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Sample records for targeted paclitaxel delivery

  1. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  2. Novel thermo-sensitive core-shell nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanpei; Pan, Shirong; Zhang, Wei; Du, Zhuo

    2009-02-01

    Novel thermo-sensitive nanoparticles self-assembled from poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide- co-acrylamide)-block-poly(γ-benzyl L-glutamate) were designed for targeted drug delivery in localized hyperthermia. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of nanoparticles was adjusted to a level between physiological body temperature (37 °C) and that used in local hyperthermia (about 43 °C). The temperature-dependent performances of the core-shell nanoparticles were systemically studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and atom force microscopy (AFM). The mean diameter of the nanoparticles increased slightly from 110 to 129 nm when paclitaxel (PTX), a poorly water-soluble anti-tumor drug, was encapsulated. A stability study in bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution indicated that the PTX loaded nanoparticles may have a long circulation time under physiological environments as the LCST was above physiological body temperature and the shell remained hydrophilic at 37 °C. The PTX release profiles showed thermo-sensitive controlled behavior. The proliferation inhibiting activity of PTX loaded nanoparticles was evaluated against Hela cells in vitro, compared with Taxol (a formulation of paclitaxel dissolved in Cremophor EL and ethanol). The cytotoxicity of PTX loaded nanoparticles increased obviously when hyperthermia was performed. The nanoparticles synthesized here could be an ideal candidate for thermal triggered anti-tumor PTX delivery system.

  3. A targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma: transferrin modified lipid coated paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Zhang, Q; Wang, X-y; Chen, X-g; He, Y-x; Yang, W-y; Yang, X

    2014-10-01

    The transferring modified lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles, as a targetable vector, were developed for the targeting delivery of anticancer drugs with paclitaxel (PTX) as a model drug to the ovarian carcinoma, which combines the advantages and avoids disadvantages of polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes in drug delivery. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the lipid coating on the polymeric core. Physicochemical characterizations of TFLPs, such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. In the cellular uptake study, the TFLPs were more efficiently endocytosed by the A2780 cells with high expression of transferrin receptors than HUVEC cells without the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, the anticancer efficacy of TFLPs on the tumor spheroids was stronger than that of lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles (LPs) and PLGA nanoparticles. In the in vivo study, the TFLPs showed the best inhibition effect of the tumor growth for the ovarian carcinoma-bearing mice. In brief, the TFLPs were proved to be an efficient targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma.

  4. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:26952466

  5. Folate-modified lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Dong, Xia; Sun, Hongfan; Song, Cunxian; Wang, Chun; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid–polymer hybrid drug carrier comprised of folate (FA) modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) for sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The core-shell NPs consist of 1) a poly(ε-caprolactone) hydrophobic core based on self-assembly of poly(ε-caprolactone)–poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL) amphiphilic copolymers, 2) a lipid monolayer formed with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000), 3) a targeting ligand (FA) on the surface, and were prepared using a thin-film hydration and ultrasonic dispersion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid monolayer on the hydrophobic polymer core. Physicochemical characterizations of PTX-loaded FLPNPs, such as particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, drug loading content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release, were also evaluated. Fluorescent microscopy proved the internalization efficiency and targeting ability of the folate conjugated on the lipid monolayer for the EMT6 cancer cells which overexpress folate receptor. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of PTX-loaded FLPNPs was lower than that of Taxol®, but higher than that of PTX-loaded LPNPs (without folate conjugation). In EMT6 breast tumor model, intratumoral administration of PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed similar antitumor efficacy but low toxicity compared to Taxol®. More importantly, PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed greater tumor growth inhibition (65.78%) than the nontargeted PTX-loaded LPNPs (48.38%) (P<0.05). These findings indicated that the PTX loaded-FLPNPs with mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core would be a promising nanosized drug formulation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:25844039

  6. Tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier for targeted intracellular delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Conghui; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Wang, Yinjie; Chen, Kang; Guo, Xiong; Chen, Dawei

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we constructed a tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier containing paclitaxel (FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX), by adding 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) and oleic acid as pH-sensitive components into the formulation of lipid core and then coating with folic acid modified bovine serum albumin (FA-BSA) for tumor targeting activity. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that paclitaxel (PTX) was released from FA-BSA-LC/DOPE in a pH-dependent manner. The vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that all the blank nanocarriers were nontoxic. However, MTT assay showed that FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX was highly cytotoxic. Cellular uptake experiments analyzed with flow cytometry and laser scan confocal microscope (LSCM) revealed that FA-BSA-LC/DOPE was taken up in great amount via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and pH-sensitive release of drug to cytoplasm. Furthermore, the study of intracellular drug release behavior demonstrated that the FA-BSA-LC/DOPE escaped from lysosomes and released drug into cytoplasm. The in vivo targeting activity showed that the nanocarrier selectively targeted tumor and had long residence time for BSA layer increased the stability in blood. Moreover, FA-BSA-LC/DOPE-PTX produced very marked anti-tumor activity in tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Therefore, FA-BSA-LC/DOPE as biocompatible, tumor-targeting and pH-sensitive lipoprotein-mimic nanocarrier is a promising system for effective intracellular delivery of PTX to tumor.

  7. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M.; Kant, Rajeev J.; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular

  8. Targeted delivery of albumin bound paclitaxel in the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Costanzo, Francesco; Gasperoni, Silvia; Rotella, Virginia; Di Costanzo, Federica

    2009-01-01

    Taxanes are chemotherapeutic agents with a large spectrum of antitumor activity when used as monotherapy or in combination regimens. Paclitaxel and docetaxel have poor solubility and require a complex solvent system for their commercial formulation, Cremophor EL® (CrEL) and Tween 80® respectively. Both these biological surfactants have recently been implicated as contributing not only to the hypersensitivity reactions, but also to the degree of peripheral neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, and may antagonize the cytotoxicity. Nab-paclitaxel, or nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (ABI-007; Abraxane®), is a novel formulation of paclitaxel that does not employ the CrEL solvent system. Nab-paclitaxel demonstrates greater efficacy and a favorable safety profile compared with standard paclitaxel in patients with advanced disease (breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, ovarian cancer). Clinical studies in breast cancer have shown that nab-paclitaxel is significantly more effective than standard paclitaxel in terms of overall objective response rate (ORR) and time to progression. Nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine, capecitabine or bevacizumab has been shown to be very active in patients with advanced breast cancer. An economic analysis showed that nab-paclitaxel would be an economically reasonable alternative to docetaxel or standard paclitaxel in metastatic breast cancer. Favorable tumor ORR and manageable toxicities have been reported for nab-paclitaxel as monotherapy or in combination treatment in advanced breast cancer. PMID:20616905

  9. Reconstituted high density lipoprotein mediated targeted co-delivery of HZ08 and paclitaxel enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xiangting; Li, Min; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    In the past decades, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) has been successfully developed as a drug carrier since the enhanced HDL-lipids uptake is demonstrated in several human cancers. In this paper, rHDL, for the first time, was utilized to co-encapsulate two hydrophobic drugs: an anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), and a new reversal agent for P-gp (P-glycoprotein)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer, N-cyano-1-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-N'-octyl-2(1H)-isoquinoline-carboximidamide (HZ08). We proposed this drug co-delivery strategy to reverse PTX resistance. The study aimed to develop a biomimetic nanovector, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL), mediating targeted PTX-HZ08 delivery for cancer therapy. Using sodium cholate dialysis method, we successfully formulated dual-agent co-delivering rHDL nanoparticles (PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs) with a typical spherical morphology, well-distributed size (~100nm), high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 90%), sustained drug release properties and exceptional stability even after storage for 1month or incubation in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) DMEM for up to 2days. Results demonstrated that PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs significantly enhanced anticancer efficacy in vitro, including higher cytotoxicity and better ability to induce cell apoptosis against both PTX-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-7/PTX cells). Mechanism studies demonstrated that these improvements could be correlated with increased cellular uptake of PTX mediated by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) as well as prolonged intracellular retention of PTX due to the HZ08 mediated drug-efflux inhibition. In addition, in vivo investigation showed that the PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs were substantially safer, have higher tumor-targeted capacity and have stronger antitumor activity than the corresponding dosage of paclitaxel injection. These findings suggested that rHDL NPs could

  10. Enhanced antitumor effect of novel dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Shuyan; Su, Bo; Li, Wei; Ding, Yongmei; Tang, Liang; Zhou, Wei; Song, Yin; Li, Heyan; Zhou, Caicun

    2010-10-01

    A novel dual-targeted peptide containing an alpha V integrins specific ligand and a neuropilin-1 specific motif was developed which showed an increased specific targeting affinity to tumors. Active dual-targeted liposomes were then produced with this peptide and exhibited greater binding activity than single-targeted liposomes in vitro. Paclitaxel entrapped in this formulation greatly increased the uptake of paclitaxel in the targeting cells and significantly suppressed the growth of HUVEC and A549 cells compared with general paclitaxel injections (Taxol) and single-targeted paclitaxel liposomes. The treatment of tumor xenograft models with dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes also resulted in better tumor growth inhibition than any other treatment groups. Therefore, the dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes prepared in the present study might be a more promising drug for cancer treatment. Furthermore, the dual-targeting approach may produce synergistic effects that can be applied in the development of new targeted drug delivery systems.

  11. Complete Regression of Xenograft Tumors upon Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel via Π-Π Stacking Stabilized Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; van der Meel, Roy; Theek, Benjamin; Blenke, Erik Oude; Pieters, Ebel H.E.; Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; Ehling, Josef; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Storm, Gert; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with taxane-based chemotherapeutics, such as paclitaxel (PTX), is complicated by their narrow therapeutic index. Polymeric micelles are attractive nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery of PTX, as they can be tailored to encapsulate large amounts of hydrophobic drugs and achieve prolonged circulation kinetics. As a result, PTX deposition in tumors is increased while drug exposure to healthy tissues is reduced. However, many PTX-loaded micelle formulations suffer from low stability and fast drug release in the circulation, limiting their suitability for systemic drug targeting. To overcome these limitations, we have developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded micelles which are stable without chemical crosslinking and covalent drug attachment. These micelles are characterized by excellent loading capacity and strong drug retention, attributed to π-π stacking interaction between PTX and the aromatic groups of the polymer chains in the micellar core. The micelles are based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-b-p(HPMAm-Bz)) block copolymers, which improved the pharmacokinetics and the biodistribution of PTX, and substantially increased PTX tumor accumulation (by more than 2000%; as compared to Taxol® or control micellar formulations). Improved biodistribution and tumor accumulation were confirmed by hybrid μCT-FMT imaging using near-infrared labeled micelles and payload. The PTX-loaded micelles were well tolerated at different doses while they induced complete tumor regression in two different xenograft models (i.e. A431 and MDA-MB-468). Our findings consequently indicate that π-π stacking-stabilized polymeric micelles are promising carriers to improve the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs to tumors and to increase their therapeutic index. PMID:25831471

  12. Heparin modification enhances the delivery and tumor targeting of paclitaxel-loaded N-octyl-N-trimethyl chitosan micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiran; Fei, Jia; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng

    2016-09-10

    Polycations have been widely used as efficient drug and gene carriers. However, the further application of polycation nanocarriers is greatly hampered by the serious cytotoxicity caused by exposed positive charges. Despite recent progress towards the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acids, there remains a compelling need for development of novel delivery systems for various types of drug. Here, we created mixed micelles based on N-octyl-N-trimethyl chitosan (OTMC) and coated them with an anionic polymer for delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). OTMC/PEG-100 stearate (S-100) micelles (PTX-SN) were firstly prepared by a dialysis method with a high drug loading efficiency and positive charge. PTX-SN micelles were then coated with two anionic polymers, heparin sodium (PTX-HSN) and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (PTX-CSN) to shield positive charges. Both PTX-HSN and PTX-CSN micelles showed decreased cytotoxicity and hemolysis while retaining high uptake efficiency. PTX-HSN micelles were taken up more effectively than PTX-CSN by HeLa cells, which over-express heparanase. PTX-HSN micelles persisted longer in the circulation of rats than free drug in pharmacokinetic studies. DIR-HSN micelles accumulated strongly in tumors, and PTX-HSN micelles significantly inhibited tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. Overall, the results validate heparin-coated OTMC micelles as safe and effective tumor-targeting carriers that are suitable for anti-tumor drug delivery. PMID:27426109

  13. Well-Defined Redox-Sensitive Polyethene Glycol-Paclitaxel Prodrug Conjugate for Tumor-Specific Delivery of Paclitaxel Using Octreotide for Tumor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tingjie; Wu, Qu; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2015-08-01

    A redox-sensitive prodrug, octreotide(Phe)-polyethene glycol-disulfide bond-paclitaxel [OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX], was successfully developed for targeted intracellular delivery of PTX. The formulation emphasizes long-circulation-time polymer-drug conjugates, combined targeting based on EPR and OCT-receptor mediated endocytosis, sharp redox response, and programmed drug release. The nontargeted redox-sensitive prodrug, mPEG-ss-PTX, and the targeted insensitive prodrug, OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX, were also synthesized as controls. These polymer-PTX conjugates, structurally confirmed by 1H NMR, exhibited approximately 23,000-fold increase in water solubility over parent PTX and possessed drug contents ranging from 11% to 14%. The redox-sensitivity of the objective OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX prodrug was verified by in vitro PTX release profile in simulated reducing conditions, and the SSTRs-mediated endocytosis was demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses. Consequently, compared with mPEG-PTX and OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX, the OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX exhibited much stronger cyotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing ability against NCI-H446 tumor cells (SSTRs overexpression), whereas a comparable cytotoxicity of these prodrugs was obtained against WI-38 normal cells (no SSTRs expression). Finally, the in vivo studies on NCI-H466 tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX possessed superior tumor-targeting ability and antitumor activity over mPEG-PTX, OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX and Taxol, as well as minimal collateral damage. This targeted redox-sensitive polymer-PTX prodrug system is promising in tumor therapy.

  14. Liprosomes loading paclitaxel for brain-targeting delivery by intravenous administration: in vitro characterization and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Fang, Guihua; Gao, Ying; Liu, Yi; Liu, Jinwen; Zou, Meijuan; Cheng, Gang

    2014-11-20

    In this study, a lipid-protein nanocomplex (liprosome) was evaluated for its potential use for brain-targeting drug delivery. Liprosome was fabricated with the desolvation-ultrasonication method and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, crystal state of the drug, and in vitro release. The in vivo distribution of paclitaxel loading lipid-protein nanocomplex (PTX-liprosome) and Taxol were compared after i.v. administration in mice. The prepared PTX-liprosome has a high entrapment efficiency (>90%), small particle size (approximately 110 nm), and narrow distribution (P.I.<0.2). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that liprosome had a spherical multilayer structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the conjugate of PTX and BSA was in the interior of the PTX-liprosome. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) demonstrated that the drug existed in a molecular or amorphous state. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) suggested that the hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds among of the PTX, lipid and protein play an important role during the formation of the PTX-liprosome. The hemolysis test showed a good safety profile for the intravenous administration of liprosome. The result of the in vivo distribution suggested that liprosome increased the drug uptake by the brain tissue and decreased drug accumulation in non-target organs. Therefore, liprosome is a potential drug delivery system for transporting PTX to the brain.

  15. Colocalized delivery of rapamycin and paclitaxel to tumors enhances synergistic targeting of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elvin; Sangai, Takafumi; Wu, Suhong; Hsiao, Angela; Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U; Gonzalez-Delgado, Carlos A; Cara, Francisca E; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Evans, Kurt W; Akcakanat, Argun; Wang, Ying; Do, Kim-Anh; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ferrari, Mauro

    2014-07-01

    Ongoing clinical trials target the aberrant PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in breast cancer through administration of rapamycin, an allosteric mTOR inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. However, synergy may not be fully exploited clinically because of distinct pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs. This study explores the synergistic potential of site-specific, colocalized delivery of rapamycin and paclitaxel through nanoparticle incorporation. Nanoparticle drug loading was accurately controlled, and synergistic drug ratios established in vitro. Precise drug ratios were maintained in tumors 48 hours after nanoparticle administration to mice, at levels twofold greater than liver and spleen, yielding superior antitumor activity compared to controls. Simultaneous and preferential in vivo delivery of rapamycin and paclitaxel to tumors yielded mechanistic insights into synergy involving suppression of feedback loop Akt phosphorylation and its downstream targets. Findings demonstrate that a same time, same place, and specific amount approach to combination chemotherapy by means of nanoparticle delivery has the potential to successfully translate in vitro synergistic findings in vivo. Predictive in vitro models can be used to determine optimum drug ratios for antitumor efficacy, while nanoparticle delivery of combination chemotherapies in preclinical animal models may lead to enhanced understanding of mechanisms of synergy, ultimately opening several avenues for personalized therapy.

  16. Colocalized Delivery of Rapamycin and Paclitaxel to Tumors Enhances Synergistic Targeting of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Elvin; Sangai, Takafumi; Wu, Suhong; Hsiao, Angela; Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U; Gonzalez-Delgado, Carlos A; Cara, Francisca E; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Evans, Kurt W; Akcakanat, Argun; Wang, Ying; Do, Kim-Anh; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ferrari, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials target the aberrant PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in breast cancer through administration of rapamycin, an allosteric mTOR inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. However, synergy may not be fully exploited clinically because of distinct pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs. This study explores the synergistic potential of site-specific, colocalized delivery of rapamycin and paclitaxel through nanoparticle incorporation. Nanoparticle drug loading was accurately controlled, and synergistic drug ratios established in vitro. Precise drug ratios were maintained in tumors 48 hours after nanoparticle administration to mice, at levels twofold greater than liver and spleen, yielding superior antitumor activity compared to controls. Simultaneous and preferential in vivo delivery of rapamycin and paclitaxel to tumors yielded mechanistic insights into synergy involving suppression of feedback loop Akt phosphorylation and its downstream targets. Findings demonstrate that a same time, same place, and specific amount approach to combination chemotherapy by means of nanoparticle delivery has the potential to successfully translate in vitro synergistic findings in vivo. Predictive in vitro models can be used to determine optimum drug ratios for antitumor efficacy, while nanoparticle delivery of combination chemotherapies in preclinical animal models may lead to enhanced understanding of mechanisms of synergy, ultimately opening several avenues for personalized therapy. PMID:24569835

  17. Octa-ammonium POSS-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes as vehicles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Naghmeh; Madani, Seyed Y.; Mosahebi, Afshin; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, novel properties can be developed by attachment or encapsulation of functional groups. These unique properties facilitate the use of CNTs in drug delivery. We developed a new nanomedicine consisting of a nanocarrier, cell-targeting molecule, and chemotherapeutic drug and assessed its efficacy in vitro. Methods The efficacy of a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-based nanoconjugate system is assessed in the targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. SWCNTs were oxidized and reacted with octa-ammonium polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (octa-ammonium POSS) to render them biocompatible and water dispersable. The functionalized SWCNTs were loaded with PTX, a chemotherapeutic agent toxic to cancer cells, and Tn218 antibodies for cancer cell targeting. The nanohybrid composites were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared (UV–Vis–NIR). Additionally, their cytotoxic effects on Colon cancer cell (HT-29) and Breast cancer cell (MCF-7) lines were assessed in vitro. Results TEM, FTIR, and UV–Vis–NIR studies confirmed side-wall functionalization of SWCNT with COOH-groups, PTX, POSS, and antibodies. Increased cell death was observed with PTX–POSS–SWCNT, PTX–POSS–Ab–SWCNT, and free PTX compared to functionalized-SWCNT (f-SWCNT), POSS–SWCNT, and cell-only controls at 48 and 72 h time intervals in both cell lines. At all time intervals, there was no significant cell death in the POSS–SWCNT samples compared to cell-only controls. Conclusion The PTX-based nanocomposites were shown to be as cytotoxic as free PTX. This important finding indicates successful release of PTX from the nanocomposites and further reiterates the potential of SWCNTs to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. PMID:26356347

  18. Targeted delivery and controlled release of Paclitaxel for the treatment of lung cancer using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baodan; Tan, Li; Zheng, Runhui; Tan, Huo; Zheng, Lixia

    2016-11-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controlled-release of the anti-cancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX) was constructed in this study. Chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently attached to the SWNTs to improve biocompatibility. Biocompatible hyaluronan was also combined to the outer CHI layer to realise the specific targeting property. The results showed that the release of PTX was pH-triggered and was better at lower pH (pH5.5). The modified SWNTs showed a significant improvement in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may have enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and further promoted cell apoptosis. The results of western blotting indicated that the apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in A549 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and cell viability assay demonstrated that PTX-loaded SWNTs could destroy cell membrane integrity, thus inducing lower cell viability of the A549 cells. Thus, this targeting DDS could effectively inhibit cell proliferation and kill A549 cells, is a promising system for cancer therapy. PMID:27524057

  19. Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J

    2013-02-18

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles.

  20. Pharmacologic sensitivity of paclitaxel to its delivery vehicles drives distinct clinical outcomes of paclitaxel formulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Nianhang; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Paclitaxel, an effective antitumor agent, is formulated in various vehicles serving as carriers to deliver the hydrophobic paclitaxel to tissue. The approved formulations in the U.S. are paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (currently known as Kolliphor EL) and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel). Despite having the same active ingredient (paclitaxel), different formulations produce distinct products with unique efficacy and safety profiles. A semimechanistic model was developed to describe the pharmacologic sensitivity of paclitaxel under different formulations. Circulating paclitaxel concentration data from patients treated with nab-paclitaxel or Cremophor EL-paclitaxel were analyzed in NONMEM using a semimechanistic model with simultaneous disposition of paclitaxel-carrier complexes and the total paclitaxel released from the complexes. The key factors driving paclitaxel exposure in circulation and peripheral tissues were explored via sensitivity analysis. The rapid decline of total paclitaxel concentration following intravenous administration of nab-paclitaxel and Cremophor EL-paclitaxel was attributed to rapid tissue distribution of the paclitaxel-carrier complexes, with minor contribution of free and protein-bound paclitaxel. Distribution of nab-paclitaxel to peripheral tissue was 4-fold faster and 10-fold more extensive than that of Cremophor EL-paclitaxel micelles, resulting in distinct tissue paclitaxel profiles. Sensitivity analyses showed the plasma paclitaxel-time profile was insensitive to the rapid rates of tissue distribution and decomposition of paclitaxel-carrier complexes but that the tissue distribution profile of paclitaxel was highly sensitive. Tissue distribution of paclitaxel is carrier complex system-dependent. Different delivery systems result in distinct tissue paclitaxel profiles but similar paclitaxel concentration-time profiles in plasma or blood, rendering the paclitaxel plasma profile a poor surrogate for its

  1. Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles. PMID:24163786

  2. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel loaded microbubbles for ultrasound triggered drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Michael C.; Eisenbrey, John; Ouma, Richard O.; Soulen, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    A polymer ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) developed in our lab has been shown to greatly reduce in size when exposed to ultrasound, resulting in nanoparticles less than 400 nm in diameter capable of escaping the leaky vasculature of a tumor to provide a sustained release of drug. Previous studies with the hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) demonstrated enhanced drug delivery to tumors when triggered with ultrasound. However the therapeutic potential has been limited due to the relatively low payload of DOX. This study compares the effects of loading the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX) on the agent’s acoustic properties, drug payload, tumoricidal activity, and the ability to deliver drugs through 400 nm pores. A maximum payload of 129.46 ± 1.80 μg PTX/mg UCA (encapsulation efficiency 71.92 ± 0.99 %) was achieved, 20 times greater than the maximum payload of DOX (6.2 μg/mg), while maintaining the acoustic properties. In vitro, the tumoricidal activity of paclitaxel loaded UCA exposed to ultrasound was significantly greater than controls not exposed to ultrasound (p<0.0016). This study has shown that PTX loaded UCA triggered with focused ultrasound have the potential to provide a targeted and sustained delivery of drug to tumors. PMID:21609756

  3. A mucoadhesive in situ gel delivery system for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Jauhari, Saurabh; Dash, Alekha K

    2006-01-01

    MUC1 gene encodes a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein that is overexpressed in human breast cancer and colon cancer. The objective of this study was to develop an in situ gel delivery system containing paclitaxel (PTX) and mucoadhesives for sustained and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. The delivery system consisted of chitosan and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in 0.33M citric acid containing PTX. The in vitro release of PTX from the gel was performed in presence and absence of Tween 80 at drug loads of 0.18%, 0.30%, and 0.54% (wt/wt), in Sorensen's phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. Different mucin-producing cell lines (Calu-3>Caco-2) were selected for PTX transport studies. Transport of PTX from solution and gel delivery system was performed in side by side diffusion chambers from apical to basal (A-B) and basal to apical (B-A) directions. In vitro release studies revealed that within 4 hours, only 7.61% +/- 0.19%, 12.0% +/- 0.98%, 31.7% +/- 0.40% of PTX were released from 0.18%, 0.30%, and 0.54% drug-loaded gel formulation, respectively, in absence of Tween 80. However, in presence of surfactant (0.05% wt/vol) in the dissolution medium, percentages of PTX released were 28.1% +/- 4.35%, 44.2% +/- 6.35%, and 97.1% +/- 1.22%, respectively. Paclitaxel has shown a polarized transport in all the cell monolayers with B-A transport 2 to 4 times higher than in the A-B direction. The highest mucin-producing cell line (Calu-3) has shown the lowest percentage of PTX transport from gels as compared with Caco-2 cells. Transport of PTX from mucoadhesive gels was shown to be influenced by the mucin-producing capability of cell.

  4. Paclitaxel tumor priming promotes delivery and transfection of intravenous lipid-siRNA in pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lu, Ze; Wang, Junfeng; Cui, Minjian; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2015-10-28

    The major barrier for using small interfering RNA (siRNA) as cancer therapeutics is the inadequate delivery and transfection in solid tumors. We have previously shown that paclitaxel tumor priming, by inducing apoptosis, expands the tumor interstitial space, improves the penetration and dispersion of nanoparticles and siRNA-lipoplexes in 3-dimensional tumor histocultures, and promotes the delivery and transfection efficiency of siRNA-lipoplexes under the locoregional setting in vivo (i.e., intraperitoneal treatment of intraperitoneal tumors). The current study evaluated whether tumor priming is functional for systemically delivered siRNA via intravenous injection, which would subject siRNA to several additional delivery barriers and elimination processes. We used the same pegylated cationic (PCat)-siRNA lipoplexes as in the intraperitoneal study to treat mice bearing subcutaneous human pancreatic Hs766T xenograft tumors. The target gene was survivin, an inducible chemoresistance gene. The results show single agent paclitaxel delayed tumor growth but also significantly induced the survivin protein level in residual tumors, whereas addition of PCat-siSurvivin completely reversed the paclitaxel-induced survivin and enhanced the paclitaxel activity (p<0.05). In comparison, PCat-siSurvivin alone did not yield survivin knockdown or antitumor activity, indicating the in vivo effectiveness of intravenous siRNA-mediated gene silencing requires paclitaxel cotreatment. Additional in vitro studies showed that paclitaxel promoted the cytoplasmic release of siGLO, a 22 nucleotide double-stranded RNA that has no mRNA targets, from its PCat lipoplex and/or endosomes/lysosomes. Taken together, our earlier and current data show paclitaxel tumor priming, by promoting the interstitial transport and cytoplasmic release, is critical to promote the delivery and transfection of siRNA in vivo. In addition, because paclitaxel has broad spectrum activity and is used to treat multiple types

  5. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors.

    PubMed

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and in spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for the evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  6. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  7. Targeted chemotherapy with nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) in metastatic breast cancer: which benefit for which patients?

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Raffaella; Sottotetti, Federico; Bernardo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic goals in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remain palliative in nature, aimed at controlling symptoms, improving or maintaining quality of life and prolonging survival. The advent of new drugs and new formulations of standard agents has led to better outcomes in patients with advanced or metastatic disease. These developments have also allowed a tailored therapeutic approach, in which the molecular biology of the tumour, the treatment history, and patient attitudes are taken into account in the decision-making process. Targeting drug delivery to the tumour is a promising mean of increasing the therapeutic index of highly active agents such as the taxanes, and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel), the first nanotechnology-based drug developed in cancer treatment, is one such advance. Data from randomized trials support the efficacy of single-agent nab-paclitaxel as first-line and further treatment lines in MBC at the registered 3-weekly schedule of 260 mg/m2, but emerging evidence suggests its activity as a weekly regimen or combined with other agents in various clinical scenarios. Thus, nab-paclitaxel seems to offer flexibility in terms of dosing schedules, allowing physicians to tailor the dose according to different clinical situations. This paper reviews the clinical trial background for nab-paclitaxel in MBC, focusing on specific ‘difficult-to-treat’ patient populations, such as taxane-pretreated or elderly women, as well as those with triple-negative, HER2-positive and poor-prognostic-factors disease. Moving beyond evidence-based information, ‘real life’ available experiences are also discussed with the aim of providing an update for daily clinical practice. PMID:27239239

  8. Polymeric nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel in lung and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubris, Kimberly Ann Veronica

    Nanoparticles are useful for addressing many of the difficulties encountered when administering therapeutic compounds. Nanoparticles are able to increase the solubility of hydrophobic drugs, improve pharmacokinetics through sustained release, alter biodistribution, protect sensitive drugs from low pH environments or enzymatic alteration, and, in some cases, provide targeting of the drug to the desired tissues. The use of functional nanocarriers can also provide controlled intracellular delivery of a drug. To this end, we have developed functional pH-responsive expansile nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel. The pH-responsiveness of these nanoparticles occurs due to a hydrophobic to hydrophilic transition of the polymer occurring under mildly acidic conditions. These polymeric nanoparticles were systematically evaluated for the delivery of paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo to improve local therapy for lung and breast cancers. Nanoparticles were synthesized using a miniemulsion polymerization process and were subsequently characterized and found to swell when exposed to acidic environments. Paclitaxel was successfully encapsulated within the nanoparticles, and the particles exhibited drug release at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. In addition, the uptake of nanoparticles was observed using flow cytometry, and the anticancer efficacy of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was measured using cancer cell lines in vitro. The potency of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was close to that of free drug, demonstrating that the drug was effectively delivered by the particles and that the particles could act as an intracellular drug depot. Following in vitro characterization, murine in vivo studies demonstrated the ability of the paclitaxel-loaded responsive nanoparticles to delay recurrence of lung cancer and to prevent establishment of breast cancer in the mammary fat pads with higher efficacy than paclitaxel alone. In addition, the ability of nanoparticles to

  9. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  10. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  11. Ultrasound-Mediated Microbubble Destruction (UMMD) Facilitates the Delivery of CA19-9 Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lingxi; Shi, Qiusheng; Zheng, Kailiang; Shen, Ming; Ma, Jing; Li, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Lizhou; Tu, Wenzhi; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies with dismal prognosis, is refractory to existing radio-chemotherapeutic treatment modalities. There is a critical unmet need to develop effective approaches, especially for targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery. Targeted and drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) combined with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction (UMMD) have been shown to significantly increase the cellular uptake in vitro and drug retention in vivo, suggesting a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we synthesized pancreatic cancer-targeting organic NPs that were modified with anti CA19-9 antibody and encapsulated paclitaxol (PTX). The three-block copolymer methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylacticco-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) constituted the skeleton of the NPs. We speculated that the PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 would circulate long-term in vivo, "actively target" pancreatic cancer cells, and sustainably release the loaded PTX while UMMD would "passively target" the irradiated tumor and effectively increase the permeability of cell membrane and capillary gaps. Our results demonstrated that the combination of PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 with UMMD achieved a low IC50, significant cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis in vitro. In mouse pancreatic tumor xenografts, the combined application of PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs with UMMD attained the highest tumor inhibition rate, promoted the pharmacokinetic profile by increasing AUC, t1/2, and mean residence time (MRT), and decreased clearance. Consequently, the survival of the tumor-bearing nude mice was prolonged without obvious toxicity. The dynamic change in cellular uptake, targeted real-time imaging, and the concentration of PTX in the plasma and tumor were all closely associated with the treatment efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs combined with UMMD is a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Ultrasound-Mediated Microbubble Destruction (UMMD) Facilitates the Delivery of CA19-9 Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lingxi; Shi, Qiusheng; Zheng, Kailiang; Shen, Ming; Ma, Jing; Li, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Lizhou; Tu, Wenzhi; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies with dismal prognosis, is refractory to existing radio-chemotherapeutic treatment modalities. There is a critical unmet need to develop effective approaches, especially for targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery. Targeted and drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) combined with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction (UMMD) have been shown to significantly increase the cellular uptake in vitro and drug retention in vivo, suggesting a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we synthesized pancreatic cancer-targeting organic NPs that were modified with anti CA19-9 antibody and encapsulated paclitaxol (PTX). The three-block copolymer methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylacticco-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) constituted the skeleton of the NPs. We speculated that the PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 would circulate long-term in vivo, "actively target" pancreatic cancer cells, and sustainably release the loaded PTX while UMMD would "passively target" the irradiated tumor and effectively increase the permeability of cell membrane and capillary gaps. Our results demonstrated that the combination of PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 with UMMD achieved a low IC50, significant cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis in vitro. In mouse pancreatic tumor xenografts, the combined application of PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs with UMMD attained the highest tumor inhibition rate, promoted the pharmacokinetic profile by increasing AUC, t1/2, and mean residence time (MRT), and decreased clearance. Consequently, the survival of the tumor-bearing nude mice was prolonged without obvious toxicity. The dynamic change in cellular uptake, targeted real-time imaging, and the concentration of PTX in the plasma and tumor were all closely associated with the treatment efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs combined with UMMD is a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27446491

  13. Ultrasound-Mediated Microbubble Destruction (UMMD) Facilitates the Delivery of CA19-9 Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lingxi; Shi, Qiusheng; Zheng, Kailiang; Shen, Ming; Ma, Jing; Li, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Lizhou; Tu, Wenzhi; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies with dismal prognosis, is refractory to existing radio-chemotherapeutic treatment modalities. There is a critical unmet need to develop effective approaches, especially for targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery. Targeted and drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) combined with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction (UMMD) have been shown to significantly increase the cellular uptake in vitro and drug retention in vivo, suggesting a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we synthesized pancreatic cancer-targeting organic NPs that were modified with anti CA19-9 antibody and encapsulated paclitaxol (PTX). The three-block copolymer methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylacticco-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) constituted the skeleton of the NPs. We speculated that the PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 would circulate long-term in vivo, "actively target" pancreatic cancer cells, and sustainably release the loaded PTX while UMMD would "passively target" the irradiated tumor and effectively increase the permeability of cell membrane and capillary gaps. Our results demonstrated that the combination of PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 with UMMD achieved a low IC50, significant cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis in vitro. In mouse pancreatic tumor xenografts, the combined application of PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs with UMMD attained the highest tumor inhibition rate, promoted the pharmacokinetic profile by increasing AUC, t1/2, and mean residence time (MRT), and decreased clearance. Consequently, the survival of the tumor-bearing nude mice was prolonged without obvious toxicity. The dynamic change in cellular uptake, targeted real-time imaging, and the concentration of PTX in the plasma and tumor were all closely associated with the treatment efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs combined with UMMD is a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27446491

  14. c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery to brain glioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, YuKun; Liu, Wenchao; Gao, Feng; Fang, Xiaoling; Chen, Yanzuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma therapy is an important challenge in oncology. Here, doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide (c(RGDyK))-decorated Pluronic micelles (cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide-decorated Pluronic micelles loaded with doxorubicin and paclitaxel [RGD-PF-DP]) were designed as a potential targeted delivery system to enhance blood–brain barrier penetration and improve drug accumulation via integrin-mediated transcytosis/endocytosis and based on integrin overexpression in blood–brain barrier and glioma cells. The physicochemical characterization of RGD-PF-DP revealed a satisfactory size of 28.5±0.12 nm with uniform distribution and core-shell structure. The transport rates across the in vitro blood–brain barrier model, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis of U87 malignant glioblastoma cells of RGD-PF-DP were significantly greater than those of non-c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated the specificity and efficacy of intracranial tumor accumulation of RGD-PF-DP. RGD-PF-DP displayed an extended median survival time of 39 days, with no serious body weight loss during the regimen. No acute toxicity to major organs was observed in mice receiving treatment doses via intravenous administration. In conclusion, RGD-PF-DP could be a promising vehicle for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery in patients with brain glioma. PMID:27143884

  15. iRGD peptide conjugation potentiates intraperitoneal tumor delivery of paclitaxel with polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Hunt, Hedi; Scodeller, Pablo; Gaitzsch, Jens; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Sugahara, Kazuki N; Tammik, Olav; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-10-01

    Polymersomes are versatile nanoscale vesicles that can be used for cytoplasmic delivery of payloads. Recently, we demonstrated that pH-sensitive polymersomes exhibit an intrinsic selectivity towards intraperitoneal tumor lesions. A tumor homing peptide, iRGD, harbors a cryptic C-end Rule (CendR) motif that is responsible for neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) binding and for triggering extravasation and tumor penetration of the peptide. iRGD functionalization increases tumor selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of systemic drug-loaded nanoparticles in many tumor models. Here we studied whether intraperitoneally administered paclitaxel-loaded iRGD-polymersomes show improved efficacy in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. First, we demonstrated that the pH-sensitive polymersomes functionalized with RPARPAR (a prototypic CendR peptide) or iRGD internalize in the cells that express NRP-1, and that internalized polymersomes release their cargo inside the cytosol. CendR-targeted polymersomes loaded with paclitaxel were more cytotoxic on NRP-1-positive cells than on NRP-1-negative cells. In mice bearing peritoneal tumors of gastric (MKN-45P) or colon (CT26) origin, intraperitoneally administered RPARPAR and iRGD-polymersomes showed higher tumor-selective accumulation and penetration than untargeted polymersomes. Finally, iRGD-polymersomes loaded with paclitaxel showed improved efficacy in peritoneal tumor growth inhibition and in suppression of local dissemination compared to the pristine paclitaxel-polymersomes or Abraxane. Our study demonstrates that iRGD-functionalization improves efficacy of paclitaxel-polymersomes for intraperitoneal treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  16. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao; Chao, Jui-I.

    2010-08-01

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 µg ml - 1 ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  17. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  18. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  19. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved.

  20. Hydrophobically modified inulin as an amphiphilic carbohydrate polymer for micellar delivery of paclitaxel for intravenous route.

    PubMed

    Muley, Pratik; Kumar, Sunny; El Kourati, Fadoua; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Tummala, Hemachand

    2016-03-16

    Micellization offers several advantages for the delivery of water insoluble drugs including a nanoparticulate 'core-shell' delivery system for drug targeting. Recently, hydrophobically modified polysaccharides (HMPs) are gaining recognition as micelle forming polymers to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs. In this manuscript, for the first time, we have evaluated the self-assembling properties of a lauryl carbamate derivative of the poly-fructose natural polymer inulin (Inutec SP1(®) (INT)) to form paclitaxel (PTX) loaded micelles. INT self-assembled into well-defined micellar structures in aqueous environment with a low critical micellar concentration of 27.8 μg/ml. INT micelles exhibited excellent hemocompatibility and low toxicity to cultured cells. PTX loaded INT micelles exhibited a mean size of 256.37 ± 10.45 nm with excellent drug encapsulation efficiency (95.66 ± 2.25%) and loading (8.69 ± 0.22%). PTX loaded micelles also displayed sustained release of PTX and enhanced anti-cancer efficacy in-vitro in mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) compared to Taxol formulation with Cremophor EL as solvent. In addition, PTX loaded INT micelles exhibited comparable in-vivo antitumor activity in B16F10 allograft mouse model at half the dose of Taxol. In conclusion, INT offers safe, inexpensive and natural alternative to widely used PEG-modified polymers for the formulation of micellar delivery systems for paclitaxel.

  1. Paclitaxel-loaded phosphonated calixarene nanovesicles as a modular drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jingxin; Eggers, Paul K.; Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Raston, Colin L.; Lim, Lee Yong

    2016-01-01

    A modular p-phosphonated calix[4]arene vesicle (PCV) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) and conjugated with folic acid as a cancer targeting ligand has been prepared using a thin film-sonication method. It has a pH-responsive capacity to trigger the release of the encapsulated PTX payload under mildly acidic conditions. PTX-loaded PCV conjugated with alkyne-modified PEG-folic acid ligands prepared via click ligation (fP-PCVPTX) has enhanced potency against folate receptor (FR)-positive SKOV-3 ovarian tumour cells over FR-negative A549 lung tumour cells. Moreover, fP-PCVPTX is also four times more potent than the non-targeting PCVPTX platform towards SKOV-3 cells. Overall, as a delivery platform the PCVs have the potential to enhance efficacy of anticancer drugs by targeting a chemotherapeutic payload specifically to tumours and triggering the release of the encapsulated drug in the vicinity of cancer cells. PMID:27009430

  2. Tumor-selective peptide-carrier delivery of Paclitaxel increases in vivo activity of the drug

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Pillozzi, Serena; Falciani, Chiara; Depau, Lorenzo; Tenori, Eleonora; Scali, Silvia; Lozzi, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Menichetti, Stefano; Bracci, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes are highly effective chemotherapeutic drugs against proliferating cancer and an established option in the standard treatment of ovarian and breast cancer. However, treatment with paclitaxel is associated with severe side effects, including sensory axonal neuropathy, and its poor solubility in water complicates its formulation. In this paper we report the in vitro and in vivo activity of a new form of paclitaxel, modified for conjugation with a tumor-selective tetrabranched peptide carrier (NT4). NT4 selectively targets tumor cells by binding to membrane sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and to endocytic receptors, like LRP1 and LRP6, which are established tumor markers. Biological activity of NT4-paclitaxel was tested in vitro on MDA-MB 231 and SKOV-3 cell lines, representing breast and ovarian cancer, respectively, and in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model of human breast cancer. Using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we found that conjugation of paclitaxel with the NT4 peptide led to increased therapeutic activity of the drug in vivo. NT4-paclitaxel induced tumor regression, whereas treatment with unconjugated paclitaxel only produced a reduction in tumor growth. Moreover, unlike paclitaxel, NT4-paclitaxel is very hydrophilic, which may improve its pharmacokinetic profile and allow the use of less toxic dilution buffers, further decreasing its general chemotherapic toxicity. PMID:26626158

  3. Non-invasive endotracheal delivery of paclitaxel-loaded alginate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Shohreh; Montaseri, Hashem; Khalili, Azadeh; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Aerosolized chemotherapeutics leads to higher, localized and continuous concentrations of active agents in lung tissue with lower side effects for other organs. The present study was performed on jugular vein cannulated rats which endothracheally received 4 mg/kg of free paclitaxel powder (Free-PTX), paclitaxel-loaded alginate microparticles (PTX-ALG-MPs) and i.v. paclitaxel (Anzatax(®)). Pharmacokinetic parameters for Free-PTX and PTX-ALG-MPs contain higher AUC, mean residence time (MRT),half-life and bioavailability, with lower elimination constant (ke). Statistical analysis showed that the amount of paclitaxel per gram of lung tissue after 0.5, 6 and 24 h after administration of Free-PTX was lower than PTX-ALG-MPs. Lung tissue AUC for Free-PTX was lower than PTX-ALG-MPs. According to the obvious advantages obtained, such as dose lowering and increasing paclitaxel residence time and half-life. It should be noted that cell cytotoxicity test on normal airway cell lines was not examined in this study but due to previous reports on safety of inhaled paclitaxel, it can be suggested that pulmonary delivery of paclitaxel can be a useful non-invasive route of administration compared with i.v administration. PMID:27447444

  4. Molecular Mechanism of Local Drug Delivery with Paclitaxel-Eluting Membranes in Biliary and Pancreatic Cancer: New Application for an Old Drug

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sookhee; Lee, Su Yeon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Yun, Jieun; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Chang Woo; Jo, Eun Ae; Yang, Sugeun; Lee, Don Haeng; Lee, Dong Ki

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is palliation for patients suffering from inoperable malignant obstructions associated with biliary and pancreatic cancers. Chemotherapeutic agent-eluting stents have been developed because SEMS are susceptible to occlusion by tumor in-growth. We reported recently that paclitaxel-eluting SEMS provide enhanced local drug delivery in an animal model. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which paclitaxel-eluting stents attenuate tumor growth. We investigated the signal transduction pathways underlying the antiproliferative effects of a paclitaxel-eluting membrane (PEM) implanted in pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma tumor bearing nude mice. Molecular and cellular alterations were analyzed in the PEM-implanted pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma xenograft tumors by Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. The quantities of paclitaxel released into the tumor and plasma were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. Paclitaxel from the PEM and its diffusion into the tumor inhibited angiogenesis, which involved suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) and increased apoptosis. Moreover, implantation of the PEM inhibited tumor-stromal interaction-related expression of proteins such as CD44, SPARC, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and vimentin. Local delivery of paclitaxel from a PEM inhibited growth of pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma tumors in nude mice by suppressing angiogenesis via the mTOR and inducing apoptosis signal pathway. PMID:25983747

  5. Pegylated polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing paclitaxel as a promising candidate for drug carriers for passive targeting.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Monika; Kruk, Tomasz; Karabasz, Alicja; Bereta, Joanna; Warszynski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems are of special importance in cancer therapies, since serious side effects resulting from unspecific accumulation of highly toxic chemotherapeutics in healthy tissues can restrict effectiveness of the therapy. In this work we present the method of preparing biocompatible, polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing the anticancer drug that may serve as a vehicle for passive tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were prepared via direct encapsulation of emulsion droplets in a polyelectrolyte multilayer shell. The oil cores that contained paclitaxel were stabilized by docusate sodium salt/poly-l-lysine surface complex (AOT/PLL) and were encapsulated in shells formed by the LbL adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes, poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) and PLL up to 5 or 6 layers. The surface of the nanoparticles was pegylated through the adsorption of the pegylated polyelectrolyte (PGA-g-PEG) as the outer layer to prolong the persistence of the nanocarriers in the circulation. The synthesized nanoparticles were stable in cell culture medium containing serum and their average size was 100nm, which makes them promising candidates for passive targeted drug delivery. This notion was further confirmed by the results of studying the biological effects of nanoformulations on two tumor cell lines: mouse colon carcinoma cell line CT26-CEA and the mouse mammary carcinoma cell line 4T1. The empty polyelectrolyte nanoparticles did not affect the viability of the tested cells, whereas encapsulated paclitaxel retained its strong cytotoxic/cytostatic activity. PMID:27037784

  6. Aptamer conjugated paclitaxel and magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Athulya; Nair, Remya; Raveendran, Sreejith; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takahashi; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2013-10-01

    Controlled and targeted drug delivery is an essential criterion in cancer therapy to reduce the side effects caused by non-specific drug release and toxicity. Targeted chemotherapy, sustained drug release and optical imaging have been achieved using a multifunctional nanocarrier constructed from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), an anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX), a fluorescent dye Nile red (NR), magnetic fluid (MF) and aptamers (Apt, AS1411, anti-nucleolin aptamer). The magnetic fluid and paclitaxel loaded fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs (MF-PTX-NR-PLGA NPs) were synthesized by a single-emulsion technique/solvent evaporation method using a chemical cross linker bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) to enable binding of aptamer on to the surface of the nanoparticles. Targeting aptamers were then introduced to the particles through the reaction with the cross linker to target the nucleolin receptors over expressed on the cancer cell surface. Specific binding and uptake of the aptamer conjugated magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA NPs (Apt-MF-NR-PLGA NPs) to the target cancer cells induced by aptamers was observed using confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity assay conducted in two cell lines (L929 and MCF-7) confirmed that targeted MCF-7 cancer cells were killed while control cells were unharmed. In addition, aptamer mediated delivery resulting in enhanced binding and uptake to the target cancer cells exhibited increased therapeutic effect of the drug. Moreover, these aptamer conjugated magnetic polymer vehicles apart from actively transporting drugs into specifically targeted tumor regions can also be used to induce hyperthermia or for facilitating magnetic guiding of particles to the tumor regions.

