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Sample records for tce perchloroethylene pce

  1. Biofiltration for removal of PCE and TCE vapors from contaminated air

    SciTech Connect

    Devinny, J.S.; Webster, T.S.; Torres, E.

    1995-12-31

    Bench scale biofilters (vapor phase bioreactors) treating a mixture of gases have removed perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene from the air. In a biofilter using carbon as the support medium, an initial period of adsorptive removal was followed by biological removal of 61% of the PCE and 48% of the TCE. In a compost biofilter, removals after the initial period were 40% for PCE and 49% for TCE. The reactors were dominantly aerobic. Because aerobic degradation of PCE has not been observed, it is believed that degradation occurred by reductive dechlorination in anaerobic zones within the particles of the support medium. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Insights into dechlorination of PCE and TCE from carbon isotope fractionation by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lesage, S.; Brown, S.

    2003-04-01

    Reductive dechlorination of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by vitamin B12 is both a potential remediation technique and an analogue of the microbial reductive dechlorination reaction. Stable carbon isotopic analysis, an effective and powerful tool for the investigation and monitoring of contaminant remediation, was used to characterize the isotopic effects of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE by vitamin B12 in laboratory microcosms. 10 mg/L vitamin B12 degraded greater than 90% of an initial concentration of PCE of 20 mg/L. TCE, the primary product of PCE degradation, accounted for between 64 - 72% of the PCE degraded. In experiments with TCE, 147 mg/L vitamin B12 degraded greater than 90% of an initial concentration of TCE of 20 mg/L. Cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), the primary product of TCE degradation, accounted for between 30 - 35% of the TCE degraded. Degradation of both PCE and TCE exhibited first order kinetics. Strong isotopic fractionation of the reactant PCE and of the reactant TCE was observed over the course of degradation. This fractionation could be described by a Rayleigh model with enrichment factors between -16.5 ppm and -15.8 ppm for PCE, and -17.2 ppm and -16.6 ppm for TCE. Fractionation was similar in all four experiments, with a mean enrichment factor of -16.5 +/- 0.6 ppm. These large enrichment factors indicate that isotopic analysis can be used to assess the occurrence of dechlorination of PCE and TCE by vitamin B12 in remediation situations. Significantly, the Rayleigh model could be used to predict the isotopic compositions of the major products of the reaction as well as the reactant, notwithstanding the lack of complete mass balance observed between product and reactant. This evidence suggests that isotopic fractionation is taking place during complexation of the chlorinated ethenes to vitamin B12, as has been suggested for reductive dechlorination by zero valent iron. The differences between e for this reaction and

  3. PCE/TCE DEGRADATION USING MULCH BIOWALLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier (Biowall) was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contamin...

  4. REPORT ON THE GEOELECTRICAL DETECTION OF SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION OF PCE: PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select physicochemical properties of nine surfactants which are conventionally used in the remediation of perchloroethylene (PCE, a.k.a. tetrachloroethene) were evaluated with varying concentrations of PCE and indicator dyes in aqueous solutions using a response surface quadrati...

  5. Indoor exposure to perchloroethylene (PCE) in individuals living with dry-cleaning workers.

    PubMed

    Aggazzotti, G; Fantuzzi, G; Predieri, G; Righi, E; Moscardelli, S

    1994-11-25

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is the most widely used solvent in dry-cleaning; it is toxic to the liver, kidney and central nervous system and may be a human carcinogen. PCE levels in the ambient air of dry-cleaners' homes were measured, and samples of end-exhaled air (alveolar air) from subjects who were not themselves occupationally exposed, but who were members of the household of dry-cleaners were compared with samples from the general population. Thirty apartments were visited housing dry-cleaners and their families, and located well away from the dry-cleaning premises. Indoor air samples and alveolar air samples were collected contemporaneously from the dry-cleaners (36) and members of their household (34). The same sampling procedure was followed in 25 private homes where samples of alveolar air were collected from 41 subjects who were not occupationally exposed and who acted as control group. All the samples were analysed by direct-injection gas-chromatography. PCE levels in dry-cleaners' homes proved to be significantly higher than in control houses (geometric means: 265 vs. 2 micrograms/m3, P < 0.001). PCE levels in the alveolar air exhaled by dry-cleaners, their family members and control subjects were statistically different (geometric means: 5140, 225 and 3 micrograms/m3, respectively; P < 0.001). PCE is a ubiquitous substance in indoor air, but is present at higher concentrations in apartments where dry-cleaners and their families live. Biological monitoring of PCE in alveolar air confirms that family members of dry-cleaners are more exposed than the general population.

  6. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.

    1991-01-01

    A pre-combustion coal desulfurization process at 120{degree}C using perchloroethylene (PCE) to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur has been developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC). However, this process has not yet proven to be as successful with Illinois coals as it has for Ohio and Indiana coals. The organic sulfur removal has been achieved only with highly oxidized Illinois coals containing high sulfatic sulfur. A logical explanation for this observation is vital to successful process optimization for the use of Illinois coals. In addition, the high levels of organic sulfur removals observed by the MWOPC may be due to certain errors involved in the ASTM data interpretation; this needs verification. For example, elemental sulfur extracted by the PCE may be derived from pyrite oxidation during coal pre-oxidation, but it may be interpreted as organic sulfur removed by the PCE using ASTM analysis. The goals of this research are: (1) to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization process reported by the MWOPC, (2) to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for the PCE process evaluation, and (3) to determine the suitability of Illinois coals for use in the PCE desulfurization process. This project involves the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Eastern Illinois University (EIU), the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign (UI-UC), and the University of Kentucky, Lexington (UK). This is the first year of a two-year project.

  7. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF A PCE AND TCE PLUME AFTER SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of the chlorinated solvents PCE and TCE at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) resulted in the contamination of groundwater in a shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer. The resulting plume had moved over 1000 feet from the disposal source area and had impacted p...

  8. Effect of biosurfactants on the aqueous solubility of PCE and TCE.

    PubMed

    Albino, John D; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2009-12-01

    The effect of biosurfactants on the solubility of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied in batch experiments pertaining to their use for solubilization and mobilization of such contaminants in surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation. Biosurfactants, rhamnolipid and surfactin used in solubility studies were synthesized in our laboratory by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 2297) and Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 2423), respectively. The efficiency of the biosurfactants in solubilizing the chlorinated solvents was compared to that of synthetic surfactants. The Weight Solubilization Ratio (WSR) values for solubilization of PCE and TCE by biosurfactants were very high compared to the values obtained for synthetic surfactants. Surfactin proved to be a better surfactant over rhamnolipid. The WSR of surfactin on solubilization of PCE and TCE were 3.83 and 12.5, respectively, whereas the values obtained for rhamnolipid were 2.06 and 8.36. The solubility of the chlorinated solvents by biosurfactants was considerably affected by the changes in pH. The aqueous solubility of PCE and TCE increased tremendously with decrease in pH. The solubility of biosurfactants was observed to decrease with the pH, favoring partitioning of surfactants into the chlorinated solvents in significant amounts at lower pH. The excessive accumulation of biosurfactants at the interface facilitated interfacial tension reductions resulting in higher solubility of the chlorinated solvents at pH less than 7.

  9. FY00 Phytoremediation of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene in the Southern Sector of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2000-12-15

    This treatability study addresses the fate of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) in an experiment that simulates a vegetated seepline supplied with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) -contaminated groundwater. The primary objective is to determine how the trees uptake TCE and PCE, accumulate it, and/or transform it.

  10. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.; Huggins, F.E.

    1992-09-01

    A pre-combustion coal desulfurization process at 120{degree}C using perchloroethylene (PCE) to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur has been developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC). However, this process has not yet proven to be as successful with Illinois coals as it has for Ohio and Indiana coals. In addition, the high levels of organic sulfur removals observed by the MWOPC may be due to certain errors involved in the ASTM data interpretation; this needs verification. For example, elemental sulfur extracted by the PCE may be derived from pyrite oxidation during coal preoxidation, but it may be interpreted as organic sulfur removed by the PCE using ASTM analysis. The purposes of this research are to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization process reported by the MWOPC and to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for the PCE process evaluation.

  11. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1992-12-31

    The Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC) has reported a precombustion coal desulfurization process using perchloroethylene (PCE) at 120{degree}C to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur. However, this process has not been proven to be as successful with Illinois coals as it has been for Ohio and Indiana coals. Also, the high levels of organic sulfur removals observed by the MWOPC may be due to certain errors involved in interpreting data from the American Society For Testing and Materials (ASTM) method for forms-of-sulfur analysis. The purposes of this research are to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization process and to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for evaluation of the PCE process. One problem that limits commercial application of the PCE process is the high chlorine content in the PCE-treated coals. Hence, an additional goal of this investigation is to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. MWOPC`s results have been repeated on our tests for the fresh IBC-104 coal. Oxidation of coals was found to affect subsequent PCE desulfurization. Elemental sulfur is more amenable than organic sulfur to removal by PCE. Ohio 5/6 coal appears to produce elemental sulfur more readily than Illinois coal during oxidation.

  12. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC) has reported a precombustion coal desulfurization process using perchloroethylene (PCE) at 120 C to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur. The purposes of this research were to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization and to verify the ASTM forms-of-sulfur determination for evaluation of the process. An additional goal was to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. A laboratory scale operation of the MWOPC PCE desulfurization process was demonstrated, and a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal was developed. The authors have determined that PCE desulfurization removed mainly elemental sulfur from coal. The higher the level of coal oxidization, the larger the amount of elemental sulfur that is removed by PCE extraction. The increased elemental sulfur during short-term preoxidation is found to be pH dependent and is attributed to coal pyrite oxidation under acidic (pH < 2) conditions. The non-ASTM sulfur analyses confirmed the hypothesis that the elemental sulfur produced by oxidation of pyrite complicates the interpretation of analytical data for PCE process evaluations when only the ASTM forms-of-sulfur is used. When the ASTM method is used alone, the elemental sulfur removed during PCE desulfurization is counted as organic sulfur. A study using model compounds suggests that mild preoxidation treatment of coal described by MWOPC for removal of organic sulfur does not produce enough oxidized organic sulfur to account for the amounts of sulfur removal reported. Furthermore, when oxidation of coal-like organosulfur compounds does occur, the products are inconsistent with production of elemental sulfur, the product reported by MWOPC. Overall, it is demonstrated that the PCE process is not suitable for organic sulfur removal.

  13. Comparison between acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and implications for the reductive dehalogenation of PCE and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Il-Su; Bae, Jae-Ho; McCarty, Perry L.

    2007-10-01

    Bioremediation by reductive dehalogenation of groundwater contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) is generally carried out through the addition of a fermentable electron donor such as lactate, benzoate, carbohydrates or vegetable oil. These fermentable donors are converted by fermenting organisms into acetate and hydrogen, either of which might be used by dehalogenating microorganisms. Comparisons were made between H 2 and acetate on the rate and extent of reductive dehalogenation of PCE. PCE dehalogenation with H 2 alone was complete to ethene, but with acetate alone it generally proceeded only about half as fast and only to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Additionally, acetate was not used as an electron donor in the presence of H 2. These findings suggest the fermentable electron donor requirement for PCE dehalogenation to ethene can be reduced up to 50% by separating PCE dehalogenation into two stages, the first of which uses acetate for the conversion of PCE to cDCE, and the second uses H 2 for the conversion of cDCE to ethene. This can be implemented with a recycle system in which the fermentable substrate is added down-gradient, where the hydrogen being produced by fermentation effects cDCE conversion into ethene. The acetate produced is recycled up-gradient to achieve PCE conversion into cDCE. With the lower electron donor usage required, potential problems of aquifer clogging, excess methane production, and high groundwater chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be greatly reduced.

  14. Target Organ Metabolism, Toxicity, and Mechanisms of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene: Key Similarities, Differences, and Data Gaps.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Guha, Neela; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Rusyn, Ivan; Lash, Lawrence H

    2016-10-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are high-production volume chemicals with numerous industrial applications. As a consequence of their widespread use, these chemicals are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which the general population is commonly exposed. It is widely assumed that TCE and PCE are toxicologically similar; both are simple olefins with three (TCE) or four (PCE) chlorines. Nonetheless, despite decades of research on the adverse health effects of TCE or PCE, few studies have directly compared these two toxicants. Although the metabolic pathways are qualitatively similar, quantitative differences in the flux and yield of metabolites exist. Recent human health assessments have uncovered some overlap in target organs that are affected by exposure to TCE or PCE, and divergent species- and sex-specificity with regard to cancer and noncancer hazards. The objective of this minireview is to highlight key similarities, differences, and data gaps in target organ metabolism and mechanism of toxicity. The main anticipated outcome of this review is to encourage research to 1) directly compare the responses to TCE and PCE using more sensitive biochemical techniques and robust statistical comparisons; 2) more closely examine interindividual variability in the relationship between toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics for TCE and PCE; 3) elucidate the effect of coexposure to these two toxicants; and 4) explore new mechanisms for target organ toxicity associated with TCE and/or PCE exposure.

  15. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.

    1991-12-31

    A pre-combustion coal desulfurization process at 120{degree}C using perchloroethylene (PCE) to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur has been developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC). However, this process has not yet proven to be as successful with Illinois coals as it has for Ohio and Indiana coals. The organic sulfur removal has been achieved only with highly oxidized Illinois coals containing high sulfatic sulfur. A logical explanation for this observation is vital to successful process optimization for the use of Illinois coals. In addition, the high levels of organic sulfur removals observed by the MWOPC may be due to certain errors involved in the ASTM data interpretation; this needs verification. For example, elemental sulfur extracted by the PCE may be derived from pyrite oxidation during coal pre-oxidation, but it may be interpreted as organic sulfur removed by the PCE using ASTM analysis. The goals of this research are: (1) to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization process reported by the MWOPC, (2) to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for the PCE process evaluation, and (3) to determine the suitability of Illinois coals for use in the PCE desulfurization process. This project involves the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Eastern Illinois University (EIU), the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign (UI-UC), and the University of Kentucky, Lexington (UK). This is the first year of a two-year project.

  16. Identification of TCE and PCE sorption and biodegradation parameters in a sandy aquifer for fate and transport modelling: batch and column studies.

    PubMed

    Kret, E; Kiecak, A; Malina, G; Nijenhuis, I; Postawa, A

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the sorption and biodegradation parameters of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) as input data required for their fate and transport modelling in a Quaternary sandy aquifer. Sorption was determined based on batch and column experiments, while biodegradation was investigated using the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). The aquifer materials medium (soil 1) to fine (soil 2) sands and groundwater samples came from the representative profile of the contaminated site (south-east Poland). The sorption isotherms were approximately linear (TCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0016; PCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0051; PCE, soil 2, K d = 0.0069) except for one case in which the best fitting was for the Langmuir isotherm (TCE, soil 2, K f = 0.6493 and S max = 0.0145). The results indicate low retardation coefficients (R) of TCE and PCE; however, somewhat lower values were obtained in batch compared to column experiments. In the column experiments with the presence of both contaminants, TCE influenced sorption of PCE, so that the R values for both compounds were almost two times higher. Non-significant differences in isotope compositions of TCE and PCE measured in the observation points (δ(13)C values within the range of -23.6 ÷ -24.3‰ and -26.3 ÷-27.7‰, respectively) indicate that biodegradation apparently is not an important process contributing to the natural attenuation of these contaminants in the studied sandy aquifer.

  17. Proof-of-Concept Study: Novel Microbially-Driven Fenton Reaction for In Situ Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with 1,4-Dioxane, Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and Trichloroethene (TCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-17

    and PCE degradation process was driven by the Fe(III)-reducing facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis. S. oneidensis batch cultures were...provided with lactate, Fe(III), and either 1,4-dioxane, TCE or PCE and exposed to alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions. During the aerobic phase...S. oneidensis reduced O2 to H2O2, while during the anaerobic phase, S. oneidensis reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). During the aerobic-to- anaerobic

  18. Biodegradation of PCE and TCE in landfill leachate predicted from concentrations of molecular hydrogen: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gonsoulin, Mary E; Wilson, Barbara H; Wilson, John T

    2004-12-01

    The Refuse Hideaway Landfill (23-acre) received municipal, commercial, and industrial waste between 1974 and 1988. It was designed as a "natural attenuation" landfill and no provision was made to collect and treat contaminated water. Natural biological degradation through sequential reductive dechlorination had been an important mechanism for natural attenuation at the site. We used the concentration of hydrogen to forecast whether reductive dechlorination would continue over time at particular locations in the plume. Based on published literature, reductive dechlorination and natural attenuation of PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE can be expected in the aquifer if the concentration of molecular hydrogen in monitoring wells are adequate (> 1 nanomolar). Reductive dechlorination can be expected to continue as the ground water moves down gradient. Natural attenuation through reductive dechlorination is not expected in flow paths that originate at down gradient monitoring wells with low concentrations of molecular hydrogen (< 1 nanomolar). In three monitoring wells at the margin of the landfill and in five monitoring wells down gradient of the landfill, ground water maintained a molecular hydrogen concentration, ranging from 1.30 to 9.17 nanomolar, that is adequate for reductive dechlorination. In three of the monitoring wells far down gradient of the landfill, the concentration of molecular hydrogen (0.33 to 0.83 nanomolar) was not adequate to support reductive dechlorination. In wells with adequate concentrations of hydrogen, the concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds were attenuated over time, or concentrations of chlorinated volatile organics were below the detection limit. In wells with inadequate concentrations of hydrogen, the concentrations of chlorinated organic compounds attenuated at a slower rate over time. In wells with adequate hydrogen the first order rate of attenuation of PCE, TCE, cis-DCE and total chlorinated volatile organic compounds varies

  19. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.

    1993-09-01

    The purposes of this project are: to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE process developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC), to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for evaluation of the PCE process, and to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. The objectives for the second year are: to verify the possible effects of PCE treatment on coal-derived FeS{sub 2}, FeSO{sub 4}, and Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} on ASTM coal analysis, to investigate the behavior of sulfur during oxidation and PCE desulfurization using the isotopically signatured coal sample, to investigate the effects of conditions and/or reagents on the oxidation of the organic-sulfur-model compounds, to evaluate the extended oxidation condition on the organic sulfur removal by PCE desulfurization, and to study other innovative pretreatment processes for the removal of organic sulfur from coal under mild conditions.

  20. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.; Huggins, F.E.; Ho, K.K.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this project are to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE process developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co.(MWOPC), to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for evaluation of the PCE process, and to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. The objectives for year-2 study are to verify the possible effect of PCE treatment on coal-derived FeS{sub 2}, FeSO{sub 4}, and Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} on ASTM coal analysis, to investigate the behavior of sulfur during oxidation and PCE desulfurization using the isotopically signatured coal sample to investigate the proprietary reagent on the oxidation of the organic sulfur model compounds with and without additives, to evaluate this new oxidation on the organic sulfur removal by PCE desulfurization, and to study other innovative pretreatment processes for the removal of organic sulfur from coal under mild conditions. Oxidation study on the organosulfur model compounds alone was completed in first quarter. The oxidation reactions were repeated on the organosulfur model compounds with the presence of hydrocarbon additives. These additives are known to easily produce hydroperoxides during air oxidation. Analysis of the reaction products is in progress.

  1. Phytoremediation of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2001-01-10

    Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents, both natural and accelerated, is exemplified by phytoremediation and biodegradation by rhizosphere microorganisms. Phytoremediation is the use of vegetation for the treatment of contaminated soils, sediments, and water. The potential for phytoremediation of chlorinated solvents has been demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Miscellaneous Chemical Basin, Southern Sector of A/M Area and TNX/D-Area. Recent characterization work at the SRS has delineated widespread plumes (1-2 miles) of low concentration (40 ppb -10-ppm range) trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) contaminated groundwater. Phytoremediation deployments are underway for TCE and PCE phytoremediation in select SRS areas. Phytoremediation appears to be an excellent technology to intercept and control plume migration. The ongoing Southern Sector treatability study is part of a multi-year field study of SRS seepline-soil systems maintained under saturated conditions. The primary focus is on determining how trees, seepline groundcover, soil microbial communities, and geochemical and surface-volatilization processes affect TCE and PCE in contaminated groundwater that flows through surface seepline areas. Therefore, FY00 represented an initial acclimation phase for soil and plant systems and will facilitate examination of seepline phyto- and bioactivity in subsequent growth season in FY01.

  2. Sorption of PCE in a reactive zero-valent iron system

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.J.; Burris, D.R.

    1995-12-01

    The degradation of the chlorinated solvents perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by reduction on the surface of zero-valent iron has emerged in recent years as a potentially viable approach to the remediation of chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwaters. The sorption of PCE in a batch reactive zero-valent iron system was examined in this study. Aqueous PCE concentrations and total system PCE masses were determined in batch time-series experiments used to ascertain degradation kinetics. Sorbed concentrations were calculated using the difference between the aqueous phase and total system masses. The results showed Langmuir isotherm behavior which is consistent with a model of a finite number of available sorption sites. The kinetics of sorption could not be determined since degradation was also occurring. Knowledge of sorption to reactive and non-reactive sites is of importance in gaining a thorough understanding of the performance-behavior of the flow-through reactive systems envisioned for remediation technologies.

  3. Transition Metal Catalyst Assisted Reductive Dechlorination of Perchloroethylene by Anaerobic Aquifer Enrichments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Apel, William Arnold; Watwood, Maribeth E.

    2000-04-01

    Bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethylene (PCE) or carbon tetrachloride, can be accomplished by adding nutrients to stimulate a microbial community capable of reductive dechlorination. However, biotransformation of these solvents, especially PCE, typically occurs very slowly or not at all. Experiments were conducted to evaluate whether the addition of transition metal tetrapyrrole catalysts would increase the reductive transformation of PCE to trichloroethylene (TCE) by sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures. Batch assays were used to test vitamin B12 and two synthetic sulfonatophenyl porphine catalysts for the stimulation of reductive dechlorination of PCE by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) enriched from aquifer sediments from two locations at Dover Air Force Base. Cells from the enrichments were concentrated and added to batch assay vials. Vials containing SRB cells amended with vitamin B12 exhibited enhanced transformation of PCE to TCE compared with reactors amended with either synthetic catalysts or reactors containing cells alone. Methane production was observed in reactors that exhibited maximum levels of dechlorination. Storage of aquifer sediments between enrichments led to decreased levels of PCE dechlorination in subsequent assays.

  4. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, Sarah E.; Miles, A. Keith; Anderson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 μl/L of TCE and 0.07 μl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  5. Three-dimensional model evaluation of the Ozone Depletion Potentials for n-propyl bromide, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuebbles, D. J.; Patten, K. O.; Wang, D.; Youn, D.; Martínez-Avilés, M.; Francisco, J. S.

    2011-03-01

    The existing solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) and proposed solvent n-propyl bromide (nPB) have atmospheric lifetimes from days to a few months, but contain chlorine or bromine that could affect stratospheric ozone. Several previous studies estimated the Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs) for various assumptions of nPB emissions location, but these studies used simplified modeling treatments. The primary purpose of this study is to reevaluate the ODP for n-propyl bromide (nPB) using a current-generation chemistry-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. For the first time, ODPs for TCE and PCE are also evaluated in a three-dimensional, global atmospheric chemistry-transport model. Emissions representing industrial use of each compound are incorporated on land surfaces from 30° N to 60° N. The atmospheric chemical lifetime obtained for nPB is 24.7 days, similar to past literature, but the ODP is 0.0049, lower than in our past study of nPB. The derived atmospheric lifetime for TCE is 13.0 days and for PCE is 111 days. The corresponding ODPs are 0.00037 and 0.0050, respectively.

  6. Three-dimensional model evaluation of the Ozone Depletion Potentials for n-propyl bromide, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuebbles, D. J.; Patten, K. O.; Wang, D.; Youn, D.; Martínez-Avilés, M.; Francisco, J. S.

    2010-07-01

    The existing solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) and proposed solvent n-propyl bromide (nPB) have atmospheric lifetimes from days to a few months, but contain chlorine or bromine that could affect stratospheric ozone. Several previous studies estimated the Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs) for various assumptions for location of nPB emissions, but these studies used simplified modeling treatments. The primary purpose of this study is to reevaluate the ODP for nPB using a current-generation chemistry-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. For the first time, ODPs for TCE and PCE are also evaluated. Emissions representing industrial use of each compound are incorporated on land surfaces from 30° N to 60° N. The atmospheric chemical lifetime obtained for nPB is 24.7 days, similar to past literature, but the ODP is 0.0049, lower than in past studies. The derived atmospheric lifetime for TCE is 13.0 days and for PCE is 111 days. The corresponding ODPs are 0.00035 and 0.0060, respectively.

  7. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF WATER/PERCHLOROETHYLENE/ANIONIC SURFACTANT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Winsor Type I (o/w), Type II (w/o), and Type III (middle phase) microemulsions have been generated for water and perchloroethylene (PCE) in combination with anionic surfactants and the appropriate electrolyte concentration. The surfactant formulation was a combination of sodium d...

  8. Sonochemical degradation of perchloroethylene: the influence of ultrasonic variables, and the identification of products.

    PubMed

    Sáez, V; Esclapez, M D; Bonete, P; Walton, D J; Rehorek, A; Louisnard, O; González-García, J

    2011-01-01

    Sonochemistry is a technique that offers promise for pollutant degradation, but earlier studies on various chlorinated substrates do not give a definitive view of the effectiveness of this methodology. We now report a thorough study of ultrasonic operational variables upon perchloroethylene (PCE) degradation in water (variables include ultrasonic frequency, power and system geometry as well as substrate concentration) and we attempt to close the mass balance where feasible. We obtained fractional conversions of >97% showing very effective loss of pollutant starting material, and give mechanistic proposals for the reaction pathway based on cavitational phenomena inducing pyrolytic and free radical processes. We note major products of Cl(-) and CO(2)/CO, and also trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloroethylene (DCE) at ppm concentrations as reported earlier. The formation at very low (ppb) concentration of small halocompounds (CHCl(3), CCl(4)) and also of higher-mass species, such as pentachloropropene, hexachloroethane, is noteworthy. But of particular importance in our work is the discovery of significant quantities of chloroacetate derivatives at ppm concentrations. Although these compounds have been described as by-products with other techniques such as radiolysis or photochemistry, this is the first time that these products have been identified in the sonochemical treatment of PCE; this allows a much more effective account of the mass balance and may explain earlier inconsistencies. This reaction system is now better identified, but a corollary is that, because these haloacetates are themselves species of some toxicity, the use of ultrasound here may not sufficiently diminish wastewater toxicity.

  9. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  10. Contamination of ground water by PCE - A national perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, M.J.; Delzer, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) has physical and chemical properties that make it likely to persist in groundwater if released to the environment. The US Geological Survey has collected or compiled data on the occurrence of PCE in groundwater from major aquifers around the US. These data represent the occurrence of PCE in the groundwater resource as a whole and not occurrence at specific release sites. PCE was detected at measurable concentrations in nearly one in 10 wells in major aquifers throughout the country. Trichloroethylene was found most commonly with PCE and its presence may be due, in part, to reductive dechlorination of PCE. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Organic Chemicals in Ground Water: Prevention, Assessment, and Remediation Conference (Houston, TX 11/6-7/2006).

  11. ACUTE NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF INHALED PERCHLOROETHYLENE ON PATTERN VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS AS A FUNCTION OF EXPOSURE AND ESTIMATED BLOOD AND BRAIN CONCENTRATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experiments have shown the effects of acute inhalation exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene are related to the target tissue concentration at the time of testing. The current studies examined exposure to another volatile organic compound, perchloroethylene (P...

  12. Quantification of perchloroethylene residues in dry-cleaned fabrics.

    PubMed

    Sherlach, Katy S; Gorka, Alexander P; Dantzler, Alexa; Roepe, Paul D

    2011-11-01

    We have used a novel gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based approach to quantify perchloroethylene (PCE) residues in dry-cleaned fabrics. Residual PCE was extracted from fabric samples with methanol and concentration was calculated by the gas chromatographic peak area, standardized using PCE calibration data. Extracts examined were from samples of 100% wool, polyester, cotton, or silk, which were dry cleaned from one to six times in seven different Northern Virginia dry-cleaning establishments. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of PCE release in the extraction solvent and to the open air. We found that polyester, cotton, and wool retained ≥ µM levels of PCE, that these levels increased in successive dry-cleaning cycles, and that PCE is slowly volatilized from these fabrics under ambient room air conditions. We found that silk does not retain appreciable PCE. Measured differences across dry-cleaning establishments and fabric type suggest more vigorous monitoring of PCE residues may be warranted. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2011;30:2481-2487. © 2011 SETAC.

  13. PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PCE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select physicochemical properties of aqueous solutions composed of surfactants, dye, and

    perchloroethylene (PCE) were evaluated through a response surface quadratic design

    model of experiment. Nine surfactants, which are conventionally used in the

    remediation...

  14. [Environmental and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to perchloroethylene in dry cleaning shops].

    PubMed

    Gobba, F; Rosa, P; Ghittori, S; Imbriani, M; Ferrari, G; Cavalleri, A

    1997-01-01

    Occupational exposure to perchloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a total of 106 workers in 78 dry cleaning shops in the province of Pavia, Northern, Italy. Environmental monitoring was performed by personal passive sampling. The median time weighted average (TWA) level of PCE was 57 mg/m3, i.e., about 30% of the current Threshold Limit Value (TLV) proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). However, in 12 workers exposure exceeded this limit. Biological monitoring was performed via measurement of urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA), i.e. the exposure index currently used in Italy, and urinary excretion of unmodified perchloroethylene (PCE-U) in samples collected at the end of the half-shift. Median levels of TCA and PCE were 1.03 mg/l and 17.7 micrograms/l respectively. The correlation coefficient between environmental TWA concentrations of perchloroethylene and PCE-U was 0.755 (0.809 after logarithmic transformation), compared to 0.660 for TCA values. The subjects were then classified as "low exposed" and "heavily exposed" according to whether personal exposure was lower or higher than 57 mg/m3, the median TWA value of the whole group. PCE-U levels were significantly correlated to exposure in both subgroups whereas TCA was correlated only in the "heavily exposed subjects", but not in those with lower exposure. The results of the study show that in the majority of dry cleaning shops exposure to PCE was well below the current occupational limits. Nevertheless surveillance of dry cleaners is recommended as nearly 10% of the workers exceeded the environmental and biological limits. Urinary excretion of unmodified PCE appears to be a very reliable indicator for biological monitoring of PCE exposure in dry cleaning and is also significantly correlated to exposure at low levels. The estimated biological equivalent exposure level (BEEL) for PCE-U, corresponding to the current TLV-TWA proposed by the ACGIH, is 55 micrograms/l. Urinary

  15. Electrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in aqueous media: an approach to different strategies.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez Vicente, M D; Frías-Ferrer, Angel J; Bonete, Pedro; González-García, José

    2009-05-01

    An approaching study to the electrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) in water has been carried out using controlled current density degradation electrolyses. The different electrochemical strategies to degrade perchloroethylene in aqueous media (i.e. cathodic, anodic and dual treatments) have been checked using divided and undivided configurations. The influence of the initial concentration, pH and current density on the general behavior of the system has been studied, and special attention was paid to the nature of the byproducts formed and to the analysis of the closed mass balance at the end of the reaction. Results from several analytical techniques have been compared. Undivided configuration provides the best results in these experimental conditions, with degradation percentages higher than 50% and with only 6% of the initial perchloroethylene concentration remaining in the system.

  16. Studies on the use of perchloroethylene as a heavy medium for the removal of pyrites from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, T.L.; Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Previous studies have shown that perchloroethylene (PCE) shows promise for use as a heavy medium for the removal of pyrites from fine coal. The studies are continued here, as the coal cleaning effectiveness of mixtures of PCE and kerosene are investigated. Float/sink experiments are run for different medium densities obtained by varying the proportions of PCE and kerosene. The effectiveness of the cleaning process is judged by data taken from a long tube sampling apparatus. Among the variables investigated are medium density, residence time, and solvent-to-coal ratio. The data is used to support scale-up predictions for a plant apparatus.

  17. EMISSIONS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a home affects the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene, and (b) the effectiveness of ‘airing...

  18. Occurrence of perchloroethylene in surface water and fish in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination.

    PubMed

    Wittlingerová, Zdena; Macháčková, Jiřina; Petruželková, Anna; Zimová, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Long-term monitoring of the content of perchloroethylene (PCE) in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination was performed at a site in the Czech Republic. The quality of surface water was monitored quarterly between 1994 and 2013, and fish were collected from the affected ecosystem to analyse the content of PCE in their tissue in 1998, 2011 and 2012. Concentrations of PCE (9-140 μg/kg) in the tissue of fish collected from the contaminated part of the river were elevated compared to the part of the river unaffected by the contamination (ND to 5 μg/kg PCE). The quality of surface water has improved as a result of groundwater remediation during the evaluated period. Before the remedial action, PCE concentrations ranged from 30 to 95 μg/L (1994-1997). Following commencement of remedial activities in September 1997, a decrease in the content of PCE in the surface water to 7.3 μg/L (1998) and further to 1 μg/L (2011) and 1.1 μg/L (2012) led to a progressive decrease in the average concentration of PCE in the fish muscle tissue from 79 μg/kg (1998) to 24 (2011) and 30 μg/kg (2012), respectively. It was determined that the bioconcentration of PCE does not have a linear dependence because the decrease in contamination in the fish muscle tissue is not directly proportional to the decrease in contamination in the river water. The observed average bioconcentration factors were 24 and 28 for the lower concentrations of PCE and 11 for the higher concentrations of PCE in the river. In terms of age, length and weight of the collected fish, weight had the greatest significance for bioconcentration, followed by the length, with age being evaluated as a less significant factor.

  19. Thermocatalytic Destruction of Gas-Phase Perchloroethylene Using Propane as a Hydrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Marty; Rupp, Erik; Barbaris, Brian; Gao, Song; Arnolda, Robert; Betterton, Eric; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The use of propane in combination with oxygen to promote the destruction of perchloroethylene (PCE) over a platinum (Pt)/rhodium (Rh) catalyst on a cerium/zirconium oxide washcoat supported on an alumina monolith was explored. Conversions of PCE were measured in a continuous flow reactor with residence times less than 0.5 s and temperatures ranging from 200 to 600°C. The presence of propane was shown to increase significantly the conversion of PCE over oxygen-only conditions. Conversions close to 100% were observed at temperatures lower than 450°C with 20% oxygen and 2% propane in the feed, which makes this process attractive from a practical standpoint. In the absence of oxygen, PCE conversion is even higher, but the catalyst suffers significant deactivation in less than an hour. Even though results show that oxygen competes with reactants for active sites on the catalyst, the long-term stability that oxygen confers to the catalyst makes the process an efficient alternative to PCE oxidation. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood competitive adsorption model is proposed to quantify PCE conversion. PMID:19217713

  20. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  1. Liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Levanova, S.V.; Evstigneev, O.V.; Rodova, R.M.; Berlin, E.R.; Ul'yanov, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    The relationships in the liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene to hexachlorethane in a thermal process and in the presence of an initiator have been studied. The rate constants and the activation parameters of the process have been determined.

  2. Removal of perchloroethylene from a layered soil system by steam flushing

    SciTech Connect

    She, H.Y.; Sleep, B.E.

    1999-10-01

    Steam flushing experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional chamber containing two layers of F75 silica sand separated by a layer of finer F110 silica sand. Perchloroethylene (PCE), which had spilled into the chamber under water-saturated conditions, formed a pool on the F110 sand layer. Steam was injected above the F110 sand layer. Temperatures, moisture content, and PCE concentrations in the chamber were monitored. Samples, taken from the various locations in the sand chamber, indicated that complete removal of PCE from the steam zone was achieved, with an 84% overall recovery. Some downward displacement of PCE-contaminated water through the F110 sand layer was observed and a small amount of gravity override occurred. Channeling of steam was minimal. The experiment indicates that steam flushing may be used successfully for removal of PCE from relatively homogeneous soils. Issues of gravity override and downward mobilization of contaminants must be considered in applying steam flushing at the field scale.

  3. Gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of perchloroethylene on glass pellets immobilized with TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C.H.; Yuan, C.S.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this research was to study gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) under illumination of four 10-W near-ultraviolet (UV) light lamps. Experiments were performed in a photocatalytic reactor packed with Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2}-coated glass pellets. Anatase TiO{sub 2} was applied as the photocatalyst in the investigation. The effects of reaction parameters including influent PCE concentrations (10 to 50 ppm), water vapor content (0 to 100 % relative humidity), oxygen concentrations (0.31 to 21%), reactor space times (0.55 to 1.83 seconds), and irradiated light intensity (0.4 to 1.0 mW/cm{sup 2}) were investigated in the study. Experimental results indicated that fast photocatalytic degradation of PCE took place in the presence of TiO2 illuminated with near-UV light. Experimental results also showed that the highest degradation rate and quantum efficiency of PCE were 0.523 m mol/secgm and 5.2 %, respectively. The highest conversion ratio of PCE of 99.8 % was achieved in the study. Greater conversation ratios of PCE were observed for longer reaction time. Increase in the reaction rates of PCE by increasing influent PCE and oxygen concentrations were presented. Higher reaction rates of PCE under stronger illumination light intensity were detected. The degradation rates of PCE were proportional to light intensity with the power order of 1.2. On the other hand, the inhibited degradation of PCE was observed in the presence of water vapor. Lower reaction rates of PCE were detected when water vapor was present in the reaction. A modified Langmuir-Hishelwood kinetic was applied to model photocatalytic degradation of PCE. Two different adsorption sites on irradiated TiO2{sub 2} surfaces for the adsorption of PCE and oxygen molecules respectively were assumed in the model. The assumption of water vapor competing with PCE for reactive sites was considered in the reaction.

  4. NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE): DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is a background document for a meeting of neurotoxicity experts to discuss the central nervous system effects of exposure to perchloroethylene (perc). The document reviews the literature on neurological testing of people exposed to perc occupationally in dry cleanin...

  5. Nature's Helpers: Using Microorganisms to Remove Trichloroethene (TCE) from Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. G.; Krajmlanik-Brown, R.; Fajardo-Williams, D.; Halloum, I.

    2015-12-01

    Organic chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), are toxic pollutants threatening ground water quality worldwide and present at many superfund sites. Bioremediation using microorganisms is a promising, green, efficient, and sustainable approach to remove PCE and TCE contamination from soil and groundwater. Under anaerobic conditions, specialized microorganisms (dechlorinators) can reduce these chlorinated ethenes to ethene, an innocuous product, and gain energy for growth by a process known as reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinators are most often present in the environment and in dechlorinating cultures alongside other microbes such as fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens. Fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens syntrophically provide essential nutrients and growth factors to dechlorinators, most specifically to the only members able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene: Dehalococcoides; unfortunately, they also compete with dechlorinators for electron donors. My laboratory devises reductive chlorination platforms to study competition and syntrophy among Dehalococcoides, and other microbes to optimize remediation reactions and transport in the subsurface. We look at competing processes present as part of the natural soil chemistry and microbiology and address these challenges through a combination of enrichment techniques, molecular microbial ecology (deep sequencing), water chemistry, and electron balances. We have applied knowledge gathered in my laboratory to: 1) enrich microbial dechlorinating cultures capable of some of the fastest rates of TCE to ethene dechlorination ever reported, and 2) successfully design and operate three different continuous dechlorinating reactor types. We attribute our successful reactor operations to our multidisciplinary approach which links microbiology and engineering. Our reactors produce robust dechlorinating cultures used for in-situ bioaugmentation of PCE and TCE at contaminated sites

  6. The viability of professional wet cleaning as a pollution prevention alternative to perchloroethylene dry cleaning.

    PubMed

    Sinsheimer, Peter; Grout, Cyrus; Namkoong, Angela; Gottlieb, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The vast majority of dry cleaners worldwide use the toxic chemical perchloroethylene (PCE), which is associated with a number of adverse health and environmental impacts. Professional wet cleaning was developed as a nontoxic alternative to PCE dry cleaning but has not been widely adopted as substitute technology. In the greater Los Angeles, CA, region, a demonstration project was set up to showcase this technology and evaluate its commercial viability by converting seven cleaners from PCE dry cleaning to professional wet cleaning. The demonstration site cleaners who switched to professional wet cleaning were able to maintain their level of service and customer base while lowering operating costs. The cleaners were able to transition to professional wet cleaning without a great degree of difficulty and expressed a high level of satisfaction with professional wet cleaning. Crucial to this success was the existence of the demonstration project, which helped to develop a supporting infrastructure for professional wet cleaning that had otherwise been lacking in the garment care industry.

  7. Response to issues and data submissions on the carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The scientific debate over the potential carciongenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. The document reviews the issues considered by the EPA`s Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addenedum to the Health Assessment Document for Tetrachloroethylene (1986) and discusses relevant research data published between 1986 and early 1991. The topics include three tumor end points observed in rodents: (1) hepatocellular carcinoma in male and female mice, (2) renal tubule neoplasia in male rats, and (3) mononuclear cell leukemia in male and female rats, and data on metabolism, metagenicity, peroxisome proliferation, and alpha-2u-globulin. EPA`s recommended weight-of-evidence classification of perc is B2, probable human carcinogen.

  8. A study of the effect of perchloroethylene exposure on semen quality in dry cleaning workers

    SciTech Connect

    Eskenazi, B.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Fenster, L.; Katz, D.F.; Sadler, M.; Lee, J.; Hudes, M.; Rempel, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of perchloroethylene (PCE) exposure on human semen quality. We compared the semen quality of 34 dry cleaners with that of 48 laundry workers. We examined the relationships of 17 semen parameters to expired air levels of PCE and to an index of exposure based on job tasks in the last three months. The average sperm concentration was over 80 million for both dry cleaners and laundry workers, but approximately one-quarter of each group was oligospermic. The overall percentage of abnormal forms was similar for the two groups; however, sperm of dry cleaners were significantly more likely to be round (t = -3.29, p = 0.002) and less likely to be narrow (t = 2.35, p = 0.02) than the sperm of laundry workers. These effects were dose-related to expired air levels and to the exposure index after controlling for potential confounders (e.g., heat exposure). The average percent motile sperm for both groups was slightly over 60%; however, sperm of dry cleaners tended to swim with greater amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) than those of laundry workers (t = -1.73, p = 0.09), and level of PCE in expired air was a significant predictor of ALH in the multiple regression model (t = 2.00, p = 0.05). In addition, exposure index was a significant negative predictor of the sperm linearity parameter (t = -2.57, p = 0.01). These results suggest that occupational exposures to PCE can have subtle effects on sperm quality. Additional analyses are required to determine whether these effects are associated with changes in fertility.

  9. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  10. HORIZONTAL LASAGNA TO BIOREMEDIATE TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Removal of TCE from these tight clay soils has been technically difficult and expensive. However, the LASAGNATM technique allows movement of the TCE into treatment zones for biodegradation or dechlorination in place, lessening the costs and exposure to TCE. Electroosmosis was c...

  11. The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-12

    While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

  12. FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this summer research project was to investigate whether perchloroethylene can be used as a solvent for the quantitative analysis of industrial hydraulic fluids by infrared spectroscopy employing Beer's law. Standard calibration curves using carbon-hydrogen stretching (generic) and ester absorption peaks were prepared for a series of standard dilutions at low ppm levels of concentration of seven hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene. The absorbance spectras were recorded with 1.5-10 mm fixed and variable path length sample cells made of potassium bromide. The results indicate that using ester infrared spectral peak, it is possible to detect about 20 ppm of the hydraulic fluid in perchloroethylene.

  13. Risk Assessment: Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners Refined Human Health Risk Characterization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 2005 memo and appendices describe the methods by which EPA conducted its refined risk assessment of the Major Source and Area Source facilities within the perchloroethylene (perc) dry cleaners source category.

  14. Physical cleaning of coal using perchloroethylene as heavy medium

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, T.L.; Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.

    1994-12-31

    Use of perchloroethylene solvent in the physical cleaning of finely crushed coal has been studied in a glass tube batch apparatus. The density of perchloroethylene makes it an ideal heavy medium for float/sink separation processes. Float/sink removal of pyrites and mineral matter has been studied to determine the effect of process variables. The effect of various parameters is studied, such as mean residence time, solvent-to-coal ratio, and heavy medium density. The density of the perchloroethylene solvent is varied using kerosene to study the effects of medium density. The test results are used to assess the effectiveness of perchloroethylene as a heavy medium for the removal of pyritic sulfur from the coal. The data is used to develop a model of the process for use in scale-up and plant studies.

  15. A convenient method for the quantitative determination of elemental sulfur in coal by HPLC analysis of perchloroethylene extracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, D.H.; Coombs, K.J.; Murphy, P.M.; Chaven, C.

    1993-01-01

    A convenient method for the quantitative determination of elemental sulfur in coal is described. Elemental sulfur is extracted from the coal with hot perchloroethylene (PCE) (tetrachloroethene, C2Cl4) and quantitatively determined by HPLC analysis on a C18 reverse-phase column using UV detection. Calibration solutions were prepared from sublimed sulfur. Results of quantitative HPLC analyses agreed with those of a chemical/spectroscopic analysis. The HPLC method was found to be linear over the concentration range of 6 ?? 10-4 to 2 ?? 10-2 g/L. The lower detection limit was 4 ?? 10-4 g/L, which for a coal sample of 20 g is equivalent to 0.0006% by weight of coal. Since elemental sulfur is known to react slowly with hydrocarbons at the temperature of boiling PCE, standard solutions of sulfur in PCE were heated with coals from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample program. Pseudo-first-order uptake of sulfur by the coals was observed over several weeks of heating. For the Illinois No. 6 premium coal, the rate constant for sulfur uptake was 9.7 ?? 10-7 s-1, too small for retrograde reactions between solubilized sulfur and coal to cause a significant loss in elemental sulfur isolated during the analytical extraction. No elemental sulfur was produced when the following pure compounds were heated to reflux in PCE for up to 1 week: benzyl sulfide, octyl sulfide, thiane, thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, sulfuric acid, or ferrous sulfate. A sluury of mineral pyrite in PCE contained elemental sulfur which increased in concentration with heating time. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-21

    The Des Moines TCE site includes the underground infiltration gallery used by the Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) as a source of the public water supply. The site was discovered in 1984 after trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in the city's public water supply. The Dico Company disposed of an unknown quantity of oily waste sludge containing TCE onto their parking lot for dust control and into a drainage ditch on their property. The primary contaminants of concern include: TCE, PCE, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride. The selected remedial action for this site includes: extraction wells to collect the contaminated ground water; isolation of the northern-most section of the north gallery; treatment of the ground water through air stripping to remove 96% of the TCE; discharge of the treated water to the Raccoon River; operation of the west extraction wells until established effluent levels are achieved for four consecutive months.

  17. Complete remediation of PCE contaminated unsaturated soils by sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioventing.

    PubMed

    Mihopoulos, P G; Suidan, M T; Sayles, G D

    2001-01-01

    Bioventing principles have been applied to completely dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene vapors in the unsaturated zone in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic pattern. The aerobic step yields trans-DCE and VC as PCE reductive dechlorination byproducts, while TCE and cis-DCE are observed as intermediates. The aerobic step results in rapid oxidation of the VC and trans-DCE to carbon dioxide. Hydrogen was delivered in the gas phase as a reducing agent for the anaerobic step at levels of 1%, and oxygen at 4.2% was used as an electron acceptor in the aerobic step. PCE and VC half lives in the anaerobic and aerobic steps respectively, where less than 10 min.

  18. Mining hazard evaluation and technical assistance report no. HHF-80-109-110, Patriot Coal Company Laboratory, Kingwood, West Virginia. [Exposure to perchloroethylene during float-sink testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    On March 5, 1980, at the request of the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) District 3 Manager, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an industrial hygiene survey of the Patriot Coal Co.'s Coal Laboratory located in Kingwood, WV., to assess worker exposure to ambient air-borne concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE)* vapors generated during routine float sink testing of coal. Results of air sampling conducted during the float-and-sink testing operation demonstrated that the personnel employed in this area were exposed to PCE in excess of the current NIOSH recommended ceiling level of 100 parts per million (ppM). The combination of incorrect work practices, inadequate ventilation and the projected workload increase at the laboratory could reasonably be expected to produce exposures in excess of the current MSHA standard (100 ppM-8 hr. Time Weighted Average).

  19. Perchloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of breast cancer: additional results from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Rogers, Sarah; Ozonoff, David

    2003-01-01

    In 1998 we published the results of a study suggesting an association between breast cancer and perchloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethylene) exposure from public drinking water. The present case-control study was undertaken to evaluate this association further. The cases were composed of female residents of eight towns in the Cape Cod region of Massachusetts who had been diagnosed with breast cancer from 1987 through 1993 (n = 672). Controls were composed of demographically similar women from the same towns (n = 616). Women were exposed to PCE when it leached from the vinyl lining of water distribution pipes from the late 1960s through the early 1980s. A relative delivered dose of PCE that entered a home was estimated using an algorithm that took into account residential history, water flow, and pipe characteristics. Small to moderate elevations in risk were seen among women whose exposure levels were above the 75th and 90th percentiles when 0-15 years of latency were considered (adjusted odds ratios, 1.5-1.9 for > 75th percentile, 1.3-2.8 for > 90th percentile). When data from the present and prior studies were combined, small to moderate increases in risk were also seen among women whose exposure levels were above the 75th and 90th percentiles when 0-15 years of latency were considered (adjusted odds ratios, 1.6-1.9 for > 75th percentile, 1.3-1.9 for > 90th percentile). The results of the present study confirm those of the previous one and suggest that women with the highest PCE exposure levels have a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer. PMID:12573900

  20. Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption using sustainable organic mulch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Seo, Youngwoo

    2010-09-15

    Soluble substrates (electron donors) have been commonly injected into chlorinated solvent contaminated plume to stimulate reductive dechlorination. Recently, different types of organic mulches with economic advantages and sustainable benefits have received much attention as new supporting materials that can provide long term sources of electron donors for chlorinated solvent bioremediation in engineered biowall systems. However, sorption capacities of organic mulches for chlorinated solvents have not been studied yet. In this study, the physiochemical properties of organic mulches (pine, hardwood and cypress mulches) were measured and their adsorption capacity as a potential media was elucidated. Single, binary and quaternary isotherm tests were conducted with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trans-dichloroethylene (trans-DCE) and cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE). Among the three tested mulches, pine mulch showed the highest sorption capacity for the majority of the tested chemicals in single isotherm test. In binary or quaternary isotherm tests, competition among chemicals appears to diminish the differences in Q(e) for tested mulches. However, pine mulch also showed higher adsorption capacity for most chemicals when compared to hardwood and cypress mulches in the two isotherm tests. Based upon physicochemical properties of the three mulches, higher sorption capacity of pine mulch over hardwood and cypress mulches appears to be attributed to a higher organic carbon content and the lower polarity.

