nanocarriers in Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Bradley, Ryan; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using functionalized nanocarriers (NCs) is a strategy in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this paper we review the recent development of models at multiple length and time scales and their applications to targeting of antibody functionalized nanocarriers to antigens (receptors) on the endothelial cell (EC) surface. Our mesoscale (100 nm-1 μm) model is based on phenomenological interaction potentials for receptor-ligand interactions, receptor-flexure and resistance offered by glycocalyx. All free parameters are either directly determined from independent biophysical and cell biology experiments or estimated using molecular dynamics simulations. We employ a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) strategy in conjunction with the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) to compute the free energy landscape (potential of mean force or PMF) associated with the multivalent antigen-antibody interactions mediating the NC binding to EC. The binding affinities (association constants) are then derived from the PMF by computing absolute binding free energy of binding of NC to EC, taking into account the relevant translational and rotational entropy losses of NC and the receptors. We validate our model predictions by comparing the computed binding affinities and PMF to a wide range of experimental measurements, including in vitro cell culture, in vivo endothelial targeting, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and flow chamber experiments. The model predictions agree closely and quantitatively with all types experimental measurements. On this basis, we conclude that our computational protocol represents a quantitative and predictive approach for model driven design and optimization of functionalized NCs in targeted vascular drug delivery. PMID:22116782

  9. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  10. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  11. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  12. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    PubMed

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  13. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  14. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  15. Cargo-Delivery Platforms for Targeted Delivery of Inhibitor Cargos Against Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei

    2015-01-01

    Delivering therapeutic cargos to specific cell types in vivo poses many technical challenges. There is currently a plethora of drug leads and therapies against numerous diseases, ranging from small molecule compounds to nucleic acids to peptides to proteins with varying binding or enzymatic functions. Many of these candidate therapies have documented potential for mitigating or reversing disease symptoms, if only a means for gaining access to the intracellular target were available. Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of cellular uptake and transport processes and the mode of action of bacterial protein toxins have accelerated the development of toxin-based cargo-delivery vehicle platforms. This review provides an updated survey of the status of available platforms for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos, outlining various strategies that have been used to deliver different types of cargo into cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of toxin-based approaches, examining critical issues that have hampered realization of post-intoxication antitoxins against botulism. PMID:25335885

  16. Cargo-delivery platforms for targeted delivery of inhibitor cargos against botulism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda A; Ho, Mengfei

    2014-01-01

    Delivering therapeutic cargos to specific cell types in vivo poses many technical challenges. There is currently a plethora of drug leads and therapies against numerous diseases, ranging from small molecule compounds to nucleic acids to peptides to proteins with varying binding or enzymatic functions. Many of these candidate therapies have documented potential for mitigating or reversing disease symptoms, if only a means for gaining access to the intracellular target were available. Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of cellular uptake and transport processes and the mode of action of bacterial protein toxins have accelerated the development of toxin-based cargo-delivery vehicle platforms. This review provides an updated survey of the status of available platforms for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos, outlining various strategies that have been used to deliver different types of cargo into cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of toxin-based approaches, examining critical issues that have hampered realization of post-intoxication antitoxins against botulism.

  17. Development of targeted delivery techniques for Zequanox®

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, Todd J.; Luoma, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water temperature and concentration on the physical characteristics of Zequanox®, a dead-cell spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) used for controlling invasive dreissenid mussels (zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, and quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis), were investigated to determine optimal temperature-specific concentrations and delivery techniques for use during open-water subsurface Zequanox applications. Temperature-controlled laboratory tests evaluated viscosity, settling, stratification, and buoyancy of various concentrations of Zequanox suspension in water to select an optimal target viscosity for Zequanox applications. A two-step linear regression procedure was used to create a temperature-specific Zequanox prediction model from the viscosity data. The prediction model and subsurface application techniques were validated by conducting three independent outdoor pond trials at temperatures of ~9, 14, and 20°C. During these outdoor trials, subsurface applications of Zequanox at concentrations predicted by the model were performed and water samples were collected at varying depths and analyzed via spectroscopy to determine Zequanox concentration and dispersion. Although the predicted Zequanox concentrations and delivery techniques used resulted in successfully maintaining lethal Zequanox concentrations in the bottom 7.5 cm of the water column for the duration of the exposure, a revised prediction model is also provided for more accurately selecting temperature-specific Zequanox concentrations.

  18. Targeting tumor metastases: drug delivery mechanisms and technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Roth, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary sites of tumor are the focal triggers of cancers, yet it is the subsequent metastasis events that cause the majority of the morbidity and mortality. Metastatic tumor cells exhibit a phenotype that differs from that of the parent cells, as they represent a resistant, invasive subpopulation of the original tumor, may have acquired additional genetic or epigenetic alterations under exposure to prior chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments, and reside in a microenvironment differing from that of its origin. This combination of resistant phenotype and distal location make tracking and treating metastases particularly challenging. In this review, we highlight some of the unique biological traits of metastasis, which in turn, inspire emerging strategies for targeted imaging of metastasized tumors and metastasis-directed delivery of therapeutics. PMID:26409123

  19. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  20. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  1. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  2. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  3. A hyaluronic acid nanogel for photo-chemo theranostics of lung cancer with simultaneous light-responsive controlled release of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Nafiujjaman, Md; Reeck, Gerald R.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK).The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid

  4. Oligoperoxide Based Physically Detectable Nanocomposites for Cell Targeting, Visualization and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaichenko, A.; Mitina, N.; Shevchuk, O.; Shapoval, O.; Boiko, N.; Bilyy, R.; Stoika, R.; Voloshinovskii, A.; Horak, D.

    2010-10-01

    Novel promising routes for the obtaining luminescent, magnetic, plasmon resonance capable nanocomposites as well as drug delivery systems are proposed and studied. These routes are based on the synthesis and application of original type of functional oligoperoxides, their coordinating complexes of transition including rare earth metal cations for controlled synthesis of block, comb-like or nanogel oligoelectrolytes as well as for template synthesis of functional polymer and polymer-mineral nanoparticles. Developed nanoscale delivery systems were tested as medicines for cancer administration in vitro and in vivo. Physically detectable lectin-conjugated nanocomposites were studied as biomarkers for pathological cell targeting and visualization.

  5. Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer

  6. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  7. Mucoadhesive platforms for targeted delivery to the colon.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

    2011-11-25

    A novel platform system, comprising a mucoadhesive core and a rapid release carrier, was designed for targeted drug delivery to the colon. Prednisolone pellets containing different carbomers, including Carbopol 971P, Carbopol 974P and Polycarbophil AA-1, with or without organic acids, were produced by extrusion-spheronization. Mucoadhesive pellets were coated with a new enteric double-coating system, which dissolves at pH 7. This system comprises an inner layer of partially neutralized Eudragit S and buffer salt and an outer coating of standard Eudragit S. A single layer of standard Eudragit S was also applied for comparison purposes. Dissolution of the coated pellets was assessed in USP II apparatus in 0.1N HCl followed by Krebs bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4. Visualization of the coating dissolution process was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent markers in both layers. The mucoadhesive properties of uncoated, single-coated and-double coated pellets were evaluated ex vivo on porcine colonic mucosa. Mucoadhesive pellets coated with a single layer of Eudragit S release its cargo after a lag time of 120 min in Krebs buffer. In contrast, drug release from the double-coated mucoadhesive pellets was significantly accelerated, starting at 75 min. In addition, the mucoadhesive properties of the core of the double coated pellets were higher than those from single-coated pellets after the core had been exposed to the buffer medium. This novel platform technology has the potential to target the colon and overcome the variability in transit and harmonize drug release and bioavailability.

  8. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  9. Universal conformational properties of polymers in ionic nanogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-02-01

    Polyelectrolyte gels are known to undergo significant conformational changes in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, or the dielectric constant. Specifically, an increase of the degree of ionization associated with an increasing number of counterions leads to swelling of the network. For a macroscopically large gel, which is electrostatically neutral in its interior, swelling is no longer governed by electrostatic interactions, but rather by the osmotic pressure of counterions. However, this electrostatic neutrality is typically violated for nanogels, because counterions are free to leave a gel particle. Although nanogel-swelling exhibits similar features as swelling of micro- and macrogels, another mechanism has to be relevant. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations and scaling theory to unravel the structural properties of nanogels upon changing the electrostatic interactions. We demonstrate that the swelling of nanogels is governed by screened electrostatic interactions without a relevant contribution by the counterion osmotic pressure.

  10. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability.

    PubMed

    Lux, Jacques; Chan, Minnie; Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-12-14

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd(3+) within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd(3+). This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy.

  11. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability

    PubMed Central

    Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-01-01

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd3+ within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd3+. This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy. PMID:24505553

  12. Universal conformational properties of polymers in ionic nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte gels are known to undergo significant conformational changes in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, or the dielectric constant. Specifically, an increase of the degree of ionization associated with an increasing number of counterions leads to swelling of the network. For a macroscopically large gel, which is electrostatically neutral in its interior, swelling is no longer governed by electrostatic interactions, but rather by the osmotic pressure of counterions. However, this electrostatic neutrality is typically violated for nanogels, because counterions are free to leave a gel particle. Although nanogel-swelling exhibits similar features as swelling of micro- and macrogels, another mechanism has to be relevant. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations and scaling theory to unravel the structural properties of nanogels upon changing the electrostatic interactions. We demonstrate that the swelling of nanogels is governed by screened electrostatic interactions without a relevant contribution by the counterion osmotic pressure. PMID:26830457

  13. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability.

    PubMed

    Lux, Jacques; Chan, Minnie; Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-12-14

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd(3+) within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd(3+). This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy. PMID:24505553

  14. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.; Turcu, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  15. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Turcu, R.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.

    2013-11-13

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  16. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins. PMID:22019910

  17. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  18. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  19. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  20. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  1. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  2. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  3. Delivery of drugs to intracellular organelles using drug delivery systems: Analysis of research trends and targeting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2015-12-30

    Targeting of drug delivery systems (DDSs) to specific intracellular organelles (i.e., subcellular targeting) has been investigated in numerous publications, but targeting efficiency of these systems is seldom reported. We searched scientific publications in the subcellular DDS targeting field and analyzed targeting efficiency and major formulation parameters that affect it. We identified 77 scientific publications that matched the search criteria. In the majority of these studies nanoparticle-based DDSs were applied, while liposomes, quantum dots and conjugates were used less frequently. The nucleus was the most common intracellular target, followed by mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In 65% of the publications, DDSs surface was decorated with specific targeting residues, but the efficiency of this surface decoration was not analyzed in predominant majority of the studies. Moreover, only 23% of the analyzed publications contained quantitative data on DDSs subcellular targeting efficiency, while the majority of publications reported qualitative results only. From the analysis of publications in the subcellular targeting field, it appears that insufficient efforts are devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters and of the DDSs' intracellular fate. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future studies in the field of organelle-specific drug delivery and targeting.

  4. Multifunctional hybrid nanogel for integration of optical glucose sensing and self-regulated insulin release at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Mitra, Nivedita; Yan, Elsa C Y; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-08-24

    Optical detection of glucose, high drug loading capacity, and self-regulated drug delivery are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional hybrid nanogel particle under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such hybrid nanogels are made of Ag nanoparticle (NP) cores covered by a copolymer gel shell of poly(4-vinylphenylboronic acid-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate) [p(VPBA-DMAEA)]. The introduction of the glucose sensitive p(VPBA-DMAEA) gel shell onto Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ag NPs responsive to glucose. While the small sized Ag cores (10 +/- 3 nm) provide fluorescence as an optical code, the responsive polymer gel shell can adapt to a surrounding medium of different glucose concentrations over a clinically relevant range (0-30 mM), convert the disruptions in homeostasis of glucose level into optical signals, and regulate release of preloaded insulin. This shows a new proof-of-concept for diabetes treatment that exploits the properties from each building block of a multifunctional nano-object. The highly versatile multifunctional hybrid nanogels could potentially be used for simultaneous optical diagnosis, self-regulated therapy, and monitoring of the response to treatment.

  5. Multifunctional hybrid nanogel for integration of optical glucose sensing and self-regulated insulin release at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Mitra, Nivedita; Yan, Elsa C Y; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-08-24

    Optical detection of glucose, high drug loading capacity, and self-regulated drug delivery are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional hybrid nanogel particle under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such hybrid nanogels are made of Ag nanoparticle (NP) cores covered by a copolymer gel shell of poly(4-vinylphenylboronic acid-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate) [p(VPBA-DMAEA)]. The introduction of the glucose sensitive p(VPBA-DMAEA) gel shell onto Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ag NPs responsive to glucose. While the small sized Ag cores (10 +/- 3 nm) provide fluorescence as an optical code, the responsive polymer gel shell can adapt to a surrounding medium of different glucose concentrations over a clinically relevant range (0-30 mM), convert the disruptions in homeostasis of glucose level into optical signals, and regulate release of preloaded insulin. This shows a new proof-of-concept for diabetes treatment that exploits the properties from each building block of a multifunctional nano-object. The highly versatile multifunctional hybrid nanogels could potentially be used for simultaneous optical diagnosis, self-regulated therapy, and monitoring of the response to treatment. PMID:20731458

  6. Strategies and advances in nanomedicine for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Surendra; Gupta, Nidhi; Chandra, Ramesh

    2011-06-01

    siRNA are a rapidly emerging class of new therapeutic molecules for the treatment of inherited and acquired diseases. However, poor cellular uptake and instability in physiological conditions limits its therapeutic potential, hence a need to develop a delivery system that can protect and efficiently transport siRNA to the target cells has arisen. Nanoparticles have been proposed as suitable delivery vectors with reduced cytotoxicity and enhanced efficacy. These delivery vectors form condensed complexes with siRNA which, in turn, provides protection to siRNA against enzymatic degradation and further leads to tissue and cellular targeting. Nanoparticles derived from polymers, such as chitosan and polyethylenimine have found numerous applications owing to ease of manipulation, high stability, low cost and high gene carrying capability. This article focuses on various aspects of nanomedicine based siRNA delivery with emphasis on targeted delivery to tumors.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma.

  8. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success.

  9. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  10. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  11. Acid and reduction stimulated logic "and"-type combinational release mode achieved in DOX-loaded superparamagnetic nanogel.

    PubMed

    Song, Meifang; Xue, Yanan; Chen, Lidi; Xia, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Long, Sihui; Huang, Shiwen; Yu, Faquan

    2016-08-01

    A superparamagnetic nanogel featured with a logic "and"-type pH/reduction combinational stimulated release mode was fabricated as a drug delivery system by virtue of parallel crosslinking. The disulfide bond and electrostatic interaction between thiolated alginate (SA-SH) and thiolated/aminated iron oxide nanoparticles (SH-MION-NH2) were employed to achieve the mechanism. The obtained DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel is 122.7±20.3nm in size with superparamagnetism. The combinational conditions of pH5.0/10mM glutathione (GSH) stimulated a significantly high accumulative release. However, either pH7.4/10mM (GSH) or pH5.0 alone induced much low release. This verified the typical logic "and"-type combinationally stimulated release mode. In vitro cytotoxicity tests clearly illustrated the effective selectivity of killing the human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) with IC50 of 1.01μg/mL and the human hepatoma cells (HepG2) with IC50 of 1.57μg/mL but significantly low cytotoxicity to the cercopithecus aethiops kidney cells (Vero). CLSM presented the internationalization of the nanogel into cytoplasm and nuclei with time. In vivo investigation revealed that the selective intratumoral accumulation and antitumor efficacy were considerably advantageous over free DOX whereas low systemic toxicity exhibited up-regulated security as compared to free DOX. Overall, the DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel with enhanced antitumor efficacy and down-regulated adverse effect was a promising nanoplatform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy. PMID:27157762

  12. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  13. The role of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wanyi; Mahato, Rubi; Cheng, Kun

    2010-01-01

    HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer. Since the discovery of its role in tumorigenesis, HER2 has received great attention in cancer research during the past two decades. Successful development of the humanized monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab) for the treatment of breast cancer further spurred scientists to develop various HER2 specific antibodies, dimerization inhibitors and kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. On the other hand, the high expression of HER2 and the accessibility of its extracellular domain make HER2 an ideal target for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs as well as imaging agents. Although there is no natural ligand for HER2, various artificial ligands targeting HER2 have been developed and applied in various targeted drug delivery systems. The emphasis of this review is to elucidate the roles of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. The structure and signal pathway of HER2 will be briefly described. The role of HER2 in tumorigenesis and its relationship with other tumor markers will be discussed. For the HER2 targeted cancer therapy, numerous strategies including the blockage of receptor dimerization, inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity, and interruption of the downstream signal pathway will be summarized. For the targeted drug delivery to HER2 positive tumor cells, various targeting ligands and their delivery systems will be described in details. PMID:20385184

  14. Nanostructured lipid carriers and their current application in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Piyush; Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, various drug-delivery technologies have emerged and a fascinating part of this has been the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles (NPs) and other colloidal drug-delivery systems modify the kinetics, drug distribution in the body and release profile of an associated drug. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been reported to be an alternative system to emulsions, liposomes, microparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and their polymeric counterparts due to their numerous advantages. This paper basically reviews the types of NLCs, mechanism of skin penetration, stability related issues along with their production techniques, characterisation and applications towards targeted drug delivery.