  7. Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R.; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

    2014-04-01

    Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

  8. Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K.; Zeng, Qi; Miao, Bolong; Tang, Benjamin C.; Simons, Brian W.; Ensign, Laura; Liu, Guanshu; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Juang, Chih-Yin; Mert, Olcay; Wood, Joseph; Fu, Jie; McMahon, Michael T.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the cervicovaginal tract using nanoparticles may reduce adverse side effects associated with systemic chemotherapy, while improving outcomes for early stage cervical cancer. We hypothesize drug-loaded nanoparticles must rapidly penetrate cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) lining the female reproductive tract to effectively deliver their payload to underlying diseased tissues in a uniform and sustained manner. We develop paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles, composed entirely of polymers used in FDA-approved products, which rapidly penetrate human CVM and provide sustained drug release with minimal burst effect. We further employ a mouse model with aggressive cervical tumors established in the cervicovaginal tract to compare paclitaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (conventional particles , or CP) and similar particles coated with Pluronic® F127 (mucus-penetrating particles , or MPP). CP are mucoadhesive and, thus, aggregated in mucus, while MPP achieve more uniform distribution and close proximity to cervical tumors. Paclitaxel-MPP suppress tumor growth more effectively and prolong median survival of mice compared to free paclitaxel or paclitaxel-CP. Histopathological studies demonstrate minimal toxicity to the cervicovaginal epithelia, suggesting paclitaxel-MPP may be safe for intravaginal use. These results demonstrate for the first time the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. PMID:24339398

  9. Sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide nanoparticles as paclitaxel vehicles targeting breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Qin, Fei; Yang, Li; Mo, Liqian; Li, Lei; Hou, Lianbing

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle (NP) delivery vehicles are emerging technologies, the full potential of which has yet to be realized. Sulfatide is known to bind to extracellular matrix glycoproteins that are highly expressed in breast tumors. In this study, we report for the first time the combination of sulfatide and lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs as a targeted breast cancer delivery vehicle for paclitaxel (PTX). PTX-sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-SNPs) were prepared using the emulsion/solvent evaporation method. PTX-SNPs exhibited a spherical shape, small particle size, high encapsulation efficiency, and a biphasic release in phosphate-buffered solution. The cytotoxicity study and cell apoptosis assay revealed that blank sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (SNPs) had no cytotoxicity, whereas PTX-SNPs had greater EMT6 cytotoxicity levels than PTX-lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-NPs) and free PTX. An in vitro cellular uptake study revealed that SNPs can deliver greater amounts of drug with more efficient and immediate access to intracellular targets. In vivo biodistribution measured using high-performance liquid chromatography confirmed that the PTX-SNPs can target breast tumor tissues to increase the accumulation of PTX in these tissues. The in vivo tumor inhibition ability of PTX-SNPs was remarkably higher than PTX-NPs and free PTX. Furthermore, toxicity studies suggested that the blank SNPs had no systemic toxicity. All results suggested that SNPs may serve as efficient PTX delivery vehicles targeting breast carcinoma. PMID:25170267

  10. Paclitaxel delivery systems: the use of amino acid linkers in the conjugation of paclitaxel with carboxymethyldextran to create prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Shu-ichi; Kajiki, Masahiro; Kuriyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, To-ru

    2002-05-01

    Paclitaxel was bound via its hydroxyl group to carboxymethyldextran (CMDex, 150 kDa) by means of an amino acid linker; the linker was introduced into the 2'- or 7-hydroxyl group of the paclitaxel through an ester bond. These conjugates--CMDex-2'-paclitaxel and CMDex-7-paclitaxel--were designed to be water-soluble with a paclitaxel content between 6-8% (w/w) with a degree of subsititution (DS) of the CM groups at 0.6 per sugar residue. The release of the paclitaxel from the conjugates was influenced by the hydroxyl group (2'- or 7-) of paclitaxel to which the amino acid linker was introduced, and by what amino acid was used as the linker. In mouse plasma incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 h, the most paclitaxel was released using CMDex-paclitaxel conjugate with 2'gly followed by, in descending order, 2'-ala, 2'-leu, 2'-ile, and 7-gly as the amino linkers. Colon 26, a Taxol resistant cancer, was introduced into mice and the conjugates were intravenously administered by bolus injection for a tumor distribution study, and intermittently intravenously administered for a tumor growth regression study. In both studies the highest amount of paclitaxel release was found in the CMDex-2'-gly-paclitaxel followed by CMDex-2'-ala-paclitaxel, CMDex-2'-leu-paclitaxel and paclitaxel. There was a direct correlation between the amount of paclitaxel released and the observed efficacy. CMDex-2'-ile-paclitaxel and CMDex-7-gly-paclitaxel did not show any anti-tumor activity. These results clearly demonstrate that a CMDex-paclitaxel with an appropriate amino acid linker has significant anti-tumor activity against colon 26, and that these anti-tumor effects appear to correlate with the amounts of paclitaxel released in the tumor. PMID:12033505

  11. Hemocompatibility of folic-acid-conjugated amphiphilic PEG-PLGA copolymer nanoparticles for co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel: treatment effects for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Zelai; Shi, Zengfang; Sun, Wenjie; Ma, Jing; Xia, Junyong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Jingwen

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we used folic-acid-modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (FA-PEG-PLGA) to encapsulate cisplatin and paclitaxel (separately or together), and evaluated their antitumor effects against lung cancer; this study was conducted in order to investigate the antitumor effects of the co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel by a targeted drug delivery system. Blood compatibility assays and complement activation tests revealed that FA-PEG-PLGA nanoparticles did not induce blood hemolysis, blood clotting, or complement activation. The results also indicated that FA-PEG-PLGA nanoparticles had no biotoxic effects, the drug delivery system allowed controlled release of the cargo molecules, and the co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel efficiently induces cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle retardation. In addition, co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel showed the ability to suppress xenograft lung cancer growth and prolong the survival time of xenografted mice. These results implied that FA-PEG-PLGA nanoparticles can function as effective carriers of cisplatin and paclitaxel, and that co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel by FA-PEG-PLGA nanoparticles results in more effective antitumor effects than the combination of free-drugs or single-drug-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:26695149

  12. Effect of integrin receptor-targeted liposomal paclitaxel for hepatocellular carcinoma targeting and therapy

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LIYU; LIU, YANBIN; WANG, WEIYA; LIU, KAI

    2015-01-01

    The major aim of the present study was to develop an integrin receptor-targeted liposomal paclitaxel (PTX) to enhance the targeting specificity and therapeutic effect of PTX on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The specific Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) ligand was conjugated to 1,2-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000 to prepare the RGD-modified liposomes (RGD-LP). Furthermore, physicochemical characteristics of RGD-LP, including particle size, ζ potential, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro PTX release, were evaluated. RGD-modified liposomes were selected as the carrier for the present study, as they exhibit good biocompatibility and are easy to modify using RGD. The cellular uptake efficacy of RGD-LP by HepG2 cells was 3.3-fold higher than that of liposomes without RGD, indicating that RGD-LP may specifically target HepG2 cells by overexpressing integrin αvβ3 receptors. The RGD modification appeared to enhance the anti-proliferative activity of LP-PTX against HepG2 cells, with the extent of anti-proliferative activity dependent on the concentration of PTX and the incubation time. Additionally, evaluation of the homing specificity and anticancer efficacy of RGD-LP on the tumor spheroids indicated that solid tumor penetration was enhanced by the modification of RGD. In agreement with these in vitro findings, in vivo investigations demonstrated that RGD-LP-PTX exhibited a greater inhibitory effect on tumor growth in HepG2-bearing mice than LP-PTX or free PTX. Thus, RGD-LPs may represent an efficient targeted PTX delivery system for the treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:26170980

  13. In vitro and in vivo targeting effect of folate decorated paclitaxel loaded PLA-TPGS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thu, Ha Phuong; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Quang, Bui Thuc; Son, Ho Anh; Toan, Nguyen Linh; Quang, Duong Tuan

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for treating various types of cancer. However, the clinical application of paclitaxel in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its poor water solubility and low therapeutic index. Thus, it requires an urgent solution to improve therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel. In this study, folate decorated paclitaxel loaded PLA-TPGS nanoparticles were prepared by a modified emulsification/solvent evaporation method. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method. The spherical nanoparticles were around 50 nm in size with a narrow size distribution. Targeting effect of nanoparticles was investigated in vitro on cancer cell line and in vivo on tumor bearing nude mouse. The results indicated the effective targeting of folate decorated paclitaxel loaded copolymer nanoparticles on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26702264

  14. Efficient drug delivery of Paclitaxel glycoside: a novel solubility gradient encapsulation into liposomes coupled with immunoliposomes preparation.

    PubMed

    Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Kasai, Tomonari; Murakami, Masaharu; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Tominaga, Yuki; Okada, Masashi; Kudoh, Takayuki; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Salomon, David S; Mikuni, Katsuhiko; Mandai, Tadakatsu; Hamada, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Although the encapsulation of paclitaxel into liposomes has been extensively studied, its significant hydrophobic and uncharged character has generated substantial difficulties concerning its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes. We found that a more hydrophilic paclitaxel molecule, 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel, retained tubulin polymerization stabilization activity. The hydrophilic nature of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel allowed its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes, which was successfully accomplished using a remote loading method with a solubility gradient between 40% ethylene glycol and Cremophor EL/ethanol in PBS. Trastuzumab was then conjugated onto the surface of liposomes as immunoliposomes to selectively target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-overexpressing cancer cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed that the immunoliposomes enhanced the toxicity of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells and showed more rapid suppression of cell growth. The immunoliposomes strongly inhibited the tumor growth of HT-29 cells xenografted in nude mice. Notably, mice survived when treated with the immunoliposomes formulation, even when administered at a lethal dose of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in vivo. This data successfully demonstrates immunoliposomes as a promising candidate for the efficient delivery of paclitaxel glycoside. PMID:25264848

  15. Efficient Drug Delivery of Paclitaxel Glycoside: A Novel Solubility Gradient Encapsulation into Liposomes Coupled with Immunoliposomes Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masaharu; Sekhar, Sreeja C.; Tominaga, Yuki; Okada, Masashi; Kudoh, Takayuki; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Salomon, David S.; Mikuni, Katsuhiko; Mandai, Tadakatsu; Hamada, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Although the encapsulation of paclitaxel into liposomes has been extensively studied, its significant hydrophobic and uncharged character has generated substantial difficulties concerning its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes. We found that a more hydrophilic paclitaxel molecule, 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel, retained tubulin polymerization stabilization activity. The hydrophilic nature of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel allowed its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes, which was successfully accomplished using a remote loading method with a solubility gradient between 40% ethylene glycol and Cremophor EL/ethanol in PBS. Trastuzumab was then conjugated onto the surface of liposomes as immunoliposomes to selectively target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-overexpressing cancer cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed that the immunoliposomes enhanced the toxicity of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells and showed more rapid suppression of cell growth. The immunoliposomes strongly inhibited the tumor growth of HT-29 cells xenografted in nude mice. Notably, mice survived when treated with the immunoliposomes formulation, even when administered at a lethal dose of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in vivo. This data successfully demonstrates immunoliposomes as a promising candidate for the efficient delivery of paclitaxel glycoside. PMID:25264848

  16. Paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes as ultrasound-triggered therapeutic drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Li, Lu; Deng, Zhiting; Jin, Qiaofeng; Chen, Juanjuan; Yang, Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-03-28

    Liposome-microbubble complexes (LMC) have become a promising therapeutic carrier for ultrasound-triggered drug delivery to treat malignant tumors. However, the efficacy for ultrasound-assisted chemotherapy in vivo and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the feasibility of using paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes (PLMC) as possible ultrasound (US)-triggered targeted chemotherapy against breast cancer. PTX-liposomes (PL) were conjugated to the microbubble (MB) surface through biotin-avidin linkage, increasing the drug-loading efficiency of MBs. The significant increased release of payloads from liposome-microbubble complexes was achieved upon US exposure. We used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as a model drug to show that released QDs were taken up by 4T1 breast cancer cells treated with QD-liposome-microbubble complexes (QLMC) and US, and uptake depended on the exposure time and intensity of insonication. We found that PLMC plus US inhibited tumor growth more effectively than PL plus US or PLMC without US, not only in vitro, but also in vivo. Histologically, the inhibition of tumor growth appeared to result from increased apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis in tumor xenografts. In addition, a significant increase of drug concentration in tumors was observed in comparison to treatment with non-conjugated PL or PLMC without US. The significant increase in an antitumor efficacy of PLMC plus US suggests their potential use as a new targeted US chemotherapeutic approach to inhibit breast cancer growth.

  17. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular delivery of paclitaxel to colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxia; Ho, Paul C; Lim, Lee Yong

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentiation of the anticancer activity and enhanced cellular retention of paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles after surface conjugation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) against colon cancer cells. Glycosylation patterns of representative colon cancer cells confirmed the higher expression levels of WGA-binding glycoproteins in the Caco-2 and HT-29 cells, than in the CCD-18Co cells. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of WNP (final formulation) against colon cell lines was evaluated alongside control formulations. Confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis of intracellular paclitaxel were used to monitor the endocytosis and retention of nanoparticles inside the cells. WNP showed enhanced anti-proliferative activity against Caco-2 and HT-29 cells compared to corresponding nanoparticles without WGA conjugation (PNP). The greater efficacy of WNP was associated with higher cellular uptake and sustained intracellular retention of paclitaxel, which in turn was attributed to the over-expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-containing glycoprotein on the colon cell membrane. WNP also demonstrated increased intracellular retention in the Caco-2 (30% of uptake) and HT-29 (40% of uptake) cells, following post-uptake incubation with fresh medium, compared to the unconjugated PNP nanoparticles (18% in Caco-2) and (27% in HT-29), respectively. Cellular trafficking study of WNP showed endocytosed WNP could successful escape from the endo-lysosome compartment and release into the cytosol with increasing incubation time. It may be concluded that WNP has the potential to be applied as a targeted delivery platform for paclitaxel in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:20804835

  18. Stable and Efficient Paclitaxel Nanoparticles for Targeted Glioblastoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qingxin; Jeon, Mike; Hsiao, Meng-Hsuan; Patton, Victoria K.; Wang, Kui; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Development of efficient nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy remains a challenge. NPs are required to have high stability, uniform size, sufficient drug loading, targeting capability, and ability to overcome drug resistance. In this study, we report the development of a nanoparticle formulation that can meet all these challenging requirements for targeted glioblastoma multiform (GBM) therapy. This multifunctional nanoparticle is composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated magnetic iron oxide NP conjugated with cyclodextrin (CD) and chlorotoxin (CTX) and loaded with fluorescein and paclitaxel (PTX) (IONP-PTX-CTX-FL). The physicochemical properties of the IONP-PTX-CTX-FL were characterized by TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and HPLC. The cellular uptake of NPs was studied using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed with the Alamar Blue viability assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL had a uniform size of ~44 nm and high stability in cell culture medium. Importantly, the presence of CTX on NPs enhanced the uptake of the NPs by GBM cells and improved the efficacy of PTX in killing both GBM and GBM drug-resistant cells. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL has demonstrated its great potential for brain cancer therapy and may also be used to deliver PTX to treat other cancers. PMID:25761648

  19. Stable and efficient Paclitaxel nanoparticles for targeted glioblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qingxin; Jeon, Mike; Hsiao, Meng-Hsuan; Patton, Victoria K; Wang, Kui; Press, Oliver W; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-06-01

    Development of efficient nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy remains a challenge. NPs are required to have high stability, uniform size, sufficient drug loading, targeting capability, and ability to overcome drug resistance. In this study, the development of a NP formulation that can meet all these challenging requirements for targeted glioblastoma multiform (GBM) therapy is reported. This multifunctional NP is composed of a polyethylene glycol-coated magnetic iron oxide NP conjugated with cyclodextrin and chlorotoxin (CTX) and loaded with fluorescein and paclitaxel (PTX) (IONP-PTX-CTX-FL). The physicochemical properties of the IONP-PTX-CTX-FL are characterized by transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The cellular uptake of NPs is studied using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cell viability and apoptosis are assessed with the Alamar Blue viability assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL had a uniform size of ≈44 nm and high stability in cell culture medium. Importantly, the presence of CTX on NPs enhanced the uptake of the NPs by GBM cells and improved the efficacy of PTX in killing both GBM and GBM drug-resistant cells. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL demonstrated its great potential for brain cancer therapy and may also be used to deliver PTX to treat other cancers.

  20. Tumor priming using metronomic chemotherapy with neovasculature-targeted, nanoparticulate paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xin; Guan, Ying-Yun; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zhao, Mei; Lu, Qin; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Dong, Xiao; Yang, Si-Cong; Zheng, Lin; Sun, Peng; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-07-01

    Normalization of the tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to render conventional chemotherapy more effective. Although passively targeted drug nanocarriers have been investigated to this end, actively targeted tumor priming remains to be explored. In this work, we demonstrate an effective tumor priming strategy using metronomic application of nanoparticles actively targeted to tumor neovasculature. F56 peptide-conjugated paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (F56-PTX-NP) were formulated from PEGylated polylactide using an oil in water emulsion approach. Metronomic F56-PTX-NP specifically targeted tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs), pruned vessels with strong antiangiogenic activity and induced thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) secretion from ECs. The treatment induced tumor vasculature normalization as evidenced by significantly increased coverage of basement membrane and pericytes. The tumor microenvironment was altered with enhanced pO2, lower interstitial fluid pressure, and enhanced vascular perfusion and doxorubicin delivery. A "normalization window" of at least 9 days was induced, which was longer than other approaches using antiangiogenic agents. Together, these results show that metronomic, actively-targeted nanomedicine can induce tumor vascular normalization and modulate the tumor microenvironment, opening a window of opportunity for effective combination chemotherapies.

  1. Tumor priming using metronomic chemotherapy with neovasculature-targeted, nanoparticulate paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xin; Guan, Ying-Yun; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zhao, Mei; Lu, Qin; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Dong, Xiao; Yang, Si-Cong; Zheng, Lin; Sun, Peng; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-07-01

    Normalization of the tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to render conventional chemotherapy more effective. Although passively targeted drug nanocarriers have been investigated to this end, actively targeted tumor priming remains to be explored. In this work, we demonstrate an effective tumor priming strategy using metronomic application of nanoparticles actively targeted to tumor neovasculature. F56 peptide-conjugated paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (F56-PTX-NP) were formulated from PEGylated polylactide using an oil in water emulsion approach. Metronomic F56-PTX-NP specifically targeted tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs), pruned vessels with strong antiangiogenic activity and induced thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) secretion from ECs. The treatment induced tumor vasculature normalization as evidenced by significantly increased coverage of basement membrane and pericytes. The tumor microenvironment was altered with enhanced pO2, lower interstitial fluid pressure, and enhanced vascular perfusion and doxorubicin delivery. A "normalization window" of at least 9 days was induced, which was longer than other approaches using antiangiogenic agents. Together, these results show that metronomic, actively-targeted nanomedicine can induce tumor vascular normalization and modulate the tumor microenvironment, opening a window of opportunity for effective combination chemotherapies. PMID:27130953

  2. Development of chitosan graft pluronic®F127 copolymer nanoparticles containing DNA aptamer for paclitaxel delivery to treat breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Le, Duc Vinh; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    HER-2/ErbB2/Neu(HER-2), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is specifically overexpressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and serves a therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to isolate DNA aptamer (Ap) that specifically bind to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. We developed a novel multifunctional composite micelle with surface modification of Ap for targeted delivery of paclitaxel. This binary mixed system consisting of Ap modified pluronic®F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Polymeric micelles had a spherical shape and were self-assemblies of block copolymers of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameter. PTX could be loaded with high encapsulation efficiency (83.28 ± 0.13%) and loading capacity (9.12 ± 0.34%). The release profile were 29%-35% in the first 12 h and 85%-93% after 12 d at pH 7.5 of receiving media. The IC50 doses by MTT assay showed the greater activity of nanoparticles loaded paclitaxel over free paclitaxel and killed cells up to 95% after 6 h. These results demonstrated unique assembly with the capacity to function as an efficient detection and delivery vehicle in the biological living system.

  3. Development of chitosan graft pluronic®F127 copolymer nanoparticles containing DNA aptamer for paclitaxel delivery to treat breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Le, Duc Vinh; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    HER-2/ErbB2/Neu(HER-2), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is specifically overexpressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and serves a therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to isolate DNA aptamer (Ap) that specifically bind to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. We developed a novel multifunctional composite micelle with surface modification of Ap for targeted delivery of paclitaxel. This binary mixed system consisting of Ap modified pluronic®F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Polymeric micelles had a spherical shape and were self-assemblies of block copolymers of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameter. PTX could be loaded with high encapsulation efficiency (83.28 ± 0.13%) and loading capacity (9.12 ± 0.34%). The release profile were 29%–35% in the first 12 h and 85%–93% after 12 d at pH 7.5 of receiving media. The IC50 doses by MTT assay showed the greater activity of nanoparticles loaded paclitaxel over free paclitaxel and killed cells up to 95% after 6 h. These results demonstrated unique assembly with the capacity to function as an efficient detection and delivery vehicle in the biological living system.

  4. Facile preparation of paclitaxel loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles for enhanced antitumor efficacy by locoregional drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Puyuan; Liu, Qin; Li, Rutian; Wang, Jing; Zhen, Xu; Yue, Guofeng; Wang, Huiyu; Cui, Fangbo; Wu, Fenglei; Yang, Mi; Qian, Xiaoping; Yu, Lixia; Jiang, Xiqun; Liu, Baorui

    2013-12-11

    Non-toxic, safe materials and preparation methods are among the most important factors when designing nanoparticles (NPs) for future clinical application. Here we report a novel and facile method encapsulating anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) into silk fibroin (SF), a biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer, without adding any toxic organic solvents, surfactants or other toxic agents. The paclitaxel loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles (PTX-SF-NPs) with a diameter of 130 nm were formed in an aqueous solution at room temperature by self-assembling of SF protein, which demonstrated mainly silk I conformation in the NPs. In cellular uptake experiments, coumarin-6 loaded SF NPs were taken up efficiently by two human gastric cancer cell lines BGC-823 and SGC-7901. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that PTX kept its pharmacological activity when incorporating into PTX-SF-NPs, while SF showed no cytotoxicity to cells. The in vivo antitumor effects of PTX-SF-NPs were evaluated on gastric cancer nude mice exnograft model. We found that locoregional delivery of PTX-SF-NPs demonstrated superior antitumor efficacy by delaying tumor growth and reducing tumor weights compared with systemic administration. Furthermore, the organs of mice in NP treated groups didn't show obvious toxicity, indicating the in vivo safety of SF NPs. These results suggest that SF NPs are promising drug delivery carriers, and locoregional delivery of SF NPs could be a potential future clinical cancer treatment regimen.

  5. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis.

  6. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis. PMID:26899550

  7. Two-Step Delivery: Exploiting the Partition Coefficient Concept to Increase Intratumoral Paclitaxel Concentrations In vivo Using Responsive Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Aaron H.; Liu, Rong; Schulz, Morgan D.; Padera, Robert F.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Drug dose, high local target tissue concentration, and prolonged duration of exposure are essential criteria in achieving optimal drug performance. However, systemically delivered drugs often fail to effectively address these factors with only fractions of the injected dose reaching the target tissue. This is especially evident in the treatment of peritoneal cancers, including mesothelioma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer, which regularly employ regimens of intravenous and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy (e.g., gemcitabine, cisplatin, pemetrexed, and paclitaxel) with limited results. Here, we show that a “two-step” nanoparticle (NP) delivery system may address this limitation. This two-step approach involves the separate administration of NP and drug where, first, the NP localizes to tumor. Second, subsequent administration of drug then rapidly concentrates into the NP already stationed within the target tissue. This two-step method results in a greater than 5-fold increase in intratumoral drug concentrations compared to conventional “drug-alone” administration. These results suggest that this unique two-step delivery may provide a novel method for increasing drug concentrations in target tissues.

  8. Core-shell nanocarriers with high paclitaxel loading for passive and active targeting

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhu; Lv, Yaqi; Cao, Hui; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; He, Wei; Yin, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Rapid blood clearance and premature burst release are inherent drawbacks of conventional nanoparticles, resulting in poor tumor selectivity. iRGD peptide is widely recognized as an efficient cell membrane penetration peptide homing to αVβ3 integrins. Herein, core-shell nanocapsules (NCs) and iRGD-modified NCs (iRGD-NCs) with high drug payload for paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared to enhance the antitumor activities of chemotherapy agents with poor water solubility. Improved in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting and penetration were observed with NCs and iRGD-NCs; the latter exhibited better antitumor activity because iRGD enhanced the accumulation and penetration of NCs in tumors. The NCs were cytocompatible, histocompatible, and non-toxic to other healthy tissues. The endocytosis of NCs was mediated by lipid rafts in an energy-dependent manner, leading to better cytotoxicity of PTX against cancer cells. In contrast with commercial product, PTX-loaded NCs (PTX-NCs) increased area under concentration-time curve (AUC) by about 4-fold, prolonged mean resident time (MRT) by more than 8-fold and reduced the elimination rate constant by greater than 68-fold. In conclusion, the present nanocarriers with high drug-loading capacity represent an efficient tumor-targeting drug delivery system with promising potential for cancer therapy. PMID:27278751

  9. Core-shell nanocarriers with high paclitaxel loading for passive and active targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhu; Lv, Yaqi; Cao, Hui; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; He, Wei; Yin, Lifang

    2016-06-01

    Rapid blood clearance and premature burst release are inherent drawbacks of conventional nanoparticles, resulting in poor tumor selectivity. iRGD peptide is widely recognized as an efficient cell membrane penetration peptide homing to αVβ3 integrins. Herein, core-shell nanocapsules (NCs) and iRGD-modified NCs (iRGD-NCs) with high drug payload for paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared to enhance the antitumor activities of chemotherapy agents with poor water solubility. Improved in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting and penetration were observed with NCs and iRGD-NCs; the latter exhibited better antitumor activity because iRGD enhanced the accumulation and penetration of NCs in tumors. The NCs were cytocompatible, histocompatible, and non-toxic to other healthy tissues. The endocytosis of NCs was mediated by lipid rafts in an energy-dependent manner, leading to better cytotoxicity of PTX against cancer cells. In contrast with commercial product, PTX-loaded NCs (PTX-NCs) increased area under concentration-time curve (AUC) by about 4-fold, prolonged mean resident time (MRT) by more than 8-fold and reduced the elimination rate constant by greater than 68-fold. In conclusion, the present nanocarriers with high drug-loading capacity represent an efficient tumor-targeting drug delivery system with promising potential for cancer therapy.

  10. Magnetic-nanoparticle-modified paclitaxel for targeted therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Wen-Jauh; Chuang, Kun-Lung; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chuang, Heng-Chang; Pang, See-Tong

    2010-10-01

    A nontoxic drug nanocarrier containing carboxyl groups was successfully developed by mixing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of Fe(3)O(4) with the water-soluble polyaniline derivative poly[aniline-co-sodium N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline] (SPAnNa) and doping with HCl aqueous solution to form SPAnH/MNPs shell/core. SPAnH/MNPs could be used to effectively immobilize the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX), thus enhancing the drug's thermal stability and water solubility. Up to 302.75 mug of PTX could be immobilized per mg of SPAnH/MNPs. SPAnH/MNPs-bound-PTX (bound-PTX) was more stable than free-PTX at both 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Furthermore, bound-PTX was more cytotoxic to human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3 and CWR22R) than free-PTX at 37 degrees C, and the inhibition of cellular growth was even more pronounced when magnetic targeting was applied to the bound-PTX. These data indicate that this magnetically targeted drug delivery system provides more effective treatment of prostate cancer cells using lower therapeutic doses and thus with potentially fewer side-effects.

  11. IRAK1 is a therapeutic target that drives breast cancer metastasis and resistance to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Zhen Ning; Yatim, Siti Maryam J. M.; Kohlbauer, Vera K; Feng, Min; Goh, Jian Yuan; Yi, Bao; Lee, Puay Leng; Zhang, Songjing; Wang, Pan Pan; Lim, Elgene; Tam, Wai Leong; Cai, Yu; Ditzel, Henrik J; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Tan, Ern Yu; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumour recurrence due to failed treatments remains a major challenge of breast cancer clinical management. Here we report that interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) is overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers, in particular triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), where it acts to drive aggressive growth, metastasis and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. We show that IRAK1 overexpression confers TNBC growth advantage through NF-κB-related cytokine secretion and metastatic TNBC cells exhibit gain of IRAK1 dependency, resulting in high susceptibility to genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1. Importantly, paclitaxel treatment induces strong IRAK1 phosphorylation, an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression, enrichment of cancer stem cells and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. Pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1 is able to reverse paclitaxel resistance by triggering massive apoptosis at least in part through inhibiting p38-MCL1 pro-survival pathway. Our study thus demonstrates IRAK1 as a promising therapeutic target for TNBC metastasis and paclitaxel resistance. PMID:26503059

  12. Delivery of baicalein and paclitaxel using self-assembled nanoparticles: synergistic antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xi, Mei; Duan, Xuezhong; Wang, Yong; Kong, Fansheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Combination anticancer therapy is promising to generate synergistic anticancer effects to maximize the treatment effect and overcome multidrug resistance. The aim of the study reported here was to develop multifunctional, dual-ligand, modified, self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) for the combination delivery of baicalein (BCL) and paclitaxel (PTX) prodrugs. Methods Prodrug of PTX and prodrug of BCL, containing dual-targeted ligands of folate (FA) and hyaluronic acid (HA), were synthesized. Multifunctional self-assembled NPs for combination delivery of PTX prodrug and BCL prodrug (PTX-BCL) were prepared and the synergistic antitumor effect was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the novel modified vectors was evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and drug-resistant lung cancer A549/PTX cells. The in vivo antitumor efficiency and systemic toxicity of different formulations were further investigated in mice bearing A549/PTX drug-resistant human lung cancer xenografts. Results The size of the PTX-BCL NPs was approximately 90 nm, with a positive zeta potential of +3.3. The PTX-BCL NPs displayed remarkably better antitumor activity over a wide range of drug concentrations, and showed an obvious synergism effect with CI50 values of 0.707 and 0.513, indicating that double-ligand modification and the co-delivery of PTX and BCL prodrugs with self-assembled NPs had remarkable superiority over other formulations. Conclusion The prepared PTX-BCL NP drug-delivery system was proven efficient by its targeting of drug-resistant human lung cancer cells and delivering of BCL and PTX prodrugs. Enhanced synergistic anticancer effects were achieved by PTX-BCL NPs, and multidrug resistance of PTX was overcome by this promising targeted nanomedicine. PMID:26045664

  13. Multidrug resistance reversal by co-delivery of tariquidar (XR9576) and paclitaxel using long-circulating liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Rathi, Alok; Mongayt, Dmitriy; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to the success of cancer chemotherapy is the multidrug resistance (MDR) often resulting due to the overexpression of drug efflux transporter pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Highly efficacious third generation P-gp inhibitors, like tariquidar, have shown promising results in overcoming the MDR. However, P-gp is also expressed in normal tissues like blood brain barrier, gastrointestinal track, liver, spleen and kidney. To maximize the efficacy of P-gp inhibitor and reduce the systemic toxicity, it is important to limit the exposure of P-gp inhibitors and the anticancer drugs to normal tissues and increase their co-localization with tumor cells. In this study, we have investigated the co-delivery of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, and cytotoxic drug, paclitaxel, into tumor cells to reverse the MDR using long-circulating liposomes. Tariquidar- and paclitaxel-loaded long-circulating liposomes showed significant resensitization of the resistant variant for paclitaxel, which could be correlated with an increased accumulation of paclitaxel in tumor cells. These results suggest that the co-delivery of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, and the cytotoxicity inducer, paclitaxel, looks like a promising approach to overcome the MDR. PMID:21703341

  14. Synergistic inhibition of breast cancer by co-delivery of VEGF siRNA and paclitaxel via vapreotide-modified core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiang; Yu, Min-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Hou, Wen-Jie; Gao, Ling-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Fei; Pei, Xi-Wei; Niu, Yu-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Chong; Pang, Wen-Hao; Du, Li-Li; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    A somatostatin analog, vapreotide (VAP), can be used as a ligand for targeting drug delivery based on its high affinity to somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which is overexpressed in many tumor cells. RNA interference plays an important role on downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is important for tumor growth, progression and metastasis. To improve tumor therapy efficacy, the vapreotide-modified core-shell type nanoparticles co-encapsulating VEGF targeted siRNA (siVEGF) and paclitaxel (PTX), termed as VAP-PLPC/siRNA NPs, were developed in this study. When targeted via somatostatin receptors to tumor cells, the VAP-PLPC/siRNA NPs could simultaneously delivery siVEGF and PTX into cells and achieve a synergistic inhibition of tumor growth. Interestingly, in vitro cell uptake and gene silencing experiments demonstrated that the targeted VAP-PLPC/siRNA NPs exhibited significant higher intracellular siRNA accumulation and VEGF downregulation in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, compared to those of the non-targeted PEG-PLPC/siRNA NPs. More importantly, in vivo results further demonstrated that the targeted VAP-PLPC/siRNA NPs had significant stronger drug distribution in tumor tissues and tumor growth inhibition efficacy via receptor-mediated targeting delivery, accompany with an obvious inhibition of neovascularization induced by siVEGF silencing. These results suggested that the co-delivery of siRNA and paclitaxel via vapreotide-modified core-shell nanoparticles would be a promising approach for tumor targeted therapy.

  15. Transferrin-Targeted Polymeric Micelles Co-Loaded with Curcumin and Paclitaxel: Efficient Killing of Paclitaxel-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Sarisozen, Can

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to successfully treat advanced forms of cancer remains a challenge due to chemotherapy resistance. Numerous studies indicate that NF-κB, a protein complex that controls the expression of numerous genes, as being a key factor in producing chemo-resistant tumors. In this study, the therapeutic potential of transferrin (TF)-targeted mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin (CUR), a potent NF-κB inhibitor, and paclitaxel (PCL), was examined. Methods The cytotoxicity of non-targeted and TF-targeted CUR and PCL micelles as a single agent or in combination was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant (MDR) version SK-OV-3-PCL-resistant (SK-OV-3TR) cells in vitro. Results Our results indicated that the TF-targeted combination micelles were able to improve the net cytotoxic effect of CUR and PCL to clear synergistic one against the SK-OV-3 cells. In addition, even though the non-targeted combination treatment demonstrated a synergistic effect against the SK-OV-3TR cells, the addition of the TF-targeting moiety significantly increased this cytotoxic effect. While keeping CUR constant at 5 and 10 μM and varying the PCL concentration, the PCL IC50 decreased from ~ 1.78 and 0.68 μM for the non-targeted formulations to ~ 0.74 and 0.1 μM for the TF-targeted ones, respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that such co-loaded targeted mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer and provide a clear rational for further in vivo investigation. PMID:24522815

  16. Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A.; Parmar, Chirag K.; Gillespie, James W.; Praveen, Kulkarni P.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG- PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer cells rather than non-target, non- cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, the targeted phage-micelles triggered a dramatic tumor reduction and extensive necrosis as a result of improved tumor delivery of paclitaxel. The enhanced anticancer effect was also verified by an enhanced apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation following the treatment with the targeted micellar paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. The absence of hepatotoxicity and pathological changes in tissue sections of vital organs, together with maintenance of overall health of mice following the treatment, further support its translational potential as an effective and safe chemotherapy for improved breast cancer treatment. PMID:25239936

  17. Dual Targeting Biomimetic Liposomes for Paclitaxel/DNA Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Fang, Gui-Qing; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs with nucleic acid has shown great promise in cancer therapy. In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) and DNA were co-loaded in the hyaluronic acid (HA) and folate (FA)-modified liposomes (HA/FA/PPD), to obtain the dual targeting biomimetic nanovector. The prepared HA/FA/PPD exhibited nanosized structure and narrow size distributions (247.4 ± 4.2 nm) with appropriate negative charge of −25.40 ± 2.7 mV. HA/FA/PD (PTX free HA/FA/PPD) showed almost no toxicity on murine malignant melanoma cell line (B16) and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) (higher than 80% cell viability), demonstrating the safety of the blank nanovector. In comparison with the FA-modified PTX/DNA co-loaded liposomes (FA/PPD), HA/FA/PPD showed significant superiority in protecting the nanoparticles from aggregation in the presence of plasma and degradation by DNase I. Moreover, HA/FA/PPD could also significantly improve the transfection efficiency and cellular internalization rates on B16 cells comparing to that of FA/PPD (p < 0.05) and PPD (p < 0.01), demonstrating the great advantages of dual targeting properties. Furthermore, fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry results showed that PTX and DNA could be effectively co-delivered into the same tumor cell via HA/FA/PPD, contributing to PTX/DNA combination cancer treatment. In conclusion, the obtained HA/FA/PPD in the study could effectively target tumor cells, enhance transfection efficiency and subsequently achieve the co-delivery of PTX and DNA, displaying great potential for optimal combination therapy. PMID:25177862

  18. Endocytosis of fluorescent cyclodextrins by intestinal Caco-2 cells and its role in paclitaxel drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Réti-Nagy, Katalin; Malanga, Milo; Fenyvesi, Éva; Szente, Lajos; Vámosi, György; Váradi, Judit; Bácskay, Ildikó; Fehér, Pálma; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Róka, Eszter; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Balogh, György; Vasvári, Gábor; Fenyvesi, Ferenc

    2015-12-30

    Cyclodextrins are widely used excipients in pharmaceutical formulations. They are mainly utilized as solubilizers and absorption enhancers, but recent results revealed their effects on cell membranes and pharmacological barriers. In addition to the growing knowledge on their interaction with plasma membranes, it was confirmed that cyclodextrins are able to enter cells by endocytosis. The number of the tested cyclodextrins was limited, and the role of this mechanism in drug absorption and delivery is not known. Our aim was to examine the endocytosis of fluorescently labeled hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, random methyl-β-cyclodextrin and soluble β-cyclodextrin polymer, and the cellular uptake of the fluorescent paclitaxel derivative-random methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex. The studied cyclodextrin derivatives were able to enter Caco-2 intestinal cells and localized in vesicles in the cytoplasm, while their permeability was very limited through Caco-2 monolayers. We demonstrated for the first time that the fluorescent paclitaxel derivative and rhodamine-labeled random methyl-β-cyclodextrin were detected in the same intracellular vesicles after treating cells with their inclusion complex. These results indicate that the endocytosis of cyclodextrin complexes can contribute to drug absorption processes.

  19. Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor-specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A; Parmar, Chirag K; Gillespie, James W; Praveen, Kulkarni P; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water-insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer cells rather than nontarget, non cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, the targeted phage micelles triggered a dramatic tumor reduction and extensive necrosis as a result of improved tumor delivery of paclitaxel. The enhanced anticancer effect was also verified by an enhanced apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation following the treatment with the targeted micellar paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. The absence of hepatotoxicity and pathologic changes in tissue sections of vital organs, together with maintenance of overall health of mice following the treatment, further support its translational potential as an effective and safe chemotherapy for improved breast cancer treatment. PMID:25239936

  20. Telodendrimer nanocarrier for co-delivery of paclitaxel and cisplatin: A synergistic combination nanotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Wang, Xu; Luo, Juntao

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) and paclitaxel (PTX) are two established chemotherapeutic drugs used in combination for the treatment of many cancers, including ovarian cancer. We have recently developed a three-layered linear-dendritic telodendrimer micelles (TM) by introducing carboxylic acid groups in the adjacent layer via “thio-ene” click chemistry for CDDP complexation and conjugating cholic acids via peptide chemistry in the interior layer of telodendrimer for PTX encapsulation. We hypothesize that the co-delivery of low dosage PTX with CDDP could act synergistically to increase the treatment efficacy and reduce their toxic side effects. This design allowed us to co-deliver PTX and CDDP at various drug ratios to ovarian cancer cells. The in vitro cellular assays revealed strongest synergism in anti-tumor effects when delivered at a 1:2 PTX/CDDP loading ratio. Using the SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model, we demonstrate that our co-encapsulation approach resulted in an efficient tumor-targeted drug delivery, decreased cytotoxic effects and stronger anti-tumor effect, when compared with free drug combination or the single loading TM formulations. PMID:25453973

  1. Programmed co-delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin boosted by camouflaging with erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Lv, Piping; Chen, Zhongke; Ni, Dezhi; Zhang, Lijun; Yue, Hua; Yue, Zhanguo; Wei, Wei; Ma, Guanghui

    2015-03-01

    Combination chemotherapy has been proven promising for cancer treatment, but unsatisfactory therapeutic data and increased side effects slow down the development in the clinic. In this study, we develop an effective approach to co-encapsulate a hydrophilic-hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drug pair (paclitaxel and doxorubicin) into magnetic O-carboxymethyl-chitosan nanoparticles. To endow them with the ability of programmed delivery, these carriers are further camouflaged with an Arg-Gly-Asp anchored erythrocyte membrane. Compared with the traditional polyethylene glycol coating method, this biomimetic decoration strategy is demonstrated to be superior in prolonging circulation time, improving tumor accumulation, facilitating tumor uptake, and tuning intracellular fate. These outstanding properties enable the as-designed nanodevice to exhibit greater tumor growth inhibition ability and much lower side effects than the combined use of commercial formulations.