  1. TCE treatment pasta-bilities.

    PubMed Central

    Holton, W C

    1999-01-01

    Monsanto's "Lasagna" process uses layers of treatment zones spaced between buried electrodes to remove trichloroethylene (TCE) from contaminated soil and groundwater. TCE is used primarily as a metal degreaser as well as in products such as dyes, printing ink, and paint. TCE can eventually make its way into the environment and is prevalent in the water and soil of industrialized nations. Although TCE breaks down in a few days when released into the atmosphere, it degrades much more slowly in soil, taking months or years. Moreover, it is often broken down by microbes into toxic substances such as vinylidene chloride (a suspected human carcinogen) and vinyl chloride (a known human carcinogen). The Lasagna process is based on the principle of electro-osmosis, in which an electric current draws water from low--permeability soils such as clays, silts, and fine sands. To remove TCE from contaminated soils, Monsanto scientists added layers of filtering media, which attack the contaminant as it is pulled from electrode to electrode. The technology has been tested at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky, where it removed over 98% of TCE from contaminated soil. PMID:10464086

  2. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE ON HUMAN NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (PERC) is a volatile organic solvent with a variety of industrial uses. PERC exposure has been shown to cause adverse neurological effects including deficits in vision and memory in exposed individuals. Despite knowledge of these effects, the mechanisms by whi...

  3. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment...

  4. Effect of nonionic surfactant partitioning on the dissolution kinetics of residual perchloroethylene in a model porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharmin, Rumana; Ioannidis, Marios A.; Legge, Raymond L.

    2006-01-01

    At concentrations above the critical micelle concentration, surfactants can significantly enhance the solubilization of residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) and, for this reason, are the focus of research on surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). As a consequence of their amphiphilic nature, surfactants may also partition to various extents between the organic and aqueous phases, thereby affecting SEAR performance. We report here on the observation and analysis of the effect of surfactant partitioning on the dissolution kinetics of residual perchloroethylene (PCE) by aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 in a model porous medium. For this fluid system, batch equilibration experiments showed that the surfactant partitions strongly into the NAPL (NAPL-water partition coefficient equal to 12.5). Dynamic interfacial tension (IFT) measurements were employed to study surfactant diffusion and interfacial adsorption. The dynamic IFT measurements were consistent with partitioning of the surfactant between the two liquid phases. PCE dissolution experiments, conducted in a transparent glass micromodel using an aqueous surfactant solution, were contrasted to experiments using clean water. Surfactant partitioning was observed to delay significantly the onset of micellar solubilization of PCE, an observation reproduced by a numerical model. This effect is attributed to the reduction of surfactant concentration in the immediate vicinity of the NAPL-water interface, which accompanies transport of the surfactant into the NAPL. Accordingly, it is suggested that both the rate and the extent of diffusion of the surfactant into the NAPL affect the onset of and the driving force for micellar solubilization. While many surfactants do not readily partition in NAPL, this possibility must be considered when selecting non-ionic surfactants for the enhanced solubilization of residual chlorinated solvents in porous media.

  5. Recent advances in the perchloroethylene coal cleaning system

    SciTech Connect

    Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    The perchloroethylene coal desulfurization process has been shown to selectively remove both inorganic and organic sulfur as well as mineral matter from high sulfur Midwestern coals. The process consists of four stages: a wet grinding of the coal to {minus}200 mesh, an extraction stage used to remove organic sulfur, a float sink stage to remove pyritic sulfur and mineral matter, and finally, a steam stripping stage to remove residual perchloroethylene from the coal. Using this process, up to 70% of the organic sulfur and over 90% of the pyritic sulfur can be removed from the coal. Recent work has studied the effects of parameters such as type of coal, particle size, moisture content, process temperatures, etc., on the sulfur removal efficiency. In addition, a kinetic relation was established for several types of Midwestern coals and minimum extraction time was established. The kinetic study was also used to conduct simulation studies of batch, plug flow reactor, and continuous stirred tank reactor.

  6. HORIZONTAL LASAGNA^TM TO BIOREMEDIATE TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Removal of TCE from these tight clay soils has been technically difficult and expensive. However, the LASAGNA technique allows movement of the TCE into treatment zones for biodegradation or dechlorination in place, lessening the costs and exposure to TCE.

    Electroosmosis wa...

  7. Permeation of protective clothing materials by methylene chloride and perchloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, N

    1987-07-01

    The permeation of methylene chloride and perchloroethylene through seven protective clothing materials was studied to determine the permeation parameters, and to investigate the effect of solubility (polymer weight gain) and material thickness on the permeation parameters. The materials tested were two different nitrile rubbers, neoprene, Combination (a blend of natural rubber, neoprene and nitrile), two different polyvinyl chlorides, and polyvinyl alcohol. Methylene chloride permeated through all materials, except PVA, with breakthrough times in the range of 2 to 8 min, and permeation rates in the range of 1250-5800 micrograms/cm2 X min. PVA and unsupported nitrile offered good protection against perchloroethylene with breakthrough time occurring after 2 hr. Perchloroethylene permeated through the other materials with breakthrough times in the range of 8 to 36 min and permeation rates in the range of 200 to 1600 micrograms/cm2 X min. It was shown that for both chemicals, there is a correlation between the solubility (weight gain) and the ratio of permeation rate to breakthrough time (PR/BT). For all material/chemical pairs, an increase in solubility, increased (PR/BT). The change in material thickness had an effect on breakthrough time and permeation rate, but no effect on normalized breakthrough time. An increase in thickness reduced permeation rate and increased breakthrough time.

  8. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected. The endophyte P. putida W619-TCE degrades TCE during its transport through the xylem, leading to reduced TCE concentrations in poplar, and decreased TCE evapotranspiration.

  9. Review of the epidemiologic literature on residential exposure to perchloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, John A

    2011-10-01

    Perchloroethylene is a solvent that is widely used for dry cleaning. There has been considerable interest in the toxicity of this chemical because of the potential for low-level exposure among a large portion of the US population. Although substantial epidemiologic literature exists on high-level occupational exposure to perchloroethylene, there are relatively few studies dealing with lower-level residential exposure. In the current paper, the author reviews this limited residential literature, with special emphasis on strengths, limitations, and consistency. Reviewed studies primarily address neurobehavioral, cancer, and reproductive endpoints. Most studies used an ecological or cross-sectional design, with exposure defined by either drinking-water contamination or proximity to dry cleaning. In general, reviewed studies were highly exploratory, with inconsistencies and potential for bias that detract from interpretation of study findings. The magnitudes of reported effects are frequently incompatible with the effects reported from much higher occupational and human-chamber exposures. Overall, few reliable conclusions can be drawn from this sparse and highly limited body of literature.

  10. Sulfur cement production using by products of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process and the FC4-1 cleaned soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bassam Masri, K.L.; Fullerton, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    An introductory set of experiments to show the feasibility of making sulfur cement were carried out at the University of Akron according to Parrett and Currett`s patent which requires the use of sulfur, a filler, a plasticizer, and a vulcanization accelerator. Small blocks of cement were made using byproducts of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process. Extracted elemental and organic sulfur, ash and mineral matters from the float sink portion of the PCE process, and FC4-1 cleaned soil were used as substitutes for sulfur and filler needed for the production of sulfur cement. Leaching tests in different solutions and under different conditions were conducted on the sulfur blocks. Other tests such as strength, durability, resistance to high or low temperatures will be conducted in the future. Sulfur cement can be used as a sealing agent at a joint, roofing purposes, forming ornamental figures, and coating of exposed surfaces of iron or steel. When mixed with an aggregate, sulfur concrete is formed. This concrete can be used for structural members, curbings, guthers, slabs, and can be precast or cast at the job site. An advantage of sulfur cement over Portland cement is that it reaches its design strength in two to three hours after processing and it can be remelted and recast.

  11. Perchloroethylene: Multigeneration Inhalation Study in the Rat. Zeneca Tinston (11-03-1994)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of inhalation of atomospheres containing perchloroethylene and the propagation of two generations of the Alpk:APfSD (Wistar-derived) strain of rat.

  12. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Most, C.C.

    1989-08-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene. Its intended audience includes Federal, State, and local air-pollution personnel and others in locating potential emitters of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene and in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. The document presents information on the types of sources that may emit perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources, and available emissions information indicating the potential for trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene releases into the air from each operation.

  13. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Truyens, Sascha; Dupae, Joke; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1) TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l(-1) TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected.

  14. BIODEGRADATION OF PCE AND TCE IN LANDFILL, LEACHATE PREDICTED FROM CONCENTRATIONS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Refuse Hideaway Landfill (23-acre) was designed as a "natural attenuation" landfill and no provision was made to collect and treat contaminated water. Natural biological degradation through sequential reductive dechlorination had been an important mechanism for natural atten...

  15. Phytoremediation of trichloroethene (TCE) using cottonwood trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Lee, R.W.; Kuniansky, E.L.; ,

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cottonwood trees for phytoremediation was studied on aerobic shallow groundwater containing TCE. Cottonwood trees were planted over a 0.2-ha area at the Naval Air Station at Fort Worth, TX, in April 1996. Two years later, groundwater chemistry in the terrace alluvial aquifer was changing locally. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations declined at the southern end of the whip plantings while total iron concentration increased. Groundwater chemistry near a mature cottonwood tree ~ 60 m from the caliper trees was different from that observed elsewhere. Anaerobic conditions near the mature cottonwood tree were evident. Reductive dechlorination of TCE occurred in the aquifer near the mature tree, as demonstrated by very small concentration of TCE in groundwater, a small median ratio of TCE to the degradation product cis-1,2-DCE and the presence of vinyl chloride.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of TCE contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, D.H.; Robinson, K.G.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Solvent contaminated soils are ubiquitous in the industrial world and represent a significant environmental hazard due to their persistence and potentially negative impacts on human health and the environment. Environmental regulations favor treatment of soils with options which reduce the volume and toxicity of contaminants in place. One such treatment option is the in-situ application of hydrogen peroxide to soils contaminated with chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). This study investigated hydrogen peroxide mass loading rates on removal of TCE from soils of varying organic matter content. Batch experiments conducted on contaminated loam samples using GC headspace analysis showed up to 80% TCE removal upon peroxide treatment. Column experiments conducted on sandy loam soils with high organic matter content showed only 25% TCE removal, even at hydrogen peroxide additions of 25 g peroxide per kg soil.

  17. Monitoring Anaerobic TCE Degradation by Evanite Cultre in Column Packed with TCE-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Han, K.; Ahn, G.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, dehalococcoides spp., but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we examined two different types (i.e., Natural attenuation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation process in anaerobic column packed with TCE-contaminated soil. A TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms was confirmed by monitoring TCE and the metabolites (c-DCE, VC, ETH). However, TCE was transformed and stoichiometry amount of c-DCE was produced, and VC and ETH was not detected. To test bioaugmentation of Evanite culture containing dehalococcoides spp., Evanite culture was injected into the column and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the column by measuring TCE and VC reductases. In the result, the TCE was completely degraded to ETH using hydrogen as electron donor generate by hydrogen-production fermentation from formate.

  18. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene concentrations on TCE and toluene biodegradation and the population density of TCE and toluene degraders in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Mu, D Y; Scow, K M

    1994-01-01

    Toluene is one of several cosubstrates able to support the cometabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) by soil microbial communities. Indigenous microbial populations in soil degraded TCE in the presence, but not the absence, of toluene after a 60- to 80-h lag period. Initial populations of toluene and TCE degraders ranged from 0.2 x 10(3) to 4 x 10(3) cells per g of soil and increased by more than 4 orders of magnitude after the addition of 20 micrograms of toluene and 1 microgram of TCE per ml of soil solution. The numbers of TCE and toluene degraders and the percent removal of TCE increased with an increase in initial toluene concentration. As the initial TCE concentration was increased from 1 to 20 micrograms/ml, the numbers of toluene and TCE degraders and the rate of toluene degradation decreased, and no TCE degradation occurred. No toluene or TCE degradation occurred at a TCE concentration of 50 micrograms/ml. PMID:8074538

  19. Chemical oxidation of TCE contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical oxidation of contaminated soils and sediments has been evaluated as a potential in situ mediation technique. The objective of this research was to compare two potential chemical oxidants; hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) plus iron (Fenton`s reagent) and potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}). The TCE reduction efficiency for both oxidants was determined during a series of bench-scale experiments. The persistence of the two oxidants in soil systems and the effect of the oxidants on bulk soil properties were also evaluated. In clay soil systems, KMnO{sub 4} was able to reduce the TCE content by 99% from an average initial concentration of 130 mg/kg to a average posttreatment concentration of 4 mg/kg. TCE reductions achieved with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were slightly lower (86%) and appeared to depend on both the soil pH and the iron concentration. The results ofthe laboratory studies have beenusedasthebasisforseveral completed and proposed field demonstrations of the in situ chemical oxidation of sites contaminated with volatile organic compounds including TCE.

  20. Monitoring TCE Degradation by In-situ Bioremediation in TCE-Contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K.; Hong, U.; Ahn, G.; Jiang, H.; Yoo, H.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we investigated two different tests (i.e., biostimulation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation through the Well-to-Well test (injection well to extraction well) in TCE-contaminated site. Also solutions (Electron donor & acceptor, tracer) were injected into the aquifer using a liquid coupled with nitrogen gas sparging. In biostimulation, we use 3 phases to monitoring biological remediation. Phase 1: we inject formate solution to get electron donor hydrogen (hydrogen can be generated from fermentation of formate). We also inject bromide as tracer. Phase 2: we made injection solution by formate, bromide and sulfate. The reason why we inject sulfate is that as a kind of electron accepter, sulfate reduction process is helpful to create anaerobic condition. Phase 3: we inject mixed solution made by formate, sulfate, fumarate, and bromide. The degradation of fumarate has the same mechanism and condition with TCE degradation, so we added fumarate to make sure that if the anaerobic TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms started up (Because low TCE concentration by gas sparging). In the bioaugmentation test, we inject the Evanite culture (containing dehalococcoides spp) and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the field by measuring TCE and VC reductases.

  1. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: TRICHLOROETHANE, TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND PERCHLOROETHYLENE. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effective destruction of trichloroethane, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene by steam reforming with a commercial nickel catalyst has been demonstrated. Conversion levels of up to 0.99999 were attained in both laboratory and semi-pilot experiments, with the products c...

  2. PERCHLOROETHYLENE (PERC) INHIBITS FUNCTION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The industrial solvent perchloroethylene (PERC) is listed as a hazardous air pollutant in the 1990 Ammendments to Clean Air Act and is a known neurotoxicant. However, the mechanisms by which PERC alters nervous system function are poorly understood. In recent years, it has been d...

  3. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  4. 3D-CSIA: carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation in transformation of TCE to ethene by a Dehalococcoides culture.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; van Breukelen, Boris M; Vanderford, Mindy; Philp, Paul

    2013-09-03

    Carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), and hydrogen (H) isotope effects were determined during dechlorination of TCE to ethene by a mixed Dehalococcoides (Dhc) culture. The C isotope effects for the dechlorination steps were consistent with data published in the past for reductive dechlorination (RD) by Dhc. The Cl effects (combined with an inverse H effect in TCE) suggested that dechlorination proceeded through nucleophilic reactions with cobalamin rather than by an electron transfer mechanism. Depletions of (37)Cl in daughter compounds, resulting from fractionation at positions away from the dechlorination center (secondary isotope effects), further support the nucleophilic dechlorination mechanism. Determination of C and Cl isotope ratios of the reactants and products in the reductive dechlorination chain offers a potential tool for differentiation of Dhc activity from alternative transformation mechanisms (e.g., aerobic degradation and reductive dechlorination proceeding via outer sphere mechanisms), in studies of in situ attenuation of chlorinated ethenes. Hydrogenation of the reaction products (DCE, VC, and ethene) showed a major preference for the (1)H isotope. Detection of depleted dechlorination products could provide a line of evidence in discrimination between alternative sources of TCE (e.g., evolution from DNAPL sources or from conversion of PCE).

  5. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  6. Status of groundwater pollution in the San Gabriel Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    Contamination of groundwater in the San Gabriel Valley of California has been identified as a potential health hazard from industrial sources. Sampling has revealed the presence of trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC); therefore, water purveyors are using a variety of means to alleviate the contamination and the use of contaminated water.

  7. Long-term perchloroethylene exposure: a limited meta-analysis of neurobehavorial deficits in occupationally and residentially exposed groups

    EPA Science Inventory

    The literature concerning the neurobehavioral and neurophysiological effects of long-term exposure to perchloroethylene (PERC) in humans was meta-analyzed to provide a quantitative review and synthesis. The useable data base from this literature comprised studies reporting effec...

  8. Design and operation of a mini-pilot plant for the removal of sulfur from coal using the perchloroethylene process

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, T.L.; Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.

    1994-12-31

    A mini-pilot plant has been designed and fabricated to study the removal of sulfur from coal using perchloroethylene in a continuous process. Perchloroethylene solvent is used in a recycle process stream to perform both physical and chemical cleaning of finely crushed coal. Organic sulfur is removed in an extraction stage using perchloroethylene at atmospheric pressure. Physical removal of pyrites and minerals takes place in a float/sink apparatus in which perchloroethylene is used as a heavy medium. The plant is used to study process efficiency, control, and to provide scale-up data. The process variables studied will include type of coal, solvent-to-coal ratio, and extraction time among others. Design of the plant using bench-scale data will be discussed. Unit operations will be discussed, including extraction, heavy medium separation, screen separation, and drying.

  9. Biodegradation of vapor phase trichloroethylene (TCE) in compost packed biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Sukesan, S.; Watwood, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    Batch and column scale biofiltration experiments were performed to measure biodegradation of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) in finished compost. Compost was amended with hydrocarbon gas (methane or propane) as primary substrate to support microorganisms capable of cometabolic TCE degradation. In column biofilter experiments hydrocarbon utilization was observed within 10-15 days; gaseous TCE (50 ppmv) was then introduced continuously into the biofilter at approximately 1 L min{sup -1}. Columns supplied with 0.5% v/v methane removed 73% TCE after 8 days of continuous column operation, whereas amendment with 0.25% v/v methane corresponded with TCE removal of 93%, which was observed after 1.5 h of column operation. Similar results were obtained for propane amendment. Biofilters without hydrocarbon amendment exhibited no TCE biodegradation over 35 days. These results, analyzed together with those obtained in batch experiments, indicate that hydrocarbon identity and concentration and other related parameters influence the extent of ICE breakdown.

  10. PceRBase: a database of plant competing endogenous RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chunhui; Meng, Xianwen; Li, Xue; Illing, Nicola; Ingle, Robert A.; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Competition for microRNA (miRNA) binding between RNA molecules has emerged as a novel mechanism for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) can act as decoys for miRNA binding, thereby forming a ceRNA network by regulating the abundance of other RNA transcripts which share the same or similar microRNA response elements. Although this type of RNA cross talk was first described in Arabidopsis, and was subsequently shown to be active in animal models, there is no database collecting potential ceRNA data for plants. We have developed a Plant ceRNA database (PceRBase, http://bis.zju.edu.cn/pcernadb/index.jsp) which contains potential ceRNA target-target, and ceRNA target-mimic pairs from 26 plant species. For example, in Arabidopsis lyrata, 311 candidate ceRNAs are identified which could affect 2646 target–miRNA–target interactions. Predicted pairing structure between miRNAs and their target mRNA transcripts, expression levels of ceRNA pairs and associated GO annotations are also stored in the database. A web interface provides convenient browsing and searching for specific genes of interest. Tools are available for the visualization and enrichment analysis of genes in the ceRNA networks. Moreover, users can use PceRBase to predict novel competing mimic-target and target–target interactions from their own data. PMID:28053167

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EFFECTS OF INHALED PERCHLOROETHYLENE ON SUSTAINED ATTENTION IN RATS PERFORMING A VISUAL SIGNAL DETECTION TASK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aliphatic hydrocarbon perchloroethyelene (PCE) has been associated with neurobehavioral dysfunction including reduced attention in humans. The current study sought to assess the effects of inhaled PCE on sustained attention in rats performing a visual signal detection task (S...

  12. Fate and Transport of TCE Solvents Through Saturated Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Carmona, M.; Anaya, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) are a group of organic compounds that have been a serious problem for groundwater pollution in karst. The industrial production and utilization of these chemicals spread since 1940, and are present at tens of thousands of contaminated sites worldwide. The physic-chemical properties of DNAPLs in conjunction with the hydraulic properties of the karst systems create the perfect condition for DNAPLs to penetrate the epikarst, reach the groundwater, and more within the karst system to zones of potential exposure, such as wells, streams and wetlands. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is the most common DNPAL found in the subsurface environment. This research studies the fate and transport of TCE DNAPL in a karstified limestone physical model (KLPM). Experiments are carried out in KLPM. The KLPM is an enclosed stainless steel tank packed with a rectangular limestone block (15cm x 15cm x 76cm) that simulates a saturated confine karst aquifer. DNAPL experiment involve the injection of 40 ml of pure TCE into steady groundwater flow at the upstream boundary of the KLPM model, while sampling spatially and temporally along the block. Samples are analyzed for TCE on the pure and dissolved phase. Pure TCE is analyzed volumetrically and dissolved phase concentrations are analyze using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). TCE data is used to construct temporal distributions curves (TDCs) at different spatial locations. Results show that pure TCE volumes are collected at the beginnings of the experiment in sampling ports located near the injection port and along preferential flow paths. TCE concentration TDCs show spatial variations related to the limestone block heterogeneously. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response and long tailing of TCE of TCE concentration are associated with diffusive transport in rock matrix and mass transport rates limitations. Bimodal distributions are

  13. Coexistence of a sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio species and the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 in defined chemostat cultures grown with various combinations of sulfate and tetrachloroethene.

    PubMed

    Drzyzga, O; Gerritse, J; Dijk, J A; Elissen, H; Gottschal, J C

    2001-02-01

    A two-member co-culture consisting of the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 and the sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio sp. strain SULF1 was obtained via anaerobic enrichment from soil contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE). In this co-culture, PCE dechlorination to cis-dichloroethene was due to the activity of the dehalorespiring bacterium only. Chemostat experiments with lactate as the primary electron donor for both strains along with varying sulphate and PCE concentrations showed that the sulphate-reducing strain outnumbered the dehalogenating strain at relatively high ratios of sulphate/PCE. Stable co-cultures with both organisms present at similar cell densities were observed when both electron acceptors were supplied in the reservoir medium in nearly equimolar amounts. In the presence of low sulphate/PCE ratios, the Desulfitobacterium sp. became the numerically dominant strain within the chemostat co-culture. Surprisingly, in the absence of sulphate, strain SULF1 did not disappear completely from the co-culture despite the fact that there was no electron acceptor provided with the medium to be used by this sulphate reducer. Therefore, we propose a syntrophic association between the sulphate-reducing and the dehalorespiring bacteria via interspecies hydrogen transfer. The sulphate reducer was able to sustain growth in the chemostat co-culture by fermenting lactate and using the dehalogenating bacterium as a 'biological electron acceptor'. This is the first report describing growth of a sulphate-reducing bacterium in a defined two-member continuous culture by syntrophically coupling the electron and hydrogen transfer to a dehalorespiring bacterium.

  14. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PCE) IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), typically used as a dry cleaning solvent, is a predominant contaminant in the subsurface at Superfund Sites. PCE is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that migrates downward into the earth, leaving behind areas of residual saturation and free prod...

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (TCE) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroethylene (TCE) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  16. TCE Removal From Contaminated Soil and Ground Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a halogenated aliphatic organic compound which, due to its unique properties and solvent effects, has been widely used as an ingredient in industrial cleaning solutions and as a “universal” degreasing agent.

  17. Widespread PCE Contamination: Characterization and Source Investigation to Protect Municipal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, C. A.; Benedict, J.; Berg, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    Fifteen years of groundwater quality monitoring of municipal wells in Reno, Nevada have shown increasing levels of PCE (tetrachloroethylene) beyond the U.S. EPA MCL of 5 ug/L. Eleven of the 28 municipal wells have detectable levels of PCE, with five of those wells requiring wellhead treatment. The Central Truckee Meadows Remediation District (CTMRD) was created to provide wellhead treatment of PCE, and evaluate, characterize, and remediate (if possible) the PCE-contaminated groundwater. The CTMRD's first tasks of wellhead treatment, plume characterization, remediation plan development, and source zone identification has been completed. The CTMRD recently completed investigations into the presence of PCE in sanitary sewer systems and their potential as pathways for contaminant migration throughout the Reno/Sparks metropolitan area. The first phase of the sewer investigation considered the possibility that PCE resides in the sanitary sewer system and that it may be actively discharged to the sewer system as well. Results of this investigation revealed that nine sub-regions contained maximum PCE concentrations of that exceeded 100 ug/L, 20 times the U.S. EPA MCL of 5 ug/L. Eight of these nine subregions were located downgradient from active dry-cleaning facilities. One of the sampling locations had a maximum PCE concentration greater than 36,000 ug/L over a 24-hour period. The second phase of the sewer investigation explored for the sanitary sewer system to allow PCE to act as a conduit for contaminant migration. A phased approach was employed to investigate the sewer line leakage and resultant soil and groundwater impact. The investigation found that groundwater beneath most of the targeted sewer line reaches was contaminated. In particular, PCE was detected in 88% of all passive soil gas samples, 71% of all active soil gas samples, 23% of all soil samples, and 73% of all groundwater samples.

  18. Coupling Surfactant Flushing and Bioaugmentation for PCE-DNAPL Source Zone Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Amos, B. K.; Löffler, F. E.; Pennell, K. D.

    2008-12-01

    Enhanced solubilization flushing using a biodegradable surfactant (Tween 80) was combined with bioaugmentation to initiate microbial reductive dechlorination and detoxify residual tetrachloroethene (PCE)- dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Dechlorination activity, spatial distribution of Dehalococcoides spp., and down-gradient plume development were monitored in a 2-D aquifer cell equipped with eighteen sampling ports. Saturation distributions of the PCE-DNAPL source zone were quantified using a light transmission system to determine the ganglia-to-pool (GTP) volume ratio, which was approximately 1.5 (i.e., 60% ganglia and 40% pools) prior to surfactant flushing. Flushing with three pore volumes (PVs) of 4% (w/w) Tween 80 solution recovered approximately 55% of the original PCE mass and reduced PCE effluent concentration from saturation (200 mg/L) to less than 50 mg/L. Following the introduction of reduced basal salts medium amended with 10 mM lactate, nine side ports located upstream and within the initial PCE- DNAPL source zone were augmented with Bio-Dechlor INOCULUM (BDI), a PCE-to-ethene dechlorinating consortium. Flux-averaged measurements of aqueous effluent samples revealed the conversion of PCE to cis-dichloroethene (DCE) with minimal lag time (7 days, approx. 1 PV), and vinyl chloride and ethene were detected within 10 PVs after bioaugmentation. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting Dehalococcoides spp. demonstrated growth once aqueous PCE concentrations decreased below inhibitory levels (~540 mM), with significant growth (2 to 4-orders of magnitude) near the remaining source zone. These results demonstrate the successful colonization of a pool-dominated (NAPL saturation >0.13) PCE- DNAPL source zone by a dechlorinating consortium following partial mass removal, and the potential for locally bioenhanced DNAPL dissolution.

  19. The Potential of the Ni-Resistant TCE-Degrading Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to Reduce Phytotoxicity and Improve Phytoremediation Efficiency of Poplar Cuttings on A Ni-TCE Co-Contamination.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Beckers, Bram; Schellingen, Kerim; Ceulemans, Reinhart; van der Lelie, Daniel; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    To examine the potential of Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve phytoremediation of Ni-TCE co-contamination, the effects of inoculation of a Ni-resistant, TCE-degrading root endophyte on Ni-TCE phytotoxicity, Ni uptake and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of Ni-TCE-exposed poplar cuttings are evaluated. After inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE, root weight of non-exposed poplar cuttings significantly increased. Further, inoculation induced a mitigation of the Ni-TCE phytotoxicity, which was illustrated by a diminished exposure-induced increase in activity of antioxidative enzymes. Considering phytoremediation efficiency, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE resulted in a 45% increased Ni uptake in roots as well as a slightly significant reduction in TCE concentration in leaves and TCE evapotranspiration to the atmosphere. These results indicate that endophytes equipped with the appropriate characteristics can assist their host plant to deal with co-contamination of toxic metals and organic contaminants during phytoremediation. Furthermore, as poplar is an excellent plant for biomass production as well as for phytoremediation, the obtained results can be exploited to produce biomass for energy and industrial feedstock applications in a highly productive manner on contaminated land that is not suited for normal agriculture. Exploiting this land for biomass production could contribute to diminish the conflict between food and bioenergy production.

  20. Simultaneous Transformation of Commingled Trichloroethylene, Tetrachloroethylene, and 1,4-Dioxane by a Microbially Driven Fenton Reaction in Batch Liquid Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Ramanan; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2016-11-01

    Improper disposal of 1,4-dioxane and the chlorinated organic solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene [PCE]) has resulted in widespread contamination of soil and groundwater. In the present study, a previously designed microbially driven Fenton reaction system was reconfigured to generate hydroxyl (HO˙) radicals for simultaneous transformation of source zone levels of single, binary, and ternary mixtures of TCE, PCE, and 1,4-dioxane. The reconfigured Fenton reaction system was driven by fed batch cultures of the Fe(III)-reducing facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis amended with lactate, Fe(III), and contaminants and exposed to alternating anaerobic and aerobic conditions. To avoid contaminant loss due to volatility, the Fe(II)-generating, hydrogen peroxide-generating, and contaminant transformation phases of the microbially driven Fenton reaction system were separated. The reconfigured Fenton reaction system transformed TCE, PCE, and 1,4-dioxane either as single contaminants or as binary and ternary mixtures. In the presence of equimolar concentrations of PCE and TCE, the ratio of the experimentally derived rates of PCE and TCE transformation was nearly identical to the ratio of the corresponding HO˙ radical reaction rate constants. The reconfigured Fenton reaction system may be applied as an ex situ platform for simultaneous degradation of commingled TCE, PCE, and 1,4-dioxane and provides valuable information for future development of in situ remediation technologies.

  1. Applicability Determination Letters for 40 C.F.R. Part 63 Subpart M, National Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This pages contains two letters on the applicability of the National Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities (40 CFR 63, Subpart M). Both letters clarify what constitutes instillation of a dry cleaning machine.

  2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Source Categories: Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaning Facilities - 1993 Final Rule (58 FR 49354)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a copy of the Federal Register publication of the September 22, 1993 Final Rule for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories: Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaning Facilities.

  3. Design and optimization of a 36 MT/day pilot plant for the removal of sulfur from coal using the perchloroethylene process

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, T.L.; Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.

    1994-12-31

    Perchloroethylene solvent can be used for both the physical and chemical cleaning of high sulfur, finely crushed coals. Previous studies using bench-scale extractions have shown that perchloroethylene solvent can remove from 20% to 60% of the organic sulfur in many coals. Associated research using glass tube settlers has demonstrated the potential for using perchloroethylene as a heavy medium for the removal of pyrites and mineral matter using a float/sink process. Additionally, a mini-plot plant has been designed and fabricated to study the cleaning of coal using perchloroethylene in a continuous process. Data from the studies are used to develop models for the unit operations in the coal cleaning process. The models are then used to support the design of a 36 MT/day pilot plant planned for future construction. Studies are done using ASPEN to assess the optimal configuration for the 36 MT/day pilot plant unit operations and to evaluate overall plant efficiency.

  4. Drip Irrigation Aided Phytoremediation for Removal of TCE from Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2003-04-24

    Groundwater in D-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and by-products resulting from discharges of this organic solvent during past disposal practices. This contaminated groundwater occurs primarily at depths of 9 meters to 15 meters below ground surface, well below the depths that are typically penetrated by plant roots. The process investigated in this study involved pumping water from the contaminated aquifer and discharging the water into overlying test plots two inches below the surface using drip irrigation. The field treatability study was conducted from 8/31/00 to 4/18/02 using six 0.08 hectare test plots, two each containing pines, cottonwoods, and no vegetation (controls). The primary objective was to determine the overall effectiveness of the process for TCE removal and to determine the principal biotic and abiotic pathways for its removal. Results demonstrated that the process provides a viable method to remove TCE-contaminated groundwater. The data clearly showed that the presence of trees reduced volatilization of TCE from the drip irrigation system to the atmosphere. Influent groundwater TCE concentrations averaging 89 mg/L were reduced to non-detectable levels (less than 5 mg/L) within the upper two feet of soil (rhizosphere).

  5. COMPARISON OF HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN PCE-DEHALOGENATING AND SULFATE-REDUCING ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary transformation pathway for PCE in anoxic environments is through sequential reductive dehalogenation, and information concerning dehalogenation processes that occur in environments containing alternative electron acceptors (sulfate) is limited. Hydrogen is postulated ...

  6. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  7. EPA Takes Action to Reduce Exposure to TCE in Art and Crafts Spray Fixatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - After the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) assessment of trichloroethylene or TCE showed risk, the sole manufacturer of a fixative product using TCE voluntarily withdrew it from the marketplace. The EPA is now taking action

  8. FRACTIONATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES DURING ABIOTIC TRANSFORMATION OF TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a Superfund Site in Minnesota, ground water is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) with the contaminant plume stretching over five miles long. The ground water is iron and manganese reducing, and the complete absence of dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethene in th...

  9. The Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  10. Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  11. 75 FR 25319 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages... document contains a correction to a notice of the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability... Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Grant Program Office at...

  12. 77 FR 20695 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages... of the availability of Application Packages for the 2013 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program... package to the IRS for the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is May 31, 2012. All...

  13. 75 FR 22437 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages... of the availability of Application Packages for the 2011 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program... application package to the IRS for the 2011 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is July 9,...

  14. 78 FR 17777 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages... of the availability of Application Packages for the 2014 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program... package to the IRS for the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is May 31, 2013. All...

  15. 76 FR 30243 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages... of the availability of Application Packages for the 2012 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program... application package to the IRS for the 2012 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is June 30,...

  16. Biological removal of the xenobiotic trichloroethylene (TCE) through cometabolism in nitrifying systems.

    PubMed

    Kocamemi, B Alpaslan; Ceçen, F

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, cometabolic TCE degradation was evaluated using NH(4)-N as the growth-substrate. At initial TCE concentrations up to 845 microg/L, TCE degradation followed first-order kinetics. The increase in ammonium utilization rate favored the degradation of TCE. This ensured that biological transformation of TCE in nitrifying systems is accomplished through a cometabolic pathway by the catalysis of non-specific ammonia oxygenase enzyme of nitrifiers. The transformation yield (T(y)) of TCE, the amount of TCE degraded per unit mass of NH(4)-N, strongly depended on the initial NH(4)-N and TCE concentrations. In order to allow a rough estimation of TCE removal and nitrification at different influent TCE and NH(4)-N concentrations, a linear relationship was developed between 1/T(y) and the initial NH(4)-N/TCE ratio. The estimated T(y) values lead to the conclusion that nitrifying systems are promising candidates for biological removal of TCE through cometabolism.

  17. Use of exhaled air as an improved biomonitoring method to assess perchloroethylene short-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cláudia M; Menezes, Helvécio C; Cardeal, Zenilda L

    2017-03-22

    This paper shows the use of exhaled air as a biomonitoring method to assess perchloroethylene (PERC) environmental and occupational exposure. A sensitive, fast, and solvent free analytical method was developed to determine PERC in ambient and exhaled air of individuals occupationally exposed. The developed method used cold fiber solid phase microextraction (CF-SPME) as the sampling technique, and a standard permeation method to simulation of air matrix. The analysis were conducted by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The methods were validated and were found to be precise, linear and sensitive for environmental and biological monitoring. The developed methods were applied to twenty-seven sampling points spread across Belo Horizonte city, Brazil, twenty four dry cleaners, an electroplating industry, a research laboratory, and an automotive paint preparation shop. The results of ambient air analyses ranging from 14.0 to 3205.0µgm(-3) with median concentration of 599.0µgm(-3). Furthermore, sampling of exhaled air of individuals occupationally exposed presented results ranging from 6.0 to 2635.0µgm(-3) with median concentration of 325.0µgm(-3). The strong correlation observed between ambient and exhaled air (r =0.930) demonstrates that exhaled air is a suitable biomarker for evaluating occupational exposure to PERC.

  18. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m(3) and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an "Imminent Hazard" condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed.

  19. Au Nanocluster assisted PCE improvement in PEDOT: PSS - Si Hybrid Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2015-03-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), a P-type organic polymer is frequently employed in the fabrication of heterojunction p-n solar cell devices due to its proper HOMO-LUMO band gap as well as its tunable conductivity. In this report we describe the incorporation of gold (Au) nanoclusters in the PEDOT:PSS blend and its influence on the power-conversion-efficiency (PCE) on planar silicon (Si) hybrid heterojunction solar cell devices. Specifically, the reference samples without the aforementioned nanoclusters, were measured to exhibit a 6.10% PCE, value that increased to 7.55% upon the addition of the Au nanoclusters. The observed increase in the PCE is attributed to the enhanced electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS films due to the incorporation of the nanoclusters, which is directly reflected in their improved fill factor. It is further theorized that the presence of Au nanoclusters in the insulating PSS layer in the PEDOT:PSS blend have a positive influence in the charge collection effectiveness of the devices produced. Considering that the Au nanoparticles involved in this research exercise had an average size of only 4 nm, it is considered that plasmonic effects did not play a relevant role in the observed PCE improvement.

  20. Hydration of alumina cement containing ferrotitanium slag with polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE) additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechkalov, Denis; Chernogorlov, Sergey; Abyzov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper is discussing results of study of alumina binder containing aluminous cement and ferrotitanium slag from aluminothermic process by Kliuchevskoi Ferroalloys corp. with various additives containing polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE). Selecting ferrotitanium slag as additive is based on the fact that its content of alumina and phase composition is closest to the alumina cement. The composition of the ferrotitanium slag is displayed. In order to compensate the decrease in strength caused by addition of ferrotitanium slag having low activity, PCE additives were added. As PCE additives were used Melflux 1641F, Melflux 2651F and Melflux PP200F by BASF. The effect of additives on the hydration of the binder, depending on the amount and time of additives hardening is shown. The composition of the hydration products in the cement was studied by physico-chemical analysis: derivatography and X-ray analysis. It is found that in the early stages of hardening PCE additives have inhibitory effect on hydration processes and promote new phase amorphization. The optimal content of additives was investigated. The basic properties of the binders have been tested. It was observed that the modified binders meet the requirements of Russian National State Standard GOST 969 to the alumina cement.

  1. PCE/K-10 Activities for Career Education, Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR. Area II Office.

    The Portland (Oregon) Public School Project Career Education (PCE) Activities for grades 4-6 is based on the city's overall Area 2 program goals for career education which proposed that children completing school should have sufficient knowledge and competencies to enter into a field of employment or an advanced training program in that field.…

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the pneumococcal teichoic acid phosphorylcholine esterase Pce

    SciTech Connect

    Lagartera, Laura; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; García, Pedro; Kahn, Richard; Menéndez, Margarita; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2005-02-01

    The modular choline-binding protein Pce, the phosphorylcholine esterase from S. pneumoniae, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a derivative with a gadolinium complex has been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  3. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  4. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D.; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M.; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m3 and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an “Imminent Hazard” condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed. PMID:23950637

  5. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION RATES AT A PCE SITE (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. Results from an initial site ch...

  6. Experimental Evaluation and Mathematical Modeling of Microbially Enhanced Tetrachloroethene (PCE) Dissolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    concentration. Serum bottles (160 mL nominal capacity, Wheaton Co., Millville , NJ) were prepared with a N2/CO2 (80%/20% [vol/vol]) headspace and sealed with...Teflon-lined, gray butyl rubber septa (1014-4937, West Pharmaceuticals, Lionville, PA) and aluminum crimp caps (Wheaton Co., Millville , NJ). PCE was

  7. Cognitive ATI Research: A Simulated Laboratory Environment in (PCE-)Prolog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamsteeg, Paul A.; Bierman, Dick J.

    A study of 228 undergraduate psychology students examined the effectiveness of a prototype of "heatlab," a laboratory simulation written in PCE-PROLOG, intended for remedying misconceptions of the concepts "heat" and "temperature." The effect of varying the amount of structure on students' understanding and the…

  8. A Planet Hunters Search of the Kepler TCE Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Meg; Lintott, Chris; Fischer, Debra; Smith, Arfon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Brewer, John; Giguere, Matt; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Rob; Wang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    NASA's Kepler spacecraft has spent the past 4 years monitoring ~160,000 stars for the signatures of transiting exoplanets. Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse (http://www.zooniverse.org) collection of citizen science projects, uses the power of human pattern recognition via the World Wide Web to identify transits in the Kepler public data. We have demonstrated the success of a citizen science approach with the project's discoveries including PH1 b, a transiting circumbinary planet in a four star system., and over 20 previously unknown planet candidates. The Kepler team has released the list of 18,406 potential transit signals or threshold-crossing events (TCEs) identified in Quarters 1-12 (~1000 days) by their automated Transit Planet Search (TPS) algorithm. The majority of these detections found by TPS are triggered by transient events and are not valid planet candidates. To identify planetary candidates from the detected TCEs, a human review of the validation reports, generated by the Kepler pipeline for each TCE, is performed by several Kepler team members. We have undertaken an independent crowd-sourced effort to perform a systematic search of the Kepler Q1-12 TCE list. With the Internet we can obtain multiple assessments of each TCE's data validation report. Planet Hunters volunteers evaluate whether a transit is visible in the Kepler light curve folded on the expected period identified by TPS. We present the first results of this analysis.

  9. Bacteria associated with oak and ash on a TCE-contaminated site: Characterization of isolates with potential to avoid evapotranspiration of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Barac, T.; Boulet, J.; Artois, T.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2009-11-01

    Along transects under a mixed woodland of English Oak (Quercus robur) and Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) growing on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater plume, sharp decreases in TCE concentrations were observed, while transects outside the planted area did not show this remarkable decrease. This suggested a possibly active role of the trees and their associated bacteria in the remediation process. Therefore, the cultivable bacterial communities associated with both tree species growing on this TCE-contaminated groundwater plume were investigated in order to assess the possibilities and practical aspects of using these common native tree species and their associated bacteria for phytoremediation. In this study, only the cultivable bacteria were characterized because the final aim was to isolate TCE-degrading, heavy metal resistant bacteria that might be used as traceable inocula to enhance bioremediation. Cultivable bacteria isolated from bulk soil, rhizosphere, root, stem, and leaf were genotypically characterized by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of their 16S rRNA gene and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria that displayed distinct ARDRA patterns were screened for heavy metal resistance, as well as TCE tolerance and degradation, as preparation for possible future in situ inoculation experiments. Furthermore, in situ evapotranspiration measurements were performed to investigate if the degradation capacity of the associated bacteria is enough to prevent TCE evapotranspiration to the air. Between both tree species, the associated populations of cultivable bacteria clearly differed in composition. In English Oak, more species-specific, most likely obligate endophytes were found. The majority of the isolated bacteria showed increased tolerance to TCE, and TCE degradation capacity was observed in some of the strains. However, in situ evapotranspiration measurements revealed that a significant amount of TCE and its metabolites

  10. Abiotic dechlorination in rock matrices impacted by long-term exposure to TCE.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Towne, Rachael M; Lippincott, David R; Lacombe, Pierre J; Bishop, Michael E; Dong, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    Field and laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the abiotic reaction of trichloroethene (TCE) in sedimentary rock matrices. Hydraulically conductive fractures, and the rock directly adjacent to the hydraulically conductive fractures, within a historically contaminated TCE bedrock aquifer were used as the basis for this study. These results were compared to previous work using rock that had not been exposed to TCE (Schaefer et al., 2013) to assess the impact of long-term TCE exposure on the abiotic dechlorination reaction, as the longevity of these reactions after long-term exposure to TCE was hitherto unknown. Results showed that potential abiotic TCE degradation products, including ethane, ethene, and acetylene, were present in the conductive fractures. Using minimally disturbed slices of rock core at and near the fracture faces, laboratory testing on the rocks confirmed that abiotic dechlorination reactions between the rock matrix and TCE were occurring. Abiotic daughter products measured in the laboratory under controlled conditions were consistent with those measured in the conductive fractures, except that propane also was observed as a daughter product. TCE degradation measured in the laboratory was well described by a first order rate constant through the 118-d study. Observed bulk first-order TCE degradation rate constants within the rock matrix were 1.3×10(-8) s(-1). These results clearly show that abiotic dechlorination of TCE is occurring within the rock matrix, despite decades of exposure to TCE. Furthermore, these observed rates of TCE dechlorination are expected to have a substantial impact on TCE migration and uptake/release from rock matrices.

  11. DEPENDENCE OF A HIGH-RATE, PCE-DECHLORINATING ENRICHMENT CULTURE ON METHANOGENIC ACTIVITY. (R825549C053)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role served by the presence of methanogenic activity within a tetrachloroethene (PCE)-dechlorinating culture was investigated through a series of supplementation experiments. An acclimated lactate-enrichment culture (LEC 1) capable of rapidly converting PCE to ethene was s...

  12. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Malvern TCE Superfund Site, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    1997-01-01

    The Malvern TCE Superfund Site, a former solvent recycling facility that now stores and sells solvents, consists of a plant and disposal area, which are approximately 1,900 ft (feet) apart. The site is underlain by an unconfined carbonate bedrock aquifer in which permeability has been enhanced in places by solution. Water levels respond quickly to precipitation and show a similar seasonal variation, response to precipitation, and range of fluctuation. The altitude of water levels in wells at the disposal area is nearly identical because of the small hydraulic gradient. A comparison of water-table maps for 1983, 1993, and 1994 shows that the general shape of the water table and hydraulic gradients in the area have remained the same through time and for different climatic conditions. The plant area is underlain by dolomite of the Elbrook Formation. The dolomite at the plant area does not yield as much water as the dolomite at the disposal area because it is less fractured, and wells penetrate few water-bearing fractures. Yields of nine wells at the plant area range from 1 to 200 gal/min (gallons per minute); the median yield is 6 gal/min. Specific capacities range from 0.08 to 2 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot). Aquifer tests were conducted in two wells; median transmissivities estimated from the aquifer-test data ranged from 528 to 839 feet squared per day. Maximum concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in ground water at the plant area in 1996 were 53,900 ug/L (micrograms per liter) for trichloroethylene (TCE), 7,110 ug/L for tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 17,700 ug/L for 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). A ground-water divide is located between the plant area and the disposal area. Ground-water withdrawal for dewatering the Catanach quarry has caused a cone of depression in the water-table surface that reaches to the plant area. From the plant area, ground water flows 1.2 miles to the northeast and discharges to the Catanach quarry. The regional

  13. Characterization of TCE DNAPL and Dissolved Phase Transport in Karst Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, M.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated sites are a threat to the environment and human health. Of particular concerns is the contamination of karst groundwater systems (KGWSs). Their heterogeneous character, rapid flow through conduits, high permeability zones, and strong storage capacity in the rock porous-matrix pose a high risk of exposure over large areas and temporal scales. To achieve effective remedial actions for TCE removal, it is important to understand and quantify the fate and transport process of trichloroethylene in these systems. This research studies the fate, transport, and distribution of TCE Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) and associated dissolved species in KGWSs. Experiments are conducted in a karstified limestone physical model, a limestone rock mimicking a saturated confined karst aquifer. After injecting TCE solvent into a steady groundwater flow field, samples are taken spatially and temporally and analyzed for TCE NAPL and dissolved phases. Data analysis shows the rapid detection of TCE NAPL and high aqueous concentrations along preferential pathway, even at distances far away from the injection point. Temporal distribution curves exhibit spatial variations related to the limestone rock heterogeneity. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response with long tailing indicates rate-limited diffusive transport in the rock matrix. Overall, results indicate that karstified limestone has a high capacity to rapidly transport pure and dissolved TCE along preferential flow paths, and to store and slowly release TCE over long periods of time.

  14. Biodegradation of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene in a continuous flow column system

    SciTech Connect

    Isalou, M; Sleep, B.E.; Liss, S.N.

    1998-11-15

    A long-term (2.5 years) study of the anaerobic biodegradation of high concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE) was carried out in a continuously operated laboratory column filled with sand which was inoculated with biomass from an anaerobic digester. Concentrations of PCE fed to the column were increased from 12 {micro}M to over 600 {micro}M over 21 months, with methanol added as electron donor. Vinyl chloride (VC) was the terminal product of PCE dechlorination for the first 21 months at which point significant conversion of VC to ethylene (ETH) was detected. The onset of ETH production coincided with acetogenesis becoming the primary pathway for methanol metabolism. ETH production occurred in the column in the presence of PCE and TCE. Varying methanol:PCE molar ratios from 1.4 to 7.5 had little effect on the transformation of PCE and TCE to VC. The degradation of VC to ETH was much more sensitive, and VC accumulated when the methanol:PCE molar ratio dropped below 5.0. Withdrawal of PCE from the system for a 5 month period and maintenance of the column on methanol alone did not result in the loss of PCE degradation capability of the consortium.