  15. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  16. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2016-11-01

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  17. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  18. Control of polymerization shrinkage and stress in nanogel-modified monomer and composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Rafael R.; Garcia, Jeffrey W.; Barros, Matthew D.; Lewis, Steven H.; Pfeifer, Carmem S.; Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study demonstrates the effects of nano-scale prepolymer particles as additives to model dental monomer and composite formulations. Methods Discrete nanogel particles were prepared by solution photopolymerization of isobornyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate in the presence of a chain transfer agent, which also provided a means to attach reactive groups to the prepolymer. Nanogel was added to triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in increments between 5 and 40 wt% with resin viscosity, reaction kinetics, shrinkage, mechanical properties, stress and optical properties evaluated. Maximum loading of barium glass filler was determined as a function of nanogel content and composites with varied nanogel content but uniform filler loading were compared in terms of consistency, conversion, shrinkage and mechanical properties. Results High conversion, high molecular weight internally crosslinked and cyclized nanogel prepolymer was efficiently prepared and redispersed into TEGDMA with an exponential rise in viscosity accompanying nanogel content. Nanogel addition at any level produced no deleterious effects on reaction kinetics, conversion or mechanical properties, as long as reactive nanogels were used. A reduction in polymerization shrinkage and stress was achieved in proportion to nanogel content. Even at high nanogel concentrations, the maximum loading of glass filler was only marginally reduced relative to the control and high strength composite materials with low shrinkage were obtained. Significance The use of reactive nanogels offers a versatile platform from which resin and composite handling properties can be adjusted while the polymerization shrinkage and stress development that challenge the adhesive bonding of dental restoratives are controllably reduced. PMID:21388669

  19. Photo-Reactive Nanogel as a Means to Tune Properties during Polymer Network Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Rad, Ima Y.; Sun, Fang; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Photo-reactive nanogels with an integrated photoinitiator-based functionality were synthesized via a Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) process. Without additional free initiators, this nanogel is capable of radical generation and initiating polymerization of a secondary monomer (i.e. dimethacrylate) that infiltrates and disperses the nanogel particles. Due to the presence of RAFT functionality and the fact that all initiating sites are initially located within the nanogel structure, gelation can be delayed by sequencing the polymerization from the nanogel to the bulk matrix. During polymerization of a nanogel-filled resin system, a progressive delay of gelation conversion from about 2 % for conventional chain growth polymerization to 18 % for the same monomer containing 20 wt% nanogel additive was achieved. A significant delay of stress development was also observed with much lower final stress achieved with the nanogel-modified systems due to the change of network formation mechanics. Compared with the nanogel-free dimethacrylate control, which contained uniformly distributed free initiator, the flexural modulus and mechanical strength results were maintained for the photopolymers with nanogel contents greater than 10 wt%. There appears to be a critical interparticle spacing of the photo-reactive nanogel that provides effective photopolymerization while providing delayed gelation and substantial stress reduction. PMID:24348753

  20. Sustained delivery of siRNAs targeting viral infection by cell-degradable multilayered polyelectrolyte films.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Maria; Affolter, Christine; Meyer, Florent; Nguyen, Isabelle; Richard, Doriane G; Schuster, Catherine; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Ogier, Joëlle; Baumert, Thomas F

    2008-10-21

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to represent a recently discovered approach for the treatment of human diseases, including viral infection. A major limitation for the success of therapeutic strategies based on RNAi has been the delivery and shortlasting action of synthetic RNA. Multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), consisting of alternate layer-by-layer deposition of polycations and polyanions, have been shown to represent an original approach for the efficient delivery of DNA and proteins to target cells. Using hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) as a model, we demonstrate that siRNAs targeting the viral genome are efficiently delivered by MPFs. This delivery method resulted in a marked, dose-dependent, specific, and sustained inhibition of HCV replication and infection in hepatocyte-derived cells. Comparative analysis demonstrated that delivery of siRNAs by MPFs was more sustained and durable than siRNA delivery by standard methods, including electroporation or liposomes. The antiviral effect of siRNA-MPFs was reversed by a hyaluronidase inhibitor, suggesting that active degradation of MPFs by cellular enzymes is required for siRNA delivery. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that cell-degradable MPFs represent an efficient and simple approach for sustained siRNA delivery targeting viral infection. Moreover, this MPF-based delivery system may represent a promising previously undescribed perspective for the use of RNAi as a therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  1. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  2. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  3. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  4. Size matters: gold nanoparticles in targeted cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dreaden, Erik C; Austin, Lauren A; Mackey, Megan A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the current leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for approximately one quarter of all deaths in the USA and UK. Nanotechnologies provide tremendous opportunities for multimodal, site-specific drug delivery to these disease sites and Au nanoparticles further offer a particularly unique set of physical, chemical and photonic properties with which to do so. This review will highlight some recent advances, by our laboratory and others, in the use of Au nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery to these malignancies and will also provide insights into their rational design, synthesis, physiological properties and clinical/preclinical applications, as well as strategies and challenges toward the clinical implementation of these constructs moving forward. PMID:22834077

  5. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  6. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  7. Advances in nanotechnology-based delivery systems for curcumin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Su, Xun; Ding, Buyun; He, Xiuli; Liu, Xiuju; Yu, Aihua; Lou, Hongxiang; Zhai, Guangxi

    2012-07-01

    Curcumin (CUR), a bioactive component of turmeric, which is a commonly used spice and nutritional supplement, is isolated from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae). In recent years, the potential pharmacological actions of CUR in inflammatory disorders, cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and neurological disorders have been shown. However, the clinical application of CUR is severely limited by its main drawbacks such as instability, low solubility, poor bioavailability and rapid metabolism. Multifarious nanotechnology-based delivery approaches have been used to enhance the oral bioavailability, biological activity or tissue-targeting ability of CUR. This article reviews potential novel drug delivery systems for CUR including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, nanogels, nanosuspensions, nanoemulsions, complexes and dendrimer/dimer, which provide promising results for CUR to improve its biological activities. PMID:22846093

  8. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  9. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  10. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  11. Advances in Bone-targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Long-Bang; Shi, Xin; Wu, Su-Jia; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Targeted therapy for osteosarcoma includes organ, cell and molecular biological targeting; of these, organ targeting is the most mature. Bone-targeted drug delivery systems are used to concentrate chemotherapeutic drugs in bone tissues, thus potentially resolving the problem of reaching the desired foci and minimizing the toxicity and adverse effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some progress has been made in bone-targeted drug delivery systems for treatment of osteosarcoma; however, most are still at an experimental stage and there is a long transitional period to clinical application. Therefore, determining how to combine new, polymolecular and multi-pathway targets is an important research aspect of designing new bone-targeted drug delivery systems in future studies. The purpose of this article was to review the status of research on targeted therapy for osteosarcoma and to summarize the progress made thus far in developing bone-targeted drug delivery systems for neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma with the aim of providing new ideas for highly effective therapeutic protocols with low toxicity for patients with osteosarcoma.

  12. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particles incorporating a recombinant protein. This recombinant protein was produced with or without a c-terminal peptide previously shown to have high affinity binding to Claudin 4, a protein associated with M cell endocytosis. While the PLGA nanoparticles incorporate the protein throughout the matrix, much of the protein was also displayed on the surface, allowing us to take advantage of the binding activity of the targeting peptide. Accordingly, we found that instillation of these nanoparticles into the nasal passages or stomach of mice was found to significantly enhance their uptake by upper airway and intestinal M cells. Our results suggest that a reasonably simple nanoparticle manufacture method can provide insight into developing an effective needle-free delivery system. PMID:19896996

  13. Micromixer Based Preparation of Functionalized Liposomes and Targeting Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqian; Wang, Weizhi; Han, Qiuju; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Yunhong; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-14

    We present here a specific targeting nanocarrier system by functionalization of liposomes with one new type of breast cancer targeting peptide (H6, YLFFVFER) by a micromixer with high efficiency. Antitumor drugs could be successfully delivered into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer cells with high efficiency in both in vivo and ex vivo models. PMID:27096054

  14. Oxygen saturation targets for preterm infants in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Vento, Máximo; Aguar, Marta; Brugada, María; Escobar, Javier; Escrig, Raquel; Cubells, Elena; Cernada, María

    2012-04-01

    Fetal life evolves in a low oxygen milieu as compared to the extra-uterine. In the fetal to neonatal transition rapid changes in the oxygen content of the newly born infant occur within a brief period of time. Delivery room care givers should be aware of the slow transition regarding oxygenation, and supply oxygen as needed trying to avoid damage caused by hyper-and-hypoxia. In this regard, titrating oxygen inspiratory fraction against oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry following recent nomogram ranges is a valid method. PMID:22390353

  15. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  16. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

  17. Functionalized Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Tumor Vasculature Targeting and PET Image-Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Hong, Hao; Chen, Feng; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Aim Development of multifunctional and well-dispersed hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) for tumor vasculature targeted drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Materials and Methods Amine functionalized HMSNs (150–250 nm) were conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator, NOTA, PEGylated and loaded with anti-angiogenesis drug, Sunitinib. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys) (cRGDyK) peptide was attached to the nanoconjugate and radiolabeled with 64Cu for PET imaging. Results 64Cu-NOTA-HMSN-PEG-cRGDyK exhibited integrin specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo. PET results indicated ~ 8 %ID/g uptake of targeted nanoconjugates in U87MG tumors, which correlated well with ex vivo and histological analyses. Enhanced tumor targeted delivery of sunitinib was also observed. Conclusions We successfully developed tumor vasculature targeted HMSNs for PET imaging and image guided drug delivery. PMID:25955122

  18. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed.

  19. Application of traditional Chinese medicine preparation in targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xing, Feng J; Dong, Kai; You, Cuiyu; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Guilan; Chen, Youliang; Wang, Ke

    2015-05-01

    Targeting drug system (TDS) or targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) is a new kind of drug delivery system which could make drug to be directly concentrated on the target site with high curative effects and low side-effects. As the quintessence of Chinese culture, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a large advantage in many disease clinical treatments, especially in cancer, hypertension and many other intractable diseases owing to their low toxicity and side-effects relative to western medicine. This article reviews literatures on development of TCM-targeted preparations which were published in the past 10 years. TDS including active-targeting, passive-targeting and physical-chemical-targeting preparations were introduced through domestic and overseas literatures to reveal the unique advantages of TCM-targeting preparations in drug delivery system. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of TCM-targeting preparations and indicated that great attention should be paid to the research on the TCM-targeting preparations.

  20. Direct Cytoplasmic Delivery and Nuclear Targeting Delivery of HPMA-MT Conjugates in a Microtubules Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Zhu, Xi; Luo, Kui; Li, Lian; Tang, Manlin; Liu, Yanxi; Zhou, Zhou; Huang, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    As the hearts of tumor cells, the nucleus is the ultimate target of many chemotherapeutic agents and genes. However, nuclear drug delivery is always hampered by multiple intracellular obstacles, such as low efficiency of lysosome escape and insufficient nuclear trafficking. Herein, an N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) polymer-based drug delivery system was designed, which could achieve direct cytoplasmic delivery by a nonendocytic pathway and transport into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent fashion. A special targeting peptide (MT), derived from an endogenic parathyroid hormone-related protein, was conjugated to the polymer backbone, which could accumulate into the nucleus a by microtubule-mediated pathway. The in vitro studies found that low temperature and NaN3 could not influence the cell internalization of the conjugates. Besides, no obvious overlay of the conjugates with lysosome demonstrated that the polymer conjugates could enter the tumor cell cytoplasm by a nonendocytic pathway, thus avoiding the drug degradation in the lysosome. Furthermore, after suppression of the microtubule dynamics with microtubule stabilizing docetaxel (DTX) and destabilizing nocodazole (Noc), the nuclear accumulation of polymeric conjugates was significantly inhibited. Living cells fluorescence recovery after photobleaching study found that the nuclear import rate of conjugates was 2-fold faster compared with the DTX and Noc treated groups. These results demonstrated that the conjugates transported into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent way. Therefore, in addition to direct cytoplasmic delivery, our peptide conjugated polymeric platform could simultaneously mediate nuclear drug accumulation, which may open a new path for further intracellular genes/peptides delivery. PMID:27417390

  1. PNIPAM gel-coated gold nanorods for targeted delivery responding to a near-infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takahito; Niidome, Yasuro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki; Niidome, Takuro

    2009-02-01

    Gold nanorods can be used as photothermal converters, permitting near-infrared (NIR) light to be transmitted deep into tissues without causing damage. We prepared hybrid nanorods with a core-shell structure, i.e., a single gold nanorod encapsulated in a poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) nanogel. Hybrid nanorods demonstrated remote, reversible, pulsatile phase transition and in vivo action after irradiation using a NIR laser.

  2. Charge-reversal nanoparticles: novel targeted drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinli; Liu, Lisha; Jiang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Spurred by significant progress in materials chemistry and drug delivery, charge-reversal nanocarriers are being developed to deliver anticancer formulations in spatial-, temporal- and dosage-controlled approaches. Charge-reversal nanoparticles can release their drug payload in response to specific stimuli that alter the charge on their surface. They can elude clearance from the circulation and be activated by protonation, enzymatic cleavage, or a molecular conformational change. In this review, we discuss the physiological basis for, and recent advances in the design of charge-reversal nanoparticles that are able to control drug biodistribution in response to specific stimuli, endogenous factors (changes in pH, redox gradients, or enzyme concentration) or exogenous factors (light or thermos-stimulation). PMID:27471667

  3. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  4. Mitochondrion: A Promising Target for Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ru; Umeano, Afoma C.; Francis, Lily; Sharma, Nivita; Tundup, Smanla; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most popular technologies in disease prevention and eradication. It is promising to improve immunization efficiency by using vectors and/or adjuvant delivery systems. Nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems have attracted increasing interest due to enhancement of antigen uptake via prevention of vaccine degradation in the biological environment and the intrinsic immune-stimulatory properties of the materials. Mitochondria play paramount roles in cell life and death and are promising targets for vaccine delivery systems to effectively induce immune responses. In this review, we focus on NPs-based delivery systems with surfaces that can be manipulated by using mitochondria targeting moieties for intervention in health and disease. PMID:27258316

  5. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  6. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  7. Targeted Delivery of Hyaluronan-Immobilized Magnetic Ceramic Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsi-Chin; Wang, Tzu-Wei; Hsieh, Shun-Yu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Kang, Pei-Leun

    2016-01-01

    Effective cancer therapy relies on delivering the therapeutic agent precisely to the target site to improve the treatment outcome and to minimize side effects. Although surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are the standard methods commonly used in clinics, hyperthermia has been developed as a new and promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, magnetic bioceramic hydroxyapatite (mHAP) nanocrystals have been developed as heat mediator for intracellular hyperthermia. Hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mHAP nanocrystals are synthesized by a wet chemical precipitation process to achieve active targeting. The results demonstrate that the HA targeting moiety conjugated by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer arm is successfully immobilized on the surface of mHAP. The HA-modified mHAP possesses relatively good biocompatibility, an adequate biodegradation rate and superparamagnetic properties. The HA-modified mHAP could be localized and internalized into HA receptor-overexpressed malignant cells (e.g., MDA-MB-231 cell) and used as the heat generating agent for intracellular hyperthermia. The results from this study indicate that biocompatible HA-modified mHAP shows promise as a novel heat mediator and a specific targeting nanoagent for intracellular hyperthermia cancer therapy. PMID:27301176

  8. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  9. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-10-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical

  10. Choline transporter-targeting and co-delivery system for glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guo, Yubo; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising approach for glioma therapy. In this study, a co-delivery system of plasmid encoding human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail) and doxorubicin (DOX) has been simply constructed in two steps. Firstly, DOX was intercalated into Trail to form a stable complex. Secondly, DOX-Trail complex was condensed by Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) to form a nanoscaled co-delivery system. Choline transporters are both expressed on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma, Herein, a choline derivate with high choline transporter affinity was chosen as BBB and glioma dual targeting ligand. Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system showed higher cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than unmodified co-delivery system in U87 MG cells. In comparison with single medication or unmodified delivery system, Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system induced more apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy on U87 MG bearing xenografts further confirmed the predominance of this dual targeting and co-delivery system.

  11. New development and application of ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Jiang, Lan; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound is a common used technique for clinical imaging. In recent years, with the advances in preparation technology of microbubbles and the innovations in ultrasound imaging, ultrasound is no longer confined to detection of tissue perfusion, but extends to specific ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy gradually. With the development of research, ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy have made great progresses. Targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging are achieved by binding target molecules, specific antibody or ligand to the surface of microbubbles to obtain specific imaging by attaching to target tissues. Meanwhile, it can also achieve targeting gene therapy or drug delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) mediating genes or drugs to specific target sites. UTMD has a number of advantages, such as target-specific, highly effective, non-invasivity, relatively low-cost and no radiation, and has broad application prospects, which is regarded as one hot spot in medical studies. We reviewed the new development and application of UTMD in gene therapy and drug delivery in this paper. With further development of technology and research, the gene or drug delivery system and related methods will be widely used in application and researches.

  12. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  13. Use of Single-Chain Antibody Derivatives for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Khalili, Masoumeh; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei; Zarei, Vahid; Erfani-Moghadam, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Single-chain antibodies (scFvs), which contain only the variable domains of full-length antibodies, are relatively small molecules that can be used for selective drug delivery. In this review, we discuss how scFvs help improve the specificity and efficiency of drugs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery using scFv-drug fusion peptides, siRNA delivery using scFv-conjugated nanoparticles, targeted delivery using scFv-viral peptide-fusion proteins, use of scFv in fusion with cell-penetrating peptides for effective targeted drug delivery, scFv-mediated targeted delivery of inorganic nanoparticles, scFv-mediated increase of tumor killing activity of granulocytes, use of scFv for tumor imaging, site-directed conjugation of scFv molecules to drug carrier systems, use of scFv to relieve pain and use of scFv for increasing drug loading efficiency are among the topics that are discussed here. PMID:27249008

  14. Using Gold Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine Phosphate to Treat Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Song, Steven; Hao, Yuzhi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging paradigm for creating functional nanoscale materials for various biomedical applications. In this study, a new nanotechnology-based drug delivery method was developed using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a delivery vehicle to reduce adverse drug side effects. Fludarabine Phosphate is a commercial chemotherapy drug used in cancer treatment, and has ability to kill various cancer cells. KG-1 cell, a type of acute cancer leukemia cell, was selected as a proof-of-concept target in this study. Due to the small size of GNPs, they can help Fludarabine Phosphate enter cancer cells more efficiently and better interfere with DNA synthesis in the cancer cells. To enhance targeting ability, folic acid molecules were also covalently linked to GNPs, resulting in GNP-Fludarabine-folic acid (GNP-F/f). Compared to treatments with GNP-F or drugs on its own (Fludarabine Phosphate), the GNP-F/f achieves much improved cell-killing effects. The UV-Vis spectra results also revealed that the drugs had successfully bonded covalently to the GNPs. The higher cell-killing efficiency of GNP-F/f compared with GNP-Fludarabine (GNP-F) or drugs on their own further validates the effectiveness of both the vectors (GNPs) and folic acid in enhancing the drug delivery to the cancer cells. The MTT viability tests showed that the GNPs had no cytotoxicity.

  15. Dextran-gated, multifunctional mesoporous nanoparticle for glucose-responsive and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arjyabaran; Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2014-12-24

    Design of drug delivery nanocarrier having targeted recognition followed by bioresponsive controlled release, especially via glucose-responsive release, is a challenging issue. Here, we report magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS)-based drug delivery nanocarrier that can target specific cell and release drug via glucose-responsive gate. The design involves synthesis of MMS functionalized with phenylboronic acid and folate. After drug loading inside the pores of MMS, outside of the pores are closed by dextran via binding with phenylboronic acid. Dextran-gated pores are opened for drug release in the presence of glucose that competes binding with phenylboronic acid. We found that tolbutamide and camptothecin loaded MMS can target beta cells and cancer cells, respectively, release drugs depending on bulk glucose concentration and offers glucose concentration dependent cytotoxicity. Developed functional MMS can be used for advanced drug delivery applications for diabetes and cancers with more efficient therapy. PMID:25458145

  16. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  17. An orthopedic tissue adhesive for targeted delivery of intraoperative biologics.

    PubMed

    Simson, Jacob; Crist, Joshua; Strehin, Iossif; Lu, Qiaozhi; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-03-01

    Tissue adhesives can bind together damaged tissues and serve as tools to deliver and localize therapeutics to facilitate regeneration. One emerging therapeutic trend in orthopedics is the use of intraoperative biologics (IOB), such as bone marrow (BM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to stimulate healing. Here, we introduce the application of the biomaterial chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS) to deliver IOB in a hydrogel adhesive. We demonstrate the biomaterial's ability to bind various tissue types and its cellular biocompatibility with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Further, we examine in detail the CS-NHS adhesive combined with BM aspirate for use in bone applications. hMSCs were encapsulated in CS-BM and cultured for 5 weeks in osteogenic medium. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated osteogenesis via upregulation of the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2 and bone markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Significant deposition of calcium and osteocalcin was detected using biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. Shear testing demonstrated that the CS-BM adhesive exhibited an adhesive strength approximately an order of magnitude stronger than fibrin glue and approaching that of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. These results indicate that CS-NHS is a promising delivery tool for IOB in orthopedic applications requiring a strong, degradable, and biocompatible adhesive that supports bone growth. PMID:23097279

  18. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively con-trolled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics). Conclusion The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent. PMID:23678437

  19. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  20. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  1. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  2. Characterization of Magnetic Viral Complexes for Targeted Delivery in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Almstätter, Isabella; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Settles, Marcus; Altomonte, Jennifer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Ebert, Oliver; Plank, Christian; Braren, Rickmer

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising new agents in cancer therapy. Success of tumor lysis is often hampered by low intra-tumoral titers due to a strong anti-viral host immune response and insufficient tumor targeting. Previous work on the co-assembly of oncolytic virus particles (VPs) with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was shown to provide shielding from inactivating immune response and improve targeting by external field gradients. In addition, MNPs are detected by magnet resonance imaging (MRI) enabling non-invasive therapy monitoring. In this study two selected core-shell type iron oxide MNPs were assembled with adenovirus (Ad) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The selected MNPs were characterized by high r2 and r2* relaxivities and thus could be quantified non-invasively by 1.5 and 3.0 tesla MRI with a detection limit below 0.001 mM iron in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Assembly and cell internalization of MNP-VP complexes resulted in 81 - 97 % reduction of r2 and 35 - 82 % increase of r2* compared to free MNPs. The relaxivity changes could be attributed to the clusterization of particles and complexes shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a proof-of-principle study the non-invasive detection of MNP-VPs by MRI was shown in vivo in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma model. In conclusion, MNP assembly and compartmentalization have a major impact on relaxivities, therefore calibration measurements are required for the correct quantification in biodistribution studies. Furthermore, our study provides first evidence of the in vivo applicability of selected MNP-VPs in cancer therapy. PMID:25897333

  3. RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes for brain targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Kumari, Lakshmi; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Bharti, Shreekant; Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel (DTX) and quantum dots (QDs) for brain cancer imaging and therapy. RGD conjugated TPGS (RGD-TPGS) was synthesized and conjugation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The theranostic liposomes were prepared by the solvent injection method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release study. Biocompatibility and safety of theranostic liposomes were studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study and histopathology of brain. In-vivo study was performed for determination of brain theranostic effects in comparison with marketed formulation (Docel™) and free QDs. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found in between 100 and 200nm. About 70% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from RGD-TPGS decorated liposomes was sustained for more than 72h with 80% of drug release. The in-vivo results demonstrated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes were 6.47- and 6.98-fold more effective than Docel™ after 2h and 4h treatments, respectively. Further, RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes has reduced ROS generation effectively, and did not show any signs of brain damage or edema in brain histopathology. The results of this study have indicated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes are promising carrier for brain theranostics.