  2. Enhanced combination therapy effect on paclitaxel-resistant carcinoma by chloroquine co-delivery via liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Menghua; Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    A novel composite liposomal system co-encapsulating paclitaxel (PTX) with chloroquine phosphate (CQ) was designed for treating PTX-resistant carcinoma. It was confirmed that liposomal CQ can sensitize PTX by means of autophagy inhibition and competitively binding with multidrug-resistance transporters. Furthermore, according to the in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis assay, real-time observation of cellular uptake, and in vivo tissue distribution study, co-encapsulation of PTX and CQ in liposomes was validated as superior to the mixture of PTX liposome plus CQ liposome due to the simultaneous delivery and synergetic effect of the two drugs. Consequently, this composite liposome achieved significantly stronger anticancer efficacy in vivo than the PTX liposome plus CQ liposome mixture. This study helps to guide and enlighten ongoing and future clinical trials about the optimal administration modes for drug combination therapy. PMID:26543365

  3. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  4. Programmed co-delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin boosted by camouflaging with erythrocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Lv, Piping; Chen, Zhongke; Ni, Dezhi; Zhang, Lijun; Yue, Hua; Yue, Zhanguo; Wei, Wei; Ma, Guanghui

    2015-02-01

    Combination chemotherapy has been proven promising for cancer treatment, but unsatisfactory therapeutic data and increased side effects slow down the development in the clinic. In this study, we develop an effective approach to co-encapsulate a hydrophilic-hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drug pair (paclitaxel and doxorubicin) into magnetic O-carboxymethyl-chitosan nanoparticles. To endow them with the ability of programmed delivery, these carriers are further camouflaged with an Arg-Gly-Asp anchored erythrocyte membrane. Compared with the traditional polyethylene glycol coating method, this biomimetic decoration strategy is demonstrated to be superior in prolonging circulation time, improving tumor accumulation, facilitating tumor uptake, and tuning intracellular fate. These outstanding properties enable the as-designed nanodevice to exhibit greater tumor growth inhibition ability and much lower side effects than the combined use of commercial formulations.Combination chemotherapy has been proven promising for cancer treatment, but unsatisfactory therapeutic data and increased side effects slow down the development in the clinic. In this study, we develop an effective approach to co-encapsulate a hydrophilic-hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drug pair (paclitaxel and doxorubicin) into magnetic O-carboxymethyl-chitosan nanoparticles. To endow them with the ability of programmed delivery, these carriers are further camouflaged with an Arg-Gly-Asp anchored erythrocyte membrane. Compared with the traditional polyethylene glycol coating method, this biomimetic decoration strategy is demonstrated to be superior in prolonging circulation time, improving tumor accumulation, facilitating tumor uptake, and tuning intracellular fate. These outstanding properties enable the as-designed nanodevice to exhibit greater tumor growth inhibition ability and much lower side effects than the combined use of commercial formulations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  5. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR. PMID:25956050

  6. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR.

  7. Cysteine modified and bile salt based micelles: preparation and application as an oral delivery system for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Fan, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yanli; Li, Lingbing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to construct a cysteine modified polyion complex micelles made of Pluronic F127-chitosan (PF127-CS), Pluronic F127-cysteine (PF127-cysteine) and sodium cholate (NaC) and to evaluate the potential of the micelles as an oral drug delivery system for paclitaxel. Systematic studies on physicochemical properties including size distribution, zeta-potential and morphology were conducted to validate the formation of micelle structure. Compared with Pluronic micelles, drug-loading capacity of PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles was increased from 3.35% to 12.77%. Both the critical micelle concentration and the stability test confirmed that the PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles were more stable in aqueous solution than sodium cholate micelles. Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that when oral administration the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) and the absolute bioavailability of paclitaxel-loaded micelles were five times greater than that of the paclitaxel solution. In general, PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles were proven to be a potential oral drug delivery system for paclitaxel.

  8. Well-defined, size-tunable, multi-functional micelles for efficient paclitaxel delivery for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juntao; Xiao, Kai; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce S.; Shi, Lifang; Tan, Yih-Horng; Xing, Li; Cheng, R. Holland; Liu, Gang-Yu; Lam, Kit S.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a well-defined and biocompatible amphiphilic telodendrimer system (PEG-b-dendritic oligo-cholic acid) which can self-assemble into multifunctional micelles in aqueous solution for efficient delivery of hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel. In this telodendrimer system, cholic acid is essential for the formation of stable micelles with high drug loading capacity, owing to its facial amphiphilicity. A series of telodendrimers with variable length of PEG chain and number of cholic acid in the dendritic blocks were synthesized. The structure and molecular weight of each of these telodendrimers were characterized, and their critical micellization concentration (CMC), drug-loading properties, particle sizes and cytotoxicity were examined and evaluated for further optimization for anticancer drug delivery. The sizes of the micelles, with and without paclitaxel loading, could be tuned from 11.5 to 21 nm and from 15 to 141 nm, respectively. Optical imaging studies in xenograft models demonstrated preferential uptakes of the smaller paclitaxel-loaded micelles (17–60 nm) by the tumor, and the larger micelles (150 nm) by the liver and lung. The toxicity and anti-tumor efficacy profiles of these paclitaxel-loaded micelles in xenograft models were found to be superior to those of Taxol® and Abraxane®. PMID:20536174

  9. Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Modified with MCF-7 Cell-Specific Phage Protein: Enhanced Binding to Target Cancer Cells and Increased Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are used as pharmaceutical carriers to increase solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Different ligands are used to prepare targeted polymeric micelles. Earlier, we developed the method for use of specific landscape phage fusion coat proteins as targeted delivery ligands and demonstrated the efficiency of this approach with doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes. Here, we describe a MCF-7 cell-specific micellar formulation self-assembled from the mixture of the micelle-forming amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate, MCF-7-specific landscape phage fusion coat protein, and the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel. These micelles demonstrated a very low CMC value and specific binding to target cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, FACS analysis, and fluorescence microscopy we showed that MCF-7 targeted phage micelles preferential bound to target cells compared to non-target cells. As a result, targeted paclitaxel-loaded phage micelles demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity towards target MCF-7 cells than free drug or non-targeted micelle formulations, but failed to show such a differential toxicity towards non-target C166 cells. Overall, cancer cell-specific phage proteins identified from phage display peptide libraries can serve as targeting ligands (“substitute antibody”) for polymeric micelle-based pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20518562

  10. Effective Drug Delivery, in vitro and in vivo, By Carbon-Based Nanovectors Non-Covalently Loaded With Unmodified Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Leonard, Ashley D.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Marcano, Daniela C.; Yan, Shayou; Fiorentino, Stefania; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Katherine Price, B.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca M.; Wen, XiaoXia; Gabriela Raso, M.; Craig, Suzanne L.; Tran, Hai T.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Many new drugs have low aqueous solubility and high therapeutic efficacy. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a classic example of this type of compound. Here we show that extremely small (<40 nm) hydrophilic carbon clusters (HCCs) that are PEGylated (PEG-HCCs) are effective drug delivery vehicles when simply mixed with paclitaxel. This formulation of PTX sequestered in PEG-HCCs (PTX/PEG-HCCs) is stable for at least twenty weeks. The PTX/PEG-HCCs formulation was as effective as PTX in a clinical formulation in reducing tumor volumes in an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Preliminary toxicity and biodistribution studies suggest that the PEG-HCCs are not acutely toxic and, like many other nanomaterials, are primarily accumulated in the liver and spleen. This work demonstrates that carbon nanomaterials are effective drug delivery vehicles in vivo when non-covalently loaded with an unmodified drug. PMID:20681596

  11. Novel targets for paclitaxel nano formulations: Hopes and hypes in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakrania, Anita K; Variya, Bhavesh C; Patel, Snehal S

    2016-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer is defined as one of the utmost prevailing breast cancers worldwide, possessing an inadequate prognosis and treatment option limited to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, creating a challenge for researchers as far as developing a specific targeted therapy is concerned. The past research era has shown several promising outcomes for TNBC such as nano-formulations of the chemotherapeutic agents already used for the management of the malignant tumor. Taking a glance at paclitaxel nano formulations, it has been proven beneficial in several researches in the past decade; nevertheless its solubility is often a challenge to scientists in achieving success. We have henceforth discussed the basic heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancer along with the current management options as well as a brief outlook on pros and cons of paclitaxel, known as the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of the disease. We further analyzed the need of nanotechnology pertaining to the problems encountered with the current paclitaxel formulations available discussing the strategic progress in various nano-formulations till date taking into account the basic research strategies required in terms of solubility, permeability, physicochemical properties, active and passive targeting. A thorough review in recent advances in active targeting for TNBC was carried out whereby the various ligands which are at present finding its way into TNBC research such as hyaluronic acid, folic acid, transferrin, etc. were discussed. These ligands have specific receptor affinity to TNBC tumor cells hence can be beneficial for novel drug targeting approaches. Conversely, there are currently several novel strategies in the research pipeline whose targeting ligands have not yet been studied. Therefore, we reviewed upon the numerous novel receptor targets along with the respective nano-formulation aspects which have not yet been fully researched upon and could be

  12. Formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a paclitaxel nanosuspension for intravenous delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming; Wang, Liyao; Xu, Yuanlong; Cheng, Xiaodan; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a diterpenoid isolated from Taxus brevifolia. It is effective for various cancers, especially ovarian and breast cancer. Due to its aqueous insolubility, it is administered dissolved in ethanol and Cremophor® EL (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany), which can cause serious allergic reactions. In order to eliminate Cremophor EL, paclitaxel was formulated as a nanosuspension by high-pressure homogenization. The nanosuspension was lyophilized to obtain the dry paclitaxel nanoparticles (average size, 214.4 ± 15.03 nm), which enhanced both the physical and chemical stability of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Paclitaxel dissolution was also enhanced by the nanosuspension. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the crystallinity of paclitaxel was preserved during the high-pressure homogenization process. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of paclitaxel were compared after intravenous administration of paclitaxel nanosuspension and paclitaxel injection. In rat plasma, paclitaxel nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (P < 0.01) reduced area under the concentration curve (AUC)0–∞ (20.343 ± 9.119 μg · h · mL−1 vs 5.196 ± 1.426 μg · h · mL−1), greater clearance (2.050 ± 0.616 L · kg−1 · h−1 vs 0.556 ± 0.190 L · kg−1 · h−1), and shorter elimination half-life (5.646 ± 2.941 vs 3.774 ± 1.352 hours) compared with the paclitaxel solution. In contrast, the paclitaxel nanosuspension resulted in a significantly greater AUC0–∞ in liver, lung, and spleen (all P < 0.01), but not in heart or kidney. PMID:21796250

  13. Micro RNA 100 sensitizes luminal A breast cancer cells to paclitaxel treatment in part by targeting mTOR

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Fu, Xing; Fu, Liya; Zhu, Zhengmao; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Luminal A breast cancer usually responds to hormonal therapies but does not benefit from chemotherapies, including microtubule-targeted paclitaxel. MicroRNAs could play a role in mediating this differential response. In this study, we examined the role of micro RNA 100 (miR-100) in the sensitivity of breast cancer to paclitaxel treatment. We found that while miR-100 was downregulated in both human breast cancer primary tumors and cell lines, the degree of downregulation was greater in the luminal A subtype than in other subtypes. The IC50 of paclitaxel was much higher in luminal A than in basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Ectopic miR-100 expression in the MCF-7 luminal A cell line enhanced the effect of paclitaxel on cell cycle arrest, multinucleation, and apoptosis, while knockdown of miR-100 in the MDA-MB-231 basal-like line compromised these effects. Similarly, overexpression of miR-100 enhanced the effects of paclitaxel on tumorigenesis in MCF-7 cells. Rapamycin-mediated inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a target of miR-100, also sensitized MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that genes that are part of the known paclitaxel-sensitive signature had a significant expression correlation with miR-100 in breast cancer samples. In addition, patients with lower levels of miR-100 expression had worse overall survival. These results suggest that miR-100 plays a causal role in determining the sensitivity of breast cancers to paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26744318

  14. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery. PMID:27713328

  15. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  16. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfate as a novel platform for paclitaxel delivery: pitfalls of ester linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Herves, Ana; Würfel, Patrick; Wegner, Nicole; Khandare, Jayant; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Welker, Pia; Calderón, Marcelo

    2015-02-01

    In this study, dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) is evaluated as a delivery platform for the anticancer, tubulin-binding drug paclitaxel (PTX). The conjugation of PTX to dPGS is conducted via a labile ester linkage. A non-sulfated dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) is used as a control, and the labeling with an indocarbocyanine dye (ICC) renders multifunctional conjugates that can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The conjugates are characterized by 1H NMR, UV-vis measurements, and RP-HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of PTX and dendritic conjugates is evaluated using A549 and A431 cell lines, showing a reduced cytotoxic efficacy of the conjugates compared to PTX. The study of uptake kinetics reveals a linear, non saturable uptake in tumor cells for dPGS-PTX-ICC, while dPG-PTX-ICC is hardly taken up. Despite the marginal uptake of dPG-PTX-ICC, it prompts tubulin polymerization to a comparable extent as PTX. These observations suggest a fast ester hydrolysis and premature drug release, as confirmed by HPLC measurements in the presence of plasma enzymes.In this study, dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) is evaluated as a delivery platform for the anticancer, tubulin-binding drug paclitaxel (PTX). The conjugation of PTX to dPGS is conducted via a labile ester linkage. A non-sulfated dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) is used as a control, and the labeling with an indocarbocyanine dye (ICC) renders multifunctional conjugates that can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The conjugates are characterized by 1H NMR, UV-vis measurements, and RP-HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of PTX and dendritic conjugates is evaluated using A549 and A431 cell lines, showing a reduced cytotoxic efficacy of the conjugates compared to PTX. The study of uptake kinetics reveals a linear, non saturable uptake in tumor cells for dPGS-PTX-ICC, while dPG-PTX-ICC is hardly taken up. Despite the marginal uptake of dPG-PTX-ICC, it prompts tubulin polymerization to a comparable extent as PTX. These

  17. Targeting delivery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Dunnett, Stephen B; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to halt the neurodegenerative process and to stimulate the protection, repair, and regeneration of dopaminergic neurons, remain a vital but unmet clinical need. Targeting the delivery of current and new therapeutics directly to the diseased brain region (in particular the nigrostriatal pathway) could result in greater improvements in the motor functions that characterise PD. Here, we highlight some of the opportunities and challenges facing the development of the next generation of therapies for patients with PD. PMID:27312875

  18. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfate as a novel platform for paclitaxel delivery: pitfalls of ester linkage.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Herves, Ana; Würfel, Patrick; Wegner, Nicole; Khandare, Jayant; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Welker, Pia; Calderón, Marcelo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) is evaluated as a delivery platform for the anticancer, tubulin-binding drug paclitaxel (PTX). The conjugation of PTX to dPGS is conducted via a labile ester linkage. A non-sulfated dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) is used as a control, and the labeling with an indocarbocyanine dye (ICC) renders multifunctional conjugates that can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The conjugates are characterized by (1)H NMR, UV-vis measurements, and RP-HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of PTX and dendritic conjugates is evaluated using A549 and A431 cell lines, showing a reduced cytotoxic efficacy of the conjugates compared to PTX. The study of uptake kinetics reveals a linear, non saturable uptake in tumor cells for dPGS-PTX-ICC, while dPG-PTX-ICC is hardly taken up. Despite the marginal uptake of dPG-PTX-ICC, it prompts tubulin polymerization to a comparable extent as PTX. These observations suggest a fast ester hydrolysis and premature drug release, as confirmed by HPLC measurements in the presence of plasma enzymes.

  19. Liposomal co-delivery of curcumin and albumin/paclitaxel nanoparticle for enhanced synergistic antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ruttala, Hima Bindu; Ko, Young Tag

    2015-04-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and curcumin (CUR) are potent chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer. In the present study, hybrid polymer-lipid nanoparticles co-loaded with PTX and CUR were developed to investigate the therapeutic potential of a combination drug regimen. For this purpose, PTX-loaded albumin nanoparticles (APN) were prepared and encapsulated in PEGylated hybrid liposomes containing CUR (CL-APN) via a thin-film hydration technique. CL-APN was nanosized with a uniform spherical morphology. PTX and CUR release was sustained and occurred in a sequential manner, wherein CUR was expected to downregulate the nuclear factor NF-κB and Akt pathways and increase the therapeutic efficacy of PTX. The ratiometric combination of PTX and CUR was significantly more cytotoxic than the individual drugs. Importantly, dual-drug-loaded nanocarriers exhibited a superior cytotoxic effect than a cocktail combination at a lower dose. CL-APN induced significantly higher early and late apoptosis, induced a stronger G2/M arrest, and significantly increased the subG1 cell population. By combining CUR, an effective NF-κB inhibitor, with PTX, a powerful anticancer drug, in a polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticle system, we could improve the therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatments. Our results showed that such co-loaded delivery systems could serve as a promising therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes against various malignancies.

  20. Liposomal formulation for co-delivery of paclitaxel and lapatinib, preparation, characterization and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravar, Fatemeh; Saadat, Ebrahim; Kelishadi, Pouya Dehghan; Dorkoosh, Farid A

    2016-09-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most promising natural anticancer agents with a wide therapeutic range which is limited by its hydrophobic nature, low therapeutic index and more importantly, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR). Lapatinib (LPT) is a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor with a significant potential to inhibit p-glycoproteins which form one of the main groups of proteins responsible for efflux pump mediated MDR. To overcome the PTX related MDR, a novel liposomal formulation was optimized for co-delivery of PTX and LPT by applying the D-optimal response surface methodology. The encapsulation efficiency (EE%) of the optimized formulation for LPT and PTX was 52 ± 3% and 68 ± 5, respectively. The optimized formulation showed a narrow size distribution with the average of 235 ± 12 nm. The transmission electron microscopy image showed that liposomes were round in shape and discrete. The release profile exhibited 93% and 71% drug release for PTX and LPT after 40 h in the sink condition. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis indicated the conversion of both drugs from crystalline state to molecular state in the optimized lyophilized formulation. The cytotoxicity of the prepared formulation was studied against 4T1 murine mammary cells. The liposomal formulation showed better cytotoxicity in comparison to the binary mixture of free drugs. PMID:26266828

  1. Intratumoral delivery of paclitaxel using a thermosensitive hydrogel in human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Joo-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Suck; Na, Kun; Song, Soo-Chang; Lee, Jaehwi; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Poly(organophosphazene), a novel thermosensitive hydrogel, is an injectable drug delivery system (DDS) that transforms from sol to gel at body temperature. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a mitotic inhibitor used in the treatment of various solid tumors. Due to its poor solubility in water and efflux systems in the gastrointestinal tract, PTX is a good candidate for local DDS. Here, we evaluated the penetration kinetics of PTX released from the PTX-poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel mixture in multicellular layers (MCLs) of human cancer cells. We also investigated the tumor pharmacokinetics of PTX (60 mg/kg) when administered as an intratumoral injection using poly(organophosphazene) in mice with human tumor xenografts. When PTX was formulated at 0.6 % w/w into a 10 % w/w hydrogel, the in vitro and in vivo release were found to be 40 and 90 % of the dose, respectively, in a sustained manner over 4 weeks. Exposure of MCLs to PTX-hydrogel showed time-dependent drug penetration and accumulation. In mice, the hydrogel mass was well retained over 6 weeks, and the PTX concentration in the tumor tissue was maximal at 14 days, which rapidly decreased and coincided with rebound tumor growth after 14 days of suppression. These data indicate that PTX-hydrogel should be intratumorally injected every 14 days, or drug release duration should be prolonged in order to achieve a long-term antitumor effect. Overall, poly(organophosphazene) represents a novel thermosensitive DDS for intratumoral delivery of PTX, which can accommodate a large dose of the drug in addition to reducing its systemic exposure by restricting biodistribution to tumor tissue alone. PMID:23371803

  2. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  3. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

  4. Co-delivery of hydrophobic paclitaxel and hydrophilic AURKA specific siRNA by redox-sensitive micelles for effective treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tingjie; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a novel redox-sensitive micellar system constructed from a hyaluronic acid-based amphiphilic conjugate (HA-ss-(OA-g-bPEI), HSOP) was successfully developed for tumor-targeted co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and AURKA specific siRNA (si-AURKA). HSOP exhibited excellent loading capacities for both PTX and siRNA with adjustable dosing ratios and desirable redox-sensitivity independently verified by morphological changes of micelles alongside in vitro release of both drugs in different reducing environments. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that HSOP micelles were capable of simultaneously delivering PTX and siRNA into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via HA-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by rapid transport of cargoes into the cytosol. Successful delivery and transport amplified the synergistic effects between the drugs while leading to substantially greater antitumor efficacy when compared with single drug-loaded micelles and non-sensitive co-loaded micelles. In vivo investigation demonstrated that HSOP micelles could effectively accumulate in tumor sites and possessed the greatest antitumor efficacy over non-sensitive co-delivery control and redox-sensitive single-drug controls. These findings indicated that redox-sensitive HSOP co-delivery system holds great promise for combined drug/gene treatment for targeted cancer therapy.

  5. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Doan Do, Hai; Thong Phan, Quoc; Nguyet Tran Thi, Minh; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan; Nhung Hoang Thi, My; Huong Le, Mai; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Quang Bui, Thuc; Hieu Phan, Van

    2016-03-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50-100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment.

  6. Integrin-assisted drug delivery of nano-scaled polymer therapeutics bearing paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Eldar-Boock, Anat; Miller, Keren; Sanchis, Joaquin; Lupu, Ruth; Vicent, María J; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2011-05-01

    Angiogenesis plays a prominent role in cancer progression. Anti-angiogenic therapy therefore, either alone or in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapy, offers a promising therapeutic approach. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a widely-used potent cytotoxic drug that also exhibits anti-angiogenic effects at low doses. However, its use, at its full potential, is limited by severe side effects. Here we designed and synthesized a targeted conjugate of PTX, a polymer and an integrin-targeted moiety resulting in a polyglutamic acid (PGA)-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)(2)] nano-scaled conjugate. Polymer conjugation converted PTX to a macromolecule, which passively targets the tumor tissue exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention effect, while extravasating via the leaky tumor neovasculature. The cyclic RGD peptidomimetic enhanced the effects previously seen for PGA-PTX alone, utilizing the additional active targeting to the α(v)β(3) integrin overexpressed on tumor endothelial and epithelial cells. This strategy is particularly valuable when tumors are well-vascularized, but they present poor vascular permeability. We show that PGA is enzymatically-degradable leading to PTX release under lysosomal acidic pH. PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)(2)] inhibited the growth of proliferating α(v)β(3)-expressing endothelial cells and several cancer cells. We also showed that PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)(2)] blocked endothelial cells migration towards vascular endothelial growth factor; blocked capillary-like tube formation; and inhibited endothelial cells attachment to fibrinogen. Orthotopic studies in mice demonstrated preferential tumor accumulation of the RGD-bearing conjugate, leading to enhanced anti-tumor efficacy and a marked decrease in toxicity as compared with free PTX-treated mice.

  7. Specific tumor delivery of paclitaxel using glycolipid-like polymer micelles containing gold nanospheres.

    PubMed

    You, Jian; Wang, Zuhua; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Peizun; Zhou, Jialin; Liu, Fei; Li, Chun; Hu, Fuqiang

    2013-06-01

    It is difficult for most of the drug delivery systems to really display a temporal and spatial release of entrapped drug once the systems are iv administrated. We hypothesized that the photothermal effect, mediated by a near-infrared (NIR) laser and hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), can modulate paclitaxel (PTX) release from polymer micelles, and further result in the enhanced antitumor activity of the micelles. We loaded PTX and HAuNS, which display strong plasmon absorption in the NIR region, into glycolipid-like polymer micelles with an excellent cell internalization capability. The surface of the micelles was conjugated successfully with a peptide, which has the specific-binding with EphB4, a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases overexpressed on cell membrane of numerous tumors, to increase the delivery of PTX into tumor cells. Rapid and repetitive drug release from our polymer (HP-TCS) micelles could be readily achieved upon NIR laser irradiation. Our data demonstrated the specific delivery of HP-TCS micelles into positive-EphB4 tumors using a duel-tumor model after iv administration during the whole experiment process (1-48 h). Interestingly, significantly higher uptake of the micelles by SKOV3 tumors (positive-EphB4) than A549 tumors (negtive-EphB4) was observed, with increased ratio on experiment time. However, the specific cell uptake was observed only during the short incubation time (1-4 h) in vitro. Our data also indicated the treatment of tumor cells with the micelles followed by NIR laser irradiation showed significantly greater toxicity activity than the treatment with the micelles alone, free PTX and the micelles (without PTX loading) plus NIR laser irradiation. The enhanced toxicity activity to tumor cells should be attributed to the enhanced drug cellular uptake mediated by the glycolipid-like micelles, chemical toxicity of the released drug from the micelles due to the trigger of NIR laser, and the photothermal ablation under NIR

  8. Specific tumor delivery of paclitaxel using glycolipid-like polymer micelles containing gold nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    You, Jian; Wang, Zuhua; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Peizun; Zhou, Jialin; Liu, Fei; Li, Chun; Hu, Fuqiang

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult for most of drug delivery system to really display a temporal and spatial release of entrapped drug once the systems are iv administrated. We hypothesized that the photothermal effect, mediated by a near-infrared (NIR) laser and hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), can modulate paclitaxel (PTX) release from polymer micelles, and further result in the enhanced antitumor activity of the micelles. We loaded PTX and HAuNS, which display strong plasmon absorption in the NIR region, into glycolipid-like polymer micelles with an excellent cell internalization capability. The surface of the micelles was conjugated successfully with a peptide, which has the specific-binding with EphB4, a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases overexpressed on cell membrane of numerous tumors, to increase the delivery of PTX into tumor cells. Rapid and repetitive drug release from our polymer (HP-TCS) micelles could be readily achieved upon NIR laser irradiation. Our data demonstrated the specific-delivery of HPTCS micelles into positive-EphB4 tumors using a duel-tumor model after iv administration during the whole experiment process (1-48h). Interestingly, significantly higher uptake of the micelles by SKOV3 tumors (positive-EphB4) than A549 tumors (negtive-EphB4) was observed, with increased ratio on experiment time. However, the specific cell uptake was observed only during the short incubation time (1-4h) in vitro. Our data also indicated the treatment of tumor cells with the micelles followed by NIR laser irradiation showed significantly greater toxicity activity than the treatment with the micelles alone, free PTX and the micelles (without PTX loading) plus NIR laser irradiation. The enhanced toxicity activity to tumor cells should be attributed to the enhanced drug cellular uptake mediated by the glycolipid-like micelles, chemical toxicity of the released drug from the micelles due to the trigger of NIR laser, and the photothermal ablation under NIR laser

  9. Preparation of copolymer paclitaxel covalently linked via a disulfide bond and its application on controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wulian; Shi, Yuanlin; Feng, Hua; Du, Ming; Zhang, Jin Zhong; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Dong

    2012-08-01

    A novel controlled drug delivery system based on copolymer covalently linked paclitaxel via a disulfide bond was constructed. Copolymer with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains and carboxyl groups on the backbone was prepared by radical copolymerization of tert-butyl acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate, followed by selectively hydrolyzing tert-butyl groups to carboxyl groups. Utilizing the carboxyl group as an active reaction site, paclitaxel, a well-known chemotherapeutic drug, could be covalently linked to the backbone of a copolymer via a disulfide bond, and the loading content of paclitaxel could reach up to 32 wt %. In aqueous solution, this drug-loaded copolymer could self-assemble into a spherical micelle, with the hydrophobic drug as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The mean diameter of the micelles evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was approximately 60 nm. The in vitro cytotoxicity experiments showed that the copolymer was biocompatible and suitable to use as a drug carrier. After covalently loading the drug, the copolymer showed apparent cytotoxicity to OS-RC-2 cells (kidney tumor cells) and low cytotoxicity to macrophage cells (human normal cells), indicating that the disulfide bond was stable in human normal cells, but would be broken in tumor cells. This selective bond scission behavior is potentially favorable for reducing the toxic and side effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:22774761

  10. Self-assembly PEGylation assists SLN-paclitaxel delivery inducing cancer cell apoptosis upon internalization.

    PubMed

    Arranja, Alexandra; Gouveia, Luís F; Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana F; Pereira, Carolina; Schwartz, Simó; Videira, Mafalda A

    2016-03-30

    In past years, a considerable progress has been made in the conversion of conventional chemotherapy into potent and safe nanomedicines. The ultimate goal is to improve the therapeutic window of current chemotherapeutics by reducing systemic toxicities and to deliver higher concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agents to malignant cells. In this work, we report that PEGylation of the nanocarriers increases drug intracellular bioavailability leading therefore to higher therapeutic efficacy. The surface of the already patented solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with paclitaxel (SLN-PTX) was coated with a PEG layer (SLN-PTX_PEG) through an innovative process to provide stable and highly effective nanoparticles complying with the predefined pharmaceutical quality target product profile. We observed that PEGylation not only stabilizes the SLN, but also modulates their cellular uptake kinetics. As a consequence, the intracellular concentration of chemotherapeutics delivered by SLN-PTX_PEG increases. This leads to the increase of efficacy and thus it is expected to significantly circumvent cancer cell resistance and increase patient survival and cure. PMID:26853316

  11. Self-assembly PEGylation assists SLN-paclitaxel delivery inducing cancer cell apoptosis upon internalization.

    PubMed

    Arranja, Alexandra; Gouveia, Luís F; Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana F; Pereira, Carolina; Schwartz, Simó; Videira, Mafalda A

    2016-03-30

    In past years, a considerable progress has been made in the conversion of conventional chemotherapy into potent and safe nanomedicines. The ultimate goal is to improve the therapeutic window of current chemotherapeutics by reducing systemic toxicities and to deliver higher concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agents to malignant cells. In this work, we report that PEGylation of the nanocarriers increases drug intracellular bioavailability leading therefore to higher therapeutic efficacy. The surface of the already patented solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with paclitaxel (SLN-PTX) was coated with a PEG layer (SLN-PTX_PEG) through an innovative process to provide stable and highly effective nanoparticles complying with the predefined pharmaceutical quality target product profile. We observed that PEGylation not only stabilizes the SLN, but also modulates their cellular uptake kinetics. As a consequence, the intracellular concentration of chemotherapeutics delivered by SLN-PTX_PEG increases. This leads to the increase of efficacy and thus it is expected to significantly circumvent cancer cell resistance and increase patient survival and cure.

  12. Poly-cyclodextrin and poly-paclitaxel nano-assembly for anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Ran; Mi Lee, Yeong; Kim, Jihoon; Jang, Yuna; Lee, Byung-Heon; Kim, In-San; Sokkar, Pandian; Rhee, Young Min; Hoffman, Allan S.; Kim, Won Jong

    2014-05-01

    Effective anticancer therapy can be achieved by designing a targeted drug-delivery system with high stability during circulation and efficient uptake by the target tumour cancer cells. We report here a novel nano-assembled drug-delivery system, formed by multivalent host-guest interactions between a polymer-cyclodextrin conjugate and a polymer-paclitaxel conjugate. The multivalent inclusion complexes confer high stability to the nano-assembly, which efficiently delivers paclitaxel into the targeted cancer cells via both passive and active targeting mechanisms. The ester linkages between paclitaxel and the polymer backbone permit efficient release of paclitaxel within the cell by degradation. This novel targeted nano-assembly exhibits significant antitumour activity in a mouse tumour model. The strategy established in this study also provides knowledge for the development of advanced anticancer drug delivery.

  13. MDR1 siRNA loaded hyaluronic acid-based CD44 targeted nanoparticle systems circumvent paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoqian; Lyer, Arun K.; Singh, Amit; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is an almost universal phenomenon in patients with ovarian cancer, and this severely limits the ultimate success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Overexpression of the MDR1 gene and corresponding P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best known MDR mechanisms. MDR1 siRNA based strategies were proposed to circumvent MDR, however, systemic, safe, and effective targeted delivery is still a major challenge. Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) targeted hyaluronic acid (HA) based nanoparticle has been shown to successfully deliver chemotherapy agents or siRNAs into tumor cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate the ability of HA-PEI/HA-PEG to deliver MDR1 siRNA and the efficacy of the combination of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA with paclitaxel to suppress growth of ovarian cancer. We observed that HA-PEI/HA-PEG nanoparticles can efficiently deliver MDR1 siRNA into MDR ovarian cancer cells, resulting in down-regulation of MDR1 and Pgp expression. Administration of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles followed by paclitaxel treatment induced a significant inhibitory effect on the tumor growth, decreased Pgp expression and increased apoptosis in MDR ovarian cancer mice model. Our findings suggest that CD44 targeted HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles can serve as a therapeutic tool with great potentials to circumvent MDR in ovarian cancer.

  14. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  15. Heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meifang; Li, Minghui; Wang, Guangtian; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Daming; Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Qun

    2014-09-01

    The efficacious delivery of drugs to the heart is an important treatment strategy for various heart diseases. Nanocarriers have shown increasing promise in targeted drug delivery systems. The success of nanocarriers for delivering drugs to therapeutic sites in the heart mainly depends on specific target sites, appropriate drug delivery carriers and effective targeting ligands. Successful targeted drug delivery suggests the specific deposition of a drug in the heart with minimal effects on other organs after administration. This review discusses the pathological manifestations, pathogenesis, therapeutic limitations and new therapeutic advances in various heart diseases. In particular, we summarize the recent advances in heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems, including dendrimers, liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates, microparticles, nanostents, nanoparticles, micelles and microbubbles. Current clinical trials, the commercial market and future perspective are further discussed in the conclusions.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of a paclitaxel-loaded low molecular weight heparin-all-trans-retinoid acid conjugate ternary nanoparticulate drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-07-01

    Amphiphilic low molecular weight heparin-all-trans-retinoid acid (LHR) conjugate, as a drug carrier for cancer therapy, was found to have markedly low toxicity and to form self-assembled nanoparticles for simultaneous delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and all-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) in our previous study. In the present study, PTX-loaded LHR nanoparticles were prepared and demonstrated a spherical shape with particle size of 108.9 nm. Cellular uptake analysis suggested rapid internalization and nuclear transport of LHR nanoparticles. In order to investigate the dynamic behaviors and targeting ability of LHR nanoparticles on tumor-bearing mice, near-infrared fluorescent (NIFR) dye DiR was encapsulated into the nanoparticles for ex vivo optical imaging. The results indicated that LHR nanoparticles could enhance the targeting and residence time in tumor site. Furthermore, in vivo biodistribution study also showed that the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC (0→inf)) values of PTX and ATRA for PTX-loaded LHR nanoparticles in tumor were 1.56 and 1.62-fold higher than those for PTX plus ATRA solution. Finally, PTX-loaded LHR nanoparticles demonstrated greater tumor growth inhibition effect in vivo without unexpected side effects, compared to PTX solution and PTX plus ATRA solution. These results suggest that PTX-loaded LHR nanoparticles can be considered as promising targeted delivery system for combination cancer chemotherapy to improve therapeutic efficacy and minimize adverse effects.

  17. Non-Covalent Functionalization of Carbon Nanovectors with an Antibody Enables Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Mohamedali, Khalid A.; Marcano, Daniela C.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutics are characterized by efficient tumor cell-killing and severe side effects mostly derived from off target toxicity. Hence targeted delivery of these drugs to tumor cells is actively sought. We previously demonstrated that poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized carbon nanovectors are able to sequester paclitaxel, a widely used hydrophobic cancer drug, by simple physisorption and deliver the drug for killing of cancer cells. The cell-killing when these drug-loaded carbon nanoparticles were used was equivalent to when a commercial formulation of paclitaxel was used. Here we show that by further mixing the drug-loaded nanoparticles with Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), paclitaxel is preferentially targeted to EGFR+ tumor cells in vitro. This supports progressing to in vivo studies. Moreover, the construct is unusual in that all three components are assembled through non-covalent interactions. Such non-covalent assembly could enable high-throughput screening of drug/antibody combinations. PMID:21736358

  18. A New Carbon Nanotube-Based Breast Cancer Drug Delivery System: Preparation and In Vitro Analysis Using Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Paul, Arghya; Rodes, Laetitia; Prakash, Satya

    2015-04-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most important drugs for breast cancer; however, the drug effects are limited by its systematic toxicity and poor water solubility. Nanoparticles have been applied for delivery of cancer drugs to overcome their limitations. Toward this goal, a novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based drug delivery system was developed by conjugation of human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles for loading of antitumor agent PTX. The nanosized macromolecular SWNT-drug carrier (SWNT-HSA) was characterized by TEM, UV-Vis-NIR spectrometry, and TGA. The SWNT-based drug carrier displayed high intracellular delivery efficiency (cell uptake rate of 80%) in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, as examined by fluorescence-labeled drug carriers, suggesting the needle-shaped SWNT-HSA drug carrier was able to transport drugs across cell membrane despite its macromolecular structure. The drug loading on SWNT-based drug carrier was through high binding affinity of PTX to HSA proteins. The PTX formulated with SWNT-HSA showed greater growth inhibition activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells than PTX formulated with HSA nanoparticle only (cell viability of 63 vs 70% in 48 h and 53 vs 62% in 72 h). The increased drug efficacy could be driven by SWNT-mediated cell internalization. These data suggest that the developed SWNT-based antitumor agent is functional and effective. However, more studies for in vivo drug delivery efficacy and other properties are needed before this delivery system can be fully realized. PMID:27101155

  19. The Effect of Short-term Intra-arterial Delivery of Paclitaxel on Neointimal Hyperplasia and the Local Thrombotic Environment after Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Yajun, E; He Nengshu Fan Hailun

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the effects of short-term intra-arterial delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the local thrombotic environment after angioplasty.MethodsAn experimental common carotid artery injury model was established in 60 rats, which were divided into experimental groups (40 rats) and controls (20 rats). Local intra-arterial administration of paclitaxel was applied at 2 doses (90 and 180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l), and the effects of short-term delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the expression of tissue factor (TF), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) were evaluated at days 15 and 30 by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry.ResultsAt 15 and 30 days after injury, neointimal thickness and area, the ratio of intimal area to medial area and the stenotic rate were all significantly decreased in the group provided the high concentrations (180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 2 min or 10 min and in the group provided the low concentration (90 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 10 min (p < 0.05). At 30 days after injury, there were no significant changes in TF expression among all experimental groups. PAI-1 expression increased in the neointima of the high concentration 10 min group (p < 0.05), while t-PA expression decreased in the neointima of the high concentration 2 min group (p < 0.05).ConclusionIn the rat common carotid artery injury model, the short-term delivery of paclitaxel could effectively inhibit neointimal hyperplasia in the long term, with very little influence on the local expression of TF and PAI-1.

  20. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  1. MRI-visible liposome nanovehicles for potential tumor-targeted delivery of multimodal therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Shizhen; Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Real-time diagnosis and monitoring of disease development, and therapeutic responses to treatment, are possible by theranostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the synthesis of a multifunctional liposome, which contains Gd-DOTA (an MRI probe), paclitaxel and c(RGDyk) (a targeted peptide). This nanoparticle overcame the insolubility of paclitaxel, reduced the side effects of FDA-approved formulation of PTX-Cre (Taxol®) and improved drug delivery efficiency to the tumor. c(RGDyk) modification greatly enhanced the cytotoxicity of the drug in tumor cells A549. The T1 relaxivity in tumor cells treated with the targeted liposome formulation was increased 16-fold when compared with the non-targeted group. In vivo, the tumors in mice were visualized using T1-weighted imaging after administration of the liposome. Also the tumor growth could be inhibited well after the treatment. Fluorescence images in vitro and ex vivo also showed the targeting effect of this liposome in tumor cells, indicating that this nanovehicle could limit the off-target side effects of anticancer drugs and contrast agents. These findings lay the foundation for further tumor inhibition study and application of this delivery vehicle in cancer therapy settings.

  2. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300–600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 25–90% range.Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells.

  3. Simultaneous delivery of Paclitaxel and Bcl-2 siRNA via pH-Sensitive liposomal nanocarrier for the synergistic treatment of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Teegala Lakshminarayan; Garikapati, Koteswara Rao; Reddy, S. Gopal; Reddy, B. V. Subba; Yadav, J. S.; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2016-01-01

    pH-sensitive drug carriers that are sensitive to the acidic (pH = ~6.5) microenvironments of tumor tissues have been primarily used as effective drug/gene/siRNA/microRNA carriers for releasing their payloads to tumor cells/tissues. Resistance to various drugs has become a big hurdle in systemic chemotherapy in cancer. Therefore delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and siRNA’s targeting anti apoptotic genes possess advantages to overcome the efflux pump mediated and anti apoptosis-related drug resistance. Here, we report the development of nanocarrier system prepared from kojic acid backbone-based cationic amphiphile containing endosomal pH-sensitive imidazole ring. This pH-sensitive liposomal nanocarrier effectively delivers anti-cancer drug (Paclitaxel; PTX) and siRNA (Bcl-2), and significantly inhibits cell proliferation and reduces tumor growth. Tumor inhibition response attributes to the synergistic effect of PTX potency and MDR reversing ability of Bcl-2 siRNA in the tumor supporting that kojic acid based liposomal pH-sensitive nanocarrier as efficient vehicle for systemic co-delivery of drugs and siRNA. PMID:27786239

  4. PEGylation of paclitaxel largely improves its safety and anti-tumor efficacy following pulmonary delivery in a mouse model of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tian; Loira-Pastoriza, Cristina; Patil, Harshad P; Ucakar, Bernard; Muccioli, Giulio G; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Vanbever, Rita

    2016-10-10

    Pulmonary delivery offers an attractive route of administration for chemotherapeutic agents, with the advantages of high drug concentrations locally and low side effects systemically. However, fast clearance mechanisms result in short residence time of small molecule drugs in the lungs. Moreover, the local toxicity induced by antineoplastic drugs is considered a major obstacle for the clinical application of inhaled chemotherapy. In this study, we explored the utility of 6kDa and 20kDa polyethylene glycol-paclitaxel (PEG-PTX) conjugates to retain paclitaxel within the lungs, achieve its sustained release locally, and thereby, improve its efficacy and reduce its pulmonary toxicity. The conjugates increased the maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel by up to 100-fold following intratracheal instillation in healthy mice. PEG-PTX conjugates induced lung inflammation. However, the inflammation was lower than that induced by an equivalent dose of the free drug and it was reversible. Conjugation of paclitaxel to both PEG sizes significantly enhanced its anti-tumor efficacy following intratracheal instillation of a single dose in a Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice. PEG-PTX 20k showed equivalent efficacy as PEG-PTX 6k delivered at a 2.5-fold higher dose, suggesting that the molecular weight of the conjugate plays a role in anti-cancer activity. PEG-PTX 20k conjugate presented a prolonged residency and a sustained paclitaxel release within the lungs. This study showed that PEGylation of paclitaxel offers a potential delivery system for inhalation with improved anti-cancer efficacy, prolonged exposure of lung-resident tumors to the antineoplastic drug and reduced local toxicity. PMID:27515664

  5. Paclitaxel-conjugated PEG and arginine-grafted bioreducible poly (disulfide amine) micelles for co-delivery of drug and gene

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kihoon; Nam, Hye Yeong; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung Wan

    2012-01-01

    We developed a paclitaxel-conjugated polymeric micelle, ABP-PEG3.5k-Paclitaxel (APP) consisting of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and arginine-grafted poly(cystaminebisacrylamide-diaminohexane) (ABP) for the co-delivery of gene and drug. The APP polymer self-assembled into cationic polymeric micelles with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of approximately 0.062 mg/mL, which was determined from measurements of the UV absorption of pyrene. The micelles have an average size of about 3 nm and a zeta potential of about +14 mV. Due to the positive surface charge, APP micelles formed polyplexes with plasmid DNA approximately 200 nm in diameter. The luciferase gene and mouse interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene was used to monitor gene delivery potency. APP polyplexes showed increased gene delivery efficiency and cellular uptake with higher anticancer potency than paclitaxel alone. These results demonstrate that an APP micelle-based delivery system is well suitable for the co-delivery of gene and drug. PMID:22871423

  6. Self-assembled nanoparticles from hyaluronic acid-paclitaxel prodrugs for direct cytosolic delivery and enhanced antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoran; He, Wei; Lv, Yaqi; Qin, Chao; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang

    2015-09-30

    A prodrug-based nanosystem obtained by formulating prodrug and nanotechnology into a system is one of the most promising strategies to enhance drug delivery for disease treatment. Herein, we report a new nanosystem based on HA-PTX conjugates (HA-PTX Ns), which penetrated across cell membranes into cytosol, thus enhancing paclitaxel (PTX) delivery. HA-PTX Ns were successfully obtained based on HA-PTX, and their average particle size was approximately 200 nm. Importantly, unlike other prodrug-based nanosystems, HA-PTX Ns obtained cellular entry without entrapment within the lysosomal-endosomal system by using pathways including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, microtubule-associated internalization, macropinocytosis and cholesterol-dependence. Due to significant accumulation in tumors, HA-PTX Ns had more than a 4-fold decrease in tumor volume on day 14 in contrast with PTX alone. In conclusion, HA-PTX Ns could enter cells, bypass the lysosomal-endosomal system and improve PTX delivery. PMID:26232702

  7. A self-assembling nanoparticle for paclitaxel delivery in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Fowler, Wiley; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Li; Lam, Kit S.