  15. In-situ field tests for site characterization and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    An effort is under way at the Groundwater Remediation Field Laboratory National Test Site at Dover AFB to conduct a field demonstration of bioventing of a controlled release containing a mixture of JP-4 jet fuel and trichloroethylene (TCE). The main objective of the field experiment is to demonstrate that the fuel vapors will support the biological co-oxidation of TCE under the aerobic conditions provided by the bioventing system. Some highly chlorinated compounds, such as perchloroethylene (PCE), cannot be biodegraded under aerobic conditions. However, under the proper anaerobic conditions, PCE can be transformed to harmless degradation products via a series of sequential reductive dechlorination steps. A collaborative effort between the Air Force, Navy and EPA is taking place at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, to determine if complete dechlorination of PCE can be efficiently stimulated in situ by the addition of suitable electron donors. Descriptions of these Air Force research demonstrations and results to date will be discussed in this presentation.

  16. RATE OF TCE DEGRADATION IN PASSIVE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews a case study at Altus AFB on the extent of treatment of TCE in a passive reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch. It presents data from a tracer test to estimate the rate of ground water flow at the site, and the residence time of water and TCE in...

  17. Functional Analysis of Esterase TCE2 Gene from Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) involved in Acaricide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Li; Wei, Peng; Wang, Xiangzun; Shen, Guangmao; Zhang, Jiao; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Zhifeng; Xu, Qiang; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important pest of crops and vegetables worldwide, and it has the ability to develop resistance against acaricides rapidly. Our previous study identified an esterase gene (designated TCE2) over-expressed in resistant mites. To investigate this gene’s function in resistance, the expression levels of TCE2 in susceptible, abamectin-, fenpropathrin-, and cyflumetofen-resistant strains were knocked down (65.02%, 63.14%, 57.82%, and 63.99%, respectively) via RNA interference. The bioassay data showed that the resistant levels to three acaricides were significantly decreased after the down-regulation of TCE2, indicating a correlation between the expression of TCE2 and the acaricide-resistance in T. cinnabarinus. TCE2 gene was then re-engineered for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant TCE2 exhibited α-naphthyl acetate activity (483.3 ± 71.8 nmol/mg pro. min−1), and the activity of this enzyme could be inhibited by abamectin, fenpropathrin, and cyflumetofen, respectively. HPLC and GC results showed that 10 μg of the recombinant TCE2 could effectively decompose 21.23% fenpropathrin and 49.70% cyflumetofen within 2 hours. This is the first report of a successful heterologous expression of an esterase gene from mites. This study provides direct evidence that TCE2 is a functional gene involved in acaricide resistance in T. cinnabarinus. PMID:26725309

  18. MICROFRACTURE SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY AND ADHERENT MICROBIAL POPULATION METABOLISM IN TCE-CONTAMINATED COMPETENT BEDROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A TCE-contaminated competent bedrock site in Portsmouth, NH was used to determine if a relation existed between microfracture (MF) surface geochemistry and the ecology and metabolic activity of attached microbes relative to terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and TCE bi...

  19. Plume Development and Mass Flux Following Surfactant-Based Treatment of Heterogeneous PCE-DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomel, E. J.; Pennell, K. D.

    2004-12-01

    The zones of contamination at typical chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites can be divided into two regions: a source zone in which free-phase contaminants (dense nonaqueous phase liquids, or DNAPLs) are present, and a solute plume containing only dissolved-phase contaminants. Currently, pump-and-treat is the most common method for achieving dissolved-phase plume containment; however, it is widely recognized that this approach is generally ineffective for source zone mass removal. As a result, a number of innovative technologies for in situ DNAPL source zone treatment have been developed, but mass removal using these methods is often incomplete. In addition, the effects of partial source zone mass removal on subsequent dissolved-phase plume development and contaminant flux remain poorly understood. To address these issues laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a two dimensional (2-D) aquifer cell having overall dimensions of 150 cm (length) by 48 cm (height) by 1.4 cm (internal thickness) and containing both source zone and down-gradient "plume" regions. The aquifer cells were packed under water-saturated conditions with Accusand (either 20/30 sieve size or a mixture of 50% 20/30 and 50% 40/50 sieve sizes). Within the source zone, three layers of F-70 Ottawa sand lenses were emplaced to mimic heterogeneous regions of lower permeability media. Following tetrachloroethene (PCE) release and redistribution in the source zone, a solubilizing surfactant solution containing 4% Tween 80 was used to achieve sequential PCE mass removals ranging from 30% to 80%. At the conclusion of each surfactant flood, down-gradient contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes were monitored at a hydraulic gradient of 1x10-3. The PCE-DNAPL distributions in the source zone were quantified using light transmission prior to and following each surfactant flood. PCE-DNAPL distribution was expressed in terms of a ganglia to pool ratio (G:P), for which the volume of PCE above residual

  20. Structure, inheritance, and transcriptional effects of Pce1, an insertional element within Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase gene lipI

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, J.; Wymelenberg, A.V.; Cullen, D. |

    1995-08-01

    A 1747-bp insertion within a lignin peroxidase allele of Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767 is described. Pce1, the element, lies immediately adjacent to the fourth intron of lipI2. Southern blots reveal the presence of Pce1-homologous sequences in other P. chrysosporium strains. Transposon-like features include inverted terminal repeats and a dinucleotide (TA) target duplication. Atypical of transposons, Pce1 is present at very low copy numbers (one to five copies), and conserved transposase motifs are lacking. The mutation transcriptionally inactivates lipI2 and is inherited in a 1:1 Mendelian fashion among haploid progeny. Thus, Pce1 is a transposon-like element that may play a significant role in generating ligninolytic variation in certain P. chrysosporium strains. 39 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 2. Transport of TCE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sahoo, D.; Smith, J.A.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Mclellan, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added for a 36-day period (days 36-71 from the start of clean water injection). The effect of Triton X-100 on the desorption and transport of TCE in the field was examined by observing the concentrations of these two solutes in four monitoring wells 3-9 m from the injection wells. These data show a small but discernible increase in the TCE concentration in two of the wells corresponding approximately to the time when surfactant reaches the wells; in the other two monitoring wells, the increase in TCE concentration is negligible. A solute transport model that assumes local sorption equilibrium and used a laboratory-derived distribution coefficient could not adequately describe TCE desorption and transport observed in the aquifer. Two model formulations that accounted for rate-limited sorption - two-site and multisite models - fit the data well. TCE concentrations after surfactant injection were underpredicted by the models unless mass transfer rate was increased to account for the effect of surfactant on the rate of TCE desorption. The concentration data from the two wells and the model analysis suggest that the rate of TCE desorption is increased (by approximately 30%) as a result of Triton X-100 injection.Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added

  2. A study of the effect of perchloroethylene exposure on the reproductive outcomes of wives of dry-cleaning workers

    SciTech Connect

    Eskenazi, B.; Fenster, L.; Hudes, M.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Katz, D.F.; Gerson, J.; Rempel, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the reproductive outcomes of wives of men exposed to perchloroethylene in the dry-cleaning industry compared to those of wives of laundry workers. Seventeen female partners of dry cleaners and 32 partners of laundry workers were interviewed. The number of pregnancies and the standardized fertility ratios were similar between the two groups. Wives of dry cleaners did not have higher rates of spontaneous abortions. However, wives of dry cleaners were more than twice as likely to have a history of attempting to become pregnant for more than 12 months or to have sought care for an infertility problem. Cox proportional hazards models indicated that dry-cleaners' wives had half of the per-cycle pregnancy rate of wives of laundry workers, when controlling for other potential confounders (estimated rate ratio of 0.54, 95% C.I. = 0.23, 1.27).

  3. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  4. Experimental determination of the thermodynamic parameters affecting the adsorption behaviour and dispersion effectiveness of PCE superplasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, J.; Sachsenhauser, B.; Reese, J. de

    2010-05-15

    For adsorption of three different allylether-based PCE superplasticizers on CaCO{sub 3} surface, the thermodynamic parameters DELTAH, DELTAS and DELTAG were determined experimentally. The GIBBS standard free energy of adsorption DELTAG{sub 0ads}, the standard enthalpy of adsorption DELTAH{sub 0ads} and the standard entropy of adsorption DELTAS{sub 0ads} applying to an unoccupied CaCO{sub 3} surface were obtained via a linear regression of ln K (equilibrium constant) versus 1 / T (VAN'T HOFF plot). Additionally, the thermodynamic parameters characteristic for a CaCO{sub 3} surface loaded already with polymer (isosteric conditions) were determined using a modified CLAUSIUS-CLAPEYRON equation. For all PCE molecules, negative DELTAG values were found, indicating that adsorption of these polymers is energetically favourable and a spontaneous process. Adsorption of PCEs possessing short side chains is mainly instigated by electrostatic attraction and a release of enthalpy. Contrary to this, adsorption of PCEs with long side chains occurs because of a huge gain in entropy. The gain in entropy results from the release of counter ions attached to the carboxylate groups of the polymer backbone and of water molecules and ions adsorbed on the CaCO{sub 3} surface. With increased surface loading, however, DELTAG{sub isosteric} decreases and adsorption ceases when DELTAG becomes 0. The presence of Ca{sup 2+} ions in the pore solution strongly impacts PCE adsorption, due to complexation of carboxylate groups and a reduced anionic charge amount of the molecule. In the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, adsorption of allylether-based PCEs is almost exclusively driven by a gain in entropy. Consequently, PCEs should produce a strong entropic effect upon adsorption to be effective cement dispersants. Molecular architecture, anionic charge density and molecular weight as well as the type of anchor groups present in a superplasticizer determine whether enthalpy or entropy is the dominant force for

  5. Acetylene fuels reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter-containing microbial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Mao, X.; Mahandra, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Gushgari, S.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Liu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) poses a threat to health and leads to the generation of vinyl chloride (VC), a carcinogen. Dehalococcoides mccartyi is the only bacterium that can completely dechlorinate TCE to ethene (C2H4). Acetylene (C2H2) occurs in TCE-contaminated sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of TCE. Yet acetylene inhibits a variety of microbial processes including methanogesis and reductive dechlorination. Pelobacter acetylenicus and related species can metabolize acetylene via acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutatse thereby generating acetate and H2 as endproducts, which could serve as electron donor and carbon source for growth of D. mccartyi. We found that 1mM acetylene (aqueous) inhibits growth of D. mccartyi strain 195 on 0.3 mM TCE, but that the inhibition was removed after 12 days with the addition of an acetylene-utilizing isolate from San Francisco Bay, Pelobacter strain SFB93. TCE did not inhibit the growth of this Pelobacter at the concentrations tested (0.1-0.5 mM) and TCE was not consumed by strain SFB93. Co-cultures of strain 195 with strain SFB93 at 5% inoculation were established in 120 mL serum bottles containing 40 mL defined medium. TCE was supplied at a liquid concentration of 0.1 mM, with 0.1 mM acetylene and N2/CO2 (90:10 v/v) headspace at 34 °C. Co-cultures were subsequently transferred (5% vol/vol inoculation) to generate subcultures after 20 μmol TCE was reduced to VC and 36 μmol acetylene was depleted. Aqueous H2 ranged from 114 to 217 nM during TCE-dechlorination, and the cell yield of strain 195 was 3.7 ±0.3 × 107 cells μmol-1 Cl- released. In a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture (ANAS) under the same conditions as above, it was found that inhibition of dechlorination by acetylene was reversed after 19 days by adding SFB93. Thus we showed that a co-culture of Pelobacter SFB93 and D. mccartyi 195 could be maintained with C2H2 as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE

  6. Health assessment for Whitehall Wells, Whitehall, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980701254. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-14

    The Whitehall Wells (WW) are listed on the National Priorities List. Tap water in Whitehall City was found to contain 4 ppb of perchloroethylene (PCE). Two of the city's five production wells contained up to 6 ppb PCE, and nearby monitor wells contained up to 5 ppb 1,1-dichloroethane, 68 ppb trichloroethylene (TCE), 28 ppb chloroform, and 474 ppb cis-1,2-dichloroethylene. Analysis of soil, surface water, and especially ground water within the City of Whitehall clearly demonstrate the presence of chemical contaminants in the environment. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time; human exposure to perchloroethylene has occurred via ground water.

  7. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~ 75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity.

  8. Factors Influencing TCE Anaerobic Dechlorination Investigated via Simulations of Microcosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Harkness, M.; Lee, M. D.; Mack, E. E.; Dworatzek, S.; Acheson, C.; McCarty, P.; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a public-private consortium whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The focus of this 4-year, $5.7 million research project is a field site in the United Kingdom containing a TCE DNAPL source area. In preparation, a microcosm study was performed to determine the optimal combination of factors to support reductive dechlorination of TCE in site soil and groundwater. The study consisted of 168 bottles distributed between four laboratories (Dupont, GE, SiREM, and Terra Systems) and tested the impact of six carbon substrates (lactate, acetate, methanol, SRS (soybean oil), hexanol, butyl acetate), bioaugmentation with KB-1 bacterial culture, three TCE levels (100 mg/L, 400 mg/L, and 800 mg/L) and two sulphate levels (200 mg/L, >500 mg/L) on TCE dechlorination. This research presents a numerical model designed to simulate the main processes occurring in the microcosms, including substrate fermentation, sequential dechlorination, toxic inhibition, and the influence of sulphate concentration. In calibrating the model to over 60 of the microcosm experiments, lumped parameters were employed to quantify the effect of key factors on the conversion rate of each chlorinated ethene in the TCE degradation sequence. Results quantify the benefit (i.e., increased stepwise dechlorination rate) due to both bioaugmentation and the presence of higher sulphate concentrations. Competitive inhibition is found to increase in significance as TCE concentrations increase; however, inclusion of Haldane inhibition is not supported. Over a wide range of experimental conditions and dechlorination steps, SRS appears to induce relatively little hydrogen limitation, thereby facilitating relatively quick conversion of TCE to ethene. In general, hydrogen limitation is found to increase with increasing TCE concentration and with bioaugmentation, and

  9. Improving the treatment of non-aqueous phase TCE in low permeability zones with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Comfort, Steve; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Dvorak, Bruce

    2014-03-15

    Treating dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) embedded in low permeability zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate (MnO4(-)) into LPZs to treat high concentrations of TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into a LPZ that was spiked with non-aqueous phase (14)C-TCE. The treatments we evaluated included permanganate paired with: (i) a shear-thinning polymer (xanthan); (ii) stabilization aids that minimized MnO2 rind formation and (iii) a phase-transfer catalyst. In addition, we quantified the ability of these flooding solutions to improve TCE destruction under batch conditions by developing miniature LPZ cylinders that were spiked with (14)C-TCE. Transport experiments showed that MnO4(-) alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with non-aqueous phase TCE, due to a distinct and large MnO2 rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. By including xanthan with MnO4(-), the sweeping efficiency increased (90%) but rind formation was still evident. By including the stabilization aid, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. Batch experiments using LPZ cylinders allowed longer contact times between the flooding solutions and the DNAPL and results showed that SHMP+MnO4(-) improved TCE destruction by ∼16% over MnO4(-) alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%). These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in low permeable zones.

  10. Highly organic natural media as permeable reactive barriers: TCE partitioning and anaerobic degradation profile in eucalyptus mulch and compost.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Zuhal; Tansel, Berrin; Katsenovich, Yelena; Sukop, Michael; Laha, Shonali

    2012-10-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted with eucalyptus mulch and commercial compost to evaluate suitability of highly organic natural media to support anaerobic decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. Experimental data for TCE and its dechlorination byproducts were analyzed with Hydrus-1D model to estimate the partitioning and kinetic parameters for the sequential dechlorination reactions during TCE decomposition. The highly organic natural media allowed development of a bioactive zone capable of decomposing TCE under anaerobic conditions. The first order TCE biodecomposition reaction rates were 0.23 and 1.2d(-1) in eucalyptus mulch and compost media, respectively. The retardation factors in the eucalyptus mulch and compost columns for TCE were 35 and 301, respectively. The results showed that natural organic soil amendments can effectively support the anaerobic bioactive zone for remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater. The natural organic media are effective environmentally sustainable materials for use in permeable reactive barriers.

  11. Time trends of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene in confined and unconfined aquifers of a groundwater system in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Altissimo, Lorenzo; Andreoli, Elisa; Giacometti, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene were recorded in a groundwater system of Northern Italy over the period 1985-1997. In the unconfined recharging aquifer these chemicals showed a remarkable overall decline which was accompanied by a five-fold reduction in their consumption (from approx. 250 to approx. 50 tons year-1) over the same period. The time trends for the confined aquifers indicated a steady decline for 1,1,1-trichloroethane which was accompanied by a constant concentration of trichloroethylene and an increasing presence of perchloroethylene. It is suggested that the confined aquifers are recording a contamination which took place in the unconfined recharging aquifer before monitoring period (1982) started. At present, in most of the study area 1,1,1-trichloroethane contamination is below the detection limit (0.1 microgram/L). For trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, the average unconfined aquifer contamination accounts for approx. 1 +/- 1 and approx. 4 +/- 3 micrograms/L, respectively, while in the confined aquifers the average concentrations are approx. 8 +/- 3 and approx. 35 +/- 5 micrograms/L, respectively.

  12. Comparison of TCeMA and TDMA for Inter-Satellite Communications using OPNET Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hain, Regina Rosales; Ramanathan, Ram; Bergamo, Marcos; Wallett, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    A robust data link protocol, enabling unique physical and MAC layer technologies and sub-network level protocols, is needed in order to take advantage of the full potential of using both TDMA and CDMA in a satellite communication network. A novel MAC layer protocol, TDMA with CDMA-encoding multiple access (TCeMA) integrated with null-steered digital beam-forming spatial multiplexing, is investigated to support flexible spacecraft communications. Abstract models of the TCeMA and TDMA processes are developed in OPNFiT and a comparison of the performances of TCeMA and TDMA in a satellite network simulation are made. TCeMA provides the better connectivity and capacity with respect to TDMA for satellite communication traffic.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLOROMETHANE FROMATION PATHS DURING ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TCE USING GRAPHITE ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the formation of chloromethane during TCE dechlorination in a mixed electrochemical reactor using graphite electrodes. Chloromethane was the major chlorinated organic compound detected in previous dechlorination experiments. In order...

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLOROMETHANE FORMATION PATHS DURING ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TCE USING GRAPHITE ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the formation of chloromethane during TCE dechlorination in a mixed electrochemical reactor using graphite electrodes. Chloromethane was the major chlorinated organic compound detected in previous dechlorination experiments. In order...

  15. Summary of External Peer Review and Public Comments and Disposition for Trichloroethylene (TCE)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document summarizes the public and external peer review comments that the EPA’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) received for the draft work plan risk assessment for trichloroethylene (TCE).

  16. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  17. Structural characterization of bagasse-derived composts with different maturities and their solubility enhancing effect on PCE and toluene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chihhao; Tsai, Minzhe; Tsui, Lo

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the structure variation of bagasse-derived composts during their maturation process. The surface tension and dissolved carbon content of their extract (compost tea) were measured, and the compost structure was analyzed using FTIR and (13)C NMR. The FTIR and (13)C NMR analyses showed that the alkyl and aromatic contents of the investigated composts increased as the composting time increased from 0 to 6 months. The aqueous solubility enhancements of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and toluene by bagasse-derived compost tea with different maturities were investigated. The PCE and toluene solubility enhancement experiments were conducted at various compost concentrations. The most PCE and toluene solubility were enhanced by 3 and 6-month bagasse-derived composts, respectively. This observation was due to the structural transformation from alkyl to aromatic functional groups in the composting process.

  18. In-situ bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Rosenberg, N.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A barrier to wider use of in situ bioremediation technology is that results are often variable and difficult to predict. In situ bioremediation has shown some very notable and well publicized successes, but implementation of the technology is complex. An incomplete understanding of the effects of variable site characteristics and the lack of adequate tools to predict and measure success have made the design, control and validation of bioremediation more empirical than desired. The long-term objective of this project is to improve computational tools used to assess and optimize the expected performance of bioremediation at a site. An important component of the approach is the explicit inclusion of uncertainties and their effect on the end result. The authors have extended their biokinetics model to include microbial competition and predation processes. Predator species can feed on the microbial species that degrade contaminants, and the simulation studies show that species interactions must be considered when designing in situ bioremediation systems. In particular, the results for TCE indicate that protozoan grazing could reduce the amount of biodegradation by about 20%. These studies also indicate that the behavior of barrier systems can become complex due to predator grazing.

  19. The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE). Final report, August 13, 1990--February 12, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-12

    While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

  20. Dynamic virtual link mesh topology aggregation in multi-domain translucent WSON with hierarchical-PCE.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Ramon; Martínez, Ricardo; Muñoz, Raül; Liu, Lei; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Tsurusawa, Munefumi

    2011-12-12

    We present a lab-trial of the designed and implemented path computation architecture for multi-domain translucent wavelength switched optical networks (WSON), using hierarchical Path Computation Elements (H-PCE). The approach is based on the dynamic aggregation of the domain topologies, represented as a virtual link meshes at a higher level, in order to perform dynamic domain sequence selection. We detail the extended path computation procedures, involving both domain selections considering inter domain links and segment expansions which are impairment-aware, along with the proposed control plane protocol extensions. We validate the approach with the overall performance of the end to end path computation latency, highlighting the benefits of parallelization.

  1. Impacts of Residual Surfactant on Tetrachloroethene (PCE) Degradation Following Pilot-Scale SEAR Treatment at a Chloroethene-Impacted Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Abriola, L. M.; Pennell, K. D.; Löffler, F. E.; Gamache, M.; Petrovskis, E. A.

    2003-04-01

    A pilot-scale surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) demonstration was completed during the summer of 2000 at the Bachman Road site (Oscoda, MI USA). For this test, an aqueous solution of 60 g/L Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate) was used to recover tetrachloroethene (PCE) from a suspected source zone, located underneath a former dry-cleaning facility. Tween 80 was selected for use based upon its demonstrated capacity to solubilize PCE, “food-grade” status, and biodegradative potential. Hydraulic control was maintained throughout the test, with 95% of the injected surfactant mass recovered by a single extraction well. Source-zone monitoring conducted 15 months after SEAR treatment revealed the presence of previously undetected volatile fatty acids (acetate and formate) and PCE degradation products (trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, trans-1,2-dichlorethene, and vinyl chloride), in conjunction with PCE concentration reductions of approximately two orders-of-magnitude. The detection of volatile fatty acids is relevant, as they are likely fermentation products of residual Tween 80. Microbial reductive dechlorination is limited by available electron donors, and microcosm studies demonstrated that both acetate and formate support reductively dechlorinating populations present at the oligotrophic Bachman Road site aquifer. Surfactant transport simulations, using a regional flow model developed for the site, were employed to determine appropriate down-gradient monitoring locations. Drive point samples taken 15 months post-treatment in the vicinity of the simulated residual surfactant plume, contained elevated concentrations of acetate and PCE daughter products. Ongoing efforts include continued site-monitoring, and microcosm studies to corroborate a causal relationship between Tween 80 fermentation and PCE dechlorination.

  2. Endophytic bacteria improve phytoremediation of Ni and TCE co-contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Croes, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate if engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of co-contaminations by organic pollutants and toxic metals. As a model system, yellow lupine was inoculated with the endophyte Burkholderia cepacia VM1468 possessing (a) the pTOM-Bu61 plasmid, coding for constitutive trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation, and (b) the ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system. Plants were exposed to Ni and TCE and (a) Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, (b) TCE degradation and evapotranspiration, and (c) Ni concentrations in the roots and shoots were determined. Inoculation with B. cepacia VM1468 resulted in decreased Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, as measured by 30% increased root biomass and up to 50% decreased activities of enzymes involved in anti-oxidative defence in the roots. In addition, TCE evapotranspiration showed a decreasing trend and a 5 times higher Ni uptake was observed after inoculation. Engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of mixed contaminations via enhanced degradation of organic contaminants and improved metal uptake and translocation.

  3. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  4. [Steam and air co-injection in removing TCE in 2D-sand box].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Peng, Sheng; Chen, Jia-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Steam and air co-injection is a newly developed and promising soil remediation technique for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in vadose zone. In this study, in order to investigate the mechanism of the remediation process, trichloroethylene (TCE) removal using steam and air co-injection was carried out in a 2-dimensional sandbox with different layered sand structures. The results showed that co-injection perfectly improved the "tailing" effect compared to soil vapor extraction (SVE), and the remediation process of steam and air co-injection could be divided into SVE stage, steam strengthening stage and heat penetration stage. Removal ratio of the experiment with scattered contaminant area was higher and removal speed was faster. The removal ratios from the two experiments were 93.5% and 88.2%, and the removal periods were 83.9 min and 90.6 min, respectively. Steam strengthened the heat penetration stage. The temperature transition region was wider in the scattered NAPLs distribution experiment, which reduced the accumulation of TCE. Slight downward movement of TCE was observed in the experiment with TCE initially distributed in a fine sand zone. And such downward movement of TCE reduced the TCE removal ratio.

  5. Modeling the uptake and transpiration of TCE using phreatophytic trees. Master`s Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.P.

    1997-12-01

    Phytoremediation is a recent addition to the numerous methods used today to remediate ground water contaminants. It is proving more effective and efficient compared to existing remediation techniques. The use of phreatophytes, or water seeking trees, has great potential for phytoremediation. These trees are fast growing, long lived, grow their roots down to the ground water table, transpire large amounts of water, and are proven to actively remove contaminants from the soil horizon. The purpose of this research is to develop quantitative concepts for understanding the dynamics of TCE uptake and transpiration by phreatophytic trees over a short rotation woody crop time frame. This will he done by constructing a system dynamics model of this process and running it over a wide range of conditions. This research will offer managers a tool to simulate long-term uptake and transpiration of TCE at potential sites. The results of this study indicate that TCE is actively removed from the soil horizon by phreatophytic trees and a significant proportion of this TCE is then transpired. Changes in soil horizon parameters, xylem flow rates, and variables in the uptake equation greatly influence TCE uptake rates as well as transpiration. Also, parameters used in equations representing flows in and out of the leaf greatly influence transpiration. Better understanding of these processes is essential for managers to accurately predict the amount of TCE removed and transpired during potential phytoremediation projects.

  6. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  7. FY01 Phytoremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in Southern Sector Seepline Sediments of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2004-01-30

    This treatability study is now in the second year of deployment for the Southern Sector Phytoremediation Project. Phytoremediation is the use of vegetation and associated media to treat contaminated soils, sediments, and groundwater. Phytoremediation is a rapidly developing technology that promises effective and safe cleanup of certain hazardous wastes. This ongoing work addresses the fate of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) in an experiment that simulates a vegetated seepline supplied with trichloroethylene- (TCE-) and perchloroethylene- (PCE-) contaminated groundwater. The primary objective is to determine how the trees and sediments uptake groundwater TCE and PCE, biodegrade it, and/or transform it. The experimental focus of this project is the biological removal of VOCs from seepline groundwater and sediments.

  8. INFLUENCE OF HYDRAULIC RETENTION TIME ON EXTENT OF PCE DECHLORINATION AND PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ENRICHMENT CULTURE. (R826694C703)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dechlorination in two chemostats was evaluated as a function of hydraulic retention time (HRT). The inoculum of these chemostats was from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that rapidly converts PCE to vinyl chloride (VC) an...

  9. TCE degradation by toluene/benzene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 and Escherichia coli recombinant

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Junichi; Kitayama, Atsushi

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 incorporates more than three degradation pathways for aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylene. A dioxygenase and two monooxygenases were cloned in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue. The dioxygenase yielding cis-toluene dihydrodiol and one of the monooxygenases producing o-cresol from toluene did not exhibit conspicuous activity in trichloroethylene (TCE) oxygenation, although DNA sequencing proved that the former enzyme was an isozyme of toluene dioxygenase of the known TCE decomposer P.putida F1. The other toluene/benzene monooxygenase that could generate o-, m-, and p-cresol simultaneously from toluene showed TCE oxygenation activity resulting in TCE decomposition in E. coli. The activity was inhibited competitively by toluene, ethylbenzene, and o- and m-xylene: their inhibition constants were greater than those of propylbenzene and p-xylene. When the E. coli recombinant harboring the monooxygenase was induced by isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and incubated in the absence of toluene, TCE degradation activity decreased during incubation, compared to that with toluene. Toluene probably controlled the lifetime of the enzyme.

  10. Niépce-Bell or Turing: how to test odour reproduction.

    PubMed

    Harel, David

    2016-12-01

    Decades before the existence of anything resembling an artificial intelligence system, Alan Turing raised the question of how to test whether machines can think, or, in modern terminology, whether a computer claimed to exhibit intelligence indeed does so. This paper raises the analogous issue for olfaction: how to test the validity of a system claimed to reproduce arbitrary odours artificially, in a way recognizable to humans. Although odour reproduction systems are still far from being viable, the question of how to test candidates thereof is claimed to be interesting and non-trivial, and a novel method is proposed. Despite the similarity between the two questions and their surfacing long before the tested systems exist, the present question cannot be answered adequately by a Turing-like method. Instead, our test is very different: it is conditional, requiring from the artificial no more than is required from the original, and it employs a novel method of immersion that takes advantage of the availability of easily recognizable reproduction methods for sight and sound, a la Nicéphore Niépce and Alexander Graham Bell.

  11. Optimizing binary phase and amplitude filters for PCE, SNR, and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Binary phase-only filters (BPOFs) have generated much study because of their implementation on currently available spatial light modulator devices. On polarization-rotating devices such as the magneto-optic spatial light modulator (SLM), it is also possible to encode binary amplitude information into two SLM transmission states, in addition to the binary phase information. This is done by varying the rotation angle of the polarization analyzer following the SLM in the optical train. Through this parameter, a continuum of filters may be designed that span the space of binary phase and amplitude filters (BPAFs) between BPOFs and binary amplitude filters. In this study, we investigate the design of optimal BPAFs for the key correlation characteristics of peak sharpness (through the peak-to-correlation energy (PCE) metric), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and discrimination between in-class and out-of-class images. We present simulation results illustrating improvements obtained over conventional BPOFs, and trade-offs between the different performance criteria in terms of the filter design parameter.

  12. Application of electrolysis to stimulate microbial reductive PCE dechlorination and oxidative VC biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Tiehm, Andreas

    2009-09-15

    A novel approach was applied to stimulate biodegradation of chloroethenes bya coupled bioelectro-process. In a flow-through column system, microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to cis-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, and ethene was stimulated by hydrogen produced by water electrolysis. Dechlorinating bacteria (Dehalococcoides spp. and Desulfitobacterium spp.) and also methanogens and homoacetogens were detected in the anaerobic column. Simultaneously, oxidative biodegradation of lower chlorinated metabolites (vinyl chloride) was stimulated by electrolytic oxygen formation in the corresponding aerobic column. The process was stable for more than 100 days and an average removal of approximately 23 micromol/d PCE and 72 micromo/d vinyl chloride was obtained with a current density of 0.05 mA/cm2. Abiotic electrochemical degradation of the contaminants was not observed. Microbial dechlorination correlated with the current densities in the applied range of 0.01-0.05 mA/cm2. The results are promising for environmental applications, since with electrolysis hydrogen and oxygen can be supplied continuously to chloroethene degrading microorganisms, and the supply rates can be easily controlled by adjusting the electric current.

  13. Development and evaluation of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for perchloroethylene toxicokinetics in mice, rats, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Ginsberg, Gary L.

    2011-06-15

    This article reports on the development of a 'harmonized' PBPK model for the toxicokinetics of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene or perc) in mice, rats, and humans that includes both oxidation and glutathione (GSH) conjugation of perc, the internal kinetics of the oxidative metabolite trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and the urinary excretion kinetics of the GSH conjugation metabolites N-Acetylated trichlorovinyl cysteine and dichloroacetic acid. The model utilizes a wider range of in vitro and in vivo data than any previous analysis alone, with in vitro data used for initial, or 'baseline,' parameter estimates, and in vivo datasets separated into those used for 'calibration' and those used for 'evaluation.' Parameter calibration utilizes a limited Bayesian analysis involving flat priors and making inferences only using posterior modes obtained via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). As expected, the major route of elimination of absorbed perc is predicted to be exhalation as parent compound, with metabolism accounting for less than 20% of intake except in the case of mice exposed orally, in which metabolism is predicted to be slightly over 50% at lower exposures. In all three species, the concentration of perc in blood, the extent of perc oxidation, and the amount of TCA production is well-estimated, with residual uncertainties of {approx} 2-fold. However, the resulting range of estimates for the amount of GSH conjugation is quite wide in humans ({approx} 3000-fold) and mice ({approx} 60-fold). While even high-end estimates of GSH conjugation in mice are lower than estimates of oxidation, in humans the estimated rates range from much lower to much higher than rates for perc oxidation. It is unclear to what extent this range reflects uncertainty, variability, or a combination. Importantly, by separating total perc metabolism into separate oxidative and conjugative pathways, an approach also recommended in a recent National Research Council review, this analysis

  14. Numerical simulation of transport and sequential biodegradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons using CHAIN_2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerlaekens, J.; Mallants, D.; Imûnek, J.; van Genuchten, M. Th.; Feyen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Microbiological degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) under anaerobic conditions follows a series of chain reactions, in which, sequentially, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), vinylchloride (VC) and ethene are generated. First-order degradation rate constants, partitioning coefficients and mass exchange rates for PCE, TCE, c-DCE and VC were compiled from the literature. The parameters were used in a case study of pump-and-treat remediation of a PCE-contaminated site near Tilburg, The Netherlands. Transport, non-equilibrium sorption and biodegradation chain processes at the site were simulated using the CHAIN_2D code without further calibration. The modelled PCE compared reasonably well with observed PCE concentrations in the pumped water. We also performed a scenario analysis by applying several increased reductive dechlorination rates, reflecting different degradation conditions (e.g. addition of yeast extract and citrate). The scenario analysis predicted considerably higher concentrations of the degradation products as a result of enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCE. The predicted levels of the very toxic compound VC were now an order of magnitude above the maximum permissible concentration levels.

  15. The Observation of the Change of TCE Caused by Different Acupuncture Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Xinnong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the change of transcutaneous CO2 emission on meridian points or nonacupoints when the different needle sensations were gotten and study the associativity between Deqi acupuncture and periphery constitution energy metabolism effect. Method. 20 healthy volunteers were punctured on Neiguan (P6) in different ways including sham, shallow, Deqi acupuncture, and Deqi plus pressed P5, and measured TCE of different points before, during, and after acupuncture. Result. Needle sensations of sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture were less than those of Deqi acupuncture. TCE of meridian points increased significantly and showed the specificity of meridian/channels. Conclusion. Verum acupuncture could cause the stronger needling sensations including distention, aching, numbness, and tingling than sham and shallow acupuncture. The strength of needling sensation caused by Deqi acupuncture is moderate and brought the best curative effects in TCE measurement. Deqi acupuncture could improve the energy metabolism of the points on the corresponding meridian/channel.

  16. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate.

    PubMed

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2016-02-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min(-1)) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its adverse effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min(-1) flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L(-1) initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated.

  17. Acetylene fuels TCE reductive dechlorination by defined Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter consortia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, Xinwei; Oremland, Ronald S.; Liu, Tong; Landers, Abigail A; Baesman, Shaun; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) can be generated in contaminated groundwater sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by in situ minerals, and C2H2 is known to inhibit bacterial dechlorination. In this study, we show that while high C2H2 (1.3 mM) concentrations reversibly inhibit reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides mccartyi isolates as well as enrichment cultures containing D. mccartyi sp., low C2H2 (0.4 mM) concentrations do not inhibit growth or metabolism of D. mccartyi. Cocultures of Pelobacter SFB93, a C2H2-fermenting bacterium, with D. mccartyi strain 195 or with D. mccartyi strain BAV1 were actively sustained by providing acetylene as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE or cis-DCE served as the electron acceptor. Inhibition by acetylene of reductive dechlorination and methanogenesis in the enrichment culture ANAS was observed, and the inhibition was removed by adding Pelobacter SFB93 into the consortium. Transcriptomic analysis of D. mccartyi strain 195 showed genes encoding for reductive dehalogenases (e.g., tceA) were not affected during the C2H2-inhibition, while genes encoding for ATP synthase, biosynthesis, and Hym hydrogenase were down-regulated during C2H2 inhibition, consistent with the physiological observation of lower cell yields and reduced dechlorination rates in strain 195. These results will help facilitate the optimization of TCE-bioremediation at contaminated sites containing both TCE and C2H2.

  18. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min−1) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its advers effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min−1 flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L−1 initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated. PMID:26344148

  19. System for In-Situ Detection of Plant Exposure to Trichloroethylene (TCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark D. (Inventor); Anderson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Newman, Lee A. (Inventor); Keith, Amy G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A system detects a plant's exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through plant leaf imaging. White light impinging upon a plant's leaf interacts therewith to produce interacted light. A detector is positioned to detect at least one spectral band of the interacted light. A processor coupled to the detector performs comparisons between photonic energy of the interacted light at the one or more spectral bands thereof and reference data defining spectral responses indicative of leaf exposure to TCE. An output device coupled to the processor provides indications of the comparisons.

  20. Preliminary technology report for Southern Sector bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; White, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Jones, D.; Berry, C.

    1997-06-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate the potential of intrinsic bioremediation and phytoremediation in the Southern Sector of the A/M-Area at the Savannah River Site. A subsurface plume of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) is present in the Lost Lake aquifer upgradient of the study site and is predicted to impact the area at some point in the future. The surface area along the Lost lake aquifer seep line where the plume is estimated to emerge was identified. Ten sites along the seep line were selected for biological, chemical, and contaminant treatability analyses. A survey was undertaken in this area to to quantify the microbial and plant population known to be capable of remediating TCE and PCE. The current groundwater quality upgradient and downgradient of the zone of influence was determined. No TCE or PCE was found in the soils or surface water from the area tested at this time. A TCE biodegradation treatability test was done on soil from the 10 selected locations. From an initial exposure of 25 ppm of TCE, eight of the samples biodegraded up to 99.9 percent of all the compound within 6 weeks. This biodegradation of TCE appears to be combination of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activity as intermediates that were detected in the treatability test include vinyl chloride (VC) and the dichloroethenes (DCE) 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethylene. The TCE biological treatability studies were combines with microbiological and chemical analyses. The soils were found through immunological analysis with direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) and microbiological analysis with direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) and microbiological analysis to have a microbial population of methanotrophic bacteria that utilize the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) and cometabolize TCE.

  1. Use Of Statistical Tools To Evaluate The Reductive Dechlorination Of High Levels Of TCE In Microcosm Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large, multi-laboratory microcosm study was performed to select amendments for supporting reductive dechlorination of high levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) found at an industrial site in the United Kingdom (UK) containing dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE. The study ...

  2. PD-CATALYZED TCE DECHLORINATION IN GROUNDWATER: SOLUTE EFFECTS, BIOLOGICAL CONTROL, AND OXIDATIVE CATALYST REGENERATION. (R825421)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a Pd-on-src="/ncer/pubs/images/gamma.gif">-Al2O3 catalyst for
    dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) was evaluated in synthetic and real
    groundwater. Low initial TCE conversions were used to provide maximum ...

  3. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE, Perc) levels in residential dry cleaner buildings in diverse communities in New York City.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Michael J; Mazor, Kimberly A; Shost, Stephen J; Narang, Rajinder S; Aldous, Kenneth M; Storm, Jan E

    2005-10-01

    Fugitive tetrachloroethylene (PCE, perc) emissions from dry cleaners operating in apartment buildings can contaminate residential indoor air. In 1997, New York State and New York City adopted regulations to reduce and contain perc emissions from dry cleaners located in residential and other buildings. As part of a New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) study, indoor air perc levels were determined in 65 apartments located in 24 buildings in New York City where dry cleaners used perc on site. Sampling occurred during 2001-2003, and sampled buildings were dispersed across minority and nonminority as well as low-income and higher income neighborhoods. For the entire study area, the mean apartment perc level was 34 microg/m3, 10-fold lower than mean apartment levels of 340-360 microg/m3 documented before 1997. The maximum detected perc level was 5,000 microg/m3, 5-fold lower than the maximum of 25,000 microg/m3 documented before 1997. Despite these accomplishments, perc levels in 17 sampled apartments still exceeded the NYSDOH residential air guideline of 100 microg/m3, and perc levels in 4 sampled apartments exceeded 1,000 microg/m3. Moreover, mean indoor air perc levels in minority neighborhoods (75 microg/m3) were four times higher than in nonminority households (19 microg/m3) and were > 10 times higher in low-income neighborhoods (256 microg/m3) than in higher income neighborhoods (23 microg/m3). Logistic regression suitable for clustered data (apartments within buildings) indicated that perc levels on floors 1-4 were significantly more likely to exceed 100 microg/m3 in buildings located in minority neighborhoods (odds ratio = 6.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-30.5) than in nonminority neighborhoods. Factors that may be contributing to the elevated perc levels detected, especially in minority and low-income neighborhoods, are being explored.

  4. A novel PCE-based algorithm for P2MP inter-domain traffic engineering in optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Koubo; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Yu, Ziyan; Gu, Wanyi; Wang, Dajiang; Cao, Xuping

    2011-12-01

    Point-to-Multipoint (P2MP) services in optical networks are more and more important for high-capacity applications. Steiner tree algorithms have been investigated to compute minimum-cost multicast tree. However, it is difficult to compute an optimal P2MP tree in multi-domain networks because of isolation of each domain. There are several algorithms based on Path Computation Element (PCE) for computing multi-domain Point-to-point path, but computing P2MP Traffic Engineering Label Switched Path (TE-LSP) in a multi-domain networks is still a challenge. In this paper, three PCE-based schemes for P2MP inter-domain LSP computation are compared in full splitting capability networks, and a novel Multi-Domain Minimum-cost Path Heuristic (MDMPH) algorithm is proposed. Simulation results proved that the MDMPH algorithm computes P2MP tree with less cost than the other three schemes.

  5. Effect of emplaced nZVI mass and groundwater velocity on PCE dechlorination and hydrogen evolution in water-saturated sand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Leitch, Megan; Naknakorn, Bhanuphong; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2017-01-15

    The effect of nZVI mass loading and groundwater velocity on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination rate and the hydrogen evolution rate for poly(maleic acid-co-olefin) (MW=12K) coated nZVI was examined. In batch reactors, the PCE reaction rate constant (3.7×10(-4)Lhr(-1)m(-2)) and hydrogen evolution rate constant (1.4 nanomolLhr(-1)m(-2)) were independent of nZVI concentration above 10g/L, but the PCE dechlorination rate decreased and the hydrogen evolution rate increased for nZVI concentration below 10g/L. The nonlinearity between nZVI mass loading and PCE dechlorination and H2 evolution was explained by differences in pH and Eh at each nZVI mass loading; PCE reactivity increased when solution Eh decreased, and the H2 evolution rate increased with decreasing pH. Thus, nZVI mass loading of <5g/L yields lower reactivity with PCE and lower efficiency of Fe° utilization than for higher nZVI mass loading. The PCE dechlorination rate increased with increasing pore-water velocity, suggesting that mass transfer limits the reaction at low porewater velocity. Overall, this work suggests that design of nZVI-based reactive barriers for groundwater treatment should consider the non-linear effects of both mass loading and flow velocity on performance and expected reactive lifetime.

  6. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  7. Chemical oxidation of contaminants in clay or sandy soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Cline, S.R.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes laboratory studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), investigating the feasibility of the application of low-strength hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) solutions to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A statistically designed screening study was completed that evaluated the effect of several factors on chemical oxidation treatment efficiency. This study revealed that the most important factors include oxidant type, oxidant concentration, reaction time and soil type. Using the optimum treatment conditions, greater than 90% reduction of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) was achieved using in situ chemical oxidation.

  8. Episodic emissions data summary. Final report, March-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Howle, R.H.; Nash, R.A.

    1987-06-01

    The report presents a complete summary of episodic emissions data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of Section 114 of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Episodic emissions data were collected for the production and use of nine potentially hazardous organic compounds: methylene chloride (MC), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF), perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethylene dichloride (EDC), butadiene (BD), ethylene oxide (EO), and epichlorohydrin (EPI). These chemicals and data are reported in 13 source categories that best describe the scope of use of these chemicals.

  9. Consistent post-reaction vibrational energy redistribution in DSMC simulations using TCE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges Sebastião, Israel; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-10-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method has been widely applied to study shockwaves, hypersonic reentry flows, and other nonequilibrium flow phenomena. Although there is currently active research on high-fidelity models based on ab initio data, the total collision energy (TCE) and Larsen-Borgnakke (LB) models remain the most often used chemistry and relaxation models in DSMC simulations, respectively. The conventional implementation of the discrete LB model, however, may not satisfy detailed balance when recombination and exchange reactions play an important role in the flow energy balance. This issue can become even more critical in reacting mixtures involving polyatomic molecules, such as in combustion. In this work, this important shortcoming is addressed and an empirical approach to consistently specify the post-reaction vibrational states close to thermochemical equilibrium conditions is proposed within the TCE framework. Following Bird's quantum-kinetic (QK) methodology for populating post-reaction states, the new TCE-based approach involves two main steps. The state-specific TCE reaction probabilities for a forward reaction are first pre-computed from equilibrium 0-D simulations. These probabilities are then employed to populate the post-reaction vibrational states of the corresponding reverse reaction. The new approach is illustrated by application to exchange and recombination reactions relevant to H2-O2 combustion processes.

  10. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  11. Decision Tree based Prediction and Rule Induction for Groundwater Trichloroethene (TCE) Pollution Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Yoo, K.

    2013-12-01

    For groundwater resource conservation, it is important to accurately assess groundwater pollution sensitivity or vulnerability. In this work, we attempted to use data mining approach to assess groundwater pollution vulnerability in a TCE (trichloroethylene) contaminated Korean industrial site. The conventional DRASTIC method failed to describe TCE sensitivity data with a poor correlation with hydrogeological properties. Among the different data mining methods such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Multiple Logistic Regression (MLR), Case Base Reasoning (CBR), and Decision Tree (DT), the accuracy and consistency of Decision Tree (DT) was the best. According to the following tree analyses with the optimal DT model, the failure of the conventional DRASTIC method in fitting with TCE sensitivity data may be due to the use of inaccurate weight values of hydrogeological parameters for the study site. These findings provide a proof of concept that DT based data mining approach can be used in predicting and rule induction of groundwater TCE sensitivity without pre-existing information on weights of hydrogeological properties.

  12. RATE OF TCE DEGRADATION IN A PLANT MULCH PASSIVE REACTIVE BARRIER (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contaminated groun...

  13. FIELD SCALE EVALUATION OF TREATMENT OF TCE IN A BIOWALL AT THE OU-1 SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier (Biowall) was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contamin...

  14. Abiotic and Biotic Transformation of TCE under Sulfate Reducing Conditions: the Role of Spatial Heterogeneity

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a number of sites in the USA, passive reactive barriers built with shredded plant mulch have been constructed to treat ground water contaminated with TCE. These barriers are called biowalls because anaerobic biodegradation of the plant mulch is expected to provide substrates...

  15. A SEARCH FOR RESIDUAL BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) IN RATS EXPOSED AS YOUNG ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a solvent of concern to the EPA due to its extensive use in industry, its prevalence in urban air, and its appearance in water supplies. Human clinical studies have associated short and long-termsolvent exposures with cognitive dysfunction including att...

  16. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contaminated with TCE is commonly treated with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) constructed with zero-valence iron. The cost of iron as the reactive matrix has driven a search for less costly alternatives, and composted plant mulch has been used as an alternative ...

  17. Lifetime exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) does not accelerate autoimmune disease in MRL +/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Peden-Adams, Margie M; Eudaly, Jackie G; Lee, A Michelle; Miller, Julie; Keil, Deborah E; Gilkeson, Gary S

    2008-10-01

    A genetically-prone murine lupus model was used to assess the developmental effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure on disease symptom onset (e.g., autoantibody production and proteinuria), lymphocyte proliferation, splenic B-cell populations, and thymic and splenic T-cell populations. MRL +/+ mice were exposed to TCE (0, 1,400 or 14,000 ppb) via drinking water beginning on gestation day (GD) 0 and continuing until 12 months of age. With the exception of splenic CD4-/CD8-cells in female mice only, no alterations were observed in splenic T-cell populations, numbers of splenic B220+ cells, or in lymphocyte proliferation at 12 months of age. Furthermore, populations of all thymic T-cell subpopulations were decreased in male but not female mice following exposure to 14,000 ppb TCE. Autoantibody levels (anti-dsDNA and anti-GA) were assessed periodically from 4 to 12 months of age. Over this period, no increase in autoantibody levels as compared to control was detected, suggesting that TCE did not contribute to or accelerate the development of autoimmune disease markers following lifetime exposure. Not only does this study offer encouraging results, but it is the first study to approach the development of autoimmunity in a novel lifetime exposure paradigm, using an autoimmune prone model, at environmentally relevant exposure levels.