  4. Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Pavitra

    CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

  5. Enhanced Targeted Delivery of Cyclodextrin-Based Supermolecules by Core-Shell Nanocapsules for Magnetothermal Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chieh; Fang, Jen-Hung; Lin, Chien-Ting; Sung, Shou-Yuan; Su, Yu-Lin; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2016-09-01

    In this study, double-emulsion capsules (DECs) capable of concealing drug-incorporated targeted-supermolecules are developed to achieve "on-demand" supermolecule release and enhanced sequential targeting for magneto-chemotherapy. These water-in-oil-in-water DECs less than 200 nm in diameter are synthesized using a single component of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) polymer and the magnetic nanoparticles, which are capable of encapsulating large quantities of targeted supermolecules composed of palitaxel-incorporated beta-cyclodextrin decorated by hyaluronic acid (HA, a CD44-targeting ligand) in the watery core. The release profiles (slow, sustained and burst release) of the targeted supermolecules can be directly controlled by regulating the high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) and polymer conformation without sacrificing the targeting ability. Through an intravenous injection, the positive targeting of the supermolecules exhibited a 20-fold increase in tumor accumulation via the passive targeting and delivery of DECs followed by positive targeting of the supermolecules. Moreover, this dual-targeting drug-incorporated supermolecular delivery vehicle at the tumor site combined with magneto-thermal therapy suppressed the cancer growth more efficiently than treatment with either drug or supermolecule alone. PMID:27328404

  6. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-01

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis

  7. Biodegradable poly(amine-co-ester) terpolymers for targeted gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangbing; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christopher J.; Patel, Toral R.; Weller, Caroline E.; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Many synthetic polycationic vectors for non-viral gene delivery show high efficiency in vitro, but their usually excessive charge density makes them toxic for in vivo applications. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of high molecular weight terpolymers with low charge density, and show that they exhibit efficient gene delivery, some surpassing the efficiency of the commercial transfection reagents Polyethylenimine and Lipofectamine 2000. The terpolymers were synthesized via enzyme-catalyzed copolymerization of lactone with dialkyl diester and amino diol, and their hydrophobicity adjusted by varying the lactone content and by selecting a lactone comonomer of specific ring size. Targeted delivery of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL gene to tumour xenografts by one of the terpolymers results in significant inhibition of tumour growth, with minimal toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that the gene delivery ability of the terpolymers stems from their high molecular weight and increased hydrophobicity, which compensates for their low charge density.

  8. Transferrin Decorated Thermoresponsive Nanogels as Magnetic Trap Devices for Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Asadian-Birjand, Mazdak; Biglione, Catalina; Bergueiro, Julian; Cappelletti, Ariel; Rahane, Chinmay; Chate, Govind; Khandare, Jayant; Klemke, Bastian; Strumia, Miriam C; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A rational design of magnetic capturing nanodevices, based on a specific interaction with circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can advance the capturing efficiency and initiate the development of modern smart nanoformulations for rapid isolation and detection of these CTCs from the bloodstream. Therefore, the development and evaluation of magnetic nanogels (MNGs) based on magnetic nanoparticles and linear thermoresponsive polyglycerol for the capturing of CTCs with overexpressed transferrin (Tf(+) ) receptors has been presented in this study. The MNGs are synthesized using a strain-promoted "click" approach which has allowed the in situ surface decoration with Tf-polyethylene glycol (PEG) ligands of three different PEG chain lengths as targeting ligands. An optimal value of around 30% of cells captures is achieved with a linker of eight ethylene glycol units. This study shows the potential of MNGs for the capture of CTCs and the necessity of precise control over the linkage of the targeting moiety to the capturing device.

  9. Transferrin Decorated Thermoresponsive Nanogels as Magnetic Trap Devices for Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Asadian-Birjand, Mazdak; Biglione, Catalina; Bergueiro, Julian; Cappelletti, Ariel; Rahane, Chinmay; Chate, Govind; Khandare, Jayant; Klemke, Bastian; Strumia, Miriam C; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A rational design of magnetic capturing nanodevices, based on a specific interaction with circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can advance the capturing efficiency and initiate the development of modern smart nanoformulations for rapid isolation and detection of these CTCs from the bloodstream. Therefore, the development and evaluation of magnetic nanogels (MNGs) based on magnetic nanoparticles and linear thermoresponsive polyglycerol for the capturing of CTCs with overexpressed transferrin (Tf(+) ) receptors has been presented in this study. The MNGs are synthesized using a strain-promoted "click" approach which has allowed the in situ surface decoration with Tf-polyethylene glycol (PEG) ligands of three different PEG chain lengths as targeting ligands. An optimal value of around 30% of cells captures is achieved with a linker of eight ethylene glycol units. This study shows the potential of MNGs for the capture of CTCs and the necessity of precise control over the linkage of the targeting moiety to the capturing device. PMID:26691543

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  11. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  12. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  13. Tetanus toxin C fragment conjugated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Seth A.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Gu, Frank X.; Schulze, Martin P.; Brown, Robert H.; Langer, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery is often facilitated by specific conjugation of functional targeting molecules to the nanoparticle surface. We compared different biotin binding proteins (avidin, streptavidin, or neutravidin) as crosslinkers to conjugate proteins to biodegradable nanoparticles prepared from PLGA-PEG-biotin polymers. Avidin gave the highest levels of overall protein conjugation, whereas neutravidin minimized protein non-specific binding to the polymer. The tetanus toxin C fragment (TTC), which is efficiently retrogradely transported in neurons and binds to neurons with high specificity and affinity, retained the ability to bind to neuroblastoma cells following amine group modifications. TTC was conjugated to nanoparticles using neutravidin, and the resulting nanoparticles were shown to selectively target neuroblastoma cells in vitro. TTC-conjugated nanoparticles have the potential to serve as drug delivery vehicles targeted to the central nervous system. PMID:17854886

  14. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  15. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  16. Overcoming transport barriers for interstitial-, lymphatic-, and lymph node-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Susan N.; Schudel, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Despite drug formulation improving circulation times and targeting, efficacy is stymied by inadequate penetration into and retention within target tissues. This review highlights the barriers restricting delivery to the connective tissue interstitium, lymphatics, and lymph nodes as well as advances in engineering drug carriers to overcome these delivery challenges. Three-dimensional tissue physiology is discussed in the context of providing material design principles for delivery to these tissues; in particular the influence of interstitial and lymphatic flows as well as differential permeabilities of the blood and lymphatic capillaries. Key examples of materials with different characteristics developed to overcome these transport barriers are discussed as well as potential areas for further development. PMID:25745594

  17. Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

    2014-01-01

    Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system.

  18. Synchronized delivery of DMLC intensity modulated radiation therapy for stationary and moving targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech

    2005-06-15

    When delivering intensity modulated treatments the 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effect is a concern that should not be ignored. Algorithms aimed at removing the tongue-and-groove underdosage have been investigated in the past for irradiation of stationary targets. This paper is devoted to algorithms that remove tongue and grove effect for stationary and moving targets. To this end this paper develops original mid-time based algorithms for leaf synchronization. These algorithms exhibit a few additional advantageous properties for DMLC IMRT delivery beyond the removal of tongue-and-grove underdosage. In particular, they safeguard the minimization of time of delivery (for mid-time synchronized algorithms). Moreover, they avoid iterative procedures for synchronization of delivery for multiple pairs of leaves.

  19. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  20. Delivery strategies and potential targets for siRNA in major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has gained attention as a potential therapeutic reagent due to its ability to inhibit specific genes in many genetic diseases. For many years, studies of siRNA have progressively advanced toward novel treatment strategies against cancer. Cancer is caused by various mutations in hundreds of genes including both proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In order to develop siRNAs as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, delivery strategies for siRNA must be carefully designed and potential gene targets carefully selected for optimal anti-cancer effects. In this review, various modifications and delivery strategies for siRNA delivery are discussed. In addition, we present current thinking on target gene selection in major tumor types. PMID:27259398

  1. Towards erythropoietin equations that estimate oxygen delivery rather than static hemoglobin targets.

    PubMed

    Diskin, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Although we have known since the 19th century that oxygen tension affects erythrocyte production, we have only recently begun to understand many subtleties of erythropoietin physiology. The unanticipated increase in mortality associated with erythropoietin use found in recent randomized studies is prompting a reassessment of static hemoglobin targets. Hemoglobin levels in dialysis patients do not correlate with endogenous erythropoietin production and may be related to differences in oxygen delivery resulting from shifts in the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. The time may have arrived to develop more physiologic targets such as oxygen delivery that would mimic the natural response to hypoxia. There are several equations that already exist that can compensate for the effects of the concentration of inorganic and organic phosphates as well as pH, carbon dioxide, and temperature on the delivery of oxygen. However, since the shape and dispersion of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve may actually change in different disease states, more work is needed.

  2. Development of a Targeted Gene-Delivery System Using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng; Kao, Ming-Ching

    2016-01-01

    A gene-delivery system based on microbes is useful for development of targeted gene therapy of non-phagocytic cancer cells. Here, the feasibility of the delivery system is illustrated by targeted delivery of a transgene (i.e., eukaryotic GFP) by Escherichia coli to HER2/neu-positive cancer cells. An E. coli strain was engineered with surface display of the anti-HER2/neu affibody. To release the gene cargo, a programmed lysis system based on phage ϕX174 gene E was introduced into the E. coli strain. As a result, 3 % of HER2/neu-positive cells that were infected with engineered E. coli were able to express the GFP. PMID:26846805

  3. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction.

  4. Chimeric nucleolin aptamer with survivin DNAzyme for cancer cell targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Akilandeswari, Balachandran; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-04-25

    A chimeric aptamer-DNAzyme conjugate was generated for the first time using a nucleolin aptamer (NCL-APT) and survivin Dz (Sur_Dz) and exhibited the targeted killing of cancer cells. This proof of concept of using an aptamer for the delivery of DNAzyme can be applied to other cancer types to target survivin in cancer cells in a specific manner. PMID:25797393

  5. Tumor homing cell penetrating peptide decorated nanoparticles used for enhancing tumor targeting delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin

    2015-01-15

    Specific targeting ability and good tissue penetration are two critical requirements for tumor targeted delivery systems. Systematical selected peptides from a library may meet these two requirements. RLW was such a cell penetrating peptide that could specifically target to non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549). In this study, RLW was linked onto nanoparticles (RNPs) and then the RNPs were used for lung cancer targeting delivery. A traditional cell penetrating peptide, R8 (RRRRRRRR), was used as control. In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that modification with RLW specifically enhanced the uptake by A549 cells rather than human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while modification with R8 increased the uptake by both cells. Furthermore, the modification with RLW specifically elevated the penetration into A549 tumor spheroids rather than glioma cell (U87, used as in vivo control) spheroids. And the in vivo imaging further demonstrated RNPs could target to A549 xenografts rather than U87 xenografts. Importantly, the distribution of RNPs in normal organs was approximately the same as that of unmodified nanoparticles. However, R8 modified nanoparticles elevated the distribution in almost all the tissues. These results demonstrated that RLW was superior in A549 tumor targeted delivery. After loaded with docetaxel, an anti-microtube agent, different formulations could effectively induce the A549 cell apoptosis, and inhibit the growth of A549 spheroids in vitro. While in vivo, RNPs displayed the best antitumor effect. The tumor volume was significantly lower than other groups, which was only 33.3% as that of saline group. In conclusion, in vitro RLW could specifically target to A549 cells and enhance the cytotoxicity of docetaxel. In vivo, RLW could significantly enhance the A549 xenografts targeting delivery and led to improved antitumor effect.

  6. Systemic delivery of blood-brain barrier-targeted polymeric nanoparticles enhances delivery to brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer NP systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All the NP preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One NP produced significantly higher brain uptake (∼0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad NPs provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing NP transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects.

  7. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  8. Targeted systemic mesenchymal stem cell delivery using hyaluronate - wheat germ agglutinin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seop; Kong, Won Ho; Kim, Hyemin; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-11-01

    A variety of receptors for hyaluronate (HA), a natural linear polysaccharide, were found in the body, which have been exploited as target sites for HA-based drug delivery systems. In this work, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were surface-modified with HA - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugate for targeted systemic delivery of MSCs to the liver. WGA was conjugated to HA by coupling reaction between aldehyde-modified HA and amine group of WGA. The conjugation of WGA to HA was corroborated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the successful surface modification of MSCs with HA-WGA conjugate was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The synthesized HA-WGA conjugate could be incorporated onto the cellular membrane by agglutinating the cell-associated carbohydrates. Fluorescent imaging for in vivo biodistribution visualized the targeted delivery of the HA-WGA/MSC complex to the liver after intravenous injection. This new strategy for targeted delivery of MSCs using HA-WGA conjugate might be successfully exploited for various regenerative medicines including cell therapy. PMID:27569867

  9. Nanoparticles Effectively Target Rapamycin Delivery to Sites of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Takuro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Miura, Yutaka; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Several drugs targeting the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm have shown efficacy in model systems but not in clinical trials, potentially owing to the lack of targeted drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel drug delivery system using nanoparticles to target the disrupted aortic aneurysm micro-structure. We generated poly(ethylene glycol)-shelled nanoparticles incorporating rapamycin that exhibited uniform diameter and long-term stability. When injected intravenously into a rat model in which abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had been induced by infusing elastase, labeled rapamycin nanoparticles specifically accumulated in the AAA. Microscopic analysis revealed that rapamycin nanoparticles were mainly distributed in the media and adventitia where the wall structures were damaged. Co-localization of rapamycin nanoparticles with macrophages was also noted. Rapamycin nanoparticles injected during the process of AAA formation evinced significant suppression of AAA formation and mural inflammation at 7 days after elastase infusion, as compared with rapamycin treatment alone. Correspondingly, the activities of matrix metalloproteinases and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed by rapamycin nanoparticle treatment. Our findings suggest that the nanoparticle-based delivery system achieves specific delivery of rapamycin to the rat AAA and might contribute to establishing a drug therapy approach targeting aortic aneurysm. PMID:27336852

  10. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  11. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

  12. A new liposome-based gene delivery system targeting lung epithelial cells using endothelin antagonist.

    PubMed

    Allon, Nahum; Saxena, Ashima; Chambers, Carolyn; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2012-06-10

    We formulated a new gene delivery system based on targeted liposomes. The efficacy of the delivery system was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo models. The targeting moiety consists of a high-affinity 7-amino-acid peptide, covalently and evenly conjugated to the liposome surface. The targeting peptide acts as an endothelin antagonist, and accelerates liposome binding and internalization. It is devoid of other biological activity. Liposomes with high phosphatidyl serine (PS) were specially formulated to help their fusion with the endosomal membrane at low pH and enable release of the liposome payload into the cytoplasm. A DNA payload, pre-compressed by protamine, was encapsulated into the liposomes, which directed the plasmid into the cell's nucleus. Upon exposure to epithelial cells, binding of the liposomes occurred within 5-10 min, followed by facilitated internalization of the complex. Endosomal escape was complete within 30 min, followed by DNA accumulation in the nucleus 2h post-transfection. A549 lung epithelial cells transfected with plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes expressed significantly more protein than those transfected with plasmid complexed with Lipofectamine. The intra-tracheal instillation of plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes into rat lungs resulted in the expression of GFP in bronchioles and alveoli within 5 days. These results suggest that this delivery system has great potential in targeting genes to lungs.

  13. Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

  14. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  15. EGFR targeted thermosensitive liposomes: A novel multifunctional platform for simultaneous tumor targeted and stimulus responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Azadeh; Zalba, Sara; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Dadashzadeh, Simin; Koning, Gerben A

    2016-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to design thermosensitive liposomes (TSL), functionalized with anti-EGFR ligands for targeted delivery and localized triggered release of chemotherapy. For targeting, EGFR specific peptide (GE11) and Fab' fragments of cetuximab were used and the effect of ligand density on in vitro tumor targeting was investigated. Ligand conjugation did not significantly change the physicochemical characteristics of liposomes. Fab'-decorated TSL (Fab'-TSL) can specifically and more efficiently bind to the EGFR overexpressed cancer cells as compared to GE11 modified TSL. Calcein labeled Fab'-TSL showed adequate stability at 37°C in serum (<4% calcein released after 1h) and a temperature dependent release at above 40°C. FACS analysis and live cell imaging showed efficient and EGFR mediated cellular association as well as dramatic intracellular cargo release upon hyperthermia. Fab'-conjugation and hyperthermia induced enhanced tumor cell cytotoxicity of doxorubicin loaded TSL. The relative cytotoxicity of Fab'-TSL was also correlated to EGFR density on the tumor cells. These results suggest that Fab'-TSL showed great potential for combinational targeted and triggered release drug delivery. PMID:27434152

  16. Light-controlled active release of photocaged ciprofloxacin for lipopolysaccharide-targeted drug delivery using dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Shengzhuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Tang, Kenny; Gam, Kristina; Isham, Danielle; Murat, Claire; Sun, Rachel; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2016-08-16

    We report an active delivery mechanism targeted specifically to Gram(-) bacteria based on the photochemical release of photocaged ciprofloxacin carried by a cell wall-targeted dendrimer nanoconjugate. PMID:27476878

  17. Membrane Fusion Mediated Targeted Cytosolic Drug Delivery Through scFv Engineered Sendai Viral Envelopes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Mani, P; Pratheesh, P; Chandra, S; Jeyakkodi, M; Chattopadhyay, P; Sarkar, D P; Sinha, S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody targeted cytoplasmic delivery of drugs is difficult to achieve as antigen-antibody interaction results in the payload being directed to the endosomal compartment. However, Sendai viral envelopes can bring about cytoplasmic delivery due to F-protein mediated membrane fusion. In this study we have generated and fused a recombinant scFv directed to the onco-fetal antigen, the Placental isozyme of Alkaline Phosphatase (PAP) with the trans-membrane and part of the cytoplasmic domain of the Sendai F protein (F(TMC)). Reconstituted virosomes, having both the fusion protein as well as the native F-protein were able to specifically bind and deliver drugs to PAP expressing cells. About 75% of the delivery was cytoplasmic in nature. Hence, this immuno-virosome, which is devoid of the comparatively more toxic HN protein, has the novel ability to combine specific antibody mediated targeting with cytoplasmic delivery. The scFv ensured specific binding to PAP expressing cells, without cross reacting with the other isozymes of alkaline phosphatase. The advantages of cytoplasmic delivery would include reduced degradation and lowered immunogenicity of the payload and carrier. The ubiquitous expression of PAP on a variety of cancers like seminoma, choriocarcinoma, cervical and breast cancers also suggests its potential usefulness in a number of malignancies.

  18. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-28

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.