    2009-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of a variety of cancers. However, it is associated with serious side effects caused by PTX itself and the Cremophor EL emulsifier. In the present study, we report the development of a well-defined amphiphilic linear–dendritic copolymer (named as telodendrimer) composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG), cholic acid (CA, a facial amphiphilic molecule) and lysine, which can form drug-loaded core/shell micelles when mixed with hydrophobic drug, such as PTX, under aqueous condition. We have used PEG5k-CA8, a representive telodendrimer, to prepare paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-PEG5k-CA8 NPs) with high loading capacity (7.3 mg PTX/mL) and a size of 20–60 nm. This novel nanoformulation of PTX was found to exhibit similar in vitro cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells as the free drug (Taxol®) or paclitaxel/ human serum albumin nanoaggregate (Abraxane®). The maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) of PTX-PEG5k-CA8 NPs after single dose and five consective daily doses in mice were approximately 75 and 45 mg PTX/kg, respectively, which were 2.5-fold higher than those of Taxol®. In both subcutaneous and orthotopic intraperitoneal murine models of ovarian cancer, PTX-PEG5k-CA8 NPs achieved superior toxicity profiles and antitumor effects compared to Taxol® and Abraxane® at equivalent PTX doses, which were attributed to their preferential tumor accumulation, and deep penetration into tumor tissue, as confirmed by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. PMID:19660809

  8. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  9. A novel biosensor for quantitative monitoring of on-target activity of paclitaxel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley, H. E.; Zheng, Y.; Goldsmith, J.; Zheng, Y. Y.; Stratford, M. R. L.; Dobson, P. J.; Ahmed, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of α-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of α-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of α-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the feasibility of combining the drug with the peptide biomarker. As a proof of concept, we found that the degree of peptide cleavage, and therefore enzymatic activity, was directly correlated with exogenous bovine carboxypeptidase (CPA) an enzyme that mimics endogenous detyrosination. In addition, we show that cell lysates obtained from paclitaxel-treated cancer cells competed with exogenous CPA for biosensor cleavage in a paclitaxel dose-dependent manner. Our work provides strong evidence for the feasibility of combining paclitaxel with a novel biosensor in a multi-load nanoparticle.This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of α-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of α-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of α-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the

  10. Liposomes Loaded with Paclitaxel and Modified with Novel Triphenylphosphonium-PEG-PE Conjugate Possess Low Toxicity, Target Mitochondria and Demonstrate Enhanced Antitumor Effects In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Dodwadkar, Namita S.; Deshpande, Pranali P.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, stearyl triphenylphosphonium (STPP)-modified liposomes (STPP-L) were reported to target mitochondria. To overcome a non-specific cytotoxicity of STPP-L, we synthesized a novel polyethylene glycol- phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate with the TPP group attached to the distal end of the PEG block (TPP-PEG-PE). This conjugate was incorporated into the liposomal lipid bilayer, and the modified liposomes were studied for their toxicity, mitochondrial targeting, and efficacy in delivering paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These TPP-PEG-PE-modified liposomes (TPP-PEG-L), surface grafted with as high as 8 mole % of the conjugate, were less cytotoxic compared to STPP-L or PEGylated STPP-L. At the same time, TPP-PEG-L demonstrated efficient mitochondrial targeting in cancer cells as shown by confocal microscopy in co-localization experiments with stained mitochondria. PTX-loaded TPP-PEG-L demonstrated enhanced PTX-induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor efficacy in cell culture and mouse experiments compared to PTX-loaded unmodified plain liposomes (PL). Thus, TPP-PEG-PE can serve as a targeting ligand to prepare non-toxic liposomes as mitochondria-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS). PMID:22286008

  11. Polymeric nanoparticles based on chitooligosaccharide as drug carriers for co-delivery of all-trans-retinoic acid and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xiuli; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Maolei; Zhang, Daolai; Han, Jingtian

    2015-09-20

    An amphiphilic all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-chitooligosaccharide (RCOS) conjugate was synthesized to form self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles to facilitate the co-delivery of ATRA and paclitaxel (PTX). The blank RCOS nanoparticles possessed low hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity, and could efficiently load PTX with a drug loading of 22.2% and a high encapsulation efficiency of 71.3%. PTX-loaded RCOS nanoparticles displayed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells compared to PTX plus ATRA solution when corrected by the accumulated drug release. Cellular uptake profiles of RCOS nanoparticles were evaluated via confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry with FITC as a fluorescent mark. The RCOS nanoparticles could be rapidly and continuously taken up by HepG2 cells via endocytosis and transported into the nucleus, and the uptake rates increased with particle concentration. These results revealed the promising potential of RCOS nanoparticles as drug carriers for co-delivery of ATRA and PTX or other hydrophobic therapeutic agents.

  12. Magnetizable implants for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Zachary Graham

    The capability to deliver high effective dosages to specific sites in the human body has become the holy grail of drug delivery research. Drugs with proven effectiveness under in vitro investigation often reach a major roadblock under in vivo testing due to a lack of an effective delivery strategy. In addition, many clinical scenarios require delivery of agents that are therapeutic at the desired delivery point, but otherwise systemically toxic. This project proposes a method for targeted drug delivery by applying high magnetic field gradients within the body to an injected superparamagnetic colloidal fluid carrying a drug, with the aid of modest uniform magnetic field. The design involves patterning of endovascular implants, such as coronary stents, with soft magnetic coatings capable of applying high local magnetic field gradients within the body. Examination of the feasibility of the design has been focused around the treatment of coronary restenosis following angioplasty. Drug-eluting stents, which have debuted in hospitals over the past two years, have thus far reduced restenosis rates to below 10%. Our local drug delivery system is a viable alternative or enhancement to drug-eluting stents, offering increased clinician control of dose size, the ability to treat a site repeatedly, and a wide array of applications for treatment of other pathologies. The theoretical models, parallel plate and pipe flow analysis, and cell culture models presented give insight into the use of micron and sub-micron scale magnetic particles for site-specific delivery of pharmaceuticals and magnetically labeled cells.

  13. Delivery of paclitaxel from cobalt–chromium alloy surfaces without polymeric carriers

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Gopinath; Macias, Celia E.; Feldman, Marc D.; Marton, Denes; Oh, Sunho; Agrawal, C. Mauli

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based carriers are commonly used to deliver drugs from stents. However, adverse responses to polymer coatings have raised serious concerns. This research is focused on delivering drugs from stents without using polymers or any carriers. Paclitaxel (PAT), an anti-restenotic drug, has strong adhesion towards a variety of material surfaces. In this study, we have utilized such natural adhesion property of PAT to attach these molecules directly to cobalt–chromium (Co–Cr) alloy, an ultra-thin stent strut material. Four different groups of drug coated specimens were prepared by directly adding PAT to Co–Cr alloy surfaces: Group-A (PAT coated, unheated, and ethanol cleaned); Group-B (PAT coated, heat treated, and ethanol cleaned); Group-C (PAT coated, unheated, and not ethanol cleaned); and Group-D (PAT coated, heat treated and not ethanol cleaned). In vitro drug release of these specimens was investigated using high performance liquid chromatography. Groups A and B showed sustained PAT release for up to 56 days. A simple ethanol cleaning procedure after PAT deposition can remove the loosely bound drug crystals from the alloy surfaces and thereby allowing the remaining strongly bound drug molecules to be released at a sustained rate. The heat treatment after PAT coating further improved the stability of PAT on Co–Cr alloy and allowed the drug to be delivered at a much slower rate, especially during the initial 7 days. The specimens which were not cleaned in ethanol, Groups C and D, showed burst release. PAT coated Co–Cr alloy specimens were thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These techniques were collectively useful in studying the morphology, distribution, and attachment of PAT molecules on Co–Cr alloy surfaces. Thus, this study suggests the potential for delivering paclitaxel from Co–Cr alloy surfaces without using any carriers. PMID:20398928

  14. [Co-delivery of paclitaxel and cyclosporine by a novel liposome-silica hybrid nano-carrier for anti-tumor therapy via oral route].

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Su, Ting-Ting; Huang, Xing-Liang; Wang, Ya-Hua; Li, Chong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel liposome-silica hybrid nano-carrier for tumor combination therapy via oral route, using paclitaxel and cyclosporine as a model drug pair. Optimization of the preparation of the drug-loading formulation and characterization of its physicochemical parameters and drug release profile were performed in vitro. Then in vivo pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics studies were performed. The results showed that the obtained formulation has a small particle size (mean diameter of 100.2 +/- 15.2 nm), a homogeneous distribution [the polydispersity index was (0.251 +/- 0.018)] and high encapsulation efficiency (90.15 +/- 2.47) % and (80.64 +/- 3.52) % for paclitaxel and cyclosporine respectively with a mild and easy preparation process. A sequential drug release trend of cyclosporine prior to palictaxel was observed. The liposome-silica hybrid nano-carrier showed good biocompatibility in vivo and co-delivery of cyclosporine and paclitaxel significantly enhanced the oral absorption of paclitaxel with improved anti-tumor efficacy, suggesting a promising approach for multi-drug therapy against tumor and other serious diseases via oral route. PMID:24783515

  15. Self-assembled silk sericin/poloxamer nanoparticles as nanocarriers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs for targeted delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Biman B.; Kundu, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    In recent times self-assembled micellar nanoparticles have been successfully employed in tissue engineering for targeted drug delivery applications. In this review, silk sericin protein from non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta tropical tasar silk cocoons was blended with pluronic F-127 and F-87 in the presence of solvents to achieve self-assembled micellar nanostructures capable of carrying both hydrophilic (FITC-inulin) and hydrophobic (anticancer drug paclitaxel) drugs. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently characterized for their size distribution, drug loading capability, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Nanoparticle sizes ranged between 100 and 110 nm in diameter as confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Rapid uptake of these particles into cells was observed in in vitro cellular uptake studies using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles against breast cancer cells showed promising results comparable to free paclitaxel drugs. Drug-encapsulated nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by FACS and confocal microscopic studies using Annexin V staining. Up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cleavage of regulatory protein PARP through Western blot analysis suggested further drug-induced apoptosis in cells. This study projects silk sericin protein as an alternative natural biomaterial for fabrication of self-assembled nanoparticles in the presence of poloxamer for successful delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to target sites.

  16. D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate-based derivative nanoparticles as a novel carrier for paclitaxel delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yupei; Chu, Qian; Tan, Songwei; Zhuang, Xiangting; Bao, Yuling; Wu, Tingting; Zhang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective antineoplastic drugs. Its current clinical administration Taxol® is formulated in Cremophor EL, which causes serious side effects. Nanoparticles (NP) with lower systemic toxicity and enhanced therapeutic efficiency may be an alternative formulation of the Cremophor EL-based vehicle for PTX delivery. In this study, novel amphipathic 4-arm-PEG-TPGS derivatives, the conjugation of D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) and 4-arm-polyethylene glycol (4-arm-PEG) with different molecular weights, have been successfully synthesized and used as carriers for the delivery of PTX. These 4-arm-PEG-TPGS derivatives were able to self-assemble to form uniform NP with PTX encapsulation. Among them, 4-arm-PEG5K-TPGS NP exhibited the smallest particle size, highest drug-loading efficiency, negligible hemolysis rate, and high physiologic stability. Therefore, it was chosen for further in vitro and in vivo investigations. Facilitated by the effective uptake of the NP, the PTX-loaded 4-arm-PEG5K-TPGS NP showed greater cytotoxicity compared with free PTX against human ovarian cancer (A2780), non-small cell lung cancer (A549), and breast adenocarcinoma cancer (MCF-7) cells, as well as a higher apoptotic rate and a more significant cell cycle arrest effect at the G2/M phase in A2780 cells. More importantly, PTX-loaded 4-arm-PEG5K-TPGS NP resulted in a significantly improved tumor growth inhibitory effect in comparison to Taxol® in S180 sarcoma-bearing mice models. This study suggested that 4-arm-PEG5K-TPGS NP may have the potential as an anticancer drug delivery system. PMID:26316751

  17. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  18. Prodrug Strategies for Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziyuan; Lv, Quanxia; Lu, Jun; Yao, Houzong; Lv, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anti-tumor agent with remarkable anti-tumor activity and wide clinical uses. However, it is also faced with various challenges especially for its poor water solubility and low selectivity for the target. To overcome these disadvantages of paclitaxel, approaches using small molecule modifications and macromolecule modifications have been developed by many research groups from all over the world. In this review, we discuss the different strategies especially prodrug strategies that are currently used to make paclitaxel more effective. PMID:27223283

  19. Prodrug Strategies for Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ziyuan; Lv, Quanxia; Lu, Jun; Yao, Houzong; Lv, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anti-tumor agent with remarkable anti-tumor activity and wide clinical uses. However, it is also faced with various challenges especially for its poor water solubility and low selectivity for the target. To overcome these disadvantages of paclitaxel, approaches using small molecule modifications and macromolecule modifications have been developed by many research groups from all over the world. In this review, we discuss the different strategies especially prodrug strategies that are currently used to make paclitaxel more effective. PMID:27223283

  20. Hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel for regional delivery of paclitaxel to intraperitoneal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Gaurav; Kim, Mi Ran; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Yeo, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy is an effective way of treating local and regional malignancies confined in the peritoneal cavity such as ovarian cancer. However, a persistent major challenge in IP chemotherapy is the need to provide effective drug concentrations in the peritoneal cavity for an extended period of time. We hypothesized that hyaluronic acid (HA)-based in-situ crosslinkable hydrogel would serve as a carrier of paclitaxel (PTX) particles to improve their IP retention and therapeutic effects. In-vitro gel degradation and release kinetics studies demonstrated that HA gels could entrap microparticulate PTX (>100 μm) and release the drug over 10 days, gradually degraded by hyaluronidase, but had limited effect on retention of Taxol, a 14-nm micelle form of PTX. When administered IP to tumor-bearing nude mice, PTX was best retained in the peritoneal cavity as PTX-gel (microparticulate PTX entrapped in the HA gel), whereas Taxol-gel and other Taxol-based formulations left negligible amount of PTX in the cavity after 14 days. Despite the increase in IP retention of PTX, PTX-gel did not further decrease the tumor burdens than Taxol-based formulations, presumably due to the limited dissolution of PTX. This result indicates that spatial availability of a drug does not necessarily translate to the enhanced anti-tumor effect unless it is accompanied by the temporal availability. PMID:22178261

  1. PEG-Derivatized Embelin as a Dual Functional Carrier for the Delivery of Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yixian; Lu, Jianqin; Gao, Xiang; Li, Jiang; Zhao, Wenchen; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna Beer; Venkataramanan, Raman; Rohan, Lisa Cencia; Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    Embelin, identified primarily from the Embelia ribes plant, has been shown to be a natural small molecule inhibitor of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). It is also a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation, which makes it a potentially effective suppressor of tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and inflammation. However, embelin itself is insoluble in water, which makes it unsuitable for in vivo applications. In this work, we developed a novel micelle system through conjugating embelin to a hydrophilic polymer, polyethylene glycol 3,500 (PEG3.5K) through an aspartic acid bridge. The PEG3.5k-embelin2 (PEG3.5k-EB2) conjugate readily forms micelles in aqueous solutions with a CMC of 0.0205mg/mL. Furthermore, PEG3.5k-EB2 micelles effectively solubilize paclitaxel (PTX), a model hydrophobic drug used in this study. Both drug-free and drug-loaded micelles were small in sizes (20 ~ 30 nm) with low polydispersity indexes. In vitro cytotoxicity studies with several tumor cell lines showed that PEG3.5k-EB2 is comparable to embelin in antitumor activity and synergizes with PTX at much lower doses. Our results suggest that PEG-derivatized embelin may represent a novel and dual-functional carrier to facilitate the in vivo applications of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs such as PTX. PMID:22681537

  2. Bioresorbable polymersomes for targeted delivery of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Matthew A; Hillmyer, Marc A; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2013-04-17

    Nontoxic bioresorbable polymersomes have been developed that efficiently and site-selectively tether targeting peptides under mild conditions with no toxic catalysts. The binding and release properties of these polymersomes have been evaluated when targeting DLD-1 human colon cancer cells overexpressing the α(5)β(1) integrin. The delivery efficacy to these cells is markedly improved over commonly used RGD targeting peptides by use of an α(5)β(1)-specific targeting peptide, PR_b. Release profiles in buffered solution from pH 7.4 to 4.5 were evaluated and compared to release after binding to cells, and enzymatic degradation was identified as a major cause of rapid payload release in the cell. Intracellular trafficking and release were imaged via confocal microscopy in live cells and colocalization with organelles was evaluated quantitatively over time. Finally, the anticancer drug cisplatin was encapsulated in the PR_b functionalized polymersomes and the presence of PR_b greatly improved delivery efficacy, with increased cisplatin-induced losses to targeted DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability. When delivered to CACO-2 model human epithelial cells expressing low levels of α(5)β(1) integrin, low toxicity was maintained, suggesting that targeting was specific to α(5)β(1) overexpressing cells. These results demonstrate that PR_b-functionalized bioresorbable polymersomes may be an attractive route to minimizing the dose-limiting side effects associated with existing approaches to cisplatin chemotherapy.

  3. Low molecular weight chitosan-coated polymeric nanoparticles for sustained and pH-sensitive delivery of paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Abouelmagd, Sara A.; Ku, Youn Jin; Yeo, Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) is a promising polymer for surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs), which can impart both stealth effect and electrostatic interaction with cells at mildly acidic pH of tumors. We previously produced LMWC-coated NPs via covalent conjugation to poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA-LMWC NPs). However, this method had several weaknesses including inefficiency and complexity of the production as well as increased hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, which led to poor drug release control. Here, we used the dopamine polymerization method to produce LMWC-coated NPs (PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs), where the core NPs were prepared with PLGA that served best to load and retain drugs and then functionalized with LMWC via polydopamine layer. The PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs overcame the limitations of PLGA-LMWC NPs while maintaining their advantages. First of all, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs attenuated the release of paclitaxel to a greater extent than PLGA-LMWC NPs. Moreover, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs had a pH-dependent surface charge profile and cellular interactions similar to PLGA-LMWC NPs, enabling acid-specific NP-cell interaction and enhanced drug delivery to cells in weakly acidic environment. Although the LMWC layer did not completely prevent protein binding in serum solution, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs showed less phagocytic uptake than bare PLGA NPs. PMID:26453168

  4. Poly-α,β-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-α,β-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  5. Low molecular weight chitosan-coated polymeric nanoparticles for sustained and pH-sensitive delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Abouelmagd, Sara A; Ku, Youn Jin; Yeo, Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) is a promising polymer for surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs), which can impart both stealth effect and electrostatic interaction with cells at mildly acidic pH of tumors. We previously produced LMWC-coated NPs via covalent conjugation to poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA-LMWC NPs). However, this method had several weaknesses including inefficiency and complexity of the production as well as increased hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, which led to poor drug release control. Here, we used the dopamine polymerization method to produce LMWC-coated NPs (PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs), where the core NPs were prepared with PLGA that served best to load and retain drugs and then functionalized with LMWC via polydopamine layer. The PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs overcame the limitations of PLGA-LMWC NPs while maintaining their advantages. First of all, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs attenuated the release of paclitaxel to a greater extent than PLGA-LMWC NPs. Moreover, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs had a pH-dependent surface charge profile and cellular interactions similar to PLGA-LMWC NPs, enabling acid-specific NP-cell interaction and enhanced drug delivery to cells in weakly acidic environment. Although the LMWC layer did not completely prevent protein binding in serum solution, PLGA-pD-LMWC NPs showed less phagocytic uptake than bare PLGA NPs.

  6. PEG-PE-based micelles co-loaded with paclitaxel and cyclosporine A or loaded with paclitaxel and targeted by anticancer antibody overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarisozen, Can; Vural, Imran; Levchenko, Tatyana; Hincal, A Atilla; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-05-01

    The over-expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of the acquired Multidrug Resistance (MDR). Combined treatment of MDR cancer cells with P-gp inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents could result in reversal of resistance in P-gp-expressing cells. In this study, paclitaxel (PTX) was co-encapsulated in actively targeted (anticancer mAb 2C5-modified) polymeric lipid-core PEG-PE-based micelles with Cyclosporine A (CycA), which is one of the most effective first generation P-gp inhibitors. Cell culture studies performed using MDCKII (parental and MDR1) cell lines to investigate the potential MDR reversal effect of the formulations. The average size of both empty and loaded PEG₂₀₀₀-PE/Vitamin E mixed micelles was found between 10 and 25 nm. Zeta potentials of the formulations were found between -7 and -35 mV. The percentage of PTX in the micelles was found higher than 3% for both formulations and cumulative PTX release of about 70% was demonstrated. P-gp inhibition with CycA caused an increase in the cytotoxicity of PTX. Dual-loaded micelles demonstrated significantly higher cytotoxicity in the resistant MDCKII-MDR1 cells than micelles loaded with PTX alone. Micelle modification with mAb 2C5 results in the highest cytotoxicity against resistant cells, with or without P-gp modulator, probably because of better internalization bypassing the P-gp mechanism. Our results suggest that micelles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug or micelles loaded with only PTX, but targeted with mAb 2C5 represent a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:22506922

  7. Polymer Nanocomposites Based Thermo-Sensitive Gel for Paclitaxel and Temozolomide Co-Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Shen, Ming; Sun, Ying; Gao, Pei; Duan, Yourong

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have reported the preparation and optimization of paclitaxel (PTX) and temozolomide (TMZ) loaded monomethoxy (polyethylene glycol)-poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA) nanocomposite which is a thermo-sensitive gel delivery system to glioblastoma. We utilized the orthogonal design and homogeneous design for the optimal drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) and composite gel prescription, respectively. The physicochemical characteristics of NPs and rheological properties of the gel were analyzed. Then the in vitro release of the gel was determined with a membrane-less diffusion system. Finally, the cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects of the gel on the human malignant glioblastoma cell line U87 and C6 rat glioblastoma cell line were evaluated by MTT and flow cytometry apoptosis assay, respectively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed the optimized NPs with a relatively uniform diameter and distribution. The homogeneous design and rheological determination showed that the optimized gel prescription was 250 mg/mL Pluronic F127 (F127), 0.5% hydroxy propyl methylcellulose (HPMC-100M), 0.5% Pluronic F68 (F68), 0.5% sodium alginate (SA) and suitable NPs, which possessed the appropriate gelation behaviors: gelation temperature 28.01 degrees C, gelation time 127.1 s and corrosion speed 0.1892 g/cm2 x hr; and rheological properties: suitable elasticity modulus, viscosity modulus and low phase angle. The in vitro results suggested that the PTX and TMZ were sustainedly released from nanoparticles or the composite gel, and the release and elimination time greatly prolonged; and the composite gel possessed much higher growth-inhibiting effect and apoptosis-inducing rate in U87 and C6 cells than other formulations. These findings demonstrated that the optimal gel was a promising delivery system for the interstitial chemotherapy to glioblastoma. PMID:26682412

  8. Targeting of Synthetic Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Safe, efficient, and specific delivery of therapeutic genes remains an important bottleneck for the development of gene therapy. Synthetic, nonviral systems have a unique pharmaceutical profile with potential advantages for certain applications. Targeting of the synthetic vector improves the specificity of gene medicines through a modulation of the carriers' biodistribution, thus creating a dose differential between healthy tissue and the target site. The biodistribution of current carrier systems is being influenced to a large extent by intrinsic physicochemical characteristics, such as charge and size. Consequently, such nonspecific interactions can interfere with specific targeting, for example, by ligands. Therefore, a carrier complex should ideally be inert, that is, free from intrinsic properties that would bias its distribution away from the target site. Strategies such as coating of DNA carrier complexes with hydrophilic polymers have been used to mask some of these intrinsic targeting effects and avoid nonspecific interactions. Preexisting endogenous ligand-receptor interactions have frequently been used for targeting to certain cell types or tumours. Recently exogenous ligands have been derived from microorganisms or, like antibodies or phage-derived peptides, developed de novo. In animal models, such synthetic vectors have targeted remote sites such as a tumour. Furthermore, the therapeutic proof of the concept has been demonstrated for fitting combinations of synthetic vectors and therapeutic gene. PMID:12721518

  9. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  10. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S

    2016-10-21

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  11. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  12. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  13. Biodistribution and Bioimaging Studies of Hybrid Paclitaxel Nanocrystals: Lessons Learned of the EPR Effect and Image-Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Christin P.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Leggas, Markos; Evers, B. Mark; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Li, Tonglei

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals (200 nm) were produced by crystallization from solution. Antitumor efficacy and toxicity were examined through a survival study in a human HT-29 colon cancer xenograft murine model. The antitumor activity of the nanocrystal treatments was comparable with that by the conventional solubilization formulation (Taxol®), but yielded less toxicity as indicated by the result of survival study. Tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were further produced with a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye physically integrated in the crystal lattice. Biodistribution and tumor accumulation of the tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were determined immediately after intravenous administration and up to 48 hours by scintillation counting. Whole-body optical imaging of animals was concurrently carried out; fluorescent intensities were also measured from excised tumors and major organs of euthanized animals. It was found that drug accumulation in the tumor was less than 1% of 20 mg/kg intravenous dose. Qualitatively correlation was identified between the biodistribution determined by using tritium-labeled particles and that using optical imaging, but quantitative divergence existed. The divergent results suggest possible ways to improve the design of hybrid nanocrystals for cancer therapy and diagnosis. The study also raises questions of the general role of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in tumor targeting and the effectiveness of bioimaging, specifically for hybrid nanocrystals, in tracking drug distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:23920039

  14. β-Cyclodextrin-Based Inclusion Complexation Bridged Biodegradable Self-Assembly Macromolecular Micelle for the Delivery of Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanzuo; Huang, Yukun; Qin, Dongdong; Liu, Wenchao; Song, Chao; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel adamantanamine-paclitaxel (AD-PTX) incorporated oligochitosan- carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CSO-g-CM-β-CD) self-assembly macromolecular (CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX) micelle was successfully prepared in water through sonication. The formed molecules were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, two-dimensional NMR, elemental analysis, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while the correspondent micelles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that the macromolecular micelle contained a spherical core-shell structure with a diameter of 197.1 ± 3.3 nm and zeta potential of -19.1 ± 4.3 mV. The CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle exhibited a high drug-loading efficacy up to 31.3%, as well as a critical micelle concentration of 3.4 × 10-7 M, which indicated good stability. Additionally, the in vitro release profile of the CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle demonstrated a long-term release pattern, 63.1% of AD-PTX was released from the micelle during a 30-day period. Moreover, the CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle displayed cytotoxicity at a sub-μM scale similar to PTX in U87 MG cells, and CSO-g-CM-β-CD exhibited a good safety profile by not manifesting significant toxicity at concentrations up to 100 μM. These results indicated that β-CD-based inclusion complexation resulting in biodegradable self-assembled macromolecular micelles can be utilized as nanocarrier, and may provide a promising platform for drug delivery in the future medical applications. PMID:26964047

  15. β-Cyclodextrin-Based Inclusion Complexation Bridged Biodegradable Self-Assembly Macromolecular Micelle for the Delivery of Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanzuo; Huang, Yukun; Qin, Dongdong; Liu, Wenchao; Song, Chao; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel adamantanamine-paclitaxel (AD-PTX) incorporated oligochitosan- carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CSO-g-CM-β-CD) self-assembly macromolecular (CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX) micelle was successfully prepared in water through sonication. The formed molecules were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, two-dimensional NMR, elemental analysis, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while the correspondent micelles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that the macromolecular micelle contained a spherical core-shell structure with a diameter of 197.1 ± 3.3 nm and zeta potential of −19.1 ± 4.3 mV. The CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle exhibited a high drug-loading efficacy up to 31.3%, as well as a critical micelle concentration of 3.4 × 10-7 M, which indicated good stability. Additionally, the in vitro release profile of the CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle demonstrated a long-term release pattern, 63.1% of AD-PTX was released from the micelle during a 30-day period. Moreover, the CSO-g-CM-β-CD@AD-PTX micelle displayed cytotoxicity at a sub-μM scale similar to PTX in U87 MG cells, and CSO-g-CM-β-CD exhibited a good safety profile by not manifesting significant toxicity at concentrations up to 100 μM. These results indicated that β-CD-based inclusion complexation resulting in biodegradable self-assembled macromolecular micelles can be utilized as nanocarrier, and may provide a promising platform for drug delivery in the future medical applications. PMID:26964047

  16. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  17. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  18. Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymersomes for Enhanced Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Hunt, Hedi; Scodeller, Pablo D; Gaitzsch, Jens; Braun, Gary B; Willmore, Anne-Mari A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is present in more than 60% of gastric cancer, 40% of ovarian cancer, and 35% of colon cancer patients. It is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality, with a median survival of 1 to 3 months. Cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is the current clinical treatment, but achieving curative drug accumulation and penetration in peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions remains an unresolved challenge. Here, we used flexible and pH-sensitive polymersomes for payload delivery to peritoneal gastric (MKN-45P) and colon (CT26) carcinoma in mice. Polymersomes were loaded with paclitaxel and in vitro drug release was studied as a function of pH and time. Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes remained stable in aqueous solution at neutral pH for up to 4 months. In cell viability assay on cultured cancer cell lines (MKN-45P, SKOV3, CT26), paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes were more toxic than free drug or albumin-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane). Intraperitoneally administered fluorescent polymersomes accumulated in malignant lesions, and immunofluorescence revealed an intense signal inside tumors with no detectable signal in control organs. A dual targeting of tumors was observed: direct (circulation-independent) penetration, and systemic, blood vessel-associated accumulation. Finally, we evaluated preclinical antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel-polymersomes in the treatment of MKN-45P disseminated gastric carcinoma using a total dose of 7 mg/kg. Experimental therapy with paclitaxel-polymersomes improved the therapeutic index of drug over free paclitaxel and Abraxane, as evaluated by intraperitoneal tumor burden and number of metastatic nodules. Our findings underline the potential utility of the polymersome platform for delivery of drugs and imaging agents to peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 670-9. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Paclitaxel-loaded Polymersomes for Enhanced Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Hunt, Hedi; Scodeller, Pablo D; Gaitzsch, Jens; Braun, Gary B; Willmore, Anne-Mari A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is present in more than 60% of gastric cancer, 40% of ovarian cancer, and 35% of colon cancer patients. It is the second most common cause of cancer mortality, with a median survival of 1–3 months. Cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is the current clinical treatment, but achieving curative drug accumulation and penetration in peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions remains an unresolved challenge. Here we employed flexible and pH-sensitive polymersomes for payload delivery to peritoneal gastric (MKN-45P) and colon (CT26) carcinoma in mice. Polymersomes were loaded with Paclitaxel® and in vitro drug release was studied as a function of pH and time. Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes remained stable in aqueous solution at neutral pH for up to four months. In cell viability assay on cultured cancer cell lines (MKN-45P, SKOV3, CT26), Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes were more toxic than free drug or albumin-bound Paclitaxel (Abraxane®). Intraperitoneally administered fluorescent polymersomes accumulated in malignant lesions, and immunofluorescence revealed intense signal inside tumors with no detectable signal in control organs. A dual targeting of tumors was observed: direct (circulation independent) penetration, and systemic, blood vessel-associated accumulation. Finally, we evaluated preclinical antitumor efficacy of polymersomes-paclitaxel in treatment of MKN-45P disseminated gastric carcinoma using a total dose of 7 mg/kg. Experimental therapy with polymersome-Paclitaxel improved the therapeutic index of drug over Paclitaxel-Cremophor and Abraxane®, as evaluated by intraperitoneal tumor burden and number of metastatic nodules. Our findings underline the potential utility of the polymersome platform for delivery of drugs and imaging agents to peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions. PMID:26880267

  20. Intraperitoneal delivery of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel redirects metabolic reprogramming and effectively inhibits cancer stem cells in Taxol(®)-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao-An; Li, Wai-Hou; Chen, Po-Hung; He, Chun-Lin; Chang, Yen-Hou; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Taxol(®) remained as the mainstay therapeutic agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer, however recurrence rate is still high. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells in the bulk of tumors and play a central role in inducing drug resistance and recurrence. Furthermore, cancer metabolism has been an area under intensive investigation, since accumulating evidence has shown that CSCs and cancer metabolism are closely linked, an effect named as metabolic reprogramming. In this work, we aimed to investigate the impacts of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel (Nano-Taxol) on the stemness phenotype and metabolic reprogramming. A paclitaxel-resistant cell line (TR) was established at first. Tumor growth was induced in the mice peritoneal cavity by inoculation of TR cells. A 2x2 factorial experiment was designed to test the therapeutic efficacy in which factor 1 represented the comparison of drugs (Taxol(®) versus Nano-Taxol), while factor 2 represented the delivery route (intravenous versus intraperitoneal delivery). In this work, we found that intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol redirects metabolic reprogramming, from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and effectively suppresses cancer stem cells. Also, intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol led to a significantly better control of tumor growth compared with intravenous delivery of Taxol(®) (current standard treatment). This translational research may serve as a novel pathway for the drug development of nanomedicine. In the future, this treatment modality may be extended to treat several relevant cancers that have been proved to be suitable for the loco-regional delivery of therapeutic agents, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, and pancreatic cancer.

  1. Intraperitoneal delivery of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel redirects metabolic reprogramming and effectively inhibits cancer stem cells in Taxol®-resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao-An; Li, Wai-Hou; Chen, Po-Hung; He, Chun-Lin; Chang, Yen-Hou; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Taxol® remained as the mainstay therapeutic agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer, however recurrence rate is still high. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells in the bulk of tumors and play a central role in inducing drug resistance and recurrence. Furthermore, cancer metabolism has been an area under intensive investigation, since accumulating evidence has shown that CSCs and cancer metabolism are closely linked, an effect named as metabolic reprogramming. In this work, we aimed to investigate the impacts of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel (Nano-Taxol) on the stemness phenotype and metabolic reprogramming. A paclitaxel-resistant cell line (TR) was established at first. Tumor growth was induced in the mice peritoneal cavity by inoculation of TR cells. A 2x2 factorial experiment was designed to test the therapeutic efficacy in which factor 1 represented the comparison of drugs (Taxol® versus Nano-Taxol), while factor 2 represented the delivery route (intravenous versus intraperitoneal delivery). In this work, we found that intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol redirects metabolic reprogramming, from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and effectively suppresses cancer stem cells. Also, intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol led to a significantly better control of tumor growth compared with intravenous delivery of Taxol® (current standard treatment). This translational research may serve as a novel pathway for the drug development of nanomedicine. In the future, this treatment modality may be extended to treat several relevant cancers that have been proved to be suitable for the loco-regional delivery of therapeutic agents, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26175846

  2. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Jena, Prasanna K.; Behera, Sumita; Lockey, Richard F.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    A major problem associated with therapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to a specific site of the body without causing nonspecific toxicity. Development of magnetic nanoparticles and techniques for their safe transport and concentration in specific sites in the body would constitute a powerful tool for gene/drug therapy in vivo. Furthermore, drug delivery in vitro could improve further if the drugs were modified with antibodies, proteins or ligands. For in vivo experiments, magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with plasmid DNA expressing GFP and then coated with chitosan. These particles were injected into mice through tail vein and directed to heart and kidney by means of external magnets of 25 gauss or 2kA –kA/m. These particles were concentrated in the lungs, heart, and kidney of mice and the expression of GFP in these sites were monitored. The expression of GFP in specific locations was visualized by whole-body fluorescent imaging and the concentration of these particles in the designated body locations was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In another model system, we used atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and Carcino Embryonic Antigen (CEA) antibodies coupled to the chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles to target cells in vitro. The present work demonstrates that a simple external magnetic field is all that is necessary to target a drug to a specific site inside the body without the need to functionalize the nanoparticles. However, the option to use magnetic targeting with external magnets on functionalized nanoparticles could prove as a more efficient means of drug delivery. PMID:19446653

  3. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  4. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S

    2016-10-21

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX. PMID:27640312

  5. Hypoxia-targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Perche, F; Biswas, S; Wang, T; Zhu, L; Torchilin, V P

    2014-03-24

    Altered vasculature and the resultant chaotic tumor blood flow lead to the appearance in fast-growing tumors of regions with gradients of oxygen tension and acute hypoxia (less than 1.4% oxygen). Due to its roles in tumorigenesis and resistance to therapy, hypoxia represents a problem in cancer therapy. Insufficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the hypoxic regions in solid tumors is recognized as one of the causes of resistance to therapy. This led to the development of hypoxia imaging agents, and the use of hypoxia-activated anticancer prodrugs. Here we show the first example of the hypoxia-induced siRNA uptake and silencing using a nanocarrier consisting of polyethyleneglycol 2000, azobenzene, polyethyleneimine (PEI)(1.8 kDa), and 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) units (the nanocarrier is referred to as PAPD), where azobenzene imparts hypoxia sensitivity and specificity. We report hypoxia-activated green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing in vitro and its downregulation in GFP-expressing tumors after intravenous administration. The proposed nanoformulation represents a novel tumor-environment-responsive modality for cancer targeting and siRNA delivery. PMID:24554550

  6. Supramolecular micellar nanoaggregates based on a novel chitosan/vitamin E succinate copolymer for paclitaxel selective delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lian, He; Sun, Jin; Yu, Yan Ping; Liu, Yan Hua; Cao, Wen; Wang, Yong Jun; Sun, Ying Hua; Wang, Si Ling; He, Zhong Gui

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, many cytotoxic anticancer drugs exhibit low solubility and poor tumor selectivity, which means that the drug formulation is very important. For example, in the case of paclitaxel (PTX), Cremophor EL® (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany) needs to be used as a solubilizer in its clinical formulation (Taxol®, Bristol-Myers Squibb, New York, NY), although it can cause serious side effects. Nanomicellar systems are promising carriers to resolve the above problems, and the polymer chosen is the key element. Methods In this study, a novel amphiphilic chitosan/vitamin E succinate (CS-VES) copolymer was successfully synthesized for self-assembling polymeric micelles. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared were used to characterize the molecular structure of the copolymer. The PTX-loaded CS-VES polymeric micelles (PTX-micelles) were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Results The critical micelle concentration of CS-VES was about 12.6 μg/mL, with the degree of amino group substitution being 20.4%. PTX-micelles were prepared by a nanoprecipitation/dispersion technique without any surfactant being involved. PTX-micelles exhibited a drug loading as high as 21.37% and an encapsulation efficiency of 81.12%, with a particle size ranging from 326.3 to 380.8 nm and a zeta potential of +20 mV. In vitro release study showed a near zero-order sustained release, with 51.06%, 50.88%, and 44.35% of the PTX in the micelles being released up to 168 hours at three drug loadings of 7.52%, 14.09%, and 21.37%, respectively. The cellular uptake experiments, conducted by confocal laser scanning microscopy, showed an enhanced cellular uptake efficiency of the CS-VES micelles in MCF-7 cells compared with Taxol. The PTX-micelles exhibited a comparable but delayed cytotoxic effect compared with Taxol against MCF-7 cells, due to the sustained-release characteristics

  7. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2016-07-01

    Due to the ability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed. PMID:27471668

  8. Heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B and fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel ranging 50 to 70°C: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, R.; Shinozuka, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2016-03-01

    We studied heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B ranging 50 to 70°C ex vivo study. Porcine carotid artery was dipped in the heated Rhodamine B solution in 15 s and then cooled by 37°C saline. Rhodamine B concentration distribution in the vascular wall cross-section was measured by a fluorescence microscope using 550 nm for excitation and 620 nm emission for fluorescence detection. The total amount of measured fluorescence in the vascular wall was calculated as a indication of delivered Rhodamine B quantity. The delivered Rhodamine B quantity was increased with increasing heating temperature with 50 to 70°C. In the cases of 60 to 70°C heating, the delivered Rhodamine B quantity was 3.1 to 23.3 fold by that of 37°C. Defined penetration depth of the delivered Rhodamine B in the vascular wall was also significantly increased with 65°C and 70°C heating. We also studied heating drug delivery to the vascular wall with fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel with 70°C in 15 s and 60 s heating ex vivo. In both contact duration, the delivered Paclitaxel quantity was increased. To understand these drug delivery enhancement effects, we investigated the vascular cross-sectional structure change by the heating. Some holes over 50 nm in diameter appeared on the internal elastic lamina with 70°C heating. We prospected that vascular surface structure change by the heating might enhance drug delivery to the vascular wall.

  9. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes.