  18. Remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater by a permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch (Biowall).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Wilson, John T; Shen, Hai; Henry, Bruce M; Kampbell, Donald H

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base in Oklahoma, USA to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in groundwater emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 meters deep, and 0.5 meters wide. The barrier is also called a Biowall because one of the mechanisms for removal of TCE is anaerobic biodegradation. This study aimed at evaluating the performance of the pilot-scale Biowall after its installation. Data from over four years' monitoring indicated that the Biowall greatly changed geochemistry in the study area and stimulated TCE removal. The concentration of TCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was greatly reduced as compared to that in ground water upgradient of the Biowall, while the concentration of cis-DCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was much higher than that observed upgradient of the Biowall. Over time, the concentration of vinyl chloride in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall increased. Dehalococcoides DNA was detected within and downgradient of the Biowall, corresponding to the observation that vinyl chloride was produced at these locations. Results from a tracer study indicated that the regional groundwater flow pattern ultimately determined the flow direction in the area around the Biowall. The natural groundwater velocity was estimated at an average of 0.060 +/- 0.015 m/d.

  19. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  20. LESSONS LEARNED FROM IN-SITU RESISTIVE HEATING OF TCE AT FORT LEWIS, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EGDY is the source of a potentially expanding, three mile long TCE plume in a sole source drinking water aquifer. Thermal remediation is being employed to reduce source mass loading to the dissolved phase aquifer plume and reduce the time to reach site cleanup goals. This i...

  1. Spatial and temporal dynamics of organohalide-respiring bacteria in a heterogeneous PCE-DNAPL source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, Natalie L.; Löffler, Frank E.; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2015-11-01

    Effective treatment of sites contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) requires detailed understanding of the microbial community responses to changes in source zone strength and architecture. Changes in the spatial and temporal distributions of the organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains and Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ (GeoSZ) were examined in a heterogeneous tetrachloroethene- (PCE-) DNAPL source zone within a two-dimensional laboratory-scale aquifer flow cell. As part of a combined remedy approach, flushing with 2.3 pore volumes (PVs) of 4% (w/w) solution of the nonionic, biodegradable surfactant Tween® 80 removed 55% of the initial contaminant mass, and resulted in a PCE-DNAPL distribution that contained 51% discrete ganglia and 49% pools (ganglia-to-pool ratio of 1.06). Subsequent bioaugmentation with the PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium BDI-SZ resulted in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) formation after 1 PV (ca. 7 days), while vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene were detected 10 PVs after bioaugmentation. Maximum ethene yields (ca. 90 μM) within DNAPL pool and ganglia regions coincided with the detection of the vcrA reductive dehalogenase (RDase) gene that exceeded the Dhc 16S rRNA genes by 2.0 ± 1.3 and 4.0 ± 1.7 fold in the pool and ganglia regions, respectively. Dhc and GeoSZ cell abundance increased by up to 4 orders-of-magnitude after 28 PVs of steady-state operation, with 1 to 2 orders-of-magnitude increases observed in close proximity to residual PCE-DNAPL. These observations suggest the involvement of these dechlorinators the in observed PCE dissolution enhancements of up to 2.3 and 6.0-fold within pool and ganglia regions, respectively. Analysis of the solid and aqueous samples at the conclusion of the experiment revealed that the highest VC (≥ 155 μM) and ethene (≥ 65 μM) concentrations were measured in zones where Dhc and GeoSZ were predominately attached to the solids. These findings demonstrate

  2. Preliminary study of propyl bromide exposure among New Jersey dry cleaners as a result of a pending ban on perchloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Blando, James D; Schill, Donald P; De La Cruz, Mary Pauline; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    Many states are considering, and some states have actively pursued, banning the use of perchloroethylene (PERC) in dry cleaning establishments. Proposed legislation has led many dry cleaners to consider the use of products that contain greater than 90% n-propyl bromide (n-PB; also called 1-bromopropane or 1-BP). Very little information is known about toxicity and exposure to n-PB. Some n-PB-containing products are marketed as nonhazardous and "green" or "organic." This has resulted in some users perceiving the solvent as nontoxic and has resulted in at least one significant poisoning incident in New Jersey. In addition, many dry cleaning operators may not realize that the machine components and settings must be changed when converting from PERC to n-PB containing products. Not performing these modifications may result in overheating and significant leaks in the dry cleaning equipment. A preliminary investigation was conducted of the potential exposures to n-PB and isopropyl bromide (iso-PB; also called 2-bromopropane or 2-BP) among dry cleaners in New Jersey who have converted their machines from PERC to these new solvent products. Personal breathing zone and area samples were collected using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Sampling and Analytical Method 1025, with a slight modification to gas chromatography conditions to facilitate better separation of n-PB from iso-PB. During the preliminary investigation, exposures to n-PB among some workers in two of three shops were measured that were greater than the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) for n-PB. The highest exposure measured among a dry cleaning machine operator was 54 parts per million (ppm) as an 8-hr time-weighted average, which is more than 5 times the ACGIH TLV of 10 ppm. The preliminary investigation also found that the work tasks most likely to result in the highest short-term exposures included the introduction of

  3. Fingerprinting TCE in a bedrock aquifer using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Lojkasek-Lima, Paulo; Aravena, Ramon; Parker, Beth L; Cherry, John A

    2012-01-01

    A dual isotope approach based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) was used to identify sources of persistent trichloroethylene (TCE) that caused the shut-down in 1994 of a municipal well in an extensive fractured dolostone aquifer beneath Guelph, Ontario. Several nearby industrial properties have known subsurface TCE contamination; however, only one has created a comprehensive monitoring network in the bedrock. The impacted municipal well and many monitoring wells were sampled for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic parameters, and CSIA. A wide range in isotope values was observed at the study site. The TCE varies between -35.6‰ and -21.8‰ and from 1.6‰ to 3.2‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. In case of cis-1,2-dichloroethene, the isotope values range between -36.3‰ and -18.9‰ and from 2.4‰ to 4.7‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. The dual isotope approach represented by a plot of δ(13) C vs. δ(37) Cl shows the municipal well samples grouped in a domain clearly separate from all other samples from the property with the comprehensive well network. The CSIA results collected under non-pumping and short-term pumping conditions thus indicate that this particular property, which has been studied intensively for several years, is not a substantial contributor of the TCE presently in the municipal well under non-pumping conditions. This case study demonstrates that CSIA signatures would have been useful much earlier in the quest to examine sources of the TCE in the municipal well if bedrock monitoring wells had been located at several depths beneath each of the potential TCE-contributing properties. Moreover, the CSIA results show that microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE occurs in some parts of the bedrock aquifer. At this site, the use of CSIA for C and Cl in combination with analyses of VOC and redox parameters proved to be important due to the complexity introduced by

  4. Remediation of TCE contaminated soils by in situ EK-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Yang, G C; Liu, C Y

    2001-08-17

    The treatment performance and cost analysis of in situ electrokinetic (EK)-Fenton process for oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in soils were evaluated in this work. In all experiments, an electric gradient of 1V/cm, de-ionized water as the cathode reservoir fluid and a treatment time of 10 days were employed. Treatment efficiencies of TCE were evaluated in terms of the electrode material, soil type, catalyst type, and catalyst dosage and granular size if applicable. Test results show that graphite electrodes are superior to stainless steel electrodes. It was found that the soil with a higher content of organic matter would result in a lower treatment efficiency (e.g. a sandy loam is less efficient than a loamy sand). Experimental results show that the type of catalyst and its dosage would markedly affect the reaction mechanisms (i.e. "destruction" and "removal") and the treatment efficiency. Aside from FeSO4, scrap iron powder (SIP) in the form of a permeable reactive wall was also found to be an effective catalyst for Fenton reaction to oxidize TCE. In general, the smaller the granular size of SIP, the lower the overall treatment efficiency and the greater the destruction efficiency. When a greater quantity of SIP was used, a decrease of the overall treatment efficiency and an increase of percent destruction of TCE were found. Experimental results have shown that the quantity of electro-osmotic (EO) flow decreased as the quantity of SIP increased. It has been verified that the treatment performances are closely related to the corresponding EO permeability. Results of the cost analysis have indicated that the EK-Fenton process employed in this work is very cost-effective with respect to TCE destruction.

  5. The Drosophila Translational Control Element (TCE) is required for high-level transcription of many genes that are specifically expressed in testes.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Rach, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Ashley K; Ohler, Uwe; Wassarman, David A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the importance of core promoter elements for tissue-specific transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, we examined testis-specific transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic analyses of core promoter sequences from 190 genes that are specifically expressed in testes identified a 10 bp A/T-rich motif that is identical to the translational control element (TCE). The TCE functions in the 5' untranslated region of Mst(3)CGP mRNAs to repress translation, and it also functions in a heterologous gene to regulate transcription. We found that among genes with focused initiation patterns, the TCE is significantly enriched in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in testes but not in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in other tissues. The TCE is variably located in core promoters and is conserved in melanogaster subgroup species, but conservation dramatically drops in more distant species. In transgenic flies, short (300-400 bp) genomic regions containing a TCE directed testis-specific transcription of a reporter gene. Mutation of the TCE significantly reduced but did not abolish reporter gene transcription indicating that the TCE is important but not essential for transcription activation. Finally, mutation of testis-specific TFIID (tTFIID) subunits significantly reduced the transcription of a subset of endogenous TCE-containing but not TCE-lacking genes, suggesting that tTFIID activity is limited to TCE-containing genes but that tTFIID is not an obligatory regulator of TCE-containing genes. Thus, the TCE is a core promoter element in a subset of genes that are specifically expressed in testes. Furthermore, the TCE regulates transcription in the context of short genomic regions, from variable locations in the core promoter, and both dependently and independently of tTFIID. These findings set the stage for determining the mechanism by which the TCE regulates testis-specific transcription and understanding the

  6. Evaluation of the effects of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) dispersants on intrinsic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE).

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Huang, S C; Chen, K F

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the biodegradability of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) dispersants and their effects on the intrinsic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) were evaluated. Results of a microcosm study show that the biodegradability of three dispersants followed the sequence of: polyvinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate-co-itaconic acid (PV3A) > polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) > polyacrylic acid (PAA) under aerobic conditions, and PV3A > Tween 20 > PAA under anaerobic conditions. Natural biodegradation of TCE was observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. No significant effects were observed on the intrinsic biodegradation of TCE under aerobic conditions with the presence of the dispersants. The addition of PAA seemed to have a slightly adverse impact on anaerobic TCE biodegradation. Higher accumulation of the byproducts of anaerobic TCE biodegradation was detected with the addition of PV3A and Tween 20. The diversity of the microbial community was enhanced under aerobic conditions with the presence of more biodegradable PV3A and Tween 20. The results of this study indicate that it is necessary to select an appropriate dispersant for nZVI to prevent a residual of the dispersant in the subsurface. Additionally, the effects of the dispersant on TCE biodegradation and the accumulation of TCE biodegrading byproducts should also be considered.

  7. Change of pH and Iron Ion Concentration During Photodegradation of TCE with Ferrioxalate/UVvis Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, Wataru; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi; Nakazawa, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Recently, some studies show various organic compounds such as pesticides and dyes degraded with the irradiation of ultraviolet light and visible light in the presence of oxalic acid and ferric ion (ferrioxalate/UVvis process). The process has much advance than other technologies because it can utilize the wavelength of 300˜450nm and also under the condition of neutral pH. Chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE), which have caused ground water pollution on a lot of sites, have never been applied by photodegradation with this process. In this study, we showed the degradation of TCE in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion and the change of pH, ferric and ferrous ion concentration during the photodegradation of TCE with ferrioxalate/UV-vis process. TCE was degraded in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion. In the reactions, the equilibrium of oxalate ion and iron ion is important since it determines the amount of ferrioxalate complex which absorbs light and induces the reactions of the degradation of TCE. Thus, the pH value and iron ion concentration are the important factors which determine the amount of ferrioxalate complex. The pH is nearly constant during the photodegradation of TCE. The ferrous ion concentration was decreased as soon as beginning photodegradation of TCE, and then the ferrous ion concentration and ferric ion concentration became constant.

  8. High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells with PCE of 10.42% via Al-Doped ZnO Cathode Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Yaru; Song, Changjian; Zhu, Liping; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Fang, Junfeng

    2016-09-01

    High-performance polymer solar cells incorporating a low-temperature-processed aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) cathode interlayer are constructed with power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.42% based on PTB7-Th:PC71 BM blends (insensitive to the AZO thickness). Moreover, flexible devices on poly(ethylene terephthalate)/indium tin oxide substrates with PCE of 8.93% are also obtained, and welldistributed efficiency and good device stability are demonstrated as well.

  9. Mammalian cytochrome CYP2E1 triggered differential gene regulation in response to trichloroethylene (TCE) in a transgenic poplar

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Won; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Farin, Federico M.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Strand, Stuart E.

    2011-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an important environmental contaminant of soil, groundwater, and air. Studies of the metabolism of TCE by poplar trees suggest that cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Using poplar genome microarrays, we report a number of putative genes that are differentially expressed in response to TCE. In a previous study, transgenic hybrid poplar plants expressing mammalian cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) had increased metabolism of TCE. In the vector control plants for this construct, 24 h following TCE exposure, 517 genes were upregulated and 650 genes were downregulated over 2-fold when compared with the non-exposed vector control plants. However, in the transgenic CYP2E1 plant, line 78, 1,601 genes were upregulated and 1,705 genes were downregulated over 2-fold when compared with the non-exposed transgenic CYP2E1 plant. It appeared that the CYP2E1 transgenic hybrid poplar plants overexpressing mammalian CYP2E1 showed a larger number of differentially expressed transcripts, suggesting a metabolic pathway for TCE to metabolites had been initiated by activity of CYP2E1 on TCE. These results suggest that either the over-expression of the CYP2E1 gene or the abundance of TCE metabolites from CYP450 2E1 activity triggered a strong genetic response to TCE. Particularly, cytochrome p450s, glutathione S-transferases, glucosyltransferases, and ABC transporters in the CYP2E1 transgenic hybrid poplar plants were highly expressed compared with in vector controls. PMID:20213342

  10. Quantitation of TCE-Induced Radicals in Liver of B6C3Fl Mice In Vivo: An EPR Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-01

    PAGE 1 First derivative EPR spectrum of B6C3F1 mouse liver (a) after and (b) before lyophilization 8 2 GC/MS of PBN extract (a) Total ion current...of TCE-induced cancer in a number of animal species remains to be elucidated. The biological effects of TCE are of special interest to us because TCE...injection the mouse was killed and the liver was harvested. Figure 2A shows the total ion current gas chromatogram of the GC/MS analysis of.a non polar

  11. 20 kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in sodium sulfate aqueous media: influence of the operational variables in batch mode.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez, María Deseada; Tudela, Ignacio; Bonete, Pedro; Louisnard, Olivier; González-García, José

    2010-11-15

    A preliminary study of the 20 kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in aqueous sodium sulfate has been carried out using controlled current density degradation sonoelectrolyses in batch mode. An important improvement in the viability of the sonochemical process is achieved when the electrochemistry is implemented, but the improvement of the electrochemical treatment is lower when the 20 kHz ultrasound field is simultaneously used. A fractional conversion of 100% and degradation efficiency around 55% are obtained independently of the ultrasound power used. The current efficiency is also enhanced compared to the electrochemical treatment and a higher speciation is also detected; the main volatile compounds produced in the electrochemical and sonochemical treatment, trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene, are not only totally degraded, but also at shorter times than in the sonochemical or electrochemical treatments.

  12. Case study: In-situ methods for the recovery of dissolved and free-phase TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lindhult, E.C.; Edelman, M.J.; Buggey, T.R.; Hart, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    Two-phase vacuum extraction (VE) technology, which simultaneously removes groundwater and soil vapor from the subsurface, has been applied at a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) site with promising results. The two-phase VE (a.k.a. dual-phase VE) has been used to enhance groundwater recovery to attain a zone of capture by enhancing groundwater yields from groundwater recovery wells not attainable from pumping alone. Operation of the two-phase VE system has resulted in the recovery of significant quantities of DNAPL, consisting primarily of trichloroethylene (TCE). Controlled pumping has been applied to recover the free-phase TCE. This paper presents a summary of site conditions, description of the two-phase VE and groundwater remediation system, and conclusions from the site remediation.

  13. Retaining and recovering enzyme activity during degradation of TCE by methanotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Carroll, S.

    1997-12-31

    To determine if compounds added during trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation could reduce the loss of enzyme activity or increase enzyme recovery, different compounds serving as energy and carbon sources, pH buffers, or free radical scavengers were tested. Formate and formic acid (reducing power and a carbon source), as well as ascorbic acid and citric acid (free radical scavengers) were added during TCE degradation at a concentration of 2 mM. A saturated solution of calcium carbonate was also tested to address pH concerns. In the presence of formate and methane, only calcium carbonate and formic acid had a beneficial effect on enzyme recovery. The calcium carbonate and formic acid both reduced the loss of enzyme activity and resulted in the highest levels of enzyme activity after recovery. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Trichloroethylene (TCE) in tree cores to complement a subsurface investigation on residential property near a former electroplating facility.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Kathy M

    2016-10-01

    Tree cores were collected and analyzed for trichloroethylene (TCE) on a private property between a former electroplating facility in Asheville, North Carolina (USA), and a contaminated wetland/spring complex. TCE was detected in 16 of 31 trees, the locations of which were largely consistent with a "plume core" delineated by a more detailed subsurface investigation nearly 2 years later. Concentrations in tree cores and nearby soil borings were not correlated, perhaps due to heterogeneities in both geologic and tree root structure, spatial and temporal variability in transpiration rates, or interferences caused by other contaminants at the site. Several tree cores without TCE provided evidence for significantly lower TCE concentrations in shallow groundwater along the margins of the contaminated spring complex in an area with limited accessibility. This study demonstrates that tree core analyses can complement a more extensive subsurface investigation, particularly in residential or ecologically sensitive areas.

  15. In Situ Redox Manipulation of Subsurface Sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron Reduction and TCE Dechlorination Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Evans, John C.

    2000-03-17

    The feasibility of chemically treating sediments from the Ft. Lewis, Washington, Logistics Center to develop a permeable barrier for dechlorination of TCE was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments.

  16. Review of intrinsic bioremediation of TCE in groundwater at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey and St. Joseph, Michigan. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.T.; Kampbell, D.; Weaver, J.; Wilson, B.; Imbrigiotta, T.

    1995-10-01

    Reductive dechlorination occurs frequently in large trichloroethylene (TCE) plumes. TCE is transformed largely to cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), then to vinyl chloride, and finally to compounds that do not contain organic chlorine. This abstract evaluates the rate and extent of natural reductive dechlorination of TCE in two large plumes with similar properties. The half life for attenuation of TCE and its dechlorination products was approximately six months in both plumes. The rates of attenuation in the two plumes are slow as humans experience time. In particular, they are slow compared to the time usually devoted to site characterization. However, in plumes with a long residence time, on the order of decades, they have significance for protection of waters that receive the plumes.

  17. Documents for SBAR Panel: Trichloroethylene (TCE); Regulation of Use in Vapor Degreasing under TSCA §6(a)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SBAR panel to to address risks resulting from the manufacture, import, processing, distribution in commerce, and use of chemicals, as well as any manner or method of disposal of chemicals: Trichloroethylene (TCE)

  18. Electrochemically induced dual reactive barriers for transformation of TCE and mixture of contaminants in groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhui; Yuan, Songhu; Fallahpour, Noushin; Ciblak, Ali; Howard, Joniqua; Padilla, Ingrid; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    A novel reactive electrochemical flow system consisting of iron anode and porous cathode is proposed for the remediation of mixture of contaminants in groundwater. The system consists of a series of sequentially arranged electrodes, a perforated iron anode, a porous copper cathode followed by a mesh-type mixed metal oxide anode. The iron anode generates ferrous species and a chemically reducing environment, the porous cathode provides a reactive electrochemically reducing barrier, and the inert anode provides proton and oxygen to neutralize the system. The redox conditions of the electrolyte flowing through this system can be regulated by controlling the distribution of the electric current. Column experiments are conducted to evaluate the process and study the variables. The electrochemical reduction on a copper foam cathode produced an electrode-based reductive potential capable of reducing TCE and nitrate. Rational electrodes arrangement, longer residence time of electrolytes and higher surface area of foam electrode improve the reductive transformation of TCE. More than 82.2% TCE removal efficiency is achieved for the case of low influent concentration (< 7.5 mg/L) and high current (> 45 mA). The ferrous species produced from the iron anode not only enhance the transformation of TCE on the cathode, but also facilitates transformation of other contaminants including dichromate, selenate and arsenite. Removal efficiencies greater than 80% are achieved for these contaminants from flowing contaminated water. The overall system, comprising the electrode-based and electrolyte-based barriers, can be engineered as a versatile and integrated remedial method for a relatively wide spectrum of contaminants and their mixtures. PMID:23067023

  19. In situ detection of organic molecules: Optrodes for TCE (trichloroethylene) and CHCl sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S. M.; Langry, K. C.; Ridley, M. N.

    1990-05-01

    We have developed new absorption-based chemical indicators for detecting chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and trichloroethylene (TCE). These indicators were used to make very sensitive optical chemical sensors (optrodes) for each of these two contaminants. Concentrations below 10 ppb can be accurately measured using these sensors. Furthermore, they are selective and do not response to similar contaminants commonly found with TCE and CHCl{sub 3} in contaminated groundwater. In addition, the sensor response is linearly proportional to the chemical concentration. In this report, we describe the details of this optrode and the putative reaction sequences of the indicator chemistries with CHCl{sub 3} and TCE and present an analysis of the spectral data obtained from the reaction products. A key part of the development of this optrode was designing a simple readout device. The readout is a dual-channel fiber-optic fluorimeter modified to measure transmission or absorption of light. The system is controlled by a lap-top microcomputer and is fully field portable. In addition to describing the final absorption optrode, details of the chemical indicator reactions are presented for both absorption- (colorimetric) and fluorescence-based optrodes. Finally, we report on the syntheses of several compounds used to evaluate the indicator chemical reactions that led to the development of the absorption optrode. 23 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Electrolytic Manipulation of Persulfate Reactivity by Iron Electrodes for TCE Degradation in Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Activated persulfate oxidation is an effective in situ chemical oxidation process for groundwater remediation. However, reactivity of persulfate is difficult to manipulate or control in the subsurface causing activation before reaching the contaminated zone and leading to a loss of chemicals. Furthermore, mobilization of heavy metals by the process is a potential risk. An effective approach using iron electrodes is thus developed to manipulate the reactivity of persulfate in situ for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in groundwater, and to limit heavy metals mobilization. TCE degradation is quantitatively accelerated or inhibited by adjusting the current applied to the iron electrode, following k1 = 0.00053•Iv + 0.059 (−122 A/m3 ≤ Iv ≤ 244 A/m3) where k1 and Iv are the pseudo first-order rate constant (min−1) and volume normalized current (A/m3), respectively. Persulfate is mainly decomposed by Fe2+ produced from the electrochemical and chemical corrosion of iron followed by the regeneration via Fe3+ reduction on the cathode. SO4•− and •OH co-contribute to TCE degradation, but •OH contribution is more significant. Groundwater pH and oxidation-reduction potential can be restored to natural levels by the continuation of electrolysis after the disappearance of contaminants and persulfate, thus decreasing adverse impacts such as the mobility of heavy metals in the subsurface. PMID:24328192

  1. The role of microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE at a phytoremediation site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.; Paganelli, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    In April 1996, a phytoremediation field demonstration site at the Naval Air Station, Fort Worth, Texas, was developed to remediate shallow oxic ground water (< 3.7 m deep) contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. Microbial populations were sampled in February and June 1998. The populations under the newly planted cottonwood trees had not yet matured to an anaerobic community that could dechlorinate trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE); however, the microbial population under a mature (???22-year-old) cottonwood tree about 30 m southwest of the plantings had a mature anaerobic population capable of dechlorinating TCE to DCE, and DCE to vinyl chloride (VC). Oxygen-free sediment incubations with contaminated groundwater also demonstrated that resident microorganisms were capable of the dechlorination of TCE to DCE. This suggests that a sufficient amount of organic material is present for microbial dechlorination in aquifer microniches where dissolved O2 concentrations are low. Phenol, benzoic acid, acetic acid, and a cyclic hydrocarbon, compounds consistent with the degradation of root exudates and complex aromatic compounds, were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in sediment samples under the mature cottonwood tree. Elsewhere at the site, transpiration and degradation by the cottonwood trees appears to be responsible for loss of chlorinated ethenes.

  2. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  3. Analysis of TCE Fate and Transport in Karst Groundwater Systems Using Statistical Mixed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems are highly productive and provide an important fresh water resource for human development and ecological integrity. Their high productivity is often associated with conduit flow and high matrix permeability. The same characteristics that make these aquifers productive also make them highly vulnerable to contamination and a likely for contaminant exposure. Of particular interest are trichloroethylene, (TCE) and Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). These chemicals have been identified as potential precursors of pre-term birth, a leading cause of neonatal complications with a significant health and societal cost. Both of these contaminants have been found in the karst groundwater formations in this area of the island. The general objectives of this work are to: (1) develop fundamental knowledge and determine the processes controlling the release, mobility, persistence, and possible pathways of contaminants in karst groundwater systems, and (2) characterize transport processes in conduit and diffusion-dominated flow under base flow and storm flow conditions. The work presented herein focuses on the use of geo-hydro statistical tools to characterize flow and transport processes under different flow regimes, and their application in the analysis of fate and transport of TCE. Multidimensional, laboratory-scale Geo-Hydrobed models (GHM) were used for this purpose. The models consist of stainless-steel tanks containing karstified limestone blocks collected from the karst aquifer formation of northern Puerto Rico. The models integrates a network of sampling wells to monitor flow, pressure, and solute concentrations temporally and spatially. Experimental work entails injecting dissolved CaCl2 tracers and TCE in the upstream boundary of the GHM while monitoring TCE and tracer concentrations spatially and temporally in the limestone under different groundwater flow regimes. Analysis of the temporal and spatial concentration distributions of solutes

  4. Survey of hazardous organic compounds in the groundwater, air and wastewater effluents near the Tehran automobile industry.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Mahdi; Nadafi, Kazem; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Nasseri, Simin; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Rastkari, Noushin

    2013-02-01

    Potential of wastewater treatment in car industry and groundwater contamination by volatile organic compounds include perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloromethane (DCM) near car industry was conducted in this study. Samples were collected in September through December 2011 from automobile industry. Head-space Gas chromatography with FID detector is used for analysis. Mean PCE levels in groundwater ranged from 0 to 63.56 μg L(-1) with maximum level of 89.1 μg L(-1). Mean TCE from 0 to 76.63 μg L(-1) with maximum level of 112 μg L(-1). Due to the data obtained from pre treatment of car staining site and conventional wastewater treatment in car factory, the most of TCE, PCE and DCM removed by pre aeration. Therefor this materials entry from liquid phase to air phase and by precipitation leak out to the groundwater. As a consequence these pollutants have a many negative health effect on the workers by air and groundwater.

  5. Experimental demonstration of an OpenFlow/PCE integrated control plane for IP over translucent WSON with the assistance of a per-request-based dynamic topology server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Casellas, Ramon; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Martínez, Ricardo; Muñoz, Raül

    2013-02-25

    To mitigate the potential scalability issues of an OpenFlow-based control plane, a seamless OpenFlow and Path Computation Element (PCE) integrated control plane is proposed, by means of an architecture in which the path computation function is formally decoupled from the controller so the controller can off-load the task to one or more dedicated PCEs using an open and standard interface and protocol, and where the PCE obtains its topology database by means of a dedicated dynamic topology server, which is accessed by the PCE on a per-request basis. The overall feasibility and performance metrics of this integrated control plane are experimentally verified and quantitatively evaluated on a real IP over translucent Wavelength Switched Optical Network (WSON) testbed.

  6. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-24

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  7. The influence of different geotechnically relevant amendments on the reductive degradation of TCE by nZVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Peter; Schöftner, Philipp; Waldner, Georg; Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Nickel, Claudia; Spitz, Marcus; Dietzel, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was widely used as a cleaning and degreasing agent. Companies needing these agents were often situated in or close to built up areas, so spillage led to contaminated sites which now can only be remediated using in situ techniques. The situation is compounded by the fact that TCE tends to seep through ground water bodies forming pools at the bottom of the aquifer. When reacting with TCE, nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) is known to reduce it into non-toxic substances. The difficulty is to bring it in contact with the pollutant. Attempts using passive insertion into the groundwater via wells yielded mixed results. Reasons for this are that ZVI tends to coagulate, to sediment and to adsorb on the matrix of the aquifer. Also, in inhomogeneous aquifers a passive application of nZVI can be difficult and might not bring the desired results, due to existence of preferential flow paths. A possible solution to this problem is the physical in situ mixing of ZVI into the contaminant source. This can, in principle, be done by adapting jet grouting - a method that uses a high pressure slurry jet, consisting of water and geotechnical additives ("binders"), to mix and compact zones ("columns") in soil. These columns are commonly used to solve foundation problems but can also be used to solve the problem of delivering nZVI to TCE source zones. This paper examines the influence binders have on the degradation reaction between TCE and nZVI. The necessity of these binders is explained by the fact that the subsoil structure is rearranged during the jetting process leading to subsidence on the surface. These subsidences could result in damage to neighbouring structures. A series of batch experiments was conducted in this study. Contaminated groundwater was brought into contact with samples of slurries commonly used in geotechnical applications. We tested the effects of concresole, bentonite, zeolithe, fly ash, slag sand and cement on the kinetics of TCE

  8. A scrutiny of heterogeneity at the TCE Source Area BioREmediation (SABRE) test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivett, M.; Wealthall, G. P.; Mcmillan, L. A.; Zeeb, P.

    2015-12-01

    A scrutiny of heterogeneity at the UK's Source Area BioREmediation (SABRE) test site is presented to better understand how spatial heterogeneity in subsurface properties and process occurrence may constrain performance of enhanced in-situ bioremediation (EISB). The industrial site contained a 25 to 45 year old trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that was exceptionally well monitored via a network of multilevel samplers and high resolution core sampling. Moreover, monitoring was conducted within a 3-sided sheet-pile cell that allowed a controlled streamtube of flow to be drawn through the source zone by an extraction well. We primarily focus on the longitudinal transect of monitoring along the length of the cell that provides a 200 groundwater point sample slice along the streamtube of flow through the DNAPL source zone. TCE dechlorination is shown to be significant throughout the cell domain, but spatially heterogeneous in occurrence and progress of dechlorination to lesser chlorinated ethenes - it is this heterogeneity in dechlorination that we primarily scrutinise. We illustrate the diagnostic use of the relative occurrence of TCE parent and daughter compounds to confirm: dechlorination in close proximity to DNAPL and enhanced during the bioremediation; persistent layers of DNAPL into which gradients of dechlorination products are evident; fast flowpaths through the source zone where dechlorination is less evident; and, the importance of underpinning flow regime understanding on EISB performance. Still, even with such spatial detail, there remains uncertainty over the dataset interpretation. These includes poor closure of mass balance along the cell length for the multilevel sampler based monitoring and points to needs to still understand lateral flows (even in the constrained cell), even greater spatial resolution of point monitoring and potentially, not easily proven, ethene degradation loss.

  9. Public health assessment for Grand Traverse Overall Supply Company, Greilickville, Leelanau County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID017418559. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) placed the Grand Traverse Overall Supply site on the National Priorities List (NPL) on September 8, 1983. From 1953 through 1977, GTOS disposed of waste water from the process in a dry well and four lagoons on their property. Since 1977, they have used the township sewer system. In 1978, tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were found in the water in wells serving a school adjacent to GTOS and several nearby residences. The soil around the dry well was excavated and taken off-site for disposal. The lagoons were filled in, and covered with gravel or grass. The site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. Trace amounts of PCE in well water have been detected in the most recent testing, however, the amounts are below the level of public health concern.

  10. Acute Exposure to Perchlorethylene alters Rat Visual Evoked Potentials in Relation to Brain Concentration

    EPA Science Inventory

    These experiments sought to establish a dose-effect relationship between the concentration of perchloroethylene (PCE) in brain tissue and concurrent changes in visual function. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was implemented to predict concentrations of PCE ...

  11. The Drosophila Translational Control Element (TCE) Is Required for High-Level Transcription of Many Genes That Are Specifically Expressed in Testes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ashley K.; Ohler, Uwe; Wassarman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the importance of core promoter elements for tissue-specific transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, we examined testis-specific transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic analyses of core promoter sequences from 190 genes that are specifically expressed in testes identified a 10 bp A/T-rich motif that is identical to the translational control element (TCE). The TCE functions in the 5′ untranslated region of Mst(3)CGP mRNAs to repress translation, and it also functions in a heterologous gene to regulate transcription. We found that among genes with focused initiation patterns, the TCE is significantly enriched in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in testes but not in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in other tissues. The TCE is variably located in core promoters and is conserved in melanogaster subgroup species, but conservation dramatically drops in more distant species. In transgenic flies, short (300–400 bp) genomic regions containing a TCE directed testis-specific transcription of a reporter gene. Mutation of the TCE significantly reduced but did not abolish reporter gene transcription indicating that the TCE is important but not essential for transcription activation. Finally, mutation of testis-specific TFIID (tTFIID) subunits significantly reduced the transcription of a subset of endogenous TCE-containing but not TCE-lacking genes, suggesting that tTFIID activity is limited to TCE-containing genes but that tTFIID is not an obligatory regulator of TCE-containing genes. Thus, the TCE is a core promoter element in a subset of genes that are specifically expressed in testes. Furthermore, the TCE regulates transcription in the context of short genomic regions, from variable locations in the core promoter, and both dependently and independently of tTFIID. These findings set the stage for determining the mechanism by which the TCE regulates testis-specific transcription and understanding

  12. Affinity for risky behaviors following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies of adults with acute and chronic solvent exposure have shown adverse effects on cognition, behavior and mood. No prior study has investigated the long-term impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure to the solvent tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on the affinity for risky behaviors, defined as smoking, drinking or drug use as a teen or adult. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods Eight hundred and thirty-one subjects with prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects were studied. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on risky behaviors as a teenager and young adult, demographic characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure was estimated using the U.S. EPA's water distribution system modeling software (EPANET) that was modified to incorporate a leaching and transport model to estimate PCE exposures from pipe linings. Results Individuals who were highly exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water during gestation and early childhood experienced 50-60% increases in the risk of using two or more major illicit drugs as a teenager or as an adult (Relative Risk (RR) for teen use = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2; and RR for adult use = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-1.9). Specific drugs for which increased risks were observed included crack/cocaine, psychedelics/hallucinogens, club/designer drugs, Ritalin without a prescription, and heroin (RRs:1.4-2.1). Thirty to 60% increases in the risk of certain smoking and drinking behaviors were also seen among highly exposed subjects. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that risky behaviors, particularly drug use, are more frequent among adults with high PCE exposure levels during gestation and early childhood

  13. Biodegradation of TCE Improved with Lactate Injection in Deep, Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Kent Soren

    2000-12-01

    After a recent one-year field evaluation, in situ biodegradation enhanced with the injection of lactate was selected by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Region 10, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, and U.S. Department of Energy for use in a deep, fractured rock aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory’s (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN). The enhanced biodegradation will replace the default pump-and-treat remedy for the residual source area of a large trichloroethylene (TCE) plume. The field evaluation was conducted as part of an innovative technology evaluation process specified in the site Record of Decision. Five innovative technologies–enhanced in situ biodegradation, in situ chemical oxidation, metal enhanced reductive dechlorination, monolithic confinement, and natural attenuation–were evaluated in this process. Based on initial evaluation and bench-scale testing, biodegradation was selected for evaluation in the residual source area, where nonaqueous TCE is present in a sludge mixture due to the historical injection of waste into the basalt aquifer.

  14. Moffett Field Funnel and Gate TCE Treatment System: Interpretation of Field Performance using Reactive Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Sass, B. M.

    2001-06-30

    A multicomponent reactive transport simulator was used to understand the behavior of chemical components, including TCE and cis-1,2-DCE, in groundwater transported through the pilot-scale funnel and gate chemical treatment system at Moffett Field, California. Field observations indicated that zero-valent iron emplaced in the gate to effect the destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons also resulted in increases in pH and hydrocarbons, as well as decreases in EH, alkalinity, dissolved O2 and CO2, and major ions (i.e., Ca, Mg, Cl, sulfate, nitrate). Of concern are chemical transformations that may reduce the effectiveness or longevity of the iron cell and/or create secondary contaminants. A coupled model of transport and reaction processes was developed to account for mobile and immobile components undergoing equilibrium and kinetic reactions including TCE degradation, parallel iron dissolution reactions, precipitation of secondary minerals, and complexation reactions. The model reproduced solution chemistry observed in the iron cell using reaction parameters from the literature and laboratory studies. Mineral precipitation in the iron zone, which is critical to correctly predicting the aqueous concentrations, was predicted to account for up to 3 percent additional mineral volume annually. Interplay between rates of transport and rates of reaction in the field was key to understanding system behavior.

  15. Reduction of occupational exposure to perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene in metal degreasing over the last 30 years: influences of technology innovation and legislation.

    PubMed

    von Grote, Julia; Hürlimann, Christian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2003-09-01

    Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene (TRIC) and perchloroethylene (PERC) in metal degreasing is analyzed by calculating airborne concentrations for a large set of possible exposure scenarios (Scenario-Based Risk Assessment, SceBRA). Different types of degreasing machines ranging from open-top machines used until the 1980s to closed-loop nonvented machines used since the 1990s are investigated; the scope of the study is Germany. Concentrations are calculated for different kinds of releases (emissions from open baths, leakage, release of contaminated air during loading and unloading) with a dynamic two-box model for the near-field and the far-field. The concentration estimates are in good agreement with measured data. The airborne concentrations are compared to maximum workplace concentrations (MAK values). The full set of scenarios shows for which situations MAK values were exceeded and how the transition to newer degreasing machines reduced the occupational exposure by more than one order of magnitude. In addition, numbers of exposed workers are estimated for different years. While more than 25,000 workers in the near-field were exposed to TRIC and PERC in 1985, the number is below 3000 since 1996, which is mainly due to technology changes, rationalization, automatization, and replacement of TRIC and PERC by nonchlorinated solvents.

  16. Changes in concentrations of a TCE plume in near- stream zones of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    A field investigation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume originating at an industrial complex and its discharges to a stream nearby showed that apparent plume attenuation occurred in the near-stream zone of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream prior to discharging to the stream. The concentrations of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in groundwater, hyporheic water, stream water and streambed, and hydrogeology were characterized using mini-piezometers, monitoring wells, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys, and soil coring. In the near stream zones temporal and spatial TCE plume concentration changes and mass fluxes were investigated along the flowpath of groundwater discharging to the stream. It is evident that observed concentrations of contaminants (TCE and cis-DCE) were reduced in the near-stream zone, resulting that TCE and cis-DCE were not detected in the streambed and stream water. Ground GPR surveys done in the near stream zone found that wire and water treatment pipe conduits were buried under the ground next to the stream, which could lead groundwater flow field distortion in this zone. At streambed, the GPR survey and soil coring indicated the presence of low permeable zones consisting of rotten material deposits at the top of 0.3 m ~ 0.8 m underlain by silty sands. These hydrogeological features can also attribute to no detection of contaminants in the streambed and stream water because low permeable zone is an obstacle to effective interactions between groundwater and stream water. More investigations will be carried out for comprehensive understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes associated with TCE plume attenuation in near stream zones and streambed in the site.

  17. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic In situ bioremediation of TCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-01

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested consisted of a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses using a horizontal injection well. Sediment core samples (n=367) taken from 0 (surface)-43m depth were probed for genes coding for soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to cometabolize TCE. The same samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) to access changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations. Hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent 4% methane:air (v/v) injection resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since subsequent addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process becoming non-detectable by the final treatment. These patterns indicate methanotrophs displaced heterotrophs containing TOD genes. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with studies showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in methanotroph viable counts, increased mineralization rates of TCE, and increases in chloride inventories provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. This work suggests that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the biodegradation of TCE observed. This study demonstrated that the use of nucleic acid analytical methods provided a gene specific assessment of the effects of in situ treatment technologies.

  18. Using slow-release permanganate candles to remove TCE from a low permeable aquifer at a former landfill.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Mark D; Kambhu, Ann; Comfort, Steve D

    2012-10-01

    Past disposal of industrial solvents into unregulated landfills is a significant source of groundwater contamination. In 2009, we began investigating a former unregulated landfill with known trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Our objective was to pinpoint the location of the plume and treat the TCE using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). We accomplished this by using electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to survey the landfill and map the subsurface lithology. We then used the ERI survey maps to guide direct push groundwater sampling. A TCE plume (100-600 μg L(-1)) was identified in a low permeable silty-clay aquifer (K(h)=0.5 md(-1)) that was within 6m of ground surface. To treat the TCE, we manufactured slow-release potassium permanganate candles (SRPCs) that were 91.4 cm long and either 5. cm or 7.6 cm in dia. For comparison, we inserted equal masses of SRPCs (7.6-cm versus 5.1-cm dia) into the low permeable aquifer in staggered rows that intersected the TCE plume. The 5.1-cm dia candles were inserted using direct push rods while the 7.6-cm SRPCs were placed in 10 permanent wells. Pneumatic circulators that emitted small air bubbles were placed below the 7.6-cm SRPCs in the second year. Results 15 months after installation showed significant TCE reductions in the 7.6-cm candle treatment zone (67-85%) and between 10% and 66% decrease in wells impacted by the direct push candles. These results support using slow-release permanganate candles as a means of treating chlorinated solvents in low permeable aquifers.

  19. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic in situ bioremediation of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-15

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested included a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses of the test plot using horizontal injection wells. During the test period, the levels of TCE reduced drastically in almost all test samples. Sediment core samples (n = 367) taken from 0 m (surface)-43 m depth were probed for gene coding for methanotrophic soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and heterotrophic toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to co-metabolize TCE. The same sediment samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) (catalyzing the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde) to assess specifically changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations in the site. Gene hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent injection of 4% methane:air (v/v) resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) thereafter caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process, and eventually they were non-detectable by the final treatment, suggesting that methanotrophs displaced the TOD gene containing heterotrophs. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with results showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in chloride concentration and increases in methanotroph viable counts, provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. Our results suggest that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the observed biodegradation of TCE. This study

  20. Microbially enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination of PCE by a mixed culture: Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingjie; Abriola, Linda M.; Amos, Benjamin K.; Suchomel, Eric J.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Löffler, Frank E.; Christ, John A.

    2013-08-01

    Reductive dechlorination catalyzed by organohalide-respiring bacteria is often considered for remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones due to cost savings, ease of implementation, regulatory acceptance, and sustainability. Despite knowledge of the key dechlorinators, an understanding of the processes and factors that control NAPL dissolution rates and detoxification (i.e., ethene formation) is lacking. A recent column study demonstrated a 5-fold cumulative enhancement in tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolution and ethene formation (Amos et al., 2009). Spatial and temporal monitoring of key geochemical and microbial (i.e., Geobacter lovleyi and Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains) parameters in the column generated a data set used herein as the basis for refinement and testing of a multiphase, compositional transport model. The refined model is capable of simulating the reactive transport of multiple chemical constituents produced and consumed by organohalide-respiring bacteria and accounts for substrate limitations and competitive inhibition. Parameter estimation techniques were used to optimize the values of sensitive microbial kinetic parameters, including maximum utilization rates, biomass yield coefficients, and endogenous decay rates. Comparison and calibration of model simulations with the experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to accurately reproduce measured effluent concentrations, while delineating trends in dechlorinator growth and reductive dechlorination kinetics along the column. Sensitivity analyses performed on the optimized model parameters indicate that the rates of PCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) transformation and Dehalococcoides growth govern bioenhanced dissolution, as long as electron donor (i.e., hydrogen flux) is not limiting. Dissolution enhancements were shown to be independent of cis-DCE accumulation; however, accumulation of cis-DCE, as well as column length and flow rate (i.e., column residence time

  1. Assessment of trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure in murine strains genetically-prone and non-prone to develop autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Keil, Deborah E; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Wallace, Stacy; Ruiz, Phillip; Gilkeson, Gary S

    2009-04-01

    There is increasing laboratory and epidemiologic evidence relating exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with autoimmune disease including scleroderma and lupus. New Zealand Black/New Zealand White (NZBWF1) and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to TCE (0, 1, 400 or 14,000 ppb) via drinking water for 27 or 30 weeks, respectively. NZBWF1 mice spontaneously develop autoimmune disease while B6C3F1 mice, a standard strain used in immunotoxicology testing, are not genetically prone to develop autoimmune disease. During the TCE exposure period, serum levels of total IgG, and autoantibodies (anti-ssDNA, -dsDNA, and -glomerular antigen [GA]) were monitored. At the termination of the study, renal pathology, natural killer (NK) cell activity, total IgG levels, autoantibody production, T-cell activation, and lymphocytic proliferative responses were evaluated. TCE did not alter NK cell activity, or T- and B-cell proliferation in either strain. Numbers of activated T-cells (CD4+/CD44+) were increased in the B6C3F1 mice but not in the NZBWF1 mice. Renal pathology, as indicated by renal score, was significantly increased in the B6C3F1, but not in the NZBWF1 mice. Serum levels of autoantibodies to dsDNA and ssDNA were increased at more time points in B6C3F1, as compared to the NZBWF1 mice. Anti-GA autoantibodies were increased by TCE treatment in early stages of the study in NZBWF1 mice, but by 23 weeks of age, control levels were comparable to those of TCE-exposed animals. Serum levels anti-GA autoantibodies in B6C3F1 were not affected by TCE exposure. Overall, these data suggest that TCE did not contribute to the progression of autoimmune disease in autoimmune-prone mice during the period of 11-36 weeks of age, but rather lead to increased expression of markers associated with autoimmune disease in a non-genetically prone mouse strain.

  2. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  3. CuSCN-Based Inverted Planar Perovskite Solar Cell with an Average PCE of 15.6%.

    PubMed

    Ye, Senyun; Sun, Weihai; Li, Yunlong; Yan, Weibo; Peng, Haitao; Bian, Zuqiang; Liu, Zhiwei; Huang, Chunhui

    2015-06-10

    Although inorganic hole-transport materials usually possess high chemical stability, hole mobility, and low cost, the efficiency of most of inorganic hole conductor-based perovskite solar cells is still much lower than that of the traditional organic hole conductor-based cells. Here, we have successfully fabricated high quality CH3NH3PbI3 films on top of a CuSCN layer by utilizing a one-step fast deposition-crystallization method, which have lower surface roughness and smaller interface contact resistance between the perovskite layer and the selective contacts in comparison with the films prepared by a conventional two-step sequential deposition process. The average efficiency of the CuSCN-based inverted planar CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells has been improved to 15.6% with a highest PCE of 16.6%, which is comparable to that of the traditional organic hole conductor-based cells, and may promote wider application of the inexpensive inorganic materials in perovskite solar cells.

  4. An Approach Using Gas Monitoring to Find the Residual TCE Location in the Unsaturated Zone of Woosan Industrial Complex (WIC), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Y.; Lee, S.; Yang, J.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    An area accommodating various industrial facilities has fairly high probability of groundwater contamination with multiple chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform (CF). Source tracing of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone is an essential procedure for the management and remediation of contaminated area. From the previous study on seasonal variations in hydrological stresses and spatial variations in geologic conditions on a TCE plume, the existence of residual DNAPLs at or above the water table has proved. Since TCE is one of the frequently detected VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in groundwater, residual TCE can be detected by gas monitoring. Therefore, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in the gas phase TCE contaminant at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea, were used to find the residual TCE locations. As pilot tests, TCE gas samples collected in the unsaturated zone at 4 different wells were analyzed using SPME (Solid Phase MicroExtraction) fiber and Gas Chromatography (GC). The results indicated that detecting TCE in gas phase was successful from these wells and TCE analysis on gas samples, collected from the unsaturated zone, will be useful for source area characterization. However, some values were too high to doubt the accuracy of the current method, which needs a preliminary lab test with known concentrations. The modified experiment setups using packer at different depths are in process to find residual TCE locations in the unsaturated zone. Meanwhile, several PVD (polyethylene-membrane Passive Vapor Diffusion) samplers were placed under water table to detect VOCs by equilibrium between air in the vial and VOCs in pore water.

  5. Abiotic and Biotic Transformation of TCE under Sulfate Reducing Conditions: the Role of Spatial Heterogeneity (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a number of sites in the USA, passive reactive barriers built with shredded plant mulch have been constructed to treat ground water contaminated with TCE. These barriers are called biowalls because anaerobic biodegradation of the plant mulch is expected to provide substrates ...

  6. Abiotic Removal of TCE and cis-DCE by Magnetite under Aerobic Conditions in Ground Water (Maryland)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The former Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) is located just north of St. Paul, Minnesota. Disposal of chlorinated solvents at the Building102 site on the TCAAP contaminated groundwater in the shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer with TCE and cis-DCE. Concentrations of ...

  7. Numerical simulations of the impact of seasonal heat storage on source zone emission in a TCE contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Steffi; Beyer, Christof; Dahmke, Andreas; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    In urban regions, with high population densities and heat demand, seasonal high temperature heat storage in the shallow subsurface represents an attractive and efficient option for a sustainable heat supply. In fact, the major fraction of energy consumed in German households is used for room heating and hot water production. Especially in urbanized areas, however, the installation of high temperature heat storage systems is currently restricted due to concerns on negative influences on groundwater quality caused e.g. by possible interactions between heat storages and subsurface contaminants, which are a common problem in the urban subsurface. Detailed studies on the overall impact of the operation of high temperature heat storages on groundwater quality are scarce. Therefore, this work investigates possible interactions between groundwater temperature changes induced by heat storage via borehole heat exchangers and subsurface contaminations by numerical scenario analysis. For the simulation of non-isothermal groundwater flow, and reactive transport processes the OpenGeoSys code is used. A 2D horizontal cross section of a shallow groundwater aquifer is assumed in the simulated scenario, consisting of a sandy sediment typical for Northern Germany. Within the aquifer a residual trichloroethene (TCE) contaminant source zone is present. Temperature changes are induced by a seasonal heat storage placed within the aquifer with scenarios of maximum temperatures of 20°C, 40°C and 60°C, respectively, during heat injection and minimum temperatures of 2°C during heat extraction. In the scenario analysis also the location of the heat storage relative to the TCE source zone and plume was modified. Simulations were performed in a homogeneous aquifer as well as in a set of heterogeneous aquifers with hydraulic conductivity as spatially correlated random fields. In both cases, results show that the temperature increase in the heat plume and the consequential reduction of water

  8. Application of fluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for TCE and PAH degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; Franck, M.; Brey, J.; Scott, D.; Lanclos, K.; Fliermans, C.