  19. Targeted in vivo delivery of siRNA and an endosome-releasing agent to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Magdolna G; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Lewis, David L; Wooddell, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    The discoveries of RNA interference (RNAi) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have provided the opportunity to treat diseases in a fundamentally new way: by co-opting a natural process to inhibit gene expression at the mRNA level. Given that siRNAs must interact with the cells' natural RNAi machinery in order to exert their silencing effect, one of the most fundamental requirements for their use is efficient delivery to the desired cell type and, specifically, into the cytoplasm of those cells. Numerous research efforts involving the testing of a large number of delivery approaches using various carrier molecules and inventing several distinct formulation technologies during the past decade illustrate the difficulty and complexity of this task. We have developed synthetic polymer formulations for in vivo siRNA delivery named Dynamic PolyConjugates™ (DPCs) that are designed to mimic the features viruses possess for efficient delivery of their nucleic acids. These include small size, long half-life in circulation, capability of displaying distinct host cell tropism, efficient receptor binding and cell entry, disassembly in the endosome and subsequent release of the nucleic acid cargo to the cytoplasm. Here we present an example of this delivery platform composed of a hepatocyte-targeted endosome-releasing agent and a cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). This delivery platform forms the basis of ARC-520, an siRNA-based therapeutic for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this chapter, we provide a general overview of the steps in developing ARC-520 and detailed protocols for two critical stages of the discovery process: (1) verifying targeted in vivo delivery to hepatocytes and (2) evaluating in vivo drug efficacy using a mouse model of chronic HBV infection.

  20. [Targeting mitochondria: innovation from mitochondrial drug delivery system (DDS) to mitochondrial medicine].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Effective medical therapies for such diseases will ultimately require the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to mitochondria. This will likely be achieved through innovations in the areas of the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. Mitochondrial delivery systems for a variety of cargoes have been repored to date. However, only a limited number of approaches are available for delivering macromolecules directly to mitochondria. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule in conjunction with analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, we were able to confirm the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, we reported that the Dual Function MITO-Porter (DF-MITO-Porter) could efficiently deliver cargo to mitochondria, through endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. Here, We will present our findings on the development of our mitochondrial drug delivery system, and discuss our attempts regarding mitochondrial gene delivery and therapy. Finally, We will discuss the potential use of mitochondrial drug delivery systems in mitochondrial medicine.

  1. Bacterial ghosts as a novel advanced targeting system for drug and DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Susanne; Stiedl, Thomas; Kudela, Pavol; Bizik, Jozef; Al Laham, Firas; Lubitz, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Although there are powerful drugs against infectious diseases and cancer on the market, delivery systems are needed to decrease serious toxic and noncurative side effects. In order to enhance compliance, several delivery systems such as polymeric micro- and nanoparticles, liposomal systems and erythrocyte ghosts have been developed. Bacterial ghosts representing novel advanced delivery and targeting vehicles suitable for the delivery of hydrophobic or water-soluble drugs, are the main focus of this review. They are useful nonliving carriers, as they can carry different active substances in more than one cellular location separately and simultaneously. Bacterial ghosts combine excellent natural or engineered adhesion properties with versatile carrier functions for drugs, proteins and DNA plasmids or DNA minicircles. The simplicity of both bacterial ghost production and packaging of drugs and/or DNA makes them particularly suitable for the use as a delivery system. Further advantages of bacterial ghost delivery vehicles include high bioavailability and a long shelf life without the need of cold-chain storage due to the possibility to freeze-dry the material. PMID:16370937

  2. Bioresponsive hyaluronic acid-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Li, Zhenhua; Lin, Youhui; Yin, Meili; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, we present a facile strategy to synthesize hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSP) for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery, in which the anchored HA polysaccharides not only act as capping agents but also as targeting ligands without the need of additional modification. The nanoconjugates possess many attractive features including chemical simplicity, high colloidal stability, good biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and precise cargo release, making them promising agents for biomedical applications. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the nanoconjugates are shown to release cargoes from the interior pores of MSPs upon HA degradation in response to hyaluronidase-1 (Hyal-1). Moreover, after receptor-mediated endocytosis into cancer cells, the anchored HA was degraded into small fragments, facilitating the release of drugs to kill the cancer cells. Overall, we envision that this system might open the door to a new generation of carrier system for site-selective, controlled-release delivery of anticancer drugs.

  3. Targeted delivery by smart capsules for controlling two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David; Harvard Weitzgroup Team

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is significantly influenced by the physical properties of the fluids and the geometry of the medium. We develop a variety of smart microcapsules that can deliver and release specific substances to the target location in the porous medium, and therefore change the fluid property or medium geometry at certain locations. In this talk, I will present two types of smart capsules for targeted surfactant delivery to the vicinity of oil-water interface and targeted microgel delivery for improving the homogeneity of the porous medium, respectively. We further prove the concept by monitoring the capsule location and the fluid structure in the porous media by micro-CT and confocal microscopy. This technique not only is of particular importance to the relevant industry applications especially in the oil industry but also opens a new window to study the mechanism of two-phase flow in porous media. Advanced Energy Consortium BEG08-027.

  4. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  5. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  6. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  7. MSCs: Delivery Routes and Engraftment, Cell-Targeting Strategies, and Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Dennis, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being widely investigated both in the lab and in clinical trials for multiple disease states. The differentiation, trophic, and immunomodulatory characteristics of MSCs contribute to their therapeutic effects. Another often overlooked factor related to efficacy is the degree of engraftment. When reported, engraftment is generally low and transient in nature. MSC delivery methods should be tailored to the lesion being treated, which may be local or systemic, and customized to the mechanism of action of the MSCs, which can also be local or systemic. Engraftment efficiency is enhanced by using intra-arterial delivery instead of intravenous delivery, thus avoiding the “first-pass” accumulation of MSCs in the lung. Several methodologies to target MSCs to specific organs are being developed. These cell targeting methodologies focus on the modification of cell surface molecules through chemical, genetic, and coating techniques to promote selective adherence to particular organs or tissues. Future improvements in targeting and delivery methodologies to improve engraftment are expected to improve therapeutic results, extend the duration of efficacy, and reduce the effective (MSC) therapeutic dose. PMID:24000286

  8. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units.

  9. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  10. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  11. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  12. Brain tumor-targeted delivery and therapy by focused ultrasound introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Mao, Kai-Li; Tian, Fu-Rong; Yang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Pian-Pian; Xu, Jie; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Li, Wen-Feng; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-02-01

    Brain tumor lacks effective delivery system for treatment. Focused ultrasound (FUS) can reversibly open BBB without impacts on normal tissues. As a potential drug carrier, cationic liposomes (CLs) have the ability to passively accumulate in tumor tissues for their positive charge. In this study, FUS introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes (DOX-CLs) were applied to improve the efficiency of glioma-targeted delivery. Doxorubicin-loaded CLs (DOX-CLs) and quantum dot-loaded cationic liposomes (QD-CLs) were prepared using extrusion technology, and their characterizations were evaluated. With the advantage of QDs in tracing images, the glioma-targeted accumulation of FUS + CLs was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometer. Cell survival rate, tumor volume, animal survival time, and brain histology in C6 glioma model were investigated to evaluate the glioma-targeted delivery of FUS + DOX-CLs. DOX-CLs and QD-CLs had suitable nanoscale sizes and high entrapment efficiency. The combined strategy of FUS introduced CLs significantly increased the glioma-targeted accumulation for load drugs. FUS + DOX-CLs showed the strongest inhibition on glioma based on glioma cell in vitro and glioma model in vivo experiments. From MRI and histological analysis, FUS + DOX-CLs group strongly suppressed the glioma progression and extended the animal survival time to 81.2 days. Among all the DOX treatment groups, FUS + DOX-CLs group showed the best cell viability and highest level of tumor apoptosis and necrosis. Combining the advantages of BBB reversible opening by FUS and glioma-targeted binding by CLs, ultrasound introduced cationic liposomes could achieve glioma-targeted delivery, which might be developed as a potential strategy for future brain tumor therapy.

  13. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  14. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  15. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  16. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  17. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  18. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  19. Non-polymeric nano-carriers in HIV/AIDS drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh; Jain, Narendra K

    2010-03-18

    Development of an effective drug delivery approach for the treatment of HIV/AIDS is a global challenge. The conventional drug delivery approaches including Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) have increased the life span of the HIV/AIDS patient. However, the eradication of HIV is still not possible with these approaches due to some limitations. Emergence of polymeric and non-polymeric nanotechnological approaches can be opportunistic in this direction. Polymeric carriers like, dendrimers and nanoparticles have been reported for the targeting of anti HIV drugs. The synthetic pathways as well polymeric framework create some hurdles in their successful formulation development as well as in the possible drug delivery approaches. In the present article, we have discussed the general physiological aspects of the infection along with the relevance of non-polymeric nanocarriers like liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), ethosomes, etc. in the treatment of this disastrous disease. PMID:19913579

  20. Vorinostat-polymer conjugate nanoparticles for Acid-responsive delivery and passive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Denis, Iza; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Gueugnon, Fabien; Pouliquen, Daniel; Pichavant, Loic; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    In vivo histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition by vorinostat under clinically acceptable dosing is limited by its poor pharmacokinetics properties. A new type of nontoxic pH-responsive delivery system has been synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, allowing for the selective distribution of vorinostat in mesothelioma tumors in vivo and subsequent histone reacetylation. The delivery system is synthesized by generic click chemistry, possesses native stealth properties for passive tumor targeting, and does not need additional chemistry for cellular internalization. Although vorinostat alone at 50 mg/kg in mice showed no effect, our new delivery system with 2 mg/kg vorinostat promoted histone reacetylation in tumors without side effects, demonstrating that our strategy improves the activity of this HDAC inihibitor in vivo. PMID:25333409

  1. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  2. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  3. Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  4. Efficient management of fruit pests by pheromone nanogels.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  5. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma.

  6. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150–250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  7. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  8. Targeted Delivery of Immunotoxin by Antibody to Ganglioside GD3: A Novel Drug Delivery Route for Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres Demichelis, Vanina; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Iglesias-Bartolomé, Ramiro; Ruggiero, Fernando M.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids expressed on plasma membranes from nearly all vertebrate cells. The expression of ganglioside GD3, which plays essential roles in normal brain development, decreases in adults but is up regulated in neuroectodermal and epithelial derived cancers. R24 antibody, directed against ganglioside GD3, is a validated tumor target which is specifically endocytosed and accumulated in endosomes. Here, we exploit the internalization feature of the R24 antibody for the selective delivery of saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, to GD3-expressing cells [human (SK-Mel-28) and mouse (B16) melanoma cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells]. This immunotoxin showed a specific cytotoxicity on tumor cells grew on 2D monolayers, which was further evident by the lack of any effect on GD3-negative cells. To estimate the potential antitumor activity of R24-saporin complex, we also evaluated the effect of the immunotoxin on the clonogenic growth of SK-Mel-28 and CHO-K1GD3+ cells cultured in attachment-free conditions. A drastic growth inhibition (>80–90%) of the cell colonies was reached after 3 days of immunotoxin treatment. By the contrary, colonies continue to growth at the same concentration of the immuntoxin, but in the absence of R24 antibody, or in the absence of both immunotoxin and R24, undoubtedly indicating the specificity of the effect observed. Thus, the ganglioside GD3 emerge as a novel and attractive class of cell surface molecule for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents and, therefore, provides a rationale for future therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:23383146

  9. Targeted Delivery of Antiglaucoma Drugs to the Supraciliary Space Using Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that highly targeted delivery of antiglaucoma drugs to the supraciliary space by using a hollow microneedle allows dramatic dose sparing of the drug compared to topical eye drops. The supraciliary space is the most anterior portion of the suprachoroidal space, located below the sclera and above the choroid and ciliary body. Methods. A single, hollow 33-gauge microneedle, 700 to 800 μm in length, was inserted into the sclera and used to infuse antiglaucoma drugs into the supraciliary space of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 3–6 per group). Sulprostone, a prostaglandin analog, and brimonidine, an α2-adrenergic agonist, were delivered via supraciliary and topical administration at various doses. The drugs were delivered unilaterally, and intraocular pressure (IOP) of both eyes was measured by rebound tonometry for 9 hours after injection to assess the pharmacodynamic responses. To assess safety of the supraciliary injection, IOP change immediately after intravitreal and supraciliary injection were compared. Results. Supraciliary delivery of both sulprostone and brimonidine reduced IOP by as much as 3 mm Hg bilaterally in a dose-related response; comparison with topical administration at the conventional human dose showed approximately 100-fold dose sparing by supraciliary injection for both drugs. A safety study showed that the kinetics of IOP elevation immediately after supraciliary and intravitreal injection of placebo formulations were similar. Conclusions. This study introduced the use of targeted drug delivery to the supraciliary space by using a microneedle and demonstrated dramatic dose sparing of antiglaucoma therapeutic agents compared to topical eye drops. Targeted delivery in this way can increase safety by reducing side effects and could allow a single injection to contain enough drug for long-term sustained delivery. PMID:25212782

  10. Angiopep2-functionalized polymersomes for targeted doxorubicin delivery to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Wu, Dalin; Palivan, Cornelia G; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-09-25

    A targeted drug delivery nanosystem for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on polymersomes (Ps) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-PMOXA) diblock copolymers was developed to evaluate their potential to actively target brain cancer cells and deliver anticancer drugs. Angiopep2 was conjugated to the surface of preformed Ps to target the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 that are overexpressed in blood brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells. The conjugation efficiency yield for angiopep2 was estimated to be 24%. The angiopep2-functionalized Ps showed no cellular toxicity after 24h and enhanced the cellular uptake around 5 times more in U87MG glioblastoma cells compared to the non-targeted Ps. The encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX) in Ps was 13% by co-solvent method, compared to a film rehydration method (4%). The release profiles of the DOX from Ps showed a release of 42% at pH 5.5 and 40% at pH 7.4 after 24h, indicating that Ps can efficiently retain the DOX with a slow release rate. Furthermore, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of DOX-loaded Ps-Angiopep2 showed enhanced toxicity to U87MG glioblastoma cells, compared to non-targeted Ps. Overall, our in vitro results suggested that angiopep2-conjugated Ps can be used as nanocarriers for efficient targeted DOX delivery to glioblastoma cells.

  11. Targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Wells, Jack A; Kyrtatos, Panagiotis G; Price, Anthony N; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-07-01

    The success of cell therapies depends on the ability to deliver the cells to the site of injury. Targeted magnetic cell delivery is an emergent technique for localised cell transplantation therapy. The use of permanent magnets limits such a treatment to organs close to the body surface or an implanted magnetic source. A possible alternative method for magnetic cell delivery is magnetic resonance targeting (MRT), which uses magnetic field gradients inherent to all magnetic resonance imaging system, to steer ferromagnetic particles to their target region. In this study we have assessed the feasibility of such an approach for cell targeting, using a range of flow rates and different super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in a vascular bifurcation phantom. Using MRT we have demonstrated that 75% of labelled cells could be guided within the vascular bifurcation. Furthermore we have demonstrated the ability to image the labelled cells before and after magnetic targeting, which may enable interactive manipulation and assessment of the distribution of cellular therapy. This is the first demonstration of cellular MRT and these initial findings support the potential value of MRT for improved targeting of intravascular cell therapies.

  12. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  13. Angiopep2-functionalized polymersomes for targeted doxorubicin delivery to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Wu, Dalin; Palivan, Cornelia G; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-09-25

    A targeted drug delivery nanosystem for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on polymersomes (Ps) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-PMOXA) diblock copolymers was developed to evaluate their potential to actively target brain cancer cells and deliver anticancer drugs. Angiopep2 was conjugated to the surface of preformed Ps to target the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 that are overexpressed in blood brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells. The conjugation efficiency yield for angiopep2 was estimated to be 24%. The angiopep2-functionalized Ps showed no cellular toxicity after 24h and enhanced the cellular uptake around 5 times more in U87MG glioblastoma cells compared to the non-targeted Ps. The encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX) in Ps was 13% by co-solvent method, compared to a film rehydration method (4%). The release profiles of the DOX from Ps showed a release of 42% at pH 5.5 and 40% at pH 7.4 after 24h, indicating that Ps can efficiently retain the DOX with a slow release rate. Furthermore, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of DOX-loaded Ps-Angiopep2 showed enhanced toxicity to U87MG glioblastoma cells, compared to non-targeted Ps. Overall, our in vitro results suggested that angiopep2-conjugated Ps can be used as nanocarriers for efficient targeted DOX delivery to glioblastoma cells. PMID:27484836

  14. Targeted drug delivery into reversibly injured myocardium with silica nanoparticles: surface functionalization, natural biodistribution, and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael M; Korolev, Dmitry V; Sonin, Dmitry L; Postnov, Viktor N; Papayan, Garry V; Uskov, Ivan S; Belozertseva, Anastasia V; Shlyakhto, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with ischemic heart disease can be significantly improved with the implementation of targeted drug delivery into the ischemic myocardium. In this paper, we present our original findings relevant to the problem of therapeutic heart targeting with use of nanoparticles. Experimental approaches included fabrication of carbon and silica nanoparticles, their characterization and surface modification. The acute hemodynamic effects of nanoparticle formulation as well as nanoparticle biodistribution were studied in male Wistar rats. Carbon and silica nanoparticles are nontoxic materials that can be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. Concepts of passive and active targeting can be applied to the development of targeted drug delivery to the ischemic myocardial cells. Provided that ischemic heart-targeted drug delivery can be proved to be safe and efficient, the results of this research may contribute to the development of new technologies in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20463939

  15. Surface-engineered targeted PPI dendrimer for efficient intracellular and intratumoral siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Kirkpatrick, Paul; Pandya, Ipsit; Savla, Ronak; Pozharov, Vitaly P; He, Huixin; Minko, Tamara

    2009-12-16

    Low penetration ability of Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) through the cellular plasma membrane combined with its limited stability in blood, limits the effectiveness of the systemic delivery of siRNA. In order to overcome such difficulties, we constructed a nanocarrier-based delivery system by taking advantage of the lessons learned from the problems in the delivery of DNA. In the present study, siRNA nanoparticles were first formulated with Poly(Propyleneimine) (PPI) dendrimers. To provide lateral and steric stability to withstand the aggressive environment in the blood stream, the formed siRNA nanoparticles were caged with a dithiol containing cross-linker molecules followed by coating them with Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) polymer. A synthetic analog of Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) peptide was conjugated to the distal end of PEG polymer to direct the siRNA nanoparticles specifically to the cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that this layer-by-layer modification and targeting approach confers the siRNA nanoparticles stability in plasma and intracellular bioavailability, provides for their specific uptake by tumor cells, accumulation of siRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells, and efficient gene silencing. In addition, in vivo body distribution data confirmed high specificity of the proposed targeting delivery approach which created the basis for the prevention of adverse side effects of the treatment on healthy organs.

  16. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size <20nm, negative zeta potential and good stability. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ME revealed high and rapid ex vivo permeation of drugs through sheep nasal mucosa. Intranasal DHA ME resulted in high brain concentrations and 10.76 (ABZ-SO) and 3.24 (CUR) fold enhancement in brain area-under-the-curve (AUC) compared to intravenous DHA MEs at the same dose. Direct nose to brain transport (DTP) of >95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery.