  10. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  11. Design and characterization of novel EphA2 agonists for targeted delivery of chemotherapy to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Bridget A.; Zharkikh, Irina; Purves, Angela; Stebbins, John L.; Oshima, Robert G.; Fisher, Paul B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel, targeted delivery agents for anti-cancer therapies requires the design and optimization of potent and selective tumor-targeting agents that are stable and amenable to conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs. While short peptides represent potentially an excellent platform for these purposes, they often get degraded and are eliminated too rapidly in vivo. In this manuscript, we used a combination of NMR-guided structure activity relationships along with biochemical and cellular studies to derive a novel tumor homing agent, named 123B9, targeting the EphA2 tyrosine kinase receptor ligand binding domain. Conjugating 123B9 to the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) via a stable linker results in an agent that is significantly more effective than the unconjugated drug in both a pancreatic cancer xenograft model and a melanoma lung colonization and metastases model. Hence, 123B9 could represent a promising strategy for the development of novel targeted therapies for cancer. PMID:26165155

  12. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  13. The class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin targets inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli and synergizes with paclitaxel to inhibit metastasis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Chu, Khoi; Boley, Kimberly M; Ye, Zaiming; Liu, Hui; Wright, Moishia C; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Green, Tessa L; Barsky, Sanford H; Heise, Carla; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer. IBC has distinctive characteristics including invasion of tumor emboli into the skin and rapid disease progression. Given our previous studies suggesting that HDAC inhibitors have promise in targeting IBC, the present study revealed that the class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin (FK-288, Istodax; Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ) potently induced destruction of IBC tumor emboli and lymphatic vascular architecture. associated with inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha, (HIF1alpha) proteins in the Mary-X pre-clinical model of IBC. Romidepsin treatment induced clinically relevant biomarkers in including induction of acetylated Histone 3 (Ac-H3) proteins, apoptosis, and increased p21WAF1/CIP1. Romidepsin, alone and synergistically when combined with Paclitaxel, effectively eliminated both primary tumors and metastatic lesions at multiple sites formed by the SUM149 IBC cell line. This is the first report of the ability of an HDAC inhibitor to eradicate IBC tumor emboli, to destroy the integrity of lymphatic vessel architecture and to target metastasis. Furthermore, Romidepsin, in combination with a taxane, warrants evaluation as a therapeutic strategy that may effectively target the skin involvement and rapid metastasis that are hallmarks of IBC.

  14. Nanoparticles of star-like copolymer mannitol-functionalized poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS for delivery of paclitaxel to prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kebing; Guo, Longhua; Xiong, Wei; Sun, Leilei; Zheng, Yi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop novel nanoparticles (NPs) of star-like copolymer mannitol-functionalized poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS (M-PLA-TPGS) for paclitaxel delivery for prostate cancer treatment, and evaluate their therapeutic effects in prostate cancer cell line and animal model in comparison with the linear PLGA NPs and poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS (PLA-TPGS) NPs. The paclitaxel-loaded M-PLA-TPGS NPs, prepared by a modified nano-precipitation method, were observed by FESEM to be near-spherical shape with narrow size distribution. The drug-loaded NPs were further characterized in terms of size, surface charge, drug content, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The results showed that the M-PLA-TPGS NPs were found to be stable, showing almost no change in particle size and surface charge during the three-month storage period. In vitro drug release exhibited biphasic pattern with initial burst release followed by slow and continuous release. The cellular uptake level of M-PLA-TPGS NPs was demonstrated higher than linear PLGA NPs and PLA-TPGS NPs in PC-3 cells. The data also showed that the paclitaxel-loaded M-PLA-TPGS nanoparticles have higher antitumor efficacy than that of linear PLA-TPGS nanoparticles and PLGA nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. In summary, the star-like copolymer M-PLA-TPGS could be used as a potential and promising molecular biomaterial in developing novel nanoformulation for prostate cancer treatment.

  15. Novel ZnO hollow-nanocarriers containing paclitaxel targeting folate-receptors in a malignant pH-microenvironment for effective monitoring and promoting breast tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Konar, Suraj; Brunt, Keith R; Rao, Raj R; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Das, Swadesh K; Basu, Ranadhir; Fisher, Paul B; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Low pH in the tumor micromilieu is a recognized pathological feature of cancer. This attribute of cancerous cells has been targeted herein for the controlled release of chemotherapeutics at the tumour site, while sparing healthy tissues. To this end, pH-sensitive, hollow ZnO-nanocarriers loaded with paclitaxel were synthesized and their efficacy studied in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The nanocarriers were surface functionalized with folate using click-chemistry to improve targeted uptake by the malignant cells that over-express folate-receptors. The nanocarriers released ~75% of the paclitaxel payload within six hours in acidic pH, which was accompanied by switching of fluorescence from blue to green and a 10-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence-switching phenomenon is due to structural collapse of the nanocarriers in the endolysosome. Energy dispersion X-ray mapping and whole animal fluorescent imaging studies were carried out to show that combined pH and folate-receptor targeting reduces off-target accumulation of the nanocarriers. Further, a dual cell-specific and pH-sensitive nanocarrier greatly improved the efficacy of paclitaxel to regress subcutaneous tumors in vivo. These nanocarriers could improve chemotherapy tolerance and increase anti-tumor efficacy, while also providing a novel diagnostic read-out through fluorescent switching that is proportional to drug release in malignant tissues. PMID:26145450

  16. Novel ZnO hollow-nanocarriers containing paclitaxel targeting folate-receptors in a malignant pH-microenvironment for effective monitoring and promoting breast tumor regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B. N. Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Konar, Suraj; Brunt, Keith R.; Rao, Raj R.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Das, Swadesh K.; Basu, Ranadhir; Fisher, Paul B.; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2015-07-01

    Low pH in the tumor micromilieu is a recognized pathological feature of cancer. This attribute of cancerous cells has been targeted herein for the controlled release of chemotherapeutics at the tumour site, while sparing healthy tissues. To this end, pH-sensitive, hollow ZnO-nanocarriers loaded with paclitaxel were synthesized and their efficacy studied in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The nanocarriers were surface functionalized with folate using click-chemistry to improve targeted uptake by the malignant cells that over-express folate-receptors. The nanocarriers released ~75% of the paclitaxel payload within six hours in acidic pH, which was accompanied by switching of fluorescence from blue to green and a 10-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence-switching phenomenon is due to structural collapse of the nanocarriers in the endolysosome. Energy dispersion X-ray mapping and whole animal fluorescent imaging studies were carried out to show that combined pH and folate-receptor targeting reduces off-target accumulation of the nanocarriers. Further, a dual cell-specific and pH-sensitive nanocarrier greatly improved the efficacy of paclitaxel to regress subcutaneous tumors in vivo. These nanocarriers could improve chemotherapy tolerance and increase anti-tumor efficacy, while also providing a novel diagnostic read-out through fluorescent switching that is proportional to drug release in malignant tissues.

  17. Novel ZnO hollow-nanocarriers containing paclitaxel targeting folate-receptors in a malignant pH-microenvironment for effective monitoring and promoting breast tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B.N. Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Konar, Suraj; Brunt, Keith R.; Rao, Raj R.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Das, Swadesh K.; Basu, Ranadhir; Fisher, Paul B.; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Low pH in the tumor micromilieu is a recognized pathological feature of cancer. This attribute of cancerous cells has been targeted herein for the controlled release of chemotherapeutics at the tumour site, while sparing healthy tissues. To this end, pH-sensitive, hollow ZnO-nanocarriers loaded with paclitaxel were synthesized and their efficacy studied in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The nanocarriers were surface functionalized with folate using click-chemistry to improve targeted uptake by the malignant cells that over-express folate-receptors. The nanocarriers released ~75% of the paclitaxel payload within six hours in acidic pH, which was accompanied by switching of fluorescence from blue to green and a 10-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence-switching phenomenon is due to structural collapse of the nanocarriers in the endolysosome. Energy dispersion X-ray mapping and whole animal fluorescent imaging studies were carried out to show that combined pH and folate-receptor targeting reduces off-target accumulation of the nanocarriers. Further, a dual cell-specific and pH-sensitive nanocarrier greatly improved the efficacy of paclitaxel to regress subcutaneous tumors in vivo. These nanocarriers could improve chemotherapy tolerance and increase anti-tumor efficacy, while also providing a novel diagnostic read-out through fluorescent switching that is proportional to drug release in malignant tissues. PMID:26145450

  18. Co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel by folic acid conjugated amphiphilic PEG-PLGA copolymer nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small lung cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Zelai; Huang, Jingwen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Teng, Yanwei; Huang, Can; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Huijun; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-12-01

    An amphiphilic copolymer, folic acid (FA) modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (FA-PEG-PLGA) was prepared and explored as a nanometer carrier for the co-delivery of cisplatin (cis-diaminodichloroplatinum, CDDP) and paclitaxel (PTX). CDDP and PTX were encapsulated inside the hydrophobic inner core and chelated to the middle shell, respectively. PEG provided the outer corona for prolonged circulation. An in vitro release profile of the CDDP + PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the PTX chelation cross-link prevented an initial burst release of CDDP. After an incubation period of 24 hours, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles exhibited a highly synergistic effect for the inhibition of A549 (FA receptor negative) and M109 (FA receptor positive) lung cancer cell line proliferation. Pharmacokinetic experiment and distribution research shows that nanoparticles have longer circulation time in the blood and can prolong the treatment times of chemotherapeutic drugs. For the in vivo treatment of A549 cells xeno-graft lung tumor, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles displayed an obvious tumor inhibiting effect with an 89.96% tumor suppression rate (TSR). This TSR was significantly higher than that of free chemotherapy drug combination or nanoparticles with a single drug. For M109 cells xeno-graft tumor, the TSR was 95.03%. In vitro and in vivo experiments have all shown that the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles have better targeting and antitumor effects in M109 cells than CDDP+PTX-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles (p < 0.05). In addition, more importantly, the enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles came with reduced side-effects. No obvious body weight loss or functional changes occurred within blood components, liver, or kidneys during the treatment of A549 and M109 tumor-bearing mice with the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles. Thus, the FA modified amphiphilic copolymer-based combination of CDDP and

  19. Co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel by folic acid conjugated amphiphilic PEG-PLGA copolymer nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small lung cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Zelai; Huang, Jingwen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Teng, Yanwei; Huang, Can; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Huijun; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-12-01

    An amphiphilic copolymer, folic acid (FA) modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (FA-PEG-PLGA) was prepared and explored as a nanometer carrier for the co-delivery of cisplatin (cis-diaminodichloroplatinum, CDDP) and paclitaxel (PTX). CDDP and PTX were encapsulated inside the hydrophobic inner core and chelated to the middle shell, respectively. PEG provided the outer corona for prolonged circulation. An in vitro release profile of the CDDP + PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the PTX chelation cross-link prevented an initial burst release of CDDP. After an incubation period of 24 hours, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles exhibited a highly synergistic effect for the inhibition of A549 (FA receptor negative) and M109 (FA receptor positive) lung cancer cell line proliferation. Pharmacokinetic experiment and distribution research shows that nanoparticles have longer circulation time in the blood and can prolong the treatment times of chemotherapeutic drugs. For the in vivo treatment of A549 cells xeno-graft lung tumor, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles displayed an obvious tumor inhibiting effect with an 89.96% tumor suppression rate (TSR). This TSR was significantly higher than that of free chemotherapy drug combination or nanoparticles with a single drug. For M109 cells xeno-graft tumor, the TSR was 95.03%. In vitro and in vivo experiments have all shown that the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles have better targeting and antitumor effects in M109 cells than CDDP+PTX-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles (p < 0.05). In addition, more importantly, the enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles came with reduced side-effects. No obvious body weight loss or functional changes occurred within blood components, liver, or kidneys during the treatment of A549 and M109 tumor-bearing mice with the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles. Thus, the FA modified amphiphilic copolymer-based combination of CDDP and

  20. Polymer-Lipid Hybrid Theranostic Nanoparticles Co-Delivering Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide and Paclitaxel for Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Therapy in Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinmei; Chen, Huaiwen; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xuefeng; Tian, Xia; Zhang, Yingying; Shi, Zhang; Liu, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) is effective for the detection of atherosclerotic (AS) plaque, and paclitaxel is effective for the treatment of AS. C11 is a polypeptide with high affinity and specificity for collagen IV. It is abundantly expressed in the outer layer of AS plaque. This study aimed to develop USPIO + paclitaxel-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid theranostic nanoparticles conjugated with C11 (UP-NP-C11) for simultaneous imaging and treatment AS plaque. UP-NP-C11 was developed by the nanoprecipitation method, and the theranostics of AS plaque by UP-NP-C11 were evaluated both in vitro and in the rabbit AS model. UP-NP-C11 was of desired particle size (140.2 nm), showed encapsulation efficiency of 35.5% and 55.2% for USPIO and paclitaxel, respectively, and had drug release profile. The accumulation of USPIO in Matrigel (containing abundant collagen IV) and macrophages coated on the Matrigel was significantly higher in the UP-NP-C11-treated group than in the group treated by UP-NP (USPIO + paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles). Thus, UP-NP-C11 exerted better growth inhibitory effect and MRI ability in macrophages than UP-NP. Significantly, UP-NP-C11 showed better in vivo MRI ability and therapeutic effect in rabbit AS plaque than UP-NP and commercial USPIO + paclitaxel, and Prussian blue staining revealed significantly greater accumulation of USPIOs in the UP-NP-C11-treated group than in the control group. Furthermore, UP-NP-C11 did not cause severe toxicity to the rabbits. UP-NP-C11 represents a potential approach for targeted MRI and therapy in AS plaque. PMID:27319218

  1. Overcoming drug-resistant lung cancer by paclitaxel loaded dual-functional liposomes with mitochondria targeting and pH-response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Li, Li; He, Xiaodan; Yi, Qiangying; He, Bin; Cao, Jun; Pan, Weisan; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrion-orientated transportation of smart liposomes has been developed as a promising strategy to deliver anticancer drugs directly to tumor sites, and these have a tremendous potential for killing cancer cells, especially those with multidrug resistance (MDR). Herein we report a novel dual-functional liposome system possessing both extracellular pH response and mitochondrial targeting properties to enhance drug accumulation in mitochondria and trigger apoptosis of drug-resistant cancer cells. Briefly, peptide D[KLAKLAK]2 (KLA) was modified with 2, 3-dimethylmaleic anhydride (DMA) and combined with 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) to yield a DSPE-KLA-DMA (DKD) lipid. This dual-functional DKD was then mixed with other commercially available lipids to fabricate liposomes. In vitro anticancer efficacy of this liposome system was evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and drug-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. At tumor extracellular pH (∼6.8), liposomes could reverse their surface charge (negative to positive), facilitating liposome internalization. After cellular uptake, KLA peptide directed delivery-enabled selective accumulation of these liposomes into mitochondria and favored release of their cargo paclitaxel (PTX) into desired sites. Specifically, enhanced apoptosis of MDR cancer cells through mitochondrial signaling pathways was evidenced by release of cytochrome c and increased activity of caspase-9 and -3. These dual-functional liposomes had the greatest efficacy for treating A549 cells and A549/Taxol cells in vitro, and in treating drug-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells xenografted onto nude mice (tumor growth inhibition 86.7%). In conclusion, dual-functional liposomes provide a novel and versatile approach for overcoming MDR in cancer treatment.

  2. Delayed onset of paresis in rats with experimental intramedullary spinal cord gliosarcoma following intratumoral administration of the paclitaxel delivery system OncoGel

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Betty M.; Hdeib, Alia; Caplan, Justin; Legnani, Federico G.; Fowers, Kirk D.; Brem, Henry; Jallo, George; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Object Treatment options for anaplastic or malignant intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) remain limited. Paclitaxel has potent cytotoxicity against experimental intracranial gliomas and could be beneficial in the treatment of IMSCTs, but poor CNS penetration and significant toxicity limit its use. Such limitations could be overcome with local intratumoral delivery. Paclitaxel has been previously incorporated into a biodegradable gel depot delivery system (OncoGel) and in this study the authors evaluated the safety of intramedullary injections of OncoGel in rats and its efficacy against an intramedullary rat gliosarcoma. Methods Safety of intramedullary OncoGel was tested in 12 Fischer-344 rats using OncoGel concentrations of 1.5 and 6.0 mg/ml (5 μl); median survival and functional motor scores (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] scale) were compared with those obtained with placebo (ReGel) and medium-only injections. Efficacy of OncoGel was tested in 61 Fischer-344 rats implanted with an intramedullary injection of 9L gliosarcoma containing 100,000 cells in 5 μl of medium, and randomized to receive OncoGel administered on the same day (in 32 rats) or 5 days after tumor implantation (in 29 rats) using either 1.5 mg/ml or 3.0 mg/ml doses of paclitaxel. Median survival and BBB scores were compared with those of ReGel-treated and tumor-only rats. Animals were killed after the onset of deficits for histopathological analysis. Results OncoGel was safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 μl of 3.0 mg/ml of paclitaxel; a dose of 5 μl of 6.0 mg/ml caused rapid deterioration in BBB scores. OncoGel at concentrations of 1.5 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml paclitaxel given on both Day 0 and Day 5 prolonged median survival and preserved BBB scores compared with controls. OncoGel 1.5 mg/ml produced 62.5% long-term survivors when delivered on Day 0. A comparison between the 1.5 mg/ml and the 3.0 mg/ml doses showed higher median survival with the 1.5 mg/ml dose on Day 0

  3. pH-Sensitive Biocompatible Nanoparticles of Paclitaxel-Conjugated Poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) for Anticancer Drug Delivery in Solid Tumors of Syngeneic Mice.

    PubMed

    Dalela, Manu; Shrivastav, T G; Kharbanda, Surender; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride), a biocompatible copolymer that was further conjugated with paclitaxel (PTX) via ester linkage and self-assembled to form poly(styrene-co-maleic acid)-paclitaxel (PSMAC-PTX) nanoparticles (NPs). The in vitro release of PTX from PSMAC-PTX NPs showed a higher release at lower pH than at the physiological pH of 7.4, confirming its pH-dependent release. The cell viability of PSMAC-PTX nanoparticles was evaluated using MTT assay. IC50 values of 9.05-18.43 ng/mL of PTX equivalent were observed in various cancer cell lines after 72 h of incubation. Confocal microscopy, Western blotting, and Flow cytometry results further supported that the cellular uptake and apoptosis of cancer cells with PSMAC-PTX NPs. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the conjugation of PTX to the PSMAC co-polymer not only increased the plasma and tumor C(max) of PTX but also prolonged its plasma half-life and retention in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Administration of PSMAC-PTX NPs showed significant tumor growth inhibition with improved apoptosis effects in vivo on Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT)-bearing BALB/c syngeneic mice in comparison with Taxol, without showing any cytotoxicity. On the basis of preliminary results, no subacute toxicity was observed in major organs, tissues and hematological system up to a dosage of 60 mg/kg body weight in mice. Therefore, PSMAC-PTX NPs may be considered as an alternative nanodrug delivery system for the delivery of PTX in solid tumors. PMID:26528585

  4. Novel Mad2-targeting miR-493-3p controls mitotic fidelity and cancer cells’ sensitivity to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Jouppila, Jenni; Chen, Ping; Elgaaen, Bente Vilming; Straume, Anne Hege; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Cárpen, Olli; Lønning, Per Eystein; Davidson, Ben; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Kallio, Marko J.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathways that contribute to the proliferation and drug response of cancer cells are highly complex and currently insufficiently characterized. We have identified a previously unknown microRNA-based mechanism that provides cancer cells means to stimulate tumorigenesis via increased genomic instability and, at the same time, evade the action of clinically utilized microtubule drugs. We demonstrate miR-493-3p to be a novel negative regulator of mitotic arrest deficient-2 (MAD2), an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint that monitors the fidelity of chromosome segregation. The microRNA targets the 3′ UTR of Mad2 mRNA thereby preventing translation of the Mad2 protein. In cancer cells, overexpression of miR-493-3p induced a premature mitotic exit that led to increased frequency of aneuploidy and cellular senescence in the progeny cells. Importantly, excess of the miR-493-3p conferred resistance of cancer cells to microtubule drugs. In human neoplasms, miR-493-3p and Mad2 expression alterations correlated with advanced ovarian cancer forms and high miR-493-3p levels were associated with reduced survival of ovarian and breast cancer patients with aggressive tumors, especially in the paclitaxel therapy arm. Our results suggest that intratumoral profiling of miR-493-3p and Mad2 levels can have diagnostic value in predicting the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy. PMID:26943585

  5. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  6. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  7. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lemort, Marc; Wilke, Celine; Vanderbeeken, Marie-Catherine; D’Hondt, Veronique; De Azambuja, Evandro; Gombos, Andrea; Lebrun, Fabienne; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Bustin, Fanny; Maetens, Marion; Ameye, Lieveke; Veys, Isabelle; Michiels, Stefan; Paesmans, Marianne; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Piccart, Martine; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC) in combination with paclitaxel. Methods HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2) every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (%) reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) estimated Gadolinium (Gd) enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR) defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated. Results Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001) for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04). Conclusions The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment

  8. Dendrimeric micelles for controlled drug release and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Ashootosh V.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the developments in dendrimer-based micelles for drug delivery. Dendrimers, the perfectly branched monodisperse macromolecules, have certain structural advantages that make them attractive candidates as drug carriers for controlled release or targeted delivery. As polymeric micelle-based approaches precede the work in dendrimers, these are also discussed briefly. The review concludes with a perspective on possible applications of biaryl-based dendrimeric micelles that exhibit environment-dependent conformations, in drug delivery. PMID:16053329

  9. Enhanced anti-tumor efficacy by co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel with amphiphilic methoxy PEG-PLGA copolymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Yan; Hu, Yu-lin; Nan, Kaihui; Nie, Guangjun; Chen, Hao

    2011-11-01

    The use of single chemotherapeutic drug has shown some limitations in anti-tumor treatment, such as development of drug resistance, high toxicity and limited regime of clinical uses. The combination of two or more therapeutic drugs is feasible means to overcome the limitations. Co-delivery strategy has been proposed to minimize the amount of each drug and to achieve the synergistic effect for cancer therapies. Attempts have been made to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs simultaneously using drug carriers, such as micelles, liposomes, and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). Here we reported core-shell NPs that were doubly emulsified from an amphiphilic copolymer methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA). These NPs offered advantages over other nanocarriers, as they were easy to fabricate by improved double emulsion method, biocompatible, and showed high loading efficacy. More importantly, these NPs could co-deliver hydrophilic doxorubicin (DOX) and hydrophobic paclitaxel (TAX). The drug-loaded NPs possessed a better polydispersity, indicating that they are more readily subject to controlled size distribution. Studies on drug release and cellular uptake of the co-delivery system demonstrated that both drugs were effectively taken up by the cells and released simultaneously. Furthermore, the co-delivery nanocarrier suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than the delivery of either DOX or TAX at the same concentrations, indicating a synergistic effect. Moreover, the NPs loading drugs with a DOX/TAX concentration ratio of 2:1 showed the highest anti-tumor activity to three different types of tumor cells. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple anti-tumor drugs with different properties. PMID:21807411

  10. pH-sensitive polymeric micelles formed by doxorubicin conjugated prodrugs for co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yakun; Fan, Xiaohui; Li, Lingbing

    2016-02-10

    A doxorubicin conjugated prodrug incorporated acid-sensitive linkage between drug and Pluronic F127-chitosan (F127-CS) polymer was successfully synthesized. Subsequently a pH-sensitive polymeric micelle system was designed based on the conjugated prodrugs (F127-CS-DOX) to co-deliver doxorubicin and paclitaxel. Paclitaxel (PTX) was physically entrapped in the hydrophobic inner core of the micelles simultaneously. The structures of conjugates were analyzed by means of (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectrum. Size distribution and morphology of the micelles were observed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that obtained micelles had good dispersity and the diameter was between 56.3 and 403.4 nm. The loading of PTX into the micelle increased with higher DOX content. DOX and PTX release from polymeric micelles followed an acid-triggered manner. Furthermore, in vivo pharmacokinetic study also showed that the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC0-∞) values of PTX and DOX for PTX-loaded F127-CS-DOX micelles in rats were 3.97 and 4.38-fold higher than those for PTX plus DOX solution. These results suggested the PTX-loaded F127-CS-DOX micelles would be a promising carrier for co-delivering DOX and PTX. PMID:26686101

  11. Enhanced transfection efficiency and targeted delivery of self-assembling h-R3-dendriplexes in EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Li, Shengnan; Xia, Songyun; Feng, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xuedi; Hao, Yanli; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2015-09-22

    The efficient gene transfection, cellular uptake and targeted delivery in vivo are key issues for non-viral gene delivery vectors in cancer therapy. To solve these issues, we designed a new targeted gene delivery system based on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting strategy. An anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody h-R3 was introduced to dendriplexes of PAMAM and DNA via electrostatic interactions to form self-assembled h-R3-PAMAM-DNA complexes (h-R3-dendriplexes). Dendriplexes h-R3-dendriplexes represented excellent DNA encapsulation ability and formed unique nanostructures. Compared to dendriplexes, h-R3-dendriplexes presented lower cytotoxicity, higher gene transfection efficiency, excellent endosome escape ability and high nuclear accumulation in the EGFR-overexpressing HepG2 cells. Both ex vivo fluorescence imaging and confocal results of frozen section revealed that h-R3-dendriplexes showed higher targeted delivery and much better gene expression in the tumors than dendriplexes at the same N/P ratio, and h-R3-dendriplexes had accumulation primarily in the tumor and kidney. Moreover, h-R3-dendriplexes for p53 delivery indicated efficient cell growth inhibition and potentiated paclitaxel-induced cell death. These results indicate that the h-R3-dendriplexes represent a great potential to be used as efficient targeted gene delivery carriers in EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:26309162

  12. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Muqing; Duval, Kayla; Guo, Xing; Chen, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this article, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (passive targeting, active targeting and physical targeting), compare methods of action, advantages, limitations, and the current stage of research. For the most commonly used nanoparticle carriers, fabrication methods are also reviewed. This is followed by a review of computational simulations and models on nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:27398083

  13. Improved tumor-targeting drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy by cationic liposome modified with truncated bFGF peptide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xianhuo; Wang, Yongsheng; Yang, Li; Hu, Jia; Xiao, Wenjing; Fu, Afu; Cai, Lulu; Li, Xia; Ye, Xia; Liu, Yalin; Wu, Wenshuang; Shao, Ximing; Mao, Yongqiu; Wei, Yuquan; Chen, Lijuan

    2010-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), overexpressed on the surface of a variety of tumor cells and on tumor neovasculature in situ, are potential targets for tumor- and vascular-targeting therapy. This study aimed to develop a FGFR-mediated drug delivery system to target chemotherapeutic agents to FGFR-overexpressed tumor cells and tumor neovasculature endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Here we designed a truncated human basic fibroblast growth factor peptide (tbFGF), which was attached to the surface of cationic liposomal doxorubicin (LPs-DOX) and paclitaxel (LPs-PTX) via electrostatic force. Then we characterized the tbFGF-modified liposome (tbFGF-LPs) and examined internalization of doxorubicin in tumor cells (TRAMP-C1, B16) and HUVEC cells in vitro. In vivo, we evaluated the biodistribution and antitumor efficacy of tbFGF-LPs-DOX and tbFGF-LPs-PTX in C57BL/6J mice bearing TRAMP-C1 prostate carcinoma and B16 melanoma, respectively. The tbFGF-LPs-DOX significantly improved the uptake of doxorubicin in TRAMP-C1, B16 and HUVEC cells, respectively. Biodistribution study in B16 tumor-bearing mice showed that tbFGF-LPs-PTX achieved 7.1-fold (72.827+/-7.321mgh/L vs 10.292+/-0.775mgh/L, mean+/-SD, P<0.01) accumulation of paclitaxel in tumor tissue than those of free paclitaxel. More importantly, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with tbFGF-LPs-DOX and tbFGF-LPs-PTX showed the significant inhibition in tumor growth and improvement in survival rate as compared with mice treated with free and liposomal drugs in TRAMP-C1 and B16 tumor models, respectively. Furthermore, repeated intravenous administration of tbFGF-LPs-DOX/PTX did not induce anti-bFGF antibodies. These results suggested that this FGFR-mediated drug delivery system may provide a new treatment strategy for tumors which overexpress FGFRs. PMID:20307599

  14. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  15. Effective method of chitosan-coated alginate nanoparticles for target drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Siqian; Yuan, Jian; Gao, Qinwei; Huang, Chaobo

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, alginate nanoparticles were firstly prepared for paclitaxel (PTX) delivery with an average size of 200 ± 21 nm. To improve the stability and targeting effect, the chitosan (CS) and folate-chitosan (FA-CS) were introduced to form PTX-loaded CS/ALG NPs and FA-CS/ALG NPs by a new double emulsion cross-linking electrostatic attraction method. The optimization chitosan concentration was 0.5% obtained from the experiment results. The CS/ALG-PTX NPs and FA-CS/ALG-PTX NPs had the average particle size of 306.9 ± 12.9 nm and 283.6 ± 19.2 nm with the zeta potential of 31.1 ± 1.3 mV and -2.98 ± 0.7 mV, and had higher drug loading and entrapment efficiencies than ALG-PTX NPs. The in vitro drug release profile along with release kinetics and mechanism from PTX-loaded NPs were studied under two simulated physiological conditions. Further, the in vitro anti-cancer activity of nanoparticles and the cellular uptake of nanoparticles on HepG2 cells were investigated. The results demonstrated that alginate, CS/ALG and FA-CS/ALG can be used as nanoformulation drug carriers by our new method, and FA-CS/ALG was a promising vehicle for anticancer drug targeted delivery system. PMID:27164869

  16. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

  17. β-Lapachone and Paclitaxel Combination Micelles with Improved Drug Encapsulation and Therapeutic Synergy as Novel Nanotherapeutics for NQO1-Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Kuan; Liu, Chun; Gao, Jinming; Qian, Feng

    2015-11-01

    β-Lapachone (LPC) is a novel cytotoxic agent that is bioactivated by NADP(H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), an enzyme elevated in a variety of tumors, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer. Despite its unique mechanism of action, its clinical evaluation has been largely hindered by low water solubility, short blood half-life, and narrow therapeutic window. Although encapsulation into poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) micelles could modestly improve its solubility and prolong its half-life, the extremely fast intrinsic crystallization tendency of LPC prevents drug loading higher than ∼2 wt %. The physical stability of the LPC-loaded micelles is also far from satisfactory for further development. In this study, we demonstrate that paclitaxel (PTX), a front-line drug for many cancers, can provide two functions when coencapsulated together with LPC in the PEG-PLA micelles; first, as a strong crystallization inhibitor for LPC, thus to significantly increase the LPC encapsulation efficiency in the micelle from 11.7 ± 2.4% to 100.7 ± 2.2%. The total drug loading efficiency of both PTX and LPC in the combination polymeric micelle reached 100.3 ± 3.0%, and the drug loading density reached 33.2 ± 1.0%. Second, the combination of LPC/PTX demonstrates strong synergistic cytotoxicity effect against the NQO1 overexpressing cancer cells, including A549 NSCLC cells, and several pancreatic cancer cells (combination index <1). In vitro drug release study showed that LPC was released faster than PTX either in phosphate-buffered saline (PH = 7.4) or in 1 M sodium salicylate, which agrees with the desired dosing sequence of the two drugs to exert synergistic pharmacologic effect at different cell checkpoints. The PEG-PLA micelles coloaded with LPC and PTX offer a novel nanotherapeutic, with high drug loading, sufficient physical stability, and biological synergy to increase drug delivery efficiency

  18. Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

  19. Surface modulatable nanocapsids for targeting and tracking toward nanotheranostic delivery.

    PubMed

    Stark, Marie; Cheng, R Holland

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticle diagnostics and therapeutics (nanotheranostics) have significantly advanced cancer detection and treatment. However, many nanotheranostics are ineffective due to defects in tumor localization and bioavailability. An engineered Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) nanocapsid is a proposed platform for targeted cancer-cell delivery. Self-assembling from HEV capsid subunits, nanocapsids retain the capacity to enter cells and resist proteolytic/acidic conditions, but lack infectious viral elements. The nanocapsid surface was modified for chemical activation to confer tumor-specific targeting and detection, immune-response manipulation and controlled theranostic delivery. Nanotheranostic molecules can be packaged in the hollow nanocapsid shell during in vitro assembly. Complementing the adapted stability and cell-entry characteristics of the HEV capsid, a modified nanocapsid serves as a tunable tumor-targeting platform for nanotheronostic delivery. PMID:27610752

  20. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  1. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  2. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  3. CYCLOSTREPTIN DERIVATIVES SPECIFICALLY TARGET CELLULAR TUBULIN AND FURTHER MAP THE PACLITAXEL SITE†

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Enrique; Barasoain, Isabel; Matesanz, Ruth; Pera, Benet; Camafeita, Emilio; Pineda, Oriol; Hamel, Ernest; Vanderwal, Christopher D.; Andreu, José Manuel; López, Juan A.; Díaz, José Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cyclostreptin is the first microtubule stabilizing agent whose mechanism of action was discovered to involve formation of a covalent bond with tubulin. Treatment of cells with cyclostreptin irreversibly stabilizes their microtubules because cyclostreptin forms a covalent bond to β-tubulin at either the T220 or the N228 residue, located, respectively, at the microtubule pore and luminal taxoid binding sites. Due to its unique mechanism of action, cyclostreptin overcomes P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in tumor cells. We used a series of reactive cyclostreptin analogues, 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, and [14C-acetyl]-8-acetyl-cyclostreptin, to characterize the cellular target of the compound and to map the binding site. The three analogues were cytotoxic and stabilized microtubules in both sensitive and multidrug resistant tumor cells. In both types of cells, we identified β-tubulin as the only or the predominantly labeled cellular protein, indicating that a covalent binding to microtubules is sufficient to prevent drug efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein. 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, and 8-acetyl-cyclostreptin labeled both microtubules and unassembled tubulin at a single residue of the same tryptic peptide of β-tubulin as was labeled by cyclostreptin (219-LTTPTYGDLNHLVSATMSGVTTCLR-243), but labeling with the analogues occurred at different positions of the peptide. 8-Acetyl-cyclostreptin reacted either with T220 or N228, as did the natural product, while 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin formed a cross link to C241. Finally 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin reacted with any one of the three residues, thus labeling the pathway for cyclostreptin-like compounds, leading from the pore where these compounds enter the microtubule to the luminal binding pocket. PMID:22148836

  4. Biomineralized anisotropic gold microplate-macrophage interactions reveal frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon: a novel paclitaxel drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Batuwangala, Madu; Mundra, Ruchir; Mehta, Krunal; Patke, Sanket; Falletta, Ermelinda; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, W N

    2014-08-27

    This study reports a facile biomineralization route for gold microplates (GMPs) synthesis using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a reductant and stabilizing agent. Adding BSA to HAuCl4 solution yields spontaneous versatile anisotropic and partially hollow GMPs upon aging. We hypothesize that the instantaneous protein denaturation at low pH enabled access to serine and threonine hydroxyl, and sulfhydryl groups of BSA, which act as a reductant and stabilizer, respectively. This reaction could be hastened by increasing the temperature well beyond 65 °C. Transmission electron microscopy/X-ray diffraction studies revealed highly crystalline and anisotropic structures (triangle, pentagon, and rectangle). Atomic force microscopy/scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated unique morphology of microplates with a partially void core and BSA mineralized edge structure. RAW 264.7 mice peritoneal macrophage-microplate interaction studies using live cell confocal imaging reveal that cells are capable of selectively internalizing smaller GMPs. Large GMPs are preferentially picked with sharp vertices but cannot be internalized and exhibit frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon. We explored particle phagocytosis as an actin mediated process that recruits phagosome-like acidic organelles, shown by a lysosensor probe technique. The biocompatible GMPs exhibited ∼70% paclitaxel (PCL) loading and sustained release of PCL, showing antitumor activity with the MCF-7 cell line, and could be a novel drug carrier for breast cancer therapy.

  5. Self-aggregated nanoparticles of linoleic acid-modified glycol chitosan conjugate as delivery vehicles for paclitaxel: preparation, characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingmou; Liu, Yonghua; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jianguo; Ren, Jin; Zhang, Lifang; Jin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A series of linoleic acid-modified glycol chitosan (LAGC) conjugates were synthesized and characterized by FTIR and (1)H NMR. The effect of the amount of linoleic acid (LA) on the physicochemical properties of LAGC conjugates was investigated. The mean diameters of three LAGC nanoparticles determined by dynamic light scattering ranged from 204 to 289 nm. The critical aggregation concentration values of LAGC conjugates in aqueous solution were 0.0148, 0.0348, and 0.0807 mg/ml, respectively. Paclitaxel (PTX) was physically loaded into the LAGC nanoparticles by a dialysis method. The drug loading content and encapsulation efficiency of PTX-loaded LAGC (PTX-LAGC) nanoparticles increased with an increasing ratio of the hydrophobic LA to hydrophilic glycol chitosan in the conjugates. PTX-LAGC nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape observed by transmission electron microscopy. In vitro release revealed that PTX release from the nanoparticles was reduced as the LA substitution degree of LAGC conjugates increased. Compared with the commercial formulation Taxol, PTX-LAGC-1 nanoparticles exhibited comparable cellular uptake and cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells in vitro. Importantly, PTX-LAGC-1 nanoparticles demonstrated the stronger antitumor efficacy against hepatic H22 tumor-bearing mice than Taxol (p < 0.05). Therefore, glycolipid-like LAGC nanoparticles had a potential as delivery vehicles for tumor therapy.

  6. Oral delivery of paclitaxel nanocrystal (PNC) with a dual Pgp-CYP3A4 inhibitor: preparation, characterization and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Patil, Anand; Mehta, Miten; Gota, Vikram; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-09-10

    Several molecular inheritances have severely restrained the peroral delivery of taxanes. The main objective of the present investigation was to develop a paclitaxel (PTX) formulation which can circumvent the hurdles of its extremely poor solubility and permeability, Pgp efflux and high pre-systemic metabolism. Positively charged PTX nanocrystals of 209 nm were prepared by sonoprecipitation with high pressure homogenization technique, wherein an arginine based surfactant was explored as a stabilizer. The BET surface area analysis revealed that the surface area of PNC was 8.53 m(2)/gm, reflecting significant rise in surface area with nanonization of PTX. The DSC and XRD pattern suggested that the PTX is in the form of the most stable dihydrate crystal. The PNC showed very rapid dissolution profile compared to plain PTX in both sinks and non-sink conditions. Clarithromycin (CLM) was evaluated as a better alternative to cyclosporin A in improving PTX permeability. The PNC-CLM showed remarkable enhancement of 453% in relative bioavailability along with maintaining the therapeutic concentration of PTX for 8h. Efficacy data in B16 F10 melanoma tumor bearing mice showed substantial reduction in tumor volume and improvement in percentage survival compared to the control group.

  7. Cell-Specific Aptamer-Mediated Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are in vitro-selected small, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can specifically recognize their target on the basis of their unique 3-dimensional structures. Recent advances in the development of escort aptamers to deliver and enhance the efficacy of other therapeutic agents have drawn enthusiasm in exploiting cell-type-specific aptamers as drug delivery vehicles. This review mainly focuses on the recent developments of aptamer-mediated targeted delivery systems. We also place particular emphasis on aptamers evolved against cell membrane receptors and possibilities for translation to clinical applications. PMID:21182455

  8. Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

  9. Galactose engineered solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashay; Kesharwani, Prashant; Garg, Neeraj K; Jain, Atul; Jain, Som Akshay; Jain, Amit Kumar; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Ghanghoria, Raksha; Tyagi, Rajeev Kumar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation reports the preparation, optimization, and characterization of surface engineered solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) encapsulated with doxorubicin (DOX). Salient features such as biocompatibility, controlled release, target competency, potential of penetration, improved physical stability, low cost and ease of scaling-up make SLNs viable alternative to liposomes for effective drug delivery. Galactosylation of SLNs instructs some gratifying characteristic, which leads to the evolution of promising delivery vehicles. The impendence of lectin receptors on different cell surfaces makes the galactosylated carriers admirable for targeted delivery of drugs to ameliorate their therapeutic index. Active participation of some lectin receptors in immune responses to antigen overlaid the application of galactosylated carriers in delivery of antigen and immunotherapy for treatment of maladies like cancer. These advantages revealed the promising potential of galactosylated carriers in each perspective of drug delivery. The developed DOX loaded galactosylated SLNs formulation was found to have particle size 239 ± 2.40 nm, PDI 0.307 ± 0.004, entrapment efficiency 72.3 ± 0.9%. Higher cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and nuclear localization of galactosylated SLNs against A549 cells revealed higher efficiency of the formulation. In a nutshell, the galactosylation strategy with SLNs could be a promising approach in improving the delivery of DOX for cancer therapy. PMID:26142628

  10. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoop, M; Mushtaq, F; Hurter, C; Chen, X-Z; Nelson, B J; Pané, S

    2016-07-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. PMID:27297037

  11. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  12. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  13. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  14. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  15. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  16. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  17. 'Smart' non-viral delivery systems for targeted delivery of RNAi to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joanne M; Hibbitts, Alan; Barlow, James; Kelly, Ciara; Sivadas, Neeraj; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of RNAi offers a potentially exciting new therapeutic paradigm for respiratory diseases. However, effective delivery remains a key requirement for their translation into the clinic and has been a major factor in the limited clinical success seen to date. Inhalation offers tissue-specific targeting of the RNAi to treat respiratory diseases and a diminished risk of off-target effects. In order to deliver RNAi directly to the respiratory tract via inhalation, 'smart' non-viral carriers are required to protect the RNAi during delivery/aerosolization and enhance cell-specific uptake to target cells. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering, and specifically non-viral siRNA delivery platforms, for delivery via inhalation. This includes developments in inhaler device engineering and particle engineering, including manufacturing methods and excipients used in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering that underpin the development of smart, cell type-specific delivery systems to target siRNA to respiratory epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages. PMID:23323781

  18. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  19. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  20. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  1. Convection-enhanced delivery: targeted toxin treatment of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Sherr, Gregory T

    2006-04-15

    Historically, malignant gliomas are perhaps the most difficult intracranial neoplasms to treat. Surgery, radiation therapy, and traditional chemotherapy have not been able to significantly alter the course of this disease. By definition, these tumors are located in the protected space of the cranial vault, where the blood-brain barrier prevents most therapies from gaining access. Because of the difficulty in treating this disease, new, innovative treatments and alternative delivery techniques for those therapies are needed. Targeted toxins are fusion proteins that represent a novel medical treatment for these cancers that is under development. However, the efficacy of these agents is dependent on the method of delivery to the tumor. The administration of targeted toxins requires image-guided placement of catheters, either within the tumor or into the adjacent infiltrated brain, and positive pressure infusion. The term that has been applied to this microinfusion technique is convection-enhanced delivery (CED). This infusion method was first attempted via direct intratumoral infusion in nude mouse flank tumor models of human malignant glioma. After significant development of this delivery technique in animal models, the successful demonstration of in vivo efficacy of targeted toxins in Phase I and II clinical trials was reported. Currently, ongoing targeted toxin trials are being conducted at academic health centers to define the best clinical practice for CED. This work involves refining the details of delivery such as infusion rate, duration of treatment, and drug dosing. The early results of CED of targeted toxins supports their continued investigation, as few other treatment modalities have produced durable results in the fight against gliomas.