    1996-07-01

    Historically, methods used to identify methanotrophic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon-degrading (PAH) bacteria in environmental samples have been inadequate because isolation and identification procedures are time-consuming and often fail to separate specific bacteria from other environmental microorganisms. Methanotrophic bacteria have been isolated and characterized from TCE-contaminated soils (Bowman et al. 1993; Fliermans et al., 1988). Fliermans et al., (1988) and others demonstrated that cultures enriched with methane and propane could cometabolically degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons including ethylene; 1,2-cisdichloroethylene (c-DCE); 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (t-DCE); vinyl chloride (VC); toluene; phenol and cresol. Characterization of select microorganisms in the natural setting is important for the evaluation of bioremediation potential and its effectiveness. This realization has necessitated techniques that are selective, sensitive and easily applicable to soils, sediments, and groundwater (Fliermans, et al., 1994). Additionally these techniques can identify and quantify microbial types in situ in real time

  9. Why Litigation-Driven History Matters: Lessons Learned from the Secret History of TCE.

    PubMed

    Zahniser, Keith A

    2015-02-01

    Litigation drives extensive historical research but often allows only select observers to see the results. Historians have conducted untold studies for litigation that become "secret histories" because these histories are not published. An example is the historical use and regulation of the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE), a hazardous chemical at issue in much environmental litigation, but a topic virtually absent in the secondary literature. This practice seems to contravene accepted standards of open scholarship. Although not directly aligned with the traditional academic model of historical practice, however, historical research and writing for litigation achieve legitimate and important results without abandoning the discipline's professional standards. History done by consultants for litigation is neither a history of compromised standards nor as "secret" as feared.

  10. National exposure registry: Tichloroethylene (TCE) subregistry (on CD-ROM). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 National Exposure Registry: Trichloroethylene (TCE) Subregistry' contains data on approximately 4,000 persons and is the first CD-ROM product released in the National Exposure Registry Series. This CD-ROM is composed of three files: Demographics and Health, Mortality, and Environmental. The CD-ROM includes access software, the Statistical Export and Tabulation System (SETS). The TCE subregistry is one of three (dioxin and benzene subregistries are the other two). The National Exposure Registry was created in response to a mandate given in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to create a registry of persons exposed to hazardous substances. This mandate was reiterated in the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The National Exposure Registry is a database composed of names of persons, along with additional information on these persons, with documented exposure to specific chemicals. The purpose of the Registry is to aid in assessing the long-term health consequences of low-level, long-term exposure to environmental contaminants. One of the goals is to establish a database that will furnish the information needed to generate appropriate and valid hypotheses for future activities such as epidemiological studies. When supplemented with additional data, the combined file can then be used to carry out hypothesis-testing epidemiological investigations. The data collected for each member of the Registry include environmental levels, demographic information, smoking and occupational history, and self-reported responses to 25 general health status questions. The files for each chemical-specific subregistry are established at the time baseline data are collected and are updated and maintained by ATSDR on an ongoing basis (annually the first year, biennially thereafter).

  11. Development of an updated PBPK model for trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, and its application to discern the role of oxidative metabolism in TCE-induced hepatomegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.V. Chiu, W.A.; Okino, M.S.; Caldwell, J.C.

    2009-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a lipophilic solvent rapidly absorbed and metabolized via oxidation and conjugation to a variety of metabolites that cause toxicity to several internal targets. Increases in liver weight (hepatomegaly) have been reported to occur quickly in rodents after TCE exposure, with liver tumor induction reported in mice after long-term exposure. An integrated dataset for gavage and inhalation TCE exposure and oral data for exposure to two of its oxidative metabolites (TCA and DCA) was used, in combination with an updated and more accurate physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, to examine the question as to whether the presence of TCA in the liver is responsible for TCE-induced hepatomegaly in mice. The updated PBPK model was used to help discern the quantitative contribution of metabolites to this effect. The update of the model was based on a detailed evaluation of predictions from previously published models and additional preliminary analyses based on gas uptake inhalation data in mice. The parameters of the updated model were calibrated using Bayesian methods with an expanded pharmacokinetic database consisting of oral, inhalation, and iv studies of TCE administration as well as studies of TCE metabolites in mice. The dose-response relationships for hepatomegaly derived from the multi-study database showed that the proportionality of dose to response for TCE- and DCA-induced hepatomegaly is not observed for administered doses of TCA in the studied range. The updated PBPK model was used to make a quantitative comparison of internal dose of metabolized and administered TCA. While the internal dose of TCA predicted by modeling of TCE exposure (i.e., mg TCA/kg-d) showed a linear relationship with hepatomegaly, the slope of the relationship was much greater than that for directly administered TCA. Thus, the degree of hepatomegaly induced per unit of TCA produced through TCE oxidation is greater than that expected per unit of TCA

  12. Analysis of sources of bulk conductivity change in saturated silica sand after unbuffered TCE oxidation by permanganate.

    PubMed

    Hort, Ryan D; Revil, André; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Time lapse resistivity surveys could potentially improve monitoring of permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants such as trichloroethene (TCE) by tracking changes in subsurface conductivity that result from injection of permanganate and oxidation of the contaminant. Bulk conductivity and pore fluid conductivity changes during unbuffered TCE oxidation using permanganate are examined through laboratory measurements and conductivity modeling using PHREEQC in fluid samples and porous media samples containing silica sand. In fluid samples, oxidation of one TCE molecule produces three chloride ions and one proton, resulting in an increase in fluid electrical conductivity despite the loss of two permanganate ions in the reaction. However, in saturated sand samples in which up to 8mM TCE was oxidized, at least 94% of the fluid conductivity associated with the presence of protons was removed within 3h of sand contact, most likely through protonation of silanol groups found on the surface of the sand grains. Minor conductivity effects most likely associated with pH-dependent reductive dissolution of manganese dioxide were also observed but not accounted for in pore-fluid conductivity modeling. Unaccounted conductivity effects resulted in an under-calculation of post-reaction pore fluid conductivity of 2.1% to 5.5%. Although small increases in the porous media formation factor resulting from precipitation of manganese dioxide were detected (about 3%), these increases could not be confirmed to be statistically significant. Both injection of permanganate and oxidation of TCE cause increases in bulk conductivity that would be detectable through time-lapse resistivity surveys in field conditions.

  13. Analysis of sources of bulk conductivity change in saturated silica sand after unbuffered TCE oxidation by permanganate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, Ryan D.; Revil, André; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Time lapse resistivity surveys could potentially improve monitoring of permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants such as trichloroethene (TCE) by tracking changes in subsurface conductivity that result from injection of permanganate and oxidation of the contaminant. Bulk conductivity and pore fluid conductivity changes during unbuffered TCE oxidation using permanganate are examined through laboratory measurements and conductivity modeling using PHREEQC in fluid samples and porous media samples containing silica sand. In fluid samples, oxidation of one TCE molecule produces three chloride ions and one proton, resulting in an increase in fluid electrical conductivity despite the loss of two permanganate ions in the reaction. However, in saturated sand samples in which up to 8 mM TCE was oxidized, at least 94% of the fluid conductivity associated with the presence of protons was removed within 3 h of sand contact, most likely through protonation of silanol groups found on the surface of the sand grains. Minor conductivity effects most likely associated with pH-dependent reductive dissolution of manganese dioxide were also observed but not accounted for in pore-fluid conductivity modeling. Unaccounted conductivity effects resulted in an under-calculation of post-reaction pore fluid conductivity of 2.1% to 5.5%. Although small increases in the porous media formation factor resulting from precipitation of manganese dioxide were detected (about 3%), these increases could not be confirmed to be statistically significant. Both injection of permanganate and oxidation of TCE cause increases in bulk conductivity that would be detectable through time-lapse resistivity surveys in field conditions.

  14. Hydrostratigraphic mapping of the Milford-Souhegan glacial drift aquifer, and effects of hydrostratigraphy on transport of PCE, Operable Unit 1, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2010-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, New Hampshire, was underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume (as mapped in 1994) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most of which consisted of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within highly transmissive stratified-drift deposits but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area outside of OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in many places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock.From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. However, inside the barrier, PCE concentrations greater than 10,000 micrograms per liter (μg/L) still exist (2008). The remediation of these areas of recalcitrant PCE presents challenges to successful remediation.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Region 1, is studying the solute transport of VOCs (primarily PCE) in contaminated groundwater in the unconsolidated sediments (overburden) of the Savage site and specifically assisting in the evaluation of the effectiveness of remedial operations in the OU1 area. As part of this effort, the USGS analyzed the subsurface stratigraphy to help understand hydrostratigraphic controls on remediation.A combination of lithologic, borehole natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic (EM) induction logging, and test drilling has identified 11 primary

  15. Field and lab trials of PCE-based OSNR-aware dynamic restoration in multi-domain GMPLS-enabled translucent WSON.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Casellas, Ramon; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Okamoto, Shuichi; Martínez, Ricardo; Muñoz, Raül

    2011-12-19

    Dynamic lightpath restoration is a key issue in wavelength switched optical networks (WSON). On the other hand, the introduction of the path computation element (PCE) and the generalized multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS) architectures into WSON as control plane technologies is expected to bring more intelligence and to enable the dynamic computation and control of end-to-end lightpaths in a cost-efficient manner. In this paper, for the first time and through a lab trial with four domains and a field trial located in Japan and Spain, we experimentally present PCE-based optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR)-aware dynamic restoration in multi-domain GMPLS-enabled translucent WSON, assessing the overall feasibility of the proposed techniques and quantitatively evaluating the service disruption time and path computation latency during end-to-end lightpath restoration.

  16. Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by Fe and Fe-Pd bimetals in the presence of surfactants and cosolvents

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Liang, L.; West, O.R.; Cameron, P.; Davenport, D.

    1997-02-01

    Surfactants and cosolvents are being used to enhance the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) from contaminated soils. However, the waste surfactant solution containing TCE and PCBs must be treated before it can be disposed. This study evaluated the use of zero-valence iron and palladized iron fillings on the dechlorination of TCE and a PCB congener in a dihexylsulfosuccinate surfactant solution. Batch experimental results indicated that TCE can be rapidly degraded by palladized iron filings with a half-life of 27.4 min. PCB was degraded at a slower rate than TCE with a half-life ranging from 100 min to 500 min as the concentration of surfactant increased. In column flow-through experiments, both TCE and PCBs degrade at an enhanced rate with a half-life about 1.5 and 6 min because of an increased solid to solution ratio in the column than in the batch experiments. Results of this work suggest that Fe-Pd filings may be potentially applicable for ex-situ treatment of TCE and PCBs in the surfactant solutions that are generated during surfactant washing of the contaminated soils.

  17. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an adult cohort following prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on the measures of white matter hypointensities (β: 127.5mm(3), 95% CI: -259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: β: 21230.0mm(3), 95% CI: -4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: β: 11976.0mm(3), 95% CI: -13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied.

  18. Biobased surfactant-like molecules from organic wastes: the effect of waste composition and composting process on surfactant properties and on the ability to solubilize Tetrachloroethene (PCE).

    PubMed

    Quadri, Giorgia; Chen, Xiaosong; Jawitz, James W; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi; Faoro, Franco; Adani, Fabrizio

    2008-04-01

    In this work, four surfactant-like humic acids (HAs) obtained from garden lignocellulose wastes and kitchen food wastes mixed with garden-lignocellulose wastes, both before and after composting, were tested for surfactant properties and the ability to solubilize tetrachloroethene (PCE). The waste-derived HAs showed good surfactant properties, lowering the water surface tension from 74 mN m(-1) to 45.4 +/- 4.4 mN m(-1), with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 1.54 +/- 1.68 g L(-1), which is lower than many synthetic ionic surfactants. CMC was affected by both waste origin and composting processes. The addition of food waste and composting reduced CMC by adding alkyl-C (measured by CP MAS 13C NMR) and N- and S-HA contents (amide molecules), so that a multistep regression was found [CMC = 24.6 - 0.189 alkyl C - 2.64 (N + S); R2 = 0.77, P < 0.10, n = 6]. The four HAs solubilized PCE at the rate of 0.18-0.47 g PCE/g aqueous biosurfactant. These results were much higher than those reported in the literature for a commercial HA (0.026 g/g), but they were in line with those measured in this work for nonionic surfactants such as Tween-80 (0.69 g/g) and Triton X-100 (1.08 g/g).

  19. Exposure of Daphnia magna to trichloroethylene (TCE) and vinyl chloride (VC): evaluation of gene transcription, cellular activity, and life-history parameters.

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Douville, Mélanie; Gagnon, Pierre; Sproull, Jim; Cloutier, François

    2015-06-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous contaminant classified as a human carcinogen. Vinyl chloride (VC) is primarily used to manufacture polyvinyl chloride and can also be a degradation product of TCE. Very few data exist on the toxicity of TCE and VC in aquatic organisms particularly at environmentally relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sub-lethal effects (10 day exposure; 0.1; 1; 10 µg/L) of TCE and VC in Daphnia magna at the gene, cellular, and life-history levels. Results indicated impacts of VC on the regulation of genes related to glutathione-S-transferase (GST), juvenile hormone esterase (JHE), and the vitelline outer layer membrane protein (VMO1). On the cellular level, exposure to 0.1, 1, and 10 µg/L of VC significantly increased the activity of JHE in D. magna and TCE increased the activity of chitinase (at 1 and 10 µg/L). Results for life-history parameters indicated a possible tendency of TCE to affect the number of molts at the individual level in D. magna (p=0.051). Measurement of VG-like proteins using the alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) assay did not show differences between TCE treated organisms and controls. However, semi-quantitative measurement using gradient gel electrophoresis (213-218 kDa) indicated significant decrease in VG-like protein levels following exposure to TCE at all three concentrations. Overall, results indicate effects of TCE and VC on genes and proteins related to metabolism, reproduction, and growth in D. magna.

  20. Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.P.; Newman, L.A.; Strand, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    'Metabolism of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Laboratory and field tests with poplar in tissue culture, bioreactors, and field sites have shown that, unlike bacteria, these plants are able to carry out complete degradation of fully chlorinated alkanes and alkenes to carbon dioxide and chloride. Carbon dioxide was produced as a product of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and perchloroethylene (PCE) when axenic tissue cultures of poplar cells were exposed to radiolabelled compounds. The apparent degradation of PCE and CT, fully chlorinated hydrocarbons, in these aerobic plants is remarkable when contrasted to the lack of comparable aerobic degradation by bacteria. Oxidized metabolites, such as trichloroethanol, and di- and trichloroacetic acid, were detected in cell cultures exposed to TCE, suggesting the involvement of cytochrome P450s or other monooxygenase activities. Mass balance experiments with small poplar plants in laboratory reactors showed that significant TCE and CT was volatilized from the leaves, while a similar fraction of radiolabeled carbon from these chlorinated solvents was retained in the plant tissue.'

  1. Aqueous reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes with tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin cobalt.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Joseph M; McNeill, Kristopher

    2005-06-27

    The catalytic dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin cobalt ((TCPP)Co), a cobalt complex structurally similar to vitamin B12, was studied. It was found to have superior aqueous-phase dechlorination activity on chlorinated ethylenes (CEs) relative to vitamin B12. Bimolecular rate constants for the degradation of CEs by (TCPP)Co of 250, 24, 0.24, and 1.5 M(-1) s(-1) were found for perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cDCE), and trans-dichloroethylene (tDCE), respectively. Through kinetic analysis, the rate laws for PCE and TCE were determined to be first order in substrate and catalyst, and PCE degradation was shown to be sensitive to the concentration of the titanium citrate bulk reductant and pH. The importance of the Co(I) oxidation state on dehalogenation was studied with UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, a variety of reducing agents, and cyclic voltammetry. Evidence of chlorovinyl complexes as potential catalytic cycle intermediates was obtained through the preparation of (TPP)Co(trans-C2H2Cl) and the observation of (TPP)Co(C2HCl2) and (TCPP)Co(C2HCl2) by mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of (TPP)Co(trans-C2H2Cl) is reported.

  2. Monitoring Performance of a Dual Wall Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treating Perchlorate and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowman, C. E.; Hashimoto, Y.; Warner, S.; Bennett, P.; Gandhi, D.; Szerdy, F.; Neville, S.; Fennessy, C.; Scow, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    AMEC Geomatrix, through collaboration with Aerojet General Corporation and the University of California, Davis (UCD), has performed work leading to the installation of a dual wall permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system capable of treating perchlorate and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), at Aerojet's Area 40 site in Sacramento, California. This unique system consisted of an upgradient zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that is intended to not only degrade CAHs, but also, provide hydrogen generated from the ZVI corrosion process, to a downgradient bio-effective PRB (carbohydrate solution circulated through a gravel-packed trench) for destroying perchlorate. The subsurface was characterized during a site investigation, and numerous logistical and site-specific challenges of installation were addressed. The site-specific challenges included installation of a passive remediation system in a remote location with no access to electricity. The selected remediation system was keyed into the undulating bedrock 20 to 25 feet below the ground surface without the use of shoring. Under a collaborative effort, UCD provided initial bench testing. AMEC Geomatrix designed and installed the dual wall system consisting of two approximately parallel 50-foot long by 2-foot thick by 25-foot deep PRB segments which are separated by about 8 feet perpendicular to the approximate direction of groundwater flow. AMEC Geomatrix performed the installation of performance monitoring network, which consisted of 21 wells, and monitored these points for a 6-month period. Monitoring and sampling techniques were designed to measure water levels and water quality parameters in the subsurface during sampling events, to better assess the hydrologic and chemical processes. The monitoring results indicate that the upgradient ZVI PRB effectively treats groundwater with TCE concentrations approaching 60 mg/L, and in addition, may

  3. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth L

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence.

  4. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J. A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence.

  5. Combined removal of a BTEX, TCE, and cis-DCE mixture using Pseudomonas sp. immobilized on scrap tyres.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qihong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Xie, Fei; Li, Junhui; Shim, Hojae

    2015-09-01

    The simultaneous aerobic removal of a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o,m,p-xylene (BTEX); cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE); and trichloroethylene (TCE) from the artificially contaminated water using an indigenous bacterial isolate identified as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida immobilized on waste scrap tyres was investigated. Suspended and immobilized conditions were compared for the removal of these volatile organic compounds. For the immobilized system, toluene, benzene, and ethylbenzene were completely removed, while the highest removal efficiencies of 99.0 ± 0.1, 96.8 ± 0.3, 73.6 ± 2.5, and 61.6 ± 0.9% were obtained for o-xylene, m,p-xylene, TCE, and cis-DCE, respectively. The sorption kinetics of contaminants towards tyre surface was also evaluated, and the sorption capacity generally followed the order of toluene > benzene > m,p-xylene > o-xylene > ethylbenzene > TCE > cis-DCE. Scrap tyres showed a good capability for the simultaneous sorption and bioremoval of BTEX/cis-DCE/TCE mixture, implying a promising waste material for the removal of contaminant mixture from industrial wastewater or contaminated groundwater.

  6. Heterogeneous carbonaceous matter in sedimentary rock lithocomponents causes significant trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption in a low organic carbon content aquifer/aquitard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, Sungwook; Zimmerman, Lisa R.; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Ligouis, Bertrand; Feenstra, Stanley

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of heterogeneous thermally altered carbonaceous matter (CM) on trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption for a low fraction organic carbon content (foc) alluvial sedimentary aquifer and aquitard system (foc = 0.046-0.105%). The equilibrium TCE sorption isotherms were highly nonlinear with Freundlich exponents of 0.46-0.58. Kerogen + black carbon was the dominant CM fraction extracted from the sediments and accounted for > 60% and 99% of the total in the sands and silt, respectively. Organic petrological examination determined that the kerogen included abundant amorphous organic matter (bituminite), likely of marine origin. The dark calcareous siltstone exhibited the greatest TCE sorption among aquifer lithocomponents and accounted for most sorption in the aquifer. The results suggest that the source of the thermally altered CM, which causes nonlinear sorption, was derived from parent Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks that outcrop throughout much of New York State. A synthetic aquifer-aquitard unit system (10% aquitard) was used to illustrate the effect of the observed nonlinear sorption on mass storage potential at equilibrium. The calculation showed that > 80% of TCE mass contained in the aquifer was sorbed on the aquifer sediment at aqueous concentration < 1000 μg L- 1. These results show that sorption is likely a significant contributor to the persistence of a TCE groundwater plume in the aquifer studied. It is implied that sorption may similarly contribute to TCE persistence in other glacial alluvial aquifers with similar geologic characteristics, i.e., comprised of sedimentary rock lithocomponents that contain thermally altered CM.

  7. Effects of Reduced Sulfur Compounds on Pd-catalytic Hydrodechlorination of TCE in Groundwater by Cathodic H2 under Electrochemically-induced Oxidizing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Mingjie; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) poison Pd catalysts for catalytic hydrodechlorination of contaminants in anoxic groundwater. This study investigates the effects of RSCs on Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in oxic groundwater. Water electrolysis in an undivided electrolytic cell is used to produce H2 for TCE hydrodechlorination under oxidizing conditions. TCE is efficiently hydrodechlorinated to ethane, with significant accumulation of H2O2 under acidic conditions. Presence of sulfide at concentrations less than 93.8 μM moderately inhibits TCE hydrodechlorination and H2O2 production. Presence of sulfite at low concentrations (≤ 1 mM) significantly enhances TCE decay, while at high concentration (3 mM) inhibits initially and enhances afterwards when sulfite concentration declines to less than 1 mM. Using radical scavenging experiments and electron spin resonance assay, SO3•− which is generated from sulfite under oxidizing conditions is validated as the new reactive species contributing to the enhancement. This study reveals a distinct mechanism of effect of sulfite on TCE hydrodechlorination by Pd and H2 in oxic groundwater and presents an alternative approach to increasing resistance of Pd to RSCs poisoning. PMID:23962132

  8. Occurrence of mental illness following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While many studies of adults with solvent exposure have shown increased risks of anxiety and depressive disorders, there is little information on the impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure on the subsequent risk of mental illness. This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods A total of 1,512 subjects born between 1969 and 1983 were studied, including 831 subjects with both prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on mental illnesses, demographic and medical characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure originating from the vinyl-liner of water distribution pipes was assessed using water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a leaching and transport algorithm. Results No meaningful increases in risk ratios (RR) for depression were observed among subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4). However, subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure had a 1.8-fold increased risk of bipolar disorder (N = 36 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4), a 1.5-fold increased risk post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 47 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-2.5), and a 2.1-fold increased risk of schizophrenia (N = 3 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.2-20.0). Further increases in the risk ratio were observed for bipolar disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR; 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-5.6) and post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.2) among subjects with the highest exposure levels. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence against an impact of early life exposure to PCE on the risk of depression. In contrast, the

  9. Drinking Water Contamination and the Incidence of Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, P; Klotz, J; Bove, F; Berkowitz, M; Fagliano, J

    1994-01-01

    >A study of drinking water contamination and leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) incidence (1979-1987) was conducted in a 75-town study area. Comparing incidence in towns in the highest trichloroethylene (TCE) stratum (>5 microg/l) to towns without detectable TCE yielded an age-adjusted rate ratio (RR) for total leukemia among females of 1.43 (95% CI 1.07-1.90). For females under 20 years old, the RR for acute lymphocytic leukemia was 3.26 (95% CI 1.27-8.15). Elevated RRs were observed for chronic myelogenous leukemia among females and for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among males and females. NHL incidence among women was also associated with the highest TCE stratum (RR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.08-1.70). For diffuse large cell NHL and non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, the RRs were 1.66 (95% CI 1.07-2.59) and 3.17 (95% CI 1.23-8.18), respectively, and 1.59 (95% CI 1.04-2.43) and 1.92 (95% CI 0.54-6.81), respectively, among males. Perchloroethylene (PCE) was associated with incidence of non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, but collinearity with TCE made it difficult to assess relative influences. The results suggest a link between TCE/PCE and leukemia/ NHL incidence. However, the conclusions are limited by potential misclassification of exposure due to lack of individual information on long-term residence, water consumption, and inhalation of volatilized compounds. PMID:9679115

  10. Drinking Water Contamination and the Incidence of Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cohn; Klotz; Bove; Berkowitz; Fagliano

    1994-06-01

    >A study of drinking water contamination and leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) incidence (1979-1987) was conducted in a 75-town study area. Comparing incidence in towns in the highest trichloroethylene (TCE) stratum (>5 microg/l) to towns without detectable TCE yielded an age-adjusted rate ratio (RR) for total leukemia among females of 1.43 (95% CI 1.07-1.90). For females under 20 years old, the RR for acute lymphocytic leukemia was 3.26 (95% CI 1.27-8.15). Elevated RRs were observed for chronic myelogenous leukemia among females and for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among males and females. NHL incidence among women was also associated with the highest TCE stratum (RR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.08-1.70). For diffuse large cell NHL and non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, the RRs were 1.66 (95% CI 1.07-2.59) and 3.17 (95% CI 1.23-8.18), respectively, and 1.59 (95% CI 1.04-2.43) and 1.92 (95% CI 0.54-6.81), respectively, among males. Perchloroethylene (PCE) was associated with incidence of non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, but collinearity with TCE made it difficult to assess relative influences. The results suggest a link between TCE/PCE and leukemia/ NHL incidence. However, the conclusions are limited by potential misclassification of exposure due to lack of individual information on long-term residence, water consumption, and inhalation of volatilized compounds.

  11. Heterogeneous hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharging to an urban river reach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Rivett, Michael O; Roche, Rachel S; Durrant Neé Cleverly, Megan; Walker, Caroline; Tellam, John H

    2015-02-01

    The typically elevated natural attenuation capacity of riverbed-hyporheic zones is expected to decrease chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) groundwater plume discharges to river receptors through dechlorination reactions. The aim of this study was to assess physico-chemical processes controlling field-scale variation in riverbed-hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharge to an urban river reach. The 50-m long pool-riffle-glide reach of the River Tame in Birmingham (UK) studied is a heterogeneous high energy river environment. The shallow riverbed was instrumented with a detailed network of multilevel samplers. Freeze coring revealed a geologically heterogeneous and poorly sorted riverbed. A chlorine number reduction approach provided a quantitative indicator of CHC dechlorination. Three sub-reaches of contrasting behaviour were identified. Greatest dechlorination occurred in the riffle sub-reach that was characterised by hyporheic zone flows, moderate sulphate concentrations and pH, anaerobic conditions, low iron, but elevated manganese concentrations with evidence of sulphate reduction. Transient hyporheic zone flows allowing input to varying riverbed depths of organic matter are anticipated to be a key control. The glide sub-reach displayed negligible dechlorination attributed to the predominant groundwater baseflow discharge condition, absence of hyporheic zone, transition to more oxic conditions and elevated sulphate concentrations expected to locally inhibit dechlorination. The tail-of-pool-riffle sub-reach exhibited patchy dechlorination that was attributed to sub-reach complexities including significant flow bypass of a low permeability, high organic matter, silty unit of high dechlorination potential. A process-based conceptual model of reach-scale dechlorination variability was developed. Key findings of practitioner relevance were: riverbed-hyporheic zone CHC dechlorination may provide only a partial, somewhat patchy barrier to CHC

  12. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Smith, Thor E.; Williams, John H.; Degnan, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  13. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA.

    PubMed

    Harte, Philip T; Smith, Thor E; Williams, John H; Degnan, James R

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  14. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Philip T.; Smith, Thor E.; Williams, John H.; Degnan, James R.

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  15. Microfabricated gas chromatograph for on-site determinations of TCE in indoor air arising from vapor intrusion. 2. Spatial/temporal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyu; Burris, David R; Bryant-Genevier, Jonathan; Gorder, Kyle A; Dettenmaier, Erik M; Zellers, Edward T

    2012-06-05

    We demonstrate the use of two prototype Si-microfabricated gas chromatographs (μGC) for continuous, short-term measurements of indoor trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor concentrations related to the investigation of TCE vapor intrusion (VI) in two houses. In the first house, with documented TCE VI, temporal variations in TCE air concentrations were monitored continuously for up to 48 h near the primary VI entry location under different levels of induced differential pressure (relative to the subslab). Concentrations ranged from 0.23 to 27 ppb by volume (1.2-150 μg/m(3)), and concentration trends agreed closely with those determined from concurrent reference samples. The sensitivity and temporal resolution of the measurements were sufficiently high to detect transient fluctuations in concentration resulting from short-term changes in variables affecting the extent of VI. Spatial monitoring showed a decreasing TCE concentration gradient with increasing distance from the primary VI entry location. In the second house, with no TCE VI, spatial profiles derived from the μGC prototype data revealed an intentionally hidden source of TCE within a closet, demonstrating the capability for locating non-VI sources. Concentrations measured in this house ranged from 0.51 to 56 ppb (2.7-300 μg/m(3)), in good agreement with reference method values. This first field demonstration of μGC technology for automated, near-real-time, selective VOC monitoring at low- or subppb levels augurs well for its use in short- and long-term on-site analysis of indoor air in support of VI assessments.

  16. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  17. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  18. The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Gavin; Lerner, David N; Leharne, Stephen A

    2005-11-01

    resolved by noting that contact between the solvent mixture and water in the sandstone core resulted in a final solvent phase which had an extremely low interfacial tension. It is therefore suspected that the observed spontaneous drainage of solvent from the core was driven by gravitational and buoyancy forces rather than strong water wetting conditions. Finally it was noted that the mobilisation of iron oxide coatings from the sandstone surface had a considerable influence in reducing the interfacial tension and in the formation and stabilisation of TCE/water emulsions.

  19. Concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in Wells Sampled During 2002-2009 in the Vicinity of the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2010-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area as a Superfund Site in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified and cleanup activities were begun in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project (TARP) area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TARP area, in some cases exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water advisory level of 3 ?g/L.

  20. In situ redox manipulation of subsurface sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron reduction and TCE dechlorination mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    JE Szecsody; JS Fruchter; DS Sklarew; JC Evans

    2000-03-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a bench-scale study to determine how effective chemically treated Ft. Lewis sediments can degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The objectives of this experimental study were to quantify: (1) sediment reduction and oxidation reactions, (2) TCE degradation reactions, and (3) other significant geochemical changes that occurred. Sediment reduction and oxidation were investigated to determine the mass of reducible iron in the Ft. Lewis sediments and the rate of this reduction and subsequent oxidation at different temperatures. The temperature dependence was needed to be able to predict field-scale reduction in the relatively cold ({approximately}11 C) Ft. Lewis aquifer. Results of these experiments were used in conjunction with other geochemical and hydraulic characterization to design the field-scale injection experiment and predict barrier longevity. For example, the sediment reduction rate controls the amount of time required for the dithionite solution to fully react with sediments. Sediment oxidation experiments were additionally conducted to determine the oxidation rate and provide a separate measure of the mass of reduced iron. Laboratory experiments that were used to meet these objectives included: (1) sediment reduction in batch (static) systems, (2) sediment reduction in 1-D columns, and (3) sediment oxidation in 1-D columns. Multiple reaction modeling was conducted to quantify the reactant masses and reaction rates.

  1. Heterogeneous carbonaceous matter in sedimentary rock lithocomponents causes significant trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption in a low organic carbon content aquifer/aquitard system.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Zimmerman, Lisa R; Allen-King, Richelle M; Ligouis, Bertrand; Feenstra, Stanley

    2014-10-15

    This study evaluated the effects of heterogeneous thermally altered carbonaceous matter (CM) on trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption for a low fraction organic carbon content (foc) alluvial sedimentary aquifer and aquitard system (foc=0.046-0.105%). The equilibrium TCE sorption isotherms were highly nonlinear with Freundlich exponents of 0.46-0.58. Kerogen+black carbon was the dominant CM fraction extracted from the sediments and accounted for >60% and 99% of the total in the sands and silt, respectively. Organic petrological examination determined that the kerogen included abundant amorphous organic matter (bituminite), likely of marine origin. The dark calcareous siltstone exhibited the greatest TCE sorption among aquifer lithocomponents and accounted for most sorption in the aquifer. The results suggest that the source of the thermally altered CM, which causes nonlinear sorption, was derived from parent Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks that outcrop throughout much of New York State. A synthetic aquifer-aquitard unit system (10% aquitard) was used to illustrate the effect of the observed nonlinear sorption on mass storage potential at equilibrium. The calculation showed that >80% of TCE mass contained in the aquifer was sorbed on the aquifer sediment at aqueous concentration <1000 μgL(-1). These results show that sorption is likely a significant contributor to the persistence of a TCE groundwater plume in the aquifer studied. It is implied that sorption may similarly contribute to TCE persistence in other glacial alluvial aquifers with similar geologic characteristics, i.e., comprised of sedimentary rock lithocomponents that contain thermally altered CM.

  2. Sorption of TCE by humic-preloaded activated carbon: Incorporating size-exclusion and pore blockage phenomenon in a competitive adsorption model

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, J.E.; Wigton, A.

    1999-01-15

    Naturally occurring, macromolecular dissolved organic matter (NOM) is known to foul activated carbon adsorbents, reducing the ability of fixed-bed adsorbers to efficiently remove targeted synthetic organic contaminants (SOCs). An accurate description of the effects of NOM competition on SOC adsorption equilibria is required to develop dynamic models, which have application to process design and analysis. A model was developed, using an approach based on the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST), to predict trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption by activated carbon preloaded with humic acid. The IAST model was formulated for a bisolute system in which TCE and humic acid single-solute uptakes were described by the Langmuir-Freundlich and Freundlich isotherms, respectively. The humic mixture was modeled as a single component based on previous studies that identified the low-molecular-weight hydrophobic fraction as the most reactive with regard to preloading effects. Isotherms for this fraction, isolated from whole humic acid using ultrafiltration, were measured, and molar concentrations were computed based on an average molecular weight determined using size-exclusion chromatography. The IAST model was modified to reflect the hypothesis that TCE molecules can access adsorption sites which humic molecules cannot and that no competition can occur on these sites. The model was calibrated with data for TCE uptake by carbon preloaded with the low-molecular-weight humic acid fraction and was verified by predicting TCE uptake by carbon preloaded with whole humic acid. Further improvement to the model was possible by accounting for pore blockage as a mechanism which can reduce the effective surface area available in TCE.

  3. Degradation of multi-DNAPLs by a UV/persulphate/ethanol system with the additional injection of a base solution.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Gu; Do, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Kong, Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the inhibited influences on and solution to the degradation of four types of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) (i.e. perchloroethylene [PCE], trichloroethylene [TCE], chloroform [CF], and carbon tetrachloride [CT]) all at the same instance in groundwater (GW). Degradations of DNAPLs in de-ionized water (DW) and GW were carried out by applying an ultraviolet radiation-activated persulphate (UV/PS) system. PCE and TCE were degraded by over 90% and CT was only degraded by 25% in both DW and GW. However, CF was degraded by over 90% in DW, while it was only degraded by 50% in GW. First of all, degradations with an inorganic anion (either Cl- or HCO3-) indicated that the lower degradation of CF in GW was caused by the existence of the chloride ion. Moreover, the low CF degradation in GW was overcome by the additional injection of a base solution (sodium hydroxide [NaOH]) into the UV/PS system. The results showed that PCE, TCE, and CF were degraded by over 90%, respectively, when a molar ratio of [base]0:[PS]0 was larger than 0.5:1, but CT was still not effectively degraded in the UV/PS system. To achieve effective CT degradation, UV/PS with the ethanol (EtOH) system was evaluated and it was found that it degraded CT over 90%. However, at this time, CF was not effectively degraded in the UV/PS/EtOH system. Finally, degradations of DNAPLs in the UV/PS/EtOH system with the additional injection of a base solution were conducted and it showed that multi-DNAPLs were degraded by over 90%, respectively, when the molar ratio of [PS]0:[EtOH]0:[base]0 was 1:1:3.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE Site, Operable Unit 3, Des Moines, IA. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-18

    The Des Moines TCE site is located southwest of downtown Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and commercial, and part of the site lies within the floodplain of the Raccoon River. Water from the Des Moines Water Works north infiltration gallery was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride at levels above accepted drinking water standards. The ROD addresses OU3, which encompasses potential sources of ground water contamination in an area north of the Raccoon River. The selected remedial action for OU3 includes no action with periodic groundwater monitoring.

  5. TceSR two-component regulatory system of Brucella melitensis 16M is involved in invasion, intracellular survival and regulated cytotoxicity for macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Fu, Q; Wang, Z; Li, T; Zhang, H; Guo, F; Wang, Y; Zhang, J; Chen, C

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms of invasion and intracellular survival of Brucella are still poorly understood. Previous studies showed that the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) play an important role in the intracellular survival of Brucella. To investigate if TCSs involve in the virulence and cytotoxicity of Brucella melitensis, we introduced a mutation into one of the TCSs in chromosome II in Br. melitensis 16M strain, and generated 16MΔTceSR, a mutant of Br. melitensis 16M strain. In vitro infection experiments using murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) showed that the survival of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages decreased 0·91-log compared with that of wild type Br. melitensis 16M strain at 2 h postinfection, replication of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages was 5·65-log, which was much lower than that wild type strain. Results of lactate dehydrogenase cytotoxicity assays in macrophages demonstrated high dose infection with wide type strain produced high level cytotoxicity to macrophages, but 16MΔTceSR mutant had very low level cytotoxicity, indicating mutation of TCSs impaired the cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis to macrophages. Animal experiments showed that the spleen colonization of 16MΔTceSR was significantly reduced compared with its wild type strains. The lower levels of survival of 16MΔTceSR in various stress conditions suggested that the mutation of the TCSs of Br. melitensis was the causative factor of its reduced resistance to stress conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrated TCS TceSR involves in the intracellular survival, virulence and cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis during its infection. Significance and impact of the study: Two-component systems (TCSs) are predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. The pathogenicity of Brucella is due to its ability to adapt to the intracellular environment including low levels of acidic pH, high-salt and heat shock. TCSs are designed to sense diverse stimuli, transfer signals and enact an

  6. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  7. Biological reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes: Implications for natural attenuation and biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated organic compounds are the most frequently found contaminants at many hazardous waste sites and industrial facilities. Numerous industries use chlorinated organics such as tetrachloroethylene also known as perchloroethylene (PCE) -- and trichloroethylene (TCE), as degreasing agents, paint strippers, and in textile processing. These solvents are often detected as soil and ground water contaminants due to improper storage and disposal practices. Laboratory and full-scale investigations have proven that complete biological transformation of PCE and TCE is possible under anaerobic conditions. Biological treatment of chlorinated ethenes has received much interest due to the prevalence of these contaminants and the need to develop technologies that destroy contaminants rather than transfer them to other media. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the biological process by which anaerobic bacteria biodegrade chlorinated ethylenes. The benefits of this process are discussed along with key findings that may be employed to determine if dechlorination is occurring under natural conditions. Requirements of these bacteria are described and an assessment of future research needs is provided.

  8. Investigation of the potential source area, contamination pathway, and probable release history of chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater at the Capital City Plume Site, Montgomery, Alabama, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Miller, Scott; Campbell, Bruce G.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Gill, Amy C.; Clark, Athena P.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of the organic solvent perchloroethylene (PCE) in a shallow public-supply well in 1991 and exposure of workers in 1993 to solvent vapors during excavation activities to depths near the water table provided evidence that the shallow aquifer beneath the capital city of Montgomery, Alabama, was contaminated. Investigations conducted from 1993 to 1999 by State and Federal agencies confirmed the detection of PCE in the shallow aquifer, as well as the detection of the organic solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and various inorganic compounds, but the source of the groundwater contamination was not determined. In May 2000 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed that the site, called the Capital City Plume (CCP) Site, be a candidate for the National Priorities List. Between 2000 and 2007, numerous site-investigation activities also did not determine the source of the groundwater contamination. In 2008, additional assessments were conducted at the CCP Site to investigate the potential source area, contamination pathway, and the probable release history of the chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater. The assessments included the collection of (1) pore water in 2008 from the hyporheic zone of a creek using passive-diffusion bag samplers; (2) tissue samples in 2008 and 2009 from trees growing in areas of downtown Montgomery characterized by groundwater contamination and from trees growing in riparian zones along the Alabama River and Cypress Creek; and (3) groundwater samples in 2009 and 2010. The data collected were used to investigate the potential source area of contaminants detected in groundwater, the pathway of groundwater contamination, and constraints on the probable contaminant-release history. The data collected between 2008 and 2010 indicate that the PCE and TCE contamination of the shallow aquifer beneath the CCP Site most likely resulted from the past use and disposal of industrial wastewater from printing operations containing chlorinated

  9. Multiplexed selective detection and identification of TCE and xylene in water by on-chip absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a device which can do multiplexed detection of two different chemicals on one chip by using infrared absorption spectroscopy. The signature of Trichloroethylene(TCE) and xylene in water enable multiplexed detection on one chip. We use the slow light effect in the photonic crystal design which enhances the absorption of the analytes by a factor of 30 as demonstrated by our previous works. In order to match the absorption peaks of these two analytes, photonic crystal slow light regions are designed at 1644nm and 1674nm with a SU8 cladding on top. Multiplexed detection is enabled by using a multimode interference (MMI) optical power splitter at the input, which divides optical power into two arms, and Y combiner at the output. Consequently, the absorption of these two chemicals can be enhanced by the slow light effect. The MMI structure and Y combiner also enable the multiplexed detection of two analytes on one chip.

  10. The structure and dynamics of Nano Particles encapsulated by the SDS monolayer collapse at the water/TCE interface

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    The super-saturated surfactant monolayer collapses with the nanoparticles (NPs) at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS) monolayer collapse is initiated by buckling and followed primarily by budding and the bud encapsulating the NPs and oil molecules. The developed bud detaches from the monolayer into a water phase and forms the swollen micelle emulsion with NPs and oil molecules. We investigate the wavelength of the initial budding and the theoretical description of the budding process. The wavelength of the monolayer increases with bending modulus. The energy barrier of the budding can be easily overcome by thermal fluctuation energy, which indicates that budding process proceeds rapidly. PMID:27853312

  11. The structure and dynamics of Nano Particles encapsulated by the SDS monolayer collapse at the water/TCE interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenxiong

    2016-11-01

    The super-saturated surfactant monolayer collapses with the nanoparticles (NPs) at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS) monolayer collapse is initiated by buckling and followed primarily by budding and the bud encapsulating the NPs and oil molecules. The developed bud detaches from the monolayer into a water phase and forms the swollen micelle emulsion with NPs and oil molecules. We investigate the wavelength of the initial budding and the theoretical description of the budding process. The wavelength of the monolayer increases with bending modulus. The energy barrier of the budding can be easily overcome by thermal fluctuation energy, which indicates that budding process proceeds rapidly.

  12. Geophysical logging and thermal imaging at the Hemphill Road TCE NPL Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs and thermal imaging data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the Hemphill Road TCE National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina, during August 2014 through February 2015. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, surface geological mapping and borehole geophysical log and image data collection, which included the delineation of more than 600 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) was conducted in 5 open borehole wells and 2 private supply bedrock wells. In addition, areas of potential groundwater discharge within a down-gradient, nearby creek were determined using thermal imagery to calculate temperature differences between the stream and bank seepage.

  13. Geophysical logging and thermal imaging near the Hemphill Road TCE National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-03-27

    Borehole geophysical logs and thermal imaging data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey near the Hemphill Road TCE (trichloroethylene) National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina, during August 2014 through February 2015. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, surface geological mapping and borehole geophysical log and thermal imaging data collection, which included the delineation of more than 600 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations), was completed in five open borehole wells and two private supply bedrock wells. In addition, areas of possible groundwater discharge within a nearby creek downgradient of the study site were determined based on temperature differences between the stream and bank seepage using thermal imagery.

  14. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  15. PCE-FR: A Novel Method for Identifying Overlapping Protein Complexes in Weighted Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Using Pseudo-Clique Extension Based on Fuzzy Relation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Buwen; Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Shulin; Ding, Pingjian

    2016-10-01

    Identifying overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks can provide insight into cellular functional organization and thus elucidate underlying cellular mechanisms. Recently, various algorithms for protein complexes detection have been developed for PPI networks. However, majority of algorithms primarily depend on network topological feature and/or gene expression profile, failing to consider the inherent biological meanings between protein pairs. In this paper, we propose a novel method to detect protein complexes using pseudo-clique extension based on fuzzy relation (PCE-FR). Our algorithm operates in three stages: it first forms the nonoverlapping protein substructure based on fuzzy relation and then expands each substructure by adding neighbor proteins to maximize the cohesive score. Finally, highly overlapped candidate protein complexes are merged to form the final protein complex set. Particularly, our algorithm employs the biological significance hidden in protein pairs to construct edge weight for protein interaction networks. The experiment results show that our method can not only outperform classical algorithms such as CFinder, ClusterONE, CMC, RRW, HC-PIN, and ProRank +, but also achieve ideal overall performance in most of the yeast PPI datasets in terms of composite score consisting of precision, accuracy, and separation. We further apply our method to a human PPI network from the HPRD dataset and demonstrate it is very effective in detecting protein complexes compared to other algorithms.

  16. Relative importance of gas-phase diffusive and advective tichloroethene (TCE) fluxes in the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Won; Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2002-07-15

    It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure changes can induce gas flow in the unsaturated zone to such an extent that the advective flux of organic vapors in unsaturated-zone soil gas can be significant relative to the gas-phase diffusion flux of these organic vapors. To test this hypothesis, a series of field measurements and computer simulations were conducted to simulate and compare diffusion and advection fluxes at a trichloroethene-contaminated field site at Picatinny Arsenal in north-central New Jersey. Moisture content temperature, and soil-gas pressure were measured at multiple depths (including at land surface) and times for three distinct sampling events in August 1996, October 1996, and August 1998. Gas pressures in the unsaturated zone changed significantly over time and followed changes measured in the atmosphere. Gas permeability of the unsaturated zone was estimated using data from a variety of sources, including laboratory gas permeability measurements made on intact soil cores from the site, a field air pump test, and calibration of a gas-flow model to the transient, one-dimensional gas pressure data. The final gas-flow model reproduced small pressure gradients as observed in the field during the three distinct sampling events. The velocities calculated from the gas-flow model were used in transient, one-dimensional transport simulations to quantify advective and diffusive fluxes of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere as a function of time for each sampling event. Effective diffusion coefficients used for these simulations were determined from independent laboratory measurements made on intact soil cores collected from the field site. For two of the three sampling events (August 1996 and August 1998), the TCE gas-phase diffusion flux at land surface was significantly greater than the advection flux over the entire sampling period. For the second sampling event (October 1996), the advection flux was frequently larger than the

  17. Installation Restoration General Environmental Technology Development. Task 8. Bench-Scale Investigation of Low Temperature Thermal Removal of TCE (Trichloroethylene) from Soil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Most of the applicable indus- trial dryer designs subject the treated material to either extensive tumbling or they force purge gas through the...volatilization of TCE from soils. A brief review of chemical and metallurgical processing equipment resulted in industrial dryers being the .* prime...candidate for full-scale operations. A brief survey of dryer manufacturers and vendors was completed. It was evident from discussions with vendors that

  18. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 9. Part I. TCE degradation using nonbiological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge for in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is used to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Draft Topical Report for Task No. 9 summarizes laboratory investigations into TCE degradation using nonbiological methods. These studies were conducted by the General Electric Company. The report concentrates on zero valent iron as the reducing agent and presents data on TCE and daughter product degradation rates in batch experiments, column studies, and electroosmotic cells. It is shown that zero valent iron effectively degrades TCE in electroosmotic experiments. Daughter product degradation and gas generation are shown to be important factors in designing field scale treatment zones for the Lasagna{trademark} process.

  19. Evaluating the potential for quantitative monitoring of in situ chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase TCE using in-phase and quadrature electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, R. D.; Revil, A.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Mao, D.

    2015-07-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements can potentially be used to remotely monitor fate and transport of ionic oxidants such as permanganate (MnO4-) during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of contaminants like trichloroethene (TCE). Time-lapse two-dimensional bulk conductivity and induced polarization surveys conducted during a sand tank ISCO simulation demonstrated that MnO4- plume movement could be monitored in a qualitative manner using bulk conductivity tomograms, although chargeability was below sensitivity limits. We also examined changes to in-phase and quadrature electrical conductivity resulting from ion injection, MnO2 and Cl- production, and pH change during TCE and humate oxidation by MnO4- in homogeneous aqueous solutions and saturated porous media samples. Data from the homogeneous samples demonstrated that inversion of the sand tank resistivity data using a common Tikhonov regularization approach was insufficient to recover an accurate conductivity distribution within the tank. While changes to in-phase conductivity could be successfully modeled, quadrature conductivity values could not be directly related to TCE oxidation product or MnO4- concentrations at frequencies consistent with field induced polarization surveys, limiting the utility of quadrature conductivity for monitoring ISCO.