  17. Surface-Engineered Targeted PPI Dendrimer for Efficient Intracellular and Intratumoral siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Kirkpatrick, Paul; Pandya, Ipsit; Savla, Ronak; Pozharov, Vitaly P.; He, Huixin; Minko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Low penetration ability of Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) through the cellular plasma membrane combined with its limited stability in blood, limits the effectiveness of the systemic delivery of siRNA. In order to overcome such difficulties, we constructed a nanocarrier-based delivery system by taking advantage of the lessons learned from the problems in the delivery of DNA. In the present study, siRNA nanoparticles were first formulated with Poly(Propyleneimine) (PPI) dendrimers. To provide lateral and steric stability to withstand the aggressive environment in the blood stream, the formed siRNA nanoparticles were caged with a dithiol containing cross-linker molecules followed by coating them with Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) polymer. A synthetic analog of Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) peptide was conjugated to the distal end of PEG polymer to direct the siRNA nanoparticles specifically to the cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that this layer-by-layer modification and targeting approach confers the siRNA nanoparticles stability in plasma and intracellular bioavailability, provides for their specific uptake by tumor cells, accumulation of siRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells, and efficient gene silencing. In addition, in vivo body distribution data confirmed high specificity of the proposed targeting delivery approach which created the basis for the prevention of adverse side effects of the treatment on healthy organs. PMID:19567257

  18. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  19. Method for tracking nanogel particles in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seal, Brandon L; Lien, Yeong-Hau H; Mazar, Carla; Salkini, Mohamad W; Cai, Tong; Hu, Zhibing; Marquez, Manuel; Garcia, Antonio A

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogels made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) can be synthesized in the form of highly monodispersed nanoparticles. After synthesis, NIPA hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) can be labeled by Alexa Fluor 488 carboxylic acid, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester through amine-terminated functional groups. This choice of dye is complementary to other biological labeling methods for in vivo studies. When the nanogel/dye nanoparticles are injected into rabbits, they can be imaged via tissue sectioning and confocal microscopy, while nanoparticle concentration can be determined by fluorescent microplate assays. Time-course persistence of nanoparticles in the circulatory system can be readily tracked by direct assay of plasma and urine samples using 485 nm excitation and 538 emission wavelengths to keep background fluorescence to nearly the same level as that found using an empty well. Depending upon how the nanoparticles are injected, circulatory system concentrations can reach high concentrations and diminish to low levels or gradually increase and gradually decrease over time. Injection in the femoral artery results in a rapid spike in circulating nanogel/dye concentration, while injection into the renal artery results in a more gradual increase.

  20. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  1. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  2. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Levy, Oren; Phillips, Joseph P.; Stratton, Tara; Triana, Brian; Ruiz, Juan P.; Gu, Fangqi; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-α & IFN-γ) compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential. PMID:24205131

  3. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  4. Rational Design of Targeted Next-Generation Carriers for Drug and Vaccine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Balaji; Goodman, Jonathan T; Vela Ramirez, Julia E

    2016-07-11

    Pattern recognition receptors on innate immune cells play an important role in guiding how cells interact with the rest of the organism and in determining the direction of the downstream immune response. Recent advances have elucidated the structure and function of these receptors, providing new opportunities for developing targeted drugs and vaccines to treat infections, cancers, and neurological disorders. C-type lectin receptors, Toll-like receptors, and folate receptors have attracted interest for their ability to endocytose their ligands or initiate signaling pathways that influence the immune response. Several novel technologies are being developed to engage these receptors, including recombinant antibodies, adoptive immunotherapy, and chemically modified antigens and drug delivery vehicles. These active targeting technologies will help address current challenges facing drug and vaccine delivery and lead to new tools to treat human diseases.

  5. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 μm respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  6. Daunomycin-loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, magnetic targeting, cell cytotoxicity, and protein delivery research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chao; Jin, Shu-Fang; Zheng, Min; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Peng-Liang; Tang, Ding-Tong; Chen, Jiong; Lin, Jia-Qi; Wang, Xia-Hong; Zhao, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The clinical use of daunomycin is restricted by dose-dependent toxicity and low specificity against cancer cells. In the present study, modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were employed to load daunomycin and the drug-loaded nanospheres exhibited satisfactory size and smart pH-responsive release. The cellular uptake efficiency, targeted cell accumulation, and cell cytotoxicity experimental results proved that the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-loading process brings high drug targeting without decreasing the cytotoxicity of daunomycin. Moreover, a new concern for the evaluation of nanophase drug delivery's effects was considered, with monitoring the interactions between human serum albumin and the drug-loaded nanospheres. Results from the multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling calculation elucidate that the drug delivery has detectable deleterious effects on the frame conformation of protein, which may affect its physiological function. PMID:27288463

  7. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically.

  8. Dual surface-functionalized Janus nanocomposites for targeted stimulus responsive drug delivery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni; Shi, Donglu

    2014-03-01

    A novel superparamagnetic Janus nanocomposite (SJNC) of polystyrene/Fe3O4@SiO2 was designed and developed for the first time using a miniemulsion method. Both surfaces were readily functionalized for bio-medical application. Folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (DOX) were conjugated stepwise to the surfaces. It was found that SJNCs achieved cell-targeted drug delivery in a pH-responsive manner.

  9. Particle shape: a new design parameter for passive targeting in splenotropic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Padma V; Jindal, Anil B; Patil, Rajesh R; Mulla, Fernaz; Gaikwad, Rajiv V; Samad, Abdul

    2010-06-01

    The role of particle size and surface modification on biodistribution of nanocarriers is widely reported. We report for the first time the role of nanoparticle shape on biodistribution. Our study demonstrates that irregular shaped polymer lipid nanoparticles (LIPOMER) evade kupffer cells and localize in the spleen. We also demonstrate the macrophage-evading characteristic of the irregular-shaped LIPOMER. Our results suggest particle shape as an important tool for passive targeting of nanocarriers in splenotropic drug delivery. PMID:20091830

  10. Targeted Delivery of Peptide-Tagged DNA Lipoplexes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ariatti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The application of homing peptides to direct DNA and RNA lipoplexes to target cells is a rapidly evolving area of study, which may find application in corrective gene therapy for the treatment of neoplasms and other disorders of a genetic origin. Here, a step-wise account of the assembly and characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma cell-specific DNA lipoplexes and their cytotoxicity assessment in and delivery to the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 is given. PMID:27436315

  11. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  12. Preparation of Pickering emulsions through interfacial adsorption by soft cyclodextrin nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shintaro; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sato, Hirofumi; Shizuma, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles are known as Pickering emulsions. To date, soft microgel particles as well as inorganic and organic particles have been utilized as Pickering emulsifiers. Although cyclodextrin (CD) works as an attractive emulsion stabilizer through the formation of a CD–oil complex at the oil–water interface, a high concentration of CD is normally required. Our research focuses on an effective Pickering emulsifier based on a soft colloidal CD polymer (CD nanogel) with a unique surface-active property. Results: CD nanogels were prepared by crosslinking heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin with phenyl diisocyanate and subsequent immersion of the resulting polymer in water. A dynamic light scattering study shows that primary CD nanogels with 30–50 nm diameter assemble into larger CD nanogels with 120 nm diameter by an increase in the concentration of CD nanogel from 0.01 to 0.1 wt %. The CD nanogel has a surface-active property at the air–water interface, which reduces the surface tension of water. The CD nanogel works as an effective Pickering emulsion stabilizer even at a low concentration (0.1 wt %), forming stable oil-in-water emulsions through interfacial adsorption by the CD nanogels. Conclusion: Soft CD nanogel particles adsorb at the oil–water interface with an effective coverage by forming a strong interconnected network and form a stable Pickering emulsion. The adsorption property of CD nanogels on the droplet surface has great potential to become new microcapsule building blocks with porous surfaces. These microcapsules may act as stimuli-responsive nanocarriers and nanocontainers. PMID:26734085

  13. Nucleolin targeting AS1411 modified protein nanoparticle for antitumor drugs delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhui; Song, Chenchen; Jiang, Chenxiao; Shen, Xin; Qiao, Qian; Hu, Yiqiao

    2013-10-01

    Over recent years, cell surface nucleolin as an anticancer target has attracted many researchers' attentions. To improve the antitumor efficacy, we developed a nucleolin targeted protein nanoparticle (NTPN) delivery system in which human serum albumin (HSA) was used as drug carrier and a DNA aptamer named AS1411, which had high affinity to nucleolin, was used as a bullet. The HSA nanoparticles (NPs-PTX) were fabricated by a novel self-assembly method and then modified with AS1411 (Apt-NPs-PTX). The resulted Apt-NPs-PTX were spherical. Compared with NPs-PTX, the uptake of Apt-NPs-PTX displayed a significant increase in MCF-7 cells while there was a decrease in nontumor cell lines such as MCF-10A and 3T3 cells. In a cytotoxic study, Apt-NPs-PTX displayed an enhanced cytotoxicity in MCF-7 tumor cells while there was almost no cytotoxicity in MCF-10A cells. Endostatin, a nucleolin inhibitor, could significantly decrease the internalization of Apt-NPs-PTX, suggesting nucleolin mediates the transmembrane process of Apt-NPs-PTX. Therefore, the AS1411 modified NTPN delivery system might be a promising targeted drug delivery system. PMID:23679916

  14. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth by targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Hyoudou, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yuki; Umeyama, Yukari; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    To develop effective anti-metastatic therapy, targeted or sustained delivery of catalase was examined in mice. We found that mouse lung with metastatic colonies of adenocarcinoma colon26 cells exhibited reduced catalase activity. The interaction of the tumor cells with macrophages or hepatocytes generated detectable amounts of ROS, and increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Hepatocyte-targeted delivery of catalase was successfully achieved by galactosylation, which was highly effective in inhibiting the hepatic metastasis of colon26 cells. PEGylation, which increased the retention of catalase in the circulation, effectively inhibited the pulmonary metastasis of the cells. To examine which processes in tumor metastasis are inhibited by catalase derivatives, the tissue distribution and proliferation of tumor cells in mice was quantitatively analyzed using firefly luciferase-expressing tumor cells. An injection of PEG-catalase just before the inoculation of melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells in the lung at 24 h. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation of the tumor cells, and increased the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that targeted or sustained delivery of catalase to sites where tumor cells metastasize is a promising approach for inhibiting metastatic tumor growth. PMID:16256238

  15. A targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma: transferrin modified lipid coated paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Zhang, Q; Wang, X-y; Chen, X-g; He, Y-x; Yang, W-y; Yang, X

    2014-10-01

    The transferring modified lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles, as a targetable vector, were developed for the targeting delivery of anticancer drugs with paclitaxel (PTX) as a model drug to the ovarian carcinoma, which combines the advantages and avoids disadvantages of polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes in drug delivery. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the lipid coating on the polymeric core. Physicochemical characterizations of TFLPs, such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. In the cellular uptake study, the TFLPs were more efficiently endocytosed by the A2780 cells with high expression of transferrin receptors than HUVEC cells without the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, the anticancer efficacy of TFLPs on the tumor spheroids was stronger than that of lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles (LPs) and PLGA nanoparticles. In the in vivo study, the TFLPs showed the best inhibition effect of the tumor growth for the ovarian carcinoma-bearing mice. In brief, the TFLPs were proved to be an efficient targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma.

  16. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications. PMID:26955887

  17. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications. PMID:26955887

  18. Lipid composition has significant effect on targeted drug delivery properties of NGR-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Lin, Aihua; Peng, Pei; Wang, Yong; Gu, Wei; Liu, Yiming

    2016-05-01

    The Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif has previously been demonstrated to specifically bind to CD13, which is selectively overexpressed in tumor vasculature and some tumor cells (e.g. HT1080). It was reported that NGR-modified stealth liposomes (NGR-SL) could be prepared with different lipid composition, such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), hydrogenated soy posphatidylcholine (HSPC) and soy posphatidylcholine (SPC). In the present study, NGR-modified liposomes were prepared with DPPC, HSPC, SPC or the mixture of HSPC and SPC. The resultant liposomes with different lipid composition were compared in terms of cell uptake, antitumor efficacy and targeted drug delivery efficiency using HT1080 tumor model. It was found that NGR-SL composed of the mixture of HSPC and SPC was able to improve targeted drug delivery efficiency to tumor producing the most significant antitumor activity. Collectively, the NGR-modified liposomes composed of the mixture of HSPC and SPC are promising carriers for the treatment of tumor. Besides NGR ligand, lipid composition could also significantly affect the targeted delivery efficiency to the tumor. PMID:26373704

  19. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  20. Realizing the Clinical Potential of Cancer Nanotechnology by Minimizing Toxicological and Targeted Delivery Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and loading combinations of cooperating agents into a single nano-sized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles needs to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. PMID:23139207

  1. AAV9-mediated central nervous system–targeted gene delivery via cisterna magna route in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lukashchuk, Vera; Lewis, Katherine E; Coldicott, Ian; Grierson, Andrew J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2016-01-01

    Current barriers to the use of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) in clinical trials for treating neurological disorders are its high expression in many off-target tissues such as liver and heart, and lack of cell specificity within the central nervous system (CNS) when using ubiquitous promoters such as human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or chicken-β-actin hybrid (CAG). To enhance targeting the transgene expression in CNS cells, self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors, scAAV9-GFP vectors carrying neuronal Hb9 and synapsin 1, and nonspecific CMV and CAG promoters were constructed. We demonstrate that synapsin 1 and Hb9 promoters exclusively targeted neurons in vitro, although their strengths were up to 10-fold lower than that of CMV. In vivo analyses of mouse tissue after scAAV9-GFP vector delivery via the cisterna magna revealed a significant advantage of synapsin 1 promoter over both Hb9 variants in targeting neurons throughout the brain, since Hb9 promoters were driving gene expression mainly within the motor-related areas of the brain stem. In summary, this study demonstrates that cisterna magna administration is a safe alternative to intracranial or intracerebroventricular vector delivery route using scAAV9, and introduces a novel utility of the Hb9 promoter for the targeted gene expression for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:26942208

  2. Development of multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and noninvasive imaging of therapeutic effect.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P; Mao, Hui; Wang, Y Andrew; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2009-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by noninvasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine.

  3. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, John T; Rudin, Charles M; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-06-29

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor.

  4. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, John T; Rudin, Charles M; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-06-29

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor. PMID:27358497

  5. MRI-visible liposome nanovehicles for potential tumor-targeted delivery of multimodal therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Shizhen; Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Real-time diagnosis and monitoring of disease development, and therapeutic responses to treatment, are possible by theranostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the synthesis of a multifunctional liposome, which contains Gd-DOTA (an MRI probe), paclitaxel and c(RGDyk) (a targeted peptide). This nanoparticle overcame the insolubility of paclitaxel, reduced the side effects of FDA-approved formulation of PTX-Cre (Taxol®) and improved drug delivery efficiency to the tumor. c(RGDyk) modification greatly enhanced the cytotoxicity of the drug in tumor cells A549. The T1 relaxivity in tumor cells treated with the targeted liposome formulation was increased 16-fold when compared with the non-targeted group. In vivo, the tumors in mice were visualized using T1-weighted imaging after administration of the liposome. Also the tumor growth could be inhibited well after the treatment. Fluorescence images in vitro and ex vivo also showed the targeting effect of this liposome in tumor cells, indicating that this nanovehicle could limit the off-target side effects of anticancer drugs and contrast agents. These findings lay the foundation for further tumor inhibition study and application of this delivery vehicle in cancer therapy settings.

  6. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Chen, Zhi-long; Yang, Xiao-xia; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Xin-ping; Du, Xiao-xia

    2009-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 µM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  7. Intracellular targeting delivery of liposomal drugs to solid tumors based on EPR effects.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-03-18

    The success of an effective drug delivery system using liposomes for solid tumor targeting based on EPR effects is highly dependent on both size ranging from 100-200 nm in diameter and prolonged circulation half-life in the blood. A major development was the synthesis of PEG-liposomes with a prolonged circulation time in the blood. Active targeting of immunoliposomes to the solid tumor tissue can be achieved by the Fab' fragment which is better than whole IgG in terms of designing PEG-immunoliposomes with prolonged circulation. For intracellular targeting delivery to solid tumors based on EPR effects, transferrin-PEG-liposomes can stay in blood circulation for a long time and extravasate into the extravascular of tumor tissue by the EPR effect as PEG-liposomes. The extravasated transferrin-PEG-liposomes can maintain anti cancer drugs in interstitial space for a longer period, and deliver them into the cytoplasm of tumor cells via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Transferrin-PEG-liposomes improve the safety and efficacy of anti cancer drug by both passive targeting by prolonged circulation and active targeting by transferrin.

  8. Stabilized Heptapeptide A7R for Enhanced Multifunctional Liposome-Based Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Liu, Yu; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-06-01

    (L)A7R (ATWLPPR) is a heptapeptide with high binding affinity in vitro to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) overexpressed on glioma, glioma vasculogenic mimicry and neovasculature. However, its tumor targeting efficacy is significantly reduced in vivo due to proteolysis in blood circulation. To improve the in vivo stability and targeting efficacy, the retro inverso isomer of (L)A7R ((D)A7R) was developed for glioma-targeted drug delivery. (D)A7R was expected to have a similar binding affinity to its receptors in vitro (VEGFR2 and NRP-1), which was experimentally confirmed. In vivo, (D)A7R-modified liposomes achieved improved glioma-targeted efficiency than did (L)A7R-modified liposomes. After loading a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin), (D)A7R-modified liposomes significantly inhibited subcutaneous model tumor in comparison to free doxorubicin, plain liposomes and (L)A7R-modified liposomes. In summary, the present study presented the potential of a proteolytically stable d-peptide ligand for in vivo tumor-targeted drug delivery. PMID:27195531

  9. Bifunctional Coupling Agents for Radiolabeling of Biomolecules and Target-Specific Delivery of Metallic Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals are of great current interest in early molecular imaging and radiotherapy of cancers, and provide a unique tool for target-specific delivery of radionuclides to the diseased tissues. In general, a target-specific radiopharmaceutical can be divided into four parts: targeting biomolecule (BM), pharmacokinetic modifying (PKM) linker, bifunctional coupling or chelating agent (BFC), and radionuclide. The targeting biomolecule serves as a “carrier” for specific delivery of the radionuclide. PKM linkers are used to modify radiotracer excretion kinetics. BFC is needed for radiolabeling of biomolecules with a metallic radionuclide. Different radiometals have significant difference in their coordination chemistry, and require BFCs with different donor atoms and chelator frameworks. Since the radiometal chelate can have a significant impact on physical and biological properties of the target-specific radiopharmaceutical, its excretion kinetics can be altered by modifying the coordination environment with various chelators or coligand, if needed. This review will focus on the design of BFCs and their coordination chemistry with technetium, copper, gallium, indium, yttrium and lanthanide radiometals. PMID:18538888

  10. The impact of nanoparticle protein corona on cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity and target drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Parodi, Alessandro; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In a perfect sequence of events, nanoparticles (NPs) are injected into the bloodstream where they circulate until they reach the target tissue. The ligand on the NP surface recognizes its specific receptor expressed on the target tissue and the drug is released in a controlled manner. However, once injected in a physiological environment, NPs interact with biological components and are surrounded by a protein corona (PC). This can trigger an immune response and affect NP toxicity and targeting capabilities. In this review, we provide a survey of recent findings on the NP-PC interactions and discuss how the PC can be used to modulate both cytotoxicity and the immune response as well as to improve the efficacy of targeted delivery of nanocarriers. PMID:26653875

  11. Modification of Polymer Network Properties through the Addition of Functional Nanogel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, JianCheng

    Multifunctional acrylic and methacrylic monomers have been widely applied in many photopolymerization applications to produce crosslinked polymers with advantages such as rapid curing, broad choices of commercially available monomers and desirable physical and mechanical properties. However, there still remain critical challenges for these materials during polymerization including limited conversion and early onset of gelation as well as the generation of significant polymerization shrinkage and stress. This thesis explores the effects of network property modification through the addition of polymeric nanoparticles or nanogels. In order to understand the relationship between nanogel structure and composite material properties, nanogels with different architectures and functionalities were studied during polymerization in terms of kinetics, shrinkage and stress reduction, mechanical performance and reaction mechanisms. Nanogel composite formulations were evaluated to understand the interaction between nanogel structure with the resin matrix during polymerization through adjustment of nanogel branching densities and reactivity of polymer chain ends. It was found that both the chemical crosslinking from reactive chain ends and physical entanglements of high branching density nanogels with the resin matrix dramatically could improve final material mechanical strength. The reductions in overall volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress were found to follow at least proportional behavior with respect to nanogel loading concentration while maintaining similar final conversion and modulus results compared with the control resin. Nanogels containing unique functionalities were designed in order to modify reaction mechanism during secondary polymerization. A nanogel containing an integrated photoinitiator and active chain-end RAFT groups was able to initiate secondary polymerization from the nanogel phase so that localized polymerization was achieved from the beginning of

  12. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction.