  2. Tetraspecific ligand for tumor-targeted delivery of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D; Liu, Rihe

    2014-07-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in Escherichia coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various 'smart' biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  3. Tetraspecific Ligand for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in E. coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various ‘smart’ biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  4. Microrough cobalt-chromium alloy surfaces for paclitaxel delivery: preparation, characterization, and in vitro drug release studies.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Susan; Kakade, Sandeep; Mani, Gopinath

    2012-08-01

    Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have extensive biomedical applications including drug-eluting stents (DES). This study investigates the use of eight different microrough Co-Cr alloy surfaces for delivering paclitaxel (PAT) for potential use in DES. The eight different surfaces include four bare microrough and four self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coated microrough surfaces. The bare microrough surfaces were prepared by grit blasting Co-Cr with glass beads (50 and 100 μm in size) and Al(2)O(3) (50 and 110 μm). The SAM coated surfaces were prepared by depositing a -COOH terminated phosphonic acid monolayer on the different microrough surfaces. PAT was then deposited on all the bare and SAM coated microrough surfaces. The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 3D optical profilometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). SEM showed the different morphologies of microrough surfaces without and with PAT coating. An optical profiler showed the 3D topography of the different surfaces and the changes in surface roughness and surface area after SAM and PAT deposition. FTIR showed ordered SAMs were formed on glass bead grit blasted surfaces, while the molecules were disordered on Al(2)O(3) grit blasted surfaces. Also, FTIR showed the successful deposition of PAT on these surfaces. The PAT release was investigated for up to two weeks using high performance liquid chromatography. Al(2)O(3) grit blasted bare microrough surfaces showed sustained release profiles, while the glass bead grit blasted surfaces showed burst release profiles. All SAM coated surfaces showed biphasic drug release profiles, which is an initial burst release followed by a slow and sustained release. SAM coated Al(2)O(3) grit blasted surfaces prolonged the sustained release of PAT in a significant amount during the second week of drug elution studies, while this behavior was not observed for any other surfaces used in this study. Thus, this study demonstrates the

  5. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  6. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  7. The role of acoustofluidics in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Zhang, Xunli; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of acoustic systems in clinical and therapeutic applications, acoustically driven microbubbles have gained a prominent role as powerful tools to carry, transfer, direct, and target drug molecules in cells, tissues, and tumors in the expanding fields of targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. The aim of the present study is to establish a biocompatible acoustic microfluidic system and to demonstrate the generation of an acoustic field and its effects on microbubbles and biological cells in the microfluidic system. The acoustic field creates non-linear oscillations of the microbubble-clusters, which results in generation of shear stress on cells in such microsystems. This effectively helps in delivering extracellular probes in living cells by sonoporation. The sonoporation is investigated under the combined effects of acoustic stress and hydrodynamic stress during targeted drug and gene delivery. PMID:26339329

  8. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  9. Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinrong; Clay, Nicholas; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Recently, several simulation and in vitro experimental studies reported that particle shape plays a pivotal role in the targeted delivery of molecules. To better understand these findings and subsequently expedite the use of particles in biomedical applications, this review paper summarizes the methods to prepare non-spherical nano- and micro-scaled particles. In addition, this review covers studies reporting the effects of particle shape on the loading, delivery and release of encapsulated bioactive cargos. Finally, it discusses future directions to further improve the properties of non-spherical particles. PMID:25838583

  10. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  11. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  12. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  13. Bispecific digoxigenin-binding antibodies for targeted payload delivery

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Silke; Haas, Alexander K.; Daub, Karin; Croasdale, Rebecca; Stracke, Jan; Lau, Wilma; Georges, Guy; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Lammens, Alfred; Scheuer, Werner; Hoffmann, Eike; Mundigl, Olaf; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that bind cell-surface targets as well as digoxigenin (Dig) were generated for targeted payload delivery. Targeting moieties are IgGs that bind the tumor antigens Her2, IGF1R, CD22, or LeY. A Dig-binding single-chain Fv was attached in disulfide-stabilized form to C termini of CH3 domains of targeting antibodies. Bispecific molecules were expressed in mammalian cells and purified in the same manner as unmodified IgGs. They are stable without aggregation propensity and retain binding specificity/affinity to cell-surface antigens and Dig. Digoxigeninylated payloads were generated that retain full functionality and can be complexed to bispecific antibodies in a defined 2∶1 ratio. Payloads include small compounds (Dig-Cy5, Dig-Doxorubicin) and proteins (Dig-GFP). Complexed payloads are targeted by the bispecifics to cancer cells and because these complexes are stable in serum, they can be applied for targeted delivery. Because Dig bispecifics also effectively capture digoxigeninylated compounds under physiological conditions, separate administration of uncharged Dig bispecifics followed by application of Dig payload is sufficient to achieve antibody-mediated targeting in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21536919

  14. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  15. Design and Characterization of Novel EphA2 Agonists for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy to Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bainan; Wang, Si; De, Surya K; Barile, Elisa; Quinn, Bridget A; Zharkikh, Irina; Purves, Angela; Stebbins, John L; Oshima, Robert G; Fisher, Paul B; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-07-23

    The development of novel, targeted delivery agents for anti-cancer therapies requires the design and optimization of potent and selective tumor-targeting agents that are stable and amenable to conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs. While short peptides represent potentially an excellent platform for these purposes, they often get degraded and are eliminated too rapidly in vivo. In this study, we used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance-guided structure-activity relationships along with biochemical and cellular studies to derive a novel tumor-homing agent, named 123B9, targeting the EphA2 tyrosine kinase receptor ligand-binding domain. Conjugating 123B9 to the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) via a stable linker results in an agent that is significantly more effective than the unconjugated drug in both a pancreatic cancer xenograft model and a melanoma lung colonization and metastases model. Hence, 123B9 could represent a promising strategy for the development of novel targeted therapies for cancer.

  16. Carbon nanotube lipid drug approach for targeted delivery of a chemotherapy drug in a human breast cancer xenograft animal model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Paul, Arghya; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Crystal; Rodes, Laetitia; Prakash, Satya

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) possesses excellent properties as a drug carrier. To overcome the challenge of drug functionalization with CNT, we have developed a lipid-drug approach for efficient drug loading onto CNT, in which a long chain lipid molecule is conjugated to the drug molecule so that the lipid-drug can be loaded directly onto CNT through binding of the lipid 'tail' in the drug molecule to CNT surfaces via hydrophobic interactions. In a proof-of-concept study, drug paclitaxel (PTX) was conjugated with a non-toxic lipid molecule docosanol for functionalization with CNT. Folic acid was also conjugated to CNT for targeted drug delivery. High level of drug loading onto SWNT could be achieved by lipid-drug approach. Conjugation of FA to SWNT-lipid-PTX led to an increase in cell penetration capacity, and the targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX showed much improved drug efficacy in vitro in comparison to free drug Taxol and non-targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX at 48 h (78.5% vs. 31.6% and 59.1% in cytotoxicity respectively, p < 0.01). In vivo analysis using a human breast cancer xenograft mice model also confirmed the improved drug efficacy. The targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX was found non-toxic as evaluated by biochemical analysis using blood samples, and by histological analysis of major organs.

  17. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  18. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are drug-delivery systems composed of both solid and liquid lipids as a core matrix. It was shown that NLCs reveal some advantages for drug therapy over conventional carriers, including increased solubility, the ability to enhance storage stability, improved permeability and bioavailability, reduced adverse effect, prolonged half-life, and tissue-targeted delivery. NLCs have attracted increasing attention in recent years. This review describes recent developments in drug delivery using NLCs strategies. The structures, preparation techniques, and physicochemical characterization of NLCs are systematically elucidated in this review. The potential of NLCs to be used for different administration routes is highlighted. Special attention is paid to parenteral injection and topical delivery since these are the most common routes for investigating NLCs. Relevant issues for the introduction of NLCs to market, including pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications, are discussed. The related patents of NLCs for drug delivery are also reviewed. Finally, the future development and current obstacles needing to be resolved are elucidated. PMID:22946628

  19. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

  20. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. PMID:26974603

  1. The Platin-X series: activation, targeting, and delivery.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer platinum (Pt) complexes have long been considered to be one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Yet there remains the hunt for the "magic bullet" which can satisfy the requirements of an effective chemotherapeutic drug formulation. Pt(iv) complexes are kinetically more inert than the Pt(ii) congeners and offer the opportunity to append additional functional groups/ligands for prodrug activation, tumor targeting, or drug delivery. The ultimate aim of functionalization is to enhance the tumor selective action and attenuate systemic toxicity of the drugs. Moreover, an increase in cellular accumulation to surmount the resistance of the tumor against the drugs is also of paramount importance in drug development and discovery. In this review, we will address the attempts made in our lab to develop Pt(iv) prodrugs that can be activated and delivered using targeted nanotechnology-based delivery platforms. PMID:27493131

  2. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A.; Robinet, Eric; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    ``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental procedures, additional SEM and TEM images of particles, complete UV-Vis and PL-monitored characterization of the breakdown of

  3. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol.

  4. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  5. Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Targeted Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xianbo; Ali, Zeeshan; Li, Song; He, Nongyue

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are a special kind of nanomaterials and widely used in biomedical technology applications. Currently they are popularly customized for disease detection and treatment, particularly as drug carriers in drug targeted delivery systems, as a therapeutic in hyperthermia (treating tumors with heat), and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to their biocompatibility and superparamagnetic properties, MNPs as next generation drug carriers have great attraction. Although the potential benefits of MNPs are considerable, any potential toxicity associated with these MNPs should be identified distinctly. The drug loading capability and the biomedical properties of MNPs generated by different surface coatings are the most sensitive parameters in toxicity. A lot of organic and inorganic materials are utilized as coating materials for surface functionalization and reducing toxicity of MNPs. pH or temperature sensitivity materials are widely used to manage drug loading and targeted release. In addition, MNPs can be controlled and directed to the desired pathological region by using external magnetic files (EMF). The realization of targeted drug delivery has decreased the dosage and improved the efficiency of drugs, which results in reduced side effects to normal tissues. This review discussed the possible organ toxicities of MNPs and their current advances as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:26328305

  6. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  7. Macitentan (ACT-064992), a tissue-targeting endothelin receptor antagonist, enhances therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel by modulating survival pathways in orthotopic models of metastatic human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Jin; Kim, Jang Seong; Kim, Seung Wook; Brantley, Emily; Yun, Seok Joong; He, Junqin; Maya, Marva; Zhang, Fahao; Wu, Qiuyu; Lehembre, François; Regenass, Urs; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2011-02-01

    Potential treatments for ovarian cancers that have become resistant to standard chemotherapies include modulators of tumor cell survival, such as endothelin receptor (ETR) antagonist. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the dual ETR antagonist, macitentan, on human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3ip1 and IGROV1, growing orthotopically in nude mice. Mice with established disease were treated with vehicle (control), paclitaxel (weekly, intraperitoneal injections), macitentan (daily oral administrations), or a combination of paclitaxel and macitentan. Treatment with paclitaxel decreased tumor weight and volume of ascites. Combination therapy with macitentan and paclitaxel reduced tumor incidence and further reduced tumor weight and volume of ascites when compared with paclitaxel alone. Macitentan alone occasionally reduced tumor weight but alone had no effect on tumor incidence or ascites. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that treatment with macitentan and macitentan plus paclitaxel inhibited the phosphorylation of ETRs and suppressed the survival pathways of tumor cells by decreasing the levels of pVEGFR2, pAkt, and pMAPK. The dose of macitentan necessary for inhibition of phosphorylation correlated with the dose required to increase antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel. Treatment with macitentan enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by paclitaxel as measured by the degree of apoptosis in tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells. Collectively, these results show that administration of macitentan in combination with paclitaxel prevents the progression of ovarian cancer in the peritoneal cavity of nude mice in part by inhibiting survival pathways of both tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells.

  8. Multifunctional TK-VLPs nanocarrier for tumor-targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yachao; Mu, Yu; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Hui; Yang, Shuman; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Hunan; Xiao, Cuihong; Peng, Haisheng; Zhou, Yulong; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-04-11

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have been exploited for various biomedical applications, such as the monitoring, prevention, diagnosis and therapy of disease. In this study, a novel multifunctional VLPs nanocarrier (TK-VLPs) was prepared and used for tumor-targeted delivery. The SPR and cell uptake results indicated that the TK peptide is a "bi-functional ligand" with high affinity for Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells through the integrin α6β1 and integrin αvβ3 receptors. The results of the direct immunofluorescence, SDS-PAGE and western blot assays demonstrated that the TK-VLPs were successfully prepared using the baculovirus expression system. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and the flow cytometry analysis validated that the TK-VLPs could target to Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells. An in vivo study further confirmed that the TK-VLPs could target and efficiently deliver fluorescein to tumor cells and the tumor vasculature in mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. TK-VLPs-DOX displayed a uniform, spherical shape and an average size of approximately 28nm. The results of the cell uptake and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TK-VLPs-DOX could enhance the selectivity for colorectal cancer cells. Together, our studies provide strong evidence that TK-VLPs could target colon tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis with enhanced permeability and retention effects, suggesting that the TK-VLPs are a multifunctional nanocarrier with potential applications in a colon tumor-targeted drug delivery system. PMID:26915810

  9. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  10. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens.

  11. Physical and chemical stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems: targeted delivery and main routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana R; Santos, Gory; Barata, Pedro; Oliveira, Rita; Lopes, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    In the area of drug delivery, novel tools and technological approaches have captured the attention of researchers in order to improve the performance of conventional therapeutics and patient compliance to pharmacological therapy. Stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems (DDS) appear as a promising approach to control and target drug delivery. When these DDS are administered, the drug release is activated and then modulated through some action or external input and facilitated by the energy supplied externally. The stimuli responsible to activate the drug release can be classified into three types according to their nature or the type of energy applied: physical (e.g. magnetic field, electric field, ultrasound, temperature and osmotic pressure); chemical (e.g. pH, ionic strength and glucose); and biological (enzymes and endogenous receptors). The present review gives an overview of the most significant physical and chemical stimuliresponsive DDS and elucidates about their current and relevant applications in controlled and targeted drug delivery attending different routes of administration.

  12. Tumor targeting and microenvironment-responsive nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Kuang, Yuyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-07-01

    A tumor targeting nanoparticle system has been successfully developed to response to the lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe) and upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are modified with activatable cell-penetrating peptide (designated as dtACPP) that's dual-triggered by the lowered pHe and MMP2. In dtACPP, the internalization function of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is quenched by a pH-sensitive masking peptide, linking by a MMP2 substrate. The masking peptide is negatively charged to quench the cationic CPP well after systemic administration. Hence, dtACPP-modified nanoparticles possesses passive tumor targetability via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Once reaching the tumor microenvironment, the pre-existing attraction would be eliminated due to the lowered pHe, accompanying the linker cleaved by MMP2, dtACPP would be activated to expose CPP to drive the nanoparticles' internalization into the intratumoral cells. The studies of plasmid DNA loading, toxicity assessment, cellular uptake, tumor targeting delivery, and gene transfection demonstrate that dtACPP-modified nanoparticle system is a potential candidate for tumor targeting gene delivery.

  13. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; O'Neill, John D; Dorrello, N Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-09-15

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  14. Polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE)/vitamin E micelles for co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin to overcome multi-drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Abraham H; Patel, Niravkumar R; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-04-10

    The therapeutic potential of mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin and paclitaxel, was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant version SK-OV-3-paclitaxel-resistant (TR) cells in vitro and in vivo. The addition of curcumin at various concentrations did not significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel against SK-OV-3 in vitro. However, a clear synergistic effect was observed with the combination treatment against SK-OV-3TR in vitro. In vivo, this combination treatment produced a three-fold tumor inhibition with each of these cell lines. Our results indicate that such co-loaded mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24440402

  15. Polyethylene Glycol–Phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE)/Vitamin E Micelles for Co-Delivery of Paclitaxel and Curcumin to Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin and paclitaxel, was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant version SK-OV-3-paclitaxel-resistant (TR) cells in vitro and in vivo. The addition of curcumin at various concentrations did not significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel against SK-OV-3 in vitro. However, a clear synergistic effect was observed with the combination treatment against SK-OV-3TR in vitro. In vivo, this combination treatment produced a three-fold tumor inhibition with each of these cell lines. Our results indicate that such co-loaded mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24440402

  16. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  17. Chlorotoxin labeled magnetic nanovectors for targeted gene delivery to glioma.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-24

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA-bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers.

  18. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  19. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  20. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  1. [Cytological Study in vitro on Co-delivery of siRNA and Paclitaxel within Solid Lipid Nanoparticles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Yao, Xinyu; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lin, Yunzhu

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the major obstacle to the success of clinical cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the MDR1, is an important part with complex mechanisms associated with the MDR. In order to overcome the MDR of tumors, we in the present experimental design incorporated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting MDR1 gene and anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) into the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to achieve the combinational therapeutic effects of genetherapy and chemotherapy. In this study, siRNA-PTX-SLNs were successfully prepared. The cytotoxicity of blank SLNs and siRNA-PTX-SLNs in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7/ADR cells were detected by MTT; and the uptake efficiency of PTX in MCF-7/ADR cells were detected via HPLC method; quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry were performed to investigate the silencing effect of siRNA-PTX- SLNs on MDR1 gene in MCF-7/ADR cells. The results showed that PTX loaded SLNs could significantly inhibit the growth of tumor cells, and more importantly, the MDR tumor cells treated with siRNA-PTX-SLNs showed the lowest viability. HPLC study showed that SLNs could enhance the cellular uptake for PTX. Meanwhile, siRNA delivered by SLNs significantly decreased the P-gp expression in MDR tumor cells, thus increased the cellular accumulation of rhodamine123 as a P-gp substrate. In conclusion, the MDR1 gene could be silenced by siRNA-PTX-SLNs, which could promote the growth inhibition efficiency of PTX on tumor cells, leading to synergetic effect on MDR tumor therapy. PMID:27382749

  2. Biodegradable Particulate Carrier Formulation and Tuning for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles have the potential to reform the drug development landscape by improving drug solubility, changing undesirable pharmacokinetics, realizing the benefits of new molecules arising from genomic and proteomic research, and increasing drug localization in target organs and tissues; i.e., drug targeting. This review provides an overview of the in vivo fate of biodegradable particulate carriers following administration via several routes, as well as how the patient's health state, disease pathophysiology and particle physicochemical properties affect such fates. It also discusses some of the widely used biodegradable polymers, their in vivo biochemical degradation, methods of nanoparticle formulation from such polymers and finally, how such methods could be tailored to achieve targeted delivery to specified tissues both passively and actively.

  3. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed.

  4. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  5. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization. PMID:25375342

  6. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization.

  7. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  8. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  9. Polymeric protective agents for nanoparticles in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard

    2016-08-30

    Surface modification/functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric protective agents is an issue of great importance and actuality for drug delivery and targeting. Improving the blood circulation half-life of surface-protected nanocarriers is closely related to the elimination of main biological barriers and limiting factors (protein absorption and opsonization), due to the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system. For passive or active targeted delivery, in biomedical area, surface-functionalized NPs with tissue-recognition ligands were designed and optimized as a result of modern research techniques. Also, multi-functionalized nanostructures are characterized by enhanced bioavailability, efficacy, targeted localization, active cellular uptake, and low side effects. Surface-protected NPs are obtained from biocompatible, biodegradable and less toxic natural polymers (dextran, β-cyclodextrin, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, gelatin) or synthetic polymers, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(alkyl cyanoacrylates). PEGylation is one of the most important functionalization methods providing steric stabilization, long circulating and 'stealth' properties for both polymeric and inorganic-based nanosystems. In addition, for their antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor effects, cutting-edge researches in the field of pharmaceutical nanobiotechnology highlighted the importance of noble metal (platinum, gold, silver) NPs decorated with biopolymers. PMID:26972379

  10. Enhanced solubility and targeted delivery of curcumin by lipopeptide micelles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ju; Wu, Wenlan; Lai, Danyu; Li, Junbo; Fang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    A lipopeptide (LP)-containing KKGRGDS as the hydrophilic heads and lauric acid (C12) as the hydrophobic tails has been designed and prepared by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis technique. LP can self-assemble into spherical micelles with the size of ~30 nm in PBS (phosphate buffer saline) (pH 7.4). Curcumin-loaded LP micelles were prepared in order to increase the water solubility, sustain the releasing rate, and improve the tumor targeted delivery of curcumin. Water solubility, cytotoxicity, in vitro release behavior, and intracellular uptake of curcumin-loaded LP micelles were investigated. The results showed that LP micelles can increase the water solubility of curcumin 1.1 × 10(3) times and sustain the release of curcumin in a low rate. Curcumin-loaded LP micelles showed much higher cell inhibition than free curcumin on human cervix carcinoma (HeLa) and HepG2 cells. When incubating these curcumin-loaded micelles with HeLa and COS7 cells, due to the over-expression of integrins on cancer cells, the micelles can efficiently use the tumor-targeting function of RGD (functionalized peptide sequences: Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence to deliver the drug into HeLa cells, and better efficiency of the self-assembled LP micelles for curcumin delivery than crude curcumin was also confirmed by LCSM (laser confocal scanning microscope) assays. Combined with the enhanced solubility and higher cell inhibition, LP micelles reported in this study may be promising in clinical application for targeted curcumin delivery.

  11. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ηm, which increase to 60–80 ηm upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ηm) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression

  12. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  13. Cancer Nanomedicine: From Targeted Delivery to Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of a variety of diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as large surface-to volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate a variety of drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, gives them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make nanoparticles a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This article highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using nanoparticles as drug-delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. PMID:25656384

  14. Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarriers as promising targeted drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiya; Xu, Yurui; Asghar, Sajid; Chen, Minglei; Zou, Lang; Eltayeb, Sulieman; Huo, Meirong; Ping, Qineng; Xiao, Yanyu

    2015-01-01

    Among the materials for preparing the polymeric nanocarriers, poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA), a polymer with medium length alkyl side chain, is of lower toxicity and proper degradation time. Therefore, PBCA has recently been regarded as a kind of widely used, biocompatible, biodegradable, low-toxic drug carrier. This review highlights the use of PBCA-based nanocarriers (PBCA-NCs) as targeting drug delivery systems and presents the methods of preparation, the surface modification and the advantages and limitations of PBCA-NCs. The drugs loaded in PBCA-NCs are summarized according to the treatment of diseases, and the different therapeutic applications and the most recent developments of PBCA-NCs are also discussed, which provides useful guidance on the targeting research of PBCA-NCs.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Functionalized Nanocarriers in Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Bradley, Ryan; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using functionalized nanocarriers (NCs) is a strategy in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this paper we review the recent development of models at multiple length and time scales and their applications to targeting of antibody functionalized nanocarriers to antigens (receptors) on the endothelial cell (EC) surface. Our mesoscale (100 nm-1 μm) model is based on phenomenological interaction potentials for receptor-ligand interactions, receptor-flexure and resistance offered by glycocalyx. All free parameters are either directly determined from independent biophysical and cell biology experiments or estimated using molecular dynamics simulations. We employ a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) strategy in conjunction with the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) to compute the free energy landscape (potential of mean force or PMF) associated with the multivalent antigen-antibody interactions mediating the NC binding to EC. The binding affinities (association constants) are then derived from the PMF by computing absolute binding free energy of binding of NC to EC, taking into account the relevant translational and rotational entropy losses of NC and the receptors. We validate our model predictions by comparing the computed binding affinities and PMF to a wide range of experimental measurements, including in vitro cell culture, in vivo endothelial targeting, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and flow chamber experiments. The model predictions agree closely and quantitatively with all types experimental measurements. On this basis, we conclude that our computational protocol represents a quantitative and predictive approach for model driven design and optimization of functionalized NCs in targeted vascular drug delivery. PMID:22116782

  16. Preparation, characterization, and antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded folic acid modified and TAT peptide conjugated PEGylated polymeric liposomes.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ruifang; Zhao, Peiqi; Wang, Hanjie; Yu, Man; Cao, Shuzhen; Zhang, Fei; Chang, Jin

    2011-06-01

    Targeting therapy is a promising strategy for enhancing the therapeutic potential of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we report the construction of a multifunctional drug delivery system, termed folic acid modified and TAT peptide conjugated PEGylated polymeric liposomes (FA-TATp-PLs), which is originally derived from octadecyl-quaternized lysine modified chitosan and cholesterol. Our data revealed that FA-TATp-PLs have a particle size of about 60 nm with a zeta potential of about 30 mV, a low burst release effect within the first day, a sustained release for the next 14 days in vitro as well as an instant cellular uptake by folate receptor-overexpressing KB human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. In vitro cytotoxicity of paclitaxel-loaded FA-TATp-PLs in KB cells was superior to that of Taxol(®). Furthermore, a comparable antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel-loaded FA-TATp-PLs and Taxol(®) was observed at the same doses in murine models bearing nasopharyngeal carcinoma. These results demonstrate that the paclitaxel formulation not only exhibits a higher antitumor activity but also significantly reduces the toxicity and improves the bioavailability as compared to that of free paclitaxel for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Taken together, our findings indicate that paclitaxel-loaded FA-TATp-PLs are a promising nano-sized drug formulation for future cancer therapy. PMID:20677917

  17. Cancer cell sensitization and improved treatment efficacy by combined sodium butyrate and paclitaxel formulations is cancer-type specific.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Ilia; Cohen, Keren; Bod, Tal; Argov, Mirit; Margalit, Rimona

    2014-01-30

    We queried whether cancer treatment by combinations of paclitaxel and butyrate - free or formulated in drug delivery systems - can improve therapeutic responses compared to each drug alone. Combination treatments were conducted with HT-29 and HeLa cells, as representatives of differentiation-induced and cell-death-induced cancer lines, respectively. Pre-treatment of the HT-29 cells with butyrate (at doses inducing differentiation), followed by butyrate+paclitaxel generated changes in cell cycle profile, increased the level of dead cells beyond that of each drug alone, and allowed reduction in paclitaxel doses. A similar combination treatment of HeLa cells was detrimental, indicating that whether the combination is beneficial or not is cancer-type specific. We hypothesize that while butyrate-treated HT-29 cells became sensitive to paclitaxel-induced Fas-mediated apoptosis, butyrate-adapted HeLa cells became apoptosis-resistant. We next tested the same drug combination on HT-29 cells, but each drug in a specific tumor-targeted carrier. The combination of drug carriers outperformed an equidose combination of the free drugs, showing potential to achieve high therapeutic responses (even in drug-resistant cells) at significantly lower and detergent-free paclitaxel doses, which should allow for reduction in adverse effects and risks of toxicity.

  18. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  19. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  20. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    PubMed

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  1. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  2. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  3. Targeted delivery of anticancer agents via a dual function nanocarrier with an interfacial drug-interactive motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Liu, Hao; Marquez, Rebecca; Lu, Jianqin; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Xu, Liang; Li, Song

    2014-11-10

    We have developed a dual-function drug carrier, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS). Here we report that incorporation of a drug-interactive motif (Fmoc) into PEG5k-FTS2 led to further improvement in both drug loading capacity and formulation stability. Doxorubicin (DOX) formulated in PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 showed sustained release kinetics slower than those of DOX loaded in PEG5k-FTS2. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX- or paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 was significantly higher than that of the free drug. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed that DOX/PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 mixed micelles were able to retain DOX in the bloodstream for a significant amount of time and efficiently deliver the drug to tumor sites. More importantly, drug (DOX or PTX)-loaded PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 led to superior antitumor activity over other treatments including drugs formulated in PEG5k-FTS2 in breast cancer and prostate cancer models. Our improved dual function carrier with a built-in drug-interactive motif represents a simple and effective system for targeted delivery of anticancer agents.

  4. Cargo-Delivery Platforms for Targeted Delivery of Inhibitor Cargos Against Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei

    2015-01-01

    Delivering therapeutic cargos to specific cell types in vivo poses many technical challenges. There is currently a plethora of drug leads and therapies against numerous diseases, ranging from small molecule compounds to nucleic acids to peptides to proteins with varying binding or enzymatic functions. Many of these candidate therapies have documented potential for mitigating or reversing disease symptoms, if only a means for gaining access to the intracellular target were available. Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of cellular uptake and transport processes and the mode of action of bacterial protein toxins have accelerated the development of toxin-based cargo-delivery vehicle platforms. This review provides an updated survey of the status of available platforms for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos, outlining various strategies that have been used to deliver different types of cargo into cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of toxin-based approaches, examining critical issues that have hampered realization of post-intoxication antitoxins against botulism. PMID:25335885

  5. Cargo-delivery platforms for targeted delivery of inhibitor cargos against botulism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda A; Ho, Mengfei

    2014-01-01

    Delivering therapeutic cargos to specific cell types in vivo poses many technical challenges. There is currently a plethora of drug leads and therapies against numerous diseases, ranging from small molecule compounds to nucleic acids to peptides to proteins with varying binding or enzymatic functions. Many of these candidate therapies have documented potential for mitigating or reversing disease symptoms, if only a means for gaining access to the intracellular target were available. Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of cellular uptake and transport processes and the mode of action of bacterial protein toxins have accelerated the development of toxin-based cargo-delivery vehicle platforms. This review provides an updated survey of the status of available platforms for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos, outlining various strategies that have been used to deliver different types of cargo into cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of toxin-based approaches, examining critical issues that have hampered realization of post-intoxication antitoxins against botulism.

  6. Development of targeted delivery techniques for Zequanox®

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, Todd J.; Luoma, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water temperature and concentration on the physical characteristics of Zequanox®, a dead-cell spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) used for controlling invasive dreissenid mussels (zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, and quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis), were investigated to determine optimal temperature-specific concentrations and delivery techniques for use during open-water subsurface Zequanox applications. Temperature-controlled laboratory tests evaluated viscosity, settling, stratification, and buoyancy of various concentrations of Zequanox suspension in water to select an optimal target viscosity for Zequanox applications. A two-step linear regression procedure was used to create a temperature-specific Zequanox prediction model from the viscosity data. The prediction model and subsurface application techniques were validated by conducting three independent outdoor pond trials at temperatures of ~9, 14, and 20°C. During these outdoor trials, subsurface applications of Zequanox at concentrations predicted by the model were performed and water samples were collected at varying depths and analyzed via spectroscopy to determine Zequanox concentration and dispersion. Although the predicted Zequanox concentrations and delivery techniques used resulted in successfully maintaining lethal Zequanox concentrations in the bottom 7.5 cm of the water column for the duration of the exposure, a revised prediction model is also provided for more accurately selecting temperature-specific Zequanox concentrations.

  7. Targeting tumor metastases: drug delivery mechanisms and technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Roth, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary sites of tumor are the focal triggers of cancers, yet it is the subsequent metastasis events that cause the majority of the morbidity and mortality. Metastatic tumor cells exhibit a phenotype that differs from that of the parent cells, as they represent a resistant, invasive subpopulation of the original tumor, may have acquired additional genetic or epigenetic alterations under exposure to prior chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments, and reside in a microenvironment differing from that of its origin. This combination of resistant phenotype and distal location make tracking and treating metastases particularly challenging. In this review, we highlight some of the unique biological traits of metastasis, which in turn, inspire emerging strategies for targeted imaging of metastasized tumors and metastasis-directed delivery of therapeutics. PMID:26409123

  8. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application.

  9. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application. PMID:25827073

  10. Construction of paclitaxel-loaded poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-g-poly (lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine copolymer nanoparticle delivery system and evaluation of its anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Huan; Jin, Shubin; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to develop drug-loaded biocompatible nanoscale packages with improved therapeutic efficacy for effective clinical treatment. To address this need, a novel poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-poly (lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine [PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE)] copolymer was designed and synthesized to enable these nanoparticles to be pH responsive under pathological conditions. Methods The structural properties and thermal stability of the copolymer was measured and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis. In order to evaluate its feasibility as a drug carrier, paclitaxel-loaded PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles were prepared using the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Results The PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles could be efficiently loaded with paclitaxel and controlled to release the drug gradually and effectively. In vitro release experiments demonstrated that drug release was faster at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4. The anticancer activity of the PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles was measured in breast cancer MCF-7 cells in vivo and in vitro. In comparison with the free drug, the paclitaxel-loaded PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles could induce more significant tumor regression. Conclusion This study indicates that PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles are promising carriers for hydrophobic drugs. This system can passively target cancer tissue and release drugs in a controllable manner, as determined by the pH value of the area in which the drug accumulates. PMID:22419875

  11. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  12. CD44 targeted chemotherapy for co-eradication of breast cancer stem cells and cancer cells using polymeric nanoparticles of salinomycin and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Kumar, Rajendra; Saladi, Shantikumar; Rafeeqi, Towseef Amin; Khan, Wahid

    2016-07-01

    This combinational therapy is mainly aimed for complete eradication of tumor by killing both cancer cells and cancer stem cells. Salinomycin (SLM) was targeted towards cancer stem cells whereas paclitaxel (PTX) was used to kill cancer cells. Drug loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method using cationic stabilizer. Size of the nanoparticles (below 150nm) was determined by dynamic light scattering technique and transmission electron microscopy. In vitro release study confirmed the sustained release pattern of SLM and PTX from nanoparticles more than a month. Cytotoxicity studies on MCF-7 cells revealed the toxicity potential of nanoparticles over drug solutions. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was coated onto the surface of SLM nanoparticles for targeting CD44 receptors over expressed on cancer stem cells and they showed the highest cytotoxicity with minimum IC50 on breast cancer cells. Synergistic cytotoxic effect was also observed with combination of nanoparticles. Cell uptake studies were carried out using FITC loaded nanoparticles. These particles showed improved cellular uptake over FITC solution and HA coating further enhanced the effect by 1.5 folds. CD44 binding efficiency of nanoparticles was studied by staining MDA-MB-231 cells with anti CD44 human antibody and CD44(+) cells were enumerated using flow cytometry. CD44(+) cell count was drastically decreased when treated with HA coated SLM nanoparticles indicating their efficiency towards cancer stem cells. Combination of HA coated SLM nanoparticles and PTX nanoparticles showed the highest cytotoxicity against CD44(+) cells. Hence combinational therapy using conventional chemotherapeutic drug and cancer stem cell inhibitor could be a promising approach in overcoming cancer recurrence due to resistant cell population.

  13. CD44 targeted chemotherapy for co-eradication of breast cancer stem cells and cancer cells using polymeric nanoparticles of salinomycin and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Kumar, Rajendra; Saladi, Shantikumar; Rafeeqi, Towseef Amin; Khan, Wahid

    2016-07-01

    This combinational therapy is mainly aimed for complete eradication of tumor by killing both cancer cells and cancer stem cells. Salinomycin (SLM) was targeted towards cancer stem cells whereas paclitaxel (PTX) was used to kill cancer cells. Drug loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method using cationic stabilizer. Size of the nanoparticles (below 150nm) was determined by dynamic light scattering technique and transmission electron microscopy. In vitro release study confirmed the sustained release pattern of SLM and PTX from nanoparticles more than a month. Cytotoxicity studies on MCF-7 cells revealed the toxicity potential of nanoparticles over drug solutions. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was coated onto the surface of SLM nanoparticles for targeting CD44 receptors over expressed on cancer stem cells and they showed the highest cytotoxicity with minimum IC50 on breast cancer cells. Synergistic cytotoxic effect was also observed with combination of nanoparticles. Cell uptake studies were carried out using FITC loaded nanoparticles. These particles showed improved cellular uptake over FITC solution and HA coating further enhanced the effect by 1.5 folds. CD44 binding efficiency of nanoparticles was studied by staining MDA-MB-231 cells with anti CD44 human antibody and CD44(+) cells were enumerated using flow cytometry. CD44(+) cell count was drastically decreased when treated with HA coated SLM nanoparticles indicating their efficiency towards cancer stem cells. Combination of HA coated SLM nanoparticles and PTX nanoparticles showed the highest cytotoxicity against CD44(+) cells. Hence combinational therapy using conventional chemotherapeutic drug and cancer stem cell inhibitor could be a promising approach in overcoming cancer recurrence due to resistant cell population. PMID:27045981

  14. Disulfiram targets cancer stem-like cells and reverses resistance and cross-resistance in acquired paclitaxel-resistant triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Kumar, I S; Brown, S; Kannappan, V; Tawari, P E; Tang, J Z; Jiang, W; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Wang, W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has significantly worse prognosis. Acquired chemoresistance remains the major cause of therapeutic failure of TNBC. In clinic, the relapsed TNBC is commonly pan-resistant to various drugs with completely different resistant mechanisms. Investigation of the mechanisms and development of new drugs to target pan-chemoresistance will potentially improve the therapeutic outcomes of TNBC patients. Methods: In this study, 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), combination index (CI)–isobologram, western blot, ALDEFLUOR analysis, clonogenic assay and immunocytochemistry were used. Results: The chemoresistant MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are highly cross-resistant to paclitaxel (PAC), cisplatin (CDDP), docetaxel and doxorubicin. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are quiescent with significantly longer doubling time (64.9 vs 31.7 h). This may be caused by high expression of p21Waf1. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and a panel of embryonic stem cell-related proteins, for example, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and nuclealisation of HIF2α and NF-κBp65. We have previously reported that disulfiram (DS), an antialcoholism drug, targets cancer stem cells (CSCs) and enhances cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs. Disulfiram abolished CSC characters and completely reversed PAC and CDDP resistance in MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells. Conclusion: Cancer stem cells may be responsible for acquired pan-chemoresistance. As a drug used in clinic, DS may be repurposed as a CSC inhibitor to reverse the acquired pan-chemoresistance. PMID:24008666

  15. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  16. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  17. Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer

  18. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  19. Mucoadhesive platforms for targeted delivery to the colon.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

    2011-11-25

    A novel platform system, comprising a mucoadhesive core and a rapid release carrier, was designed for targeted drug delivery to the colon. Prednisolone pellets containing different carbomers, including Carbopol 971P, Carbopol 974P and Polycarbophil AA-1, with or without organic acids, were produced by extrusion-spheronization. Mucoadhesive pellets were coated with a new enteric double-coating system, which dissolves at pH 7. This system comprises an inner layer of partially neutralized Eudragit S and buffer salt and an outer coating of standard Eudragit S. A single layer of standard Eudragit S was also applied for comparison purposes. Dissolution of the coated pellets was assessed in USP II apparatus in 0.1N HCl followed by Krebs bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4. Visualization of the coating dissolution process was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent markers in both layers. The mucoadhesive properties of uncoated, single-coated and-double coated pellets were evaluated ex vivo on porcine colonic mucosa. Mucoadhesive pellets coated with a single layer of Eudragit S release its cargo after a lag time of 120 min in Krebs buffer. In contrast, drug release from the double-coated mucoadhesive pellets was significantly accelerated, starting at 75 min. In addition, the mucoadhesive properties of the core of the double coated pellets were higher than those from single-coated pellets after the core had been exposed to the buffer medium. This novel platform technology has the potential to target the colon and overcome the variability in transit and harmonize drug release and bioavailability.

  20. Enhanced oral delivery of paclitaxel using acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate nanomicelles based on a mucus bioadhesion and penetration mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lian, He; Zhang, Tianhong; Sun, Jin; Liu, Xiaohong; Ren, Guolian; Kou, Longfa; Zhang, Youxi; Han, Xiaopeng; Ding, Wenya; Ai, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chunnuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Yongjun; Sun, Yinghua; Wang, Siling; He, Zhonggui

    2013-09-01

    In addition to being a physiological protective barrier, the gastrointestinal mucosal membrane is also a primary obstacle that hinders the oral absorption of many therapeutic compounds, especially drugs with a poor permeability. In order to resolve this impasse, we have designed multifunctional nanomicelles based on the acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate copolymer (CS-VES-NAC, CVN), which exhibit marked bioadhesion, possess the ability to penetrate mucus, and enhance the oral absorption of a hydrophobic drug with a poor penetrative profile, paclitaxel. The intestinal absorption (Ka = 0.38 ± 0.04 min(-1), Papp = 0.059 cm · min(-1)) of CVN nanomicelles was greatly improved (4.5-fold) in comparison with paclitaxel solution, and CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope) pictures also showed not only enhanced adhesion to the intestinal surface but improved accumulation within intestinal villi. The in vivo pharmacokinetics indicated that the AUC0-t (586.37 ng/mL · h) of CVN nanomicelles was markedly enhanced compared with PTX solution. In summary, the novel multifunctional CVN nanomicelles appear to be a promising nanocarrier for insoluble and poorly permeable drugs due to their high bioadhesion and permeation-enhancing capability. PMID:23909663

  1. Enhanced oral delivery of paclitaxel using acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate nanomicelles based on a mucus bioadhesion and penetration mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lian, He; Zhang, Tianhong; Sun, Jin; Liu, Xiaohong; Ren, Guolian; Kou, Longfa; Zhang, Youxi; Han, Xiaopeng; Ding, Wenya; Ai, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chunnuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Yongjun; Sun, Yinghua; Wang, Siling; He, Zhonggui

    2013-09-01

    In addition to being a physiological protective barrier, the gastrointestinal mucosal membrane is also a primary obstacle that hinders the oral absorption of many therapeutic compounds, especially drugs with a poor permeability. In order to resolve this impasse, we have designed multifunctional nanomicelles based on the acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate copolymer (CS-VES-NAC, CVN), which exhibit marked bioadhesion, possess the ability to penetrate mucus, and enhance the oral absorption of a hydrophobic drug with a poor penetrative profile, paclitaxel. The intestinal absorption (Ka = 0.38 ± 0.04 min(-1), Papp = 0.059 cm · min(-1)) of CVN nanomicelles was greatly improved (4.5-fold) in comparison with paclitaxel solution, and CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope) pictures also showed not only enhanced adhesion to the intestinal surface but improved accumulation within intestinal villi. The in vivo pharmacokinetics indicated that the AUC0-t (586.37 ng/mL · h) of CVN nanomicelles was markedly enhanced compared with PTX solution. In summary, the novel multifunctional CVN nanomicelles appear to be a promising nanocarrier for insoluble and poorly permeable drugs due to their high bioadhesion and permeation-enhancing capability.

  2. Glycyrrhetinic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)-glycyrrhetinic acid tri-block conjugates based self-assembled micelles for hepatic targeted delivery of poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengbo; Xu, Ting; Liu, Chi; Chen, Can; Song, Xiangrong; Zheng, Yu; He, Gu

    2013-01-01

    The triblock 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)18β-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugates (GA-PEG-GA) based self-assembled micelles were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, NMR, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. The GA-PEG-GA conjugates having the critical micelle concentration of 6 × 10(-5) M were used to form nanosized micelles, with mean diameters of 159.21 ± 2.2 nm, and then paclitaxel (PTX) was incorporated into GA-PEG-GA micelles by self-assembly method. The physicochemical properties of the PTX loaded GA-PEG-GA micelles were evaluated including in vitro cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, drug release profile, and in vivo tissue distribution. The results demonstrate that the GA-PEG-GA micelles had low cytotoxicity and good ability of selectively delivering drug to hepatic cells in vitro and in vivo by the targeting moiety glycyrrhetinic acid. In conclusion, the GA-PEG-GA conjugates have potential medical applications for targeted delivery of poor soluble drug delivery.

  3. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  4. Effects of cholesterol component on molecular interactions between paclitaxel and phospholipid within the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingyun; Feng, Si-Shen

    2006-08-01

    Cholesterol is a main component of the cell membrane and could have significant effects on drug-cell membrane interactions and thus the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. It also plays an important role in liposomal formulation of drugs for controlled and targeted delivery. In this research, Langmuir film technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are employed for a systematic investigation on the effects of cholesterol component on the molecular interactions between a prototype antineoplastic drug (paclitaxel) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) within the cell membrane by using the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface as a model of the lipid bilayer membrane and the biological cell membrane. Analysis of the measured surface pressure (pi) versus molecular area (a) isotherms of the mixed DPPC/paclitaxel/cholesterol monolayers at various molar ratios shows that DPPC, paclitaxel and cholesterol can form a non-ideal miscible system at the air-water interface. Cholesterol enhances the intermolecular forces between paclitaxel and DPPC, produces an area-condensing effect and thus makes the mixed monolayer more stable. Investigation of paclitaxel penetration into the mixed DPPC/cholesterol monolayer shows that the existence of cholesterol in the DPPC monolayer can considerably restrict the drug penetration into the monolayer, which may have clinical significance for diseases of high cholesterol. FTIR and AFM investigation on the mixed monolayer deposited on solid surface confirmed the obtained results.