  20. Efficient Degradation of TCE in Groundwater Using Pd and Electro-generated H2 and O2: A Shift in Pathway from Hydrodechlorination to Oxidation in the Presence of Ferrous Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Songhu; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in simulated groundwater by Pd and electro-generated H2 and O2 is investigated in the absence and presence of Fe(II). In the absence of Fe(II), hydrodechlorination dominates TCE degradation, with accumulation of H2O2 up to 17 mg/L. Under weak acidity, low concentrations of oxidizing •OH radical are detected due to decomposition of H2O2, slightly contributing to TCE degradation via oxidation. In the presence of Fe(II), the degradation efficiency of TCE at 396 μM improves to 94.9% within 80 min. The product distribution proves that the degradation pathway shifts from 79% hydrodechlorination in the absence of Fe(II) to 84% •OH oxidation in the presence of Fe(II). TCE degradation follows zeroth-order kinetics with rate constants increasing from 2.0 to 4.6 μM/min with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration from 0 to 27.3 mg/L at pH 4. A good correlation between TCE degradation rate constants and •OH generation rate constants confirms that •OH is the predominant reactive species for TCE oxidation. Presence of 10 mM Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3, NaHCO3, K2SO4, CaSO4 and MgSO4 does not significantly influence degradation, but sulfite and sulfide greatly enhance and slightly suppresses degradation, respectively. A novel Pd-based electrochemical process is proposed for groundwater remediation. PMID:22315993

  1. Demonstration-site development and phytoremediation processes associated with trichloroethene (TCE) in ground water, Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale phytoremediation demonstration study was initiated in 1996 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, at a site on Naval Air StationJoint Reserve Base Carswell Field (NAS–JRB) adjacent to Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) in Fort Worth, Tex. (fig. 1). Trichloroethene (TCE) has been used at AFP4 in aircraft manufacturing processes for decades; spills and leaks from tanks in the manufacturing building have resulted in shallow ground-water contamination on-site and downgradient from the facility (Eberts and others, 2003). The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of eastern cottonwoods (Populus deltoides) in decreasing the mass of dissolved TCE in ground water through phytoremediation. Phytoremediation is a process by which plants decrease the mass of a contaminant through a variety of chemical, physical, and biological means. Before development of the phytoremediation demonstration site, natural attenuation of TCE at the site occurred by sorption, dispersion, dilution, and possibly volatilization (Eberts and others, 2003).Long-term, field-scale monitoring and evaluation of this site contribute to the understanding of the processes associated with phytoremediation and provide practical information about field-scale applications of the method. This fact sheet briefly summarizes the development of the phytoremediation demonstration site at NAS–JRB and describes some of the physical and chemical processes associated with phytoremediation. The phytoremediation demonstration site is on the southern edge of the central lobe of a TCE plume in the surficial (alluvial) aquifer. The plume originates at AFP4 about 0.9 mile upgradient from the site (fig. 1). The 9.5-acre site is in the northwestern corner of the golf course on NAS–JRB. The saturated thickness of the alluvial aquifer, which is composed of clay, silt, sand, and gravel, ranges from about 1.5 to 5 feet at the site. The total thickness of the alluvial

  2. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A pilot-scale in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) demonstration, involving subsurface injections of sodium permanganate (NaMnO4), was performed at the US Marine Corp Recruit Depot (MCRD), site 45 (Parris Island (PI), SC). The ground water was originally contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE) (also known as tetrachloroethylene), a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaner operations. High resolution site characterization involved multiple iterations of soil core sampling and analysis. Nested micro-wells and conventional wells were also used to sample and analyze ground water for PCE and decomposition products (i.e., trichloroethyelene (TCE), dichloroethylene (c-DCE, t-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC)), collectively referred to as chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOC). This characterization methodology was used to develop and refine the conceptual site model and the ISCO design, not only by identifying CVOC contamination but also by eliminating uncontaminated portions of the aquifer from further ISCO consideration. Direct-push injection was selected as the main method of NaMnO4 delivery due to its flexibility and low initial capital cost. Site impediments to ISCO activities in the source area involved subsurface utilities, including a high pressure water main, a high voltage power line, a communication line, and sanitary and stormwater sewer lines. Utility markings were used in conjunction with careful planning and judicious selection of injection locations. A

  3. 1992 toxic hazards research unit annual report. Annual report, 1 October 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, H.G.; Dodd, D.E.; Vinegar, A.; Schneider, M.G.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period 1 October 1991 through 30 September 1992. The THRU conducts descriptive, mechanistic, and predictive toxicology research and toxicological risk assessments to provide data to predict health hazards and to assess health risks associated with human exposure to chemicals and materials associated with military systems and operational environments. The report includes summaries of ongoing or completed research activities for the individual toxicology research requirements of the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy; highlights of the research support elements and conference activities of the THRU; and appendices that describe the THRU organization and its publications and presentations. 1,3,3-Trinitroazetidine (TNAZ), 1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene (TNB), Carboxylic acid metabolite, Chlorofluorocarbon, Chloroform, Delayed neurotoxicity, Halon replacement, Hydraulic fluid, Hydrazine, Inhalation, Jet engine oil, Lactational transfer, Methylene chloride, MIL-H-19457C, Neurotoxic Esterase (NTE), OTTO Fuel II, Perchloroethylene (PCE), Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (pCTFE), Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR), Reproductive, Risk assessment, Smoke, Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), Toxic dust, Vinyl Chloride (VC) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) mixture.

  4. Biological reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene to ethylene under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D L; Gossett, J M

    1989-01-01

    A biological process for remediation of groundwater contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) can only be applied if the transformation products are environmentally acceptable. Studies with enrichment cultures of PCE- and TCE-degrading microorganisms provide evidence that, under methanogenic conditions, mixed cultures are able to completely dechlorinate PCE and TCE to ethylene, a product which is environmentally acceptable. Radiotracer studies with [14C]PCE indicated that [14C]ethylene was the terminal product; significant conversion to 14CO2 or 14CH4 was not observed. The rate-limiting step in the pathway appeared to be conversion of vinyl chloride to ethylene. To sustain reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE, it was necessary to supply an electron donor; methanol was the most effective, although hydrogen, formate, acetate, and glucose also served. Studies with the inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate suggested that methanogens played a key role in the observed biotransformations of PCE and TCE. PMID:2552919

  5. On the preparation of TiO2-sepiolite hybrid materials for the photocatalytic degradation of TCE: influence of TiO2 distribution in the mineralization.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Silvia; Coronado, Juan M; Portela, Raquel; Martín, Juan Carlos; Yates, Malcolm; Avila, Pedro; Sánchez, Benigno

    2008-08-15

    Hybrid structured photocatalysts based on sepiolite, an adsorbent, and TiO2 were prepared by extrusion of ceramic dough and conformed as plates. The influence of the photocatalyst configuration was studied either by including TiO2 in the extrusion process (incorporated materials) or by coating the sepiolite plates with a TiO2 film (coated materials). The influence of the OH- surface concentration in the photocatalytic performance was studied by treating the ceramic plates at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, MIP, SEM, XRD, and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and tested in the photocatalytic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) as a target VOC molecule. Most of the catalysts presented high photoactivity, but considerable differences were observed when the CO2 selectivity was analyzed. The results demonstrate that there is a significant effect of the catalyst configuration on the selectivity of the process. An intimate contact between the sepiolite fibers and TiO2 particles for incorporated materials with a corncob-like structure favored the migration of nondesirable reaction products such as COCl2 and dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC) to the adsorbent, reacting with OH- groups of the adsorbent and favoring the TCE mimeralization.

  6. Managing risks of noncancer health effects at hazardous waste sites: A case study using the Reference Concentration (RfC) of trichloroethylene (TCE).

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael L; Gadagbui, Bernard K; Thompson, Rod B; Pfau, Edward J; Lowe, John

    2016-10-01

    A method for determining a safety range for non-cancer risks is proposed, similar in concept to the range used for cancer in the management of waste sites. This safety range brings transparency to the chemical specific Reference Dose or Concentration by replacing their "order of magnitude" definitions with a scientifically-based range. EPA's multiple RfCs for trichloroethylene (TCE) were evaluated as a case study. For TCE, a multi-endpoint safety range was judged to be 3 μg/m(3) to 30 μg/m,(3) based on a review of kidney effects found in NTP (1988), thymus effects found in Keil et al. (2009) and cardiac effects found in the Johnson et al. (2003) study. This multi-endpoint safety range is derived from studies for which the appropriate averaging time corresponds to different exposure durations, and, therefore, can be applied to both long- and short-term exposures with appropriate consideration of exposure averaging times. For shorter-term exposures, averaging time should be based on the time of cardiac development in humans during fetal growth, an average of approximately 20-25 days.

  7. [Applicability of an electronic nose for detection of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in soil].

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan-Yang; Wen, Xiao-Gang; Wan, Mei; Liu, Rui; Cai, Qiang; Chen, Lü-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2011-12-01

    An electronic nose principally composed of a photo ionization detector (PID) was developed for rapid detection of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) in contaminated soil. Removal of interference gas such as benzene homologues with a pre-filtration tube was analyzed with gas chromatography (GC). A standard gas generator was applied to generate different concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) gas, with which the determine precision and reproducibility of the electronic nose were evaluated by comparison with GC. Finally, simulated contamination soil with three typical paddy soils in Yangtze river delta region were used for ventilation purification experiments, the change of VCHs concentrations in the ventilation gas was monitored, based on which the applicability of the electronic nose was evaluated for on-line detection of the on-going of the ventilation purification process. Results showed that a halogenated hydrocarbon RAE-SEP tube was effective to remove interference gas, with 80%-97% of benzene homologues such as benzene and ethyl benzene being removed while more than 90% of VCHs passed through. With PCE or TCE gas, a linear dependence was derived between the data determined with the electronic nose and GC, the linear slope being 1.012 and R2 > 0.99. The electronic nose showed data consistent with GC (R2 > 0.99, n = 47) when applied for monitoring the remediation progress in a soil ventilation process. The electronic nose is therefore possibly applicable for rapid determination of soil pollution by VCHs, improving the efficiency of pollution diagnosis and remediation.

  8. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV

  9. EPA Reaches Agreement with Manufacturer to Stop Use of TCE in Spray Fixative Products Used on Arts and Crafts/EPA also taking regulatory action to reduce exposure to this chemical

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reached an agreement with a manufacturer to voluntarily phase-out the use of trichloroethylene (TCE) in an aerosol arts and crafts spray fixative product as part of EPA's ongoing efforts

  10. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  11. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  12. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    It is estimated that over 3700 hazardous waste sites are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Energy (DOE). These sites were primarily generated from 45 years worth of environmental pollution from the design and manufacture of nuclear materials and weapons, and contain numerous types of wastes including: (1) volatile, low-volatile and nonvolatile organics, (2) radionuclides (e.g., uranium, plutonium and cesium), (3) nonradioactive heavy metals (e.g., chromium, nickel, and lead), and (4) toxic chemicals. These contaminants affect several media including soils (saturated and unsaturated), groundwater, vegetation, and air. Numerous and diverse DOE hazardous waste sites can be enumerated from soils contaminated by organics such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) at the Savannah River site to biota and vegetation contaminated by radionuclides such as radiocesium and radiostrontium at the Oak Ridge site. Over the next 30 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to bringing all its facilities into compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations. This clean-up task is quite complex involving numerous sites containing various radioactive, organic and inorganic contaminants. To perform this clean-up effort in the most efficient manner at each site will require that DOE managers have access to all available information on pertinent technologies; i.e., to aid in maximum technology transfer. The purpose of this effort is to systematically develop a databast of those currently available and emerging clean-up technologies.

  13. Decontamination systems information and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    It is estimated that over 3700 hazardous waste sites are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Energy (DOE). These sites were primarily generated from 45 years worth of environmental pollution from the design and manufacture of nuclear materials and weapons, and contain numerous types of wastes including: (1) volatile, low-volatile and nonvolatile organics, (2) radionuclides (e.g., uranium, plutonium and cesium), (3) nonradioactive heavy metals (e.g., chromium, nickel, and lead), and (4) toxic chemicals. These contaminants affect several media including soils (saturated and unsaturated), groundwater, vegetation, and air. Numerous and diverse DOE hazardous waste sites can be enumerated from soils contaminated by organics such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) at the Savannah River site to biota and vegetation contaminated by radionuclides such as radiocesium and radiostrontium at the Oak Ridge site. Over the next 30 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to bringing all its facilities into compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations. This clean-up task is quite complex involving numerous sites containing various radioactive, organic and inorganic contaminants. To perform this clean-up effort in the most efficient manner at each site will require that DOE managers have access to all available information on pertinent technologies; i.e., to aid in maximum technology transfer. The purpose of this effort is to systematically develop a databast of those currently available and emerging clean-up technologies.

  14. Sensitive and Specific In-Situ Sensor for Monitoring Contaminated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Watson, David B; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Nazarov, Erkinjun; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a high-sensitivity and high-specificity sensor, combining membrane extraction, pre-concentration, and gas-chromatographic differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS), for in situ detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. Direct in-situ detection was achieved by membrane conversion of aqueous analyte to vapor, followed by vapor spectroscopy using GC/DMS analyzer. The limit of detection (LOD) reaches 0.37 parts per billion in volume (ppbv), or 0.54 ug/L, for aqueous trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1.6 ug/L for perchloroethylene (PCE) by incorporating a preconcentrator between the membrane extraction and GC/DMS detection systems. The high specificity was achieved using two-dimensional separation parameters of GC retention time and DMS compensation voltage. The presence of co-contaminants and foreign contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, CCl4, and CHCl3 did not interfere with the identification of chlorinated hydrocarbons. This highly-sensitive and -specific sensor paves the way for developing field-deployable sensors for in-situ and real-time monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater and surface water.

  15. Assessment of Mitigation Systems on Vapor Intrusion ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion is the migration of subsurface vapors, including radon and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in soil gas from the subsurface to indoor air. Vapor intrusion happens because there are pressure and concentration differentials between indoor air and soil gas. Indoor environments are often negatively pressurized with respect to outdoor air and soil gas (for example, from exhaust fans or the stack effect), and this pressure difference allows soil gas containing subsurface vapors to flow into indoor air through advection. In addition, concentration differentials cause VOCs and radon to migrate from areas of higher to lower concentrations through diffusion, which is another cause of vapor intrusion. Current practice for evaluating the vapor intrusion pathway involves a multiple line of evidence approach based on direct measurements in groundwater, external soil gas, subslab soil gas, and/or indoor air. No single line of evidence is considered definitive, and direct measurements of vapor intrusion can be costly, especially where significant spatial and temporal variability require repeated measurements at multiple locations to accurately assess the chronic risks of long-term exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like chloroform, perchloroethylene (PCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE).

  16. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  17. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  18. The state of permanganate with relation to in situ chemical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronda, Brenda; Dingens, Matthew

    2007-07-01

    In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) with permanganate had its beginnings over 10 years ago. Since that time, many sites have been successfully treated for organic compounds including chlorinated ethenes (perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, etc.) phenols, explosives such as RDX, and many other organics. The successful application of ISCO with permanganate requires the integration of many site-specific factors into the remedial design. ISCO with permanganate is an effective technology, not only for its oxidative properties and persistence, but also for its application flexibility to remediate soil and groundwater. The merits of any type of treatment technology can be assessed in terms of effectiveness, ease of use, reaction rate, and cost. The use of permanganate for in situ chemical oxidation results in the complete mineralization of TCE and PCE and can result in treatment levels below detection limits. Permanganate is a single component oxidizer, which is easily handled, mixed and distributed to the subsurface. Permanganate is also inexpensive to design and implement as compared to other technologies. This presentation will provide a general overview of the application and safety aspects of ISCO with permanganate. This paper will discuss the advantages and limitations of this technology, typical cost ranges, site evaluation and application technologies. (authors)

  19. Desorption Behavior of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethene in U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site Unconfined Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2006-06-21

    The DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the potential applicability of the monitored natural attenuation (MNA) process as a contributor to the understanding of the restoration of its unconfined groundwater aquifer known to be contaminated with the chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This report discusses the results from aqueous desorption experiments on SRS aquifer sediments from two different locations at the SRS (A/M Area; P-Area) with the objective of providing technically defensible TCE/PCE distribution coefficient (Kd) data and data on TCE/PCE reversible and irreversible sorption behavior needed for further MNA evaluation.

  20. Mortality among aircraft manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Boice, J. D.; Marano, D. E.; Fryzek, J. P.; Sadler, C. J.; McLaughlin, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of cancer and other diseases among workers engaged in aircraft manufacturing and potentially exposed to compounds containing chromate, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and mixed solvents. METHODS: A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of workers employed for at least 1 year at a large aircraft manufacturing facility in California on or after 1 January 1960. The mortality experience of these workers was determined by examination of national, state, and company records to the end of 1996. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were evaluated comparing the observed numbers of deaths among workers with those expected in the general population adjusting for age, sex, race, and calendar year. The SMRs for 40 cause of death categories were computed for the total cohort and for subgroups defined by sex, race, position in the factory, work duration, year of first employment, latency, and broad occupational groups. Factory job titles were classified as to likely use of chemicals, and internal Poisson regression analyses were used to compute mortality risk ratios for categories of years of exposure to chromate, TCE, PCE, and mixed solvents, with unexposed factory workers serving as referents. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 77,965 workers who accrued nearly 1.9 million person-years of follow up (mean 24.2 years). Mortality follow up, estimated as 99% complete, showed that 20,236 workers had died by 31 December 1996, with cause of death obtained for 98%. Workers experienced low overall mortality (all causes of death SMR 0.83) and low cancer mortality (SMR 0.90). No significant increases in risk were found for any of the 40 specific cause of death categories, whereas for several causes the numbers of deaths were significantly below expectation. Analyses by occupational group and specific job titles showed no remarkable mortality patterns. Factory workers estimated to have been routinely exposed to chromate were

  1. Green remediation: enhanced reductive dechlorination using recycled rinse water as bioremediation substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Gaynor; McKeon, Tom

    2007-07-01

    Enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) has rapidly become a remedy of choice for use on chlorinated solvent contamination when site conditions allow. With this approach, solutions of an organic substrate are injected into the affected aquifer to stimulate biological growth and the resultant production of reducing conditions in the target zone. Under the reducing conditions, hydrogen is produced and ultimately replaces chlorine atoms on the contaminant molecule causing sequential dechlorination. Under suitable conditions the process continues until the parent hydrocarbon precursor is produced, such as the complete dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) to ethene. The process is optimized by use of a substrate that maximizes hydrogen production per unit cost. When natural biota are not present to promote the desired degradation, inoculates can be added with the substrate. The in-situ method both reduces cost and accelerates cleanup. Successful applications have been extended from the most common chlorinated compounds perchloroethylene (PCE) and TCE and related products of degradation, to perchlorate, and even explosives such as RDX and trinitrotoluene on which nitrates are attacked in lieu of chloride. In recent work, the process has been further improved through use of beverage industry wastewaters that are available at little or no cost. With material cost removed from the equation, applications can maximize the substrate loading without significantly increasing total cost. The extra substrate loading both accelerates reaction rates and extends the period of time over which reducing conditions are maintained. In some cases, the presence of other organic matter in addition to simple sugars provides for longer performance times of individual injections, thereby working in a fashion similar to emulsified vegetable oil. The paper discusses results of applications at three different sites contaminated with chlorinated ethylenes. The applications have included

  2. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  3. CONTROLLED RELEASE, BLIND TEST OF DNAPL REMEDIATION BY ETHANOL FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone was established within a sheet-pile
    isolated cell through a controlled release of perchloroethylene (PCE) to evaluate DNAPL
    remediation by in-situ cosolvent flushing. Ethanol was used as the cosolvent, and the main remedia...

  4. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed F/A-22 Maintenance Facilities, Hill AFB, Utah

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Averaging Averaging risk for quotient for time for time for Exposure Exposure carcinogens , noncarcinogens, carcinogens , noncarcinogens, duration, frequency...Administration OU operable unit PCE perchloroethylene PEG potential exposure group PM10 particulate matter (less than 10 microns) ppm parts per...workers in the potential exposure group (PEG) of the proposed RCS facility will conduct x-ray operations, perform ultrasound eddy current testing

  5. EFFECTS OF FOUR TRIHALOMETHANES ON DNA STRAND BREAKS, RENAL HYALINE DROPLET FORMATION AND SERUM TESTOSTERONE IN MALE F-344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    All four possible trihalomethanes (THMs) containing bromine and chlorine, as well as perchloroethylene (PCE), were evaluated for their ability to produce DNA strand breaks, a2u-globulin rich renal deposits, and testosterone changes in male F-344 rats. Rats received daily equimola...

  6. MICROBIAL UTILIZATION OF VADOSE ZONE ORGANIC CARBON FOR REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous extracts from a calcareous spodosol were used as the primary substrate to study the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE). A comparison was made between extracts obtained using pure water and water saturated with trichloroethene (TCE). The latter solutions w...

  7. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1 . Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1 . Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is w...

  8. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1. Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is widel...

  9. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  10. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  11. Promising Emerging Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  12. Contributions of Fe Minerals to Abiotic Dechlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  13. ENHANCED SOURCE REMOVAL OF NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID CONTAMINANTS BY CHEMICAL-BASED FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline and halogenated solvents (trichloroethylene (TCE) and teterachloroethylene (PCE), etc) enter the subsurface after a spill, or from leaking underground storage tanks. The presence of residual dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) ...

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: AQUADETOX®/ SVE SYSTEM and AWD Technologies, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AWD technology simultaneously treats groundwater and soil-gas contaminated with volatile or ganic compounds (VOC), such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This technology integrates two processes: (1) AquaDetox®, a moderate vacuum (pressure about 50 ...

  15. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  16. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  17. Optimization Evaluation, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site (NPA6 Site) addresses multiple sources of contamination and a broad contaminant plume that underlies a large portion of Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and associated....

  18. Remediation System Evaluation, Brewster Wellfield Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Brewster Well Field, located on the northern bank of the East Branch Croton River (the “River”),was found in 1978 to be contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic chemicals (CVOCs) includingtetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and..

  19. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  20. Radiolytic and thermal dechlorination of organic chlorides adsorbed on molecular sieve 13X.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Tagawa, S

    2001-05-15

    Reductive dechlorination of chlorobenzene (PhCl), trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1- and 2-chlorobutanes, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and 1,1,1- and 1,1,2-trichloroethanes adsorbed on molecular sieve 13X was investigated. The molecular sieve adsorbing the organic chlorides was irradiated with gamma-rays, heated, or allowed to stand at room temperature in a sealed ampule and was then soaked in water. The dechlorination yields were determined from the Cl- concentrations of the supernatant aqueous solutions. It was found that the chlorinated alkanes adsorbed on the molecular sieve are readily dechlorinated on standing at room temperature. The dechlorination at room temperature was limited for TCE and PCE. PhCl was quite stable even at 200 degrees C. gamma-Radiolysis was examined for PhCl, TCE, and PCE at room temperature. The radiation chemical yields of the dechlorination, G(Cl-), were 1.9, 40, and 30 for PhCl, TCE, and PCE, respectively. After 5 h of heating at 200 degrees C, the dechlorination yields for TCE and PCE were 24.5 and 4.3%, respectively. TCE is much more reactive than PCE in the thermal dechlorination, whereas their radiolytic dechlorination yields are comparable. The pH of the supernatant solutions decreased along with the dechlorination.

  1. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites. Semiannual progress report, April 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, C.T.; Benson, S.B.; Osborne, T.R.; Revis, N.W.

    1988-12-31

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a persistent environmental contaminant whose chemical stability and hydrophobicity have made it difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater. PCE is also toxic and has been implicated as a carcinogen. This study was aimed at assessing methods for biological degradation of PCE. As a part of the study, the authors have characterized possible products of the degradation of PCE, and have determined the effects of detergents and solvents on the water solubility of PCE and on the toxic effects of PCE on bacteria. The authors have also isolated PCE-resistant microorganisms from monitoring wells at Y-12. To date all of the PCE-resistant bacteria isolated from the monitoring wells have been of the genus Bacillus. One of these isolates appears to be able to degrade PCE, as indicated by the disappearance of PCE from cultures of growing cells. The organism does not grow on PCE as the sole carbon source, so degradation of the solvent must occur by cometabolism.

  2. Biological degradation of tetrachloroethylene in methanogenic conditions. Final report, 12 July 1991-11 January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.M.; DiStefano, T.D.; Stover, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    Research objective: investigate anaerobic biodegradation of perchloroethylene (PCE). Specific objectives: determine if the presence of PCE is necessary to sustain dechlorination of vinyl chloride (VC), delineate the role of hydrogen (H2) in PCE reductive dechlorination, investigate the ability of the high level PCE/methanol (MeOH) culture to utilize low levels of PCE, and determine the applicability of an Anaerobic Attached-film Expanded-bed (AAFEB) reactor to achieve PCE dechlorination. The investigators determined: by using a VC-fed culture unable to sustain ETH production, that the presence of PCE is required to sustain VC dechlorination, H2 acts as the electron donor directly used for the reductive dechlorination of PCE to ethene, the PCE/MeOH culture was able to use ppb levels of PCE due to the small requirement for electron donor (H2) by the culture, and that the loss of the dechlorinating biomass from the support matrix, and/or the inability of the culture to support PCE dechlorination at low concentrations, led to the failure of the AAFEB reactor system. Biodegradation, Tetrachloroethylene, Methanogenesis, Fixed-film reactors, Biological treatment, Chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  3. Quantifying in situ transformation rates of chlorinated ethenes by combining compound-specific stable isotope analysis, groundwater dating, and carbon isotope mass balances.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Christoph; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Amaral, Helena I F; Kipfer, Rolf; Schwarzenbach, René P; Berg, Michael

    2010-05-15

    We determined in situ reductive transformation rates of tetrachloroethene (PCE) in a contaminated aquifer by combining compound-specific carbon stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the contaminants with tracer-based ((3)H-(3)He) groundwater dating. With increasing distance from the source, PCE was gradually transformed to trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). Using the in situ determined carbon isotopic enrichment factor of -3.3 +/- 1.2 per thousand allowed for quantification of the PCE-to-TCE transformation based on isotopic (delta(13)C) shifts. By combining these estimates of the extent of PCE transformation with measured groundwater residence times (between 16 and 36 years) we calculated half-lives of 2.8 +/- 0.8 years (k = 0.27 +/- 0.09 yr(-1)) for the PCE-to-TCE transformation. Carbon isotope mass balances including the chloroethenes PCE, TCE, cDCE, and VC (delta(13)C(Sigma(CEs))) enabled an assessment of complete PCE dechlorination to nonchlorinated products. Shifts of delta(13)C(Sigma(CEs)) at the fringe of the plume of more than 25 per thousand pointed to dechlorination beyond VC of up to 55 +/- 17% of the chloroethene mass. Calculated rates for this multistep dechlorination were highly variable throughout the aquifer (k = 0.4 +/- 0.4 yr(-1)), suggesting that PCE reduction to nonchlorinated products occurred only in locally restricted zones of the investigated site.

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of tetrachloroethylene that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and ...

  5. Intrinsic and accelerated anaerobic biodegradation of perchloroethylene in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.J. Jr.; Ellis, D.E.; Odom, J.M.; Lee, M.D.; Mazierski, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    The DuPont Niagara Falls Plant is located in a heavily industrialized area of Niagara Falls, New York, adjacent to the Niagara River. The plant has been in continuous operation since 1898 and manufactured various organic and inorganic chemicals. Chlorinated solvents were produced from 1930 to 1975 at the plant. Numerous hydrogeologic investigations have described the subsurface hydrogeology and indicated that the groundwater underlying the plant was impacted by a variety of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a wide range of concentrations. DuPont initiated in-field evaluations to determine whether biological reductive anaerobic dechlorination was occurring naturally and, if so, whether such dechlorination could be enhanced in situ. A field program was subsequently implemented could be enhanced in situ. A field program was subsequently implemented in a preselected area of the plant through use of an in situ borehole bioreactor to attempt to stimulate indigenous biological reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatics by the addition of yeast extract (substrate) and sulfate (electron acceptor). At this location, a very active microbial population developed, which reduced the in situ concentrations of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by more than 94%, but did not increase the typical biological degradation products. This may have been due to an alternative biological degradation pathway or to very rapid biological kinetics. Efforts to elucidate this mechanism have been initiated under a separate laboratory program.

  6. A small amount of tetrachloroethylene ingestion from drinking water accelerates antigen-stimulated allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Seo, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Ryo; Ikeda, Koji; Satoh, Masahiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we observed that tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) increased histamine release and inflammatory mediator production from antigen-stimulated mast cells. In this study, we examined the enhancing effect of low concentrations of PCE in drinking water on antigen-stimulated allergic responses. After exposure of Wistar rats to PCE in drinking water for 2 or 4 weeks, we performed a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction. PCE exposure for 4 weeks enhanced PCA reaction in a dose-dependent manner. In pathological studies, PCE exposure for 2 weeks exacerbated inflammation characterized by infiltration of lymphocytes and accumulation of mast cells around the vessel. Non-purified mast cells (NPMCs) from rats treated with 1mg/L PCE in drinking water for 2 weeks increased antigen-stimulated histamine release. Furthermore, the leukocytes of rats treated with PCE in drinking water for 4 weeks showed increased interleukin (IL)-4 expression. The mechanism of enhancing the PCA reaction is assumed to be that PCE increases IL-4 production and PCE causes T helper (Th) 1/Th2-type helper T-cell imbalance and increases histamine release from excessively accumulated mast cells. The results suggest that the intake of PCE in drinking water, even at a low concentration, leads to the initiation and acceleration of allergic diseases.

  7. Removing hexavalent chromium from subsurface waters with anion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    Some subsurface waters at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is also present in the ground water; however, the source of the Cr(VI) may be natural. The Cr(VI) still must be treated if brought to the surface because its concentration exceeds discharge standards. We are planning facilities for removing the VOCs and Cr(VI) to a level below the discharge standards. The planned treatment includes the following steps: (1) Pumping the water to the surface facility. (2) Purging the VOCs with air and absorbing them on activated carbon. The VOCs in LLNL`s subsurface waters are primarily chlorinated organic solvents, such as dichloroethylene (DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}). Contamination levels range from tens to thousands of parts per billion. (3) Filtering the water. (4) Passing the water through anion-exchange resin to remove the Cr. The Cr in LLNL subsurface waters occurs almost entirely as Cr(VI), which exists as the chromate anion, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, at environmental pH. Cr levels range from tens to hundreds of parts per billion. (5) Discharging the treated water into the local arroyos. The relevant discharge criteria are 5 ppb total VOCs, 11 ppb Cr(VI), and pH between 6.5 and 8.5, inclusive. This report describes laboratory experiments undertaken to learn how the proposed treatment facility can be expected to operate. The laboratory results are expected to supply vendors with the detailed performance specifications needed to prepare bids on the Cr removal portion of the treatment facility. The treatment facility is expected to process 60 gallons per minute (gpm) of water by stripping VOCs with 720 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of air and removing Cr(VI) with 60 ft{sup 3} of resin.

  8. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E.; Londergan, J.T.; Pickens, J.F.

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE facilities are situated in areas of sand and gravel which have become polluted with dense, non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs, such as chlorinated solvents, from the various industrial operations at these facilities. The presence of such DNAPLs in sand and gravel aquifers is now recognized as the principal factor in the failure of standard ground-water remediation methods. The principal objective of this study, as stated in the Statement of Work of the contract (DE-AC21-92MC29111), is to demonstrate that multi-component DNAPLs can be readily solubilized in sand and gravel aquifers by dilute surfactant solutions. The specific objectives of the contract are: to identify dilute surfactants or blends of surfactants in the laboratory that will efficiently extract multi-component DNAPLs from sand and gravel aquifers by micellar solubilization (Phase 1); 2. to test the efficacy of the identified surfactants or blends of surfactants to solubilize in situ perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) DNAPLs by the injection and the subsequent extraction through an existing well or wells at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 1); and 3. to demonstrate the full-scale operation of this remedial technology at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 2). Specific objective number 1 has been completed and reported to DOE. However, the results of the test referred to in specific objective number 2, conducted at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1994, were inconclusive. Following this first test, it was decided by DOE and INTERA to move the test site elsewhere due to difficulties with obtaining core samples of the sand and gravel aquifer containing the DNAPL and with ascertaining the location of the DNAPL relative to the injection well. The solubilization test at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) will constitute the second test of Phase 1 of this contract.

  9. Development of compound-specific isotope analysis of stable chlorine in sub-µmol quantities of chlorinated organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrand, H.; Andersson, P.; Gustafsson, O.

    2003-04-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons is a common class of substances known to be of high ecotoxicity largely due to their persistence and strongly lipophilic properties. This group of chemicals include the semivolatile compounds dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which, together with solvents like trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), are globally present at detectable levels in all natural environments. Recent reports on the possibility of enzymatic synthesis of chlorinated dioxins and furans, illustrate the need for means to distinguish the naturally produced contribution from anthropogenic input to the environment. Shifts in the chlorine isotope composition due to degradation, or synthesis, of a compound are in the order of a few per mil of the initial isotope ratio. The cause of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arises from differences in preferential phase distribution of isotopic species. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of stable chlorine should accordingly provide knowledge relevant to degradation rates, distribution patterns and reaction pathways for organochlorines. Isotope analysis of chlorine, derived from chlorinated hydrocarbons, can be performed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) with positive ions. This lowers the limit of determination from about 30 μmol Cl for conventional electron ionisation mass spectrometry (EIMS), to less than 0.3 μmol Cl with a precision of 0.25 ppm (1s) for TIMS. Such a decrease by a factor 100 in the requirements of sample size will enable CSIA of sediment samples collected away from the immediate vicinity of strongly contaminated areas. The aim of this study is to develop a functioning sequence for i) sealed tube combustion with CuO of solid phase chlorinated hydrocarbons equivalent to <0.7 μmol Cl, ii) conversion of formed chloride to CsCl by ion exchange chromatography and iii) analysis of chlorine isotopes in TIMS. The described method can open new

  10. Novel Analytical Techniques Based on a Enhanced Electron Attachment Process - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 06/15/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Buchanan, Michelle V.

    2001-06-15

    Present analytical methodologies for the detection of chlorinated compounds important to DOE's environmental restoration program, such as DNAPLs [dense non-aqueous phase liquids - such as carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE)], polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and others, involve detection by negative-ion-based analytical techniques. These techniques exploit electron attachment to analyte molecules in their ground electronic states, and are limited to particular compounds with appropriate electron capture cross sections. For example, PCB contamination is detected by analysis of mixtures of chlorinated homologues of these biphenyls. Homologues with lower numbers of chlorines do not efficiently attach thermal electrons and thus are not detected by either electron capture chromatographic detectors or by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We proposed three novel analytical techniques based on enhanced negative-ion formation via electron attachment to highly-excited electronic states of molecules. In one of the proposed techniques, the excited states of the (analyte) molecules are populated via laser excitation; the resulting negative ions are mass analyzed for identification. The other two proposed techniques utilize a specialized gas discharge for the formation of excited species (and low-energy electrons for attachment), and thus will provide a cost-effective method if successful. In one version, the negative ions will be mass analyzed -as in the laser-based technique- and in the other, the decrease in electron density due to excited state attachment will be monitored (electron capture detector mode). A plasma mixing scheme will be employed to excite the analyte molecules so that the excited states of the analyte molecules will not be destroyed by the discharge.

  11. Zone of capture analysis for the A/M area of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.; Beaudoin, C.M.; Schreuder, P.J.

    1991-12-01

    The groundwater of the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) as the result of the past use and disposal of these solvents. For the purpose of remediating this contamination, the A/M Area of the SRS has been divided into three sectors termed the central, northern (or SRL), and southern sectors. The central portion of the A/M Area has had an active remediation system of eleven recovery wells since 1985 and its effectiveness has been evaluated through groundwater modeling. Remediation will soon begin at the northern or SRL sector with a pump and treat system of six wells distributed at four different locations with total pumping of approximately 250 gallons per minute (gpm). The locations and effectiveness of the capture system for each sector has been estimated through groundwater modeling without full consideration of the central recovery system. This report will provide an estimate of the number of recovery wells required for the southern sector and also consider the effects of the current and planned recovery systems for the northern and central plumes. The southern sector contamination (which is defined as the area south of the M-Area basin) has been initially characterized and one recovery well (RWM-16) has been installed, for which an aquifer test was performed. However, to date a recovery well system has not been designed for the southern sector nor has a comprehensive evaluation of the recovery systems for all three sectors been completed. The purpose of this groundwater modeling study is to: (1) determine the location and number of recovery wells necessary to contain or remediate the southern sector, and (2) complete an analysis of the combined central, northern and estimated southern sector remediation so that the interactions of the systems can be determined.

  12. Compound-specific isotope analysis: Questioning the origins of a trichloroethene plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, S.M.; Braun, C.; Jones, S.

    2008-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2- dichloroethene, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene were determined by use of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectroscopy to determine whether compound-specific stable carbon isotopes could be used to help understand the origin and history of a TCE groundwater plume in Fort Worth, TX. Calculated ??13C values for total chlorinated ethenes in groundwater samples, which can approximate the ??13C of a spilled solvent if all degradation products are accounted for, were useful for determining whether separate lobes of the plume resulted from different sources. Most notably, values for one lobe, where tetrachloroethene (PCE) has been detected periodically, were outside the range for manufactured TCE but within the range for manufactured PCE, whereas values for a separate lobe, which is downgradient of reported TCE spills, were within the range for manufactured TCE. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  13. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Draft topical report for task No. 9. Part II. Entitled: TCE degradation using non-biological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.G.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The use of zero valence iron for reductive dechlorination of aliphatic chlorinated hydrocarbons is currently under investigation by a number of research groups as a potential method of in-situ treatment of contaminated ground water. The reaction appears to involve the transfer of electrons to chloro-aliphatic compounds by the oxidation of zero valence iron to ferrous iron (Fe{sup +2}). Our studies have indicated that this reaction is consistent with those of corrosion, and as such, can be influenced or increased by the presence of small amounts of metals (5% by weight) such as copper, tin, silver, gold and palladium coated on the iron surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with a more electropositive metal results in an open galvanic cell, which increases the oxidation of iron and facilitates and increases the concurrent reduction of trichloroethylene and other chlorinated aliphatic compounds to the corresponding alkenes and alkanes. Our results show that plating more electropositive metals onto certain iron surfaces results in approximately a factor of ten increase in the dechlorination rate of small organochlorine compounds such as TCE.

  14. CONCURRENT INJECTION OF COSOLVENT AND AIR FOR ENHANCED PCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to use preferential flow of air to improve the dynamics of cosolvent displacement in order to enhance DNAPL displacement and dissolution. The concurrent injection of cosolvent and air was evaluated in a glass micromodel for a DNAPL remediation technolog...

  15. PCE/K-10 Activities for Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR. Area II Office.

    Intended for use by Marshall High School faculty as they integrate career education into their curriculum, the project notebook is based on the (Portland, Oregon) overall Area 2 program goals for career education which proposes that all children completing school should have sufficient knowledge and competencies to enter into a field of employment…

  16. Bubbleless gas transfer technology for the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J.R.; Kurz, M.D.

    1999-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the ability of hydrogen to supply reducing equivalents for the reductive dehalogenation of perchloroethylene (PCE). This objective will be accomplished by two types of activities. First, laboratory experiments will compare the kinetics of hydrogen-mediated dehalogenation with natural routes of loss (hydrolysis and natural attenuation). Secondly, bench-scale column experiments will be performed to demonstrate hydrogen-mediated reductive dehalogenation in aquifer sediments.

  17. The Microbial Degradation of TCE (Trichloroethylene).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Production Voges-Proskaver Test Gelatin Hydrolysis Utilization of: Citratea Glucose + Mannitol + Sorbitol + Rhamnose + Amygdalin + Arabinose + a. Strain was...Methanol Glucose + Citrate + 1,2-Dichloroethane 1,2-Dibromoethane Mannitol + Inositol Sorbitol + Rhamnose + Sucrose Melibiose + Amygdalin + Arabinose

  18. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  19. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  20. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1998-06-02

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  1. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-03-18

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  2. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products.

  3. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-04-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. 10 figs.

  4. Developing strategies for PAH and TCE bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffey, W.R.; Nelson, M.; Kinsella, J. ); Compeau, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Bioremediation is the controlled use of microbes, commonly bacteria and fungi, to reclaim soil and water contaminated with substances that are deleterious to human health and the environment. The organisms used often naturally inhabit the polluted matrix; however, they may inhabit a different environment and be used as seed organisms because of their ability to degrade a specific class of substances. It is because of the wide diversity of microbial metabolic potential that bioremediation is possible. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are present in fossil fuels and are formed during the incomplete combustion of organic material. PAHs exhibit low volatility and low aqueous solubility. As the molecular weight of these compounds increases, there is an exponential decrease in solubility and volatility. PAHs tend to adsorb onto soils and sediments because of their hydrophobic character, which is an intrinsic function of molecular size. The microbial degradation of individual PAHs by pure cultures and mixed populations occurs under a wide range of soil types and environmental conditions. Generally, the factors having the greatest influence on PAH biodegradation rates are soil moisture content, pH, inorganic nutrients present, PAH loading rates, initial PAH concentrations, and the presence of an acclimated microbial population. Feasibility studies are essential for developing a bioremediation strategy and are performed in a phased testing program that is designed to accomplish a number of objectives. These objectives include establishing an indigenous microbial population that will degrade specific contaminants, defining the rate-limiting factors for enhanced PAH degradation and the optimal treatment in terms of rates and cleanup levels attainable, and developing design parameters for field operations.

  5. SORPTION OF NONIONIC SURFACTANT OLIGOMERS TO SEDIMENT AND PCE DNAPL: EFFECTS ON PCE DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT. (R826650)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction of surfactant mixtures to the subsurface for the purpose of
    surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation requires consideration of the effects of
    surfactant sorption to sediment and nonaqueous phase liquids. These effects
    include alteration of the solubiliz...

  6. Human Health Effects of Tetrachloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Karen A.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Kopylev, Leonid; Barone, Stanley; Makris, Susan L.; Glenn, Barbara; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) in February 2012 in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Objectives: We reviewed key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of PCE described in the U.S. EPA’s Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene). Methods: The updated assessment of PCE synthesized and characterized a substantial database of epidemiological, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies. Key scientific issues were addressed through modeling of PCE toxicokinetics, synthesis of evidence from neurological studies, and analyses of toxicokinetic, mechanistic, and other factors (tumor latency, severity, and background rate) in interpreting experimental animal cancer findings. Considerations in evaluating epidemiological studies included the quality (e.g., specificity) of the exposure assessment methods and other essential design features, and the potential for alternative explanations for observed associations (e.g., bias or confounding). Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites that contribute to PCE toxicity. The exposure assessment approach—a key evaluation factor for epidemiological studies of bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma—provided suggestive evidence of carcinogenicity. Bioassay data provided conclusive evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Neurotoxicity was identified as a sensitive noncancer health effect, occurring at low exposures: a conclusion supported by multiple studies. Evidence was integrated from human, experimental animal, and mechanistic data sets in assessing adverse health effects of PCE. Conclusions: PCE is likely to be carcinogenic to humans. Neurotoxicity is a sensitive adverse health effect of PCE. Citation: Guyton KZ, Hogan KA, Scott CS, Cooper GS, Bale AS

  7. Biological exposure assessment to tetrachloroethylene for workers in the dry cleaning industry

    PubMed Central

    McKernan, Lauralynn T; Ruder, Avima M; Petersen, Martin R; Hein, Misty J; Forrester, Christy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Ashley, David L; Butler, Mary A

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting biological tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) exposure assessments of dry cleaning employees in conjunction with evaluation of possible PCE health effects. Methods Eighteen women from four dry cleaning facilities in southwestern Ohio were monitored in a pilot study of workers with PCE exposure. Personal breathing zone samples were collected from each employee on two consecutive work days. Biological monitoring included a single measurement of PCE in blood and multiple measurements of pre- and post-shift PCE in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine. Results Post-shift PCE in exhaled breath gradually increased throughout the work week. Statistically significant correlations were observed among the exposure indices. Decreases in PCE in exhaled breath and TCA in urine were observed after two days without exposure to PCE. A mixed-effects model identified statistically significant associations between PCE in exhaled breath and airborne PCE time weighted average (TWA) after adjusting for a random participant effect and fixed effects of time and body mass index. Conclusion Although comprehensive, our sampling strategy was challenging to implement due to fluctuating work schedules and the number (pre- and post-shift on three consecutive days) and multiplicity (air, blood, exhaled breath, and urine) of samples collected. PCE in blood is the preferred biological index to monitor exposures, but may make recruitment difficult. PCE TWA sampling is an appropriate surrogate, although more field intensive. Repeated measures of exposure and mixed-effects modeling may be required for future studies due to high within-subject variability. Workers should be monitored over a long enough period of time to allow the use of a lag term. PMID:18412959

  8. Composition Dependent Evolution in Mass Flux from Binary Trichloroethene/Tetrachloroethene-DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. I.; Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Pennell, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    In order to accurately predict the efficacy of subsurface remediation for sites contaminated with multicomponent dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), it is necessary to link changes in aqueous phase contaminant discharge with source composition and distribution. Dissolution from a binary 1:1 (molar) mixture of trichloroethene- (TCE) and tetrachloroethene- (PCE) DNAPL was measured in three separate 2-dimensional aquifer cells (100 x 48 x 1.4 cm) that were packed with different background media (1:1 mixture 20:30 and 40:50 mesh; 20:30 mesh and 40:50 mesh Accusand) and low permeability zones. Initial DNAPL source zone architectures were varied to yield ganglia to pool (GTP) ratios of 0.44, 1.56, and 1.72. Down-gradient plume evolution and DNAPL spatial distribution were measured every 5 pore volumes (PV) from side port samples and a light transmission system that allowed non-invasive measurement of volumetric DNAPL saturation and source descriptive metrics at a resolution of 0.03 to 0.08 mm2. Flux-averaged PCE and TCE effluent concentrations were measured every 0.7 PVs from a fully screened effluent chamber. To accelerate changes in source zone architecture and overall mass removal, two surfactant floods (4% w/w Tween 80) were completed after mass discharge from the source zone reached a steady state. Mass flux reductions for a given amount of DNAPL mass removed were found to correspond strongly to the molar composition of DNAPL in the source zone and the initial DNAPL saturation distribution metric (e.g., GTP). Percent reductions in mass flux from the aquifer cells with ganglia dominated architectures were 98 and 72% for TCE and PCE respectively, with a final overall NAPL source zone molar ratio of 0.49:0.51 TCE: PCE ; and 97 and 79% for TCE and PCE with molar ratios of 0.19:0.81 TCE:PCE. Reductions in mass flux from the pool dominated source zone were 90 and 53% for TCE and PCE with a final overall DNAPL source zone mole fraction of 0.26:0.74 TCE:PCE. These

  9. Reductive dechlorination pathways of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene and subsequent transformation of their dechlorination products by mackinawite (FeS) in the presence of metals.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Kim, Haekyung; Hayes, Kim F

    2007-11-15

    Because of frequent co-occurrence of metals with chlorinated organic pollutants, Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Hg(II) were evaluated for their impact on the dechlorination pathways of PCE and TCE and the subsequent transformation of the initial dechlorination products by FeS. PCE transforms to acetylene via beta-elimination, TCE via hydrogenolysis, and 1,1-DCE via alpha-elimination, while TCE transforms to acetylene via beta-elimination and cis-DCE and 1,1-DCE via hydrogenolysis. Acetylene subsequently transforms in FeS batches, but little transformation of cis-DCE and 1,1-DCE was observed. Branching ratio calculations indicate that the added metals decrease the reductive transformation of PCE and TCE via beta-elimination relative to hydrogenolysis, resulting in a higher production of the toxic DCE byproducts. Nonetheless, acetylene is generally the dominant product. Production of highly water-soluble compound(s) is suspected as a significant source for incomplete mass recoveries. In the transformation of PCE and TCE, the formation of unidentified product(s) is most significant in Co(II)-added FeS batches. Although nearly complete mass recoveries were observed in the other FeS batches, the subsequent transformation of acetylene would lead to the formation of unidentified product(s) over long time periods.

  10. Comparison of Chlorinated Ethenes DNAPL Reductive Dechlorination by Indigenous and Evanite culture with Surfactant Tween-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, R.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Lee, S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Although many innovative technologies have been developed to enhance remediation of chlorinated ethenes(e.g. tetrachloroethene[PCE], trichloroethene[TCE])DNAPL source zones, they have been ineffective in reducing contaminant concentration to regulatory end points. Thus, combination of surfactant flushing process that removes significant contaminant mass with microbial reductive dechlorination, posttreatment "polishing step" to control the remaining DNAPL that may serve as a source of reducing equivalents and stimulate the dechlorinating bacterial communities may be an attractive remediation process alternatively. Microcosm studies were conducted to explore chlorinated ethenes, PCE/TCE of 3 ~ 30 mg/L dechlorination by indigenous microbial communities from TCE DNAPL source zones of Korea and Evanite culture in the presence of Tween-80 of 10 ~ 5,000 mg/L. In the microcosms for indigenous microbial communities, by-products(e.g. c-DCE, vinyl chloride) of reductive dechlorination of PCE/TCE were not detected. This results suggest dechlorinating bacteria might be not exist or high concentration of chlorinated ethenes inhibit activity of dechlorinating bacteria in indigenous microbial communities. But VFAs like acetate, methane and hydrogen gas from fermentation of Tween-80 were detected. So Tween-80 might estimated to serve as a source of reducing equivalents. To evaluate the dechlorinating ability of Evanite-culture, we added Evanite-culture to the microcosms for indigenous bacteria and monitored by-products of reductive dechlorination of PCE/TCE and VFAs and hydrogen gas.