  13. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction. PMID:26706547

  14. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  15. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2015-11-28

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A(®) Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 ± 1.1% vs. 0.4 ± 0.1% and 7.5 ± 0.8% vs. 0.8 ± 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm(®) (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A(®) Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A(®) Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 ± 3.2% vs. 0.6 ± 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU

  16. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  17. Colon-targeted quercetin delivery using natural polymer to enhance its bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Anil; Jain, H.; Singhal, Vipin; Elias, Edwin J.; Showkat, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop a polymer (Guar Gum)-based matrix tablet (using quercetin as a model drug) with sufficient mechanical strength, and promising in vitro mouth-to-colon release profile. By definition, an oral colonic delivery system should retard drug release in the stomach and small intestine, and allow complete release in the colon. By drug delivery to the colon would therefore ensure direct treatment at the disease site, lower dosing, and fewer systemic side effects. Quercetin is antioxidant in nature and used to treat colon cancer, but they have poor absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). As a site for drug delivery, the colon offers a near neutral pH, reduced digestive enzymatic activity, a long transit time, and an increased responsiveness to absorption enhancers. By achieving a colon-targeted drug delivery system, the absorption of quercetin may be increased, which leads to better bioactivity in fewer doses. PMID:21731393

  18. Non-Condensing Polymeric Nanoparticles for Targeted Gene and siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Ganesh, Shanthi; Amiji, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy has shown a tremendous potential to benefit patients in a variety of disease conditions. However, finding a safe and effective systemic delivery system is the major obstacle in this area. Although viral vectors showed promise for high transfection rate, the immunogenicity associated with these systems has hindered further development. As an alternative to viral gene delivery, this review focuses on application of novel safe and effective non-condensing polymeric systems that have shown high transgene expression when administered systemically or by the oral route. Type B gelatin-based engineered nanocarriers were evaluated for passive and active tumor-targeted delivery and transfection using both reporter and therapeutic plasmid DNA. Additionally, we have shown that nanoparticles-in-microsphere oral system (NiMOS) can efficiently deliver reporter and therapeutic gene constructs in the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, there has been a significant recent interest in the use small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic system for gene silencing. Both gelatin nanoparticles and NiMOS have shown activity in systemic and oral delivery of siRNA, respectively. PMID:21621597

  19. Potential of targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Raichur; KusumDevi, V

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a devastating complication of cancer that requires an immediate attention. Although our understanding of the metastatic process has improved over the years, yet a number of questions still remain unanswered, and more research is required for complete understanding of the skeletal consequences of metastasis. Furthermore, as no effective treatments are available for some of the most common skeleton disorders such as arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma and metastatic bone cancer, there is an urgent need to develop new drugs and drug delivery systems for safe and efficient clinical treatments. Hence this article describes the potential of targeted delivery platforms aimed specifically at bone metastasized tumors. The review gives a brief understanding of the proposed mechanisms of metastasis and focuses primarily on the targeting moieties such as bisphosphonates, which represent the current gold standard in bone metastasis therapies. Special focus has been given to the targeted nanoparticulate systems for treating bone metastasis and its future. Also highlighted are some of the therapeutic targets that can be exploited for designing therapies for bone metastasis. Some of the patented molecules for bone metastasis prevention and treatment have also been discussed. Recently proposed HIFU-CHEM, which utilizes High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) guided by MRI in combination with temperature-sensitive nanomedicines has also been briefed. The study has been concluded with a focus on the innovations requiring an immediate attention that could improve the treatment modality of bone metastasis.

  20. Going beyond the liver: progress and challenges of targeted delivery of siRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lorenzer, Cornelia; Dirin, Mehrdad; Winkler, Anna-Maria; Baumann, Volker; Winkler, Johannes

    2015-04-10

    Therapeutic gene silencing promises significant progress in pharmacotherapy, including considerable expansion of the druggable target space and the possibility for treating orphan diseases. Technological hurdles have complicated the efficient use of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and siRNA agents suffer particularly from insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake. Intense development and evolution of delivery systems have resulted in efficient uptake predominantly in liver tissue, in which practically all nanoparticulate and liposomal delivery systems show the highest accumulation. The most efficacious strategies include liposomes and bioconjugations with N-acetylgalactosamine. Both are in early clinical evaluation stages for treatment of liver-associated diseases. Approaches for achieving knockdown in other tissues and tumors have been proven to be more complicated. Selective targeting to tumors may be enabled through careful modulation of physical properties, such as particle size, or by taking advantage of specific targeting ligands. Significant barriers stand between sufficient accumulation in other organs, including endothelial barriers, cellular membranes, and the endosome. The brain, which is shielded by the blood-brain barrier, is of particular interest to facilitate efficient oligonucleotide therapy of neurological diseases. Transcytosis of the blood-brain barrier through receptor-specific docking is investigated to increase accumulation in the central nervous system. In this review, the current clinical status of siRNA therapeutics is summarized, as well as innovative and promising preclinical concepts employing tissue- and tumor-targeted ligands. The requirements and the respective advantages and drawbacks of bioconjugates and ligand-decorated lipid or polymeric particles are discussed.

  1. Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery across Biological Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-01-01

    Cancer nanotheranostics aims to combine imaging and therapy of cancer through use of nanotechnology. The ability to engineer nanomaterials to interact with cancer cells at the molecular level can significantly improve the effectiveness and specificity of therapy to cancers that are currently difficult to treat. In particular, metastatic cancers, drug-resistant cancers, and cancer stem cells impose the greatest therapeutic challenge that requires targeted therapy to treat effectively. Targeted therapy can be achieved with appropriate designed drug delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles, adult stem cells, or T cells in immunotherapy. In this article, we first review the different types of materials commonly used to synthesize nanotheranostic particles and their use in imaging. We then discuss biological barriers that these nanoparticles encounter and must bypass to reach the target cancer cells, including the blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, and particularly the blood-brain barrier. We then review how nanotheranostics can be used to improve targeted delivery and treatment of cancer cells using nanoparticles, adult stem cells, and T cells in immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss development of nanoparticles to overcome current limitations in cancer therapy. PMID:21842473

  2. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  3. Targeted delivery of siRNA to cell death proteins in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Brahmamdam, Pavan; Watanabe, Eizo; Unsinger, Jacqueline; Chang, Katherine C.; Schierding, William; Hoekzema, Andrew S.; Zhou, Tony T.; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Holemon, Heather; Heidel, Jeremy D.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Immune suppression is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the septic patient. Apoptotic loss of immune effector cells such as CD4 T and B cells is a key component in the loss immune competence in sepsis. Inhibition of lymphocyte apoptosis has led to improved survival in animal models of sepsis. Using qRT-PCR of isolated splenic CD4 T and B cells, we determined that Bim and PUMA, two key cell death proteins, are markedly up-regulated during sepsis. Lymphocytes have been notoriously difficult to transfect with siRNA. Consequently a novel, cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted, delivery vehicle was employed to co-administer siRNA to Bim and PUMA to mice immediately after cecal ligation and puncture. Anti-apoptotic siRNA based therapy markedly decreased lymphocyte apoptosis and prevented the loss of splenic CD4 T and B cells. Flow cytometry confirmed in vivo delivery of siRNA to CD4 T and B cells and also demonstrated decreases in intracellular Bim and PUMA protein. In conclusion, Bim and PUMA are two critical mediators of immune cell death in sepsis. Use of a novel cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted siRNA delivery vehicle enables effective administration of anti-apoptotic siRNAs to lymphocytes and reverses the immune cell depletion that is a hallmark of this highly lethal disorder. PMID:19033888

  4. Nanoparticle-Mediated Target Delivery of TRAIL as Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Jeon, Mike; Silber, John R; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-12-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an attractive cancer therapeutic because of its ability to induce apoptosis in tumor cells while having a negligible effect on normal cells. However, the short serum half-life of TRAIL and lack of efficient in vivo administration approaches have largely hindered its clinical use. Using nanoparticles (NPs) as carriers in gene therapy is considered as an alternative approach to increase TRAIL delivery to tumors as transfected cells would be induced to secrete TRAIL into the tumor microenvironment. To enable effective delivery of plasmid DNA encoding TRAIL into glioblastoma (GBM), we developed a targeted iron oxide NP coated with chitosan-polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine copolymer and chlorotoxin (CTX) and evaluated its effect in delivering TRAIL in vitro and in vivo. NP-TRAIL successfully delivers TRAIL into human T98G GBM cells and induces secretion of 40 pg mL(-1) of TRAIL in vitro. Transfected cells show threefold increased apoptosis as compared to the control DNA bound NPs. Systemic administration of NP-TRAIL-CTX to mice bearing T98G-derived flank xenografts results in near-zero tumor growth and induces apoptosis in tumor tissue. Our results suggest that NP-TRAIL-CTX can potentially serve as a targeted anticancer therapeutic for more efficient TRAIL delivery to GBM. PMID:26498165

  5. A self-assembled system for tumor-targeted co-delivery of drug and gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Min; Yang, Tie; Ding, Xuefang; Bao, Xiuli; Ding, Yang; Xiong, Hui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-11-01

    A new cationic polymer eprosartan-graft-PEI (ESP) containing eprosartan (ES) and polyethylenimine 1.8K was successfully developed and employed as a safe gene vector to assemble a drug (ES) and gene co-delivery complex (ESP/pDNA). Chondroitin sulfate (CS) was then used as a coating polymer to shield the surface charge of ESP/pDNA complexes, as well as a tumor targeting entity to ensure specific delivery of CS/ESP/pDNA complexes. The CS/ESP/pDNA complexes with desirable particle size and zeta potential, exhibited amidase-responsive drug release and CS-mediated endocytosis in vitro. As compared with ESP/pDNA complexes, in vivo imaging results demonstrated decreased reticuloendothelial system uptake and remarkably increased tumor accumulation of CS/ESP/pDNA complexes. All these findings indicated the potential of CS/ESP/pDNA as a promising tumor-targeted drug and gene co-delivery system. PMID:26249591

  6. Nanoparticle-Mediated Target Delivery of TRAIL as Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Jeon, Mike; Silber, John R; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-12-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an attractive cancer therapeutic because of its ability to induce apoptosis in tumor cells while having a negligible effect on normal cells. However, the short serum half-life of TRAIL and lack of efficient in vivo administration approaches have largely hindered its clinical use. Using nanoparticles (NPs) as carriers in gene therapy is considered as an alternative approach to increase TRAIL delivery to tumors as transfected cells would be induced to secrete TRAIL into the tumor microenvironment. To enable effective delivery of plasmid DNA encoding TRAIL into glioblastoma (GBM), we developed a targeted iron oxide NP coated with chitosan-polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine copolymer and chlorotoxin (CTX) and evaluated its effect in delivering TRAIL in vitro and in vivo. NP-TRAIL successfully delivers TRAIL into human T98G GBM cells and induces secretion of 40 pg mL(-1) of TRAIL in vitro. Transfected cells show threefold increased apoptosis as compared to the control DNA bound NPs. Systemic administration of NP-TRAIL-CTX to mice bearing T98G-derived flank xenografts results in near-zero tumor growth and induces apoptosis in tumor tissue. Our results suggest that NP-TRAIL-CTX can potentially serve as a targeted anticancer therapeutic for more efficient TRAIL delivery to GBM.

  7. Chlorotoxin bound magnetic nanovector tailored for cancer cell targeting, imaging, and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest M; Fang, Chen; Mu, Ni; Jana, Soumen; Leung, Matthew C; Mok, Hyejung; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Park, James O; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-11-01

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful molecular tool that has potential to revolutionize the treatment of cancer. One major challenge of applying this technology for clinical application is the lack of site-specific carriers that can effectively deliver short interfering RNA (siRNA) to cancer cells. Here we report the development and assessment of a cancer-cell specific magnetic nanovector construct for efficient siRNA delivery and non-invasive monitoring through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The base of the nanovector construct is comprised of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-grafted chitosan, and polyethylenimine (PEI). The construct was then further functionalized with siRNA and a tumor-targeting peptide, chlorotoxin (CTX), to improve tumor specificity and potency. Flow cytometry, quantitative RT-PCR, and fluorescence microscopy analyses confirmed receptor-mediated cellular internalization of nanovectors and enhanced gene knockdown through targeted siRNA delivery. The ability of this nanovector construct to generate specific contrast enhancement of glioblastoma cells was demonstrated through MR imaging. These findings suggest that this CTX enabled nanoparticle carrier may be well suited for delivery of RNAi therapeutics to brain cancer cells.

  8. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  9. Combating malaria with nanotechnology-based targeted and combinatorial drug delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Miloni; S, Brijesh

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advancement of science, infectious diseases such as malaria remain an ongoing challenge globally. The main reason this disease still remains a menace in many countries around the world is the development of resistance to many of the currently available anti-malarial drugs. While developing new drugs is rather expensive and the prospect of a potent vaccine is still evading our dream of a malaria-free world, one of the feasible options is to package the older drugs in newer ways. For this, nano-sized drug delivery vehicles have been used and are proving to be promising prospects in the way malaria will be treated in the future. Since, monotherapy has given way to combination therapy in malaria treatment, nanotechnology-based delivery carriers enable to encapsulate various drug moieties in the same package, thus avoiding the complications involved in conjugation chemistry to produce hybrid drug molecules. Further, we envisage that using targeted delivery approaches, we may be able to achieve a much better radical cure and curb the side effects associated with the existing drug molecules. Thus, this review will focus on some of the nanotechnology-based combination and targeted therapies and will discuss the possibilities of better therapies that may be developed in the future. PMID:27067712

  10. Targeted Delivery of Amoxicillin to C. trachomatis by the Transferrin Iron Acquisition Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Jun; Serradji, Nawal; Mouton, Ludovic; Redeker, Virginie; Cornu, David; El Hage Chahine, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Weak intracellular penetration of antibiotics makes some infections difficult to treat. The Trojan horse strategy for targeted drug delivery is among the interesting routes being explored to overcome this therapeutic difficulty. Chlamydia trachomatis, as an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Chlamydia develops in a vacuole and is therefore protected by four membranes (plasma membrane, bacterial inclusion membrane, and bacterial membranes). In this work, the iron-transport protein, human serum-transferrin, was used as a Trojan horse for antibiotic delivery into the bacterial vacuole. Amoxicillin was grafted onto transferrin. The transferrin-amoxicillin construct was characterized by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Its affinity for transferrin receptor 1, determined by fluorescence emission titration [KaffTf-amox = (1.3 ± 1.0) x 108], is very close to that of transferrin [4.3 x 108]. Transmission electron and confocal microscopies showed a co-localization of transferrin with the bacteria in the vacuole and were also used to evaluate the antibiotic capability of the construct. It is significantly more effective than amoxicillin alone. These promising results demonstrate targeted delivery of amoxicillin to suppress Chlamydia and are of interest for Chlamydiaceae and maybe other intracellular bacteria therapies. PMID:26919720

  11. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  12. Antimicrobial peptide-modified liposomes for bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kewei; Gitter, Burkhard; Rüger, Ronny; Wieland, Gerhard D; Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Albrecht, Volker; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-10-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are two promising strategies to combat the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To take advantage of these two strategies, we integrated a novel antimicrobial peptide (WLBU2) and a potent generation II photosensitizer (temoporfin) into liposomes by preparing WLBU2-modified liposomes, aiming at bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin for PACT. WLBU2 was successfully coupled to temoporfin-loaded liposomes using a functional phospholipid. The delivery of temoporfin to bacteria was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, thus demonstrating that more temoporfin was delivered to bacteria by WLBU2-modified liposomes than by unmodified liposomes. Consequently, the WLBU2-modified liposomes eradicated all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and induced a 3.3 log(10) reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the in vitro photodynamic inactivation test. These findings demonstrate that the use of AMP-modified liposomes is promising for bacteria-targeted delivery of photosensitizers and for improving the PACT efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in the local infections.

  13. Focusing of photomechanical waves with an optical lens for depth-targeted molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takuichirou; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    We have been developing molecular delivery systems based on photomechanical waves (PMWs), which are generated by the irradiation of a laser absorbing material with nanosecond laser pulses. This method enables highly site-specific delivery in the horizontal plane of the tissue. However, targeting in the vertical direction is a remaining challenge. In this study, we developed a novel PMW focusing device for deeper tissue targeting. A commercial optical concave lens and black natural rubber sheet (laser absorber) were attached to the top and bottom end of a cylindrical spacer, respectively, which was filled with water. A laser pulse was transmitted through the lens and water and hit the rubber sheet to induce a plasma, generating a PMW. The PMW was propagated both downward and upward. The downward wave (1st wave) was diffused, while the upward (2nd wave) wave was reflected with the concave surface of the lens and focused at a depth determined by the geometrical parameters. To attenuate the 1st wave, a small-diameter silicon sponge rubber disk was adhered just under the rubber sheet concentrically with the laser axis. With the lens of f = -40 mm, the 2nd wave was focused to a diameter of 5.7 mm at a targeted depth of 20 mm, which was well agreed with the result of calculation by ray tracing. At a laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2, peak pressure of the PMW reached ~40 MPa at the depth of 20 mm. Under this condition, we examined depth-targeted gene delivery to the rat skin.

  14. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5'UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5'UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5'UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  15. Design and fabrication of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Gunn, Jonathan; Zhang, Miqin

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a class of non-invasive imaging agents that have been developed for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These MNPs have traditionally been used for disease imaging via passive targeting, but recent advances have opened the door to cellular-specific targeting, drug delivery, and multi-modal imaging by these nanoparticles. As more elaborate MNPs are envisioned, adherence to proper design criteria (e.g. size, coating, molecular functionalization) becomes even more essential. This review summarizes the design parameters that affect MNP performance in vivo, including the physicochemical properties and nanoparticle surface modifications, such as MNP coating and targeting ligand functionalizations that can enhance MNP management of biological barriers. A careful review of the chemistries used to modify the surfaces of MNPs is also given, with attention paid to optimizing the activity of bound ligands while maintaining favorable physicochemical properties. PMID:19909778

  16. Hyaluronic acid grafted PLGA copolymer nanoparticles enhance the targeted delivery of Bromelain in Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya Bhushan; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Panda, Amulya; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly increasing malignant neoplastic disease demands immediate attention. Several dietary compounds have recently emerged as strong anti-cancerous agents. Among, Bromelain (BL), a protease from pineapple plant, was used to enhance its anti-cancerous efficacy using nanotechnology. In lieu of this, hyaluronic acid (HA) grafted PLGA copolymer, having tumor targeting ability, was developed. BL was encapsulated in copolymer to obtain BL-copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) that ranged between 140 to 281nm in size. NPs exhibited higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in cells with high CD44 expression as compared with non-targeted NPs. In vivo results on tumor bearing mice showed that NPs were efficient in suppressing the tumor growth. Hence, the formulation could be used as a self-targeting drug delivery cargo for the remission of cancer. PMID:27287553

  17. Hyaluronic acid grafted PLGA copolymer nanoparticles enhance the targeted delivery of Bromelain in Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya Bhushan; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Panda, Amulya; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly increasing malignant neoplastic disease demands immediate attention. Several dietary compounds have recently emerged as strong anti-cancerous agents. Among, Bromelain (BL), a protease from pineapple plant, was used to enhance its anti-cancerous efficacy using nanotechnology. In lieu of this, hyaluronic acid (HA) grafted PLGA copolymer, having tumor targeting ability, was developed. BL was encapsulated in copolymer to obtain BL-copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) that ranged between 140 to 281nm in size. NPs exhibited higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in cells with high CD44 expression as compared with non-targeted NPs. In vivo results on tumor bearing mice showed that NPs were efficient in suppressing the tumor growth. Hence, the formulation could be used as a self-targeting drug delivery cargo for the remission of cancer.

  18. Targeted amplification of delivery to cell surface receptors by dendrimer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Isaacman, Steven; Buckley, Michael; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Edwin Y; Liebes, Leonard; Canary, James W

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-scale architectures assembled on cell surface receptors from smaller macromolecular constituents generated a large amplification of fluorescence. A targeted dendrimer was synthesized from a cystamine-core G4 PAMAM dendrimer, and contained an anti-BrE3 monoclonal antibody as the targeting group, several fluorophores and an average of 12 aldehyde moieties as complementary bio-orthogonal reactive sites for the covalent assembly. A cargo dendrimer, derived from a PAMAM G4 dendrimer, contained several fluorophores as the cargo for delivery and five hydrazine moieties as complimentary bio-orthogonal reactive sites. The system is designed to be flexible and allow for facile incorporation of a variety of targeting ligands.

  19. Targeted amplification of delivery to cell surface receptors by dendrimer self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Isaacman, Steven; Buckley, Michael; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Edwin Y.; Liebes, Leonard; Canary, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Nanometer-scale architectures assembled on cell surface receptors from smaller macromolecular constituents generated a large amplification of fluorescence. A targeted dendrimer was synthesized from a cystamine-core G4 PAMAM dendrimer, and contained an anti-BrE3 monoclonal antibody as the targeting group, several fluorophores and an average of 12 aldehyde moieties as complementary bio-orthogonal reactive sites for the covalent assembly. A cargo dendrimer, derived from a PAMAM G4 dendrimer, contained several fluorophores as the cargo for delivery and five hydrazine moieties as complimentary bio-orthogonal reactive sites. The system is designed to be flexible and allow for facile incorporation of a variety of targeting ligands. PMID:24513050

  20. Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-04-01

    The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy.

  1. Hydrodynamic interactions for complex-shaped nanocarriers in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaohong; Eckmann, David; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo

    2014-11-01

    Nanocarrier motion in a blood vessel involves hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, which collectively dictate the efficacy in targeted drug delivery. The shape of nanocarriers plays a crucial role in drug delivery. In order to quantify the flow and association properties of elliptical nanoparticles, we have developed an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework with capabilities to simulate the hydrodynamic motion of nanoparticles of arbitrary shapes. We introduce the quaternions for rotational motion, and two collision models, namely, (a) an impulse-based model for wall-particle collision, and (b) the short-range repulsive Gay-Berne potential for particle-particle collision. We also study the red blood cell and nanocarrier (such as ellipsoid) interactions. We compare our results with those obtained for a hard sphere model for both RBCs and nanocarriers. Supported by NIH through grant U01-EB016027.

  2. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-α). The value of exponent α provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(α-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5. PMID:25837408

  3. Design of smart nanogels that respond to physiologically relevant pH values and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Omura, Tomoyuki; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Lai, James J; Yin, Xiangchun; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of monodisperse 'smart' nanogels that exhibit a sharp volume phase transition at physiologically relevant temperatures and pH values. The nanogels were prepared by precipitation copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and propylacrylic acid (PAA). Briefly, the reaction was performed using a PAA feed of between 0 and 10 mol% in the presence of a crosslinker at 70 degrees C. The size of the nanogel particles was determined as a function of pH and temperature using dynamic light scattering (DLS). At room temperature, the NIPAAm-PAA nanogels were discrete, spherical structures with diameters ranging from 200 to 250 nm. The hydrodynamic diameter of the nanogels decreased to ca. 100-150 nm when the solution temperature was increased to 37 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, when the pKa was below that of the NIPAAm-PAA (ca. 6.0), the gels collapsed and aggregated. However, at 37 degrees C and a physiological pH of 7.4, the nanogels did not fully collapse due to the charge-charge repulsion derived from the ionized carboxyl groups of the PAA. Similar phase transition behavior was observed with the corresponding linear copolymers. Thus, such nanogel particles could be useful for releasing drugs in regions of local acidosis, including sites of infection, tumors, ischemia, and intracellular endosomes.

  4. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-α). The value of exponent α provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(α-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5.

  5. Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, Iason Titos

    Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of

  6. Targeted lipid-coated nanoparticles: delivery of tumor necrosis factor-functionalized particles to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Sylvia K E; Musyanovych, Anna; Altvater, Martin; Scheurich, Peter; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Landfester, Katharina; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles displaying tumor necrosis factor on their surface (TNF nanocytes) are useful carrier systems capable of mimicking the bioactivity of membrane-bound TNF. Thus, TNF nanocytes are potent activators of TNF receptor 1 and 2 leading to a striking enhancement of apoptosis. However, in vivo applications are hampered by potential systemic toxicity. Here, using TNF nanocytes as a model system, we developed a procedure to generate targeted lipid-coated particles (TLP) in which TNF activity is shielded. The TLPs generated here are composed of an inner single-chain TNF (scTNF)-functionalized, polymeric nanoparticle core surrounded by a lipid coat endowed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for sterical stabilization and a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment for targeting. Using a scFv directed against the tumor stroma marker fibroblast activation protein (FAP) we show that TLP and scTNF-TLP specifically bind to FAP-expressing, but not to FAP-negative cells. Lipid coating strongly reduced nonspecific binding of particles and scTNF-mediated cytotoxicity towards FAP-negative cells. In contrast, an increased cytotoxicity of TLP was observed for FAP-positive cells. Thus, through liposome encapsulation, nanoparticles carrying bioactive molecules, which are subject to nonselective uptake and activity towards various cells and tissues, can be converted into target cell-specific composite particles exhibiting a selective activity towards antigen-positive target cells. Besides safe and targeted delivery of death ligands such as TNF, TLP should be suitable for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, which benefit from a targeted delivery of reagents embedded into the particle core or displayed on the core particle surface.

  7. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  8. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N.

    2015-11-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A® Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 +/- 1.1% vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1% and 7.5 +/- 0.8% vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm® (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A® Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A® Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 +/- 3.2% vs. 0.6 +/- 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU

  9. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N.

    2015-11-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A® Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 +/- 1.1% vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1% and 7.5 +/- 0.8% vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm® (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A® Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A® Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 +/- 3.2% vs. 0.6 +/- 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU

  10. Fluorescence tomographic imaging of sentinel lymph node using near-infrared emitting bioreducible dextran nanogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiejing; Jiang, Beiqi; Lin, Chao; Zhuang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping is a critical procedure for SLN biopsy and its diagnosis as tumor metastasis in clinical practice. However, SLN mapping agents used in the clinic frequently cause side effects and complications in the patients. Here, we report the development of a near-infrared (NIR) emitting polymeric nanogel with hydrodynamic diameter of ~28 nm - which is the optimal size for SLN uptake - for noninvasive fluorescence mapping of SLN in a mouse. This polymeric nanogel was obtained by coupling Cy7, an NIR dye, to the self-assembled nanogel from disulfide-linked dextran-deoxycholic acid conjugate with the dextran of 10 kDa, denoted as Dex-Cy7. Fluorescence imaging analysis showed that Dex-Cy7 nanogels had an enhanced photostability when compared to Cy7 alone. After intradermal injection of Dex-Cy7 nanogel into the front paw of a mouse, the nanogels were able to migrate into the mouse's axillary lymph node, exhibiting longer retention time and higher fluorescence intensity in the node when compared to Cy7 alone. An immunohistofluorescence assay revealed that the nanogels were localized in the central region of lymph node and that the uptake was largely by the macrophages. In vitro and in vivo toxicity results indicated that the dextran-based nanogels were of low cytotoxicity at a polymer concentration up to 1,000 μg/mL and harmless to normal liver and kidney organs in mice at an intravenous dose of 1.25 mg/kg. The results of this study suggest that NIR-emitting polymeric nanogels based on bioreducible dextran-deoxycholic acid conjugates show high potential as fluorescence nanoprobes for safe and noninvasive SLN mapping.

  11. Tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier for targeted intracellular delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Conghui; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Wang, Yinjie; Chen, Kang; Guo, Xiong; Chen, Dawei

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we constructed a tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier containing paclitaxel (FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX), by adding 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) and oleic acid as pH-sensitive components into the formulation of lipid core and then coating with folic acid modified bovine serum albumin (FA-BSA) for tumor targeting activity. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that paclitaxel (PTX) was released from FA-BSA-LC/DOPE in a pH-dependent manner. The vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that all the blank nanocarriers were nontoxic. However, MTT assay showed that FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX was highly cytotoxic. Cellular uptake experiments analyzed with flow cytometry and laser scan confocal microscope (LSCM) revealed that FA-BSA-LC/DOPE was taken up in great amount via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and pH-sensitive release of drug to cytoplasm. Furthermore, the study of intracellular drug release behavior demonstrated that the FA-BSA-LC/DOPE escaped from lysosomes and released drug into cytoplasm. The in vivo targeting activity showed that the nanocarrier selectively targeted tumor and had long residence time for BSA layer increased the stability in blood. Moreover, FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX produced very marked anti-tumor activity in tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Therefore, FA-BSA-LC/DOPE as biocompatible, tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier is a promising system for effective intracellular delivery of PTX to tumor.

  12. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Yong; Li, Lan; Dong, Hai-Qing; Cai, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Tian-Bin

    2013-07-01

    PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ~100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery.

  13. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  14. Growth Factor Tethering to Protein Nanoparticles via Coiled-Coil Formation for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Assal, Yasmine; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2015-08-19

    Protein-based nanoparticles are attractive carriers for drug delivery because they are biodegradable and can be genetically designed. Moreover, modification of protein-based nanoparticles with cell-specific ligands allows for active targeting abilities. Previously, we developed protein nanoparticles comprising genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) with fused polyaspartic acid tails (ELP-D). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was displayed on the surface of the ELP-D nanoparticles via genetic design to allow for active cell-targeting abilities. Herein, we focused on the coiled-coil structural motif as a means for noncovalent tethering of growth factor to ELP-D. Specifically, two peptides known to form a heterodimer via a coiled-coil structural motif were fused to ELP-D and single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF121), to facilitate noncovalent tethering upon formation of the heterodimer coiled-coil structure. Drug-loaded growth factor-tethered ELP-Ds were found to be effective against cancer cells by provoking cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that tethering growth factor to protein nanoparticles through coiled-coil formation yields a promising biomaterial candidate for targeted drug delivery.

  15. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  16. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  17. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  18. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

  19. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  20. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  1. Tumor-homing peptides as tools for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna; Ndifon, Cornelia; Lui, Sylvia; Widdows, Kate; Kotamraju, Venkata R.; Agemy, Lilach; Teesalu, Tambet; Glazier, Jocelyn D.; Cellesi, Francesco; Tirelli, Nicola; Aplin, John D.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Harris, Lynda K.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of therapeutics to treat pregnancy complications is severely lacking mainly because of the risk of causing harm to the fetus. As enhancement of placental growth and function can alleviate maternal symptoms and improve fetal growth in animal models, we have developed a method for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta. We show that the tumor-homing peptide sequences CGKRK and iRGD bind selectively to the placental surface of humans and mice and do not interfere with normal development. Peptide-coated nanoparticles intravenously injected into pregnant mice accumulated within the mouse placenta, whereas control nanoparticles exhibited reduced binding and/or fetal transfer. We used targeted liposomes to efficiently deliver cargoes of carboxyfluorescein and insulin-like growth factor 2 to the mouse placenta; the latter significantly increased mean placental weight when administered to healthy animals and significantly improved fetal weight distribution in a well-characterized model of fetal growth restriction. These data provide proof of principle for targeted delivery of drugs to the placenta and provide a novel platform for the development of placenta-specific therapeutics. PMID:27386551

  2. Tumor-homing peptides as tools for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta.

    PubMed

    King, Anna; Ndifon, Cornelia; Lui, Sylvia; Widdows, Kate; Kotamraju, Venkata R; Agemy, Lilach; Teesalu, Tambet; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Cellesi, Francesco; Tirelli, Nicola; Aplin, John D; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Harris, Lynda K

    2016-05-01

    The availability of therapeutics to treat pregnancy complications is severely lacking mainly because of the risk of causing harm to the fetus. As enhancement of placental growth and function can alleviate maternal symptoms and improve fetal growth in animal models, we have developed a method for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta. We show that the tumor-homing peptide sequences CGKRK and iRGD bind selectively to the placental surface of humans and mice and do not interfere with normal development. Peptide-coated nanoparticles intravenously injected into pregnant mice accumulated within the mouse placenta, whereas control nanoparticles exhibited reduced binding and/or fetal transfer. We used targeted liposomes to efficiently deliver cargoes of carboxyfluorescein and insulin-like growth factor 2 to the mouse placenta; the latter significantly increased mean placental weight when administered to healthy animals and significantly improved fetal weight distribution in a well-characterized model of fetal growth restriction. These data provide proof of principle for targeted delivery of drugs to the placenta and provide a novel platform for the development of placenta-specific therapeutics. PMID:27386551

  3. Membrane domain formation—a key factor for targeted intracellular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein molecules, toxins and viruses internalize into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) using specific proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a barrier for many pharmaceutical agents to enter into the cytoplasm of target cells. In the case of cancer cells, tissue-specific biomarkers in the plasma membrane, like cancer-specific growth factor receptors, could be excellent candidates for RME-dependent drug delivery. Recent data suggest that agent binding to these receptors at the cell surface, resulting in membrane domain formation by receptor clustering, can be used for the initiation of RME. As a result, these pharmaceutical agents are internalized into the cells and follow different routes until they reach their final intracellular targets like lysosomes or Golgi. We propose that clustering induced formation of plasma membrane microdomains enriched in receptors, sphingolipids, and inositol lipids, leads to membrane bending which functions as the onset of RME. In this review we will focus on the role of domain formation in RME and discuss potential applications for targeted intracellular drug delivery. PMID:25520666

  4. pH-Activated Targeting Drug Delivery System Based on the Selective Binding of Phenylboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Xu, Jia-Qi; Yi, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Quan; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Li, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Phenylboronic acid (PBA) is a tumor-targeting molecule, but its nonspecific interaction with normal cells or other components containing cis-diol residues undoubtedly limits its potential application in tumor-targeting drug delivery. Herein, we developed fructose-coated mixed micelles via PBA-terminated polyethylene glycol monostearate (PBA-PEG-C18) and Pluronic P123 (PEG20-PPG70-PEG20) to solve this problem, as the stability of borate formed by PBA and fructose was dramatically dependent on pH. The fluorescence spectroscopic results indicated that the borate formed by PBA and fructose decomposed at a decreased pH, and better binding between PBA and sialic acid (SA) was observed at a low pH. These results implied that the fructose groups decorated on the surface of the micelles could be out-competed by SA at a low pH. In vitro uptake and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the fructose coating on the mixed micelles improved the endocytosis and enhanced the cytotoxicity of drug-loaded mixed micelles in HepG2 cells but reduced the cytotoxicity in normal cells. These results demonstrate that a simple decorating strategy may facilitate PBA-targeted nanoparticles for tumor-specific drug delivery. PMID:27229625

  5. Multifunctional Micellar Nanocarriers for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Hydrophobic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Zhu, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Poor water solubility, low tumor specificity, insufficient cell internalization, and drug resistance are typical among chemotherapy drugs. In this study, the multifunctional micellar nanocarriers containing the PEG2k-pp-PE, a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-labile self-assembling block copolymer, and the TAT-PEG1k-PE, a cell penetrating moiety, were developed for tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs. The functional polymers and their nanocarriers were characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, micelle formation capability, drug loading and release, cellular uptake, and anticancer activity. After the MMP2-mediated cleavage, the protective long chain PEG (PEG2k) was deshielded and the cell penetrating peptide (TAT) was exposed for the enhanced tumor targeting and cellular penetration. In the in vitro studies, the multifunctional nanocarriers showed the improved cellular uptake and anticancer activity in various cancer cells including both drug sensitive and resistant cells, compared to their nonsensitive counterparts and conventional polymeric micelles. Furthermore, the PEG2k-pp-PE and its containing micelles were found to possess the capability to reverse the P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance. Our results suggested that the multifunctional micellar nanocarriers would be a promising tumor-targeted drug delivery platform, applicable for the MMP2 up-regulated cancers. PMID:27319214

  6. Development of TMTP-1 targeted designer biopolymers for gene delivery to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McBride, John W; Massey, Ashley S; McCaffrey, J; McCrudden, Cian M; Coulter, Jonathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; Robson, Tracy; McCarthy, Helen O

    2016-03-16

    Designer biopolymers (DBPs) represent state of the art genetically engineered biomacromolecules designed to condense plasmid DNA, and overcome intra- and extra- cellular barriers to gene delivery. Three DBPs were synthesized, each with the tumor molecular targeting peptide-1 (TMTP-1) motif to specifically target metastases. Each DBP was complexed with a pEGFP-N1 reporter plasmid to permit physiochemical and biological assay analysis. Results indicated that two of the biopolymers (RMHT and RM3GT) effectively condensed pEGFP-N1 into cationic nanoparticles <100 nm and were capable of transfecting PC-3 metastatic prostate cancer cells. Conversely the anionic RMGT DBP nanoparticles could not transfect PC-3 cells. RMHT and RM3GT nanoparticles were stable in the presence of serum and protected the cargo from degradation. Additionally it was concluded that cell viability could recover post-transfection with these DBPs, which were less toxic than the commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine(®) 2000. With both DBPs, a higher transfection efficacy was observed in PC-3 cells than in the moderately metastatic, DU145, and normal, PNT2-C2, cell lines. Blocking of the TMTP-1 receptors inhibited gene transfer indicating internalization via this receptor. In conclusion RMHT and RM3GT are fully functional DBPs that address major obstacles to gene delivery and target metastatic cells expressing the TMTP-1 receptor.

  7. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

  8. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process.

  9. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process. PMID:25684634

  10. A designed recombinant fusion protein for targeted delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohamed Mohamed; Dar, Ghulam Hassan; Jeyalakshmi, Durga; Venkatraman, Uthra; Saba, Kamal; Rangaraj, Nandini; Patel, Anant Bahadur; Gopal, Vijaya

    2016-04-28

    RNA interference represents a novel therapeutic approach to modulate several neurodegenerative disease-related genes. However, exogenous delivery of siRNA restricts their transport into different tissues and specifically into the brain mainly due to its large size and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To overcome these challenges, we developed here a strategy wherein a peptide known to target specific gangliosides was fused to a double-stranded RNA binding protein to deliver siRNA to the brain parenchyma. The designed fusion protein designated as TARBP-BTP consists of a double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) of human Trans Activation response element (TAR) RNA Binding Protein (TARBP2) fused to a brain targeting peptide that binds to monosialoganglioside GM1. Conformation-specific binding of TARBP2 domain to siRNA led to the formation of homogenous serum-stable complex with targeting potential. Further, uptake of the complex in Neuro-2a, IMR32 and HepG2 cells analyzed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting, revealed selective requirement of GM1 for entry. Remarkably, systemic delivery of the fluorescently labeled complex (TARBP-BTP:siRNA) in ΑβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) led to distinctive localization in the cerebral hemisphere. Further, the delivery of siRNA mediated by TARBP-BTP led to significant knockdown of BACE1 in the brain, in both ΑβPP-PS1 mice and wild type C57BL/6. The study establishes the growing importance of fusion proteins in delivering therapeutic siRNA to brain tissues. PMID:26948382

  11. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  12. Cell-Targeting Cationic Gene Delivery System Based on a Modular Design Rationale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Luming; Jin, Yang; Qi, Chao; Li, Qilin; Zhang, Yunti; Jiang, Xulin; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    En route to target cells, a gene carrier faces multiple extra- and intracellular hurdles that would affect delivery efficacy. Although diverse strategies have been proposed to functionalize gene carriers for individually overcoming these barriers, it is challenging to generate a single multifunctional gene carrier capable of surmounting all these barriers. Aiming at this challenge, we have developed a supramolecular modular approach to fabricate a multifunctional cationic gene delivery system. It consists of two prefunctionalized modules: (1) a host module: a polymer (PCD-SS-PDMAEMA) composed of poly(β-cyclodextrin) backbone and disulfide-linked PDMAEMA arms, expectedly acting to compact DNA and release DNA upon cleavage of disulfide linkers in reductive microenvironment; and (2) a guest module: adamantyl and folate terminated PEG (Ad-PEG-FA), expectedly functioning to reduce nonspecific interactions, improve biocompatibility, and provide folate-mediated cellular targeting specificity. Through the host-guest interaction between β-cyclodextrin units of the "host" module and adamantyl groups of the "guest" module, the PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1 (host) and Ad-PEG-FA (guest) self-assemble forming a supramolecular pseudocopolymer (PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1/PEG-FA). Our comprehensive analyses demonstrate that the functions preassigned to the two building modules are well realized. The gene carrier effectively compacts DNA into stable nanosized polyplexes resistant to enzymatic digestion, triggers DNA release in reducing environment, possesses significantly improved hemocompatibility, and specifically targets folate-receptor positive cells. Most importantly, endowed with these predesigned functions, the PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1/PEG-FA supramolecular gene carrier exhibits excellent transfection efficacy for both pDNA and siRNA. Thus, this work represents a proof-of-concept example showing the efficiency and convenience of an adaptable, modular approach for conferring multiple functions to a single

  13. Development of Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery and Non-invasive Imaging of Therapeutic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P.; Mao, Hui; Wang, Andrew Y.; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by non-invasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine. PMID:19275541

  14. Design of an integrated hardware interface for AOSLO image capture and cone-targeted stimulus delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiang; Arathorn, David W.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Vogel, Curtis R.; Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated FPGA solution to project highly stabilized, aberration-corrected stimuli directly onto the retina by means of real-time retinal image motion signals in combination with high speed modulation of a scanning laser. By reducing the latency between target location prediction and stimulus delivery, the stimulus location accuracy, in a subject with good fixation, is improved to 0.15 arcminutes from 0.26 arcminutes in our earlier solution. We also demonstrate the new FPGA solution is capable of delivering stabilized large stimulus pattern (up to 256x256 pixels) to the retina. PMID:20721171

  15. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  16. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Urara; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Hirano, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; E-mail: akiyoshi.org@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH{sub 2}). The CHPNH{sub 2}-QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  17. A novel in situ gel for sustained drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sudipta; Dash, Alekha K

    2004-05-19

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel chitosan-glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in situ gel system for sustained drug delivery and targeting. The delivery system consisted of 3% (w/v) chitosan and 3% (w/v) GMO in 0.33M citric acid. In situ gel was formed at a biological pH. In vitro release studies were conducted in Sorensen's phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and drugs were analyzed either by HPLC or spectrophotometry. Characterization of the gel included the effect of cross-linker, determination of diffusion coefficient and water uptake by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Mucoadhesive property of the gel was evaluated in vitro using an EZ-Tester. Incorporation of a cross-linker (glutaraldehyde) retarded the rate and extent of drug release. The in vitro release can further be sustained by replacing the free drug with drug-encapsulated microspheres. Drug release from the gel followed a matrix diffusion controlled mechanism. Inclusion of GMO enhanced the mucoadhesive property of chitosan by three- to sevenfold. This novel in situ gel system can be useful in the sustained delivery of drugs via oral as well as parenteral routes.

  18. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. PMID:25995632

  19. Noninvasive, Targeted, and Non-Viral Ultrasound-Mediated GDNF-Plasmid Delivery for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chung‐Yin; Chan, Hong-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, You-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports the growth and survival of dopaminergic neurons. CNS gene delivery currently relies on invasive intracerebral injection to transit the blood-brain barrier. Non-viral gene delivery via systematic transvascular route is an attractive alternative because it is non-invasive, but a high-yield and targeted gene-expressed method is still lacking. In this study, we propose a novel non-viral gene delivery approach to achieve targeted gene transfection. Cationic microbubbles as gene carriers were developed to allow the stable formation of a bubble-GDNF gene complex, and transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure concurrently interacting with the bubble-gene complex allowed transient gene permeation and induced local GDNF expression. We demonstrate that the focused ultrasound-triggered GDNFp-loaded cationic microbubbles platform can achieve non-viral targeted gene delivery via a noninvasive administration route, outperform intracerebral injection in terms of targeted GDNF delivery of high-titer GDNF genes, and has a neuroprotection effect in Parkinson’s disease (PD) animal models to successfully block PD syndrome progression and to restore behavioral function. This study explores the potential of using FUS and bubble-gene complexes to achieve noninvasive and targeted gene delivery for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26786201

  20. A novel hydrolysis-resistant lipophilic folate derivative enables stable delivery of targeted liposomes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yifei; Yang, Tan; Zhang, Wendian; Lu, Yao; Ye, Peng; Yang, Guang; Li, Bin; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Yong; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J; Xu, Chuanrui; Xiang, Guangya

    2014-01-01

    Instability of targeting ligand is a roadblock towards successful development of folate targeted liposomes. Folate ligands have been linked to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cholesterol by an amide bond to form folate-CONH-PEG-CONH-Cholesterol (F-CONH-PEG-CONH-Chol), which is subject to hydrolysis. To increase the stability of folate ligands and promote the long circulation and targeting effects, we synthesized a chemically stable lipophilic folate derivative, folate-CONH-PEG-NH-Cholesterol (F-CONH-PEG-NH-Chol), where the amide bond was replaced by a C-N bond, to deliver liposomal doxorubicin (Dox). Its physical stability, cellular uptake, cellular toxicity, pharmacokinetics, distribution, anti-tumor efficacy, and cardiac toxicity were investigated. Our results indicate that F-CONH-PEG-NH-Chol conjugated liposomes are taken up selectively by folate receptor-positive HeLa and KB cells. Compared with F-CONH-PEG-CONH-Chol with two carbonate linkages, F-CONH-PEG-NH-Chol better retained its drug entrapment efficiency and folate receptor-targeting activity during prolonged circulation. F-CONH-PEG-NH-Chol thus represents a physically stable and effective ligand for delivering folate receptor-targeted liposomes, with prolonged circulation time and efficient tissue distribution, as well as higher efficacy and less cardiac toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that this novel conjugate can serve as a promising derivative for the delivery of anti-tumor therapeutic agents. PMID:25302024

  1. Liposome-protein corona in a physiological environment: challenges and opportunities for targeted delivery of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    Active targeting that exploits the (over)expression of surface receptors in target cells by ligand incorporation is a central concept in nanomedicine research. Despite unprecedented efforts, no targeted liposome-based therapeutics is commercially available for clinical practice. What is inhibiting the efficient translation of targeted liposome technology from bench to bedside? After introduction in the bloodstream, the lipid surface is immediately modified by the adsorption of a "protein corona" and preserving the surface functionality appears to be challenging. On the other hand, a long-standing corona with receptor-binding sites could associate with the target cell long enough to activate the cell's uptake machinery, triggering liposome endocytosis and intracellular cargo delivery. This opens the intriguing possibility to manipulate the corona composition by liposome design. This review will focus on the emerging field of liposome-protein corona research from basic, descriptive research to readily applicable knowledge and technologies for implementation in drug improvement and development. From the clinical editor: This review is addressing the liposome protein corona research concerning the potential gains in drug improvement and for drug development.

  2. Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-20

    Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy.

  3. Novel tumor-targeting, self-assembling peptide nanofiber as a carrier for effective curcumin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian; Xu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yumin; Chu, Liping; Liu, Qingfen; Song, Naling; Yang, Cuihong

    2014-01-01

    The poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin restrict its clinical application for cancer treatment. In this study, a novel tumor-targeting nanofiber carrier was developed to improve the solubility and tumor-targeting ability of curcumin using a self-assembled Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide. The morphologies of the peptide nanofiber and the curcumin-encapsulated nanofiber were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The tumor-targeting activity of the curcumin-encapsulated Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide nanofiber (f-RGD-Cur) was studied in vitro and in vivo, using Nap-GFFYG-RGE peptide nanofiber (f-RGE-Cur) as the control. Curcumin was encapsulated into the peptide nanofiber, which had a diameter of approximately 10–20 nm. Curcumin showed sustained-release behavior from the nanofibers in vitro. f-RGD-Cur showed much higher cellular uptake in αvβ3 integrin-positive HepG2 liver carcinoma cells than did non-targeted f-RGE-Cur, thereby leading to significantly higher cytotoxicity. Ex vivo studies further demonstrated that curcumin could accumulate markedly in mouse tumors after administration of f-RGD-Cur via the tail vein. These results indicate that Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide self-assembled nanofibers are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system for targeted treatment of cancer. PMID:24399876

  4. Brain-targeting delivery for RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Shen, Teng; Li, Jianfeng; Ma, Haojun; Guo, Yubo; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with modification of brain-targeting molecules have been extensively exploited for therapeutic gene delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). As one of the effective RNA interference (RNAi) approaches, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has been proved to be promising in the field of gene therapy. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (Ask1) has been reported to be an important target for gene therapy against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL) was decorated by dermorphin (a μ-opiate receptor agonist) through PEG for efficient brain-targeting, then complexed with anti-Ask1 shRNA plasmid DNA, yielding the DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were characterized and estimated the brain-targeting ability. In vitro, increased cellular uptake and transfection efficiency were explored; in vivo, preferable accumulation and gene transfection in brain were showed in images. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs also revealed high efficiency of neuroprotection. As a result of RNAi, corresponding mRNA was distinctly degraded, expression of Ask1 protein was obviously suppressed, apoptotic cell death was apparently decreased and cerebral infarct area was significantly reduced. Above all, DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were proved to be efficient and safe for brain-targeting RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.

  5. Folated Synperonic-Cholesteryl Hemisuccinate Polymeric Micelles for the Targeted Delivery of Docetaxel in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Taymouri, Somayeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Haghjooy Javanmard, Shaghayegh; Rostami, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the synthesis of folic acid- (FA-) targeted polymeric micelles of Synperonic PE/F 127-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (PF127-Chol) for specific delivery of docetaxel (DTX). Targeted or nontargeted micelles loaded with DTX were prepared via dialysis method. The effects of processing variables on the physicochemical properties of targeted micelles were evaluated using a full factorial design. After the optimization of the polymer/drug ratio, the organic solvent type used for the preparation of the micelles, and the temperature of dialyzing medium, the in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the optimized micelles were studied on B16F10 melanoma cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. The anticancer efficacy of DTX-loaded FA-PF127-Chol was evaluated in mice bearing melanoma tumor. Optimized targeted micelles had the particle size of 171.3 nm, zeta potential of −7.8 mV, PDI of 0.325, and a high encapsulation efficiency that released the drug within 144 h. The MTT assay indicated that targeted micelles carrying DTX were significantly more cytotoxic, had higher cellular uptake, and reduced the tumor volume significantly more than the nontargeted micelles and the free drug. FA-PF127-Chol could be, therefore, a promising biomaterial for tumors overexpressing folate receptors. PMID:25839040

  6. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  7. Lipid nanoparticles for targeted siRNA delivery – going from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zatsepin, Timofei S; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Koteliansky, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the basic aspects of small interfering RNA delivery by lipid nano-particles (LNPs) and elaborates on the current status of clinical trials for these systems. We briefly describe the roles of all LNP components and possible strategies for their improvement. We also focus on the current clinical trials using LNP-formulated RNA and the possible outcomes for therapy in the near future. Also, we present a critical analysis of selected clinical trials that reveals the common logic behind target selection. We address this review to a wide audience, especially to medical doctors who are interested in the application of RNA interference–based treatment platforms. We anticipate that this review may spark interest in this particular audience and generate new ideas in target selection for the disorders they are dealing with. PMID:27462152

  8. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  9. Lipid nanoparticles for targeted siRNA delivery - going from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zatsepin, Timofei S; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Koteliansky, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the basic aspects of small interfering RNA delivery by lipid nano-particles (LNPs) and elaborates on the current status of clinical trials for these systems. We briefly describe the roles of all LNP components and possible strategies for their improvement. We also focus on the current clinical trials using LNP-formulated RNA and the possible outcomes for therapy in the near future. Also, we present a critical analysis of selected clinical trials that reveals the common logic behind target selection. We address this review to a wide audience, especially to medical doctors who are interested in the application of RNA interference-based treatment platforms. We anticipate that this review may spark interest in this particular audience and generate new ideas in target selection for the disorders they are dealing with. PMID:27462152

  10. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aman P; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  11. Intracellular delivery of a cell-penetrating SOCS1 that targets IFN-gamma signaling.

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hawiger, Jacek

    2009-07-21

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) is an intracellular inhibitor of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway that couples interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) signaling to the nucleus. Because several inflammatory diseases are associated with uncontrolled IFN-gamma signaling, we engineered a recombinant cell-penetrating SOCS1 (CP-SOCS1) to target this pathway. Here, we show that CP-SOCS1, analogous to endogenous SOCS1, interacted with components of the IFN-gamma signaling complex and functionally attenuated the phosphorylation of STAT1, which resulted in the subsequent inhibition of the production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Thus, controlled, intracellular delivery of recombinant CP-SOCS1 boosted the anti-inflammatory potential of the cell by restoring the homeostatic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling. This approach to controlling signal transduction has potential use for therapeutic targeting of signaling pathways associated with inflammatory diseases.

  12. Enabling cytoplasmic delivery and organelle targeting by surface modification of nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Corbo, Claudia; Cevenini, Armando; Molinaro, Roberto; Palomba, Roberto; Pandolfi, Laura; Agostini, Marco; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-07-01

    Nanocarriers are designed to specifically accumulate in diseased tissues. In this context, targeting of intracellular compartments was shown to enhance the efficacy of many drugs and to offer new and more effective therapeutic approaches. This is especially true for therapies based on biologicals that must be encapsulated to favor cell internalization, and to avoid intracellular endosomal sequestration and degradation of the payload. In this review, we discuss specific surface modifications designed to achieve cell cytoplasm delivery and to improve targeting of major organelles; we also discuss the therapeutic applications of these approaches. Last, we describe some integrated strategies designed to sequentially overcome the biological barriers that separate the site of administration from the cell cytoplasm, which is the drug's site of action.

  13. Lipid nanoparticles for targeted siRNA delivery - going from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zatsepin, Timofei S; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Koteliansky, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the basic aspects of small interfering RNA delivery by lipid nano-particles (LNPs) and elaborates on the current status of clinical trials for these systems. We briefly describe the roles of all LNP components and possible strategies for their improvement. We also focus on the current clinical trials using LNP-formulated RNA and the possible outcomes for therapy in the near future. Also, we present a critical analysis of selected clinical trials that reveals the common logic behind target selection. We address this review to a wide audience, especially to medical doctors who are interested in the application of RNA interference-based treatment platforms. We anticipate that this review may spark interest in this particular audience and generate new ideas in target selection for the disorders they are dealing with.

  14. Delivery of Molecularly Targeted Therapy to Malignant Glioma, a Disease of the Whole Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sagar; Sane, Ramola; Oberoi, Rajneet; Ohlfest, John R.; Elmquist, William

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, due to its invasive nature, can be considered a disease of the entire brain. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have only a marginal impact on patient survival. A crucial challenge faced by cancer researchers is to effectively deliver drugs to invasive glioma cells residing in a sanctuary within the central nervous system. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts delivery of many small and large molecules into the brain. Drug delivery to the brain is further restricted by active efflux transporters present at the BBB, which transport drugs out of the brain back into the blood. Current clinical assessment of drug delivery and hence efficacy is based on the measured drug levels in the bulk tumor mass that is usually removed by surgery. Mounting evidence suggests that the inevitable relapse and lethality of glioblastoma multiforme is due to a failure to effectively treat invasive glioma cells. These invasive cells hide in areas of the brain that are shielded by an intact BBB where they continue to grow and give rise to the recurrent tumor. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutics to the invasive glioma cells is therefore critical, and long-term efficacy will depend upon the ability of a molecularly targeted agent to penetrate an intact and functional BBB throughout the entire brain. This review highlights the various aspects of the BBB, and also the brain–tumor-cell barrier, a barrier due to expression of efflux transporters in tumor cells, that together can significantly influence drug response. It then discusses the special challenge of glioma as a disease of the whole brain, which lends particular emphasis to the need to effectively deliver drugs across the BBB to reach both the central tumor and the invasive glioma cells. PMID:21676290

  15. Mammaglobin as a potential molecular target for breast cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Li, Ly; Wang, Qian; Fleming, Timothy P; You, Shaojin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mammaglobin (MAM) has been used as a specific molecular marker for breast cancer diagnosis. Recently, several groups of researchers proposed a number of therapeutic strategies targeting this molecule. Some of the strategies are based upon an essential but not demonstrated hypothesis – mammaglobin is associated with the surface of breast cancer cells, which strongly disputes the therapeutic strategies. Results We conducted a computer-based predictive analysis and identified a small fragment at the N-end of MAM as a potential transmembrane domain. We provided several evidences to demonstrate the presence of the membrane-associated MAM. We isolated the membrane protein components from known MAM positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB361 and MDA-MB415). We showed that about 22–64% of MAM proteins, depending upon the types of the cancer cells, directly attached on the membrane of breast cancer cells, by Western blotting assays. To directly visualize the presence of the membrane-bound MAM protein, we incubated the MAM positive cancer cells with FITC labeled anti-MAM antibody, and observed clear fluorescent signals on the surface of the cells. In studying the MAM protein distribution in human breast cancer tissues, we first identified two immunostain patterns that are associated with the membrane-bound MAM: the membrane stain pattern and luminary surface stain pattern. To test whether the membrane-associated MAM can serve as a molecular target for drug delivery, we conjugated anti-MAM antibody to human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and loaded doxorubicin (Dox) in the core of LDL. Specific binding and cytotoxicity of the MAM targeted and Dox loaded LDL was tested in the MAM positive breast cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion We first showed that some of MAM protein directly associated with the surface of breast cancer cells. The membrane-associated MAM protein may be utilized as a useful molecular marker for breast cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:19309500

  16. Formulation of Functionalized PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianjun; Teply, Benjamin A.; Sherifi, Ines; Sung, Josephine; Luther, Gaurav; Gu, Frank X.; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) size has been shown to significantly effect the biodistribution of targeted and non-targeted NPs in an organ specific manner. Herein we have developed NPs from carboxy-terminated poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG-COOH) polymer and studied the effects of altering the following formulation parameters on the size of NPs, including: 1) polymer concentration, 2) drug loading, 3) water miscibility of solvent, and 4) the ratio of water to solvent. We found that NP mean volumetric size correlates linearly with polymer concentration for NPs between 70 and 250 nm in diameter (linear coefficient = 0.99 for NPs formulated with solvents studied). NPs with desirable size, drug loading, and polydispersity were conjugated to the A10 RNA aptamer (Apt) that binds to the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), and NP and NP-Apt biodistribution was evaluated in a LNCaP (PSMA+) xenograft mouse model of PCa. The surface functionalization of NPs with the A10 PSMA aptamer significantly enhanced delivery of NPs to tumors vs. equivalent NPs lacking the A10 PSMA aptamer (a 3.77-fold increase at 24 hrs; NP-Apt 0.83% ± 0.21% vs. NP 0.22% ± 0.07% of injected dose per gram of tissue; mean ± s.d., n = 4, p = 0.002). The ability to control NP size together with targeted delivery may result in favorable biodistribution and development of clinically relevant targeted therapies. PMID:17055572

  17. Characterization of cubosomes as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinsheng; Zhou, Yanfang; Han, Ke; Qin, Lingzhen; Dian, Linghui; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Phytantriol- and glycerol monooleate-based cubosomes were produced and characterized as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin. The cubosomes were prepared by emulsification and homogenization of phytantriol (F1), glycerol monooleate (F2), and poloxamer dispersions, characterized for morphology and particle size distribution by transmission electron microscope and photon correlation spectroscopy. Their Im3m crystallographic space group was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. An in vitro release study showed that the cubosomes provided a sustained release system for capsaicin. An in vitro diffusion study conducted using Franz diffusion cells indicated that the skin retention of capsaicin from cubosomes in the stratum corneum was much higher (2.75±0.22 μg versus 4.32±0.13 μg, respectively) than that of capsaicin cream (0.72±0.13 μg). The stress testing showed that the cubosome formulations were stable under strong light and high temperature for up to 10 days. After multiapplications on mouse skin, the irritation of capsaicin cubosomes and cream was light with the least amount of side effects. Overall, the present study demonstrated that cubosomes may be a suitable skin-targeted and sustained delivery system for the transdermal administration of capsaicin. PMID:26345516

  18. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be