  5. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) enhances the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Sontum, Per Christian; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeffrey; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-08-28

    Acoustic cluster therapy (ACT) is a novel approach for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery. In the current study, we have investigated ACT in combination with paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of a subcutaneous human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3) in mice. In combination with paclitaxel (12mg/kg given i.p.), ACT induced a strong increase in therapeutic efficacy; 120days after study start, 42% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the paclitaxel only group and the median survival was increased by 86%. In combination with Abraxane® (12mg paclitaxel/kg given i.v.), ACT induced a strong increase in the therapeutic efficacy; 60days after study start 100% of the animals were in stable, remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group, 120days after study start 67% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. For the ACT+Abraxane group 100% of the animals were alive after 120days vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. Proof of concept for Acoustic Cluster Therapy has been demonstrated; ACT markedly increases the therapeutic efficacy of both paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. PMID:27297780

  6. Anisamide-Decorated pH-Sensitive Degradable Chimaeric Polymersomes Mediate Potent and Targeted Protein Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Zou, Yan; Yang, Weijing; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-06-01

    In spite of their high potency and specificity, few protein drugs have advanced to the clinical settings due to lack of safe and efficient delivery vehicles. Here, novel anisamide-decorated pH-sensitive degradable chimaeric polymersomes (Anis-CPs) were designed, prepared, and investigated for efficient and targeted delivery of apoptotic protein, granzyme B (GrB), to lung cancer cells. Anis-CPs were readily prepared with varying Anis surface densities from anisamide end-capped poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6- trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)ethane methacrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (Anis-PEG-PTTMA-PAA) and PEG-PTTMA-PAA copolymers. Using cytochrome C (CC) as a model protein, Anis-CPs displayed high protein loading efficiencies (40.5-100%) and loading contents (up to 16.8 wt %). CC-loaded Anis-CPs had narrow distribution (PDI 0.04-0.13) and small sizes ranging from 152 to 171 nm, which increased with increasing CC contents. Notably, the release of proteins from Anis-CPs was accelerated under mildly acidic conditions, due to the hydrolysis of acetal bonds in PTTMA. MTT assays showed that GrB-loaded Anis-CPs (GrB-Anis-CPs) displayed high targetability to sigma receptor overexpressing cancer cells such as H460 and PC-3 cells. For example, GrB-Anis-CPs exhibited increasing antitumor efficacy to H460 cells with increasing Anis contents from 0 to 80%. The antitumor activity of GrB-Anis-CPs was significantly reduced upon pretreating H460 cells with haloperidol (a competitive antagonist). Notably, the half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of GrB-Anis70-CPs were determined to be 6.25 and 5.94 nM for H460 and PC-3 cells, respectively, which were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel. Flow cytometry studies demonstrated that GrB-Anis70-CPs induced widespread apoptosis of H460 cells. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments using FITC-labeled CC-loaded Anis-CPs confirmed fast

  7. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  8. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  9. Preparation, characterization, and efficacy of thermosensitive liposomes containing paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhiping; Li, Ying; Gong, Wei; Yu, Fang-Lin; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Ming-Yuan; Mei, Xing-Guo

    2016-05-01

    To increase the anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel (PTX), novel temperature-sensitive liposomes loading paclitaxel (PTX-TSL) were developed. In vitro, characteristics of PTX-TSL were evaluated. The mean particle diameter was about 100 nm, and the entrapment efficiency was larger than 95%. The phase-transition temperature of PTX-TSL determined by differential scanning calorimetry was about 42 °C. The result of in vitro drug release from PTX-TSL illustrated that release rate at 37 °C was obviously lower than that at 42 °C. Stability data indicated that the liposome was physically and chemically stable for at least 3 months at -20 °C. In vivo study, after three injections with hyperthermia in the xenograft lung tumor model, PTX-TSL showed distinguished tumor growth suppression, compared with non-temperature-sensitive liposome and free drug. The results of intratumoral drug concentration indicated that PTX-TSL combined with hyperthermia delivered more paxlitaxel into the tumor location than the other two paxlitaxel formulations. In summary, PTX-TSL combined with hyperthermia significantly inhibited tumor growth, due to the increased targeting efficiency of PTX to tumor tissues. Such approach may enhance the delivery efficiency of chemotherapeutics into solid tumors. PMID:26666408

  10. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  11. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  12. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  13. Delivery of drugs to intracellular organelles using drug delivery systems: Analysis of research trends and targeting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2015-12-30

    Targeting of drug delivery systems (DDSs) to specific intracellular organelles (i.e., subcellular targeting) has been investigated in numerous publications, but targeting efficiency of these systems is seldom reported. We searched scientific publications in the subcellular DDS targeting field and analyzed targeting efficiency and major formulation parameters that affect it. We identified 77 scientific publications that matched the search criteria. In the majority of these studies nanoparticle-based DDSs were applied, while liposomes, quantum dots and conjugates were used less frequently. The nucleus was the most common intracellular target, followed by mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In 65% of the publications, DDSs surface was decorated with specific targeting residues, but the efficiency of this surface decoration was not analyzed in predominant majority of the studies. Moreover, only 23% of the analyzed publications contained quantitative data on DDSs subcellular targeting efficiency, while the majority of publications reported qualitative results only. From the analysis of publications in the subcellular targeting field, it appears that insufficient efforts are devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters and of the DDSs' intracellular fate. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future studies in the field of organelle-specific drug delivery and targeting.

  14. Biodegradation and Toxicity of Protease/Redox/pH Stimuli-Responsive PEGlated PMAA Nanohydrogels for Targeting Drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sha; Wan, Jiaxun; Meng, Lizheng; Huang, Xiaoxing; Guo, Jia; Liu, Li; Wang, Changchun

    2015-09-01

    The application of nanomaterials in intelligent drug delivery is developing rapidly for treatment of cancers. In this paper, we fabricated a new kind of protease/redox/pH stimuli-responsive biodegradable nanohydrogels with methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer and N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BACy) as the cross-linker through a facile reflux-precipitation polymerization. After that, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) and folic acid (FA) were covalently grafted onto the surface of the nanohydrogels for enhancement of their long in vivo circulation lifetime and active targeting ability to the tumor cells and tissues. This kind of nanohydrogels could be disassembled into short polymer chains (Mn<1140; PDI<1.35) both in response to glutathione (GSH) through reduction of the sensitive disulfide bonds and protease by breakage of the amido bonds in the cross-linked networks. The nanohydrogels were utilized to simultaneously load both hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) and hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX) with high drug loading efficiency. The cumulative release profile showed that the drug release from the drug-loaded nanohydrogels was significantly expedited by weak acidic (pH 5.0) and reducing environment (GSH), which exhibited an distinct redox/pH dual stimuli-responsive drug release to reduce the leakage of drugs before they reach tumor site. In addition, the in vitro experiment results indicated that the multidrug-loaded system had synergistic effect on cancer therapy. Meanwhile, the acute toxicity and intravital fluorescence imaging studies were adopted to evaluate the biocompatibility and biotoxicity of the nanohydrogels, the experimental results showed that the PEG modification could greatly enhance the long in vivo circulation lifetime and reduce the acute toxicity (LD50: from 138.4 mg/kg to 499.7 mg/kg) of the nanohydrogels. PMID:26288386

  15. Polymeric Micelles for Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs: Preparation and Anticancer Activity In Vitro of Paclitaxel Incorporated into Mixed Micelles Based on Poly(ethylene Glycol)-Lipid Conjugate and Positively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JUNPING; MONGAYT, DIMITRY; TORCHILIN, VLADIMIR P.

    2006-01-01

    Paclitaxel-loaded mixed polymeric micelles consisting of poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphoethanolamine conjugates (PEG-PE), solid triglycerides (ST), and cationic Lipofectin® lipids (LL) have been prepared. Micelles with the optimized composition (PEG-PE/ST/LL/paclitaxel = 12/12/2/1 by weight) had an average micelle size of about 100 nm, and zeta-potential of about 26 mV. Micelles were stable and did not release paclitaxel when stored at 4°C in the darkness (just 2.9% of paclitaxel have been lost after 4 months with the particle size remaining unchanged). The release of paclitaxel from such micelles at room temperature was also insignificant. However, at 37°C, approx. 16% of paclitaxel was released from PEG-PE/ST/LL/paclitaxel micelles in 72 h, probably, because of phase transition in the ST-containing micelle core. In vitro anticancer effects of PEG-PE/ST/LL/paclitaxel and control micelles were evaluated using human mammary adenocarcinoma (BT-20) and human ovarian carcinoma (A2780) cell lines. Paclitaxel in PEG-PE/ST/LL micelles demonstrated the maximum anti-cancer activity. Cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled paclitaxel-containing micelles by BT-20 cells was investigated using a fluorescence microscopy. It seems that PEG-PE/ST/LL micelles, unlike micelles without the LL component, could escape from endosomes and enter the cytoplasm of BT-20 cancer cells thus increasing the anticancer efficiency of the micellar paclitaxel. PMID:15848957

  16. Targeted lung cancer therapy: preparation and optimization of transferrin-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers as novel nanomedicine for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhenyu; Shao, Jingyu; Tan, Bingxu; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Zhulong; Zhao, Zengjun; He, Fangfang; Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) represent an improved generation of lipid nanoparticles. They have specific nanostructures to accommodate drugs/genes, and thus achieve higher loading capacity. The aim of this study was to develop transferrin (Tf)-decorated NLC as multifunctional nanomedicine for co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid. Methods Firstly, Tf-conjugated ligands were synthesized. Secondly, PTX- and DNA-loaded NLC (PTX-DNA-NLC) was prepared. Finally, Tf-containing ligands were used for the surface decoration of NLC. Their average size, zeta potential, drug, and gene loading were evaluated. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCl-H460 cells) was used for the testing of in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo transfection efficiency of NLC was evaluated on mice bearing NCl-H460 cells. Results Tf-decorated PTX and DNA co-encapsulated NLC (Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC) were nano-sized particles with positive zeta potential. Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC displayed low cytotoxicity, high gene transfection efficiency, and enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The results demonstrated that Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC can achieve impressive antitumor activity and gene transfection efficiency. Tf decoration also enhanced the active targeting ability of the carriers to NCl-H460 cells. The novel drug and gene delivery system offers a promising strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25709444

  17. Strategies and advances in nanomedicine for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Surendra; Gupta, Nidhi; Chandra, Ramesh

    2011-06-01

    siRNA are a rapidly emerging class of new therapeutic molecules for the treatment of inherited and acquired diseases. However, poor cellular uptake and instability in physiological conditions limits its therapeutic potential, hence a need to develop a delivery system that can protect and efficiently transport siRNA to the target cells has arisen. Nanoparticles have been proposed as suitable delivery vectors with reduced cytotoxicity and enhanced efficacy. These delivery vectors form condensed complexes with siRNA which, in turn, provides protection to siRNA against enzymatic degradation and further leads to tissue and cellular targeting. Nanoparticles derived from polymers, such as chitosan and polyethylenimine have found numerous applications owing to ease of manipulation, high stability, low cost and high gene carrying capability. This article focuses on various aspects of nanomedicine based siRNA delivery with emphasis on targeted delivery to tumors.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma.

  19. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success.

  20. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  1. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  2. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  3. Evolving Evidence of the Efficacy and Safety of nab-Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Cancers with Squamous Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Herbert H.; Chan, Alvita C.Y.; Wong, Ashley C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Taxanes, such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, are well-established cytotoxic chemotherapeutics used in the treatment of a variety of cancers, including those of squamous histology. In their formulation, both agents require solvents, which have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions, peripheral neuropathy, hepatic toxicities, and impaired drug delivery. nab-Paclitaxel is a novel, albumin-bound form of paclitaxel with improved tolerability, bioavailability, and efficacy compared with solvent-based paclitaxel. Currently, nab-paclitaxel is approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, locally advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and metastatic pancreatic cancer. Clinical studies suggest that nab-paclitaxel may be particularly effective in cancers with squamous histology, including NSCLC. This article reviews the emerging evidence supporting nab-paclitaxel as an effective agent in the treatment of malignancies of squamous histology. PMID:26918039

  4. The role of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wanyi; Mahato, Rubi; Cheng, Kun

    2010-01-01

    HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer. Since the discovery of its role in tumorigenesis, HER2 has received great attention in cancer research during the past two decades. Successful development of the humanized monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab) for the treatment of breast cancer further spurred scientists to develop various HER2 specific antibodies, dimerization inhibitors and kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. On the other hand, the high expression of HER2 and the accessibility of its extracellular domain make HER2 an ideal target for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs as well as imaging agents. Although there is no natural ligand for HER2, various artificial ligands targeting HER2 have been developed and applied in various targeted drug delivery systems. The emphasis of this review is to elucidate the roles of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. The structure and signal pathway of HER2 will be briefly described. The role of HER2 in tumorigenesis and its relationship with other tumor markers will be discussed. For the HER2 targeted cancer therapy, numerous strategies including the blockage of receptor dimerization, inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity, and interruption of the downstream signal pathway will be summarized. For the targeted drug delivery to HER2 positive tumor cells, various targeting ligands and their delivery systems will be described in details. PMID:20385184

  5. Nanostructured lipid carriers and their current application in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Piyush; Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, various drug-delivery technologies have emerged and a fascinating part of this has been the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles (NPs) and other colloidal drug-delivery systems modify the kinetics, drug distribution in the body and release profile of an associated drug. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been reported to be an alternative system to emulsions, liposomes, microparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and their polymeric counterparts due to their numerous advantages. This paper basically reviews the types of NLCs, mechanism of skin penetration, stability related issues along with their production techniques, characterisation and applications towards targeted drug delivery.

  6. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  7. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2016-11-01

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  8. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  9. Sustained delivery of siRNAs targeting viral infection by cell-degradable multilayered polyelectrolyte films.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Maria; Affolter, Christine; Meyer, Florent; Nguyen, Isabelle; Richard, Doriane G; Schuster, Catherine; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Ogier, Joëlle; Baumert, Thomas F

    2008-10-21

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to represent a recently discovered approach for the treatment of human diseases, including viral infection. A major limitation for the success of therapeutic strategies based on RNAi has been the delivery and shortlasting action of synthetic RNA. Multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), consisting of alternate layer-by-layer deposition of polycations and polyanions, have been shown to represent an original approach for the efficient delivery of DNA and proteins to target cells. Using hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) as a model, we demonstrate that siRNAs targeting the viral genome are efficiently delivered by MPFs. This delivery method resulted in a marked, dose-dependent, specific, and sustained inhibition of HCV replication and infection in hepatocyte-derived cells. Comparative analysis demonstrated that delivery of siRNAs by MPFs was more sustained and durable than siRNA delivery by standard methods, including electroporation or liposomes. The antiviral effect of siRNA-MPFs was reversed by a hyaluronidase inhibitor, suggesting that active degradation of MPFs by cellular enzymes is required for siRNA delivery. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that cell-degradable MPFs represent an efficient and simple approach for sustained siRNA delivery targeting viral infection. Moreover, this MPF-based delivery system may represent a promising previously undescribed perspective for the use of RNAi as a therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  10. A Rapid and Sensitive HPLC Method for Quantitation of Paclitaxel in Biological Samples using Liquid-Liquid Extraction and UV Detection: Application to Pharmacokinetics and Tissues Distribution Study of Paclitaxel Loaded Targeted Polymeric Micelles in Tumor Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Emami, Jaber; Mostafavi, Abolfazl; Rostami, Mahboubeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Sadeghi, Hojjat; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated for determination of paclitaxel (PTX) in plasma, various organs and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice. Tissue specimens of liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, heart and tumor were separately homogenized in normal saline. Plasma or tissue homogenate (250 µl) containing PTX and internal standard (diazepam) were extracted by diethyl ether (6 ml). The separation was achieved on a µ-Bondapak C18 HPLC column using sodium acetate buffer solution (0.01 M)/acetonitrile (58/42 v/v) at pH 5 ± 0.1 and flow rate of 1.9 mL/min. The effluent was monitored at 227 nm and column temperature was adjusted at 58ºC. The internal standard and PTX were eluted at 4.2 and 5.2 min, respectively and no interfering peaks were observed. Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.25-10 µg/ml of PTX in plasma and 0.3-20 µg/ml PTX in tissue homogenates with acceptable precision and accuracy (<15%). The mean recoveries of the drug after plasma extraction was 87.4% ± 3.6 while those of tissue homogenates ranged from 62.1± 4.5 to 75.5± 3.2 depending on the type of tissues studied. PTX was stable in samples with no evidence of degradation during 3 freeze-thaw cycles and 3 months storage at -70 °C. The developed HPLC method was applied to quantify PTX in the mouse plasma and tissues after intravenous administration of 10 mg equivalent PTX/Kg dose of PTX-loaded tocopherol succinate-chitosan-polyethylene glycol-folate (TS-CS-PEG-FA) micelles formulation or Anzatax® (Cremophor® EL- based formulation of PTX) to female Balb/c mice.

  11. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  12. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  13. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  14. Size matters: gold nanoparticles in targeted cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dreaden, Erik C; Austin, Lauren A; Mackey, Megan A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the current leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for approximately one quarter of all deaths in the USA and UK. Nanotechnologies provide tremendous opportunities for multimodal, site-specific drug delivery to these disease sites and Au nanoparticles further offer a particularly unique set of physical, chemical and photonic properties with which to do so. This review will highlight some recent advances, by our laboratory and others, in the use of Au nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery to these malignancies and will also provide insights into their rational design, synthesis, physiological properties and clinical/preclinical applications, as well as strategies and challenges toward the clinical implementation of these constructs moving forward. PMID:22834077

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  16. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  17. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  18. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  19. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  20. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer - specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Hatoum, Hassan; Dy, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007) is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel). A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.

  1. Co-delivery of drugs and DNA from cationic core-shell nanoparticles self-assembled from a biodegradable copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Gao, Shujun; Ye, Wen-Hui; Yoon, Ho Sup; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2006-10-01

    Non-viral gene-delivery systems are safer to use and easier to produce than viral vectors, but their comparatively low transfection efficiency has limited their applications. Co-delivery of drugs and DNA has been proposed to enhance gene expression or to achieve the synergistic/combined effect of drug and gene therapies. Attempts have been made to deliver drugs and DNA simultaneously using liposomes. Here we report cationic core-shell nanoparticles that were self-assembled from a biodegradable amphiphilic copolymer. These nanoparticles offer advantages over liposomes, as they are easier to fabricate, and are more readily subject to modulation of their size and degree of positive charge. More importantly, they achieve high gene-transfection efficiency and the possibility of co-delivering drugs and genes to the same cells. Enhanced gene transfection with the co-delivery of paclitaxel has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies. In particular, the co-delivery of paclitaxel with an interleukin-12-encoded plasmid using these nanoparticles suppressed cancer growth more efficiently than the delivery of either paclitaxel or the plasmid in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer model. Moreover, the co-delivery of paclitaxel with Bcl-2-targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.

  2. Advances in Bone-targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Long-Bang; Shi, Xin; Wu, Su-Jia; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Targeted therapy for osteosarcoma includes organ, cell and molecular biological targeting; of these, organ targeting is the most mature. Bone-targeted drug delivery systems are used to concentrate chemotherapeutic drugs in bone tissues, thus potentially resolving the problem of reaching the desired foci and minimizing the toxicity and adverse effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some progress has been made in bone-targeted drug delivery systems for treatment of osteosarcoma; however, most are still at an experimental stage and there is a long transitional period to clinical application. Therefore, determining how to combine new, polymolecular and multi-pathway targets is an important research aspect of designing new bone-targeted drug delivery systems in future studies. The purpose of this article was to review the status of research on targeted therapy for osteosarcoma and to summarize the progress made thus far in developing bone-targeted drug delivery systems for neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma with the aim of providing new ideas for highly effective therapeutic protocols with low toxicity for patients with osteosarcoma.

  3. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particles incorporating a recombinant protein. This recombinant protein was produced with or without a c-terminal peptide previously shown to have high affinity binding to Claudin 4, a protein associated with M cell endocytosis. While the PLGA nanoparticles incorporate the protein throughout the matrix, much of the protein was also displayed on the surface, allowing us to take advantage of the binding activity of the targeting peptide. Accordingly, we found that instillation of these nanoparticles into the nasal passages or stomach of mice was found to significantly enhance their uptake by upper airway and intestinal M cells. Our results suggest that a reasonably simple nanoparticle manufacture method can provide insight into developing an effective needle-free delivery system. PMID:19896996

  4. Micromixer Based Preparation of Functionalized Liposomes and Targeting Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqian; Wang, Weizhi; Han, Qiuju; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Yunhong; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-14

    We present here a specific targeting nanocarrier system by functionalization of liposomes with one new type of breast cancer targeting peptide (H6, YLFFVFER) by a micromixer with high efficiency. Antitumor drugs could be successfully delivered into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer cells with high efficiency in both in vivo and ex vivo models. PMID:27096054

  5. Targeted and controlled anticancer drug delivery and release with magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodzinski, Alexandra; Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Hadjikhani, Ali; Stewart, Tiffanie; Stimphil, Emmanuel; Runowicz, Carolyn; Cote, Richard; Altman, Norman; Datar, Ram; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2016-02-01

    It is a challenge to eradicate tumor cells while sparing normal cells. We used magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) to control drug delivery and release. The physics is due to electric-field interactions (i) between MENs and a drug and (ii) between drug-loaded MENs and cells. MENs distinguish cancer cells from normal cells through the membrane’s electric properties; cancer cells have a significantly smaller threshold field to induce electroporation. In vitro and in vivo studies (nude mice with SKOV-3 xenografts) showed that (i) drug (paclitaxel (PTX)) could be attached to MENs (30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 nanostructures) through surface functionalization to avoid its premature release, (ii) drug-loaded MENs could be delivered into cancer cells via application of a d.c. field (~100 Oe), and (iii) the drug could be released off MENs on demand via application of an a.c. field (~50 Oe, 100 Hz). The cell lysate content was measured with scanning probe microscopy and spectrophotometry. MENs and control ferromagnetic and polymer nanoparticles conjugated with HER2-neu antibodies, all loaded with PTX were weekly administrated intravenously. Only the mice treated with PTX-loaded MENs (15/200 μg) in a field for three months were completely cured, as confirmed through infrared imaging and post-euthanasia histology studies via energy-dispersive spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry.

  6. Targeted and controlled anticancer drug delivery and release with magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rodzinski, Alexandra; Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Hadjikhani, Ali; Stewart, Tiffanie; Stimphil, Emmanuel; Runowicz, Carolyn; Cote, Richard; Altman, Norman; Datar, Ram; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge to eradicate tumor cells while sparing normal cells. We used magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) to control drug delivery and release. The physics is due to electric-field interactions (i) between MENs and a drug and (ii) between drug-loaded MENs and cells. MENs distinguish cancer cells from normal cells through the membrane’s electric properties; cancer cells have a significantly smaller threshold field to induce electroporation. In vitro and in vivo studies (nude mice with SKOV-3 xenografts) showed that (i) drug (paclitaxel (PTX)) could be attached to MENs (30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 nanostructures) through surface functionalization to avoid its premature release, (ii) drug-loaded MENs could be delivered into cancer cells via application of a d.c. field (~100 Oe), and (iii) the drug could be released off MENs on demand via application of an a.c. field (~50 Oe, 100 Hz). The cell lysate content was measured with scanning probe microscopy and spectrophotometry. MENs and control ferromagnetic and polymer nanoparticles conjugated with HER2-neu antibodies, all loaded with PTX were weekly administrated intravenously. Only the mice treated with PTX-loaded MENs (15/200 μg) in a field for three months were completely cured, as confirmed through infrared imaging and post-euthanasia histology studies via energy-dispersive spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26875783

  7. Oxygen saturation targets for preterm infants in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Vento, Máximo; Aguar, Marta; Brugada, María; Escobar, Javier; Escrig, Raquel; Cubells, Elena; Cernada, María

    2012-04-01

    Fetal life evolves in a low oxygen milieu as compared to the extra-uterine. In the fetal to neonatal transition rapid changes in the oxygen content of the newly born infant occur within a brief period of time. Delivery room care givers should be aware of the slow transition regarding oxygenation, and supply oxygen as needed trying to avoid damage caused by hyper-and-hypoxia. In this regard, titrating oxygen inspiratory fraction against oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry following recent nomogram ranges is a valid method. PMID:22390353

  8. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  9. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

  10. Molecular Heterogeneity and Response to Neoadjuvant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Targeting in CALGB 40601, a Randomized Phase III Trial of Paclitaxel Plus Trastuzumab With or Without Lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donald A.; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Barry, William T.; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Harris, Lyndsay N.; Ollila, David W.; Krop, Ian E.; Henry, Norah Lynn; Weckstein, Douglas J.; Anders, Carey K.; Singh, Baljit; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Iglesia, Michael; Cheang, Maggie Chon U.; Perou, Charles M.; Winer, Eric P.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting can increase pathologic complete response rates (pCRs) to neoadjuvant therapy and improve progression-free survival in metastatic disease. CALGB 40601 examined the impact of dual HER2 blockade consisting of trastuzumab and lapatinib added to paclitaxel, considering tumor and microenvironment molecular features. Patients and Methods Patients with stage II to III HER2-positive breast cancer underwent tumor biopsy followed by random assignment to paclitaxel plus trastuzumab alone (TH) or with the addition of lapatinib (THL) for 16 weeks before surgery. An investigational arm of paclitaxel plus lapatinib (TL) was closed early. The primary end point was pCR in the breast; correlative end points focused on molecular features identified by gene expression–based assays. Results Among 305 randomly assigned patients (THL, n = 118; TH, n = 120; TL, n = 67), the pCR rate was 56% (95% CI, 47% to 65%) with THL and 46% (95% CI, 37% to 55%) with TH (P = .13), with no effect of dual therapy in the hormone receptor–positive subset but a significant increase in pCR with dual therapy in those with hormone receptor–negative disease (P = .01). The tumors were molecularly heterogeneous by gene expression analysis using mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq). pCR rates significantly differed by intrinsic subtype (HER2 enriched, 70%; luminal A, 34%; luminal B, 36%; P < .001). In multivariable analysis treatment arm, intrinsic subtype, HER2 amplicon gene expression, p53 mutation signature, and immune cell signatures were independently associated with pCR. Post-treatment residual disease was largely luminal A (69%). Conclusion pCR to dual HER2-targeted therapy was not significantly higher than single HER2 targeting. Tissue analysis demonstrated a high degree of intertumoral heterogeneity with respect to both tumor genomics and tumor microenvironment that significantly affected pCR rates. These factors should be considered when

  11. Design and optimization of novel paclitaxel-loaded folate-conjugated amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Erdoğar, Nazlı; Esendağlı, Güneş; Nielsen, Thorbjorn T; Şen, Murat; Öner, Levent; Bilensoy, Erem

    2016-07-25

    As nanomedicines are gaining momentum in the therapy of cancer, new biomaterials emerge as alternative platforms for the delivery of anticancer drugs with bioavailability problems. In this study, two novel amphiphilic cyclodextrins (FCD-1 and FCD-2) conjugated with folate group to enable active targeting to folate positive breast tumors were introduced. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize new folated-CD nanoparticles via 3(2) factorial design for optimal final parameters. Full physicochemical characterization studies were performed. Blank and paclitaxel loaded FCD-1 and FCD-2 nanoparticles remained within the range of 70-275nm and 125-185nm, respectively. Zeta potential values were neutral and -20mV for FCD-1 and FCD-2 nanoparticles, respectively. Drug release studies showed initial burst release followed by a longer sustained release. Blank nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity against L929 cells. T-47D and ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells with different levels of folate receptor expression were used to assess anti-cancer efficacy. Through targeting the folate receptor, these nanoparticles were efficiently engulfed by the breast cancer cells. Additionally, breast cancer cells became more sensitive to cytotoxic and/or cytostatic effects of PCX delivered by FCD-1 and FCD-2. In conclusion, these novel folate-conjugated cyclodextrin nanoparticles can therefore be considered as promising alternative systems for safe and effective delivery of paclitaxel with a folate-dependent mechanism. PMID:27282534

  12. Alpha fetoprotein antagonizes apoptosis induced by paclitaxel in hepatoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyue; Li, Wei; Lu, Yan; Dong, Xu; Chen, Yi; Lin, Bo; Xie, Xieju; Guo, Junli; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell resistance to the effects of paclitaxel has not been adequately addressed. In this study, we found that paclitaxel significantly inhibited the viability of HLE, Bel 7402 and L-02 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HLE cells and L-02 cells resisted the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel when transfected with pcDNA3.1-afp vectors. However, Bel 7402 cell sensitivity to paclitaxel was increased when transfected with alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-siRNA. Bel 7402 cell resistance to paclitaxel was associated with the expression of the "stemness" markers CD44 and CD133. Paclitaxel significantly inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in HLE cells and L-02 cells by inducing fragmentation of caspase-3 and inhibiting the expression of Ras and Survivin, but pcDNA3.1-afp vectors prevented these effects. However, paclitaxel could not significantly promote the cleavage of caspase-3 or suppress the expression of Ras and Survivin in Bel 7402 cells. Silenced expression of AFP may be synergistic with paclitaxel to restrain proliferation and induce apoptosis, enhance cleavage of caspase-3, and suppress the expression of Ras and Survivin. Taken together, AFP may be an important molecule acting against paclitaxel-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells via repressing the activity of caspase-3 and stimulating the expression of Ras and Survivin. Targeted inhibition of AFP expression after treatment with paclitaxel is an available strategy for the therapy of patients with HCC. PMID:27255186

  13. Alpha fetoprotein antagonizes apoptosis induced by paclitaxel in hepatoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingyue; Li, Wei; Lu, Yan; Dong, Xu; Chen, Yi; Lin, Bo; Xie, Xieju; Guo, Junli; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell resistance to the effects of paclitaxel has not been adequately addressed. In this study, we found that paclitaxel significantly inhibited the viability of HLE, Bel 7402 and L-02 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HLE cells and L-02 cells resisted the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel when transfected with pcDNA3.1-afp vectors. However, Bel 7402 cell sensitivity to paclitaxel was increased when transfected with alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-siRNA. Bel 7402 cell resistance to paclitaxel was associated with the expression of the “stemness” markers CD44 and CD133. Paclitaxel significantly inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in HLE cells and L-02 cells by inducing fragmentation of caspase-3 and inhibiting the expression of Ras and Survivin, but pcDNA3.1-afp vectors prevented these effects. However, paclitaxel could not significantly promote the cleavage of caspase-3 or suppress the expression of Ras and Survivin in Bel 7402 cells. Silenced expression of AFP may be synergistic with paclitaxel to restrain proliferation and induce apoptosis, enhance cleavage of caspase-3, and suppress the expression of Ras and Survivin. Taken together, AFP may be an important molecule acting against paclitaxel-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells via repressing the activity of caspase-3 and stimulating the expression of Ras and Survivin. Targeted inhibition of AFP expression after treatment with paclitaxel is an available strategy for the therapy of patients with HCC. PMID:27255186

  14. Functionalized Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Tumor Vasculature Targeting and PET Image-Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Hong, Hao; Chen, Feng; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Aim Development of multifunctional and well-dispersed hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) for tumor vasculature targeted drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Materials and Methods Amine functionalized HMSNs (150–250 nm) were conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator, NOTA, PEGylated and loaded with anti-angiogenesis drug, Sunitinib. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys) (cRGDyK) peptide was attached to the nanoconjugate and radiolabeled with 64Cu for PET imaging. Results 64Cu-NOTA-HMSN-PEG-cRGDyK exhibited integrin specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo. PET results indicated ~ 8 %ID/g uptake of targeted nanoconjugates in U87MG tumors, which correlated well with ex vivo and histological analyses. Enhanced tumor targeted delivery of sunitinib was also observed. Conclusions We successfully developed tumor vasculature targeted HMSNs for PET imaging and image guided drug delivery. PMID:25955122

  15. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed.

  16. Application of traditional Chinese medicine preparation in targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xing, Feng J; Dong, Kai; You, Cuiyu; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Guilan; Chen, Youliang; Wang, Ke

    2015-05-01

    Targeting drug system (TDS) or targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) is a new kind of drug delivery system which could make drug to be directly concentrated on the target site with high curative effects and low side-effects. As the quintessence of Chinese culture, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a large advantage in many disease clinical treatments, especially in cancer, hypertension and many other intractable diseases owing to their low toxicity and side-effects relative to western medicine. This article reviews literatures on development of TCM-targeted preparations which were published in the past 10 years. TDS including active-targeting, passive-targeting and physical-chemical-targeting preparations were introduced through domestic and overseas literatures to reveal the unique advantages of TCM-targeting preparations in drug delivery system. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of TCM-targeting preparations and indicated that great attention should be paid to the research on the TCM-targeting preparations.

  17. Direct Cytoplasmic Delivery and Nuclear Targeting Delivery of HPMA-MT Conjugates in a Microtubules Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Zhu, Xi; Luo, Kui; Li, Lian; Tang, Manlin; Liu, Yanxi; Zhou, Zhou; Huang, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    As the hearts of tumor cells, the nucleus is the ultimate target of many chemotherapeutic agents and genes. However, nuclear drug delivery is always hampered by multiple intracellular obstacles, such as low efficiency of lysosome escape and insufficient nuclear trafficking. Herein, an N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) polymer-based drug delivery system was designed, which could achieve direct cytoplasmic delivery by a nonendocytic pathway and transport into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent fashion. A special targeting peptide (MT), derived from an endogenic parathyroid hormone-related protein, was conjugated to the polymer backbone, which could accumulate into the nucleus a by microtubule-mediated pathway. The in vitro studies found that low temperature and NaN3 could not influence the cell internalization of the conjugates. Besides, no obvious overlay of the conjugates with lysosome demonstrated that the polymer conjugates could enter the tumor cell cytoplasm by a nonendocytic pathway, thus avoiding the drug degradation in the lysosome. Furthermore, after suppression of the microtubule dynamics with microtubule stabilizing docetaxel (DTX) and destabilizing nocodazole (Noc), the nuclear accumulation of polymeric conjugates was significantly inhibited. Living cells fluorescence recovery after photobleaching study found that the nuclear import rate of conjugates was 2-fold faster compared with the DTX and Noc treated groups. These results demonstrated that the conjugates transported into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent way. Therefore, in addition to direct cytoplasmic delivery, our peptide conjugated polymeric platform could simultaneously mediate nuclear drug accumulation, which may open a new path for further intracellular genes/peptides delivery. PMID:27417390

  18. Charge-reversal nanoparticles: novel targeted drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinli; Liu, Lisha; Jiang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Spurred by significant progress in materials chemistry and drug delivery, charge-reversal nanocarriers are being developed to deliver anticancer formulations in spatial-, temporal- and dosage-controlled approaches. Charge-reversal nanoparticles can release their drug payload in response to specific stimuli that alter the charge on their surface. They can elude clearance from the circulation and be activated by protonation, enzymatic cleavage, or a molecular conformational change. In this review, we discuss the physiological basis for, and recent advances in the design of charge-reversal nanoparticles that are able to control drug biodistribution in response to specific stimuli, endogenous factors (changes in pH, redox gradients, or enzyme concentration) or exogenous factors (light or thermos-stimulation). PMID:27471667

  19. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  20. Mitochondrion: A Promising Target for Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ru; Umeano, Afoma C.; Francis, Lily; Sharma, Nivita; Tundup, Smanla; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most popular technologies in disease prevention and eradication. It is promising to improve immunization efficiency by using vectors and/or adjuvant delivery systems. Nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems have attracted increasing interest due to enhancement of antigen uptake via prevention of vaccine degradation in the biological environment and the intrinsic immune-stimulatory properties of the materials. Mitochondria play paramount roles in cell life and death and are promising targets for vaccine delivery systems to effectively induce immune responses. In this review, we focus on NPs-based delivery systems with surfaces that can be manipulated by using mitochondria targeting moieties for intervention in health and disease. PMID:27258316

  1. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  2. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  3. Targeted Delivery of Hyaluronan-Immobilized Magnetic Ceramic Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsi-Chin; Wang, Tzu-Wei; Hsieh, Shun-Yu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Kang, Pei-Leun

    2016-01-01

    Effective cancer therapy relies on delivering the therapeutic agent precisely to the target site to improve the treatment outcome and to minimize side effects. Although surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are the standard methods commonly used in clinics, hyperthermia has been developed as a new and promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, magnetic bioceramic hydroxyapatite (mHAP) nanocrystals have been developed as heat mediator for intracellular hyperthermia. Hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mHAP nanocrystals are synthesized by a wet chemical precipitation process to achieve active targeting. The results demonstrate that the HA targeting moiety conjugated by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer arm is successfully immobilized on the surface of mHAP. The HA-modified mHAP possesses relatively good biocompatibility, an adequate biodegradation rate and superparamagnetic properties. The HA-modified mHAP could be localized and internalized into HA receptor-overexpressed malignant cells (e.g., MDA-MB-231 cell) and used as the heat generating agent for intracellular hyperthermia. The results from this study indicate that biocompatible HA-modified mHAP shows promise as a novel heat mediator and a specific targeting nanoagent for intracellular hyperthermia cancer therapy. PMID:27301176

  4. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  5. A folate receptor-targeting nanoparticle minimizes drug resistance in a human cancer model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiang; Koenig, Lydia; Gjyrezi, Ada; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Shin, Edwin H; Tighiouart, Mourad; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Nie, Shuming; Shin, Dong M

    2011-08-23

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in cancer therapy. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a folate receptor-targeting nanoparticle to overcome/minimize drug resistance and to explore the underlying mechanisms. This is accomplished with enhanced cellular accumulation and retention of paclitaxel (one of the most effective anticancer drugs in use today and a well-known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate) in a P-gp-overexpressing cancer model. The folate receptor-targeted nanoparticle, HFT-T, consists of a heparin-folate-paclitaxel (HFT) backbone with an additional paclitaxel (T) loaded in its hydrophobic core. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the HFT-T nanoparticle was superior to free paclitaxel or nontargeted nanoparticle (HT-T) in inhibiting proliferation of P-gp-overexpressing cancer cells (KB-8-5), partially due to its enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention. In a subcutaneous KB-8-5 xenograft model, HFT-T administration enhanced the specific delivery of paclitaxel into tumor tissues and remarkably prolonged retention within tumor tissues. Importantly, HFT-T treatment markedly retarded tumor growth in a xenograft model of resistant human squamous cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis further indicated that increased in vivo efficacy of HFT-T nanoparticles was associated with a higher degree of microtubule stabilization, mitotic arrest, antiangiogenic activity, and inhibition of cell proliferation. These findings suggest that when the paclitaxel was delivered as an HFT-T nanoparticle, the drug is better retained within the P-gp-overexpressing cells than the free form of paclitaxel. These results indicated that the targeted HFT-T nanoparticle may be promising in minimizing P-gp related drug resistance and enhancing therapeutic efficacy compared with the free form of paclitaxel.

  6. Choline transporter-targeting and co-delivery system for glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guo, Yubo; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising approach for glioma therapy. In this study, a co-delivery system of plasmid encoding human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail) and doxorubicin (DOX) has been simply constructed in two steps. Firstly, DOX was intercalated into Trail to form a stable complex. Secondly, DOX-Trail complex was condensed by Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) to form a nanoscaled co-delivery system. Choline transporters are both expressed on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma, Herein, a choline derivate with high choline transporter affinity was chosen as BBB and glioma dual targeting ligand. Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system showed higher cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than unmodified co-delivery system in U87 MG cells. In comparison with single medication or unmodified delivery system, Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system induced more apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy on U87 MG bearing xenografts further confirmed the predominance of this dual targeting and co-delivery system.

  7. New development and application of ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Jiang, Lan; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound is a common used technique for clinical imaging. In recent years, with the advances in preparation technology of microbubbles and the innovations in ultrasound imaging, ultrasound is no longer confined to detection of tissue perfusion, but extends to specific ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy gradually. With the development of research, ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy have made great progresses. Targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging are achieved by binding target molecules, specific antibody or ligand to the surface of microbubbles to obtain specific imaging by attaching to target tissues. Meanwhile, it can also achieve targeting gene therapy or drug delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) mediating genes or drugs to specific target sites. UTMD has a number of advantages, such as target-specific, highly effective, non-invasivity, relatively low-cost and no radiation, and has broad application prospects, which is regarded as one hot spot in medical studies. We reviewed the new development and application of UTMD in gene therapy and drug delivery in this paper. With further development of technology and research, the gene or drug delivery system and related methods will be widely used in application and researches.

  8. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  9. Use of Single-Chain Antibody Derivatives for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Khalili, Masoumeh; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei; Zarei, Vahid; Erfani-Moghadam, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Single-chain antibodies (scFvs), which contain only the variable domains of full-length antibodies, are relatively small molecules that can be used for selective drug delivery. In this review, we discuss how scFvs help improve the specificity and efficiency of drugs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery using scFv-drug fusion peptides, siRNA delivery using scFv-conjugated nanoparticles, targeted delivery using scFv-viral peptide-fusion proteins, use of scFv in fusion with cell-penetrating peptides for effective targeted drug delivery, scFv-mediated targeted delivery of inorganic nanoparticles, scFv-mediated increase of tumor killing activity of granulocytes, use of scFv for tumor imaging, site-directed conjugation of scFv molecules to drug carrier systems, use of scFv to relieve pain and use of scFv for increasing drug loading efficiency are among the topics that are discussed here. PMID:27249008

  10. Blurring the Role of Oligonucleotides: Spherical Nucleic Acids as a Drug Delivery Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuyu; Lu, Xueguang; Jia, Fei; Liu, Xiaofan; Sun, Yehui; Logan, Jessica K; Zhang, Ke

    2016-08-31

    Nucleic acids are generally regarded as the payload in gene therapy, often requiring a carrier for intracellular delivery. With the recent discovery that spherical nucleic acids enter cells rapidly, we demonstrate that nucleic acids also have the potential to act as a delivery vehicle. Herein, we report an amphiphilic DNA-paclitaxel conjugate, which forms stable micellar nanoparticles in solution. The nucleic acid component acts as both a therapeutic payload for intracellular gene regulation and the delivery vehicle for the drug component. A bioreductively activated, self-immolative disulfide linker is used to tether the drug, allowing free drug to be released upon cell uptake. We found that the DNA-paclitaxel nanostructures enter cells ∼100 times faster than free DNA, exhibit increased stability against nuclease, and show nearly identical cytotoxicity as free drug. These nanostructures allow one to access a gene target and a drug target using only the payloads themselves, bypassing the need for a cocarrier system.

  11. Using Gold Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine Phosphate to Treat Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Song, Steven; Hao, Yuzhi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging paradigm for creating functional nanoscale materials for various biomedical applications. In this study, a new nanotechnology-based drug delivery method was developed using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a delivery vehicle to reduce adverse drug side effects. Fludarabine Phosphate is a commercial chemotherapy drug used in cancer treatment, and has ability to kill various cancer cells. KG-1 cell, a type of acute cancer leukemia cell, was selected as a proof-of-concept target in this study. Due to the small size of GNPs, they can help Fludarabine Phosphate enter cancer cells more efficiently and better interfere with DNA synthesis in the cancer cells. To enhance targeting ability, folic acid molecules were also covalently linked to GNPs, resulting in GNP-Fludarabine-folic acid (GNP-F/f). Compared to treatments with GNP-F or drugs on its own (Fludarabine Phosphate), the GNP-F/f achieves much improved cell-killing effects. The UV-Vis spectra results also revealed that the drugs had successfully bonded covalently to the GNPs. The higher cell-killing efficiency of GNP-F/f compared with GNP-Fludarabine (GNP-F) or drugs on their own further validates the effectiveness of both the vectors (GNPs) and folic acid in enhancing the drug delivery to the cancer cells. The MTT viability tests showed that the GNPs had no cytotoxicity.

  12. Dextran-gated, multifunctional mesoporous nanoparticle for glucose-responsive and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arjyabaran; Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2014-12-24

    Design of drug delivery nanocarrier having targeted recognition followed by bioresponsive controlled release, especially via glucose-responsive release, is a challenging issue. Here, we report magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS)-based drug delivery nanocarrier that can target specific cell and release drug via glucose-responsive gate. The design involves synthesis of MMS functionalized with phenylboronic acid and folate. After drug loading inside the pores of MMS, outside of the pores are closed by dextran via binding with phenylboronic acid. Dextran-gated pores are opened for drug release in the presence of glucose that competes binding with phenylboronic acid. We found that tolbutamide and camptothecin loaded MMS can target beta cells and cancer cells, respectively, release drugs depending on bulk glucose concentration and offers glucose concentration dependent cytotoxicity. Developed functional MMS can be used for advanced drug delivery applications for diabetes and cancers with more efficient therapy. PMID:25458145

  13. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  14. An orthopedic tissue adhesive for targeted delivery of intraoperative biologics.