  11. Field Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies: Permeable Reactive Barriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    dweymann@ emconinc.com Caldwell Trucking Northern NJ 1998 TCE Hydraulic Fracturing , $1.12 M Fe0 Only 60% John Vidumsky Permeation Infilling...Oriented $1.15 M Granular No problems except Stephen H. Shoemaker Chloroform, Freon 11, Hydraulic Fracturing cast iron at recovering an Tel: 704-362...VC Massachusetts Falmouth, MA 1998 PCE, TCE Hydraulic Fracturing $160 K Fe0 Robert W. Gillham Military Reservation Tel: 519-888-4658 CS-10 Plume Fax

  12. Kinetic and isotope analyses of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene degradation by model Fe(II)-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoming; Philp, R Paul; Butler, Elizabeth C

    2009-03-01

    The kinetics and in some cases stable carbon isotope fractionation associated with abiotic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by model Fe(II)-bearing minerals present in anaerobic soils were measured. The minerals studied were chloride green rust (GR-Cl), sulfate green rust (GR-SO(4)), pyrite, magnetite, and adsorbed Fe(II) or FeS formed at the surface of goethite by treatment with dissolved Fe(II) or S(-II). We observed some abiotic transformation of PCE and TCE in every system studied, as evidenced by the presence of abiotic reaction products. Bulk enrichment factors (epsilon(bulk) values) for TCE transformation by GR-Cl and pyrite were -23.0+/-1.8 per thousand and -21.7+/-1.0 per thousand, respectively, which are more negative than reported values for microbial TCE dechlorination and could provide one means for distinguishing microbial from abiotic dechlorination of TCE in the environment. Considering the time scale of subsurface remediation technologies, including natural attenuation, minerals such as green rusts, pyrite, and magnetite have the potential to contribute to the transformation of PCE and TCE at contaminated sites.

  13. Evaluating the Relationship Between Source Zone Metrics and Down-Gradient Plume Response as a Function of Mixed DNAPL Mass Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, N. L.; Granbery, E. K.; Christ, J.; Pennell, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The influence of source zone architecture on down-gradient plume and flux-averaged effluent concentrations as a function of source depletion was evaluated through a series of 2-D aquifer cell experiments contaminated with a mixed dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) consisting of a 1:1 molar ratio of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The aquifer cells (1.0 m length x 48 cm height x 1.4 cm internal thickness) were packed with different size fractions of quartz sands, and low permeability lens configurations were varied to achieve alternative varied source zone saturation distributions. DNAPL saturation distributions were quantified using a light transmission system and characterized by the ganglia-to-pool ratio (GTP, 0 to infinity) and pool fraction (0 to 1), where saturations less than 0.13 represent discrete ganglia and saturations equal to or greater than 0.13 are considered to represent "pools". Flux-averaged effluent dissolved-phase TCE and PCE concentrations were monitored continuously, while down-gradient plume samples were collected periodically from 25 side-ports. Results from these studies indicated that TCE was preferentially depleted during aqueous phase dissolution from the mixed DNAPL source zone, while PCE was preferentially depleted during surfactant flooding with a 4% (w/w) solution of polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80, a nonionic, food-grade surfactant). Batch experiments were conducted to investigate this competitive solubilization of PCE and TCE from the DNAPL mixture in the presence of surfactant. Results indicate that PCE is preferentially solubilized relative to TCE in micellar solutions of Tween 80 and Aerosol MA-80I, demonstrating that a Raoult’s Law convention is not applicable to these systems. In contrast to the PCE and TCE data, results obtained using a 1:1 molar mixture of decane and dodecane in the same micellar solutions indicate that the amount of decane or dodecane solubilized in the aqueous

  14. Electrical impedance tomography of the 1995 OGI perchloroethelyne release

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1996-10-01

    Goal is to determine if electrical impedance tomography (EIT) might be useful to map free product DNAPL (dense nonaqueous phase liquids) contamination. EIT was used to image the plume resulting from a release of 189 liters (50 gallons) of perchloroethylene (PCE) into a saturated aquifer constructed of sand with two layers of bentonite. Images were made in 4 planes, before, during, and after the release, to generate a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal development of the plume. Information of the EI (both in phase and out of phase voltages) was used at several different frequencies to produce images. Some frequency dispersion was observed in the images before and after the PCE release. Laboratory measurements of organic contamination in soil indicate detectable dispersion. A search for this effect in EIT images reveals weak evidence, the signal appearing just above the measurement uncertainty, of a change in the reactance in the soil because of the PCE.

  15. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-340-1606, Denver Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, P.

    1985-07-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) (PCE) at Denver Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Denver, Colorado in July, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a company representative to determine if a health hazard from exposure to PCE existed during the commercial laundry and dry cleaning processes. A noise evaluation was also requested. The author concludes that a health hazard exists due to overexposure to PCE and noise at the facility. Recommendations include replacing the present transfer system by a dry/to/dry closed system if possible, improving work practices, removing clothing from each machine at the same time replacing or cleaning and oiling the bearings in the dryers, and establishing an educational program to instruct new employees on the hazards of chemical and noise exposure.

  16. Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Components (BTEX and MTBE) in Ground Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation is widely used in the USA to deal with ground water contamination from fuel components such as the BTEX compounds or MTBE or TBA and from chlorinated solvents such as PCE, TCE, and TCA. This presentation reviews the theory and practice of MNA in the...

  17. EFFECT OF FENTON'S REAGENT ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIOLOGY AND BIODEGRADATION CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosm studies were conducted to determine the effect of Fenton's reagent on subsurface microbiology and biodegradation capacity in a DNAPL (PCE/TCE) contaminated aquifer previously treated with the reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatmen...

  18. Assessing Risks from Emerging Contaminants: Using Expert Elicitation and Group Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    C4 -Cost to Complete C5 -Property Transfer and Re-Use Phase I Impact Assessments Completed  Tungsten  Tungsten alloy  Tetrachloroethylene (PCE...TCE)  Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6)  Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)  1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)  N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS AND THE OCCURRENCE OF DEHALOCOCCOIDES DNA IN CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stains of Dehalococcoides are the only microbes known that can completely dechlorinate PCE, TCE, cis-DCE and vinyl chloride to ethylene. Either naturally-occurring strains or bioaugmentation cultures of Dehalococcoides are widely used for in situ bioremediation ...

  20. Insights Gained from the Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195’s Transcriptome Responding to a Wide Range of Respiration Rates and Substrate Types

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    bioindicators of PCE, TCE and cDCE dehalorespiration rates: trends and 10 limitations. Environ Sci Technol. 42: 5099–5105. 11 62. Rahm, B.G., R.M. Morris, and...B. G. Rahm, S. Zhang, and R. E. Richardson. 2009. 13 Absolute quantification of Dehalococcoides proteins: enzyme bioindicators of 14 chlorinated

  1. Dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons by bimetallic Ni/Fe immobilized on polyethylene glycol-grafted microfiltration membranes under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, Ganesh K; Doong, Ruey-an

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) by bimetallic Ni/Fe nanoparticles immobilized on four different membranes was investigated under anoxic conditions. Effects of several parameters including the nature of membrane, initial concentration, pH value, and reaction temperature on the dechlorination efficiency were examined. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the Ni/Fe nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the four membranes using polyethylene glycol as the cross-linker. The agglomeration of Ni/Fe were observed in poly(vinylidene fluoride), Millex GS and mixed cellulose ester membranes, while a relatively uniform distribution of Ni/Fe was found in nylon-66 membrane because of its hydrophilic nature. The immobilized Ni/Fe nanoparticles exhibited good reactivity towards the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant for TCE dechlorination by Ni/Fe in nylon-66 were 3.7-11.7 times higher than those in other membranes. In addition, the dechlorination efficiency of chlorinated hydrocarbons followed the order TCE>PCE>CT. Ethane was the only end product for TCE and PCE dechlorination, while dichloromethane and methane were found to be the major products for CT dechlorination, clearly indicating the involvement of reactive hydrogen species in dechlorination. In addition, the initial rate constant for TCE dechlorination increased upon increasing initial TCE concentrations and the activation energy for TCE dechlorination by immobilized Ni/Fe was 34.9 kJ mol(-1), showing that the dechlorination of TCE by membrane-supported Ni/Fe nanoparticles is a surface-mediated reaction.

  2. Interplay between subsurface structural heterogeneity and multi-species reactive transport in human health risk predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.; de Barros, F.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing presence of toxic chemicals released in the subsurface has led to a rapid growth of social concerns and to the need to develop and employ models that can predict the impact of groundwater contamination in human health under uncertainty. Monitored natural attenuation is a common remediation action in many contamination cases and represents an attractive decontamination method. However, natural attenuation can lead to the production of subspecies of distinct toxicity that may pose challenges in pollution management strategies. The actual threat that these contaminants pose to human health and ecosystems greatly depends on the interplay between the complexity of the geological system and the toxicity of the pollutants and their byproducts. In this work, we examine the interplay between multispecies reactive transport and the heterogeneous structure of the contaminated aquifer on human health risk predictions. The structure and organization of hydraulic properties of the aquifer can lead to preferential flow channels and fast contamination pathways. Early travel times, associated to channeling effects, are intuitively perceived as an indicator for high risk. However, in the case of multi-species systems, early travel times may also lead a limited production of daughter species that may contain higher toxicity as in the case of chlorinated compounds. In this work, we model a Perchloroethylene (PCE) contamination problem followed by the sequential first-order production/biodegradation of its daughter species Trichloroethylene (TCE), Dichloroethylene (DCE) and Vinyl Chlorine (VC). For this specific case, VC is known to be a highly toxic contaminant. By performing numerical experiments, we evaluate transport for two distinct three-dimensional aquifer structures. First, a multi-Gaussian hydraulic conductivity field and secondly, a geostatistically equivalent connected field. These two heterogeneity structures will provide two distinct ranges of mean travel

  3. Multilayer fiber optic chemical sensors employing organically modified SiO2 and mixed TiO2/SiO2 sol gel membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivens, Delana A.; Schiza, Maria V.; Angel, S. M.

    1997-05-01

    Fiber-optic sensors have been developed that incorporate multi-layer organically modified silica sol-gel membranes. pH sensors use a single layer hydrophilic organo-silica sol-gel membrane with a covalently attached pH sensitive dye, hydroxypyrene trisulfonic acid. The hydrophilic coating is made by copolymerizing silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane and tetraethylorthosilicate with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Unlike previous methods, which use acid as a catalyst, we have found that a base catalyst produces optically transparent gels. The sol-gel coated sensors are simple to make and require drying and aging times of as little as one day. Sensors made using these gels exhibit very good long-term stability, fast response times and no dye leaching. pCO2 sensors were fabricated using the same pH sensitive sol-gel layer overcoated with a hydrophobic high organic content sol- gel membrane. The response of the pH and pCO2 sensors is very fast due to the high porosity of the sol-gel membranes. Although in-situ sensors have been described for a number of organic and inorganic species, many volatile organochloride compounds (VOCs), such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), have been difficult to measure using current fiber-optic sensor transduction schemes. One of the optical sensors described here is a multilayer (3-4) sol-gel system that incorporates a TiO2/SiO2 membrane to degrade VOCs into smaller, detectable products. Upon exposure to UV light, TiO2, a semiconductor with a bandgap of 3.2 eV, produces highly reactive electron-hole pairs that are capable of photodegrading most organic compounds. The VOCs mentioned above are sensitive to degradative oxidation on TiO2 surfaces. During photodegradation of VOCs a number of products are formed including H+, HCl, CO2 and a number of smaller hydrocarbons. These products are produced in the TiO2 membrane and on TiO2 surfaces and the products diffuse into the nearby indicator membrane where they are

  4. Degradation of Perchloroethene by zero-valent iron evaluated by carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2014-05-01

    Perchloroethene (PCE) is a widely spread groundwater contaminant in formally used industrial sites. Zero valent iron (ZVI) is used for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) of PCE contaminants in the groundwater. A key factor in the application of in situ remediation technologies is a proper monitoring of contaminant reduction. The measurement of the stable isotope ratio is a promising method that is already used for quantifying microbial degradation of chlorinated contaminants. The carbon isotope ratio of PCE, measured by - isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph via a combustion interface (GC-C-IRMS), increases during degradation of PCE and can be directly related to the degree of degradation. It can be used to directly quantify chemical degradation and thus serves as a useful monitoring tool for groundwater remediation. An experiment to determine the carbon isotopic fractionation factor was performed as a lab experiment using Nanofer Star (NANOIRON). Two different PCE concentrations (c1: 220mgL-1, c2: 110mgL-1) mixed with 0.5 g of ZVI were sealed under deoxygenated conditions in 250 ml glas bottles locked with mininert caps. The bottles were incubated on a shaker for 865 h. Samples were taken weekly to measure the change in the carbon isotopic ratio of PCE as well as its concentration. Results showed a strong increase in the carbon isotope ratio (δ-value) of PCE (start: -27 o end: -4 ), which indicates a significant dechlorination process of PCE. Beside PCE also one degradation product (Trichloroethylene - TCE) was measured. TCE was further dechlorinated as indicated by the δ-value change of TCE from -26 o to -4 oȦn unexpected intermediate value of -45 o for TCE was observed in the experiment. This fluctuation could be induced by the time depending concentration due to degradation and conversation processes. Furthermore, it seems that the progress of the δ-value is affected by the starting concentration of PCE (δ-value of c1 < c2) as

  5. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Pengfei Zhang; Xian Tao

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes experiments to develop and test surfactant-modified zeolite/zero-valent iron (SMZ/ZVI) pellets for permeable reactive barriers to treat groundwater contamination. Coating a glass foam core with a mixture of hexadecyltrimethylammonium surfactant, zeolite, and ZVI produced a high hydraulic conductivity, mechanically stable pellet. Laboratory experiments showed that the pellets completely removed soluble chromate from aqueous solution, and reduced perchloroethylene (PCE) concentrations more than pellets that lacked surfactant. Based upon the laboratory results, they predicted a 1-m-wide SMZ/ZVI barrier that would reduce PCE concentrations by four orders of magnitude. Thirteen cubic meters (470 cubic feet) of SMZ/ZVI pellets were manufactured and emplaced in a permeable barrier test facility. A controlled plume of chromate and PCE was allowed to contact the barrier for four weeks. The entire plume was captured by the barrier. No chromate was detected downgradient of the barrier. The PCE broke through the barrier after four weeks, and downgradient concentrations ultimately exceeded 10% of the influent PCE. The less-than-expected PCE reduction was attributed to insufficient surfactant content, the large size, and pH-altering characteristics of the bulk-produced pellets. The pellets developed here can be improved to yield a performance- and cost-competitive permeable barrier material.

  6. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water.

    PubMed

    Berisford, Yvette C; Bush, Parshall B; Blake, John I; Bayer, Cassandra L

    2003-01-01

    Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped for approximately 1 h at 0.19 to 0.21 MPa (28 to 30 lb in(-2)) through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall riser. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively, from mean influent dissolved concentrations of 466 to 1675 microg L(-1) TCE and 206 to 940 microg L(-1) PCE. In terms of mass removed, the mini-sprinklers removed TCE and PCE at a rate of approximately 1400 to 1700 and 700 to 900 microg L(-1), respectively, over a 1-h test period. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or purging systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotranspiration) excess waste water.

  7. Clarification on the Applicability of the Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaner Standard to Leather Rich, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  9. A comparative study of human levels of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene after occupational exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Skender, L.J.; Karacic, V.; Prpic-Majic, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The rate of trichloroethylene (TRI) and perchloroethylene (PER) absorption was investigated in workers who were (1) occupationally exposed to TRI in four dry-cleaning shops (Group 1, n = 10) and (2) occupationally exposed to PER in one dry-cleaning shop (Group 2, n = 18). Concentrations of TRI and PER in blood were analyzed, and concentrations of trichloroethanol (TCE) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in blood and urine were analyzed. Results varied widely: PER was found in the blood of workers in group 1, but TRI was not detected in blood from any worker in group 2; most blood samples from group 2 workers did not contain a detectable quantity of TCE, and urine TCE concentrations in this group were very low. During the work week, a significant difference was found in group 1 for TRI in blood and TCE in blood and urine. In group 2, however, the only significant difference during the work week was for PER in blood. Therefore, the most reliable biological indicators for TRI and PER exposure are TCE in blood and PER in blood, respectively.

  10. A review of potential neurotoxic mechanisms among three chlorinated organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Ambuja S. Barone, Stan; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.

    2011-08-15

    The potential for central nervous system depressant effects from three widely used chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), and dichloromethane (DCM), has been shown in human and animal studies. Commonalities of neurobehavioral and neurophysiological changes for the chlorinated solvents in in vivo studies suggest that there is a common mechanism(s) of action in producing resultant neurotoxicological consequences. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanistic studies conducted with these chlorinated solvents and to propose potential mechanisms of action for the different neurological effects observed. Mechanistic studies indicate that this solvent class has several molecular targets in the brain. Additionally, there are several pieces of evidence from animal studies indicating this solvent class alters neurochemical functions in the brain. Although earlier evidence indicated that these three chlorinated solvents perturb the lipid bilayer, more recent data suggest an interaction between several specific neuronal receptors produces the resultant neurobehavioral effects. Collectively, TCE, PERC, and DCM have been reported to interact directly with several different classes of neuronal receptors by generally inhibiting excitatory receptors/channels and potentiating the function of inhibitory receptors/channels. Given this mechanistic information and available studies for TCE, DCM, and PERC, we provide hypotheses on primary targets (e.g. ion channel targets) that appear to be most influential in producing the resultant neurological effects. - Research Highlights: > Comparison of neurological effects among TCE, PERC, and DCM. > Correlation of mechanistic findings to neurological effects. > Data support that TCE, PERC, and DCM interact with several ion channels to produce neurological changes.

  11. Mixed Redox Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Rupp, Erik; Bell, Suzanne; Willinger, Martin; Foley, Theresa; Barbaris, Brian; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A new thermocatalytic method to destroy chlorinated solvents has been developed in the laboratory and tested in a pilot field study. The method employs a conventional Pt/Rh catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb. Reactions proceed at moderate temperatures in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and a reductant (mixed redox conditions) to minimize catalyst deactivation. In the laboratory, stable operation with high conversions (above 90% at residence times shorter than 1 s) for perchloroethylene (PCE) is achieved using hydrogen as the reductant. A molar ratio of H2/O2 = 2 yields maximum conversions; the temperature required to produce maximum conversions is sensitive to influent PCE concentration. When a homologous series of aliphatic alkanes is used to replace hydrogen as the reductant, the resultant mixed redox conditions also produce high PCE conversions. It appears that the dissociation energy of the C–H bond in the respective alkane molecule is a strong determinant of the activation energy, and therefore the reaction rate, for PCE conversion. This new method was employed in a pilot field study in Tucson, Arizona. The mixed redox system was operated semicontinuously for 240 days with no degradation of catalyst performance and complete destruction of PCE and trichloroethylene in a soil vapor extraction gas stream. Use of propane as the reductant significantly reduced operating costs. Mixed redox destruction of chlorinated solvents provides a potentially viable alternative to current soil and groundwater remediation technologies. PMID:18991945

  12. TCE REMOVAL FROM CONTAMINATED SOIL AND GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread use of trichloroethylene (TEE) in the U.S. has resulted in its frequent detection in soil and groundwater. EE can become a health hazard after being processed in the human liver; or reductive dehalogenation in the environment may result in production of vinyl chloride,...

  13. TRANSPORT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) IN NATURAL SOIL BY ELECTROOSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation, primarily due to low mobilization of the contaminants and difficulty in uniform delivery of treatment reagents. An alternative approach using electroosmosis (EO) is used to mob...

  14. Comparative evaluation of chloroethene dechlorination to ethene by Dehalococcoides-like microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cupples, Alison M; Spormann, Alfred M; McCarty, Perry L

    2004-09-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) was examined in four cultures containing Dehalococcoides-like microorganisms. Dechlorination and growth kinetics were compared using a Monod growth-rate model for multiple electron acceptor usage with competition. Included were the Victoria mixed culture containing Dehalococcoides species strain VS (from Victoria, TX), the mixed culture KB-1/VC (from southern Ontario), the Pinellas mixed culture (from Pinellas, FL), and D. ethenogenes strain 195. All cultures, with the exception of D. ethenogenes strain 195, grew with VC as catabolic electron acceptor. A dilution method was developed that allows a valid comparison to be made of dehalogenating kinetics between different mixed cultures. Using this procedure, maximum growth rates on VC were found to be similar for strain VS and KB-1/VC (0.42-0.49 +/- 0.02 d(-1)) but slower for the Pinellas culture (0.28 +/- 0.01 d(-1)). The 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined to ensure that no cross contamination between cultures had occurred. Following enrichment of the VC dechlorinating microorganisms on VC, the cultures were amended with DCE, TCE, or PCE. The three mixed cultures failed to dechlorinate PCE or did so very slowly. However, the dilution technique indicated that all experienced growth on TCE and DCE as well as on VC. Maximum growth rates on DCE alone were quite similar (0.43-0.46 d(-1)), while the Pinellas culture grew faster on TCE alone (0.49 d(-1)) than did the other two mixed cultures (0.33-0.35 d(-1)). Half-velocity and inhibition constants for growth on TCE were also determined for the three mixed cultures; both constants were found to be essentially equal and the same for the different cultures, varying between only 8.6 and 10.5 microM. The ability of the strain VS, KB-1/VC, and Pinellas cultures to utilize TCE rapidly with conversion to ethene is quite different from that of any

  15. Investigation of the long-term performance of zero-valent iron for reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Kason, M.; Melitas, N.; Li, T.

    2000-02-01

    This research investigated the long-term performance of zero-valent iron for mediating the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over a 2-year period, rates of TCE dechlorination in columns packed with iron filings were measured in simulated groundwaters containing either 3 mM CaSO{sub 4}, 5 mM CaCl{sub 2}, or 5 mM Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. At early elapsed times, TCE reaction rates were pseudo-first-order in TCE concentration and were independent of the solution pH. With increasing elapsed time, reaction rates deviated from pseudo-first-order behavior due to reactive site saturation and increased iron surface passivation toward the influent end of each column. The extent of passivation was dependent on both the TCE concentration and the background electrolyte solution. For most of the investigation, TCE reaction rates in 3 mM CaSO{sub 4} and 5 mM CaCl{sub 2} solutions were statistically identical at the 0.05 confidence level. However, TCE reaction rates in 5 mM Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} were slower. In columns operated using chloride- and sulfate-containing waters, the effective half-life for TCE dechlorination increased from approximately 400 min after 10 days elapsed to approximately 2,500 min after 667 days. The effective TCE half-life in the nitrate-containing water increased from approximately 1,500 min after 10 days to approximately 3,500 min after 667 days. Measurements of iron corrosion rates in nitrate and chloride solutions showed that nitrate contributed to increased iron surface passivation and decreased rates of iron corrosion. Corrosion current measurements indicated that halocarbon reduction on fresh iron surfaces was cathodically controlled, whereas on aged iron surfaces, iron corrosion was anodically controlled. Anodic control of iron corrosion contributed to the development of reactive site saturation with time and to similar reaction rates for TCE and perchloroethylene. Passivation of the iron surfaces was found to be dependent on the

  16. Assessing the capacity of zero valent iron nanofluids to remediate NAPL-polluted porous media.

    PubMed

    Tsakiroglou, Christos; Terzi, Katerina; Sikinioti-Lock, Alexandra; Hajdu, Kata; Aggelopoulos, Christos

    2016-09-01

    A variety of aqueous suspensions (nanofluids) of zero-valent nano-particles (nZVI) are prepared by wet chemistry techniques, their stability and longevity is evaluated by physic-chemical methods of characterization, and their reactivity toward the dechlorination of per-chloro-ethylene (PCE) is examined with tests in batch reactors. For assessing the mobility, longevity and reactivity of nZVI suspensions (nanofluids), under flow-through conditions, visualization multiphase flow and transport tests are performed on a glass-etched pore network. The nZVI breakthrough curves are constructed by measuring the transient variation of the iron concentration in the effluent with atomic absorption spectroscopy. The capacity of nZVI to remediate the bulk phase of PCE is quantified by detecting the mass loss rate of PCE ganglia trapped in glass-etched pore networks during the continuous injection of nZVI suspension or pure water. The nZVI injection in porous media is simulated as an advection- dispersion process by accounting for the attachment/detachment of nanoparticles on the pore-walls, and describing the kinetics of PCE dissolution and reaction by 1st order equations. Visualization experiments reveal that the gradual elimination of PCE ganglia by the injected nZVI is associated with the preferential "erosion" of the upstream interfacial regions. The step controlling the overall process kinetics might be either (i) the enhanced PCE dissolution or (ii) the direct reaction of bulk PCE with the nZVI deposited upon the ganglia interfaces. Inverse modeling of the experiments under the simplifying assumption of one active mechanism indicates that the estimated kinetic coefficients are increasing functions of the flow rate.

  17. Hazardous Waste Minimization Assessment: Fort Ord, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    gal/h ... Melrose Park, IL 60160 (solvents: TCE, 1,1,1-TCE, PCE) Branson Cleaning Equipment SilW 9-15 gal/h -- Co. S121W 21-31 gal/h -- Parrot Drive...gastric disorders, skin lesions, swollen limbs, cancers, tumors, eye problems, liver disorders, menstrual irregularities, etc.) and birth defects (e.g...reproductive failures, mutations, etc.). Compounding the problem of PCBs’ toxicity is their bioaccumulation in cells and fatty tissues of micro-organisms

  18. Hazardous Waste Minimization Assessment: Fort Carson, CO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    IL 60160 (solvents: TCE, 1,1,1-TCE. PCE) Branson Cleaning Equipment S111W 9-15 gal/h -- Co. S121W 21-31 gal/h -- Parrot Drive, P.O. Box 768 Shelton...then, PCBs have been linked to severe health problems (e.g., gastric disorders, skin lesions, swollen limbs, cancers, tumors, eye problems, liver ...their bioaccumulation in cells and fatty tissues of micro-organisms and animals, which are then consumed by other animals higher in the food chain

  19. Risk-based economic decision analysis of remediation options at a PCE-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Gitte; Friis-Hansen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-05-01

    Remediation methods for contaminated sites cover a wide range of technical solutions with different remedial efficiencies and costs. Additionally, they may vary in their secondary impacts on the environment i.e. the potential impacts generated due to emissions and resource use caused by the remediation activities. More attention is increasingly being given to these secondary environmental impacts when evaluating remediation options. This paper presents a methodology for an integrated economic decision analysis which combines assessments of remediation costs, health risk costs and potential environmental costs. The health risks costs are associated with the residual contamination left at the site and its migration to groundwater used for drinking water. A probabilistic exposure model using first- and second-order reliability methods (FORM/SORM) is used to estimate the contaminant concentrations at a downstream groundwater well. Potential environmental impacts on the local, regional and global scales due to the site remediation activities are evaluated using life cycle assessments (LCA). The potential impacts on health and environment are converted to monetary units using a simplified cost model. A case study based upon the developed methodology is presented in which the following remediation scenarios are analyzed and compared: (a) no action, (b) excavation and off-site treatment of soil, (c) soil vapor extraction and (d) thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction by electrical heating of the soil. Ultimately, the developed methodology facilitates societal cost estimations of remediation scenarios which can be used for internal ranking of the analyzed options. Despite the inherent uncertainties of placing a value on health and environmental impacts, the presented methodology is believed to be valuable in supporting decisions on remedial interventions.

  20. BIOLOGICALLY-ENHANCED REMOVAL OF PCE FROM NAPL SOURCE ZONES. (R826694C703)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Cyber PCE Compendium: Cyber 300 Professional Continuing Education. Volume 1 Issue 2, Winter 2013.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    general, executives do not clearly understand the linkage between information technology (IT) risks and business operations.26 2. Within the U.S...Xavier Leadership Center’s director cites that Sun Tzu’s teachings have equal relevance in the business world (Brzozowski, 2005). This relevance also...99- supercomputer/. 4. http://www.top500.org/ 5. TradeKool: Global Business News, http://biznews.tradekool.com/13909/1

  2. VAPOR PHASE TREATMENT OF PCE IN A SOIL COLUMN BY LAB-SCALE ANAEROBIC BIOVENTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial destruction of highly chlorinated organic compounds must be initiated by anaerobic followed by aerobic dechlorination. In-situ dechlorination of vadose zone soil contaminated with these compounds requires, among other factors, the establishment of highly reductive anaer...

  3. Gas phase photocatalytic degradation on TiO{sub 2} pellets of volatile chlorinated organic compounds from a soil vapor extraction well

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki-Nishida, S.; Read, H.W.; Nagano, J.K.; Anderson, M.A.; Cervera-March, S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1993-05-20

    The mineralization of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in gas stream from a soil vapor extraction (SVE) well was demonstrated with an annular photocatalytic reactor packed with porous TiO{sub 2} pellets in field trials at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. The TiO{sub 2} pellets were prepared using a sol-gel method. The experiments were performed at 55 to 60{degree}C using space times of 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} g s/mol for TCE and PCE. Chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) were detected as minor products from side reactions. On a molar basis, CCl{sub 4} and CHCl{sub 3} produced were about 2% and 0.2 % of the reactants.

  4. Rockaway Borough Wellfield, Rockaway Borough, Morris County, New Jersey, Region 2. Cerclis No. NJD980654115. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-13

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) issued a Health Assessment for the Rockaway Borough Well Field site on April 17, 1989 (PB90-137613). The public health assessment addendum supplements the April 1989 health assessment and includes information gathered during the Phase II Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the Rockaway Borough Well Field site. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) were detected in treated municipal water supplies at levels above health comparison values. Complete (past and present) exposure pathways exist from PCE and TCE contamination of municipal water supplies during periods of contaminant breakthrough within the groundwater treatment system. Potential (past, present, future) human exposure pathways exist from contaminated residential drinking wells and surface soil through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact.

  5. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  6. FY02 Final Report on Phytoremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in Southern Sector Sediments of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R..L.

    2004-01-30

    This final report details the operations and results of a 3-year Seepline Phytoremediation Project performed adjacent to Tims Branch, which is located in the Southern Sector of the Savannah River Site (SRS) A/M Area. Phytoremediation is a process where interactions between vegetation, associated microorganisms, and the host substrate combine to effectively degrade contaminated soils, sediments, and groundwater. Phytoremediation is a rapidly developing technology that shows promise for the effective and safe cleanup of certain hazardous wastes. It has the potential to remediate numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Extensive characterization work has demonstrated that two VOCs, tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are the major components of the VOC-contaminated groundwater that is migrating through the Southern Sector and Tims Branch seepline area (WSRC, 1999). The PCE and TCE are chlorinated ethenes (CE), and have been detected in seepline soils and ground water adjacent to the ecologically-sensitive Tims Branch seepline area.

  7. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  8. DNAPL Extraction/Oleofilter Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Hazel, C.

    1997-11-03

    A short term, low flow DNAPL extraction test was performed from May 29 - 30, 1997, to gather additional information about the possibility of using monitoring well MSB-3D to recover source contamination from the M-Area Aquifer. Although no visible, free phase material was recovered, the groundwater did contain perchloroethylene (PCE) at and above aqueous solubility. Improvements in the pumping configuration were identified for future trials. Prior to final treatment in the M1 air stripper, the groundwater was passed through an Oleofiltration system to evaluate its capability as a treatment technology. The Oleofilter uses a combination of conventional gravity assisted separation with coalescing plates and a final polishing filter using proprietary coated granules to remove hydrocarbons. Although free phase DNAPL was not processed through the Oleofilter, the groundwater containing high levels of dissolved PCE was treated efficiently. Initially the Oleofilter removed 99 percent of the PCE. As the test progressed, this removal rate decreased to 83 percent as the granules became loaded with PCE. Longer term testing, perhaps with periodic backflushing, is required to determine the effective granule capacity.

  9. Sustainable remediation: electrochemically assisted microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sayali S; Adetutu, Eric M; Rochow, Jacqueline; Mitchell, James G; Ball, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Microbial electric systems (MESs) hold significant promise for the sustainable remediation of chlorinated solvents such as tetrachlorethene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Although the bio-electrochemical potential of some specific bacterial species such as Dehalcoccoides and Geobacteraceae have been exploited, this ability in other undefined microorganisms has not been extensively assessed. Hence, the focus of this study was to investigate indigenous and potentially bio-electrochemically active microorganisms in PCE-contaminated groundwater. Lab-scale MESs were fed with acetate and carbon electrode/PCE as electron donors and acceptors, respectively, under biostimulation (BS) and BS-bioaugmentation (BS-BA) regimes. Molecular analysis of the indigenous groundwater community identified mainly Spirochaetes, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and γ and δ-Proteobacteria. Environmental scanning electron photomicrographs of the anode surfaces showed extensive indigenous microbial colonization under both regimes. This colonization and BS resulted in 100% dechlorination in both treatments with complete dechlorination occurring 4 weeks earlier in BS-BA samples and up to 11.5 μA of current being generated. The indigenous non-Dehalococcoides community was found to contribute significantly to electron transfer with ∼61% of the current generated due to their activities. This study therefore shows the potential of the indigenous non-Dehalococcoides bacterial community in bio-electrochemically reducing PCE that could prove to be a cost-effective and sustainable bioremediation practice.

  10. Solubilization of dibutyltin dichloride with surfactant solutions in single and mixed oil systems.

    PubMed

    Damrongsiri, S; Tongcumpou, C; Weschayanwiwat, P; Sabatini, D A

    2010-09-15

    The harmful effects of organometallic compounds and their metabolites on the environment and human health require the development of more effective remediation methods. Surfactant enhanced remediation has been considered as a potential method for the removal of organometallic compounds; however, additional understanding is needed about the solubilization processes of these compounds. The surfactant enhanced solubilization of dibutyltin dichloride (DBT), an organometallic compound, was the focus of this research. In addition, the synergistic effects of DBT solubilization in perchloroethylene (PCE) and decane mixtures were evaluated. The results indicate that PCE and decane were solubilized into the core of these surfactant micelles in both single and mixed oil systems. DBT solubilization was limited when DBT alone was present (single oil system), and the nature of the solubilization isotherm suggests that DBT solubilization tended to occur near the micelle surface in a single oil system. DBT solubilization was found to increase when present in the PCE and decane oil mixture. PCE and decane may have facilitated the solubilization of DBT because they were solubilized in the micelle core. From this study, it may be concluded that the DBT behaves like polar oil such as dodecanol, having properties of a polar organic compound.

  11. Mining hazard evaluation and technical assistance report no. HHE-80-108-111, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service, Kingwood, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    A health hazard evaluation was conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) on February 26, 1980, at the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS) office, Kingwood, WV. This survey was conducted to investigate complaints of eye and nasal irritation, as well as general discomfort from exposure to solvent vapors invading the ASCS office area. ASCS office personnel were exposed to perchloroethylene (PCE) vapors generated in the Patriot Coal Co. Float-and-Sink Testing laboratory which is located in an adjacent room of the same building. Although the laboratory was not performing float-and-sink tests at the time the survey was conducted, PCE vapor concentrations in the ASCS office were measured at 20 parts per million (ppm). A comprehensive industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Patriot Coal Co. laboratory. Recommendations to control the PCE vapors have been made to the company through a formal report. The control measures recommended should eliminate the ASCS office personnel's exposure to PCE.

  12. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Lisa A; Aschengrau, Ann; Gallagher, Lisa E; Webster, Thomas F; Heeren, Timothy C; Ozonoff, David M

    2008-01-01

    Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC) water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior to remediation (April-November 1980), Massachusetts regulators collected drinking water samples from VL/AC pipes to determine the extent and severity of the PCE contamination. This study compares newly obtained historical records of PCE concentrations in water samples (n = 88) with concentrations estimated using an exposure model employed in epidemiologic studies on the cancer risk associated with PCE-contaminated drinking water. The exposure model was developed by Webler and Brown to estimate the mass of PCE delivered to subjects' residences. Results The mean and median measured PCE concentrations in the water samples were 66 and 0.5 μg/L, respectively, and the range extended from non-detectable to 2432 μg/L. The model-generated concentration estimates and water sample concentrations were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.48, p < 0.0001). Correlations were higher in samples taken at taps and spigots vs. hydrants (ρ = 0.84 vs. 0.34), in areas with simple vs. complex geometry (ρ = 0.51 vs. 0.38), and near pipes installed in 1973–1976 vs. other years (ρ = 0.56 vs. 0.42 for 1968–1972 and 0.37 for 1977–1980). Overall, 24% of the variance in measured PCE concentrations was explained by the model-generated concentration estimates (p < 0.0001). Almost half of the water samples had undetectable concentrations of PCE. Undetectable levels were more common in areas with the earliest installed VL/AC pipes, at the beginning and middle of VL/AC pipes, at

  13. Geohydrology and distribution of volatile organic compounds in ground water in the Casey Village area, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Conger, Randall W.; Grazul, Kevin E.

    1998-01-01

    Casey Village and the adjoining part of the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) are underlain by the Late Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which consists of a dipping series of siltstones and sandstones. The direction of vertical ground-water gradients in the Stockton Formation varies among well locations and sometimes with time. Vertical gradients can be substantial; the difference in water levels at one well pair (two wells screened at different depths) was 7.1 ft (feet) over a 32-ft vertical section of the aquifer. Potentiometric-surface maps show a groundwater divide that bisects the Casey Village area. For wells screened between 18 and 64 ft below land surface (bls), the general ground-water gradient is to the east and northeast on the east side of the divide and to the south and southwest on the west side of the divide. For wells screened between 48 and 106 ft bls, the general ground-water gradient is to the northeast on the east side of the divide and to the southwest and northwest on the west side of the divide. An aquifer test at one well in Casey Village caused drawdown in wells on the opposite side of the ground-water divide on the NAWC and shifted the ground-water divide in the deeper potentiometric surface to the west. Drawdowns formed an elliptical pattern, which indicates anisotropy; however, anisotropy is not aligned with strike or dip. Hydraulic stress caused by pumping crosses stratigraphic boundaries. Between 1993 and 1996, the trichloroethylene (TCE) concentration in water samples collected from wells in Casey Village decreased. The highest concentration of TCE measured in water from one well decreased from 1,200 mg/L (micrograms per liter) in 1993 when domestic wells were pumped in Casey Village to 140 mg/L in 1996, 3 years after the installation of public water and the cessation of domestic pumping. This suggests that pumping of domestic wells may have contributed to TCE migration. Between 1993 and 1996, the tetrachloroethylene (PCE

  14. Detection of new VOC compounds with iCRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Leen, J. B.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The instrument at Los Gatos Research (a member of ABB Inc.) which is based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously, for example, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. Previously, we have demonstrated the measurement of trichloroethylene (TCE) in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes), and the measurement of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 µg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 µg/m3). This ability has been fully demonstrated by the deployment of the instrument to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air, in excellent agreement with previous TO-15 data. In this poster, we present laboratory performance data targeting new toxic molecules with the same instrument. We have demonstrated the measurement of trichlorofluolomethane (Freon 11) in zero air with a precision of 1 ppb (3σ at 1075cm-1), and hexafluoropropene in zero air with a precision of about 0.3 ppb (3σ per spectrum). The iCRDS instrument has shown the ability to continuously and autonomously measure sub-ppb levels of toxic VOCs in the lab/field, offering an unprecedented picture of the short term dynamics associated with vapor intrusion and ground water pollution.

  15. Cost and Performance Report - Evaluating the Longevity and Hydraulic Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers at Department of Defense Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dichloroethylene DNAPL dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid DO dissolved oxygen DoD United States Department of Defense EDS energy dispersive spectrometer...and maintenance OMB Office of Management and Budget ORP oxidation -reduction potential ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory P&T pump and treat PCE...Development Program TCE trichloroethylene TDS total dissolved solids U.S. EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency USACE United States Army

  16. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: Application to urban plume in Verl, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limmer, M.A.; Balouet, J.-C.; Karg, F.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Burken, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Baseline groundwater model update for p-area groundwater operable unit, NBN

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.; Amidon, M.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the development of a numerical groundwater flow and transport model of the hydrogeologic system of the P-Area Reactor Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). The P-Area model provides a tool to aid in understanding the hydrologic and geochemical processes that control the development and migration of the current tritium, tetrachloroethene (PCE), and trichloroethene (TCE) plumes in this region.

  18. Bioaugmentation for Groundwater Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Personal protective equipment ppm Parts per million PQL Practical Quantitation Level PVC Polyvinyl chloride QA/QC Quality Assurance/Quality...USEPA United States Environmental Protection Agency USGS United States Geological Survey VC Vinyl chloride VFA Volatile fatty acid VOC Volatile...tetrachloroethene (PCE) proceeds to TCE, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and innocuous ethene. Figure 2-1 presents published pathways for the

  19. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOEpatents

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Freedman, David L.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Bratt, William B.; Wood, Elizabeth A.

    2009-11-10

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  20. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: application to urban plume in Verl, Germany.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Matt A; Balouet, Jean-Christophe; Karg, Frank; Vroblesky, Don A; Burken, Joel G

    2011-10-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times.

  1. Quantifying the Presence and Activity of Aerobic, Vinyl Chloride-Degrading Microorganisms in Dilute Groundwater Plumes by Using Real-Time PCR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    natural attenuation of VC and will thus support existing anaerobic bioremediation technologies that generate VC as a metabolic intermediate and...Defense (DoD). Anaerobic reductive dechlorination is a promising biotechnology for remediation of PCE- and TCE-contaminated groundwater, but the...water source zones. At some sites, VC will escape the anaerobic zone and enter aerobic groundwater, forming dilute plumes. Aerobic groundwater

  2. Constraining Rates of Biodegradation of Chlorinated Ethenes at Steep Concentration Gradients Using Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, P. L.; Seepersad, D. J.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Edwards, E. A.; Sleep, B. E.; McMaster, M. L.; Major, D. W.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2005-12-01

    Enhanced biodegradation of emplaced dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources of tetrachloroethene (PCE) was monitored in a 2-dimensional model aquifer and in a Dover Air Force Base pilot field study. The stable carbon isotope values of PCE and its biodegradation products were monitored along steep concentration gradients near the PCE source zones to quantify first order biodegradation rate constants during a study that assessed the potential for biological enhancement of PCE DNAPL dissolution . Stable carbon isotope measurements are an ideal tool to assess the relative rate of biodegradation versus dissolution since while biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes involves a substantial carbon isotope fractionation, dissolution of chlorinated ethenes is a largely non-fractionating process. Within the dissolved plumes that developed down gradient from the emplaced sources, the isotopic fractionation of PCE and its degradation products in both the model aquifer and field study were consistent with those previously observed in batch laboratory studies. A maximum isotope fractionation of 2.3 permil was observed in the dissolved PCE downgradient, while close to the source zone the carbon isotopic signature of the dissolved PCE remained largely unchanged, due to the continuing dissolution of unfractionated PCE DNAPL. Significant carbon isotopic fractionation was observed adjacent to and/or downstream from the source in the degradation products trichloroethene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). Therefore, close to the source zone, confirmation of PCE degradation is based primarily on the appearance of the lesser chlorinated ethene degradation products and isotopic signatures of those products consistent with biodegradation. This trend was observed on a small scale in the model aquifer and similar trends were observed in the field at a larger scale. In both cases biodegradation was correlated with enhanced rates of DNAPL dissolution compared to non

  3. Insights into the use of time-lapse GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations of DNAPL migration.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Raymond H; Poeter, Eileen P

    2007-01-05

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) saturations determined from GPR surveys were used as observations for inversion of multiphase flow simulations of a PCE injection experiment (Borden 9 m cell), allowing for the estimation of optimal bulk intrinsic permeability values. The resulting fit statistics and analysis of residuals (observed minus simulated PCE saturations) were used to improve the conceptual model. These improvements included adjustment of the elevation of a permeability contrast, use of the van Genuchten versus Brooks-Corey capillary pressure-saturation curve, and a weighting scheme to account for greater measurement error with larger saturation values. A limitation in determining PCE saturations through one-dimensional GPR modeling is non-uniqueness when multiple GPR parameters are unknown (i.e., permittivity, depth, and gain function). Site knowledge, fixing the gain function, and multiphase flow simulations assisted in evaluating non-unique conceptual models of PCE saturation, where depth and layering were reinterpreted to provide alternate conceptual models. Remaining bias in the residuals is attributed to the violation of assumptions in the one-dimensional GPR interpretation (which assumes flat, infinite, horizontal layering) resulting from multidimensional influences that were not included in the conceptual model. While the limitations and errors in using GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations are frustrating and difficult to quantify, simulation results indicate that the error and bias in the PCE saturation values are small enough to still provide reasonable optimal permeability values. The effort to improve model fit and reduce residual bias decreases simulation error even for an inversion based on biased observations and provides insight into alternate GPR data interpretations. Thus, this effort is warranted and provides information on bias in the observation data when this bias is otherwise difficult to assess.

  4. Insights into the use of time-lapse GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations of DNAPL migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.H.; Poeter, E.P.

    2007-01-01

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) saturations determined from GPR surveys were used as observations for inversion of multiphase flow simulations of a PCE injection experiment (Borden 9??m cell), allowing for the estimation of optimal bulk intrinsic permeability values. The resulting fit statistics and analysis of residuals (observed minus simulated PCE saturations) were used to improve the conceptual model. These improvements included adjustment of the elevation of a permeability contrast, use of the van Genuchten versus Brooks-Corey capillary pressure-saturation curve, and a weighting scheme to account for greater measurement error with larger saturation values. A limitation in determining PCE saturations through one-dimensional GPR modeling is non-uniqueness when multiple GPR parameters are unknown (i.e., permittivity, depth, and gain function). Site knowledge, fixing the gain function, and multiphase flow simulations assisted in evaluating non-unique conceptual models of PCE saturation, where depth and layering were reinterpreted to provide alternate conceptual models. Remaining bias in the residuals is attributed to the violation of assumptions in the one-dimensional GPR interpretation (which assumes flat, infinite, horizontal layering) resulting from multidimensional influences that were not included in the conceptual model. While the limitations and errors in using GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations are frustrating and difficult to quantify, simulation results indicate that the error and bias in the PCE saturation values are small enough to still provide reasonable optimal permeability values. The effort to improve model fit and reduce residual bias decreases simulation error even for an inversion based on biased observations and provides insight into alternate GPR data interpretations. Thus, this effort is warranted and provides information on bias in the observation data when this bias is otherwise difficult to assess. ?? 2006 Elsevier B

  5. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene elimination from the air by means of a hybrid bioreactor with immobilized biomass.

    PubMed

    Tabernacka, Agnieszka; Zborowska, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    Two-phase bioreactors consisting of bacterial consortium in suspension and sorbents with immobilized biomass were used to treat waste air containing chlorinated ethenes, trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Synthetic municipal sewage was used as the medium for bacterial growth. The system was operated with loadings in the range 1.48-4.76 gm(-3)h(-1) for TCE and 1.49-5.96 gm(-3)h(-1) for PCE. The efficiency of contaminant elimination was 55-86% in the bioreactor with wood chips and 33-89% in the bioreactor filled with zeolite. The best results were observed 1 week after the pollutant loading was increased. However, in these conditions, the stability of the process was not achieved. In the next 7 days the effectiveness of the system decreased. Contaminant removal efficiency, enzymatic activity and the biomass content were all diminished. The system was working without being supplied with additional hydrocarbons as the growth-supporting substrates. It is assumed that ammonia produced during the transformation of wastewater components induced enzymes for the cometabolic degradation of TCE and PCE. However, the evaluation of nitrogen compound transformations in the system is difficult due to the sorption on carriers and the combined processes of nitrification and the aerobic denitrification. An applied method of air treatment is advantageous from both economic and environmental point of views.

  6. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  8. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems.

  9. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

     The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems.

  10. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi; Elsner, Martin; Soler, Albert

    2015-12-15

    Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using (13)C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element (13)C-(37)Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using (13)C-(37)Cl-(2)H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the (13)C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element (13)C-(37)Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. (2)H combined with (13)C and (37)Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ(2)H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  11. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (δ13C and δ37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ≡ ɛC/ɛCl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems

  12. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  13. Electromagnetic induction of nanoscale zerovalent iron particles accelerates the degradation of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Kumloet, Itsaraphong

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a novel electromagnetically enhanced treatment concept is proposed for in situ remediation of a source zone of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that is slowly dissolved, causing contaminated groundwater for centuries. Here, we used polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles (ferromagnetic) in combination with a low frequency (LF) (150 kHz) AC electromagnetic field (EMF) to accelerate the degradation of the DNAPLs via enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were used in a bench-scaled evaluation. The PSS-modified NZVI successfully targeted the DNAPL/water interface, as evidenced by the Pickering emulsion formation. Dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL was measured by quantifying the by-product formation (acetylene, ethene, and ethane). Without magnetic induction heating (MIH) by LF EMF, PSS-modified NZVI transformed TCE- and PCE-DNAPL to ethene and ethane at the rate constants of 12.19 × 10(-3) and 1.00 × 10(-3) μmol/h/m(2), respectively, following pseudo zero-order reactions. However, four MIH cycles of PSS-NZVI increased the temperature up to 87 °C and increased the rate constants of TCE-DNAPL and PCE-DNAPL up to 14.58 and 58.01 times, respectively, in comparison to the dechlorination rate without MIH. Theoretical analysis suggested that the MIH of the PSS-modified NZVI enhanced the dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL via the combination of the enhanced thermal dissolution of DNAPL, the effect of increasing the temperature on the rate constant (the Arrhenius equation), and the accelerated NZVI corrosion. Nevertheless, the effect of the Arrhenius equation was dominant. For the first time, this proof-of-concept study reveals the potential for using polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI coupled with LF EMF as a combined remediation technique for increasing the rate and completeness of in situ chlorinated DNAPL source remediation.

  14. 76 FR 18064 - State of California; Request for Approval of Section 112(l) Authority for Hazardous Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Airborne Toxic Control Measure for Emissions of Perchloroethylene from Dry Cleaning and Water-Repelling... Emissions of Perchloroethylene from Dry Cleaning and Water Repelling Operations, Requirements for Perc... Air Pollutants; Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards From Dry Cleaning Facilities...

  15. Probabilistic Health Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures: Importance of Travel Times and Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface contamination cases giving rise to groundwater pollutions are extensively found in all industrialized countries. Under this pressure, risk assessment methods play an important role in population protection by (1) quantifying the potential impact on human health of an aquifer contamination and (2) helping and driving decisions of groundwater-resource managers. Many reactive components such as chlorinated solvents or nitrates potentially experience attenuation processes under common geochemical conditions. This represents an attractive and extensively used remediation solution but leads often to the production of by-products before to reach a harmless chemical form. This renders mixtures of contaminants a common issue for groundwater resources managers. In this case, the threat posed by these contaminants to human health at a given sensitive location greatly depends on the competition between reactive and advective-dispersive characteristic times. However, hydraulic properties of the aquifer are known to be spatially variable, which can lead to the formation of preferential flow channels and fast contamination pathways. Therefore, the uncertainty on the spatial distribution of the aquifer properties controlling the plume travel time may then play a particular role in the human health risk assessment of chemical mixtures. We investigate here the risk related to a multispecies system in response to different degrees of heterogeneity of the hydraulic conductivity (K or Y =ln(K)). This work focuses on a Perchloroethylene (PCE) contamination problem followed by the sequential first-order production/biodegradation of its daughter species Trichloroethylene (TCE), Dichloroethylene (DCE) and Vinyl Chlorine (VC). For this specific case, VC is known to be a highly toxic contaminant. By performing numerical experiments, we evaluate transport through three-dimensional mildly (σY 2=1.0) and highly (σY 2=4.0) heterogeneous aquifers. Uncertainty on the hydraulic

  16. Sub-ppb, Autonomous, Real-time Detection of VOCs with iCRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    The continuous, real-time detection of sub-parts-per-billion (ppb) concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) remains difficult, time consuming and expensive. In particular, short term exposure spikes and diurnal variations are difficult or impossible to detect with traditional TO-15 measurements. We present laboratory and field performance data from an instrument based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) and is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously. We have demonstrated the measurement of TCE in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). PCE was measured with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 μg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 μg/m3). Additionally, the instrument is capable of precisely measuring and quantifying BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. We have demonstrated the accurate, interference free measurement of Mountain View, California air doped with TCE concentrations ranging from 4.22 ppb (22.8 μg/m3) to 17.74 ppb (96 μg/m3) with a precision of 1.42 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Mountain View, California air doped with 10.83 ppb of PCE (74.0 μg/m3) was measured with a precision of 0.54 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Finally, the instrument was deployed to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air. TCE concentrations in the breathing zone averaged 0.186 × 0.669 ppb while tunnel air

  17. Partitioning of non-ionic surfactants between water and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KANG, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the hydrophobic nature, chlorinated organic compounds penetrate soil and groundwater to form non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). At the sites contaminated with such NAPLs, thus, surfactants are applied to increase the aqueous solubility of chlorinated organics via micellar solubilization. However, a portion of surfactants can be partitioned into NAPL phases by forming reverse micelles within them. Consequently, lesser amounts of surfactants are available for the micellar solubilization of chlorinated organics in the aqueous phase. In this study, we investigated the partitioning behavior of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 80, and Triton X-100) between water and a NAPL phase consisting of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), or chloroform (CF). According to the experimental results, the partitioning of surfactants in the water-NAPL systems was found to follow linear or Langmuir-type isotherms. Regardless of type of surfactants, the partitioning loss of surfactants into NAPLs became greater with the more hydrophilic (i.e., the lower water-NAPL interfacial tension) chlorinated organics: PCE < TCE < CF. Notably, the partitioning of all Tween surfactants into the NAPLs consisting of the least hydrophilic PCE was minimal. The partitioning behavior among different surfactants was somewhat complicated. The partitioning extent into CF-NAPLs increased in the order of Tween 20 < Tween 40 < Tween 80 << Triton X-100, suggesting that the greater partitioning occurred with the more hydrophobic (i.e., the lower hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, HLB) surfactant. Consistent with this postulation, the surfactant partitioning into PCE-NAPLs showed the similar trend. In case of TCE-NAPLs, however, the more hydrophobic Tween 40 was partitioned to a less extent than Tween 20. Therefore, the specific interaction of a NAPL-surfactant pair as well as their individual properties should be considered when selecting an effective surfactant for the remediation

  18. Lowering temperature to increase chemical oxidation efficiency: the effect of temperature on permanganate oxidation rates of five types of well defined organic matter, two natural soils, and three pure phase products.

    PubMed

    de Weert, J P A; Keijzer, T J S; van Gaans, P F M

    2014-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a soil remediation technique to remove organic pollutants from soil and groundwater with oxidants, like KMnO4. However, also natural organic compounds in soils are being oxidized, which makes the technique less efficient. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the influence of temperature on this efficiency, through its effect on the relative oxidation rates - by permanganate - of natural organic compounds and organic pollutants at 16 and 15°C. Specific types of organic matter used were cellulose, oak wood, anthracite, reed - and forest peat, in addition to two natural soils. Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid-tetrachloroethene (DNAPL-PCE), DNAPL trichloroethene (DNAPL-TCE) and a mixture of DNAPL-PCE, -TCE and -hexachlorobutadiene were tested as pollutants. Compared to 16°C, oxidation was slower at 5°C for the specific types of organic matter and the natural soils, with exception of anthracite, which was unreactive. The oxidation rate of DNAPL TCE was lower at 5°C too. However, at this temperature oxidation was fast, implying that no competitive loss to natural organic compounds will be expected in field applications by lowering temperature. Oxidation of DNAPL-PCE and PCE in the mixture proceeded at equal rates at both temperatures, due to the dissolution rate as limiting factor. These results show that applying permanganate ISCO to DNAPL contamination at lower temperatures will limit the oxidation of natural organic matter, without substantially affecting the oxidation rate of the contaminant. This will make such remediation more effective and sustainable in view of protecting natural soil quality.

  19. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  20. Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles: Reactivity Enhancement through Sulfidation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) synthesized in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to degrade trichloroethene (TCE) at significantly higher rates. However, the applicability of sulfidation as a general means to enhance nZVI reactivity under different particle preparation conditions and the underlying cause for this enhancement effect are not well understood. In this study, the effects of sulfidation reagent, time point of sulfidation, and sulfur loading on the resultant particles were assessed through TCE degradation experiments. Up to 60-fold increase in TCE reaction rates was observed upon sulfidation treatment, with products being fully dechlorinated hydrocarbons. While the reactivity of these sulfur-treated nZVI (S-nZVI) was relatively unaffected by the sulfidation reagent (viz., sodium sulfide, dithionite, or thiosulfate) or the sequence of sulfidation relative to iron reduction, TCE reaction rates were found to depend strongly on sulfur to iron ratio. At a low sulfur loading, TCE degradation was accelerated with increasing sulfur dose. The rate constant reached a limiting value, however, as the sulfur to iron mole ratio was greater than 0.025. Different from previous propositions that iron sulfidation leads to more efficient TCE or tetrachloroethene (PCE) degradation by enabling depassivation of iron surface, affording catalytic pathways, or facilitating electron transfer, we show that the role of sulfur in nZVI lies essentially in its ability to poison hydrogen recombination, which drives surface reactions to favor reduction by atomic hydrogen. This implies that the reactivity of S-nZVI is contaminant-specific and is selective against the background reaction of water reduction. As the effect of sulfur manifests through surface processes, sulfidation represents a broadly applicable surface modification approach to modulate or increase the reactivity of nZVI for treating TCE and other related contaminants.

  1. Lactate Injection by Electric Currents for Bioremediation of Tetrachloroethylene in Clay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingzhi; Gent, David B.; Davis, Jeffrey L.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Biological transformation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in silty clay samples by ionic injection of lactate under electric fields is evaluated. To prepare contaminated samples, a silty clay slurry was mixed with PCE, inoculated with KB-1® dechlorinators and was consolidated in a 40 cm long cell. A current density between 5.3 and 13.3 A m−2 was applied across treated soil samples while circulating electrolytes containing 10 mg L−1 lactate concentration between the anode and cathode compartments to maintain neutral pH and chemically reducing boundary conditions. The total adsorbed and aqueous PCE was degraded in the soil to trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene in 120 d, which is about double the time expected for transformation. Lactate was delivered into the soil by a reactive transport rate of 3.7 cm2 d−1 V−1. PCE degradation in the clay samples followed zero order transformation rates ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg L−1 d−1 without any significant formation of TCE. cis-DCE transformation followed first order transformation rates of 0.06 to 0.10 per day. A control experiment conducted with KB-1 and lactate, but without electricity did not show any significant lactate buildup or cis-DCE transformation because the soil was practically impermeable (hydraulic conductivity of 2×10−7 cm s−1). It is concluded that ionic migration will deliver organic additives and induce biological activity and complete PCE transformation in clay, even though the transformation occurs under slower rates compared to ideal conditions. PMID:23264697

  2. Fiber-optic sensor detects nonaqueous compounds

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    Scientists have used a fiber-optic sensor that detects scattered light to locate and identify nonaqueous liquids such as gasoline, that have seeped below the ground`s surface. The technique, called Raman spectroscopy, can be used to find both non-aqueous phase liquids - such as gasoline, that float on water, and dense nonaqueous phase liquids - such as the chemical perchloroethylene, or PCE - that sink below water. The in situ Raman spectra of the gasoline clearly showed the relative amounts of different chemical compounds, thus indicating the type of gasoline. The amount of fluorescence in the spectrum seems to be related to the degradation products in the gasoline and, thus, might be some measure of the history of the fuel.

  3. Assessment of subsurface chlorinated solvent contamination using tree cores at the front street site and a former dry cleaning facility at the Riverfront Superfund site, New Haven, Missouri, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumacher, John G.; Struckhoff, Garrett C.; Burken, Joel G.

    2004-01-01

    Tree-core sampling has been a reliable and inexpensive tool to quickly assess the presence of shallow (less than about 30 feet deep) tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in soils and ground water at the Riverfront Superfund Site. This report presents the results of tree-core sampling that was successfully used to determine the presence and extent of chlorinated solvent contamination at two sites, the Front Street site (operable unit OU1) and the former dry cleaning facility, that are part of the overall Riverfront Superfund Site. Traditional soil and ground-water sampling at these two sites later confirmed the results from the tree-core sampling. Results obtained from the tree-core sampling were used to design and focus subsequent soil and ground-water investigations, resulting in substantial savings in time and site assessment costs. The Front Street site is a small (less than 1-acre) site located on the Missouri River alluvium in downtown New Haven, Missouri, about 500 feet from the south bank of the Missouri River. Tree-core sampling detected the presence of subsurface PCE contamination at the Front Street site and beneath residential property downgradient from the site. Core samples from trees at the site contained PCE concentrations as large as 3,850 mg-h/kg (micrograms in headspace per kilogram of wet core) and TCE concentrations as large as 249 mg-h/kg. Soils at the Front Street site contained PCE concentrations as large as 6,200,000 mg/kg (micrograms per kilogram) and ground-water samples contained PCE concentrations as large as 11,000 mg/L (micrograms per liter). The former dry cleaning facility is located at the base of the upland that forms the south bank of the Missouri River alluvial valley. Tree-core sampling did not indicate the presence of PCE or TCE contamination at the former dry cleaning facility, a finding that was later confirmed by the analyses of soil samples collected from the site. The lateral extent of PCE

  4. Probabilistic approach to estimating indoor air concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds from contaminated groundwater: a case study in San Antonio, Texas.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jill E; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic model, based on the Johnson-Ettinger algorithm, developed to characterize the current and historic exposure to tricholorethylene (TCE) and tetrachlorethylene (PCE) in indoor air from plumes of groundwater contamination emanating from the former Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. We estimate indoor air concentration, house by house, in 30 101 homes and compare the estimated concentrations with measured values in a small subset of homes. We also compare two versions of the Johnson-Ettinger model: one used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and another based on an alternative parametrization. The modeled mean predicted PCE concentration historically exceeded PCE screening levels (0.41 ug/m(3)) in 5.5% of houses, and the 95th percentile of the predicted concentration exceeded screening levels in 85.3% of houses. For TCE, the mean concentration exceeded the screening level (0.25 ug/m(3)) in 49% of homes, and the 95th percentile of the predicted concentration exceeded the screening level in 99% of homes. The EPA model predicts slightly lower indoor concentrations than the alternative parametrization. Comparison with measured samples suggests both models, with the inputs selected, underestimate indoor concentrations and that the 95th percentiles of the predicted concentrations are closer to measured concentrations than predicted mean values.

  5. 76 FR 13182 - Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs; 345 North 700 East, Richfield PCE Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop Street, 3rd Floor, in Denver, Colorado. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or..., 1595 Wynkoop Street, 3rd Floor, in Denver, Colorado. Comments and requests for a copy of the Settlement... Enforcement Program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, Colorado...

  6. EFFECTS OF BIOMASS ACCUMULATION ON BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED DISSOLUTION OF A PCE POOL: A NUMERICAL SIMULATION. (R828772)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Constructing Post-Permeation Method to Fabricate Polymer/Nanocrystals Hybrid Solar Cells with PCE Exceeding 6.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohang; Zeng, Qingsen; Jin, Gan; Liu, Fangyuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Yue, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2017-03-01

    A post-permeation method is constructed for fabricating bulk-heterojunction hybrid solar cells. Porous CdTe film is prepared by annealing the mixture solution of aqueous CdTe nanocrystals and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, after which the post-permeation of polymer is employed. By this method, kinds of polymers can be applied regardless of the intermiscibility with the nanoparticles. The inorganic nanocrystals and the polymer can be treated under respective optimized annealing temperatures, which can facilitate the growth of nanocrystals without damaging the polymers. A high power conversion efficiency of 6.36% in the polymer/nanocrystals hybrid solar cells is obtained via systematical optimization.

  8. Characterization of Two Tetrachloroethene-Reducing, Acetate-Oxidizing Anaerobic Bacteria and Their Description as Desulfuromonas michiganensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youlboong; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Urbance, John W.; Flynn, Shannon J.; Tiedje, James M.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    Two tetrachlorethene (PCE)-dechlorinating populations, designated strains BB1 and BRS1, were isolated from pristine river sediment and chloroethene-contaminated aquifer material, respectively. PCE-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene-dechlorinating activity could be transferred in defined basal salts medium with acetate as the electron donor and PCE as the electron acceptor. Taxonomic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing placed both isolates within the Desulfuromonas cluster in the δ subdivision of the Proteobacteria. PCE was dechlorinated at rates of at least 139 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 at pH values between 7.0 and 7.5 and temperatures between 25 and 30°C. Dechlorination also occurred at 10°C. The electron donors that supported dechlorination included acetate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, malate, and fumarate but not hydrogen, formate, ethanol, propionate, or sulfide. Growth occurred with malate or fumarate alone, whereas oxidation of the other electron donors depended strictly on the presence of fumarate, malate, ferric iron, sulfur, PCE, or TCE as an electron acceptor. Nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and other chlorinated compounds were not used as electron acceptors. Sulfite had a strong inhibitory effect on growth and dechlorination. Alternate electron acceptors (e.g., fumarate or ferric iron) did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. The putative fumarate, PCE, and ferric iron reductases were induced by their respective substrates and were not constitutively present. Sulfide was required for growth. Both strains tolerated high concentrations of PCE, and dechlorination occurred in the presence of free-phase PCE (dense non-aqueous-phase liquids). Repeated growth with acetate and fumarate as substrates yielded a BB1 variant that had lost the ability to dechlorinate PCE. Due to the 16S rRNA gene sequence differences with the closest relatives and the unique phenotypic characteristics, we propose that the new isolates are

  9. A controlled field experiment on groundwater contamination by a multicomponent DNAPL: creation of the emplaced-source and overview of dissolved plume development.

    PubMed

    Rivett, M O; Feenstra, S; Cherry, J A

    2001-05-01

    A unique field experiment has been undertaken at the CFB Borden research site to investigate the development of dissolved chlorinated solvent plumes from a residual dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source. The "emplaced-source" tracer test methodology involved a controlled emplacement of a block-shaped source of sand containing chlorinated solvents below the water table. The gradual dissolution of this residual DNAPL solvent source under natural aquifer conditions caused dissolved solvent plumes of trichloromethane (TCM), trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) to continuously develop down gradient. Source dissolution and 3-D plume development were successfully monitored via 173 multilevel samplers over a 475-day tracer test period prior to site remediation research being initiated. Detailed groundwater level and hydraulic conductivity data were collected. Development of plumes with concentrations spanning 1-700,000 micrograms/1 is described and key processes controlling their migration identified. Plumes were observed to be narrow due to the weakness of transverse dispersion processes and long due to advection and significant longitudinal dispersion, very limited sorptive retardation and negligible, if any, attenuation due to biodegradation or abiotic reaction. TCM was shown to be essentially conservative, TCE very nearly conservative and PCE, consistent with its greater hydrophobicity, more retarded yet having a greater mobility than observed in previous Borden field tests. The absence of biodegradation was ascribed to the prevailing aerobic conditions and lack of any additional biodegradable carbon substrates. The transient groundwater flow regime caused significant transverse lateral plume movement, plume asymmetry and was likely responsible for most of the, albeit limited, transverse horizontal plume spreading. In agreement with the widespread incidence of extensive TCE and PCE plumes throughout the industrialized world, the experiment indicates

  10. Characterization Report to Support the Phytoremediation Efforts for Southern Sector, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.

    1999-06-08

    In February, 1999, we conducted a small-scale characterization effort to support future remediation decisions for the Southern Sector of the upper Three Runs watershed. The study concentrated on groundwater adjacent to the seepline at Tim's Branch above and below Steed's Pond. the primary compounds of interest were the volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), trichlorethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Due to the site topography and hydrogeology, samples collected north of Steed's Pond were from the M-Area (water table) aquifer; while those locations south of Steed's Pond provided samples from the Lost Lake aquifer. Results of the study suggest that the leading edge of the A/M Area plume in the Lost Lake aquifer may be approaching the seepline at Tim's Branch below Steed's Pond, south of Road 2. Neither TCE nor PCE were detected int he samples targeting the seepline of the water table aquifer. The concentrations found for both TCE and PCE associated with the Lost Lake aquifer outcrop region were slightly above the detection limit of the analytical instrument used. The findings of this study are consistent with the conceptual model for the organic contaminant plume in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) -- the plume in the Southern Sector is known to be depth discrete and primarily in the Lost lake Aquifer. The sites with detected VOCs are in the most upstream accessible reaches of Tim's Branch where water from the Lost Lake Aquifer crops out. Additional characterization efforts should be directed near this region to confirm the results and to support future planning for the dilute-distal portions of the A/M Area plume. These data, combined with existing groundwater plume data and future characterization results will provide key information to estimate potential contaminant flux to the seepline and to assess the effectiveness of potential clean-up activities such as phytoremediation.

  11. Subsurface occurrence and potential source areas of chlorinated ethenes identified using concentrations and concentration ratios, Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, conducted a study during 2003-05 to characterize the subsurface occurrence and identify potential source areas of the volatile organic compounds classified as chlorinated ethenes at U.S. Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field (NAS-JRB) at Fort Worth, Texas. The solubilized chlorinated ethenes detected in the alluvial aquifer originated as either released solvents (tetrachloroethene [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE], and trans-1,2-dichloroethene [trans-DCE]) or degradation products of the released solvents (TCE, cis-1,2-dichloroethene [cis-DCE], and trans-DCE). The combined influences of topographic- and bedrock-surface configurations result in a water table that generally slopes away from a ground-water divide approximately coincident with bedrock highs and the 1-mile-long aircraft assembly building at AFP4. Highest TCE concentrations (10,000 to 920,000 micrograms per liter) occur near Building 181, west of Building 12, and at landfill 3. Highest PCE concentrations (500 to 920 micrograms per liter) occur near Buildings 4 and 5. Highest cis-DCE concentrations (5,000 to 710,000 micrograms per liter) occur at landfill 3. Highest trans-DCE concentrations (1,000 to 1,700 micrograms per liter) occur just south of Building 181 and at landfill 3. Ratios of parent-compound to daughter-product concentrations that increase in relatively short distances (tens to 100s of feet) along downgradient ground-water flow paths can indicate a contributing source in the vicinity of the increase. Largest increases in ratio of PCE to TCE concentrations are three orders of magnitude from 0.01 to 2.7 and 7.1 between nearby wells in the northeastern part of NAS-JRB. In the northern part of NAS-JRB, the largest increases in TCE to total DCE concentration ratios relative to ratios at upgradient wells are from 17 to

  12. Permanganate Treatment of DNAPLs in Reactive Barriers and Source Zone Flooding Schemes - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.W.

    2000-10-01

    This study provides a detailed process-level understanding of the oxidative destruction of the organic contaminant emphasizing on reaction pathways and kinetics. A remarkable rise in the MnO{sup {minus}} consumption rate with TCA and PCE mixtures proves that the phase transfer catalysts have the ability to increase oxidation rate of DNAPLs either in pure phase or mixtures and that there is significant potential for testing the catalyzed scheme under field conditions. Secondly, as an attempt to enhance the oxidation of DNAPL, we are trying to exploit cosolvency effects, utilizing various alcohol-water mixtures to increase DNAPL solubilization. Preliminary results of cosolvency experiments indicate the enhancement in the transfer of nonaqueous phase TCE to TBA-water solution and the rate of TCE degradation in aqueous phase.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Castle Air Force Base, Merced County, CA. (First remedial action), August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    The 2,777-acre Castle Air Force Base is a Strategic Air Command training base 6 miles northwest of the City of Merced in Merced County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. Since 1941, the site has been used as a military air training base. Fire training activities, as well as aircraft and jet engine maintenance activities including metal plating and processing, have occurred onsite. In 1984, the base was required not only to implement remedial measures to correct the identified contamination but also to prevent future ground water degradation from waste discharges. The site has been divided into operable units (OUs) for remediation. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides an interim remedy for the main TCE plume, as OU1. Future RODs will address remaining soil and ground water contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE. The selected remedial action for the interim remedy is included.

  14. Vapor distribution of trichloroethene and related compounds in soil gas above contaminated ground water at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A. )

    1988-09-01

    From 1960 to 1981, wastewater from metal-plating operations was discharged into two unlined filtration pits adjacent to Building 24 at Picatinny Arsenal in Morris County, New Jersey. As a result, the unconfined, sand and gravel aquifer that underlies the site has been contaminated with several chlorinated organic compounds. The major component of the organic contamination is trichloroethene (TCE), although cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) also have been identified in some water samples. Details of the ground-water contamination have been reported elsewhere. The goals of this study are to quantify the concentration of purgeable organic compounds in the soil gas above the main axis of the contaminant plume, and to investigate the effect of soil moisture content on the sorption of TCE vapor to soil.

  15. Public health assessment for north Penn-area 1, Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD096834494. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-12

    The North Penn Area 1 site, a National Priorities List (NPL) site, is located in the Borough of Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Gentle, Cleaners, Inc., one of the parties potentially responsible for the site contamination, has been in business since 1953 and used tetrachloroethene (PCE) from 1953 to 1983 in dry cleaning operations. At present, groundwater is the only medium that is known to be contaminated. Enviromental data for surface soil, surface water, sediment, and air do not exist. Past, present, and future completed exposure pathways for volatile organic compounds such as PCE and TCE in groundwater exist for nearby residents. The site is considered an indeterminate public health hazard because limited data are available; however, data that are available do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contaminants that would be expected to cause any adverse health effects.

  16. Intelligent Unmanned Monitoring of Remediated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Emile Fiesler, Ph.D.

    2001-06-01

    During this Phase I project, IOS demonstrated the feasibility of combining digital signal processing and neural network analysis to analyze spectral signals from pure samples of several typical contaminants. We fabricated and tested a prototype system by automatically analyzing Raman spectral data taken in the Vadose zone at the 321 M site in the M area of DOE's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This test demonstration proved the ability of IOS's technology to detect the target contaminants, tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), in isolation, and to detect the spectra of these contaminants in real-world noisy samples taken from a mixture of materials obtained from this typical remediation target site.

  17. Public health assessment for Tutu Wellfield, St. Thomas, St. Thomas County, Virgin Islands. Cerclis No. VID982272569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-14

    The Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site is in east-central St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island. Twenty-two wells in the Turpentine Run Basin contain at minimum a trace of volatile organic contaminants. Volatile and chlorinated hydrocarbons including benzene; toluene; 1,2-trans-dichloroethene (DCE); trichloroethene (TCE); and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were detected in several of the wells. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, poses a public health hazard for past, present, and possible future ingestion of contaminated groundwater.

  18. Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Bender, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly detected in urban waters across the United States include gasoline-related compounds (e.g. toluene, xylene) and chlorinated compounds (e.g. chloroform, tetrachloroethane [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE]). Statistical analysis of observational data and results of modeling the partitioning of VOCs between air and water suggest that urban land surfaces are the primary nonpoint source of most VOCs. Urban air is a secondary nonpoint source, but could be an important source of the gasoline oxygenate methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Surface waters in urban areas would most effectively be protected by controlling land-surface sources.

  19. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Preferred Plating, Suffolk County, Farmingdale, NY. (Second remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    The 0.88-acre Preferred Plating site is a former metal plating facility in Farmingdale, Town of Babylon, Suffolk County, New York. From 1951 to 1976, Preferred Plating Corporation (PPC) operated a metal plating facility that degreased, cleaned, and finished metal parts. Untreated wastewater was discharged to four onsite concrete waste storage pits. The ROD addresses subsurface soil contamination contributing to the ground water problem attributable to the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs, including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and inorganics, including cyanide.

  1. Vertical circulation flows for vadose and groundwater zone in situ (bio-)remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, J.

    1995-12-31

    Vertical circulation flows have been established under in situ remediation techniques. Their hydraulic flow field permits physical and biological remediation of the saturated, as well as the unsaturated subsoil. A special advantage is that these techniques can be combined with any appropriate in-well or on-site technique. Even addition of nutrients and/or electron acceptors for stimulating biological degradation processes are possible. This paper discusses the different remediation techniques and the numerical results associated with the influence of hydrogeologic conditions on the system`s radius of influence and time behavior. Attention is focused on BTEX, PCE, and TCE.

  2. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems. Résumé Les chloroéthanes, tétrachloroéthane (PCE) et trichloroéthane (TCE) sont parmi les polluants les plus communs trouvés dans les aquifères. Depuis les années 1980, on considère que les chloroéthanes ne sont pas significativement biodégradables dans les aquifères. Par conséquent, les efforts pour dépolluer les nappes contaminées par des chloroéthanes se sont limités à des tentatives de pompage-traitement globalement sans succès. Des travaux ultérieurs ont montré que dans des conditions réductrices, des micro-organismes présents dans les aquifères peuvent, par réduction, dégrader les PCE et TCE en composés moins chlorés, comme le dichlor

  3. A two and half-year-performance evaluation of a field test on treatment of source zone tetrachloroethene and its chlorinated daughter products using emulsified zero valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W; Krug, Thomas A; Watling, Mark T; O'Hara, Suzanne K; Quinn, Jacqueline W; Ruiz, Nancy E

    2012-10-15

    A field test of emulsified zero valent iron (EZVI) nanoparticles was conducted at Parris Island, SC, USA and was monitored for two and half years to assess the treatment of subsurface-source zone chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) dominated by tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its chlorinated daughter products. Two EZVI delivery methods were used: pneumatic injection and direct injection. In the pneumatic injection plot, 2180 L of EZVI containing 225 kg of iron (Toda RNIP-10DS), 856 kg of corn oil, and 22.5 kg of surfactant were injected to remedy an estimated 38 kg of CVOCs. In the direct injection plot, 572 L of EZVI were injected to treat an estimated 0.155 kg of CVOCs. After injection of the EZVI, significant reductions in PCE and trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations were observed in downgradient wells with corresponding increases in degradation products including significant increases in ethene. In the pneumatic injection plot, there were significant reductions in the downgradient groundwater mass flux values for PCE (>85%) and TCE (>85%) and a significant increase in the mass flux of ethene. There were significant reductions in total CVOC mass (86%); an estimated reduction of 63% in the sorbed and dissolved phases and 93% reduction in the PCE DNAPL mass. There are uncertainties in these estimates because DNAPL may have been mobilized during and after injection. Following injection, significant increases in dissolved sulfide, volatile fatty acids (VFA), and total organic carbon (TOC) were observed. In contrast, dissolved sulfate and pH decreased in many wells. The apparent effective remediation seems to have been accomplished by direct abiotic dechlorination by nanoiron followed by biological reductive dechlorination stimulated by the corn oil in the emulsion.

  4. Are reactive transport models reliable tools for reconstructing historical contamination scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, P.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will be based on a recent project effort that I completed while serving as a member of National Academy of Sciences and Engineering panel. The primary goal of this congressionally-mandated project effort was to review scientific evidence on the association between adverse health effect s and exposure to a contaminated water supply system at the U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (CLJ) in North Carolina. The detailed NRC study report was released in June 2009, and is available at this NRC weblink: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12618. Multiple water supply systems at this Marine Base were contaminated with harmful chemicals, such as PCE, TCE and other waste products, since the early 50s. In 1982, a routine water quality survey completed at the site indicated the presence of several volatile organic compounds including PCE and TCE. Further investigations revealed that there are several waste disposal facilities located on-site that have discharged TCE and other waste products into groundwater systems. In addition, there was also an off-site dry cleaning facility located close to the Tarawa Terrace in-take well locations that disposed PCE into the subsurface environment. The dry cleaner has been using PCE since 1953 and disposed various forms of PCE-contaminated wastes in a septic tank and in several shallow pits. Therefore, the residents who lived in Tarawa Terrace on-site family housing units had the potential to be exposed to these harmful environmental contaminants through the drinking water source. In late 1980s, the concerns raised by CLJ public lead to an epidemiological study to evaluate the potential associations of utero and infant exposures to the VOCs and childhood cancers and birth defects. The study included births occurring during the period of 1968-1985 to women who were pregnant while they resided at the base. Since there was no monitoring data available for the study period (1968-1982), researchers used reactive transport

  5. Use of lanthanum to detect changes in the permeability barrier of rat skin after dermal exposure to organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Mattie, D.R.; McDougal, J.N.; Chase, M.R.; Hixson, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Occupational dermal exposures to organic solvents are of importance due to local effects in the skin and systematic toxicity if penetration occurs through the skin. Repeated or prolonged contact with organic solvents have been shown to penetrate the skin; little information is available however, concerning effects on the barrier properties of skin after dermal exposure to solvents. This investigation examines the ultrastructural changes in rat skin after exposure of 3 organic chemicals and to correlate changes with the location of an electron-dense tracer, lanthanum, which is normally excluded by the permeability barrier in the stratum corneum. Male rats were exposed for 24 h to sterile saline, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), or toluene using dermal-exposure cells developed in this laboratory. Rat skin exposed to saline for 24 h appeared normal. Rat skin exposed to neat TCE, PERC or toluene for 24 h caused acute, coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and upper 1/2 to 1/3 of the dermis.

  6. Solvent Exposures and Parkinson’s Disease Risk in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Samuel M; Quinlan, Patricia J; Ross, G Webster; Marras, Connie; Meng, Cheryl; Bhudhikanok, Grace S; Comyns, Kathleen; Korell, Monica; Chade, Anabel R; Kasten, Meike; Priestley, Benjamin; Chou, Kelvin L; Fernandez, Hubert H; Cambi, Franca; Langston, J William; Tanner, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several case reports have linked solvent exposure to Parkinson’s disease (PD), but few studies have assessed associations with specific agents using an analytic epidemiologic design. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to specific solvents is associated with PD risk using a discordant twin pair design. Methods 99 twin pairs discordant for PD ascertained from the National Academy of Science/National Research Council (NAS/NRC) World War II Veteran Twins Cohort were interviewed regarding lifetime occupations and hobbies using detailed job-task-specific questionnaires. Exposures to 6 specific solvents selected a priori were estimated by expert raters unaware of case status. Results Ever exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) was associated with significantly increased risk of PD (OR 6.1, 95%CI 1.2 – 33; p = 0.034), and exposure to perchloroethylene (PERC) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) tended toward significance (respectively: OR 10.5, 95%CI 0.97-113, p = 0.053; OR 2.3, 95%CI 0.9-6.1, p = 0.088). Results were similar for estimates of exposure duration and cumulative lifetime exposure. Interpretation Exposure to specific solvents may increase risk of PD. TCE is the most common organic contaminant in groundwater, and PERC and CCl4 are also ubiquitous in the environment. Our findings require replication in other populations with well-characterized exposures, but the potential public health implications are substantial. PMID:22083847

  7. BENCH-SCALE PERFORMANCE OF PARTITIONING ELECTRON DONORS FOR TCE DNAPL BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Source Area Bioremediation (SABRE) project, an international collaboration of twelve companies, two government agencies and three research institutions, is to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated ethen...

  8. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  9. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  10. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  11. Spatial And Temporal Distribution Of Microbial Communities In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project was conducted to evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. To study performance of this technology, a test cell was constructed with a longitudi...

  12. 1,1,2-Trichloroethane (TCE); Final Enforceable Consent Agreement and Testing Consent Order

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has issued an enforceable consent agreement (ECA) with The Dow Chemical Company; Vulcan Materials Company; Occidental Chemical Corp; Oxy Vinyls, LP; Georgia Gulf Corp; Westlake Chemical Corp; PPG, Borden Chemicals & Plastics, and Formosa Plastics.

  13. Sustainability of TCE Removal in the Mulch Biowalls at Altus AFB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable mulch biowall was installed in June 2002 at Landfill 3 (LF-03), Operable Unit 1 (OU-1), Altus AFB, Oklahoma. The demonstration was conducted by Parsons for the AFCEE Technology Transfer Outreach Office. The biowall is approximately 455 feet long, by 24 feet deep, by...

  14. Case Summary: Settlement Reached at Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area to Address TCE Contamination

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Case summary of the first amended consent decree with Intel Corporation and Raytheon Company to address trichloroethylene (TC) contamination in residential and commercial buildings in Mountain View, California

  15. AQUIFER PROTIST RESPONSE AND THE POTENTIAL FOR TCE BIOREMEDIATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial population for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR123 and PR131 constitutive...

  16. SABRE MULTI-LAB, STATISTICALLY-BASED MICROCOSM STUDY FOR TCE SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SABRE (source area bioremediation) is a public/private consortium of twelve companies, two government agencies, and three research institutions whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated sol...

  17. Chemically enhanced mixed region vapor stripping of TCE-contaminated saturated peat and silty clay soils

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Cameron, P.A.; Lucero, A.J.; Koran, L.J. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct further testing of MRVS, chemically enhanced with calcium oxide conditioning, on field- contaminated soils collected from beneath the NASA Michoud Rinsewater Impoundment. In this study, residual soil VOC levels as a function of vapor stripping time were measured to quantify VOC removal rates. Physical and chemical soil parameters expected to affect MRVS efficiency were measures. The effects of varying the calcium oxide loadings as well as varying the vapor stripping flow rates on VOC removal were also evaluated. The results of this study will be used to determine whether acceptable removals can be achieved within reasonable treatment times, remediation costs being directly proportional to the latter. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental results of this study, as well as to address issues that were raised after completion of the previous Michoud treatability work.

  18. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  19. COMBINATION OF A SOURCE REMOVAL REMEDY AND BIOREMEDIATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF A TCE CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historical disposal practices of chlorinated solvents have resulted in the widespread contamination of ground-water resources. These ground-water contaminants exist in the subsurface as free products, residual and vapor phases, and in solution. The remediation of these contamin...

  20. IMPACT OF TURBIDITY ON TCE AND DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated particulate concentrations in ground water samples can bias contaminant concentration data. This has been particularly problematic for metal analyses where artificially increased turbidity levels can affect metals concentrations and confound interpretation of the data. H...

  1. Oxygenation of the Root Zone and TCE Remediation: A Plant Model of Rhizosphere Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    between cells. The symplasm is an effective transport pathway and can increase flux between cells more than a hundred times that of diffusion across ...and J. P. Amon. “Seasonal dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in differing wetland habitats,” Mycorrhiza 14: 329-337 (2004). Beckett, P... Arbuscular Mycorhizial Fungi .............................................................................. 81 Soil and Microbial Influences

  2. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  3. 77 FR 6863 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for VITA/TCE Program Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service offers free assistance with tax return preparation and tax counseling using specially trained volunteers. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and Tax Counseling for the Elderly... through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology; and...

  4. Characterizing The Microbial Community In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Column And Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project is evaluating accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In support of a field scale pilot test, column studies were conducted to design the system and ob...

  5. Phreatophyte influence on reductive dechlorination in a shallow aquifer contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Jones, S.A.; Kuniansky, E.L.; Harvey, G.; Lollar, B.S.; Slater, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoremediation uses the natural ability of plants to degrade contaminants in groundwater. A field demonstration designed to remediate aerobic shallow groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene began in April 1996 with the planting of cottonwood trees, a short-rotation woody crop, over an approximately 0.2-ha area at the Naval Air Station, Fort Worth, Texas. The project was developed to demonstrate capture of contaminated groundwater and degradation of contaminants by phreatophytes. Analyses from samples of groundwater collected from July 1997 to June 1998 indicate that tree roots have the potential to create anaerobic conditions in the groundwater that will facilitate degradation of trichloroethene by microbially mediated reductive dechlorination. Organic matter from root exudates and decay of tree roots probably stimulate microbial activity, consuming dissolved oxygen. Dissolved oxygen concentrations, which varied across the site, were smallest near a mature cottonwood tree (about 20 years of age and 60 meters southwest of the cottonwood plantings) where degradation products of trichloroethene were measured. Oxidation of organic matter is the primary microbially mediated reaction occurring in the groundwater beneath the planted trees whereas near the mature cottonwood tree, data indicate that methanogenesis is the most probable reaction occurring. Reductive dechlorination in groundwater either is not occurring or is not a primary process away from the mature tree. Carbon-13 isotope values for trichloroethene are nearly identical at locations away from the mature tree, further confirming that dechlorination is not occurring at the site.

  6. Combining innovative and traditional technologies for TCE contaminated soils and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of the innovative and traditional technologies that were used to modify a record of decision (ROD) at a site in upstate New York. The state agency-approved ROD for the site specified excavation and treatment of 3,900 yds{sup 3} soils containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through an ex situ bioventing/soil vapor extraction (SVE) cell, and recovery and treatment of ground water. Total costs to implement the ROD were estimated at over $2 million over a 2-year construction and operation period. An alternative remedial technology, mechanical (volatilization) screening (MVS) was proposed for the treatment of soils and selected that ultimately saved the owner over $1 million in construction and operation costs.

  7. Chlorination byproducts induce gender specific autistic-like behaviors in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Guariglia, Sara Rose; Jenkins, Edmund C; Chadman, Kathryn K; Wen, Guang Y

    2011-10-01

    In 2000, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) released a report concerning elevated autism prevalence and the presence water chlorination byproducts in the municipal drinking water supply in Brick Township, New Jersey. The ATSDR concluded that it was unlikely that these chemicals, specifically chloroform, bromoform (Trihalomethanes; THMs) and tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene; PCE) had contributed to the prevalence of autism in this community based upon correlations between timing of exposure and/or concentration of exposure. The ATSDR conclusion may have been premature, as there is no conclusive data evidencing a correlation between a particular developmental time point that would render an individual most susceptible to toxicological insult with the development of autism. Therefore, it was our aim to determine if these chemicals could contribute to autistic like behaviors. We found that males treated with THMs and PCE have a significant reduction in the number of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) emitted in response to maternal separation, which are not attributed to deficits in vocal ability to or to lesser maternal care. These same males also show significantly elevated anxiety, an increase in perseverance behavior and a significant reduction in sociability. The sum of our data suggests that male, but not female mice, develop autistic like behaviors after gestational and postnatal exposure to the aforementioned chemical triad via drinking water. We believe development of such aberrant behaviors likely involves GABAergic system development.

  8. Development of a priority list of chemical mixtures occurring at 1188 hazardous waste sites, using the HazDat database.

    PubMed

    Fay, R M; Mumtaz, M M

    1996-01-01

    Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA or Superfund) section 104 mandate, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 USC 9604 (i)(2), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is to identify individual substances and combinations of substances that pose the greatest public health hazard at hazardous waste sites. This has led to certain mandated activities of the Agency, including development of toxicological profiles, identification of data gaps, and, ultimately, establishment of a research agenda. The Agency has also developed HazDat, a database that captures pertinent information from public health assessments conducted at hazardous waste sites. As a preliminary step, data from sites have been analysed to identify the combinations of chemicals found in various environmental media. The most frequently found combinations were perchloroethylene (PERC) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in water (23.5% of sites); chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in soil (20.5%); benzene and toluene in air (3.5%); PERC, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and TCE in water (11.6%); Cr, cadmium (Cd) and Pb in soil (12.0%); and benzene, PERC and TCE in air (2.2%). The findings of this analysis can be enhanced by factoring into the algorithm paramenters such as toxicity, source contribution, and likelihood of human exposure similar to that used for the Agency's priority list of 275 single substances. Assessment of the impact of chemical mixtures on human health is a formidable task, and estimating the toxicity of such mixtures, including the role of chemical interactions, is an equally demanding challenge. Because limited experimental data exist for chemical interactions, alternative methods such as predictive approaches and in vitro techniques are needed to address the many substances and their potential combinations.

  9. Permanganate treatment of DNAPLs in reactive barriers and source zone flooding schemes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.W.

    1997-01-01

    'The goals of this study are (1) to elucidate the basic mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes common chlorinated solvents, various constituents in aqueous solution, and porous-medium solids, and (2) to assess the potential for chemical oxidation by potassium permanganate to serve as a remedial scheme involving either source zone flooding or reactive barriers. The research plan involves a combined experimental/modeling study that builds on the extensive previous work in the area of reactive barrier systems, and modeling of reactive contaminant transport. The experimental studies are being undertaken at The Ohio State University by Dr. Schwartz and his co-workers. The modeling work is being conducted in Albuquerque, NM by Dr. Zhang of Intera, Inc. The workplan for this study is designed around the following four objectives (1) to describe through batch experiments the kinetics and mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes dissolved tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and dichloroethene (DCE), (2) to examine using column studies the nature and kinetics of reactions between potassium permanganate, residual DNAPLs (PCE, TCE, and DCE) and porous medium solids, (3) to represent the process understanding in flow and transport models that demonstrate the potential applicability of the approach, and (4) to apply the resulting computer code in the development of appropriate field tests for assessing the approach.'

  10. DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHLOROETHENE AND TETRACHLOROETHENE IN U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER SITE UNCONFINED AQUIFER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Robert G. Riley, R; James E. Szecsody, J; A. V. Mitroshkov, A; C. F. Brown, C; Brian02 Looney, B

    2007-01-10

    Sorption is governed by the physico-chemical processes that partition solutes between the aqueous and solid phases in aquifers. For environmental systems, a linear equilibrium relationship between the amount of contaminant in the alternative phases is often assumed. In this traditional approach, the distribution coefficient, or K{sub d}, is a ratio of contaminant associated with the solid phase to the contaminant in the water phase. Recent scientific literature has documented time-dependant behaviors in which more contaminant mass is held in the solid phase than predicted by the standard model. Depending on the specific conceptualization, this has been referred to as nonlinear sorption, time-variable sorption, or ''irreversible sorption''. The potential impact of time-variable sorption may be beneficial or detrimental depending on the specific conditions and remediation goals. Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been studying this process to evaluate how various soil types will affect this process for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The results described in this report evaluate sorption-desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in Savannah River Site (SRS) soils. The results of this study will be combined with ongoing PNNL research to provide a more comprehensive look at this process and its impact on contaminant plume stability and sustainability. Importantly, while the results of the study documented differences in sorption properties between two tested SRS soils, the data indicated that ''irreversible sorption'' is not influencing the sorption-desorption behaviors of TCE and PCE for these soils.

  11. Validation of adsorbents for sample preconcentration in compound-specific isotope analysis of common vapor intrusion pollutants.

    PubMed

    Klisch, Monika; Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, R Paul; McHugh, Thomas E

    2012-12-28

    Isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment are often of interest in contaminant fate studies. Adsorbent preconcentration-thermal desorption of VOCs can be used to collect environmental vapor samples for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). While active adsorbent samplers offer logistic benefits in handling large volumes of air, their performance in preserving VOCs isotope ratios was not previously tested under sampling conditions corresponding to typical indoor air sampling conditions. In this study, the performance of selected adsorbents was tested for preconcentration of TCE (for determination of C and Cl isotope ratios), PCE (C and Cl) and benzene (C and H). The key objective of the study was to identify the adsorbent(s) permitting preconcentration of the target VOCs present in air at low μg/m(3) concentrations, without significant alteration of their isotope ratios. Carboxen 1016 was found to perform well for the full range of tested parameters. Carboxen 1016 can be recommended for sampling of TCE, PCE and benzene, for CSIA, from air volumes up to 100 L. Variable extent of isotope ratio alteration was observed in the preconcentration of the target VOCs on Carbopack B and Carbopack X, resulting from partial analyte loss via adsorbent bed breakthrough and (possibly) via incomplete desorption. The results from testing the Carbopack B and Carbopack X highlight the need of adsorbent performance validation at conditions fully representative of actual sample collection conditions, and caution against extrapolation of performance data toward more challenging sampling conditions.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Rockaway Borough Well Field, Rockaway Borough, New Jersey, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-29

    The Rockaway Borough Well Field site is located in Rockaway Borough, Morris County, New Jersey, and consists of three municipal supply wells which are in a glacial aquifer designated by EPA as the sole source aquifer for Rockaway Borough and the surrounding communities. High concentrations of TCE and PCE have been detected in the aquifer since 1980, but no sources of contamination have been identified. In 1981, the Borough of Rockaway constructed a three-bed granular activated-carbon adsorption system to treat contaminated well water. Treatment has effectively reduced volatile organic contaminant concentrations in finished water to less than 1 part per billion (ppb). Although thirteen VOCs have been detected in the well water, TCE and PCE are the primary contaminants of concern. The site was listed on the NPL in December of 1982, and the RI/FS was initiated in 1985. The remedial action for the Rockaway Borough site includes maintaining the existing filtration system and modifying operations to ensure compliance with Safe Drinking Water Act standards and EPA continuing the RI/FS in an attempt to identify the source and extent of contamination and evaluate alternatives to address source control. Estimated capital cost of remedial action is zero with annual OandM costs of $74,800.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe2+ activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Massimo; Aravena, Ramon; Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert; Mancini, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe(2+)). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor ε(bulk) of -4.9‰ for PCE, -3.6‰ for TCE and -7.6‰ for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe(2+) activated persulfate.

  14. Extraction methods for recovery of volatile organic compounds from fortified dry soils

    SciTech Connect

    Minnich, M.M.; Zimmerman, J.H.; Schumacher, B.A.

    1996-09-01

    Recovery of 8 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dry soils, each fortified at 800 ng/g soil, was studied in relation to the extraction method and time of extraction. Extraction procedures studied on 2 desiccator-dried soils were modifications of EPA low- and high-level purge-and-trap extractions (SW-846 Method 5030A): treatment 1, unmodified low-level procedure; treatment 2, 18 h water presoak followed by low-level procedure; treatment 3, 24 h methanol extract at room temperature followed by high-level procedure; and treatment 4, 24 h methanol extract at 65{degrees}C followed by high-level procedure. VOC recoveries from replicate soil samples increased in the treatment order 1 through 4. With Charleston soil (8% clay and 3.8% organic carbon), highly significant differences (p {le} 0.001) in recoveries among treatments were observed for trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene, with 2- to 3-fold increased recoveries between treatments 1 and 3. With Hayesville soil (32% clay and 0.2% organic carbon), significant improvements (p{le}0.05) in recoveries of toluene, ethylbenzene, o-oxylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, TCE, and PCE were observed for heated methanol (treatment 4) rather than water extraction (treatment 1), but the increases were less than 2-fold. 19 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S.

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  16. Quantification of groundwater contamination in an urban area using integral pumping tests.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S; Bayer-Raich, M; Holder, T; Kolesar, C; Müller, D; Ptak, T

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, the integral groundwater investigation method is used for the quantification of PCE and TCE mass flow rates at an industrialized urban area in Linz, Austria. In this approach, pumping wells positioned along control planes perpendicular to the groundwater flow direction are operated for a time period on the order of days and sampled for contaminants. The concentration time series of the contaminants measured during operation of the pumping wells are then used to determine contaminant mass flow rates, mean concentrations and the plume shapes and positions at the control planes. The three control planes used in Linz were positioned downstream of a number of potential source zones, which are distributed over the field site. By use of the integral investigation method, it was possible to identify active contaminant sources, quantify the individual source strength in terms of mass flow rates at the control planes and estimate the contaminant plume position relative to the control planes. The source zones emitting the highest PCE and TCE mass flow rates could be determined, representing the areas where additional investigation and remediation activities will be needed. Additionally, large parts of the area investigated could be excluded from further investigation and remediation activities.

  17. A diffusion-based interpretation of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene concentration profiles in a groundwater aquitard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Xia, Guoshou; Young, Dirk F.

    1997-12-01

    Analysis of subsurface soil cores from the site of a field-scale groundwater remediation experiment at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, has revealed that tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contamination extends into an aquitard underlying a groundwater aquifer. The site location is well downgradient of the locations of contaminant release, and the aquitard contamination is believed to have begun when contaminated groundwater first arrived in the overlying aquifer. Using independent estimates of sorption and diffusion properties in the aquitard layers, mathematical modeling based on diffusion in laminate slabs has been used to make inferences regarding the historical concentration conditions in the overlying aquifer. The results suggest that plume arrival occurred within the last two decades, with some important differences in the inferred