    PubMed

    Simson, Jacob; Crist, Joshua; Strehin, Iossif; Lu, Qiaozhi; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-03-01

    Tissue adhesives can bind together damaged tissues and serve as tools to deliver and localize therapeutics to facilitate regeneration. One emerging therapeutic trend in orthopedics is the use of intraoperative biologics (IOB), such as bone marrow (BM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to stimulate healing. Here, we introduce the application of the biomaterial chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS) to deliver IOB in a hydrogel adhesive. We demonstrate the biomaterial's ability to bind various tissue types and its cellular biocompatibility with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Further, we examine in detail the CS-NHS adhesive combined with BM aspirate for use in bone applications. hMSCs were encapsulated in CS-BM and cultured for 5 weeks in osteogenic medium. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated osteogenesis via upregulation of the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2 and bone markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Significant deposition of calcium and osteocalcin was detected using biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. Shear testing demonstrated that the CS-BM adhesive exhibited an adhesive strength approximately an order of magnitude stronger than fibrin glue and approaching that of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. These results indicate that CS-NHS is a promising delivery tool for IOB in orthopedic applications requiring a strong, degradable, and biocompatible adhesive that supports bone growth. PMID:23097279

  15. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively con-trolled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics). Conclusion The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent. PMID:23678437

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of a Novel Amphiphilic Polymer RGD-PEG-Chol for Target Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shi; Li, Bo; Song, Xiangrong; Zheng, Yu; Peng, Cheng; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    An amphiphilic polymer RGD-PEG-Chol which can be produced in large scale at a very low cost has been synthesized successfully. The synthesized intermediates and final products were characterized and confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (1H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The paclitaxel- (PTX-) loaded liposomes based on RGD-PEG-Chol were then prepared by film formation method. The liposomes had a size within 100 nm and significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel to B16F10 cell as demonstrated by MTT test (IC50 = 0.079 μg/mL of RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes compared to 9.57 μg/mL of free PTX). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the cellular uptake of coumarin encapsulated in the RGD-PEG-Chol modified liposome was increased for HUVEC cells. This work provides a reasonable, facile, and economic approach to prepare peptide-modified liposome materials with controllable performances and the obtained linear RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes might be attractive as a drug delivery system. PMID:24578646

  17. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  18. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  19. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  20. Paclitaxel conjugated Fe3O4@LaF3:Ce3+,Tb3+ nanoparticles as bifunctional targeting carriers for Cancer theranostics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, Rajendiran; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Karthikeyan, Subramani; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-02-01

    The bi-functional Chitosan functionalized magnetite doped luminescent rare earth nanoparticles (Fe3O4@LaF3: Ce3+,Tb3+/chi NPs) as a carrier of paclitaxel (PTX) drug was designed using a co-precipitation and facile direct precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a typical diameter of 19-37 nm respectively. They are water soluble, super paramagnetic and biocompatible, in which the amino groups on the nanoparticles surface are used for the conjugation with an anticancer drug, paclitaxel. The nature of PTX binding with Fe3O4@LaF3: Ce3+,Tb3+/chi nanoparticles were studied using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer and scanning electron micrograph. The nature of interactions between PTX and Fe3O4@LaF3: Ce3+,Tb3+/chi NPs due to complex formation were conceded out by various spectroscopic methods viz., UV-visible, steady state and excited state fluorescence spectroscopy. The photo-physical characterization reveals that the adsorption and release of PTX from Fe3O4@LaF3:Tb3+/chi nanoparticles is quicker when compared with other nanoparticles and also confirms that this may be due to the hydrogen bond formation between the hydroxyl group of drug and amino group of nanoparticles respectively. The maximum loading capacity and entrapment efficiency of 83.69% and 80.51% were attained at a ratio of 5:8 of PTX and Fe3O4@LaF3: Ce3+,Tb3+/chi NPs respectively. In addition with that, antitumoral activity study of PTX conjugated Fe3O4@LaF3:Tb3+/chi nanoparticles exhibits increased cytotoxic effects on A549 lung cancer cell lines than that of unconjugated PTX.

  1. Characterization of Magnetic Viral Complexes for Targeted Delivery in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Almstätter, Isabella; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Settles, Marcus; Altomonte, Jennifer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Ebert, Oliver; Plank, Christian; Braren, Rickmer

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising new agents in cancer therapy. Success of tumor lysis is often hampered by low intra-tumoral titers due to a strong anti-viral host immune response and insufficient tumor targeting. Previous work on the co-assembly of oncolytic virus particles (VPs) with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was shown to provide shielding from inactivating immune response and improve targeting by external field gradients. In addition, MNPs are detected by magnet resonance imaging (MRI) enabling non-invasive therapy monitoring. In this study two selected core-shell type iron oxide MNPs were assembled with adenovirus (Ad) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The selected MNPs were characterized by high r2 and r2* relaxivities and thus could be quantified non-invasively by 1.5 and 3.0 tesla MRI with a detection limit below 0.001 mM iron in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Assembly and cell internalization of MNP-VP complexes resulted in 81 - 97 % reduction of r2 and 35 - 82 % increase of r2* compared to free MNPs. The relaxivity changes could be attributed to the clusterization of particles and complexes shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a proof-of-principle study the non-invasive detection of MNP-VPs by MRI was shown in vivo in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma model. In conclusion, MNP assembly and compartmentalization have a major impact on relaxivities, therefore calibration measurements are required for the correct quantification in biodistribution studies. Furthermore, our study provides first evidence of the in vivo applicability of selected MNP-VPs in cancer therapy. PMID:25897333

  2. RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes for brain targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Kumari, Lakshmi; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Bharti, Shreekant; Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel (DTX) and quantum dots (QDs) for brain cancer imaging and therapy. RGD conjugated TPGS (RGD-TPGS) was synthesized and conjugation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The theranostic liposomes were prepared by the solvent injection method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release study. Biocompatibility and safety of theranostic liposomes were studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study and histopathology of brain. In-vivo study was performed for determination of brain theranostic effects in comparison with marketed formulation (Docel™) and free QDs. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found in between 100 and 200nm. About 70% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from RGD-TPGS decorated liposomes was sustained for more than 72h with 80% of drug release. The in-vivo results demonstrated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes were 6.47- and 6.98-fold more effective than Docel™ after 2h and 4h treatments, respectively. Further, RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes has reduced ROS generation effectively, and did not show any signs of brain damage or edema in brain histopathology. The results of this study have indicated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes are promising carrier for brain theranostics.

  3. Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Pavitra

    CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

  4. Enhanced Targeted Delivery of Cyclodextrin-Based Supermolecules by Core-Shell Nanocapsules for Magnetothermal Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chieh; Fang, Jen-Hung; Lin, Chien-Ting; Sung, Shou-Yuan; Su, Yu-Lin; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2016-09-01

    In this study, double-emulsion capsules (DECs) capable of concealing drug-incorporated targeted-supermolecules are developed to achieve "on-demand" supermolecule release and enhanced sequential targeting for magneto-chemotherapy. These water-in-oil-in-water DECs less than 200 nm in diameter are synthesized using a single component of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) polymer and the magnetic nanoparticles, which are capable of encapsulating large quantities of targeted supermolecules composed of palitaxel-incorporated beta-cyclodextrin decorated by hyaluronic acid (HA, a CD44-targeting ligand) in the watery core. The release profiles (slow, sustained and burst release) of the targeted supermolecules can be directly controlled by regulating the high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) and polymer conformation without sacrificing the targeting ability. Through an intravenous injection, the positive targeting of the supermolecules exhibited a 20-fold increase in tumor accumulation via the passive targeting and delivery of DECs followed by positive targeting of the supermolecules. Moreover, this dual-targeting drug-incorporated supermolecular delivery vehicle at the tumor site combined with magneto-thermal therapy suppressed the cancer growth more efficiently than treatment with either drug or supermolecule alone. PMID:27328404

  5. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-01

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis

  6. Biodegradable poly(amine-co-ester) terpolymers for targeted gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangbing; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christopher J.; Patel, Toral R.; Weller, Caroline E.; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Many synthetic polycationic vectors for non-viral gene delivery show high efficiency in vitro, but their usually excessive charge density makes them toxic for in vivo applications. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of high molecular weight terpolymers with low charge density, and show that they exhibit efficient gene delivery, some surpassing the efficiency of the commercial transfection reagents Polyethylenimine and Lipofectamine 2000. The terpolymers were synthesized via enzyme-catalyzed copolymerization of lactone with dialkyl diester and amino diol, and their hydrophobicity adjusted by varying the lactone content and by selecting a lactone comonomer of specific ring size. Targeted delivery of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL gene to tumour xenografts by one of the terpolymers results in significant inhibition of tumour growth, with minimal toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that the gene delivery ability of the terpolymers stems from their high molecular weight and increased hydrophobicity, which compensates for their low charge density.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  8. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  9. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  10. Tetanus toxin C fragment conjugated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Seth A.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Gu, Frank X.; Schulze, Martin P.; Brown, Robert H.; Langer, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery is often facilitated by specific conjugation of functional targeting molecules to the nanoparticle surface. We compared different biotin binding proteins (avidin, streptavidin, or neutravidin) as crosslinkers to conjugate proteins to biodegradable nanoparticles prepared from PLGA-PEG-biotin polymers. Avidin gave the highest levels of overall protein conjugation, whereas neutravidin minimized protein non-specific binding to the polymer. The tetanus toxin C fragment (TTC), which is efficiently retrogradely transported in neurons and binds to neurons with high specificity and affinity, retained the ability to bind to neuroblastoma cells following amine group modifications. TTC was conjugated to nanoparticles using neutravidin, and the resulting nanoparticles were shown to selectively target neuroblastoma cells in vitro. TTC-conjugated nanoparticles have the potential to serve as drug delivery vehicles targeted to the central nervous system. PMID:17854886

  11. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  12. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  13. Overcoming transport barriers for interstitial-, lymphatic-, and lymph node-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Susan N.; Schudel, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Despite drug formulation improving circulation times and targeting, efficacy is stymied by inadequate penetration into and retention within target tissues. This review highlights the barriers restricting delivery to the connective tissue interstitium, lymphatics, and lymph nodes as well as advances in engineering drug carriers to overcome these delivery challenges. Three-dimensional tissue physiology is discussed in the context of providing material design principles for delivery to these tissues; in particular the influence of interstitial and lymphatic flows as well as differential permeabilities of the blood and lymphatic capillaries. Key examples of materials with different characteristics developed to overcome these transport barriers are discussed as well as potential areas for further development. PMID:25745594

  14. Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

    2014-01-01

    Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system.

  15. Synchronized delivery of DMLC intensity modulated radiation therapy for stationary and moving targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech

    2005-06-15

    When delivering intensity modulated treatments the 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effect is a concern that should not be ignored. Algorithms aimed at removing the tongue-and-groove underdosage have been investigated in the past for irradiation of stationary targets. This paper is devoted to algorithms that remove tongue and grove effect for stationary and moving targets. To this end this paper develops original mid-time based algorithms for leaf synchronization. These algorithms exhibit a few additional advantageous properties for DMLC IMRT delivery beyond the removal of tongue-and-grove underdosage. In particular, they safeguard the minimization of time of delivery (for mid-time synchronized algorithms). Moreover, they avoid iterative procedures for synchronization of delivery for multiple pairs of leaves.

  16. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  17. Delivery strategies and potential targets for siRNA in major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has gained attention as a potential therapeutic reagent due to its ability to inhibit specific genes in many genetic diseases. For many years, studies of siRNA have progressively advanced toward novel treatment strategies against cancer. Cancer is caused by various mutations in hundreds of genes including both proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In order to develop siRNAs as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, delivery strategies for siRNA must be carefully designed and potential gene targets carefully selected for optimal anti-cancer effects. In this review, various modifications and delivery strategies for siRNA delivery are discussed. In addition, we present current thinking on target gene selection in major tumor types. PMID:27259398

  18. Towards erythropoietin equations that estimate oxygen delivery rather than static hemoglobin targets.

    PubMed

    Diskin, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Although we have known since the 19th century that oxygen tension affects erythrocyte production, we have only recently begun to understand many subtleties of erythropoietin physiology. The unanticipated increase in mortality associated with erythropoietin use found in recent randomized studies is prompting a reassessment of static hemoglobin targets. Hemoglobin levels in dialysis patients do not correlate with endogenous erythropoietin production and may be related to differences in oxygen delivery resulting from shifts in the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. The time may have arrived to develop more physiologic targets such as oxygen delivery that would mimic the natural response to hypoxia. There are several equations that already exist that can compensate for the effects of the concentration of inorganic and organic phosphates as well as pH, carbon dioxide, and temperature on the delivery of oxygen. However, since the shape and dispersion of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve may actually change in different disease states, more work is needed.

  19. Development of a Targeted Gene-Delivery System Using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng; Kao, Ming-Ching

    2016-01-01

    A gene-delivery system based on microbes is useful for development of targeted gene therapy of non-phagocytic cancer cells. Here, the feasibility of the delivery system is illustrated by targeted delivery of a transgene (i.e., eukaryotic GFP) by Escherichia coli to HER2/neu-positive cancer cells. An E. coli strain was engineered with surface display of the anti-HER2/neu affibody. To release the gene cargo, a programmed lysis system based on phage ϕX174 gene E was introduced into the E. coli strain. As a result, 3 % of HER2/neu-positive cells that were infected with engineered E. coli were able to express the GFP. PMID:26846805

  20. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction.

  1. Chimeric nucleolin aptamer with survivin DNAzyme for cancer cell targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Akilandeswari, Balachandran; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-04-25

    A chimeric aptamer-DNAzyme conjugate was generated for the first time using a nucleolin aptamer (NCL-APT) and survivin Dz (Sur_Dz) and exhibited the targeted killing of cancer cells. This proof of concept of using an aptamer for the delivery of DNAzyme can be applied to other cancer types to target survivin in cancer cells in a specific manner. PMID:25797393

  2. Tumor homing cell penetrating peptide decorated nanoparticles used for enhancing tumor targeting delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin

    2015-01-15

    Specific targeting ability and good tissue penetration are two critical requirements for tumor targeted delivery systems. Systematical selected peptides from a library may meet these two requirements. RLW was such a cell penetrating peptide that could specifically target to non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549). In this study, RLW was linked onto nanoparticles (RNPs) and then the RNPs were used for lung cancer targeting delivery. A traditional cell penetrating peptide, R8 (RRRRRRRR), was used as control. In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that modification with RLW specifically enhanced the uptake by A549 cells rather than human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while modification with R8 increased the uptake by both cells. Furthermore, the modification with RLW specifically elevated the penetration into A549 tumor spheroids rather than glioma cell (U87, used as in vivo control) spheroids. And the in vivo imaging further demonstrated RNPs could target to A549 xenografts rather than U87 xenografts. Importantly, the distribution of RNPs in normal organs was approximately the same as that of unmodified nanoparticles. However, R8 modified nanoparticles elevated the distribution in almost all the tissues. These results demonstrated that RLW was superior in A549 tumor targeted delivery. After loaded with docetaxel, an anti-microtube agent, different formulations could effectively induce the A549 cell apoptosis, and inhibit the growth of A549 spheroids in vitro. While in vivo, RNPs displayed the best antitumor effect. The tumor volume was significantly lower than other groups, which was only 33.3% as that of saline group. In conclusion, in vitro RLW could specifically target to A549 cells and enhance the cytotoxicity of docetaxel. In vivo, RLW could significantly enhance the A549 xenografts targeting delivery and led to improved antitumor effect.

  3. Systemic delivery of blood-brain barrier-targeted polymeric nanoparticles enhances delivery to brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer NP systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All the NP preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One NP produced significantly higher brain uptake (∼0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad NPs provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing NP transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects.

  4. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  5. Targeted systemic mesenchymal stem cell delivery using hyaluronate - wheat germ agglutinin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seop; Kong, Won Ho; Kim, Hyemin; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-11-01

    A variety of receptors for hyaluronate (HA), a natural linear polysaccharide, were found in the body, which have been exploited as target sites for HA-based drug delivery systems. In this work, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were surface-modified with HA - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugate for targeted systemic delivery of MSCs to the liver. WGA was conjugated to HA by coupling reaction between aldehyde-modified HA and amine group of WGA. The conjugation of WGA to HA was corroborated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the successful surface modification of MSCs with HA-WGA conjugate was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The synthesized HA-WGA conjugate could be incorporated onto the cellular membrane by agglutinating the cell-associated carbohydrates. Fluorescent imaging for in vivo biodistribution visualized the targeted delivery of the HA-WGA/MSC complex to the liver after intravenous injection. This new strategy for targeted delivery of MSCs using HA-WGA conjugate might be successfully exploited for various regenerative medicines including cell therapy. PMID:27569867

  6. Nanoparticles Effectively Target Rapamycin Delivery to Sites of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Takuro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Miura, Yutaka; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Several drugs targeting the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm have shown efficacy in model systems but not in clinical trials, potentially owing to the lack of targeted drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel drug delivery system using nanoparticles to target the disrupted aortic aneurysm micro-structure. We generated poly(ethylene glycol)-shelled nanoparticles incorporating rapamycin that exhibited uniform diameter and long-term stability. When injected intravenously into a rat model in which abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had been induced by infusing elastase, labeled rapamycin nanoparticles specifically accumulated in the AAA. Microscopic analysis revealed that rapamycin nanoparticles were mainly distributed in the media and adventitia where the wall structures were damaged. Co-localization of rapamycin nanoparticles with macrophages was also noted. Rapamycin nanoparticles injected during the process of AAA formation evinced significant suppression of AAA formation and mural inflammation at 7 days after elastase infusion, as compared with rapamycin treatment alone. Correspondingly, the activities of matrix metalloproteinases and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed by rapamycin nanoparticle treatment. Our findings suggest that the nanoparticle-based delivery system achieves specific delivery of rapamycin to the rat AAA and might contribute to establishing a drug therapy approach targeting aortic aneurysm. PMID:27336852

  7. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  8. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

  9. A new liposome-based gene delivery system targeting lung epithelial cells using endothelin antagonist.

    PubMed

    Allon, Nahum; Saxena, Ashima; Chambers, Carolyn; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2012-06-10

    We formulated a new gene delivery system based on targeted liposomes. The efficacy of the delivery system was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo models. The targeting moiety consists of a high-affinity 7-amino-acid peptide, covalently and evenly conjugated to the liposome surface. The targeting peptide acts as an endothelin antagonist, and accelerates liposome binding and internalization. It is devoid of other biological activity. Liposomes with high phosphatidyl serine (PS) were specially formulated to help their fusion with the endosomal membrane at low pH and enable release of the liposome payload into the cytoplasm. A DNA payload, pre-compressed by protamine, was encapsulated into the liposomes, which directed the plasmid into the cell's nucleus. Upon exposure to epithelial cells, binding of the liposomes occurred within 5-10 min, followed by facilitated internalization of the complex. Endosomal escape was complete within 30 min, followed by DNA accumulation in the nucleus 2h post-transfection. A549 lung epithelial cells transfected with plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes expressed significantly more protein than those transfected with plasmid complexed with Lipofectamine. The intra-tracheal instillation of plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes into rat lungs resulted in the expression of GFP in bronchioles and alveoli within 5 days. These results suggest that this delivery system has great potential in targeting genes to lungs.

  10. Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

  11. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  12. EGFR targeted thermosensitive liposomes: A novel multifunctional platform for simultaneous tumor targeted and stimulus responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Azadeh; Zalba, Sara; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Dadashzadeh, Simin; Koning, Gerben A

    2016-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to design thermosensitive liposomes (TSL), functionalized with anti-EGFR ligands for targeted delivery and localized triggered release of chemotherapy. For targeting, EGFR specific peptide (GE11) and Fab' fragments of cetuximab were used and the effect of ligand density on in vitro tumor targeting was investigated. Ligand conjugation did not significantly change the physicochemical characteristics of liposomes. Fab'-decorated TSL (Fab'-TSL) can specifically and more efficiently bind to the EGFR overexpressed cancer cells as compared to GE11 modified TSL. Calcein labeled Fab'-TSL showed adequate stability at 37°C in serum (<4% calcein released after 1h) and a temperature dependent release at above 40°C. FACS analysis and live cell imaging showed efficient and EGFR mediated cellular association as well as dramatic intracellular cargo release upon hyperthermia. Fab'-conjugation and hyperthermia induced enhanced tumor cell cytotoxicity of doxorubicin loaded TSL. The relative cytotoxicity of Fab'-TSL was also correlated to EGFR density on the tumor cells. These results suggest that Fab'-TSL showed great potential for combinational targeted and triggered release drug delivery. PMID:27434152

  13. Light-controlled active release of photocaged ciprofloxacin for lipopolysaccharide-targeted drug delivery using dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Shengzhuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Tang, Kenny; Gam, Kristina; Isham, Danielle; Murat, Claire; Sun, Rachel; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2016-08-16

    We report an active delivery mechanism targeted specifically to Gram(-) bacteria based on the photochemical release of photocaged ciprofloxacin carried by a cell wall-targeted dendrimer nanoconjugate. PMID:27476878

  14. Membrane Fusion Mediated Targeted Cytosolic Drug Delivery Through scFv Engineered Sendai Viral Envelopes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Mani, P; Pratheesh, P; Chandra, S; Jeyakkodi, M; Chattopadhyay, P; Sarkar, D P; Sinha, S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody targeted cytoplasmic delivery of drugs is difficult to achieve as antigen-antibody interaction results in the payload being directed to the endosomal compartment. However, Sendai viral envelopes can bring about cytoplasmic delivery due to F-protein mediated membrane fusion. In this study we have generated and fused a recombinant scFv directed to the onco-fetal antigen, the Placental isozyme of Alkaline Phosphatase (PAP) with the trans-membrane and part of the cytoplasmic domain of the Sendai F protein (F(TMC)). Reconstituted virosomes, having both the fusion protein as well as the native F-protein were able to specifically bind and deliver drugs to PAP expressing cells. About 75% of the delivery was cytoplasmic in nature. Hence, this immuno-virosome, which is devoid of the comparatively more toxic HN protein, has the novel ability to combine specific antibody mediated targeting with cytoplasmic delivery. The scFv ensured specific binding to PAP expressing cells, without cross reacting with the other isozymes of alkaline phosphatase. The advantages of cytoplasmic delivery would include reduced degradation and lowered immunogenicity of the payload and carrier. The ubiquitous expression of PAP on a variety of cancers like seminoma, choriocarcinoma, cervical and breast cancers also suggests its potential usefulness in a number of malignancies.

  15. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-28

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.

  16. Targeted in vivo delivery of siRNA and an endosome-releasing agent to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Magdolna G; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Lewis, David L; Wooddell, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    The discoveries of RNA interference (RNAi) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have provided the opportunity to treat diseases in a fundamentally new way: by co-opting a natural process to inhibit gene expression at the mRNA level. Given that siRNAs must interact with the cells' natural RNAi machinery in order to exert their silencing effect, one of the most fundamental requirements for their use is efficient delivery to the desired cell type and, specifically, into the cytoplasm of those cells. Numerous research efforts involving the testing of a large number of delivery approaches using various carrier molecules and inventing several distinct formulation technologies during the past decade illustrate the difficulty and complexity of this task. We have developed synthetic polymer formulations for in vivo siRNA delivery named Dynamic PolyConjugates™ (DPCs) that are designed to mimic the features viruses possess for efficient delivery of their nucleic acids. These include small size, long half-life in circulation, capability of displaying distinct host cell tropism, efficient receptor binding and cell entry, disassembly in the endosome and subsequent release of the nucleic acid cargo to the cytoplasm. Here we present an example of this delivery platform composed of a hepatocyte-targeted endosome-releasing agent and a cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). This delivery platform forms the basis of ARC-520, an siRNA-based therapeutic for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this chapter, we provide a general overview of the steps in developing ARC-520 and detailed protocols for two critical stages of the discovery process: (1) verifying targeted in vivo delivery to hepatocytes and (2) evaluating in vivo drug efficacy using a mouse model of chronic HBV infection.

  17. [Targeting mitochondria: innovation from mitochondrial drug delivery system (DDS) to mitochondrial medicine].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Effective medical therapies for such diseases will ultimately require the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to mitochondria. This will likely be achieved through innovations in the areas of the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. Mitochondrial delivery systems for a variety of cargoes have been repored to date. However, only a limited number of approaches are available for delivering macromolecules directly to mitochondria. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule in conjunction with analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, we were able to confirm the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, we reported that the Dual Function MITO-Porter (DF-MITO-Porter) could efficiently deliver cargo to mitochondria, through endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. Here, We will present our findings on the development of our mitochondrial drug delivery system, and discuss our attempts regarding mitochondrial gene delivery and therapy. Finally, We will discuss the potential use of mitochondrial drug delivery systems in mitochondrial medicine.

  18. Bacterial ghosts as a novel advanced targeting system for drug and DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Susanne; Stiedl, Thomas; Kudela, Pavol; Bizik, Jozef; Al Laham, Firas; Lubitz, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Although there are powerful drugs against infectious diseases and cancer on the market, delivery systems are needed to decrease serious toxic and noncurative side effects. In order to enhance compliance, several delivery systems such as polymeric micro- and nanoparticles, liposomal systems and erythrocyte ghosts have been developed. Bacterial ghosts representing novel advanced delivery and targeting vehicles suitable for the delivery of hydrophobic or water-soluble drugs, are the main focus of this review. They are useful nonliving carriers, as they can carry different active substances in more than one cellular location separately and simultaneously. Bacterial ghosts combine excellent natural or engineered adhesion properties with versatile carrier functions for drugs, proteins and DNA plasmids or DNA minicircles. The simplicity of both bacterial ghost production and packaging of drugs and/or DNA makes them particularly suitable for the use as a delivery system. Further advantages of bacterial ghost delivery vehicles include high bioavailability and a long shelf life without the need of cold-chain storage due to the possibility to freeze-dry the material. PMID:16370937

  19. Bioresponsive hyaluronic acid-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Li, Zhenhua; Lin, Youhui; Yin, Meili; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, we present a facile strategy to synthesize hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSP) for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery, in which the anchored HA polysaccharides not only act as capping agents but also as targeting ligands without the need of additional modification. The nanoconjugates possess many attractive features including chemical simplicity, high colloidal stability, good biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and precise cargo release, making them promising agents for biomedical applications. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the nanoconjugates are shown to release cargoes from the interior pores of MSPs upon HA degradation in response to hyaluronidase-1 (Hyal-1). Moreover, after receptor-mediated endocytosis into cancer cells, the anchored HA was degraded into small fragments, facilitating the release of drugs to kill the cancer cells. Overall, we envision that this system might open the door to a new generation of carrier system for site-selective, controlled-release delivery of anticancer drugs.

  20. Targeted delivery by smart capsules for controlling two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David; Harvard Weitzgroup Team

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is significantly influenced by the physical properties of the fluids and the geometry of the medium. We develop a variety of smart microcapsules that can deliver and release specific substances to the target location in the porous medium, and therefore change the fluid property or medium geometry at certain locations. In this talk, I will present two types of smart capsules for targeted surfactant delivery to the vicinity of oil-water interface and targeted microgel delivery for improving the homogeneity of the porous medium, respectively. We further prove the concept by monitoring the capsule location and the fluid structure in the porous media by micro-CT and confocal microscopy. This technique not only is of particular importance to the relevant industry applications especially in the oil industry but also opens a new window to study the mechanism of two-phase flow in porous media. Advanced Energy Consortium BEG08-027.

  1. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  2. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  3. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  4. MSCs: Delivery Routes and Engraftment, Cell-Targeting Strategies, and Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Dennis, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being widely investigated both in the lab and in clinical trials for multiple disease states. The differentiation, trophic, and immunomodulatory characteristics of MSCs contribute to their therapeutic effects. Another often overlooked factor related to efficacy is the degree of engraftment. When reported, engraftment is generally low and transient in nature. MSC delivery methods should be tailored to the lesion being treated, which may be local or systemic, and customized to the mechanism of action of the MSCs, which can also be local or systemic. Engraftment efficiency is enhanced by using intra-arterial delivery instead of intravenous delivery, thus avoiding the “first-pass” accumulation of MSCs in the lung. Several methodologies to target MSCs to specific organs are being developed. These cell targeting methodologies focus on the modification of cell surface molecules through chemical, genetic, and coating techniques to promote selective adherence to particular organs or tissues. Future improvements in targeting and delivery methodologies to improve engraftment are expected to improve therapeutic results, extend the duration of efficacy, and reduce the effective (MSC) therapeutic dose. PMID:24000286

  5. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units.

  6. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  7. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  8. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  9. Brain tumor-targeted delivery and therapy by focused ultrasound introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Mao, Kai-Li; Tian, Fu-Rong; Yang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Pian-Pian; Xu, Jie; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Li, Wen-Feng; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-02-01

    Brain tumor lacks effective delivery system for treatment. Focused ultrasound (FUS) can reversibly open BBB without impacts on normal tissues. As a potential drug carrier, cationic liposomes (CLs) have the ability to passively accumulate in tumor tissues for their positive charge. In this study, FUS introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes (DOX-CLs) were applied to improve the efficiency of glioma-targeted delivery. Doxorubicin-loaded CLs (DOX-CLs) and quantum dot-loaded cationic liposomes (QD-CLs) were prepared using extrusion technology, and their characterizations were evaluated. With the advantage of QDs in tracing images, the glioma-targeted accumulation of FUS + CLs was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometer. Cell survival rate, tumor volume, animal survival time, and brain histology in C6 glioma model were investigated to evaluate the glioma-targeted delivery of FUS + DOX-CLs. DOX-CLs and QD-CLs had suitable nanoscale sizes and high entrapment efficiency. The combined strategy of FUS introduced CLs significantly increased the glioma-targeted accumulation for load drugs. FUS + DOX-CLs showed the strongest inhibition on glioma based on glioma cell in vitro and glioma model in vivo experiments. From MRI and histological analysis, FUS + DOX-CLs group strongly suppressed the glioma progression and extended the animal survival time to 81.2 days. Among all the DOX treatment groups, FUS + DOX-CLs group showed the best cell viability and highest level of tumor apoptosis and necrosis. Combining the advantages of BBB reversible opening by FUS and glioma-targeted binding by CLs, ultrasound introduced cationic liposomes could achieve glioma-targeted delivery, which might be developed as a potential strategy for future brain tumor therapy.

  10. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  11. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  12. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  13. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  14. Stathmin Potentiates Vinflunine and Inhibits Paclitaxel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  15. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  16. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  17. Non-polymeric nano-carriers in HIV/AIDS drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh; Jain, Narendra K

    2010-03-18

    Development of an effective drug delivery approach for the treatment of HIV/AIDS is a global challenge. The conventional drug delivery approaches including Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) have increased the life span of the HIV/AIDS patient. However, the eradication of HIV is still not possible with these approaches due to some limitations. Emergence of polymeric and non-polymeric nanotechnological approaches can be opportunistic in this direction. Polymeric carriers like, dendrimers and nanoparticles have been reported for the targeting of anti HIV drugs. The synthetic pathways as well polymeric framework create some hurdles in their successful formulation development as well as in the possible drug delivery approaches. In the present article, we have discussed the general physiological aspects of the infection along with the relevance of non-polymeric nanocarriers like liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), ethosomes, etc. in the treatment of this disastrous disease. PMID:19913579

  18. Vorinostat-polymer conjugate nanoparticles for Acid-responsive delivery and passive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Denis, Iza; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Gueugnon, Fabien; Pouliquen, Daniel; Pichavant, Loic; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    In vivo histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition by vorinostat under clinically acceptable dosing is limited by its poor pharmacokinetics properties. A new type of nontoxic pH-responsive delivery system has been synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, allowing for the selective distribution of vorinostat in mesothelioma tumors in vivo and subsequent histone reacetylation. The delivery system is synthesized by generic click chemistry, possesses native stealth properties for passive tumor targeting, and does not need additional chemistry for cellular internalization. Although vorinostat alone at 50 mg/kg in mice showed no effect, our new delivery system with 2 mg/kg vorinostat promoted histone reacetylation in tumors without side effects, demonstrating that our strategy improves the activity of this HDAC inihibitor in vivo. PMID:25333409

  19. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  20. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma.

  1. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150–250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  2. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  3. Prevention of nodal metastases in breast cancer following the lymphatic migration of paclitaxel-loaded expansile nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Gilmore, Denis M.; Zubris, Kimberly Ann V.; Xu, Xiaoyin; Catalano, Paul J.; Padera, Robert F.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2012-01-01

    Although breast cancer patients with localized disease exhibit an excellent long-term prognosis, up to 40% of patients treated with local resection alone may harbor occult nodal metastatic disease leading to increased locoregional recurrence and decreased survival. Given the potential for targeted drug delivery to result in more efficacious locoregional control with less morbidity, the current study assessed the ability of drug-loaded polymeric expansile nanoparticles (eNP) to migrate from the site of tumor to regional lymph nodes, locally deliver a chemotherapeutic payload, and prevent primary tumor growth as well as lymph node metastases. Expansile nanoparticles entered tumor cells and paclitaxel-loaded eNP (Pax-eNP) exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and significantly decreased tumor doubling time in vivo against human triple negative breast cancer in both microscopic and established murine breast cancer models. Furthermore, migration of Pax-eNP to axillary lymph nodes resulted in higher intranodal paclitaxel concentrations and a significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases. These findings demonstrate that lymphatic migration of drug-loaded eNP provides regionally targeted delivery of chemotherapy to both decrease local tumor growth and strategically prevent the development of nodal metastases within the regional tumor-draining lymph node basin. PMID:23228419

  4. Targeted Delivery of Immunotoxin by Antibody to Ganglioside GD3: A Novel Drug Delivery Route for Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres Demichelis, Vanina; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Iglesias-Bartolomé, Ramiro; Ruggiero, Fernando M.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids expressed on plasma membranes from nearly all vertebrate cells. The expression of ganglioside GD3, which plays essential roles in normal brain development, decreases in adults but is up regulated in neuroectodermal and epithelial derived cancers. R24 antibody, directed against ganglioside GD3, is a validated tumor target which is specifically endocytosed and accumulated in endosomes. Here, we exploit the internalization feature of the R24 antibody for the selective delivery of saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, to GD3-expressing cells [human (SK-Mel-28) and mouse (B16) melanoma cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells]. This immunotoxin showed a specific cytotoxicity on tumor cells grew on 2D monolayers, which was further evident by the lack of any effect on GD3-negative cells. To estimate the potential antitumor activity of R24-saporin complex, we also evaluated the effect of the immunotoxin on the clonogenic growth of SK-Mel-28 and CHO-K1GD3+ cells cultured in attachment-free conditions. A drastic growth inhibition (>80–90%) of the cell colonies was reached after 3 days of immunotoxin treatment. By the contrary, colonies continue to growth at the same concentration of the immuntoxin, but in the absence of R24 antibody, or in the absence of both immunotoxin and R24, undoubtedly indicating the specificity of the effect observed. Thus, the ganglioside GD3 emerge as a novel and attractive class of cell surface molecule for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents and, therefore, provides a rationale for future therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:23383146

  5. Targeted Delivery of Antiglaucoma Drugs to the Supraciliary Space Using Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that highly targeted delivery of antiglaucoma drugs to the supraciliary space by using a hollow microneedle allows dramatic dose sparing of the drug compared to topical eye drops. The supraciliary space is the most anterior portion of the suprachoroidal space, located below the sclera and above the choroid and ciliary body. Methods. A single, hollow 33-gauge microneedle, 700 to 800 μm in length, was inserted into the sclera and used to infuse antiglaucoma drugs into the supraciliary space of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 3–6 per group). Sulprostone, a prostaglandin analog, and brimonidine, an α2-adrenergic agonist, were delivered via supraciliary and topical administration at various doses. The drugs were delivered unilaterally, and intraocular pressure (IOP) of both eyes was measured by rebound tonometry for 9 hours after injection to assess the pharmacodynamic responses. To assess safety of the supraciliary injection, IOP change immediately after intravitreal and supraciliary injection were compared. Results. Supraciliary delivery of both sulprostone and brimonidine reduced IOP by as much as 3 mm Hg bilaterally in a dose-related response; comparison with topical administration at the conventional human dose showed approximately 100-fold dose sparing by supraciliary injection for both drugs. A safety study showed that the kinetics of IOP elevation immediately after supraciliary and intravitreal injection of placebo formulations were similar. Conclusions. This study introduced the use of targeted drug delivery to the supraciliary space by using a microneedle and demonstrated dramatic dose sparing of antiglaucoma therapeutic agents compared to topical eye drops. Targeted delivery in this way can increase safety by reducing side effects and could allow a single injection to contain enough drug for long-term sustained delivery. PMID:25212782

  6. Angiopep2-functionalized polymersomes for targeted doxorubicin delivery to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Wu, Dalin; Palivan, Cornelia G; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-09-25

    A targeted drug delivery nanosystem for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on polymersomes (Ps) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-PMOXA) diblock copolymers was developed to evaluate their potential to actively target brain cancer cells and deliver anticancer drugs. Angiopep2 was conjugated to the surface of preformed Ps to target the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 that are overexpressed in blood brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells. The conjugation efficiency yield for angiopep2 was estimated to be 24%. The angiopep2-functionalized Ps showed no cellular toxicity after 24h and enhanced the cellular uptake around 5 times more in U87MG glioblastoma cells compared to the non-targeted Ps. The encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX) in Ps was 13% by co-solvent method, compared to a film rehydration method (4%). The release profiles of the DOX from Ps showed a release of 42% at pH 5.5 and 40% at pH 7.4 after 24h, indicating that Ps can efficiently retain the DOX with a slow release rate. Furthermore, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of DOX-loaded Ps-Angiopep2 showed enhanced toxicity to U87MG glioblastoma cells, compared to non-targeted Ps. Overall, our in vitro results suggested that angiopep2-conjugated Ps can be used as nanocarriers for efficient targeted DOX delivery to glioblastoma cells.

  7. Targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Wells, Jack A; Kyrtatos, Panagiotis G; Price, Anthony N; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-07-01

    The success of cell therapies depends on the ability to deliver the cells to the site of injury. Targeted magnetic cell delivery is an emergent technique for localised cell transplantation therapy. The use of permanent magnets limits such a treatment to organs close to the body surface or an implanted magnetic source. A possible alternative method for magnetic cell delivery is magnetic resonance targeting (MRT), which uses magnetic field gradients inherent to all magnetic resonance imaging system, to steer ferromagnetic particles to their target region. In this study we have assessed the feasibility of such an approach for cell targeting, using a range of flow rates and different super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in a vascular bifurcation phantom. Using MRT we have demonstrated that 75% of labelled cells could be guided within the vascular bifurcation. Furthermore we have demonstrated the ability to image the labelled cells before and after magnetic targeting, which may enable interactive manipulation and assessment of the distribution of cellular therapy. This is the first demonstration of cellular MRT and these initial findings support the potential value of MRT for improved targeting of intravascular cell therapies.

  8. Angiopep2-functionalized polymersomes for targeted doxorubicin delivery to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Wu, Dalin; Palivan, Cornelia G; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-09-25

    A targeted drug delivery nanosystem for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on polymersomes (Ps) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-PMOXA) diblock copolymers was developed to evaluate their potential to actively target brain cancer cells and deliver anticancer drugs. Angiopep2 was conjugated to the surface of preformed Ps to target the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 that are overexpressed in blood brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells. The conjugation efficiency yield for angiopep2 was estimated to be 24%. The angiopep2-functionalized Ps showed no cellular toxicity after 24h and enhanced the cellular uptake around 5 times more in U87MG glioblastoma cells compared to the non-targeted Ps. The encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX) in Ps was 13% by co-solvent method, compared to a film rehydration method (4%). The release profiles of the DOX from Ps showed a release of 42% at pH 5.5 and 40% at pH 7.4 after 24h, indicating that Ps can efficiently retain the DOX with a slow release rate. Furthermore, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of DOX-loaded Ps-Angiopep2 showed enhanced toxicity to U87MG glioblastoma cells, compared to non-targeted Ps. Overall, our in vitro results suggested that angiopep2-conjugated Ps can be used as nanocarriers for efficient targeted DOX delivery to glioblastoma cells. PMID:27484836

  9. Targeted drug delivery into reversibly injured myocardium with silica nanoparticles: surface functionalization, natural biodistribution, and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael M; Korolev, Dmitry V; Sonin, Dmitry L; Postnov, Viktor N; Papayan, Garry V; Uskov, Ivan S; Belozertseva, Anastasia V; Shlyakhto, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with ischemic heart disease can be significantly improved with the implementation of targeted drug delivery into the ischemic myocardium. In this paper, we present our original findings relevant to the problem of therapeutic heart targeting with use of nanoparticles. Experimental approaches included fabrication of carbon and silica nanoparticles, their characterization and surface modification. The acute hemodynamic effects of nanoparticle formulation as well as nanoparticle biodistribution were studied in male Wistar rats. Carbon and silica nanoparticles are nontoxic materials that can be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. Concepts of passive and active targeting can be applied to the development of targeted drug delivery to the ischemic myocardial cells. Provided that ischemic heart-targeted drug delivery can be proved to be safe and efficient, the results of this research may contribute to the development of new technologies in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20463939

  10. Surface-engineered targeted PPI dendrimer for efficient intracellular and intratumoral siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Kirkpatrick, Paul; Pandya, Ipsit; Savla, Ronak; Pozharov, Vitaly P; He, Huixin; Minko, Tamara

    2009-12-16

    Low penetration ability of Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) through the cellular plasma membrane combined with its limited stability in blood, limits the effectiveness of the systemic delivery of siRNA. In order to overcome such difficulties, we constructed a nanocarrier-based delivery system by taking advantage of the lessons learned from the problems in the delivery of DNA. In the present study, siRNA nanoparticles were first formulated with Poly(Propyleneimine) (PPI) dendrimers. To provide lateral and steric stability to withstand the aggressive environment in the blood stream, the formed siRNA nanoparticles were caged with a dithiol containing cross-linker molecules followed by coating them with Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) polymer. A synthetic analog of Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) peptide was conjugated to the distal end of PEG polymer to direct the siRNA nanoparticles specifically to the cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that this layer-by-layer modification and targeting approach confers the siRNA nanoparticles stability in plasma and intracellular bioavailability, provides for their specific uptake by tumor cells, accumulation of siRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells, and efficient gene silencing. In addition, in vivo body distribution data confirmed high specificity of the proposed targeting delivery approach which created the basis for the prevention of adverse side effects of the treatment on healthy organs.

  11. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size <20nm, negative zeta potential and good stability. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ME revealed high and rapid ex vivo permeation of drugs through sheep nasal mucosa. Intranasal DHA ME resulted in high brain concentrations and 10.76 (ABZ-SO) and 3.24 (CUR) fold enhancement in brain area-under-the-curve (AUC) compared to intravenous DHA MEs at the same dose. Direct nose to brain transport (DTP) of >95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery.

  12. Surface-Engineered Targeted PPI Dendrimer for Efficient Intracellular and Intratumoral siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Kirkpatrick, Paul; Pandya, Ipsit; Savla, Ronak; Pozharov, Vitaly P.; He, Huixin; Minko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Low penetration ability of Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) through the cellular plasma membrane combined with its limited stability in blood, limits the effectiveness of the systemic delivery of siRNA. In order to overcome such difficulties, we constructed a nanocarrier-based delivery system by taking advantage of the lessons learned from the problems in the delivery of DNA. In the present study, siRNA nanoparticles were first formulated with Poly(Propyleneimine) (PPI) dendrimers. To provide lateral and steric stability to withstand the aggressive environment in the blood stream, the formed siRNA nanoparticles were caged with a dithiol containing cross-linker molecules followed by coating them with Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) polymer. A synthetic analog of Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) peptide was conjugated to the distal end of PEG polymer to direct the siRNA nanoparticles specifically to the cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that this layer-by-layer modification and targeting approach confers the siRNA nanoparticles stability in plasma and intracellular bioavailability, provides for their specific uptake by tumor cells, accumulation of siRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells, and efficient gene silencing. In addition, in vivo body distribution data confirmed high specificity of the proposed targeting delivery approach which created the basis for the prevention of adverse side effects of the treatment on healthy organs. PMID:19567257

  13. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  14. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Levy, Oren; Phillips, Joseph P.; Stratton, Tara; Triana, Brian; Ruiz, Juan P.; Gu, Fangqi; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-α & IFN-γ) compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential. PMID:24205131

  15. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors