Science.gov

Sample records for telescope key project

  1. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Pan, Zhichen

    2016-07-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese megascience project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the People's Republic of China. The National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) is in charge of its construction and subsequent operation. Upon its expected completion in September 2016, FAST will surpass the 305 m Arecibo Telescope and the 100 m Green Bank Telescope in terms of absolute sensitivity in the 70 MHz to 3 GHz bands. In this paper, we report on the project, its current status, the key science goals, and plans for early science.

  2. The DAG project, a 4m class telescope: the telescope main structure performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Busatta, A.; Ghedin, L.; Marcuzzi, E.; Manfrin, C.; Battistel, C.; Pirnay, O.; Flebus, Carlo; Yeşilyaprak, C.; Keskin, O.; Yerli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dogu Anatolu Gözlemevi (DAG-Eastern Anatolia Observatory) Project is a 4m class optical, near-infrared Telescope and suitable enclosure which will be located at an altitude of 3.170m in Erzurum, Turkey. The DAG telescope is a project fully funded by Turkish Ministry of Development and the Atatürk University of Astrophysics Research Telescope - ATASAM. The Project is being developed by the Belgian company AMOS (project leader), which is also the optics supplier and EIE GROUP, the Telescope Main Structure supplier and responsible for the final site integration. The design of the Telescope Main Structure fits in the EIE TBO Program which aims at developing a Dome/Telescope systemic optimization process for both performances and competitive costs based on previous project commitments like NTT, VLT, VST and ASTRI. The optical Configuration of the DAG Telescope is a Ritchey-Chretien with two Nasmyth foci and a 4m primary thin mirror controlled in shape and position by an Active Optic System. The main characteristics of the Telescope Main Structure are an Altitude-Azimuth light and rigid structure system with Direct Drive Systems for both axis, AZ Hydrostatic Bearing System and Altitude standard bearing system; both axes are equipped with Tape Encoder System. An innovative Control System characterizes the telescope performance.

  3. SPM-Twin Telescopes: Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.

    2007-06-01

    The SPM-Twin Project is an international initiative for a pair of 6.5-m telescopes, at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (SPM), to provide a limber, and highly competitive, platform for discovery by focusing on scientific niches technically difficult for existing or planned larger aperture telescopes, and by exploiting the superiority of the SPM site. The telescopes are based on the proven and highly efficient Magellan concept, but each with a distinct optimization to cover two complementary but mutually exclusive aspects: (a) the "Standard Field Telescope" would have a field of view of 15'- 30', capable of observing in the optical through the thermal infrared (0.4 - 24 μm) and prepared for adaptive optics, and (b) the "Wide Field Telescope" (WFT) with a field of view of 1.5° or more, capable of multi-object fiber spectroscopy, integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy, and potentially narrow-band imaging as well. The WFT spectroscopy would extend from 0.36 to 1.8 μm, and would contain several thousand fibers. We present a general overview of the project.

  4. The Gemini 8-Meter Telescopes Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroson, Todd A.

    1995-05-01

    The Gemini 8-Meter Telescopes Project is an international partnership to build and operate two 8-meter telescopes, one on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and one on Cerro Pachon, Chile. The telescopes will be international facilities, open to the scientific communities of the six member countries, the United States (50%), the United Kingdom (25%), Canada (15%), Chile (5%), Argentina (2.5%), and Brazil (2.5%). The telescopes are designed to exploit the best atmospheric conditions at these excellent sites. Near diffraction limited performance will be delivered at 2.2 microns and longward, with minimal degradation of the best seeing conditions at shorter wavelengths. The telescopes and facilities are designed to achieve emissivity <4% (requirement) or <2% (goal) if silver coatings are used. The instrument complement is diverse, including near- and mid-IR imagers, and near-IR and optical spectrographs. Both telescopes are equipped with f/16 articulated secondaries, and a future upgrade path to a wide-field f/6 configuration is provided. The northern telescope also includes a natural-guide-star adaptive optics system. Up to five instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the Cassegrain instrument interface. Approximately 50% of the telescope time will be flexibly scheduled, allowing most efficient utilization of the times of best conditions and facilitating programs which are difficult to schedule, such as synoptic and target-of-opportunity. First light for the Mauna Kea telescope is expected in late 1998, and for the Cerro Pachon telescope in mid-2000. This talk will report on construction progress, the instrumental capabilities, and operations strategies being considered. The Gemini 8-meter Telescopes Project is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation which serves as executive agency for the Gemini partner countries. U.S. participation in the project is through the U

  5. Large Binocular Telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Salinari, Piero

    2000-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, and Ohio. The telescope will have two 8.4 meter diameter primary mirrors phased on a common mounting with a 22.8 meter baseline. The second of two borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors for LBT is being case at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab this year. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes adaptive infrared secondaries of a Gregorian design. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of- view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage the two folded Gregorian focal planes to three central locations. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arm spiders which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors as well as prime focus cameras. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance were important drivers for the design of the telescope in order to provide the best possible images for interferometric observations. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The telescope structure is being fabricated in Italy by Ansaldo Energia S.p.A. in Milan. After pre-erection in the factory, the telescope will be shipped to Arizona in early 2001. The enclosure is being built on Mt. Graham under the auspices of Hart Construction Management Services of Safford, Arizona. The enclosure will be completed by late 2001 and ready for telescope installation.

  6. Large Binocular Telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Salinari, Piero

    2003-02-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, and Ohio. The first of two 8.4-meter borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors for LBT is being polished at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab this year. The second of the two 8.4-meter mirror blanks waits its turn in the polishing queue. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes adaptive infrared secondaries of a Gregorian design. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4-arcminute diameter field-of-view. These adaptive secondary mirrors with 672 voice-coil actuators are now in the early stages of fabrication. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4-meter primaries will reimage the two folded Gregorian focal planes to three central locations for phased array imaging. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arm spiders which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors as well as prime focus cameras. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The telescope structure was fabricated and pre-assembled in Italy by Ansaldo-Camozzi in Milan. The structure was disassembled, packed and shipped to Arizona. The enclosure was built on Mt. Graham and is ready for telescope installation.

  7. Towards an autonomous telescope system: the Test-Bed Telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racero, E.; Ocaña, F.; Ponz, D.; the TBT Consortium

    2015-05-01

    In the context of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme of ESA, it is foreseen to deploy several large robotic telescopes in remote locations to provide surveillance and tracking services for man-made as well as natural near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present project, termed Telescope Test Bed (TBT) is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme, and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario, consisting of two telescopes located in Spain and Australia, to collect representative test data for precursor NEO services. It is foreseen that this test-bed environment will be used to validate future prototype software systems as well as to evaluate remote monitoring and control techniques. The test-bed system will be capable to deliver astrometric and photometric data of the observed objects in near real-time. This contribution describes the current status of the project.

  8. Extremely Large Telescope Project Selected in ESFRI Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    Telescope at the Paranal Observatory. The draft Baseline Reference Design will be presented to the wider scientific community on 29 - 30 November 2006 at a dedicated ELT Workshop Meeting in Marseille (France) and will be further reiterated. The design is then to be presented to the ESO Council at the end of 2006. The goal is to start the detailed E-ELT design work by the first half of 2007. Launched in April 2002, the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures was set-up following a recommendation of the European Union Council, with the role to support a coherent approach to policy-making on research infrastructures in Europe, and to act as an incubator for international negotiations about concrete initiatives. In particular, ESFRI has prepared a European Roadmap identifying new Research Infrastructure of pan-European interest corresponding to the long term needs of the European research communities, covering all scientific areas, regardless of possible location and likely to be realised in the next 10 to 20 years. The Roadmap was presented on 19 October. It is the result of an intensive two-year consultation and peer review process involving over 1000 high level European and international experts. The Roadmap identifies 35 large scale infrastructure projects, at various stages of development, in seven key research areas including Environmental Sciences; Energy; Materials Sciences; Astrophysics, Astronomy, Particle and Nuclear Physics; Biomedical and Life Sciences; Social Sciences and the Humanities; Computation and data Treatment.

  9. The Faulkes Telescope Project at school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    The Faulkes Telescope Project [1] was started in 2000 and is currently managed by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) [2]. Allows student access to two remote telescopes (in Hawaii and in Australia), allowing you to capture images of the sky. Since January 2012 I conduct monthly observations with students: first with students from Escola Secundária de Loulé (ESL) [3] and starting from September 2013 with students from Agrupamento de Escolas Dra Laura Ayres [4], in Quarteira. Each session is previously prepared in order to make the best of the time available. For that we use a virtual planetarium that allows us to see the sky in place and time of the scheduled session. After the start of each session a student takes control in real time of one of the telescopes from a computer connected to the internet. This project is a tool that gives the students the feeling of doing science and meet the sky step by step. The observations made by my students can be found at www.miguelneta.pt/faulkestelescope. [1] http://www.faulkes-telescope.com [2] http://lcogt.net [3] https://www.es-loule.edu.pt [4] http://www.esla.edu.pt

  10. A 2.5m astronomical telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaichith, Oudomsanith

    2008-07-01

    The paper reports a recently started project for a 2,5 meter diameter robotic telescope dedicated to astronomy and education for the University of Moscow's Sternberg Institute. As a prime contractor Sagem Defense Securite's REOSC department will take on the program design as well as the production of the optical components. The project includes the Alt-Az mount, the dome and its cooling and air stabilization system, the weather station, the high-resolution camera and realization, transport and installation on-site at the Kislovodsk solar station located in the Caucasus mountains as well as the initial training for the operators. The telescope will provide a wide field of view of 40 arcmin at the Cassegrain F/8 focus. An escapable and rotating tertiary mirror will allow to direct the light to the two Nasmyth foci and two student ports located at 90° from the Nasmyth foci. A 4k x 4k CCD camera cryogenically cooled to 140 K will be provided as a first light camera. All will be delivered by end 2009. Remotely controlled via the internet, the telescope will allow Russia to train doctors in astronomy, participate in international research projects and draw up the future specifications of a larger and more advanced telescope.

  11. James Webb Space Telescope Project (JWST) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Mitra

    2008-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project. The JWST is an infrared telescope designed to collect data in the cosmic dark zone. Specifically, the mission of the JWST is to study the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. It is a deployable telescope with a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, adjustable primary mirror. outfitted with cryogenic temperature telescope and instruments for infrared performance. The JWST is several times more sensitive than previous telescope and other photographic and electronic detection methods. It hosts a near infrared camera, near infrared spectrometer, mid-infrared instrument and a fine guidance sensor. The JWST mission objection and architecture, integrated science payload, instrument overview, and operational orbit are described.

  12. The Hubble Space Telescope extragalactic distance scale key project. 2: Photometry of WFC images of M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Stetson, Peter B.; Turner, Anne; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Hill, Robert; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Freedman, Wendy L.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Madore, Barry F.; Ferrarese, Laura

    1994-01-01

    The Extragalactic Distance Scale (H(sub o)) Key Project for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) aims to employ the Cepheid period-luminosity (P-L) relation to measure galaxy distances out as far as the Virgo Cluster. The vital steps in this program are (1) to obtain precise photometry of stellar images from the Wide Field Camera (WFC) exposures of selected galaxies, and (2) to calibrate this photometry to obtain reliable distances to these galaxies from the Cepheid P-L relation. We have used the DAOPHOT II and ALLFRAME programs to determine 28 instrumental magnitudes -- 22 of F555W (of about V) and six of F785LP (of about I) -- of all stars brighter than V of about 25 in each of two 2.56 arcmin x 2.56 arcmin WFC fields of M81. The reductions use a varying point-spread function to account for the field effects in the WFC optics and yield instrumental magnitudes with single epoch precision ranging from 0.09 to 0.24 mag, at V of about 21.8 to 23.8 -- the magnitude range of the 30 Cepheids that we have now identified in M81. For brighter stars (V of about 22), single epoch magnitudes are precise to 0.09 mag. The photometric calibration onto the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I systems was determined from independent ground-based CCD observing at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6 m (confirmed by the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4.0 m) and from the Palomar 5.0 m (using the wide-field COSMIC camera) and 1.5 m telescopes. Secondary standards, taken from the COSMIC and CFHT frames, were established in each of the WFC fields in V and I, allowing a direct transformation from ALLFRAME magnitudes to calibrated V and I magnitudes, giving mean V of about 23 magnitudes accurate to of about +/- 0.1 mag. The stellar populations in M81 have been analyzed in terms of the luminosity functions and color magnitude diagrams (CMD) derived from these data, from which we identify numerous supergiants, and a CMD morphology similar to M33.

  13. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the recent selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  14. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.; Campbell, Doug; Clampin, Mark; Decker, John; Greenhouse, Matt; Johns, Alan; Menzel, Mike; Smith, Robert; Sullivan, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  15. SKA Telescope Manager (TM): status and architecture overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Swaminathan; Barbosa, Domingos; Barraca, Joao P.; Bridger, Alan; Choudhury, Subhrojyoti R.; Di Carlo, Matteo; Dolci, Mauro; Gupta, Yashwant; Guzman, Juan; Van den Heever, Lize; Le Roux, Gerhard; Nicol, Mark; Patil, Mangesh; Smareglia, Riccardo; Swart, Paul; Thompson, Roger; Vrcic, Sonja; Williams, Stewart

    2016-07-01

    The SKA radio telescope project is building two telescopes, SKA-Low in Australia and SKA-Mid in South Africa respectively. The Telescope Manager is responsible for the observations lifecycle and for monitoring and control of each instrument, and is being developed by an international consortium. The project is currently in the design phase, with the Preliminary Design Review having been successfully completed, along with re-baselining to match project scope to available budget. This report presents the status of the Telescope Manager work, key architectural challenges and our approach to addressing them.

  16. Erratum: The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. III. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to M101 Using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, Daniel D; Illingworth, Garth D.; Freedman, Wendy F.; Graham, John A.; Hill, Robert; Madore, Barry F.; Saha, Abhijit; Stetson, Peter B.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Ferrarese, Laura; Phelps, Randy; Turner, Anne; Cook, Kem H.; Ford, Holland; Hoessel, John G.; Huchra, John

    1997-03-01

    In the paper ``The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. III. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to M101 Using the Hubble Space Telescope'' by Daniel D. Kelson, Garth D. Illingworth, Wendy F. Freedman, John A. Graham, Robert Hill, Barry F. Madore, Abhijit Saha, Peter B. Stetson, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Jeremy R. Mould, Shaun M. Hughes, Laura Ferrarese, Randy Phelps, Anne Turner, Kem H. Cook, Holland Ford, John G. Hoessel, and John Huchra (ApJ, 463, 26 [1996]), two of the tables are in error. The magnitudes in Tables B1 and B2, in Appendix B, are ordered incorrectly. As a result, the Julian dates are not associated with their correct Cepheid magnitudes. We have now corrected these data, and updated versions of the tables are available on the World Wide Web. The tables are available in ASCII format at our Key Project site (http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp/) and will appear in volume 7 of the AAS CDROM. PostScript and paper copies are also available from the first author (http://www.ucolick.org/~kelson/H0/home.html or kelson@ucolick.org).

  17. CFRP composite optical telescope assembly for the 1 m ULTRA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert N.; Romeo, Robert C.

    2006-06-01

    The focus of the ULTRA Project is to develop and test Ultra-Lightweight Technology for Research applications in Astronomy. The ULTRA project is a collaborative effort involving the private firm Composite Mirror Applications, Inc (CMA) and 3 universities: University of Kansas, San Diego State University, and Dartmouth College. Funding for ULTRA is predominately from a NSF three year MRI program grant to CMA and KU with additional support from CMA, KU and SDSU. The goal of the ULTRA program is to demonstrate that a viable alternative exists to traditional glass mirror and steel telescope technology by designing, fabricating and testing a research telescope constructed from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials. In particular, a 1m diameter, Cassegrain telescope optics set and optical tube assembly (OTA) are being designed and fabricated by CMA. The completed telescope will be deployed at SDSU's Mt Laguna Observatory in a refurbished structure (new dome and mount provided via KU and SDSU). We expect that a successful completion and testing of this project will lead to future use of CFRP technology in larger telescopes and segmented telescopes. This paper describes the OTA (optical tube assembly) that has been developed for the ULTRA project. The mirror technology is described in another paper in this conference. A poster describes the ULTRA project overview in more detail.

  18. First results of the Test-Bed Telescopes (TBT) project: Cebreros telescope commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Francisco; Ibarra, Aitor; Racero, Elena; Montero, Ángel; Doubek, Jirí; Ruiz, Vicente

    2016-07-01

    The TBT project is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme (GSTP), and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario within the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The goal of the project is to provide two fully robotic telescopes, which will serve as prototypes for development of a future network. The system consists of two telescopes, one in Spain and the second one in the Southern Hemisphere. The telescope is a fast astrograph with a large Field of View (FoV) of 2.5 x 2.5 square-degrees and a plate scale of 2.2 arcsec/pixel. The tube is mounted on a fast direct-drive mount moving with speed up to 20 degrees per second. The focal plane hosts a 2-port 4K x 4K back-illuminated CCD with readout speeds up to 1MHz per port. All these characteristics ensure good survey performance for transients and fast moving objects. Detection software and hardware are optimised for the detection of NEOs and objects in high Earth orbits (objects moving from 0.1-40 arcsec/second). Nominal exposures are in the range from 2 to 30 seconds, depending on the observational strategy. Part of the validation scenario involves the scheduling concept integrated in the robotic operations for both sensors. Every night it takes all the input needed and prepares a schedule following predefined rules allocating tasks for the telescopes. Telescopes are managed by RTS2 control software, that performs the real-time scheduling of the observation and manages all the devices at the observatory.1 At the end of the night the observing systems report astrometric positions and photometry of the objects detected. The first telescope was installed in Cebreros Satellite Tracking Station in mid-2015. It is currently in the commissioning phase and we present here the first results of the telescope. We evaluate the site characteristics and the performance of the TBT Cebreros

  19. The Onsala Twin Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, R.

    2013-08-01

    This paper described the Onsala Twin Telescope project. The project aims at the construction of two new radio telescopes at the Onsala Space Observatory, following the VLBI2010 concept. The project starts in 2013 and is expected to be finalized within 4 years. Z% O. Rydbeck. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Göteborg, ISBN 91-7032-621-5, 407-823, 1991. B. Petrachenko, A. Niell, D. Behrend, B. Corey, J. Böhm, P. Charlot, A. Collioud, J. Gipson, R. Haas, Th. Hobiger, Y. Koyama, D. MacMillan, Z. Malkin, T. Nilsson, A. Pany, G. Tuccari, A. Whitney, and J. Wresnik. Design Aspects of the VLBI2010 System. NASA/TM-2009-214180, 58 pp., 2009. R. Haas, G. Elgered, J. Löfgren, T. Ning, and H.-G. Scherneck. Onsala Space Observatory - IVS Network Station. In K. D. Baver and D. Behrend, editors, International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2011 Annual Report, NASA/TP-2012-217505, 88-91, 2012. H.-G. Scherneck, G. Elgered, J. M. Johansson, and B. O. Rönnäng. Phys. Chem. Earth, Vol. 23, No. 7-8, 811-823, 1998. A. R. Whitney. Ph.D. thesis, Dept. of Electrical engineering, MIT Cambridge, MA., 1974. B. A. Harper, J. D. Kepert, and J. D. Ginger. Guidelines for converting between various wind averaging periods in tropical cyclone conditions. WMO/TD-No. 1555, 64 pp., 2010 (available at \\url{http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/tcp/documents/WMO_TD_1555_en.pdf})

  20. NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Even

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-05

    John Grunsfeld, NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, speaks to students from Mapletown Jr/Sr High School and Margaret Bell Middle School about his experiences on the final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope during the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Event in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters on Monday, May 5, 2014. Grunsfeld flew on three of the five servicing missions to the Hubble Space Telescope. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  1. Space infrared telescope facility project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    The functions undertaken during this reporting period were: to inform the planetary science community of the progress and status of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Project; to solicit input from the planetary science community on needs and requirements of planetary science in the use of SIRTF at such time that it becomes an operational facility; and a white paper was prepared on the use of the SIRTF for solar system studies.

  2. NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Even

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-05

    Dr. Amber Straughn, Lead Scientist for James Webb Space Telescope Education & Public Outreach at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks to students from Mapletown Jr/Sr High School and Margaret Bell Middle School during the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Event in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters on Monday, May 5, 2014 Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  3. CHAIN-project and installation of the flare monitoring telescopes in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Satoru; Shibata, Kazunari; Kimura, Goichi; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Kitai, Reizaburo; Nagata, Shin'ichi

    2007-12-01

    The Flare Monitoring Telescope (FMT) was constructed in 1992 at the Hida Observatory in Japan to investigate the long-term variation of solar activity and explosive events, as a project of the international coordinated observations programme (STEP). The FMT consists of five solar imaging telescopes and one guide telescope. The five telescopes simultaneously observe the full-disk Sun at different wavelengths around H-alpha absorption line or in different modes. Therefore, the FMT can measure the three-dimensional velocity field of moving structures on the full solar disk without the atmospheric seeing effect. The science target of the FMT is to monitor solar flares and erupting filaments continuously all over the solar disk and as many events as possible and to investigate the relationship between such phenomena and space weather. Now we are planning to start a new worldwide project called as ``Continuous H-alpha Imaging Network (CHAIN)-project''. As part of this project, we are examining the possibility of installing telescopes similar to the FMT in developing countries with cooperative help by the United Nations. We have selected Peru as the candidate country where the first oversea FMT will be installed, and are beginning to study the natural environment, the seeing conditions, the proper design of the telescope for Peru and the training and education programme of operating staff, etc.

  4. The Five-Hundred Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (fast) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Rendong; Li, Di; Jin, Chengjin; Wang, Qiming; Zhu, Lichun; Zhu, Wenbai; Zhang, Haiyan; Yue, Youling; Qian, Lei

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. Its innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realize a huge single dish in the most effective way. FAST also represents Chinese contribution in the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Being the most sensitive single dish radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jump-start many science goals, such as surveying the neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way and other galaxies, detecting faint pulsars, looking for the first shining stars, hearing the possible signals from other civilizations, etc. The idea of sitting a large spherical dish in a karst depression is rooted in Arecibo telescope. FAST is an Arecibo-type antenna with three outstanding aspects: the karst depression used as the site, which is large to host the 500-meter telescope and deep to allow a zenith angle of 40 degrees; the active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization and a wide band without involving complex feed systems; and the light-weight feed cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision. The feasibility studies for FAST have been carried out for 14 years, supported by Chinese and world astronomical communities. Funding for FAST has been approved by the National Development and Reform Commission in July of 2007 with a capital budget ~ 700 million RMB. The project time is 5.5 years from the commencement of work in March of 2011 and the first light is expected to be in 2016. This review intends to introduce the project of FAST with emphasis on the recent progress since 2006. In this paper, the subsystems of FAST are described in modest details followed by discussions of the fundamental science goals and examples of early science projects.

  5. NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Even

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-05

    Students and faculty from Mapletown Jr/Sr High School and Margaret Bell Middle School listen as John Grunsfeld, NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, speaks about his experiences on the final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope during the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Event in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters on Monday, May 5, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  6. The Hubble Space Telescope's Student ERO Pilot Project: Implementing Formal and Informal Collaborative Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Ryer, H.; McCallister, D.; Taylor, J.; Bishop, M.

    2010-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Early Release Observations (EROs) were revealed to the public on September 9, 2009, and K-12 students and educators in six states across the country are joining in the celebration. Students and educators in Maryland, Ohio, New York, California, New Mexico, and Delaware have been invited to participate in the Hubble Space Telescope's Student ERO Pilot Project. This is an interdisciplinary project created by STScI's Office of Public Outreach in which students research the four ERO objects and create various types of projects. In recognition of their participation, the projects are displayed at host institutions in each state (museum, science center, school, planetarium or library) during a special public event for participating students, their families, and teachers. As part of its evaluation program, STScI's Office of Public Outreach has been conducting an evaluation of the project to determine the viability and potential of conducting large-scale, formal/informal collaborative projects in the future. This poster will highlight preliminary findings and share lessons learned.

  7. Overview and status of the Giant Magellan Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Patrick J.; Fanson, James; Bernstein, Rebecca; Ashby, David; Bigelow, Bruce; Boyadjian, Nune; Bouchez, Antonin; Chauvin, Eric; Donoso, Eduardo; Filgueira, Jose; Goodrich, Robert; Groark, Frank; Jacoby, George; Pearce, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope Project is in the construction phase. Production of the primary mirror segments is underway with four of the seven required 8.4m mirrors at various stages of completion and materials purchased for segments five and six. Development of the infrastructure at the GMT site at Las Campanas is nearing completion. Power, water, and data connections sufficient to support the construction of the telescope and enclosure are in place and roads to the summit have been widened and graded to support transportation of large and heavy loads. Construction pads for the support buildings have been graded and the construction residence is being installed. A small number of issues need to be resolved before the final design of the telescope structure and enclosure can proceed and the GMT team is collecting the required inputs to the decision making process. Prototyping activities targeted at the active and adaptive optics systems are allowing us to finalize designs before large scale production of components begins. Our technically driven schedule calls for the telescope to be assembled on site in 2022 and to be ready to receive a subset of the primary and secondary mirror optics late in the year. The end date for the project is coupled to the delivery of the final primary mirror segments and the adaptive secondary mirrors that support adaptive optics operations.

  8. The Perkins Telescope in the 21st Century: An NSF PREST Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, K. A.; Buie, M. W.; Bosh, A. S.; Clemens, D. P.; Jackson, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    With the help of a grant under the NSF "Program for Research and Education with Small Telescopes (PREST)," Boston University and Lowell Observatory are engaged in a project to improve the performance of the 1.83-meter Perkins Telescope on Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, Arizona. Our goal is to bring the Perkins Telescope into the 21st century, to create effective resources in support of the scientific and educational missions of our two institutions and the larger community. Over the past several years we have re-instrumented the telescope; two facility-class instruments, Mimir, a wide-field infrared imager, polarimeter and spectrometer and PRISM, an optical counterpart, are now in operation at the Perkins Telescope. The new instrumentation at the Perkins will give our partnership and visiting observers access to an important niche in "observation space" not readily available elsewhere. Wide-field polarimetry and imaging and multi-object low-resolution spectroscopy are now possible across the spectrum from the near uv to the thermal IR. We are well-placed for surveys and synoptic studies, ranging from monitoring polarization variations in blazars to mapping the galactic magnetic field to tracking Kuiper-belt objects. Our PREST project includes four components: Thermal management to improve the seeing at the telescope, upgrades to the instrumentation, productivity enhancements to the facility, and integration of the Boston University access to the telescope into our graduate and undergraduate educational programs. In the first year of the PREST grant we have set up a visitor program (see www.lowell.edu/VisitingObservers/), established a graduate-student-in-residence program, installed fans and ductwork around the telescope and dome to improve seeing, and completed a student-led project to construct an innovative grism for optical spectroscopy based on a volume-phase holographic grating.

  9. The Virtual Telescope Project: Enjoy the Universe from your desktop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, G.

    2008-06-01

    The Virtual Telescope is a new robotic facility that makes possible for people worldwide to participate in real-time observations of the sky. Complete scientific instruments are made available, matching the needs of researchers, students and amateur astronomers. Instruments are controlled live and in real time by the remote user while qualified assistance is made available from a professional astronomer, to assist and address the observing experience. The project consists of several remote controlled and independent telescopes, including solar scopes for daytime observations. Their diameters range from 40-360 mm. The project and the technology involved are presented here, as well as the peculiar benefits for students and other users.

  10. 3.6-m Devasthal Optical Telescope Project: Completion and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Brijesh; Omar, Amitesh; Maheswar, Gopinathan; Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sagar, Ram; Uddin, Wahab; Sanwal, Basant Ballabh; Bangia, Tarun; Kumar, Tripurari Satyanarayana; Yadav, Shobhit; Sahu, Sanjit; Pant, Jayshreekar; Reddy, Bheemireddy Krishna; Gupta, Alok Chandra; Chand, Hum; Pandey, Jeewan Chandra; Joshi, Mohit Kumar; Jaiswar, Mukeshkuma; Nanjappa, Nandish; Purushottam; Yadav, Rama Kant Singh; Sharma, Saurabh; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Joshi, Santosh; Joshi, Yogesh Chandra; Lata, Sneh; Mehdi, Biman Jyoti; Misra, Kuntal; Singh, Mahendra

    2018-04-01

    We present an update on the 3.6-m aperture optical telescope, which has been installed at Devasthal in the year 2016. In this paper, a brief overview of installation activities at site and first results are presented. The 3.6-m Devasthal Optical Telescope project was initiated in 2007 by the Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES; Nainital, India) in partnership with Belgium. The telescope has Ritchey-Chretien optics, an alt-azimuth mount, an active control of the primary and a corrected science field of view of 30' at the Cassegrain focus. The construction of the telescope enclosure building was completed in June 2014 and after successful installation of the telescope. The first engineering light was obtained on 22 March 2015. The on-sky performance of the telescope was carried out till February 2016.

  11. Erratum: The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy R.; Huchra, John P.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Graham, John A.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Macri, Lucas M.; Madore, Barry F.; Sakai, Shoko; Sebo, Kim M.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2000-12-01

    In the article ``The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant'' (ApJ, 529, 786 [2000]), by Jeremy R. Mould, John P. Huchra, Wendy L. Freedman, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Laura Ferrarese, Holland C. Ford, Brad K. Gibson, John A. Graham, Shaun M. G. Hughes, Garth D. Illingworth, Daniel D. Kelson, Lucas M. Macri, Barry F. Madore, Shoko Sakai, Kim M. Sebo, Nancy A. Silbermann, and Peter B. Stetson, some sign errors need to be corrected. 1. In equation (A2) the minus signs should be plus signs. The correct version is Vcosmic=VH+Vc,LG+Vin,Virgo+Vin,GA+Vin,Shap+... 2. In Table A1 the declination of the Great Attractor (GA) is -44°, and that of the Shapley supercluster is -31°, i.e., south declination, not north, as implied in the table. The first error is the authors' and the second occurred in the publication process. In both cases the computer code was correct, and the errors are in the published representation. None of the results presented in the paper are therefore affected in any way. The authors thank Dr. Jim Condon for pointing out the error in equation (A2)

  12. The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, W. L.

    1994-12-01

    One of the major unresolved problems in observational cosmology is the determination of the Hubble Constant, (H_0). The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale aims to provide a measure of H_0 to an accuracy of 10%. Historically the route to H_0 has been plagued by systematic errors; hence there is no quick and easy route to a believeable value of H_0. Achieving plausible error limits of 10% requires careful attention to eliminating potential sources of systematic error. The strategy adopted by the Key Project team is threefold: First, to discover Cepheids in spiral galaxies located in the field and in small groups that are suitable for the calibration of several independent secondary methods. Second, to make direct Cepheid measurements of 3 spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster and 2 members of the Fornax cluster. Third, to provide a check on the the Cepheid distance scale via independent distance estimates to nearby galaxies, and in addition, to undertake an empirical test of the sensitivity of the zero point of the Cepheid PL relation to heavy-element abundances. First results from the HST Key Project will be presented. We have now determined Cepheid distances to 4 galaxies using the HST: these are the nearby galaxies M81 and M101, the edge-on galaxy NGC 925, and the face-on spiral galaxy M100 in the Virgo cluster. Recently we have measured a Cepheid distance for M100 of 17 +/- 2 Mpc, which yields a value of H_0 = 80 +/- 17 km/sec/Mpc. This work was carried out in collaboration with the other members of the HST Key Project team, R. Kennicutt, J. Mould, F. Bresolin, S. Faber, L. Ferrarese, H. Ford, J. Graham, J. Gunn, M. Han, P. Harding, J. Hoessel, R. Hill, J. Huchra, S. Hughes, G. Illingworth, D. Kelson, B. Madore, R. Phelps, A. Saha, N. Silbermann, P. Stetson, and A. Turner.

  13. The Atacama Large Aperture Submm/mm Telescope (AtLAST) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Frank

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade a strong case has been made for the construction of a next generation, 25 to 40-meter large submillimeter telescope, most notably through the CCAT and the Japanese LST projects. Although much effort had been spent on detailed science cases and technological studies, none of these projects have yet secured funding to advance to construction. We invite the interested community to join a study of the scientific merit, technical implementation, and financial path toward what we coin the "Atacama Large Submillimeter Telescope" (AtLAST). Through this community workshop, working groups, and a final report to be released in early 2019, we hope to motivate the global astronomy community to value and support the realization of such a facility.

  14. Cooperative educational project for optical technicians utilizing amateur telescope making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In the modern optical shop, technicians are typically skilled machine operators who work on only one phase of the manufacture for each and every component. The product is designed, specified, methodized, scheduled and integrated by people off the shop floor. Even at the component level, the people inside the shop usually see only one stage of completion. In an effort to make the relevance of their work visible; to demonstrate competence to their peers; to gain appreciation for the work of others; and to give them a meaningful connection with the functions of optical systems, I created "The Telescope Project" for my former employer. I invited those interested to participate in an after-hours, partially subsidized project to build telescopes for themselves. The ground-rules included that we would all make the same design (thus practicing consensus and configuration management); that we would all work on every phase (thus learning from each other); and that we would obtain our parts by random lot at the end (thus making quality assurance a personal issue). In the process the participating technicians learned about optical theory, design, tolerancing, negotiation, scheduling, purchasing, fabrication, coating and assembly. They developed an appreciation for each other's contributions and a broader perspective on the consequences of their actions. In the end, each obtained a high-quality telescope for his or her personal use. Several developed an abiding love for astronomy. The project generated much interest from technicians who didn"t initially choose to participate. In this paper I describe the project in detail.

  15. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Key Project: the Birth and Death of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Backman, Dana

    1999-01-01

    This program was designed to continue to analyze observations of stars thought to be forming protoplanets, using the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, as one of NASA Key Projects with ISO. A particular class of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) discovered stars, known after the prototype, Vega, are principal targets for these observations aimed at examining the evidence for processes involved in forming, or failing to form, planetary systems around other stars. In addition, this program continued to provide partial support for related science in the WIRE, SOFIA and Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) projects, plus approved ISO supplementary time observations under programs MCREE1 29 and VEGADMAP. Their goals include time dependent changes in SWS spectra of Long Period Variable stars and PHOT P32 mapping experiments of recognized protoplanetary disk candidate stars.

  16. Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) project: progress and status after 2 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiring, Jacobus G.; Buckley, David A. H.; Lomberg, Michael C.; Stobie, Robert S.

    2003-02-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a 10-m class optical/IR segmented mirror telescope based on the groundbreaking, low cost, Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) design. Approval to construct and operate SALT, which will be the largest single optical telescope in the Southern Hemisphere, was given by the South African Government in November 1999, after sufficient guarantees of matching funding from international partners were secured. Facility construction started in January 2001, and SALT is due to start operations by December 2004. SALT will enable a quantum leap in astronomical research capability in Southern Africa, and indeed the continent, where currently the largest telescope is a modest 1.9-m, dating to the 1940s. A substantial amount of design work for SALT has been completed, sourced from multiple suppliers, with ~60% South African content. South African industry is well equipped to handle the construction of most of the telescope, the exceptions being the glass ceramic mirror blanks (from LZOS in Russia), the polishing and ion figuring of these (Eastman Kodak in the USA), and fabrication of the four-element spherical aberration corrector (SAGEM in France). This paper will present (1) the scientific requirements, (2) the specified performance of SALT, (3) the basic design, with emphasis on the innovative modifications to the HET design that enable significantly improved performance, (4) the progress and status of the project, currently in its construction phase, (5) the first generation instrument suite, (6) the management and organisation of the project and (7) the international partnership in SALT.

  17. Investigation into the Potential of Investigative Projects Involving Powerful Robotic Telescopes to Inspire Interest in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Faulkes Telescope Project and its educational aims are briefly summarised. Research to evaluate its impact in inspiring excitement and interest among students is described. The Faulkes Telescope in Hawaii was used to provide images for assessed coursework based on two of the Faulkes "education/research" projects on galaxies.…

  18. Managing a big ground-based astronomy project: the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gary H.

    2008-07-01

    TMT is a big science project and its scale is greater than previous ground-based optical/infrared telescope projects. This paper will describe the ideal "linear" project and how the TMT project departs from that ideal. The paper will describe the needed adaptations to successfully manage real world complexities. The progression from science requirements to a reference design, the development of a product-oriented Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and an organization that parallels the WBS, the implementation of system engineering, requirements definition and the progression through Conceptual Design to Preliminary Design will be summarized. The development of a detailed cost estimate structured by the WBS, and the methodology of risk analysis to estimate contingency fund requirements will be summarized. Designing the project schedule defines the construction plan and, together with the cost model, provides the basis for executing the project guided by an earned value performance measurement system.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The Hubble Space Telescope in a picture snapped by a Servicing Mission 4 crewmember just after the Space Shuttle Atlantis captured Hubble with its robotic arm on May 13, 2009, beginning the mission to upgrade and repair the telescope. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute conducts Hubble science operations. Goddard is responsible for HST project management, including mission and science operations, servicing missions, and all associated development activities. To learn more about the Hubble Space Telescope go here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html

  20. The Genesis Project: Science Cases for a Large Submm Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    The formation of stars is intimately linked to the structure and evolution of molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. In the context of the ANR/DFG project GENESIS (GENeration and Evolution of Structures in the Ism, http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/node/965), we explore this link with a new approach by combining far-infrared maps and surveys of dust (Herschel) and cooling lines (CII, CI, CO, OI with SOFIA), with molecular line maps. Dedicated analysis tools are used to characterise molecular cloud structure, and we explore the coupling of turbulence with heating- and cooling processes. The project gathers a large observational data set, from molecular line maps at (sub)-mm wavelengths from ground-based telescopes (e.g. IRAM) up to high-frequency airborne spectroscopic and continuum observations (SOFIA). Nevertheless, we identified the need for a large single-dish submm telescope, operating in the southern hemisphere at high frequencies. Only such an instrument is able to observe important ISM cooling lines, like the CI lines at 490 and 810 GHz or high-J CO lines, shock tracers, or probes of turbulence dissipation with high angular resolution in Galactic and extragalactic sources. We will discuss possible science cases and demonstrate how those are addressed within GENESIS, and the science done with the new 6m Cologne-Cornell CCAT-prime submm telescope.

  1. The SOAR Telescope Project Southern Observatory for Astronomical Research (SOAR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-21

    completed SOAR dome and facility. 2. Dome The preliminary design of the dome was handled by M3 (US). A Brazilian firm, Equatorial Sistemas led the...for the Gemini Telescope during construction, now Project Manager at the National Solar Observatory • Robert Shelton, Provost of the University on

  2. The EEE Project: a sparse array of telescopes for the measurement of cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rocca, P.; Abbrescia, M.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini, L.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Batignani, G.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccetti, F.; Coccia, E.; Corvaglia, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Fattibene, E.; Ferraro, A.; Frolov, V.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Grazzi, S.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Liciulli, F.; Maggiora, A.; Maragoto Rodriguez, O.; Maron, G.; Martelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Miozzi, S.; Nania, R.; Noferini, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Panareo, M.; Panetta, M.; Paoletti, R.; Park, W.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Rizzi, M.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Schioppa, M.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stori, L.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Visnyei, O. B.; Vistoli, M. C.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zani, S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is meant to be the most extensive experiment to detect secondary cosmic particles in Italy. To this aim, more than 50 telescopes have been built at CERN and installed in high schools distributed all over the Italian territory. Each EEE telescope comprises three large area Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) and is capable of reconstructing the trajectories of the charged particles traversing it with a good angular resolution. The excellent performance of the EEE telescopes allows a large variety of studies, from measuring the local muon flux in a single telescope, to detecting extensive air showers producing time correlations in the same metropolitan area, to searching for large-scale correlations between showers detected in telescopes tens, hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. In addition to its scientific goal, the EEE Project also has an educational and outreach objective, its aim being to motivate young people by involving them directly in a real experiment. High school students and teachers are involved in the construction, testing and start-up of the EEE telescope in their school, then in its maintenance and data-acquisition, and later in the analysis of the data. During the last couple of years a great boost has been given to the EEE Project through the organization of simultaneous and centralized data taking with the whole telescope array. The raw data from all telescopes are transferred to CNAF (Bologna), where they are reconstructed and stored. The data are currently being analyzed, looking at various topics: variation of the rate of cosmic muons with time, upward going muons, muon lifetime, search for anisotropies in the muon angular distribution and for time coincidences between stations. In this paper an overall description of the experiment is given, including the design, construction and performance of the telescopes. The operation of the whole array is also presented by showing the most recent

  3. The Cherenkov Telescope Array: Exploring the Very-high-energy Sky from ESO's Paranal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, W.

    2017-06-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a next-generation observatory for ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, using the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique to detect and reconstruct gamma-ray induced air showers. The CTA project is planning to deploy 19 telescopes on its northern La Palma site, and 99 telescopes on its southern site at Paranal, covering the 20 GeV to 300 TeV energy domain and offering vastly improved performance compared to currently operating Cherenkov telescopes. The combination of three different telescope sizes (23-, 12- and 4-metre) allows cost-effective coverage of the wide energy range. CTA will be operated as a user facility, dividing observation time between a guest observer programme and large Key Science Projects (KSPs), and the data will be made public after a one-year proprietary period. The history of the project, the implementation of the arrays, and some of the major science goals and KSPs, are briefly summarised.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. 1: The discovery of Cepheids and a new distance to M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Madore, Barry F.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Stetson, Peter; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Turner, Anne; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland

    1994-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 30 new Cepheids in the nearby galaxy M81 based on observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The periods of these Cepheids lie in the range of 10-55 days, based on 18 independent epochs using the HST wide-band F555W filter. The HST F555W and F785LP data have been transformed to the Cousins standard V and I magnitude system using a ground-based calibration. Apparent period-luminosity relations at V and I were constructed, from which apparent distance moduli were measured with respect to assumed values of mu(sub 0) = 18.50 mag and E(B - V) = 0.10 mag for the Large Magellanic Cloud. The difference in the apparent V and I moduli yields a measure of the difference in the total mean extinction between the M81 and the LMC Cepheid samples. A low total mean extinction to the M81 sample of E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.05 mag is obtained. The true distance modulus to M81 is determined to be 27.80 +/- 0.20 mag, corresponding to a distance of 3.63 +/- 0.34 Mpc. These data illustrate that with an optimal (power-law) sampling strategy, the HST provides a powerful tool for the discovery of extragalactic Cepheids and their application to the distance scale. M81 is the first calibrating galaxy in the target sample of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, the ultimate aim of which is to provide a value of the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy.

  5. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  7. Gemini base facility operations environmental monitoring: key systems and tools for the remote operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, Martin; Serio, Andrew; Meza, Francisco; Arriagada, Gustavo; Swett, Hector; Ball, Jesse; Collins, Paul; Masuda, Neal; Fuentes, Javier

    2016-07-01

    In 2014 Gemini Observatory started the base facility operations (BFO) project. The project's goal was to provide the ability to operate the two Gemini telescopes from their base facilities (respectively Hilo, HI at Gemini North, and La Serena, Chile at Gemini South). BFO was identified as a key project for Gemini's transition program, as it created an opportunity to reduce operational costs. In November 2015, the Gemini North telescope started operating from the base facility in Hilo, Hawaii. In order to provide the remote operator the tools to work from the base, many of the activities that were normally performed by the night staff at the summit were replaced with new systems and tools. This paper describes some of the key systems and tools implemented for environmental monitoring, and the design used in the implementation at the Gemini North telescope.

  8. SiPM detectors for the ASTRI project in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billotta, Sergio; Marano, Davide; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Romeo, Giuseppe; Timpanaro, Maria Cristina; Maccarone, Maria Concetta C.; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Impiombato, Domenico; Gargano, Carmelo; Giarrusso, Salavtore

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a worldwide new generation project aimed at realizing an array of a hundred ground based gamma-ray telescopes. ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is the Italian project whose primary target is the development of an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of the CTA small size class of telescopes devoted to investigation of the highest energy region, from 1 to 100 TeV. Next target is the implementation of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array based on seven identical telescopes. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are the semiconductor photosensor devices designated to constitute the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescopes. SiPM photosensors are suitable for the detection of the Cherenkov flashes, since they are very fast and sensitive to the light in the 300-700nm wavelength spectrum. Their drawbacks compared to the traditional photomultiplier tubes are high dark count rates, after-pulsing and optical cross-talk contributions, and intrinsic gains strongly dependent on temperature. Nonetheless, for a single pixel, the dark count rate is well below the Night Sky Background, the effects of cross-talk and afterpulses are typically lower than 20%, and the gain can be kept stable against temperature variations by means of adequate bias voltage compensation strategies. This work presents and discusses some experimental results from a large set of measurements performed on the SiPM sensors to be used for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera and on recently developed detectors demonstrating outstanding performance for the future evolution of the project in the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  9. The South Pole Telescope

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope willmore » be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.« less

  10. Calvin-Rehoboth Robotic Twin Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarsma, D. B.; Molnar, L. A.; VanBaak, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The astronomy program at Calvin College, like many small colleges, is limited by poor weather and light pollution at its midwestern campus and by limited free time on the part of its astronomy faculty. Nonetheless we believe direct access to the physical universe is key to the science education both of science majors and nonmajors. Recent advances in hardware and software for modest robotic telescopes have made it possible for colleges like ours to incorporate the use of a remote bservatory into our curriculum within typical financial and time constraints. In this poster we make our first report on the installation of two robotic telescopes (one on campus and one at a remote site in New Mexico) using largely off-the-shelf components. Students learn first with the local telescope in order to understand the equipment and procedures, but obtain the majority of their data with the remote telescope. Equipment development is done first with the local telescope, and then implemented on the remote telescope (where time spent in development is difficult). We received an NSF CCLI grant and matching college funds in the summer of 2002. The local telescope was installed in the spring of 2003, and the New Mexico telescope was ready for remote operation in January 2004. Our poster will describe our equipment choices, including a few components (such as an equipment rack for the back end of the telescope) which we designed ourselves. It will also detail classroom use of the equipment in its first two semesters by students at a range of levels. A copy of the poster and many additional details of the project are available on the Calvin observatory website, http://www.calvin.edu/observatory/.

  11. Contextual Student Learning through Authentic Asteroid Research Projects using a Robotic Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoette, Vivian L.; Puckett, Andrew W.; Linder, Tyler R.; Heatherly, Sue Ann; Rector, Travis A.; Haislip, Joshua B.; Meredith, Kate; Caughey, Austin L.; Brown, Johnny E.; McCarty, Cameron B.; Whitmore, Kevin T.

    2015-11-01

    Skynet is a worldwide robotic telescope network operated by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with active observing sites on 3 continents. The queue-based observation request system is simple enough to be used by middle school students, but powerful enough to supply data for research scientists. The Skynet Junior Scholars program, funded by the NSF, has teamed up with professional astronomers to engage students from middle school to undergraduates in authentic research projects, from target selection through image analysis and publication of results. Asteroid research is a particularly fruitful area for youth collaboration that reinforces STEM education standards and can allow students to make real contributions to scientific knowledge, e.g., orbit refinement through astrometric submissions to the Minor Planet Center. We have created a set of projects for youth to: 1. Image an asteroid, make a movie, and post it to a gallery; 2. Measure the asteroid’s apparent motion using the Afterglow online image processor; and 3. Image asteroids from two or more telescopes simultaneously to demonstrate parallax. The apparent motion and parallax projects allow students to estimate the distance to their asteroid, as if they were the discoverer of a brand new object in the solar system. Older students may take on advanced projects, such as analyzing uncertainties in asteroid orbital parameters; studying impact probabilities of known objects; observing time-sensitive targets such as Near Earth Asteroids; and even discovering brand new objects in the solar system.Images are acquired from among seven Skynet telescopes in North Carolina, California, Wisconsin, Canada, Australia, and Chile, as well as collaborating observatories such as WestRock in Columbus, Georgia; Stone Edge in El Verano, California; and Astronomical Research Institute in Westfield, Illinois.

  12. The Chrysalis Opens? Photometry from the η Carinae Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Project, 2002-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.; Davidson, Kris; Koppelman, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    During the past decade η Car has brightened markedly, possibly indicating a change of state. Here we summarize photometry gathered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as part of the HST Treasury Project on this object. Our data include Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) CCD acquisition images, Advanced Camera for Surveys HRC images in four filters, and synthetic photometry in flux-calibrated STIS spectra. The HST's spatial resolution allows us to examine the central star separate from the bright circumstellar ejecta. Its apparent brightness continued to increase briskly during 2002-2006, especially after the mid-2003 spectroscopic event. If this trend continues, the central star will soon become brighter than its ejecta, quite different from the state that existed only a few years ago. One precedent may be the rapid change observed in 1938-1953. We conjecture that the star's mass-loss rate has been decreasing throughout the past century. This research was conducted as part of the η Car Hubble Space Telescope Treasury project via grant GO-9973 from the Space Telescope Science Institute. HST is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Some of the data presented in this paper were obtained from the Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NAG5-7584 and by other grants and contracts.

  13. The MEarth Project: Status Update and the Commissioning of a Brand New Telescope Array in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason

    2014-06-01

    The MEarth Project is an ongoing all-sky survey for Earth-like planets transiting the closest, smallest M dwarfs. MEarth aims to find good targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST and the next generation of enormous ground-based telescopes. MEarth's yearly data releases, containing precise light curves of nearby mid-to-late M dwarfs, provide a unique window into the photometric variability of the stars that will forever be among the most interesting targets in the search for potentially habitable exoplanets. We present a status update on the MEarth Project, including a detailed map of the progress we’ve made so far with 8 telescopes in the Northern hemisphere and promising early results from our new installation of 8 more telescopes in the Southern hemisphere.

  14. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescopes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Per Astro2010, a new, larger UVO telescope is needed to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as: is there life on Earth-like exoplanets; how galaxies assemble stellar populations; how baryonic matter interacts with intergalactic medium; and how solar systems form and evolve. And, present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVO concept. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a funded SAT project. Our objective is to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. One of our key accomplishments is that we have derived engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicle and its inherent mass and volume constraints. We defined and initiated a program to mature 6 key technologies required to fabricate monolithic and segmented space mirrors.

  15. Radio Telescopes Provide Key Clue on Black Hole Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Astronomers have discovered the strongest evidence yet found indicating that matter is being ejected by a medium-sized black hole, providing valuable insight on a process that may have been key to the development of larger black holes in the early Universe. The scientists combined the power of all the operational telescopes of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) to peer deep into the heart of the galaxy NGC 4395, 14 million light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici. NGC 4395 Core VLBI image of extended radio emission from core of NGC 4395, indicating suspected outflow powered by black hole CREDIT: Wrobel & Ho, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for larger file Optical (visible light) image of NGC 4395 See here for detail and credit information for optical image. "We are seeing in this relatively nearby galaxy a process that may have been responsible for building intermediate-mass black holes into supermassive ones in the early Universe," said Joan Wrobel, an NRAO scientist in Socorro, NM. Wrobel and Luis Ho of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Pasadena, CA, presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, WA. Black holes are concentrations of matter so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravitational pull. The black hole in NGC 4395 is about 400,000 times more massive than the Sun. This puts it in a rarely-seen intermediate range between the supermassive black holes at the cores of many galaxies, which have masses millions to billions of times that of the Sun, and stellar-mass black holes only a few times more massive than the Sun. Energetic outflows of matter are common to both the supermassive and the stellar-mass black holes, but the new radio observations of NGC 4395 provided the first direct image of such a suspected outflow from an intermediate-mass black hole. The outflows presumably are generated by little

  16. History of optical theory of reflecting telescopes and implications for future projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Raymond N.

    1997-03-01

    This contribution, The History of Optical Theory of Reflecting Telescopes and Implications for Future Projects, is a shortened form of the Karl Schwarzschild lecture given in Bochum in September 1993. Some material has been added from an invited paper given in Padua in December 1992. For a full account, with figures and tables, the reader is referred to these two papers.

  17. RTML: remote telescope markup language and you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    2001-12-01

    In order to coordinate the use of robotic and remotely operated telescopes in networks -- like Göttingen's MOnitoring NEtwork of Telescopes (MONET) -- a standard format for the exchange of observing requests and reports is needed. I describe the benefits of Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML), an XML-based protocol originally developed by the Hands-On Universe Project, which is being used and further developed by several robotic telescope projects and firms.

  18. The Travelling Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabona Oduori, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for more than 400 years, and through good use of it scientists have made many astonishing discoveries and begun to understand our place in the universe. Most people, however, have never looked through one. Yet it is a great tool for cool science and observation especially in a continent and country with beautifully dark skies. The Travelling Telescope project aims to invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky.The Travelling Telescope aims to promote science learning to a wide range of Kenyan schools in various locations exchanging knowledge about the sky through direct observations of celestial bodies using state of the art telescopes. In addition to direct observing we also teach science using various hands-on activities and astronomy software, ideal for explaining concepts which are hard to understand, and for a better grasp of the sights visible through the telescope. We are dedicated to promoting science using astronomy especially in schools, targeting children from as young as 3 years to the youth, teachers, their parents and members of the public. Our presentation focuses on the OAD funded project in rural coastal Kenya.

  19. Global Astrophysical Telescope System - GATS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polińska, M.; Kamiński, K.; Dimitrov, W.; Fagas, M.; Borczyk, W.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Baranowski, R.; Bartczak, P.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2014-02-01

    The Global Astronomical Telescope System is a project managed by the Astronomical Observatory Institute of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland) and it is primarily intended for stellar medium/high resolution spectroscopy. The system will be operating as a global network of robotic telescopes. The GATS consists of two telescopes: PST 1 in Poland (near Poznań) and PST 2 in the USA (Arizona). The GATS project is also intended to cooperate with the BRITE satellites and supplement their photometry with spectroscopic observations.

  20. Telescope networking and user support via Remote Telescope Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, Frederic V.; Pennypacker, Carlton R.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Tuparev, Georg

    2004-09-01

    Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML) is an XML-based interface/document format designed to facilitate the exchange of astronomical observing requests and results between investigators and observatories as well as within networks of observatories. While originally created to support simple imaging telescope requests (Versions 1.0-2.1), RTML Version 3.0 now supports a wide range of applications, from request preparation, exposure calculation, spectroscopy, and observation reports to remote telescope scheduling, target-of-opportunity observations and telescope network administration. The elegance of RTML is that all of this is made possible using a public XML Schema which provides a general-purpose, easily parsed, and syntax-checked medium for the exchange of astronomical and user information while not restricting or otherwise constraining the use of the information at either end. Thus, RTML can be used to connect heterogeneous systems and their users without requiring major changes in existing local resources and procedures. Projects as very different as a number of advanced amateur observatories, the global Hands-On Universe project, the MONET network (robotic imaging), the STELLA consortium (robotic spectroscopy), and the 11-m Southern African Large Telescope are now using or intending to use RTML in various forms and for various purposes.

  1. Pro-am collaborations with the Faulkes Telescopes, and the benefit to education, science and outreach awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, N.; Miles, R.; Roche, P.

    2013-09-01

    The Faulkes Telescope Project is an educational and research arm of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGTN). It has two 2-metre robotic telescopes, located at Haleakala on Maui (FT North) and Siding Spring in Australia (FT South). It is planned for these telescopes to be complemented by a research network of multiple 1-metre telescopes, along with an educational network of multiple 0.4-metre telescopes, providing 24-hour coverage of both northern and southern hemispheres. The telescope network is unique in that it provides school students with access to research grade instrumentation in the United Kingdom and several other countries across Europe as well as in Hawaii. Over the past few years, amateur astronomers have increasingly been working with schools suggesting projects which have provided valuable scientific input to professional astronomers. This poster aims to present several of the key results and observations where professional astronomers have cited and used this data obtained with the Faulkes Telescope, notably - Observations and results from the global campaign on Comet C/2007 Q3 ; Ref.[2] - Observations of the fragmentation of Comet 168P; Ref.[3] - Observations relating to the evolution of Comet C/2012 S1; Ref.[4] - Observations and imaging of the Jupiter-family comet, P/2010 TO20; Ref.[5

  2. European Extremely Large Telescope: progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2014-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope is a project of the European Southern Observatory to build and operate a 40-m class optical near-infrared telescope. The telescope design effort is largely concluded and construction contracts are being placed with industry and academic/research institutes for the various components. The siting of the telescope in Northern Chile close to the Paranal site allows for an integrated operation of the facility providing significant economies. The progress of the project in various areas is presented in this paper and references to other papers at this SPIE meeting are made.

  3. The ARC (Astrophysical Research Consortium) telescope project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. S.

    A consortium of universities intends to construct a 3.5 meter optical-infrared telescope at a site in south-central New Mexico. The use of innovative mirror technology, a fast primary, and an alt-azimuth mounting results in a compact and lightweight instrument. This telescope will be uniquely well-suited for addressing certain observational programs by virtue of its capability for fully remote operation and rapid instrument changes.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. 6: Properties of the metal-rich systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Petitjean, Patrick; Sargent, W. L. W.; Bahcall, John N.; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Savage, Blair D.; Schneider, Donald P.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of a sample of 18 metal-rich, low-redshift z(sub abs) much less than z(sub em) absorbers seen in low- and medium-resolution spectra obtained for the Quasar Absorption Line Key Project with the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS). For most of the C IV and Lyman-limit systems, observations in the optical wavelength range of the expected associated Mg II absorption are available. As at high redshift (z approximately 2), there are two subclasses of absorbers which are characterized by the presence or absence of MG II absorption. However, some low-redshift Mg II and Fe absorptions originate from regions optically thin to UV ionizing photons and thus, at low redshift, the low-ionization systems do not always trace high opacities, as is the case at high redshift. This implies that the mean ionization state of metal-rich, optically thin absorbing clouds falls with decreasing redshift, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the gas is photoionized by the metagalactic UV background radiation field. Two main constraints are derived from the analysis of the Lyman-limit sample, assuming photoionization models are valid. First, a low opacity to ionizing photons (tau(sub LL) approximately less than 1), as observed for several Mg II-Fe II systems at z approximately 0.5, sets limits on the ionization level of hydrogen, thus on the total hydrogen column density and the heavy element abundances, (Z/H) approximately -0.5 to -0.3. Second, the dimensions of individual Mg II clouds are smaller than at high redshift by a factor 3-10. At z approximately greater than 0.6, the O VI absorption doublet is detected in four of the five z(sub abs) much less than z(sub em) systems for which the O VI wavelength range has been observed, whereas the associated N V doublet is detected in only two cases. This suggests that the presence of a high-ionization O VI phase is a general property of z approximately 0.6-1 absorption systems

  5. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project management control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Jeffrey P.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program is jointly funded by the NSF, the DOE, and private institutions and donors. From an NSF funding standpoint, the LSST is a Major Research Equipment and Facilities (MREFC) project. The NSF funding process requires proposals and D&D reviews to include activity-based budgets and schedules; documented basis of estimates; risk-based contingency analysis; cost escalation and categorization. "Out-of-the box," the commercial tool Primavera P6 contains approximately 90% of the planning and estimating capability needed to satisfy R&D phase requirements, and it is customizable/configurable for remainder with relatively little effort. We describe the customization/configuration and use of Primavera for the LSST Project Management Control System (PMCS), assess our experience to date, and describe future directions. Examples in this paper are drawn from the LSST Data Management System (DMS), which is one of three main subsystems of the LSST and is funded by the NSF. By astronomy standards the LSST DMS is a large data management project, processing and archiving over 70 petabyes of image data, producing over 20 petabytes of catalogs annually, and generating 2 million transient alerts per night. Over the 6-year construction and commissioning phase, the DM project is estimated to require 600,000 hours of engineering effort. In total, the DMS cost is approximately 60% hardware/system software and 40% labor.

  6. Rival giant telescopes join to seek U.S. funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Two U.S.-led giant telescope projects, rivals for nearly 2 decades, announced this week that they have agreed to join forces. The Giant Magellan Telescope, a 25-meter telescope under construction in Chile, and the Thirty Meter Telescope, which backers hope to build atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii, are still short of partners and money. They will now work together to win funding from the National Science Foundation, which could help the projects catch up to a third giant telescope, the 39-meter European Extremely Large Telescope, due to begin operations in 2024. It is a historic peace accord to end a conflict that has divided funders and delayed both projects. The partnership commits the two projects to developing a joint plan that would allow astronomers from any institution to use the telescopes; under previous plans observing time was available only to researchers from nations or institutions that had provided funding. The projects are discussing awarding at least 25% of each telescope's time to nonpartners through a competitive process to be administered by the National Center for Optical-Infrared Astronomy—an umbrella organization that will replace the National Optical Astronomy Observatory sometime in fiscal year 2019. Telescope backers hope the public access plan will help persuade the federal government to pay for at least 25% of the total cost of the two facilities, a share that could reach $1 billion.

  7. Instrumentation for single-dish observations with The Greenland Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Paul K.; Asada, K.; Blundell, R.; Burgos, R.; Chang, H.-H.; Chen, M. T.; Goldie, D.; Groppi, C.; Han, C. C.; Ho, P. T. P.; Huang, Y. D.; Inoue, M.; Kubo, D.; Koch, P.; Leech, J.; de Lera Acedo, E.; Martin-Cocher, P.; Nishioka, H.; Nakamura, M.; Matsushita, S.; Paine, S. N.; Patel, N.; Raffin, P.; Snow, W.; Sridharan, T. K.; Srinivasan, R.; Thomas, C. N.; Tong, E.; Wang, M.-J.; Wheeler, C.; Withington, S.; Yassin, G.; Zeng, L.-Z.

    2014-07-01

    The Greenland Telescope project will deploy and operate a 12m sub-millimeter telescope at the highest point of the Greenland i e sheet. The Greenland Telescope project is a joint venture between the Smithsonian As- trophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA). In this paper we discuss the concepts, specifications, and science goals of the instruments being developed for single-dish observations with the Greenland Telescope, and the coupling optics required to couple both them and the mm-VLBI receivers to antenna. The project will outfit the ALMA North America prototype antenna for Arctic operations and deploy it to Summit Station,1 a NSF operated Arctic station at 3,100m above MSL on the Greenland I e Sheet. This site is exceptionally dry, and promises to be an excellent site for sub-millimeter astronomical observations. The main science goal of the Greenland Telescope is to carry out millimeter VLBI observations alongside other telescopes in Europe and the Americas, with the aim of resolving the event horizon of the super-massive black hole at the enter of M87. The Greenland Telescope will also be outfitted for single-dish observations from the millimeter-wave to Tera-hertz bands. In this paper we will discuss the proposed instruments that are currently in development for the Greenland Telescope - 350 GHz and 650 GHz heterodyne array receivers; 1.4 THz HEB array receivers and a W-band bolometric spectrometer. SAO is leading the development of two heterodyne array instruments for the Greenland Telescope, a 48- pixel, 325-375 GHz SIS array receiver, and a 4 pixel, 1.4 THz HEB array receiver. A key science goal for these instruments is the mapping of ortho and para H2D+ in old protostellar ores, as well as general mapping of CO and other transitions in molecular louds. An 8-pixel prototype module for the 350 GHz array is currently being built for laboratory and operational testing on the Greenland Telescope

  8. The James Webb Space Telescope: Inspiration and Context for Physics and Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Dan; Johnston, Tania; Davies, John

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the design, delivery, evaluation and impact of a CPD course for physics and chemistry teachers. A key aim of the course was to use the context of the James Webb Space Telescope project to inspire teachers and lead to enriched teaching of STEM subjects. (Contains 1 box and 3 figures.)

  9. Amateur Telescope Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, Stephen

    Many amateur astronomers make their own instruments, either because of financial considerations or because they are just interested. Amateur Telescope Making offers a variety of designs for telescopes, mounts and drives which are suitable for the home-constructor. The designs range from simple to advanced, but all are within the range of a moderately well-equipped home workshop. The book not only tells the reader what he can construct, but also what it is sensible to construct given what time is available commercially. Thus each chapter begins with reasons for undertaking the project, then looks at theoretical consideration before finishing with practical instructions and advice. An indication is given as to the skills required for the various projects. Appendices list reputable sources of (mail order) materials and components. The telescopes and mounts range from "shoestring" (very cheap) instruments to specialist devices that are unavailable commercially.

  10. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Dollinger, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    Multivariable parametric cost models for space telescopes provide several benefits to designers and space system project managers. They identify major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades. They enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment. And, they provide a basis for estimating total project cost. A survey of historical models found that there is no definitive space telescope cost model. In fact, published models vary greatly [1]. Thus, there is a need for parametric space telescopes cost models. An effort is underway to develop single variable [2] and multi-variable [3] parametric space telescope cost models based on the latest available data and applying rigorous analytical techniques. Specific cost estimating relationships (CERs) have been developed which show that aperture diameter is the primary cost driver for large space telescopes; technology development as a function of time reduces cost at the rate of 50% per 17 years; it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; and increasing mass reduces cost.

  11. Writing a success story: lessons learned from the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Roellig, T. L.; Werner, M. W.

    2010-08-01

    A key to the success of the Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly SIRTF) Mission was a unique management structure that promoted open communication and collaboration among scientific, engineering, and contractor personnel at all levels of the project. This helped us to recruit and maintain the very best people to work on Spitzer. We describe the management concept that led to the success of the mission. Specific examples of how the project benefited from the communication and reporting structure, and lessons learned about technology are described.

  12. The Role of the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project in Promoting Scientific Efficacy among Middle and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibe, Mary; Deutscher, Rebecca

    This study investigated the effects on student scientific efficacy after participation in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project. In the GAVRT program, students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the telescope and analyze real data. Scientific efficacy is a type of self-knowledge a person uses to…

  13. Systems engineering implementation in the preliminary design phase of the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiten, J.; Johns, M.; Trancho, G.; Sawyer, D.; Mady, P.

    2012-09-01

    Like many telescope projects today, the 24.5-meter Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is truly a complex system. The primary and secondary mirrors of the GMT are segmented and actuated to support two operating modes: natural seeing and adaptive optics. GMT is a general-purpose telescope supporting multiple science instruments operated in those modes. GMT is a large, diverse collaboration and development includes geographically distributed teams. The need to implement good systems engineering processes for managing the development of systems like GMT becomes imperative. The management of the requirements flow down from the science requirements to the component level requirements is an inherently difficult task in itself. The interfaces must also be negotiated so that the interactions between subsystems and assemblies are well defined and controlled. This paper will provide an overview of the systems engineering processes and tools implemented for the GMT project during the preliminary design phase. This will include requirements management, documentation and configuration control, interface development and technical risk management. Because of the complexity of the GMT system and the distributed team, using web-accessible tools for collaboration is vital. To accomplish this GMTO has selected three tools: Cognition Cockpit, Xerox Docushare, and Solidworks Enterprise Product Data Management (EPDM). Key to this is the use of Cockpit for managing and documenting the product tree, architecture, error budget, requirements, interfaces, and risks. Additionally, drawing management is accomplished using an EPDM vault. Docushare, a documentation and configuration management tool is used to manage workflow of documents and drawings for the GMT project. These tools electronically facilitate collaboration in real time, enabling the GMT team to track, trace and report on key project metrics and design parameters.

  14. Exploring Galileo's Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, Samuele; Terzuoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    In the first months of 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, the authors developed an educational project for middle-level students connected with the first astronomical discoveries that Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) made 400 years ago. The project included the construction of a basic telescope and the observation of the Moon. The project, if…

  15. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold <50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral field units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's key science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and mission status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limited down to a wavelength of 2 microns. The MIRI instrument just completed its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  16. Look to the Stars - The APUS Observatory: An Innovative Robotic Telescope for Online Astronomical Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward

    2018-01-01

    We report on the American Public University System’s new robotic telescope, located in Charles Town, WV -- an innovative observatory deployed in an online institution of higher education. The instrument is operated by the Department of Space Studies and is situated atop the university’s new Information Technology building. At the heart of the observatory is a Planewave CDK24 telescope, equipped with a SBIG STX-16803 CCD camera. The telescope is a key technological component in the Department's new undergraduate / graduate astronomy concentration. Since the university is a dedicated online educational institution, the acquisition of a fully remote controlled telescope ties closely into the program's philosophy of quality online instruction. Our robotic observatory is intimately integrated into our astronomy curriculum, with the telescope being utilized for original astronomical education and research purposes. For instance, not only is imagery used in the classroom and for laboratory instruction, graduate students in our MS degree program have an opportunity to collect original telescopic data for research / thesis projects. Examples of ongoing investigations with the telescope include observations of exoplanet transits and variable star photometry. When not in use for specific observing projects, the telescope is scripted to conduct autonomous supernova searches by patrolling dozens of galaxies throughout the night. Our goal is to have the instrument scheduled for continuous observing of the heavens throughout the year on all clear evenings.

  17. University of Texas 7.6 meter telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T. G., III

    1982-10-01

    The University of Texas very large optical telescope design is fundamentally constrained by the requirements of completion by the late 1980s and costs within the range of private philanthropy. In light of these requirements, design studies indicate that the largest possible telescope must incorporate as its essential features a monolithic, 7.6-m diameter primary mirror constructed as either an ultrathin fused silica meniscus (of 10-15 cm thickness) or a borosilicate glass honeycomb (of classical thickness). This primary mirror would be of f/2 Ritchley-Chretien geometry. Light would be relayed from the primary to two f/13.5 Nasmyth foci. The mount would be of alt-azimuth type, housed in a building similar to that employed by the Multiple Mirror Telescope with an adjacent annex containing the mirror aluminizing chamber.

  18. Thinking Big for 25 Years: Astronomy Camp Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; McCarthy, D. W.; Benecchi, S. D.; Henry, T. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Kulesa, C.; Oey, M. S.; Regester, J.; Schlingman, W. M.; Camp Staff, Astronomy

    2013-01-01

    Astronomy Camp is a deep immersion educational adventure for teenagers and adults in southern Arizona that is entering its 25th year of existence. The Camp Director (McCarthy) is the winner of the 2012 AAS Education Prize. A general overview of the program is given in an accompanying contribution (McCarthy et al.). In this presentation we describe some of the research projects conducted by Astronomy Camp participants over the years. Many of the Camps contain a strong project-oriented emphasis, which reaches its pinnacle in the Advanced Camps for teenagers. High school students from around the world participate in a microcosm of the full arc of astronomy research. They plan their own projects before the start of Camp, and the staff provide a series of "key projects." Early in the Camp the students submit observing proposals to utilize time on telescopes. (The block of observing time is secured in advance by the staff.) The participants collect, reduce and analyze astronomical data with the help of staff, and they present the results to their peers on the last night of Camp, all in a span of eight days. The Camps provide research grade telescopes and instruments, in addition to amateur telescopes. Some of the Camps occur on Kitt Peak, where we use an ensemble of telescopes: the 2.3-meter (University of Arizona) with a spectrograph; the WIYN 0.9-meter; the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope; and the 12-meter millimeter wave telescope. Additionally the Camp has one night on the 10-meter Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham. Campers use these resources to study stars, galaxies, AGN, transiting planets, molecular clouds, etc. Some of the camper-initiated projects have led to very high level performances in prestigious international competitions, such as the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. The key projects often contribute to published astronomical research (e.g., Benecchi et al. 2010, Icarus, 207, 978). Many former Campers have received Ph.D. degrees in

  19. Why Space Telescopes Are Amazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    One of humanity's best ideas has been to put telescopes in space. The dark stillness of space allows telescopes to perform much better than they can on even the darkest and clearest of Earth's mountaintops. In addition, from space we can detect colors of light, like X-rays and gamma rays, that are blocked by the Earth's atmosphere I'll talk about NASA's team of great observatories: the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory} and how they've worked together to answer key questions: When did the stars form? Is there really dark matter? Is the universe really expanding ever faster and faster?

  20. The gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope for the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldo, L.; Abchiche, A.; Allan, D.; Amans, J.-P.; Armstrong, T. P.; Balzer, A.; Berge, D.; Boisson, C.; Bousquet, J.-J.; Brown, A. M.; Bryan, M.; Buchholtz, G.; Chadwick, P. M.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Daniel, M. K.; De Franco, A.; De Frondat, F.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Dumas, D.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Fasola, G.; Funk, S.; Gironnet, J.; Graham, J. A.; Greenshaw, T.; Hervet, O.; Hidaka, N.; Hinton, J. A.; Huet, J.-M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jegouzo, I.; Jogler, T.; Kraus, M.; Lapington, J. S.; Laporte, P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Markoff, S.; Melse, T.; Mohrmann, L.; Molyneux, P.; Nolan, S. J.; Okumura, A.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, R. D.; Rosen, S.; Ross, D.; Rowell, G.; Rulten, C. B.; Sato, Y.; Sayède, F.; Schmoll, J.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Servillat, M.; Sol, H.; Stamatescu, V.; Stephan, M.; Stuik, R.; Sykes, J.; Tajima, H.; Thornhill, J.; Trichard, C.; Vink, J.; Watson, J. J.; White, R.; Yamane, N.; Zech, A.; Zink, A.; Zorn, J.; CTA Consortium

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a forthcoming ground-based observatory for very-high-energy gamma rays. CTA will consist of two arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and will combine telescopes of different types to achieve unprecedented performance and energy coverage. The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is one of the small-sized telescopes proposed for CTA to explore the energy range from a few TeV to hundreds of TeV with a field of view ≳ 8° and angular resolution of a few arcminutes. The GCT design features dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optics and a compact camera based on densely-pixelated photodetectors as well as custom electronics. In this contribution we provide an overview of the GCT project with focus on prototype development and testing that is currently ongoing. We present results obtained during the first on-telescope campaign in late 2015 at the Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, during which we recorded the first Cherenkov images from atmospheric showers with the GCT multi-anode photomultiplier camera prototype. We also discuss the development of a second GCT camera prototype with silicon photomultipliers as photosensors, and plans toward a contribution to the realisation of CTA.

  1. The University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory 6.5m telescope: project overview and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Y.; Doi, M.; Kohno, K.; Miyata, T.; Motohara, K.; Kawara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Minezaki, T.; Sako, S.; Morokuma, T.; Tamura, Y.; Tanabe, T.; Takahashi, H.; Konishi, M.; Kamizuka, T.; Kato, N.; Aoki, T.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Handa, T.; Koshida, S.; Bronfman, L.; Ruiz, M. T.; Hamuy, M.; Garay, G.

    2016-07-01

    The University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory Project is to construct a 6.5m infrared telescope at the summit of Co. Chajnantor (5640m altitude) in northern Chile, promoted by the University of Tokyo. Thanks to the dry climate (PWV 0.5mm) and the high altitude, it will achieve excellent performance in the NIR to MIR wavelengths. The telescope has two Nasmyth foci where the facility instruments are installed and two folded-Cassegrain foci for carry-in instruments. All these four foci can be switched by rotating a tertiary mirror. The final focal ratio is 12.2 and the telescope foci have large field-of-view of 25° in diameter. We adopted the 6.5m light-weighted borosilicate honeycomb primary mirror and its support system that are developed by Steward Observatory Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab. The dome enclosure has the shape of carousel, and large ventilation windows with shutters control the wind to flush heat inside the dome. The operation building with control room, aluminizing chamber and maintenance facilities is located at the side of the dome. Two cameras, SWIMS for spectroscopy and imaging in the near-infrared and MIMIZUKU in the mid-infrared, are being developed as the first-generation facility instruments. The operation of the telescope will be remotely carried out from a base facility at San Pedro de Atacama, 50km away from the summit. The construction of the telescope is now underway. Fabrication of the telescope mount has almost finished, and the pre-assembly has been carried out in Japan. The primary, secondary, and tertiary mirrors and their cells have been also fabricated, as well as their cells and support systems. Fabrication of the enclosure is now underway, and their pre-assembly in Japan will be carried out in 2016. Construction of the base facility at San Pedro de Atacama has been already completed in 2014, and operated for the activities in Atacama. The telescope is now scheduled to see the first light at the beginning of 2018.

  2. Upgraded Hubble Space Telescope Images

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-08

    David Leckrone, senior project scientist for Hubble at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. discusses newly released images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The images were from four of the telescopes' six operating science instruments. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Neutrino Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marzo, C. N.

    2002-06-01

    Neutrino astronomy is one of the frontier of the high energy astrophysics. I discuss how to build a neutrino telescope and which requirements such a detector must fulfil. A measurable flux of astrophysical neutrinos is predicted by several models for a detector at the cubic kilometer scale. The way pursued until now in building such huge apparatuses is Cherenkov light detection in water or in ice. There have been attempts to build neutrino telescopes and also some projects are yet under construction or under way to start. This situation is reviewed and also techniques alternatives to the Cherenkov light detection are mentioned.

  4. Modernization of the NASA IRTF Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, Eric J.; Harwood, James V.; Onaka, Peter M.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the ongoing modernization of the NASA IR Telescope Facility Telescope Control System. A major mandate of this project is to keep the telescope available for observations throughout. Therefore, we have developed an incremental plan that will allow us to replace components of the software and hardware without shutting down the system. The current system, running under FORTH on a DEC LSI 11/23 minicomputer interfaced to a Bus and boards developed in house, will be replaced with a combination of a Sun SPARCstation running SunOS, a MicroSPARC based Single Board Computer running LynxOS, and various intelligent VME based peripheral cards. The software is based on a design philosophy originally developed by Pat Wallace for use on the Anglo Australian Telescope. This philosophy has gained wide acceptance, and is currently used in a number of observatories around the world. A key element of this philosophy is the division of the TCS into `Virtual' and `Real' parts. This will allow us to replace the higher level functions of the TCS with software running on the Sun, while still relying on the LSI 11/23 for performance of the lower level functions. Eventual transfer of lower level functions to the MicroSPARC system will then proceed incrementally through use of a Q-Bus to VME-Bus converter.

  5. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. BETTII uses a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer to simultaneously obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets; the long baseline provides subarcsecond angular resolution, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. Here, we present key aspects of the overall design of the mission and provide an overview of the current status of the project. We also discuss briefly the implications of this experiment for future space-based far-infrared interferometers.

  6. NCAP projection displays: key issues for commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Akira; Jones, Philip J.

    1992-06-01

    Recently there has been much interest in a new polymer nematic dispersion technology, often called as NCAP, PDLC, PNLC, LCPC, etc., since projection displays using this technology have been shown to produce much brighter display images than projectors using conventional twisted nematic (TN) lightvalves. For commercializing projection displays based on this polymer nematic dispersion technology, the new materials must not only meet various electro- optic requirements, e.g., operational voltage, `off-state'' scattering angle, voltage holding ratio and hysteresis, but must also be stable over the lifetime of the product. This paper reports recent progress in the development of NCAP based projection displays and discusses some of the key commercialization issues.

  7. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Julie; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated ScienceInstrument Module (ISIM)are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirrorcenter of curvatureoptical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard SpaceFlight Center beforebeing shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparationfor the cryogenicoptical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two OpticalGround SystemEquipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize opticaltest results todate and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  8. Space Telescope Systems Description Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Space Telescope Project is to orbit a high quality optical 2.4-meter telescope system by the Space Shuttle for use by the astronomical community in conjunction with NASA. The scientific objectives of the Space Telescope are to determine the constitution, physical characteristics, and dynamics of celestial bodies; the nature of processes which occur in the extreme physical conditions existing in stellar objects; the history and evolution of the universe; and whether the laws of nature are universal in the space-time continuum. Like ground-based telescopes, the Space Telescope was designed as a general-purpose instrument, capable of utilizing a wide variety of scientific instruments at its focal plane. This multi-purpose characteristic will allow the Space Telescope to be effectively used as a national facility, capable of supporting the astronomical needs for an international user community and hence making contributions to man's needs. By using the Space Shuttle to provide scientific instrument upgrading and subsystems maintenance, the useful and effective operational lifetime of the Space Telescope will be extended to a decade or more.

  9. Dobson space telescope: development of an optical payload of the next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segert, Tom; Danziger, Björn; Gork, Daniel; Lieder, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The Dobson Space Telescope (DST) is a research project of the Department of Astronautics at the TUBerlin. For Development and commercialisation there is a close cooperation with the network of the Berlin Space Industry (RIBB). Major Partner is the Astro- und Feinwerktechnik Adlershof GmbH a specialist for space structures and head of the industry consortia which built the DLR BIRD micro satellite. The aim of the project is to develop a new type of deployable telescope that can overcome the mass and volume limitations of small satellites. With the DST payload micro satellites of the 100kg class will be able to carry 50cm main mirror diameter optics (→ 1m GSD). Basis of this technology is the fact that a telescope is mainly empty space between the optical elements. To fold down the telescope during launch and to undfold it after the satellite reached its orbit can save 70% of payload volume and 50% of payload mass. Since these advantages continue along the value added chain DST is of highest priority for the next generation of commercial EO micro satellites. Since 2002 the key technologies for DST have been developed in test benches in Labs of TU-Berlin and were tested on board a ESA parabolic flight campaign in 2005. The development team at TU-Berlin currently prepares the foundation of a start-up company for further development and commercialisation of DST.

  10. The Miyun 50 m Pulsar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Cao, Y.; Chen, H.; Gao, J.; Gao, L.; Kong, D.; Su, Y.; Wang, M.

    2006-12-01

    The National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences is now building a 50 m radio telescope at the Miyun Station. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the Miyun Station. The main specifications and the status of construction of the 50 m radio telescope are described. We are now building an L-band pulsar receiver for this new 50 m telescope. The status of this receiver project is also described. The 50 m telescope, together with the pulsar receiver, will make it a powerful radio telescope to carry out pulsar observations and researches in the near future.

  11. Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John; Stockman, H. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for launch in 2009, will be an 8-m class radiatively cooled infrared telescope at the Lagrange point L2. It will cover the wavelength range from 0.6 to 28 microns with cameras and spectrometers, to observe the first luminous objects after the Big Bang, and the formation, growth, clustering, and evolution of galaxies, stars, and protoplanetary clouds, leading to better understanding of our own Origins. It will seek evidence of the cosmic dark matter through its gravitational effects. With an aperture three times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope, it will provide extraordinary advances in capabilities and enable the discovery of many new phenomena. It is a joint project of the NASA, ESA, and CSA, and scientific operations will be provided by the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  12. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: design and early construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, Joseph P.; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Keil, Stephen L.; Warner, Mark; Barden, Samuel; Bulau, Scott; Craig, Simon; Goodrich, Bret; Hansen, Eric; Hegwer, Steve; Hubbard, Robert; McBride, William; Shimko, Steve; Wöger, Friedrich; Ditsler, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    The National Solar Observatory’s (NSO) Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is the first large U.S. solar telescope accessible to the worldwide solar physics community to be constructed in more than 30 years. The 4-meter diameter facility will operate over a broad wavelength range (0.35 to 28 μm ), employing adaptive optics systems to achieve diffraction limited imaging and resolve features approximately 20 km on the Sun; the key observational parameters (collecting area, spatial resolution, spectral coverage, polarization accuracy, low scattered light) enable resolution of the theoretically-predicted, fine-scale magnetic features and their dynamics which modulate the radiative output of the sun and drive the release of magnetic energy from the Sun’s atmosphere in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. In 2010, the ATST received a significant fraction of its funding for construction. In the subsequent two years, the project has hired staff and opened an office on Maui. A number of large industrial contracts have been placed throughout the world to complete the detailed designs and begin constructing the major telescope subsystems. These contracts have included the site development, AandE designs, mirrors, polishing, optic support assemblies, telescope mount and coudé rotator structures, enclosure, thermal and mechanical systems, and high-level software and controls. In addition, design development work on the instrument suite has undergone significant progress; this has included the completion of preliminary design reviews (PDR) for all five facility instruments. Permitting required for physically starting construction on the mountaintop of Haleakalā, Maui has also progressed. This paper will review the ATST goals and specifications, describe each of the major subsystems under construction, and review the contracts and lessons learned during the contracting and early construction phases. Schedules for site construction, key factory testing of

  13. Automatization Project for the Carl-Zeiss-Jena Coudè Telescope of the Simón Bolívar Planetarium I. The Electro-Mechanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, A.; Maharaj, A.; Muñoz, A. G.

    2009-05-01

    The ``Complejo Científico, Cultural y Turístico Simón Bolívar'' (CCCTSB), located in Maracaibo, Venezuela, lodges the Simón Bolívar Planetarium and an 150 mm aperture, 2250 mm focal length Carl-Zeiss-Jena Coudè refractor telescope. In this work we discuss the schematics for the automatization project of this Telescope, the planned improvements, methodology, engines, micro-controllers, interfaces and the uptodate status of the project. This project is working on the first two levels of the automation pyramid, the sensor -- actuator level and the control or Plant floor level. The Process control level correspond to the software related section. This mean that this project work immediately with the electrical, electronic and mechanical stuffs, and with the assembler micro controller language. All the pc related stuff, like GUI (Graphic user interfaces), remote control, Grid database, and others, correspond to the next two automation pyramid levels. The idea is that little human intervention will be required to manipulate the telescope, only giving a pair of coordinates to ubicate and follow an object on the sky. A set of three servomotors, coupling it with the telescope with a gear box, are going to manipulate right ascension, declination and focus movement. For the dome rotation, a three phase induction motor will be used. For dome aperture/closure it is suggested a DC motor powered with solar panels. All those actuators are controlled by a 8 bits micro-controller, which receive the coordinate imput, the signal from the position sensors and have the PID control algorithm. This algorithm is tuned based on the mathematical model of the telescope electro-mechanical instrumentation.

  14. A demonstration device for cosmic rays telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    We describe a hands-on accurate demonstrator for cosmic rays realized by six high school students. The main aim is to show the relevance and the functioning of the principal parts of a cosmic ray telescope (muon detector), with the help of two large sized wooden artefacts. The first one points out how cosmic rays can be tracked in a muon telescope, while the other one shows the key avalanche process of electronic ionization that effectively allows muon detection through a photomultiplier. Incoming cosmic rays are visualized in terms of laser beams, whose 3D trajectory is highlighted by turning on LEDs on two orthogonal matrices. Instead the avalanche ionization process is demonstrated through the avalanche falling off glass marbles on an inclined plane, finally turning on a LED. A pictured poster accompanying the demonstrator is as effective in assisting cosmic ray demonstration and its detection. The success of the demonstrator has been fully proven by the general public during a science festival, in which the corresponding project won the Honorable Mention in a dedicated competition.

  15. Key challenges in the development and implementation of telehealth projects.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Victor; West, Robert M; Shickle, Darren; Keen, Justin; Clamp, Susan

    2011-01-01

    A literature review was carried out to identify the key challenges in the implementation of telehealth. This was followed by a survey of organisations in England involved in telehealth projects in order to understand the challenges they faced. Ten of the 13 health or local authority organisations surveyed had telehealth projects and three were at the planning stage. The analysis revealed seven key challenges facing implementers of telehealth in England. Based on the findings from the literature review and the survey, a model was constructed and a checklist drawn up. The model contained the following elements: identifying issues, needs and partners; producing a strategy; securing funding; implementing changes; and monitoring and evaluating a telehealth project. The checklist was validated by using key informants from the organisations originally surveyed. The checklist may be useful to guide telehealth development and implementation in the future.

  16. EUSO-TA prototype telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisconti, Francesca; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    EUSO-TA is one of the prototypes developed for the JEM-EUSO project, a space-based large field-of-view telescope to observe the fluorescence light emitted by cosmic ray air showers in the atmosphere. EUSO-TA is a ground-based prototype located at the Telescope Array (TA) site in Utah, USA, where an Electron Light Source and a Central Laser Facility are installed. The purpose of the EUSO-TA project is to calibrate the prototype with the TA fluorescence detector in presence of well-known light sources and cosmic ray air showers. In 2015, the detector started the first measurements and tests using the mentioned light sources have been performed successfully. A first cosmic ray candidate has been observed, as well as stars of different magnitude and color index. Since Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are very promising for fluorescence telescopes of next generation, they are under consideration for the realization of a new prototype of EUSO Photo Detector Module (PDM). The response of this sensor type is under investigation through simulations and laboratory experimentation.

  17. Spectrographs and Large Telescopes: A Study of Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Uomoto, Alan K.; Hare, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a telescope in possession of a large aperture, must be in want of a high resolution spectrograph. Subsystems of these instruments require testing and upgrading to ensure that they can continue to be scientifically productive and usher in a new era of astronomical research. The Planet Finder Spectrograph (PFS) and Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE), both on the Magellan II Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) are examples of such instruments. Bluer flat field lamps were designed for PFS and MIKE to replace lamps no longer available in order to ensure continued, efficient functionality. These newly designed lamps will result in better flat fielding and calibration of data, and thus result in increased reduction of instrument noise. When it is built and installed in 2022, G-CLEF will be be fed by a tertiary mirror on the GMT. Stepper motors attached to the back of this mirror will be used to correct misalignments in the optical relay system. These motors were characterized to ensure that they function as expected to an accuracy of a few microns. These projects incorporate several key aspects of astronomical instrumentation: designing, building, and testing.

  18. Performance of the Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope structure: a dual-mirror telescope prototype proposed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, J. L.; Amans, J. P.; Dangeon, L.; Fasola, G.; Gironnet, J.; Huet, J. M.; Laporte, P.; Abchiche, A.; Barkaoui, S.; Bousquet, J. J.; Buchholtz, G.; Dumas, D.; Gaudemard, J.; Jégouzo, I.; Poinsignon, P.; Vergne, L.; Sol, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to create the next generation Very High-Energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescope array. It will be devoted to the observation of gamma rays from 20 GeV to above 100 TeV. Because of this wide energy band, three classes of telescopes, associated with different energy ranges and different mirror sizes, are defined. The Small Size Telescopes (SSTs) are associated with the highest energy range. Seventy of these telescopes are foreseen on the Southern site of the CTA. The large number of telescopes constrains their mechanical structure because easy maintenance and reduced cost per telescope are needed. Moreover, of course, the design shall fulfill the required performance and lifetime in the environment conditions of the site. The Observatoire de Paris started design studies in 2011 of the mechanical structure of the GCT (Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope), a four-meter prototype telescope for the SSTs of CTA, from optical and preliminary mechanical designs made by the University of Durham. At the end of 2014 these studies finally resulted in a lightweight ( 8 tons) and stiff design. This structure was based on the dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optical design, which is an interesting and innovative alternative to the one-mirror Davies-Cotton design commonly used in ground-based Cherenkov astronomy. The benefits of such a design are many since it enables a compact structure, lightweight camera and a good angular resolution across the entire field-of-view. The mechanical structure was assembled on the Meudon site of the Observatoire de Paris in spring 2015. The secondary mirror, panels of the primary mirror and the Telescope Control System were successfully implemented afterwards leading now to a fully operational telescope. This paper focuses on the mechanics of the telescope prototype. It describes the mechanical structure and presents its performance identified from computations or direct measurements. Upgrades of the design

  19. Scientific Performance Analysis of the SYZ Telescope Design versus the RC Telescope Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Donglin; Cai, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Recently, Su et al. propose an innovative design, referred as the “SYZ” design, for China’s new project of a 12 m optical-infrared telescope. The SYZ telescope design consists of three aspheric mirrors with non-zero power, including a relay mirror below the primary mirror. SYZ design yields a good imaging quality and has a relatively flat field curvature at Nasmyth focus. To evaluate the science-compatibility of this three-mirror telescope, in this paper, we thoroughly compare the performance of SYZ design with that of Ritchey–Chrétien (RC) design, a conventional two-mirror telescope design. Further, we propose the Observing Information Throughput (OIT) as a metric for quantitatively evaluating the telescopes’ science performance. We find that although a SYZ telescope yields a superb imaging quality over a large field of view, a two-mirror (RC) telescope design holds a higher overall throughput, a better diffraction-limited imaging quality in the central field of view (FOV < 5‧) which is better for the performance of extreme Adaptive Optics (AO), and a generally better scientific performance with a higher OIT value. D. Ma & Z. Cai contributed equally to this paper.

  20. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  1. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element/Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Voyton, Mark; Lander, Juli; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are integrated together to form the OTIS. Once integrated, the OTIS undergoes primary mirror center of curvature optical tests, electrical and operational tests, acoustics and vibration testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center before being shipped to the Johnson Space Center for cryogenic optical testing of the OTIS. In preparation for the cryogenic optical testing, the JWST project has built a Pathfinder telescope and has completed two Optical Ground System Equipment (OGSE) cryogenic optical tests with the Pathfinder. In this paper, we will summarize optical test results to date and status the final Pathfinder test and the OTIS integration and environmental test preparations

  3. MONET: a MOnitoring NEtwork of Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.; Beuermann, K.

    2002-01-01

    MONET is a planned network of two 1m-class robotic telescopes which will be used for various photometric monitoring projects -- variable stars, planet searches, AGN's, GRB's -- as well as by school children in Germany and over the world. The two host partners, the Univ. of Texas' McDonald Observatory and the South African Astronomical Observatory, will operate the telescopes in exchange for observing time on the network. MONET will be one of the first robotic telescope networks offering 1-m class telescopes, complete coverage of the sky, good longitude coverage for long observing sequences on objects near the celestial equator, and a heavy educational emphasis.

  4. Coded mask telescopes for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, G. K.; Ponman, T. J.

    1987-04-01

    The principle of the coded mask techniques are discussed together with the methods of image reconstruction. The coded mask telescopes built at the University of Birmingham, including the SL 1501 coded mask X-ray telescope flown on the Skylark rocket and the Coded Mask Imaging Spectrometer (COMIS) projected for the Soviet space station Mir, are described. A diagram of a coded mask telescope and some designs for coded masks are included.

  5. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  6. Unique dome design for the SOAR telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Jose U.; Porter, David S.; Hileman, Edward A.; Neff, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    The SOAR telescope dome is a 20 meter diameter 5/8 spherical structure built on a rotating steel frame with an over the top nesting shutter and covered with a fiberglass panel system. The insulated fiberglass panel system can be self- supporting and is typically used for radomes on ground based tracking systems. The enclosed observing area is ventilated using a down draft ventilation system. The rotating steel frame is comprised of a ring beam and dual arch girders to provide support to the panel system sections and guide the shutter. The dual door shutter incorporates a unique differential drive system that reduces the complexity of the control system. The dome, shutter and windscreen `track' the telescope for maximum wind protection. The dome rotates on sixteen fixed compliant bogie assemblies. The dome is designed for assembly in sections off the facility and lifted into place for minimal impact on assembly of other telescope systems. The expected cost of the complete dome; including structure, drives, and controls is under 1.7 million. The details covered in this paper are the initial trade-offs and rationale required by SOAR to define the dome, the detailed design performed by M3 Engineering and Technology, and the choices made during the design.

  7. AMTD: update of engineering specifications derived from science requirements for future UVOIR space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-08-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope.

  8. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope

  9. A project of a two meter telescope in North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhaldoun, Zouhair

    2015-03-01

    Site testing undertaken during the last 20 years by Moroccan researchers through international studies have shown that the Atlas mountains in Morocco has potentialities similar to those sites which host the largest telescopes in world. Given the quality of the sites and opportunities to conduct modern research, we believe that the installation of a 2m diameter telescope will open new horizons for Astronomy in Morocco and north Africa allowing our region to enter definitively into the very exclusive club of countries possessing an instrument of that size. A state of the art astrophysical observatory on any good astronomical observation site should be equipped with a modern 2m-class, robotic telescope and some smaller telescopes. Our plan should be to operate one of the most efficient robotic 2m class telescopes worldwide in order to offer optimal scientific opportunities for researchers and maintain highest standards for the education of students. Beside all categories of astronomical research fields, students will have the possibility to be educated intensively on the design, manufacturing and operating of modern state of the art computer controlled instruments. In the frame of such education and observation studies several PhD and dissertational work packages are possible. Many of the observations will be published in articles worldwide and a number of guest observers from other countries will have the possibility to take part in collaborations. This could be a starting point of an international reputation of our region in the field of modern astronomy.

  10. Origins Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the OST STDT, our completed first mission concept and an introduction to the second concept that will be studied at the study center in 2018. This presentation will also summarize key science drivers and the key study milestones between 2018 and 2020.

  11. Dr. John Mather and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Nobel Laureate and James Webb Space Telescope project scientist Dr. John Mather takes a selfie with the telescope. May 4, 2016 was a rare day for JWST, as it briefly faced the cleanroom observation window. The telescope was eventually rotated face-down in prep for the installation of the flight instruments. Credit: Meredith Gibb

  12. The Center for Astrophysics Web-Based Telescope Time Proposal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mink, D. J.; Kenyon, S. J.; Carter, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    A web-based telescope proposal processing system has been developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to interactively process proposals by CfA users of the MMT, FLWO 1.2-, 1.3-, and 1.5-meter telescopes, and the Magellan telescopes into a standardized form. This system is based on one from NOAO, with the addition of more interactivity and feedback. Proposals are saved so that information does not have to be re-entered for long-term projects, and a single login per user instead of per project makes life easier for scientists with multiple observing projects. Proposals are grouped by instrument and telescope and presented to the the telescope Time Allocation Committee (TAC) both online and as hard-copies. Web pages are generated for each of the TAC members to enter their grades online. Software normalizes the grades and averages them into a final grade for each proposal. The grades are given to the TAC, which then meets and allocates the trimester's (semester's for Magellan) observing time according to these grades.

  13. SLAS Library Telescope Program (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) In the fall of 2014, I submitted to the members of the St. Louis Astronomical Society to take the $1,000 profit we had from a convention we had hosted and use it to purchase three telescopes to modify for a Library Telescope program that was invented by Mark Stowbridge and promoted by the New Hampshire Astronomical Society. I had met Mark at NEAF in 2012 when he was walking the floor demonstrating the telescope. We held meetings with three libraries, the St. Louis County Library system, the St. Louis Public Library system and an independent library in Kirkwood, Missouri. The response was overwhelming! SLCL responded with a request for ten telescopes and SLPL asked for five. We did our first build in October, 2014 and placed a total of eighteen telescopes. Since that time, SLAS has placed a total of eighty-eight telescopes in library systems around the St. Louis Metro area, expanding into neighboring counties and across the river in Illinois. In this talk, I will discuss how to approach this project and put it in place in your libraries!

  14. Automation of the Lowell Observatory 0.8-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M. W.

    2001-11-01

    In the past year I have converted the Lowell Observatory 0.8-m telescope from a classically scheduled and operated telescope to an automated facility. The new setup uses an existing CCD camera and the existing telescope control system. The key steps in the conversion were writing a new CCD control and data acquisition module plus writing communication and queue control software. The previous CCD control program was written for DOS and much of the code was reused for this project. The entire control system runs under Linux and consists of four daemons: MOVE, PCCD, CMDR, and PCTL. The MOVE daemon is a process that communciates with the telescope control system via an RS232 port, keeping track of its state and forwarding commands from other processes to the telescope. The PCCD daemon controls the CCD camera and collects data. The CMDR daemon maintains a FIFO queue of commands to be executed during the night. The PCTL daemon receives notification from any other deamon of execution failures and sends an error code to the on-duty observer via a numeric pager. This system runs through the night much as you would traditionally operate a telescope. However, this system permits queuing up all the commands for a night and they execute one after another in sequence. Additional commands are needed to replace the normal human interaction during observing (ie., target acquisition, field registration, focusing). Also, numerous temporal synchronization commands are required so that observations happen at the right time. The system was used for this year's photometric monitoring of Pluto and Triton and is in general use for 2/3 of time on the telescope. Pluto observations were collected on 30 nights out of a potential pool of 90 nights. Detailed system design and capabilites plus sample observations will be presented. Also, a live demonstration will be provided if the weather is good. This work was supported by NASA Grant NAG5-4210 and the NSF REU Program grant to NAU.

  15. VLTI auxiliary telescopes: a full object-oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Duhoux, Philippe; Karban, Robert

    2000-06-01

    The Very Large Telescope (VLT) Telescope Control Software (TCS) is a portable system. It is now in use or will be used in a whole family of ESO telescopes VLT Unit Telescopes, VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes, NTT, La Silla 3.6, VLT Survey Telescope and Astronomical Site Monitors in Paranal and La Silla). Although it has been developed making extensive usage of Object Oriented (OO) methodologies, the overall development process chosen at the beginning of the project used traditional methods. In order to warranty a longer lifetime to the system (improving documentation and maintainability) and to prepare for future projects, we have introduced a full OO process. We have taken as a basis the United Software Development Process with the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and we have adapted the process to our specific needs. This paper describes how the process has been applied to the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes Control Software (ATCS). The ATCS is based on the portable VLT TCS, but some subsystems are new or have specific characteristics. The complete process has been applied to the new subsystems, while reused code has been integrated in the UML models. We have used the ATCS on one side to tune the process and train the team members and on the other side to provide a UML and WWW based documentation for the portable VLT TCS.

  16. Theoretical contamination of cryogenic satellite telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, M.

    1978-01-01

    The state of contaminant molecules, the deposition rate on key surfaces, and the heat transfer rate were estimated by the use of a zeroth-order approximation. Optical surfaces of infrared telescopes cooled to about 20 K should be considered to be covered with at least several deposition layers of condensible molecules without any contamination controls. The effectiveness of the purge gas method of contamination controls was discussed. This method attempts to drive condensible molecules from the telescope tube by impacts with a purge gas in the telescope tube. For this technique to be sufficiently effective, the pressure of the purge gas must be more than 2 x .000001 torr. The influence caused by interactions of the purged gas with the particulate contaminants was found to slightly increase the resident times of the particulate contaminants within the telescope field of view.

  17. Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: Telescope Design and Simulated Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey proposed multiple missions with NIR focal planes and 3 mirror wide field telescopes in the 1.5m aperture range. None of them would have won as standalone missions WFIRST is a combination of these missions, created by Astro 2010 committee. WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) tasked to examine the design. Project team is a GSFC-JPL-Caltech collaboration. This interim mission design is a result of combined work by the project team with the SDT.

  18. γ-ray telescopes using conversions to e+e- pairs: event generators, angular resolution and polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, P.; Bernard, D.

    2017-02-01

    We benchmark various available event generators in Geant4 and EGS5 in the light of ongoing projects for high angular-resolution pair-conversion telescopes at low energy. We compare the distributions of key kinematic variables extracted from the geometry of the three final state particles. We validate and use as reference an exact generator using the full 5D differential cross-section of the conversion process. We focus in particular on the effect of the unmeasured recoiling nucleus on the angular resolution. We show that for high resolution trackers, the choice of the generator affects the estimated resolution of the telescope. We also show that the current available generator are unable to describe accurately a linearly polarised photon source.

  19. Diversity in research projects - A key to success?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Taubner, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    According to demographers, psychologists, sociologists and economists diverse groups, which are groups of different race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, are more innovative than homogeneous groups. This is also true for groups working together in research collaborations and international cooperation involving a culturally and functionally diverse mix of individuals who have to be integrated into an effective unit - a project team. If the goal is scientific excellence, diversity should be an essential ingredient to conduct science on high level productivity, quality and innovation. Effective teamwork is a key to project success and prime responsibilities of the project manager. Therefore, the project manager has to take into consideration different characteristics such as cultures, languages, and different values related to individual project partners. Here we show how diversity can affect the performance of a research project. Furthermore, the presentation indicates skills and abilities which are required for the management in order to deal also with the challenges of diversity in research projects. The presentation is based on insights experienced in the context of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions of the European HORIZON 2020 program and TRION a Collaborative Research Project in the Framework of the Trilateral Program of the German Research Foundation.

  20. Gamma--Ray burst afterglows with the Watcher robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, M.; Hanlon, L.; Meehan, S.; Tisdall, P.; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; van Heerden, H.; Meintjes, P.

    2014-12-01

    The main scientific goal of the Watcher robotic telescope is the rapid follow-up observation of gamma--ray burst afterglows. Some examples of recent observations, including GRB 120327A and GRB 130606A, at a redshift of 5.9, are presented. The telescope has recently been successfully integrated into the GLORIA global robotic telescope network, which allows users to use the array for their own scientific projects.

  1. Sensitivity projections for dark matter dearches with the Fermi large area telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Charles, E.; M. Sanchez-Conde; Anderson, B.; ...

    2016-05-20

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of themore » $$\\gamma$$-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 MeV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this report we describe methods used to search for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. We also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We project the expected sensitivities of each search method for 10 and 15 years of LAT data taking. In particular, we find that the sensitivity of searches targeting dwarf galaxies, which provide the best limits currently, will improve faster than the square root of observing time. Current LAT limits for dwarf galaxies using six years of data reach the thermal relic level for masses up to 120 GeV for the $$b\\bar{b}$$ annihilation channel for reasonable dark matter density profiles. With projected discoveries of additional dwarfs, these limits could extend to about 250 GeV. With as much as 15 years of LAT data these searches would be sensitive to dark matter annihilations at the thermal relic cross section for masses to greater than 400 GeV (200 GeV) in the $$b\\bar{b}$$ ($$\\tau^+ \\tau^-$$) annihilation channels.« less

  2. Sensitivity projections for dark matter dearches with the Fermi large area telescope

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Charles, E.; M. Sanchez-Conde; Anderson, B.

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of themore » $$\\gamma$$-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 MeV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this report we describe methods used to search for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. We also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We project the expected sensitivities of each search method for 10 and 15 years of LAT data taking. In particular, we find that the sensitivity of searches targeting dwarf galaxies, which provide the best limits currently, will improve faster than the square root of observing time. Current LAT limits for dwarf galaxies using six years of data reach the thermal relic level for masses up to 120 GeV for the $$b\\bar{b}$$ annihilation channel for reasonable dark matter density profiles. With projected discoveries of additional dwarfs, these limits could extend to about 250 GeV. With as much as 15 years of LAT data these searches would be sensitive to dark matter annihilations at the thermal relic cross section for masses to greater than 400 GeV (200 GeV) in the $$b\\bar{b}$$ ($$\\tau^+ \\tau^-$$) annihilation channels.« less

  3. Sensitivity projections for dark matter searches with the Fermi large area telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, E.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Anderson, B.; Caputo, R.; Cuoco, A.; Di Mauro, M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Meyer, M.; Tibaldo, L.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Ceraudo, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Digel, S. W.; Gaskins, J.; Gustafsson, M.; Mirabal, N.; Razzano, M.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of the γ-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 meV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this report we describe methods used to search for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. We also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We project the expected sensitivities of each search method for 10 and 15 years of LAT data taking. In particular, we find that the sensitivity of searches targeting dwarf galaxies, which provide the best limits currently, will improve faster than the square root of observing time. Current LAT limits for dwarf galaxies using six years of data reach the thermal relic level for masses up to 120 GeV for the b b ¯ annihilation channel for reasonable dark matter density profiles. With projected discoveries of additional dwarfs, these limits could extend to about 250 GeV. With as much as 15 years of LAT data these searches would be sensitive to dark matter annihilations at the thermal relic cross section for masses to greater than 400 GeV (200 GeV) in the b b ¯ (τ+τ-) annihilation channels.

  4. South African Student Constructed Indlebe Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGruder, Charles H.; MacPherson, Stuart; Janse Van Vuuren, Gary Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Indlebe Radio Telescope (IRT) is a small transit telescope with a 5 m diameter parabolic reflector working at 21 cm. It was completely constructed by South African (SA) students from the Durban University of Technology (DUT), where it is located. First light occurred on 28 July 2008, when the galactic center, Sagittarius A, was detected. As a contribution to the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, staff members in the Department of Electronic Engineering at DUT in 2006 decided to have their students create a fully functional radio telescope by 2009. The specific project aims are to provide a visible project that could generate interest in science and technology in high school students and to provide a real world system for research in radio astronomy in general and an optimization of low noise radio frequency receiver systems in particular. These aims must be understood in terms of the SA’s government interests in radio astronomy. SA is a partner in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project, has constructed the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) and MeerKat, which is the largest and most sensitive radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. SA and its partners in Africa are investing in the construction of the African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (AVN), an array of radio telescopes throughout Africa as an extension of the existing global Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (VLBI). These projects will allow SA to make significant contributions to astronomy and enable astronomy to contribute to the scientific education and development goals of the country. The IRT sees on a daily basis the transit of Sag A. The transit time is influenced by precession, nutation, polar motion, aberration, celestial pole offset, proper motion, length of the terrestrial day and variable ionospheric refraction. Of these eight factors six are either predictable or measureable. To date neither celestial pole offset nor variable ionospheric refraction are predicable

  5. Mechanical design of SST-GATE, a dual-mirror telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Huet, Jean-Michel; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Delphine; Laporte, Philippe; Sol, Hélène; Blake, Simon

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to create the next generation Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescope array. It will be devoted to the observation of gamma rays over a wide band of energy, from a few tens of GeV to more than 100 TeV. Two sites are foreseen to view the whole sky where about 100 telescopes, composed of three different classes, related to the specific energy region to be investigated, will be installed. Among these, the Small Size class of Telescopes, SSTs, are devoted to the highest energy region, to beyond 100 TeV. Due to the large number of SSTs, their unit cost is an important parameter. At the Observatoire de Paris, we have designed a prototype of a Small Size Telescope named SST-GATE, based on the dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical formula, which has never before been implemented in the design of a telescope. Over the last two years, we developed a mechanical design for SST-GATE from the optical and preliminary mechanical designs made by the University of Durham. The integration of this telescope is currently in progress. Since the early stages of mechanical design of SST-GATE, finite element method has been used employing shape and topology optimization techniques to help design several elements of the telescope. This allowed optimization of the mechanical stiffness/mass ratio, leading to a lightweight and less expensive mechanical structure. These techniques and the resulting mechanical design are detailed in this paper. We will also describe the finite element analyses carried out to calculate the mechanical deformations and the stresses in the structure under observing and survival conditions.

  6. Thermal Control of the Balloon-Borne HEROES Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) telescope is scheduled to fly on a high altitude balloon from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in the Fall of 2013. Once it reaches an altitude of 40km it will observe the Sun, Crab Nebula, and other astrophysical objects in the hard X-Ray spectrum (20-75keV) for around 28 hours. The HEROES project is a joint effort between Marshall and Goddard Space Flight Centers (MSFC and GSFC), and will utilize the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope, which last flew in 2011 in Australia. The addition of new systems will allow the telescope to view the Sun, and monitor the mechanical alignment of the structure during flight. This paper will give an overview of the telescope, and then provide a description of the thermal control method used on HEROES. The thermal control is done through a passive cold-bias design. Detailed thermal analyses were performed in order to prove the design. This will be discussed along with the results of the analyses. HEROES is funded by the NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE) Training Opportunity. The HOPE opportunity provides early career employees within NASA hands on experience with a yearlong flight project. HOPE was awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer, and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ON TRACK FOR MEASURING THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Two international teams of astronomers, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, are reporting major progress in converging on an accurate measurement of the Universe's rate of expansion -- a value which has been debated for over half a century. These new results yield ranges for the age of the Universe from 9-12 billion years, and 11-14 billion years, respectively. The goal of the project is to measure the Hubble Constant to ten percent accuracy. The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project team, an international group of over 20 astronomers, is led by Wendy Freedman of Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA, Robert Kennicutt, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and Jeremy Mould, Mount Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory, Australia. The group's interim results, announced at a meeting held at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, are consistent with their preliminary result, announced in 1994, of 80 kilometers per second per megaparsec (km/sec/Mpc), based on observations of a galaxy in the Virgo cluster. 'We have five different ways of measuring the Hubble Constant with HST,' said Dr. Freedman. 'The results are coming in between 68 and 78 km/sec/Mpc.' (For example, at an expansion rate of 75 km/sec/Mpc, galaxies appear to be receding from us at a rate of 162,000 miles per hour for every 3.26 million light-years farther out we look). Two months ago, a second team, led by Allan Sandage, also of the Carnegie Observatories, Abhijit Saha, STScI, Gustav Tammann and Lukas Labhardt, Astronomical Institute, University of Basel, Duccio Macchetto and Nino Panagia, STScI/European Space Agency, reported a slower expansion rate of 57 km/sec/Mpc. The value of the Hubble Constant allows astronomers to calculate the expansion age of the Universe, the time elapsed since the Big Bang. Astronomers have been arguing recently whether the time since the Big Bang is consistent with the ages of the oldest stars. The ages are calculated from combining the expansion

  8. Artificial Intelligence in Autonomous Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, William; Thanjavur, Karun

    2011-03-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is key to the natural evolution of today's automated telescopes to fully autonomous systems. Based on its rapid development over the past five decades, AI offers numerous, well-tested techniques for knowledge based decision making essential for real-time telescope monitoring and control, with minimal - and eventually no - human intervention. We present three applications of AI developed at CFHT for monitoring instantaneous sky conditions, assessing quality of imaging data, and a prototype for scheduling observations in real-time. Closely complementing the current remote operations at CFHT, we foresee further development of these methods and full integration in the near future.

  9. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Infrastructure for the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, F.; Tacchini, A.; Leto, G.; Martinetti, E.; Bruno, P.; Bellassai, G.; Conforti, V.; Gallozzi, S.; Mastropietro, M.; Tanci, C.; Malaguti, G.; Trifoglio, M.

    2016-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) represents the next generation of ground-based observatories for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The CTA will consist of two arrays at two different sites, one in the northern and one in the southern hemisphere. The current CTA design foresees, in the southern site, the installation of many tens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes of three different classes, namely large, medium and small, so defined in relation to their mirror area; the northern hemisphere array would consist of few tens of the two larger telescope types. The Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) is developing the Cherenkov Small Size Telescope ASTRI SST- 2M end-to-end prototype telescope within the framework of the International Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project. The ASTRI prototype has been installed at the INAF observing station located in Serra La Nave on Mt. Etna, Italy. Furthermore a mini-array, composed of nine of ASTRI telescopes, has been proposed to be installed at the Southern CTA site. Among the several different infrastructures belonging the ASTRI project, the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment is dedicated to operations of computing and data storage, as well as the control of the entire telescope, and it is designed to achieve the maximum efficiency for all performance requirements. Thus a complete and stand-alone computer centre has been designed and implemented. The goal is to obtain optimal ICT equipment, with an adequate level of redundancy, that might be scaled up for the ASTRI mini-array, taking into account the necessary control, monitor and alarm system requirements. In this contribution we present the ICT equipment currently installed at the Serra La Nave observing station where the ASTRI SST-2M prototype will be operated. The computer centre and the control room are described with particular emphasis on the Local Area Network scheme, the computing and data storage system, and the

  10. The Cherenkov Telescope Array For Very High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2015-08-01

    The field of very high energy (VHE) astrophysics had been revolutionized by the results from ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, including the current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) arrays: HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS. A worldwide consortium of scientists from 29 countries has formed to propose the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) that will capitalize on the power of this technique to greatly expand the scientific reach of ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. CTA science will include key topics such as the origin of cosmic rays and cosmic particle acceleration, understanding extreme environments in regions close to neutron stars and black holes, and exploring physics frontiers through, e.g., the search for WIMP dark matter, axion-like particles and Lorentz invariance violation. CTA is envisioned to consist of two large arrays of Cherenkov telescopes, one in the southern hemisphere and one in the north. Each array will contain telescopes of different sizes to provide a balance between cost and array performance over an energy range from below 100 GeV to above 100 TeV. Compared to the existing IACT arrays, CTA will have substantially better angular resolution and energy resolution, will cover a much wider energy range, and will have up to an order of magnitude better sensitivity. CTA will also be operated as an open observatory and high-level CTA data will be placed into the public domain; these aspects will enable broad participation in CTA science from the worldwide scientific community to fully capitalize on CTA's potential. This talk will: 1) review the scientific motivation and capabilities of CTA, 2) provide an overview of the technical design and the status of prototype development, and 3) summarize the current status of the project in terms of its proposed organization and timeline. The plans for access to CTA data and opportunities to propose for CTA observing time will be highlighed.Presented on behalf of the CTA Consortium.

  11. Relevant Optical Issues of the SPM-Twin Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Orlov, V.

    2007-06-01

    Most technical aspects of the SPM-Twin Telescopes have been basically solved by the Magellan and MMT projects. However, the Spectroscopic "Wide Field Telescope" will be the first of its kind and an optical solution based on Magellan needs to be further investigated. In addition, the requirements for adaptive optics for the Standard Field Telescope need to be worked out. In this contribution we will compare optical wide field conceptual designs and the potential scope of AO for SPM-Twin.

  12. The Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Seery, Bernard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope NGST is an 6-7 m class radiatively cooled telescope, planned for launch to the Lagrange point L2 in 2009, to be built by a partnership of NASA, ESA, and CSA. The NGST science program calls for three core instruments: 1) Near IR camera, 0.6 - 5 micrometer; 2) Near IR multiobject spectrometer, 1 - 5 micrometer, and 3) Mid IR camera and spectrometer, 5 - 28 micrometers. I will report on the scientific goals, project status, and the recent reduction in aperture from the target of 8 m.

  13. Computing design principles for robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Mark K.; Ford, Martyn J.; Lett, Robert D. J.; McKay, Derek J.; Mücke-Herzberg, Dorothy; Norbury, Martin A.

    2002-12-01

    Telescopes capable of making observing decisions independent of human supervision have become a reality in the 21st century. These new telescopes are likely to replace automated systems as the telescopes of choice. A fully robotic implementation offers not only reduced operating costs, but also significant gains in scientific output over automated or remotely operated systems. The design goals are to maximise the telescope operating time and minimise the cost of diagnosis and repair. However, the demands of a robotic telescope greatly exceed those of its remotely operated counterpart, and the design of the computing system is key to its operational performance. This paper outlines the challenges facing the designer of these computing systems, and describes some of the principles of design which may be applied. Issues considered include automatic control and efficiency, system awareness, robustness and reliability, access, security and safety, as well as ease-of-use and maintenance. These requirements cannot be considered simply within the context of the application software. Hence, this paper takes into account operating system, hardware and environmental issues. Consideration is also given to accommodating different levels of manual control within robotic telescopes, as well as methods of accessing and overriding the system in the event of failure.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the first deployable infrared to millimeter wave space telescopes. We will describe the progress on JWST and introduce other speakers in the session. The JWST will operate at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2, where radiative cooling lowers the telescope and instrument temperatures to about 35 K. It will have an 18-segment beryllium primary mirror with a 25 m2 area fitting inside a 6.6m circumscribed circle, and will provide spectroscopy and imaging over the wavelength range from 0.6 to 28 microns. It is planned for launch in 2011 on an Ariane 5 rocket. The project is a partnership of NASA, ESA, and CSA, and the prime contractor is Northrop Grumman. See http://www.jwst.nasa.gov for more details on JWST.

  15. Progress on the Construction of The PS2 Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The PS2 telescope is the second in a series of 4 telescopes that are being fabricated for the Pan-STARRS project. Its fabrication is currently in progress and this talk will discuss the current state of this fabrication. The optics for this telescope consist of the primary and secondary mirrors along with 3 large corrector lenses. These have already been purchased from Rayleigh Optical Corporation and are mostly complete. We will show the interferometric measurements of the completed elements. The site and enclosure for PS2 have been chosen to be the old LURE north dome which sits adjacent to the current PS1 telescope on Haleakala, Maui. We will show design renderings for the renovations of this enclosure for the PS2 telescope. The design of the PS2 telescope has small, but significant differences that have been initiated by our experience with PS1. We will discuss these changes. Finally, we will discuss the fabrication schedule for PS2. The Pan-STARRS construction project is led by the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy with funding support from the United States Air Force AFRL and in partnership with the Maui High Performance Computing Center and MIT Lincoln Laboratory.

  16. NEWS: Hands-on telescopes!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    As part of the International Astronomical Union Meeting taking place in Manchester in August, the Education Committee of the Royal Astronomical Society is organizing a day conference on using robotic telescopes in schools. `Astronomy research projects for schools and university students' will commence at 10.30 on Friday 18 August 2000. This discussion meeting will explore ways in which students at school and university can participate in research projects, and at the same time increase their understanding of astronomy and develop useful skills. The increase in access to robotic telescopes and to astronomy databases is making research by school and undergraduate students ever more feasible. In addition, useful research can be done with very modest telescope systems, of the sort a school could afford. A range of international speakers will describe and demonstrate the possibilities, as well as leading the discussion. This meeting is being organized by the Education Committee of the Royal Astronomical Society and by Commission 46 of the International Astronomical Union. It is being held at the end of the IAU General Assembly. Those who pay the registration fee for the General Assembly need pay no further fee for attending the discussion meeting; otherwise there is a fee of £10. Refreshments will be provided at no charge. To obtain a registration form for this discussion meeting please contact Alan Pickwick (Alan_C_Pickwick@compuserve.com).

  17. The Lunar Configurable Array Telescope (LCAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.

    1990-01-01

    The desire for a much larger space telescope than HST by astronomers is clearly demonstrated by the attendance at this Workshop. The reality is that a much larger space telescope than the HST collides with cost scaling reality. Coupled with this reality is the fact that any multi-billion dollar science project must have broad-based support from the science community and solid political support at both Presidential and Congressional levels. The HST successor is certainly in the same multi-billion dollar class as the Super Collider of the physics community, a project that has finally achieved the broad support base necessary for funding to follow. Advocacy of a bigger HST on the general grounds that 'bigger is better' will not be sufficient. A new concept needs to be developed that clearly diverges from scaling up of a traditional HST-type space telescope. With these realities in mind we have a few comments regarding the nature of a possible space telescope that may depart from what the organizers of this Workshop had in mind. The national goal declared by the President is Space Station, the Moon and Mars, in that order. Space Station is a potential location where a large system could be assembled prior to being sent into a high orbit. It is not a desirable environment for a large space telescope. Mars is not relevant as an observatory site. The Moon is very relevant for reasons we will address. Our comments are based on the premise of a permanent Lunar Outpost. One of the main arguments for a lunar telescope is a degree of permanency, that is, as long as a Lunar Outpost is maintained. In contrast, the relatively short lifetime of an orbiting telescope is a disadvantage, especially as a cost penalty. Access to a telescope in a 100,000 km orbit for refurbishment and resupply is a major problem with no solution in the present NASA planning. A telescope in conjunction with a Lunar Outpost means the possibility for continual upgrading or modifying the telescope to meet

  18. Inquiry-Based Educational Design for Large-Scale High School Astronomy Projects Using Real Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; McKinnon, David H.; Danaia, Lena

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we outline the theory behind the educational design used to implement a large-scale high school astronomy education project. This design was created in response to the realization of ineffective educational design in the initial early stages of the project. The new design follows an iterative improvement model where the materials and general approach can evolve in response to solicited feedback. The improvement cycle concentrates on avoiding overly positive self-evaluation while addressing relevant external school and community factors while concentrating on backward mapping from clearly set goals. Limiting factors, including time, resources, support and the potential for failure in the classroom, are dealt with as much as possible in the large-scale design allowing teachers the best chance of successful implementation in their real-world classroom. The actual approach adopted following the principles of this design is also outlined, which has seen success in bringing real astronomical data and access to telescopes into the high school classroom.

  19. Telescope technology for space-borne submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, David H.; Helou, George

    1990-01-01

    The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) project which is developing telescope technology needed for future spaceborne submillimeter astronomy missions is described. Four major technical areas are under development. Lighweight composite mirrors and associated materials, precision structures and segmented reflector figure sensing and control are discussed. The objectives of the PSR project, approaches, and project technology status, are reported.

  20. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Allured, Ryan; Atkins, Carolyn; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The future of x-ray astronomy depends upon development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (>1 sq m) and finer angular resolution(<1).Combined with the special requirements of nested grazing incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of spaceborne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging. Achieving this goal will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (>100 sq m) of lightweight (1 kg/sq m areal density) high quality mirrors-possibly entailing active (in-space adjustable) alignment and figure correction. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward large area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes. Key words: X-ray telescopes, x-ray optics, active optics, electroactive devices, silicon mirrors, differential deposition, ion implantation.

  1. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  2. Key Recommendations from the MedtecHTA Project.

    PubMed

    Tarricone, Rosanna; Torbica, Aleksandra; Drummond, Michael

    2017-02-01

    There are particular characteristics of Medical Devices, such as the device-user interaction, the incremental nature of innovation and the broader organizational impact that lead to additional challenges for health technology assessment (HTA). The project explored key aspects of the conduct and methods of HTA for MDs. Systematic reviews and original research studies were conducted to determine improvements in processes and methods that could enhance the potential for HTA and optimize the diffusion of MDs. Regulatory processes for MDs should be more closely aligned, the HTA evaluative framework should be harmonized and processes for conditional coverage and evidence development should be used. The methods for HTA should consider MDs as complex interventions, require the establishment of high quality registries, consider an iterative approach to the evaluation over time, recognize and allow for the particular characteristics of devices and use appropriate approaches for confounder adjustment in comparative effectiveness studies. To optimize the diffusion, a common classification should be developed across countries in order to facilitate international comparisons, factors driving diffusion should be explored in HTA reports and physicians' personal goals and motivation should be better understood. The key recommendations of the MedtecHTA project should improve the conduct and use of HTA for MDs. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Engineering Specification for Large-aperture UVO Space Telescopes Derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Smith, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is a three year effort initiated in FY12 to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. A key accomplishment is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints.

  4. San Pedro Martir Telescope: Mexican design endeavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Ramirez, Gengis K.; Bringas-Rico, Vicente; Reyes, Noe; Uribe, Jorge; Lopez, Aldo; Tovar, Carlos; Caballero, Xochitl; Del-Llano, Luis; Martinez, Cesar; Macias, Eduardo; Lee, William; Carramiñana, Alberto; Richer, Michael; González, Jesús; Sanchez, Beatriz; Lucero, Diana; Manuel, Rogelio; Segura, Jose; Rubio, Saul; Gonzalez, German; Hernandez, Obed; García, Mary; Lazaro, Jose; Rosales-Ortega, Fabian; Herrera, Joel; Sierra, Gerardo; Serrano, Hazael

    2016-08-01

    The Telescopio San Pedro Martir (TSPM) is a new ground-based optical telescope project, with a 6.5 meters honeycomb primary mirror, to be built in the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) located in Baja California, Mexico. The OAN-SPM has an altitude of 2830 meters above sea level; it is among the best location for astronomical observation in the world. It is located 1830 m higher than the atmospheric inversion layer with 70% of photometric nights, 80% of spectroscopic nights and a sky brightness up to 22 mag/arcsec2. The TSPM will be suitable for general science projects intended to improve the knowledge of the universe established on the Official Mexican Program for Science, Technology and Innovation 2014-2018. The telescope efforts are headed by two Mexican institutions in name of the Mexican astronomical community: the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica. The telescope has been financially supported mainly by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT). It is under development by Mexican scientists and engineers from the Center for Engineering and Industrial Development. This development is supported by a Mexican-American scientific cooperation, through a partnership with the University of Arizona (UA), and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). M3 Engineering and Technology Corporation in charge of enclosure and building design. The TSPM will be designed to allow flexibility and possible upgrades in order to maximize resources. Its optical and mechanical designs are based upon those of the Magellan and MMT telescopes. The TSPM primary mirror and its cell will be provided by the INAOE and UA. The telescope will be optimized from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared wavelength range (0.35-2.5 m), but will allow observations up to 26μm. The TSPM will initially offer a f/5 Cassegrain focal station. Later, four folded Cassegrain and

  5. Building the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous presentation, I reported on how the freak collapse of the NRAO 300-ft transit radio telescope led to the inclusion of $75 million for a new radio telescope in the 1989 Congressional Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act. But, this was only the beginning. NRAO was faced with challenging specifications and an unworkable schedule, but there was no design and no project team. Only one bid was even close to the Congressional appropriation. In an attempt to meet the unrealistic antenna delivery date, the contractor started construction of the foundation and fabrication of antenna members before the design was finished, leading to retrofits, redesign, and multiple delays. The antenna contractor was twice sold to other companies leading to further delays and cost escalation. In order to recoup their mounting losses, the new owners sued NRAO for $29 million for claimed design changes, and NRAO countersued demanding to be reimbursed for added project management costs and lost scientific data resulting from the seven-year delay in the completion of the telescope. Legal fees and a small net award in favor of the contractor left NRAO and the NSF with a nine million dollar bill which NSF handled by an innovative accounting adjustment.

  6. Management of optics. [for HEAO-2 X ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, T. E.; Russell, M.

    1981-01-01

    American Science and Engineering, Inc., designed the large X-ray optic for the HEAO-2 X-ray Telescope. The key element in this project was the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), subcontracting the fabrication of the optical surfaces and their assembly and alignment. The roles and organization of the key participants in the creation of HRMA are defined, and the degree of interaction between the groups is described. Management of this effort was extremely complex because of the intricate weaving of responsibilities, and AS&E, as HEAO-2 Program managers, needed to be well versed in the scientific objectives, the technical requirements, the program requirements, and the subcontract management. Understanding these factors was essential for implementing both technical and management controls, such as schedule and budget constraints, in-process control, residence requirements, and scientist review and feedback. Despite unforeseen technical problems and interaction differences, the HEAO-2 was built on schedule and to specification.

  7. Simulation of Telescope Detectivity for Geo Survey and Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, P.

    2014-09-01

    As the number of space debris on Earths Orbit increases steadily, the need to survey, track and catalogue them becomes of key importance. In this context, CNES has been using the TAROT Telescopes (Rapid Telescopes for Transient Objects owned and operated by CNRS) for several years to conduct studies about space surveillance and tracking. Today, two testbeds of services using the TAROT telescopes are running every night: one for GEO situational awareness and the second for debris tracking. Additionally to the CNES research activity on space surveillance and tracking domain, an operational collision avoidance service for LEO and GEO satellites is in place at CNES for several years. This service named CAESAR (Conjunction Analysis and Evaluation: Alerts and Recommendations) is used by CNES as well as by external customers. As the optical debris tracking testbed based on TAROT telescopes is the first step toward an operational provider of GEO measures that could be used by CAESAR, simulations have been done to help choosing the sites and types of telescopes that could be added in the GEO survey and debris tracking telescope network. One of the distinctive characteristics of the optical observation of space debris compared to traditional astronomic observation is the need to observe objects at low elevations. The two mains reasons for this are the need to observe the GEO belt from non-equatorial sites and the need to observe debris at longitudes far from the telescope longitude. This paper presents the results of simulations of the detectivity for GEO debris of various telescopes and sites, based on models of the GEO belt, the atmosphere and the instruments. One of the conclusions is that clever detection of faint streaks and spread sources by image processing is one of the major keys to improve the detection of debris on the GEO belt.

  8. A TREETOPS simulation of the Hubble Space Telescope-High Gain Antenna interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Virtually any project dealing with the control of a Large Space Structure (LSS) will involve some level of verification by digital computer simulation. While the Hubble Space Telescope might not normally be included in a discussion of LSS, it is presented to highlight a recently developed simulation and analysis program named TREETOPS. TREETOPS provides digital simulation, linearization, and control system interaction of flexible, multibody spacecraft which admit to a point-connected tree topology. The HST application of TREETOPS is intended to familiarize the LSS community with TREETOPS by presenting a user perspective of its key features.

  9. Educational Studies of Cosmic Rays with a Telescope of Geiger-Muller Counters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibig, T.; Kolodziejczak, K.; Pierzynski, R.; Sobczak, R.

    2006-01-01

    A group of high school students (XII Liceum) in the framework of the Roland Maze Project has built a compact telescope of three Geiger-Muller counters. The connection between the telescope and a PC computer was also created and programmed by students involved in the Project. This has allowed students to use their equipment to perform serious…

  10. Alternative designs for space x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Pína, L.; Maršíková, Veronika; Černá, Daniela; Inneman, A.; Tichý, V.

    2017-11-01

    The X-ray optics is a key element of space X-ray telescopes, as well as other X-ray imaging instruments. The grazing incidence X-ray lenses represent the important class of X-ray optics. Most of grazing incidence (reflective) X-ray imaging systems used in astronomy but also in other (laboratory) applications are based on the Wolter 1 (or modified) arrangement. But there are also other designs and configurations proposed, used and considered for future applications both in space and in laboratory. The Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) lenses as well as various types of Lobster-Eye optics and MCP/Micropore optics serve as an example. Analogously to Wolter lenses, the X-rays are mostly reflected twice in these systems to create focal images. Various future projects in X-ray astronomy and astrophysics will require large segments with multiple thin shells or foils. The large Kirkpatrick-Baez modules, as well as the large Lobster-Eye X-ray telescope modules in Schmidt arrangement may serve as examples. All related space projects will require high quality and light segmented shells (bent or flat foils) with high X-ray reflectivity and excellent mechanical stability. The Multi Foil Optics (MFO) approach represent a promising alternative for both LE and K-B X-ray optical modules. Several types of reflecting substrates may be considered for these applications, with emphasis on thin float glass sheets and, more recently, high quality silicon wafers. This confirms the importance of non-Wolter X-ray optics designs for the future. The alternative designs require novel reflective substrates which are also discussed in the paper.

  11. Life Extension Activities for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith D.; Pepe, Joyce A. K.; Prior, Michael

    2004-01-01

    With the cancellation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), the HST Project will face numerous challenges to keep the Telescope operating during the remainder of the decade. As part of the SM4, the HST Project had planned to install various upgrades to the Telescope including the installation of new batteries and new rate integrating gyros. Without these upgrades, reliability analysis indicates that the spacecraft will lose the capability to conduct science operations later this decade. The HST team will be severely challenged to maximize the Telescope's remaining operational lifetime, while still trying to maximize - its science output and quality. Two of the biggest areas of concern are the age and condition of the batteries and gyros. Together they offer the largest potential extension in Telescope lifetime and present the biggest challenges to the HST team. The six Ni-H batteries on HST are the original batteries from launch. With fourteen years of operational life, these batteries have collectively lasted longer than any other comparable mission. Yet as with all batteries, their capacity has been declining. Engineers are examining various methods to prolong the life of these mission critical batteries, and retard the rate of degradation. This paper will focus on these and other efforts to prolong the life of the HST, thus enabling it to remain a world-class observatory for as long as possible.

  12. The Chajnantor Sub/Millimeter Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golwala, Sunil

    2018-01-01

    We are developing the Chajnantor Sub/millimeter Survey Telescope, a project to build a 30-m telescope operating at wavelengths as short as 850 µm with 1 degree field of view for imaging and multi-object spectroscopic surveys. This project will provide massive new data sets for studying star formation at high redshift and in the local universe, feedback mechanisms in galaxy evolution, the structure of galaxy clusters, and the cosmological peculiar velocity field. We will highlight CSST's capabilities for studying galaxy evolution, where it will: trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies from high redshift to the z ≍ 1-3 epoch when they dominate the cosmic star formation rate; connect this population to the high-redshift rest-frame UV/optical galaxy population; use these dusty galaxies, the most biased overdensities, to guide ultra-deep followup at z > 3.5 and possibly z > 7; measure the brightness of important submm/FIR spectral lines like [CII]; search for molecular and atomic outflows; and do calorimetry of the CGM via the thermal SZ effect. We will describe the expected surveys addressing these science goals, the novel telescope design, and the planned survey instrumentation.

  13. A Galaxy Zoo - WorldWide Telescope Mashup: Expanding User Defined Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebbert, Jarod; Sands, M.; Fay, J.; Smith, A.; Gay, P. L.; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2010-01-01

    We present a new way of exploring your favorite Galaxy Zoo galaxies within the context of the sky using Microsoft Research's WorldWide Telescope. Galaxy Zoo has a fantastic community that is eager to learn and contribute to science through morphological classifications of galaxies. WorldWide Telescope is an interactive observatory that allows users to explore the sky. WorldWide Telescope uses images from the world's best telescopes, including the galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. WorldWide Telescope provides a fantastic sense of size and distance that is hard to experience in Galaxy Zoo. Creating tours from favorite galaxies directly from Galaxy Zoo aims to solve this dilemma.The incorporation of Galaxy Zoo and WorldWide telescope provides a great resource for users to learn more about the galaxies they are classifying. Users can now explore the areas around certain galaxies and view information about that location from within WorldWide Telescope. Not only does this encourage self-motivated research but after tours are created they can be shared with anyone. We hope this will help spread citizen science to different audiences via email, Facebook, and Twitter.Without the WorldWide Telescope team at Microsoft Research this project would not have been possible. Please go start exploring at http://wwt.galaxyzoo.org. This project was funded through the Microsoft Research Academic Program.

  14. G-133: A soft x ray solar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Memorie K.; Campbell, Branton; Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Moody, J. Ward

    1992-01-01

    The GOLDHELOX Project, NASA payload number G-133, is a robotic soft x ray solar telescope designed and built by an organization of undergraduate students. The telescope is designed to observe the sun at a wavelength of 171 to 181 A. Since we require observations free from atmospheric interference, the telescope will be launched in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister with a Motorized Door Assembly (MDA). In this paper we primarily discuss the most important elements of the telescope itself. We also elaborate on some of the technical difficulties associated with doing good science in space on a small budget (about $100,000) and mention ways in which controlling the instrument environment has reduced the complexity of the system and thus saved us money.

  15. Update on Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Models for Ground and Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper reports on recent revisions and improvements to our ground telescope cost model and refinements of our understanding of space telescope cost models. One interesting observation is that while space telescopes are 50X to 100X more expensive than ground telescopes, their respective scaling relationships are similar. Another interesting speculation is that the role of technology development may be different between ground and space telescopes. For ground telescopes, the data indicates that technology development tends to reduce cost by approximately 50% every 20 years. But for space telescopes, there appears to be no such cost reduction because we do not tend to re-fly similar systems. Thus, instead of reducing cost, 20 years of technology development may be required to enable a doubling of space telescope capability. Other findings include: mass should not be used to estimate cost; spacecraft and science instrument costs account for approximately 50% of total mission cost; and, integration and testing accounts for only about 10% of total mission cost.

  16. New 50-m-class single-dish telescope: Large Submillimeter Telescope (LST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Oshima, Tai; Ishii, Shun

    2016-08-01

    We report on a plan to construct a 50-m-class single-dish telescope, the Large Submillimeter Telescope (LST). The conceptual design and key science behind the LST are presented, together with its tentative specifications. This telescope is optimized for wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys in the 70-420 GHz frequency range, which spans the main atmospheric windows at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths for good observation sites such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) site in Chile. We also target observations at higher frequencies of up to 1 THz, using an inner high-precision surface. Active surface control is required in order to correct gravitational and thermal deformations of the surface, and will be useful for correction of the wind-load deformation. The LST will facilitate new discovery spaces such as wide-field imaging with both continuum and spectral lines, along with new developments for time-domain science. Through exploitation of its synergy with ALMA and other telescopes, the LST will contribute to research on a wide range of topics in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics, e.g., astrochemistry, star formation in our Galaxy and galaxies, the evolution of galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, the search for transients such as γ-ray burst reverse shocks produced during the epoch of re-ionization, electromagnetic follow up of detected gravitational wave sources, and examination of general relativity in the vicinity of super massive black holes via submillimeter very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI).

  17. Large infrared survey telescope for Antarctica at Dome C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari-Toniolo, Marco; Epchtein, Nicolas; Corcione, Leonardo; Marenzi, Anna R.

    2002-12-01

    The first results obtained from the Site Campaigns performed in the last years in different locations of the Antarctic Continent and the acquired experience obtained from the first astronomical IR measures with SPIREX, have in fact opened the way to a present time challenge, about the installation of a large IR Telescope in the best possible site on earth, that will be competitive with the present frontier of ground based and space telescopes in the Infrared range. A project in this context has been submitted to the Italian Plan for Antarctic Research (PNRA), in collaboration with French and Australian colleagues that began to be funded this year. The project entitled "A preliminary study for a Large Infrared Telescope at Dome C", will lay the bases for the realization of a non-conventional instrument for the mid-IR domain, suited for the very particular and severe Antarctic situation. In this first paper a general overview is done about the future development plan for the GTA (Grande Telescopio Antartico), paying attention to the following themes: Large aperture and low emissivity and high reliability of Antarctic IR telescopes High resolution and very high sensitivity objectives for a mid-ir Survey Telescope. Non-conventional observing modes for quasi drift-scan measurements.

  18. Undergraduate Education with the WIYN 0.9-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Several models have been explored at Indiana University Bloomington for undergraduate student engagement in astronomy using the WIYN 0.9-m telescope at Kitt Peak. These models include individual student research projects using the telescope, student observations as part of an observational techniques course for majors, and enrichment activities for non-science majors in general education courses. Where possible, we arrange for students to travel to the telescope. More often, we are able to use simple online tools such as Skype and VNC viewers to give students an authentic observing experience. Experiences with the telescope motivate students to learn basic content in astronomy, including the celestial sphere, the electromagnetic spectrum, telescopes and detectors, the variety of astronomical objects, date reduction processes, image analysis, and color image creation and appreciation. The WIYN 0.9-m telescope is an essential tool for our program at all levels of undergraduate education

  19. Large-Aperture, Three Mirror Telescopes for Near-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.

    In this era when Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is a national priority and optical-infrared telescopic sensor development is underway, cost-benefit analyses of competing approaches are necessary and appropriate. The DOD is presently investing in a new three-mirror telescope for SSA. At the same time, the Air Force, various universities and private research organizations are either studying or building wide-field telescopes with similar capabilities, but in most cases, at a significantly lower cost. Much of the expense for the DOD system appears driven by certain design choices which were advertised as necessary to fulfill the mission. Design details which would allow an independent analysis have not been published and no public comparison with other approaches is known to exist. Most telescope designs however, can be closely approximated from their optical configuration and imaging performance specifications. An optical designer will tell you that field curvature is one of the five monochromatic aberrations which they try to eliminate. The fact that one DOD development effort considers field curvature a design feature immediately draws attention to the project. This coupled with the paucity of published information and the very high development cost makes this program irresistible for comparison with competing approaches. This paper examines the likely design and performance of a proxy telescope intended to find NEOs, compares and contrasts that telescope with similar, but lower cost on-going projects, and examines the predictable impacts of reproducing such a telescope and placing multiple copies around the globe. The study primarily concentrates on performance measured in terms of search rate in square degrees per hour vs. object visual magnitude. Other considerations such as cost, transportability, availability of replacement components and ease of installation are also considered.

  20. MeerLICHT and BlackGEM: custom-built telescopes to detect faint optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Steven; Groot, Paul; Woudt, Patrick; Klein Wolt, Marc; McBride, Vanessa; Nelemans, Gijs; Körding, Elmar; Pretorius, Margaretha L.; Roelfsema, Ronald; Bettonvil, Felix; Balster, Harry; Bakker, Roy; Dolron, Peter; van Elteren, Arjen; Elswijk, Eddy; Engels, Arno; Fender, Rob; Fokker, Marc; de Haan, Menno; Hagoort, Klaas; de Hoog, Jasper; ter Horst, Rik; van der Kevie, Giel; Kozłowski, Stanisław; Kragt, Jan; Lech, Grzegorz; Le Poole, Rudolf; Lesman, Dirk; Morren, Johan; Navarro, Ramon; Paalberends, Willem-Jelle; Paterson, Kerry; Pawłaszek, Rafal; Pessemier, Wim; Raskin, Gert; Rutten, Harrie; Scheers, Bart; Schuil, Menno; Sybilski, Piotr W.

    2016-07-01

    We present the MeerLICHT and BlackGEM telescopes, which are wide-field optical telescopes that are currently being built to study transient phenomena, gravitational wave counterparts and variable stars. The telescopes have 65 cm primary mirrors and a 2.7 square degree field-of-view. The MeerLICHT and BlackGEM projects have different science goals, but will use identical telescopes. The first telescope, MeerLICHT, will be commissioned at Sutherland (South Africa) in the first quarter of 2017. It will co-point with MeerKAT to collect optical data commensurate with the radio observations. After careful analysis of MeerLICHT's performance, three telescopes of the same type will be commissioned in La Silla (Chile) in 2018 to form phase I of the BlackGEM array. BlackGEM aims at detecting and characterizing optical counterparts of gravitational wave events detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo. In this contribution we present an overview of the science goals, the design and the status of the two projects.

  1. Systems engineering in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project: an application of model based systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claver, C. F.; Selvy, Brian M.; Angeli, George; Delgado, Francisco; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Hascall, Patrick; Lotz, Paul; Marshall, Stuart; Schumacher, German; Sebag, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project was an early adopter of SysML and Model Based Systems Engineering practices. The LSST project began using MBSE for requirements engineering beginning in 2006 shortly after the initial release of the first SysML standard. Out of this early work the LSST's MBSE effort has grown to include system requirements, operational use cases, physical system definition, interfaces, and system states along with behavior sequences and activities. In this paper we describe our approach and methodology for cross-linking these system elements over the three classical systems engineering domains - requirement, functional and physical - into the LSST System Architecture model. We also show how this model is used as the central element to the overall project systems engineering effort. More recently we have begun to use the cross-linked modeled system architecture to develop and plan the system verification and test process. In presenting this work we also describe "lessons learned" from several missteps the project has had with MBSE. Lastly, we conclude by summarizing the overall status of the LSST's System Architecture model and our plans for the future as the LSST heads toward construction.

  2. National Large Solar Telescope of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Mikhail

    One of the most important task of the modern solar physics is multi-wavelength observations of the small-scale structure of solar atmosphere on different heights, including chromosphere and corona. To do this the large-aperture telescopes are necessary. At present time there several challenging projects of the large (and even giant) solar telescopes in the world are in the process of construction or designing , the most known ones among them are 4-meter class telescopes ATST in USA and EST in Europe. Since 2013 the development of the new Large Solar Telescope (LST) with 3 meter diameter of the main mirror is started in Russia as a part (sub-project) of National Heliogeophysical Complex (NHGC) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It should be located at the Sayan solar observatory on the altitude more then 2000 m. To avoid numerous problems of the off-axis optical telescopes (despite of the obvious some advantages of the off-axis configuration) and to meet to available financial budget, the classical on-axis Gregorian scheme on the alt-azimuth mount has been chosen. The scientific equipment of the LST-3 will include several narrow-band tunable filter devices and spectrographs for different wavelength bands, including infrared. The units are installed either at the Nasmyth focus or/and on the rotating coude platform. To minimize the instrumental polarization the polarization analyzer is located near diagonal mirror after M2 mirror. High order adaptive optics is used to achieve the diffraction limited performances. It is expected that after some modification of the optical configuration the LST-3 will operate as an approximately 1-m mirror coronograph in the near infrared spectral lines. Possibilities for stellar observations during night time are provided as well.

  3. James Webb Space Telescope - Applying Lessons Learned to I&T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Jones, Ronald; Fatig, Curtis; Wasiak, Francis

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is part of a new generation of spacecraft acquiring large data volumes from remote regions in space. To support a mission such as the JWST, it is imperative that lessons learned from the development of previous missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Earth Observing System mission set be applied throughout the development and operational lifecycles. One example of a key lesson that should be applied is that core components, such as the command and telemetry system and the project database, should be developed early, used throughout development and testing, and evolved into the operational system. The purpose of applying lessons learned is to reap benefits in programmatic or technical parameters such as risk reduction, end product quality, cost efficiency, and schedule optimization. In the cited example, the early development and use of the operational command and telemetry system as well as the establishment of the intended operational database will allow these components to be used by the developers of various spacecraft components such that development, testing, and operations will all use the same core components. This will reduce risk through the elimination of transitions between development and operational components and improve end product quality by extending the verification of those components through continual use. This paper will discuss key lessons learned that have been or are being applied to the JWST Ground Segment integration and test program.

  4. A concept for a thirty-meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, Denis; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Dohlen, Kjetil; Ferrari, Marc; Hammer, Francois; Sayede, Frederic; Rigaud, Francois

    2004-07-01

    In May 2000, the Canada-France-Hawaii (CFHT) Telescope Science Advisory Committee solicited the Canadian, Hawaiian and French communities to propose concepts to replace the present CFH telescope by a larger telescope. Three groups were selected: Carlberg et al. (2001) in Canada, Khun et al. (2001) in Hawaii and Burgarella et al. (2001a) in France. The reports were delivered to CFHT in May 2001 and are now available throughout the CFHT website. One of the main constraints was due to the fact that the new and larger telescope should use as much as possible the existing site and be compliant with the Mauna Kea Science reserve Master Plan (2000). This plan analyses all aspects of the Mauna Kea summit but most of them are related to the facts that the mountain must be considered as a sacred area for indigenous Hawaiian people and that the ecosystem is fragile. But in addition, the plan also tries to account for the fact that the summit of Mauna Kea is a world famous site for astronomy. The points that we can highlight in the context of our project are of two types. Since then, the project evolved and Hawaii is not considered as the one and only site to build an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). Moreover, the size of the primary mirror, which was strongly dependent on the above constraints, is no more limited to the 16 - 20 m which was our conclusion at this time. Nevertheless, the three points of the resolution are still valid and since then, we have kept on working on the concept by launching differnt follow-up studies that are necessary to start such a project. Of course, the main point is the Science Objectives which drive the main specifications for an ELT. But related technical studies are also mandatory e.g. Adaptive Optics, Building of a primary mirror larger than 30 m in diameter, Image Quality as a function of the segment size and shape.

  5. Origins Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha R.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. I will summarize the OST STDT, mission design and instruments, key science drivers, and the study plan over the next two years.

  6. Telescopes in Education: the Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Vanlew, K.; Melsheimer, T.; Melsheimer, L.; Rideout, C.; Patterson, T.

    1997-12-01

    A second observatory of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project is in the planning stages, with hopes to be in use by fall 1998. The Little Thompson Observatory will be located adjacent to Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. TIE has offered the observatory a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope until midnight; after that, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet. The first TIE observatory is a 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson, already booked through July 1998. That telescope has been in use every clear night for the past four years by up to 50 schools per month. Students remotely control the telescope over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The estimated cost of the Little Thompson Observatory is roughly \\170,000. However, donations of labor and materials have reduced the final price tag closer to \\40,000. Habitat for Humanity is organized to construct the dome, classrooms, and other facilities. Tom and Linda Melsheimer, who developed the remote telescope control system for the University of Denver's Mount Evans Observatory, are donating a similar control system. The formally-trained, all-volunteer staff will be comprised of local residents, teachers and amateur astronomers. Utilities and Internet access will be provided by the Thompson School District.

  7. Instrumentation progress at the Giant Magellan Telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, George H.; Bernstein, R.; Bouchez, A.; Colless, M.; Crane, Jeff; DePoy, D.; Espeland, B.; Hare, Tyson; Jaffe, D.; Lawrence, J.; Marshall, J.; McGregor, P.; Shectman, Stephen; Sharp, R.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Uomoto, Alan; Walls, B.

    2016-08-01

    Instrument development for the 24m Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is described: current activities, progress, status, and schedule. One instrument team has completed its preliminary design and is currently beginning its final design (GCLEF, an optical 350-950 nm, high-resolution and precision radial velocity echelle spectrograph). A second instrument team is in its conceptual design phase (GMACS, an optical 350-950 nm, medium resolution, 6-10 arcmin field, multi-object spectrograph). A third instrument team is midway through its preliminary design phase (GMTIFS, a near-IR YJHK diffraction-limited imager/integral-field-spectrograph), focused on risk reduction prototyping and design optimization. A fourth instrument team is currently fabricating the 5 silicon immersion gratings needed to begin its preliminary design phase (GMTNIRS, a simultaneous JHKLM high-resolution, AO-fed, echelle spectrograph). And, another instrument team is focusing on technical development and prototyping (MANIFEST, a facility robotic, multifiber feed, with a 20 arcmin field of view). In addition, a medium-field (6 arcmin, 0.06 arcsec/pix) optical imager will support telescope and AO commissioning activities, and will excel at narrow-band imaging. In the spirit of advancing synergies with other groups, the challenges of running an ELT instrument program and opportunities for cross-ELT collaborations are discussed.

  8. The tail wags the dog: managing large telescope construction projects with lagging requirements and creeping scope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a perfect world, large telescopes would be developed and built in logical, sequential order. First, scientific requirements would be agreed upon, vetted, and fully developed. From these, instrument designers would define their own subsystem requirements and specifications, and then flesh out preliminary designs. This in turn would then allow optic designers to specify lens and mirror requirements, which would permit telescope mounts and drives to be designed. Finally, software and safety systems, enclosures and domes, buildings, foundations, and infrastructures would be specified and developed. Unfortunately, the order of most large telescope projects is the opposite of this sequence. We don't live in a perfect world. Scientists usually don't want to commit to operational requirements until late in the design process, instrument designers frequently change and update their designs due to improving filter and camera technologies, and mount and optics engineers seem to live by the words "more" and "better" throughout their own design processes. Amplifying this is the fact that site construction of buildings and domes are usually the earliest critical path items on the schedule, and are often subject to lengthy permitting and environmental processes. These facility and support items therefore must quickly get underway, often before operational requirements are fully considered. Mirrors and mounts also have very long lead times for fabrication, which in turn necessitates that they are specified and purchased early. All of these factors can result in expensive and time-consuming change orders when requirements are finalized and/or shift late in the process. This paper discusses some of these issues encountered on large, multi-year construction projects. It also presents some techniques and ideas to minimize these effects on schedule and cost. Included is a discussion on the role of Interface Control Documents (ICDs), the importance (and danger) of making big

  9. Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Brian

    2016-06-01

    The key driver for a telescope's sensitivityis directly related to the size of t he mirror area that collects light from the objects being observed.The "Search for Life" via imaging of exoplanets is a mission that requires extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. The HDST envisioned for this mission would have an aperture >10 m, which is a larger payload than can be delivered to space using a single launch vehicle. Building and assembling the mirror segments enabling large telescopes will likely require multiple launches and assembly in space. The Optical Telescope Assembly for HDST is a primary mission cost driver. Enabling affordable solutions for this next generation of large aperture space-based telescope are needed.This reports on the concept for the MODEST, which demonstrates on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of a precision optical telescope in space. It will facilitate demonstration of active correction of phase and mirror shape. MODEST is proposed to be delivered to the ISS using standard Express Logistics Carriers and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets. Post-assembly value includes space, ground, and environmental studies, a testbed for new instruments, and a tool for student's exploration of space. This demonstration program for next generation mirror technology provides significant risk reduction and demonstrates the technology in a six-mirror phased telescope. Key features of the demonstration include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control that allows on-orbit optimization and demonstration of precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Ceramic Matrix Composite that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion. It has been demonstrated

  10. Liverpool Telescope and Liverpool Telescope 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, N. R.; Jermak, H.; Marchant, J. M.; Mottram, C. J.; Piascik, A.; Smith, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Liverpool Telescope is a fully robotic optical/near-infrared telescope with a 2-metre clear aperture, located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos on the Canary Island of La Palma. The telescope is owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University, with financial support from the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council. The telescope began routine science operations in 2004 and is a common-user facility with time available through a variety of committees via an open, peer reviewed process. Seven simultaneously mounted instruments support a broad science programme, with a focus on transient follow-up and other time domain topics well suited to the characteristics of robotic observing. Development has also begun on a successor facility, with the working title `Liverpool Telescope 2', to capitalise on the new era of time domain astronomy which will be brought about by the next generation of survey facilities such as LSST. The fully robotic Liverpool Telescope 2 will have a 4-metre aperture and an improved response time. In this paper we provide an overview of the current status of both facilities.

  11. Innovative space x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Pina, L.; Sveda, L.; Ticha, H.; Brozek, V.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the progress in innovative X-ray mirror development with focus on requirements of future X-ray astronomy space projects. Various future projects in X-ray astronomy and astrophysics will require large lightweight but highly accurate segments with multiple thin shells or foils. The large Wolter 1 grazing incidence multiple mirror arrays, the Kirkpatrick-Baez modules, as well as the large Lobster-Eye X-ray telescope modules in Schmidt arrangement may serve as examples. All these space projects will require high quality and light segmented shells (shaped, bent or flat foils) with high X-ray reflectivity and excellent mechanical stability.

  12. A robotic reflective Schmidt telescope for Dome C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Steinbach, M.

    2004-10-01

    This paper lays out a wide-field robotic Schmidt telescope (RST) for the Antarctic site Dome C. The telescope is based on 80/120cm reflective Schmidt optics, built originally for a space project, and a mosaic of four 7.5k×7.5k 8-μm thinned CCDs from the PEPSI/LBT wafer run. The telescope's total field of view (FOV) would be 5o circular (minimum 3o× 3o square) with a plate scale of 0.7 arcsec per pixel. Limiting magnitude is expected to be V=21.5mag in 60 sec for a field of 9 square degrees.

  13. New robotic telescopes by Halfmann-Teleskoptechnik GmbH and Tuparev Technologies Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Karsten; Hessman, Frederic V.; Tuparev, Georg; Atanasova, Ekatarina; Pessev, Peter

    2008-07-01

    We will present aspects of the installation, commissioning, software development, and early operation of several new robotic telescopes: 1) the 1.2-m MONET/South telescope at Sutherland/ZA, the second Halfmann telescope for the MONET telescope network (the other telescope has been in operation at McDonald Observatory in Texas since early 2006); 2) a siderostat for a 0.5-m vacuum tower telescope for the new physics building of the Georg-August-Universitat Göttingen and 3) new developments for smaller (down to 0.5m) aperture telescopes. Special emphasis will be given to drive technology: using torque motors we adjust maximum slewing speeds of 10°/sec as standard. Although sufficient for most projects we are investigating even faster slewing speeds.

  14. Remote observing with the Nickel Telescope at Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, Bryant; Chloros, Konstantinos; Gates, John; Deich, William T. S.; Gates, Elinor; Kibrick, Robert

    2008-07-01

    We describe a project to enable remote observing on the Nickel 1-meter Telescope at Lick Observatory. The purpose was to increase the subscription rate and create more economical means for graduate- and undergraduate students to observe with this telescope. The Nickel Telescope resides in a 125 year old dome on Mount Hamilton. Remote observers may work from any of the University of California (UC) remote observing facilities that have been created to support remote work at both Keck Observatory and Lick Observatory. The project included hardware and software upgrades to enable computer control of all equipment that must be operated by the astronomer; a remote observing architecture that is closely modeled on UCO/Lick's work to implement remote observing between UC campuses and Keck Observatory; new policies to ensure safety of Observatory staff and equipment, while ensuring that the telescope subsystems would be suitably configured for remote use; and new software to enforce the safety-related policies. The results increased the subscription rate from a few nights per month to nearly full subscription, and has spurred the installation of remote observing sites at more UC campuses. Thanks to the increased automation and computer control, local observing has also benefitted and is more efficient. Remote observing is now being implemented for the Shane 3- meter telescope.

  15. So You Want a Meade LX Telescope!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Lawrence

    Perhaps every generation of astronomers believes that their telescopes are the best that have ever been. They are surely all correct! The great leap of our time is that computer-designed and machined parts have led to more accurately made components that give the astronomer ever better views. The manual skills of the craftsman mirror grinder have been transformed into the new-age skills of the programmer and the machine maker. (The new products did not end the work of craftsman telescope makers, though. Many highly skilled amateur/professional opticians continued to produce good-quality mirrors that are still seen today.) Amateur-priced telescopes are now capable of highly accurate tracking and computer control that were once only the province of professionals. This has greatly increased the possibilities of serious astronomy projects for which tailor-made software has been developed. Add a CCD camera to these improved telescopes (see Chap. 3), and you bring a whole new dimension to your astronomy (see Fig. 1.1).

  16. Development of High Resolution Hard X-Ray Telescope with Multilayer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, John C. (Technical Monitor); Gorenstein, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The major objective of this program is the development of a focusing hard X-ray telescope with moderately high angular resolution, i .e. comparable to the telescopes of XMM-Newton. The key ingredients of the telescope are a depth graded multilayer coatings and electroformed nickel substrates that are considerably lighter weight than those of previous missions such as XMM-Newton, which have had conventional single metal layer reflective coatings and have operated at much lower energy X-rays. The ultimate target mission for this technology is the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) of the Constellation X-Ray Mission. However, it is applicable to potential SMEX and MIDEX programs as well.

  17. LSST telescope and site status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressler, William J.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Project1 received its construction authorization from the National Science Foundation in August 2014. The Telescope and Site (T and S) group has made considerable progress towards completion in subsystems required to support the scope of the LSST science mission. The LSST goal is to conduct a wide, fast, deep survey via a 3-mirror wide field of view optical design, a 3.2-Gpixel camera, and an automated data processing system. The summit facility is currently under construction on Cerro Pachón in Chile, with major vendor subsystem deliveries and integration planned over the next several years. This paper summarizes the status of the activities of the T and S group, tasked with design, analysis, and construction of the summit and base facilities and infrastructure necessary to control the survey, capture the light, and calibrate the data. All major telescope work package procurements have been awarded to vendors and are in varying stages of design and fabrication maturity and completion. The unique M1M3 primary/tertiary mirror polishing effort is completed and the mirror now resides in storage waiting future testing. Significant progress has been achieved on all the major telescope subsystems including the summit facility, telescope mount assembly, dome, hexapod and rotator systems, coating plant, base facility, and the calibration telescope. In parallel, in-house efforts including the software needed to control the observatory such as the scheduler and the active optics control, have also seen substantial advancement. The progress and status of these subsystems and future LSST plans during this construction phase are presented.

  18. Hunting Spinning Asteroids with the Faulkes Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The Faulkes telescopes are proving a dab hand at allowing schools and amateurs to do real science. The author discusses the latest Faulkes research project, and his record-breaking discovery that was pert of it.

  19. Restoration of an old telescope: a pedagogic opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The "Lycée Jules Haag" High School is a former clockwork learning school. It has a telescope, built in the 1930's, which was used to calibrate time for watches. Nowadays, this telescope is no longer of any practical use, and has been classified for its historical interest. Thanks to the financial help of local companies, a new pedagogic project has started inside our school. This astronomical device is going to be repaired, and many teachers and classes will be involved. This will create opportunities during and after the restoration. Our High School will have practical classes that may work around the motorisation of the telescope and creating a new eyepiece. When the telescope is operational, we can use this device for physics and optics classes, and organise an astronomical club to do some day and night observations.

  20. Wide Field and Planetary Camera for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    The Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera instrument, presently under construction, will be used to map the observable universe and to study the outer planets. It will be able to see 1000 times farther than any previously employed instrument. The Wide Field system will be located in a radial bay, receiving its signals via a pick-off mirror centered on the optical axis of the telescope assembly. The external thermal radiator employed by the instrument for cooling will be part of the exterior surface of the Space Telescope. In addition to having a larger (1200-12,000 A) wavelength range than any of the other Space Telescope instruments, its data rate, at 1 Mb/sec, exceeds that of the other instruments. Attention is given to the operating modes and projected performance levels of the Wide Field Camera and Planetary Camera.

  1. SMARTS 0.9-m Telescope | CTIO

    Science.gov Websites

    Travel Information Questionnaire Vistor Support Questionaire Telescope Schedules Astronomer's Tools Contact Acknowledgments TS4 History ISPI ISPI Exposure Time Calculator OSIRIS Spartan Optical Imagers Filter list for more information on the available filters. Time Synchronization For projects that require

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Space telescope RM project. V. NGC5548 sp. monitoring (Pei+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Barth, A. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; De Rosa, G.; Denney, K. D.; Goad, M. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Bennert, V. N.; Brotherton, M.; Clubb, K. I.; Dalla Bonta, E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Greene, J. E.; Grier, C. J.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.; Adams, S. M.; Beatty, T. G.; Bigley, A.; Brown, J. E.; Brown, J. S.; Canalizo, G.; Comerford, J. M.; Coker, C. T.; Corsini, E. M.; Croft, S.; Croxall, K. V.; Deason, A. J.; Eracleous, M.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Henderson, C. B.; Holmbeck, E.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Jensen, J. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kelly, P. L.; Kim, S.; King, A.; Lau, M. W.; Li, M.; Lochhaas, C.; Ma, Z.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mauerhan, J. C.; Malkan, M. A.; McGurk, R.; Morelli, L.; Mosquera, A.; Mudd, D.; Sanchez, F. M.; Nguyen, M. L.; Ochner, P.; Ou-Yang, B.; Pancoast, A.; Penny, M. T.; Pizzella, A.; Poleski, R.; Runnoe, J.; Scott, B.; Schimoia, J. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Shivvers, I.; Simonian, G. V.; Siviero, A.; Somers, G.; Stevens, D. J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tayar, J.; Tejos, N.; Treu, T.; van Saders, J.; Vican, L.; Villanueva, S.; Yuk, H.; Zakamska, N. L.; Zhu, W.; Anderson, M. D.; Arevalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Bisogni, S.; Borman, G. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Crenshaw, D. M.; de Lorenzo-Caceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Ferland, G. J.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Grupe, D.; Gupta, A.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Horne, K.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. C.; Klimanov, S. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; Macinnis, F.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Netzer, H.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schnulle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M.; Skielboe, A.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zu, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Spectroscopic data were obtained from five telescopes: the McGraw-Hill 1.3m telescope at the MDM Observatory (4225-5775Å; median S/N=118), the Shane 3m telescope at the Lick Observatory (Kast Double Spectrograph: 3250-7920Å; median S/N=194), the 1.22m Galileo telescope at the Asiago Astrophysical Observatory (3250-7920Å; median S/N=160), the 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO; Dual Imaging Spectrograph: 4180-5400Å, median S/N =160), and the 2.3m telescope at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO; 5599-4399Å; median S/N=217). The optical spectroscopic monitoring targeting NGC 5548 began on 2014 January 4 and continued through 2014 July 6 with approximately daily cadence. MDM contributed the largest number of spectra with 143 epochs. (1 data file).

  3. Managment and construction of the Large Binocular Telescope enclosure: Meeting unusual challenges with a competitive discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, James H.; Hill, John M.; Davison, Warren B.; Hart, Wood; Teran, Jose U.

    1998-08-01

    Planning, estimating, and building a telescope and its enclosure within a budget is a challenge to any project staff. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) project office goal has been to break every phase of the project into small packages and competitively bid the packages. In this way the project office can minimize costs and keep the project budget from escalating out of control. This paper will discuss both the unique and common problems associated with the building of telescopes into the next millennium. The discussion is centered on the planning and execution phases of construction for the LBT, located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. The paper will discuss the effects of delays on the actual start of the telescope due to environmental issues and the impact the delays had on design and budget. The paper will provide the solutions that have been incorporated by the LBT project office to maximize the quality of construction while holding costs to a minimum. The use of a team approach by the contractors, engineers, and the project office has been successful in maintaining quality construction at a reasonable cost.

  4. Reception and dissemination of American amateur telescope making in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnfelt, Johan

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the appropriation of the American Amateur Telescope Making (ATM) movement in Sweden in the 1940s and 1950s. A key player was the Swedish Astronomical Society, which in 1943, and inspired by the American example, launched a campaign to raise interest in ATM and disseminate the necessary knowledge amongst potential amateur astronomers. The campaign was successful and in just a few years it quadrupled the number of amateurs with access to telescopes. Swedish amateurs kept on building telescopes through the 1950s, but the activities then stalled with the introduction of cheap mass-market telescopes. The appropriation of ATM in Sweden is an important example of how technical innovations have shaped the course of amateur astronomy.

  5. Eight-dimensional methodology for innovative thinking about the case and ethics of the Mount Graham, Large Binocular Telescope project.

    PubMed

    Berne, Rosalyn W; Raviv, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    This paper introduces the Eight Dimensional Methodology for Innovative Thinking (the Eight Dimensional Methodology), for innovative problem solving, as a unified approach to case analysis that builds on comprehensive problem solving knowledge from industry, business, marketing, math, science, engineering, technology, arts, and daily life. It is designed to stimulate innovation by quickly generating unique "out of the box" unexpected and high quality solutions. It gives new insights and thinking strategies to solve everyday problems faced in the workplace, by helping decision makers to see otherwise obscure alternatives and solutions. Daniel Raviv, the engineer who developed the Eight Dimensional Methodology, and paper co-author, technology ethicist Rosalyn Berne, suggest that this tool can be especially useful in identifying solutions and alternatives for particular problems of engineering, and for the ethical challenges which arise with them. First, the Eight Dimensional Methodology helps to elucidate how what may appear to be a basic engineering problem also has ethical dimensions. In addition, it offers to the engineer a methodology for penetrating and seeing new dimensions of those problems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the Eight Dimensional Methodology as an analytical tool for thinking about ethical challenges to engineering, the paper presents the case of the construction of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mount Graham in Arizona. Analysis of the case offers to decision makers the use of the Eight Dimensional Methodology in considering alternative solutions for how they can proceed in their goals of exploring space. It then follows that same process through the second stage of exploring the ethics of each of those different solutions. The LBT project pools resources from an international partnership of universities and research institutes for the construction and maintenance of a highly sophisticated, powerful new telescope. It will soon mark

  6. The SKA1 LOW telescope: system architecture and design performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterson, Mark F.; Labate, Maria Grazia; Schnetler, Hermine; Wagg, Jeff; Turner, Wallace; Dewdney, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The SKA1-LOW radio telescope will be a low-frequency (50-350 MHz) aperture array located in Western Australia. Its scientific objectives will prioritize studies of the Epoch of Reionization and pulsar physics. Development of the telescope has been allocated to consortia responsible for the aperture array front end, timing distribution, signal and data transport, correlation and beamforming signal processors, infrastructure, monitor and control systems, and science data processing. This paper will describe the system architectural design and key performance parameters of the telescope and summarize the high-level sub-system designs of the consortia.

  7. Phase Synchronization for the Mid-Frequency Square Kilometre Array Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schediwy, Sascha; Gozzard, David; Stobie, Simon; Gravestock, Charles; Whitaker, Richard; Alachkar, Bassem; Malan, Sias; Boven, Paul; Grainge, Keith

    2018-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s most sensitive radio telescope operating in the 50 MHz to 14 GHz frequency range. Construction of the SKA has been divided into phases, with the first phase (SKA1) accounting for the first 10% of the telescope's receiving capacity. During SKA1, a low-frequency aperture array comprising over a hundred thousand individual dipole antenna elements will be constructed in Western Australia (SKA1-low), while an array of 197 parabolic-dish antennas, incorporating the 64 dishes of MeerKAT, will be constructed in South Africa (SKA1-mid).Radio telescope arrays such as the SKA require phase-coherent reference signals to be transmitted to each antenna site in the array. In the case of the SKA1-mid, these reference signals will be generated at a central site and transmitted to the antenna sites via fiber-optic cables up to 175 km in length. Environmental perturbations affect the optical path length of the fiber and act to degrade the phase stability of the reference signals received at the antennas, which has the ultimate effect of reducing the fidelity and dynamic range of the data.Since 2011, researchers at the University of Western Australia (UWA) have led the development of an actively-stabilized phase-synchronization system designed specifically to meet the scientific needs and technical challenges of the SKA telescope. Recently this system has been select as the official phase synchronization system for the SKA1-mid telescope. The system is an evolution of Atacama Large Millimeter Array’s distributed ‘photonic local oscillator system’, incorporating key advances made by the international frequency metrology community over the last decade, as well as novel innovations developed by UWA researchers.In this presentation I will describe the technical details of the system; outline how the system's performance was tested using metrology techniques in a laboratory setting, on 186 km

  8. Origins Space Telescope: Study Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the OST STDT, the OST Study Team based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, study partners, and the advisory panel to the study. This presentation will also summarize recent activities, including the process used to reach a decision on the mission architecture, the identification of key science drivers, and the key study milestones between 2017 and 2020.

  9. Origins Space Telescope: Study Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha R.; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the OST STDT, the OST Study Team based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, study partners, and the advisory panel to the study. This presentation will also summarize recent activities, including the process used to reach a decision on the mission architecture, the identification of key science drivers, and the key study milestones between 2017 and 2020.

  10. Model Uncertainty and Test of a Segmented Mirror Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Optical Telescope project EOM: equation of motion FCA: fine control actuator FCD: Face-Centered Cubic Design FEA: finite element analysis FEM: finite...housed in a dark tent to isolate the telescope from stray light, air currents, or dust and other debris. However, the closed volume is prone to...is composed of six hexagonal segments that each have six coarse control actuators (CCA) for segment phasing control, three fine control actuators

  11. Europe, Japan and North America Prepare for Joint Construction of the Giant Radio Telescope "ALMA" in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-04-01

    our own Galaxy, ALMA will study the morphology, the motions and the chemistry of dust-enshrouded regions where stars and planets are being formed. ALMA will shed light on these optically `dark' celestial regions that carry key information on the origin of the richness of structure in the Universe and clues to the origin of life. ALMA is a merger of three large projects - The Millimeter Array (MMA) of the United States, the Large Southern Array (LSA) of Europe, and the Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (LMSA) of Japan - each of which has been endorsed as the top-priority project in their respective astronomical communities. The European and North American projects were merged into ALMA in 1999 and joint design and development of ALMA began at that time. The National Research Council of Canada is participating with the U.S. in the project. With Japan joining the project as a third partner equal with North America and Europe, and with Chile also taking part, ALMA has become one of the first truly global projects in the history of fundamental science. In the agreement signed today, the partners pledge to use their best efforts to obtain full approval and funding for their participation in ALMA. With the schedule planned, the telescope should be in full operation in 2010. Note [1]: This Press Release is issued jointly by ESO for its members plus UK and Spain, by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and by CONICYT in Chile. The embargo period coincides with a Press Conference by the partners in Tokyo (Japan). Links to earlier Press Releases etc. about ALMA are found on the dedicated webpage.

  12. Design solutions for dome and main structure (mount) of giant telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murga, Gaizka; Bilbao, Armando; de Bilbao, Lander; Lorentz, Thomas E.

    2016-07-01

    During the last recent years, designs for several giant telescopes ranging from 20 to 40m in diameter are being developed: European Extremely Large Telescope Telescope (TMT). (E-ELT), Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) and Thirty Meter It is evident that simple direct up-scaling of solutions that were more or less successful in the 8 to 10m class telescopes can not lead to viable designs for the future giant telescopes. New solutions are required to provide adequate load sharing, to cope with the large-scale derived deflections and to provide the required compliance, or to respond to structure-mechanism control interaction issues, among others. From IDOM experience in the development of the Dome and Main Structure of the European Extremely Large Telescope and our participation in some other giant telescopes, this paper reviews several design approaches for the main mechanisms and key structural parts of enclosures and mounts/main structures for giant telescopes, analyzing pros and cons of the different alternatives and outlining the preferred design schemes. The assessment is carried out mainly from a technical and performance-based angle but it also considers specific logistical issues for the assembly of these large telescopes in remote and space-limited areas, together with cost and schedule related issues.

  13. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope mount final design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Shawn; Gressler, William; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Gessner, Chuck; Warner, Mike; Barr, Jeff; Lotz, Paul J.; Schumacher, German; Wiecha, Oliver; Angeli, George; Andrew, John; Claver, Chuck; Schoening, Bill; Sebag, Jacques; Krabbendam, Victor; Neill, Doug; Hileman, Ed; Muller, Gary; Araujo, Constanza; Orden Martinez, Alfredo; Perezagua Aguado, Manuel; García-Marchena, Luis; Ruiz de Argandoña, Ismael; Romero, Francisco M.; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Carlos González, José; Venturini, Marco

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the status and details of the large synoptic survey telescope1,2,3 mount assembly (TMA). On June 9th, 2014 the contract for the design and build of the large synoptic survey telescope mount assembly (TMA) was awarded to GHESA Ingeniería y Tecnología, S.A. and Asturfeito, S.A. The design successfully passed the preliminary design review on October 2, 2015 and the final design review January 29, 2016. This paper describes the detailed design by subsystem, analytical model results, preparations being taken to complete the fabrication, and the transportation and installation plans to install the mount on Cerro Pachón in Chile. This large project is the culmination of work by many people and the authors would like to thank everyone that has contributed to the success of this project.

  14. Secondary mirror system for the European Solar Telescope (EST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaller, L.; Siegel, B.; Prieto, G.; Hernandez, E.; Casalta, J. M.; Mercader, J.; Barriga, J.

    2010-07-01

    The European Solar Telescope (EST) is a European collaborative project to build a 4m class solar telescope in the Canary Islands, which is now in its design study phase. The telescope will provide diffraction limited performance for several instruments observing simultaneously at the Coudé focus at different wavelengths. A multi-conjugated adaptive optics system composed of a tip-tilt mirror and several deformable mirrors will be integrated in the telescope optical path. The secondary mirror system is composed of the mirror itself (Ø800mm), the alignment drives and the cooling system needed to remove the solar heat load from the mirror. During the design study the feasibility to provide fast tip-tilt capabilities at the secondary mirror to work as the adaptive optics tip-tilt mirror is also being evaluated.

  15. Lunar-Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) integrated program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Janice F. (Compiler); Forrest, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A detailed Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) program plan representing major decisions and tasks leading to those decisions for program execution are presented. The purpose of this task was to develop an integrated plan of project activities for the LUTE project, and to display the plan as an integrated network that shows the project activities, all critical interfaces, and schedules. The integrated network will provide the project manager with a frame work for strategic planning and risk management throughout the life of the project.

  16. Building a Futuristic Telescope on the Moon - A Fun Project for Research, Science Teaching, and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Haas, J. Patrick; Mirel, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present the design and demonstrate the operation of a model lunar observatory. While this is a research project, it is also intended to stimulate student interest in space science, astronomy, physics, chemistry, and engineering. First, we discuss the science objectives of a lunar observatory. The Moon is a great location for astronomy. Why? What science can best be done from there? What are exoplanets? We would like to see what planets around other stars look like. Why is it so difficult? What are optical interferometers and why do we need them? Next, we discuss the physics, chemistry, and engineering principles involved. The lunar environment is totally different from Earth. It features high vacuum, low gravity, very slow rotation rate, cryogenic temperatures, and dust. How can an observatory be designed that not only survives, but can take advantage of the environment? We present a “cool” solution (the model uses liquid nitrogen) that combines the following elements: high temperature superconductors, telescope mirrors made of “moondust”, novel telescope support system, an observatory structure made of simulated lunar soil, 3D printing, and methods for dust mitigation. Information will be provided on how similar systems can be built and what further refinements (e.g. voice control, precision stepper drives, autonomous operation, and telerobotics) can be added.

  17. Lights Out on the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    What happens when the lights are turned out in the enormous clean room that currently houses NASA's James Webb Space Telescope? The technicians who are inspecting the telescope and its expansive golden mirrors look like ghostly wraiths in this image as they conduct a "lights out inspection" in the Spacecraft Systems Development and Integration Facility (SSDIF) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The clean room lights were turned off to inspect the telescope after it experienced vibration and acoustic testing. The contamination control engineer used a bright flashlight and special ultraviolet flashlights to inspect for contamination because it's easier to find in the dark. NASA photographer Chris Gunn said "The people have a ghostly appearance because it's a long exposure." He left the camera's shutter open for a longer than normal time so the movement of the technicians appear as a blur. He also used a special light "painting" technique to light up the primary mirror. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency. For more information about the Webb telescope visit: www.jwst.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/webb Image Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

  18. Multivariable parametric cost model for space and ground telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost (X) D (1.75 +/- 0.05) λ (-0.5 +/- 0.25) T-0.25 e (-0.04) Y Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  19. System concepts for a large UV/optical/IR telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, Max E.; Davis, Billy

    1991-01-01

    To assess the systems and technological requirements for constructing lunar telescopes in conjunction with the buildup of a lunar base for scientific exploration and as a waypoint for travel to Mars, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted concept studies of a 16-m-aperture large lunar telescope (LLT) and a 4-m-aperture precursor telescope, both operating in the UV/visible/IR spectral region. The feasibility of constructing a large telescope on the lunar surface is assessed, and its systems and subsystems are analyzed. Telescope site selection, environmental effects, and launch and assembly scenarios are also evaluated. It is argued that key technical drivers for the LLT must be tested in situ by precursor telescopes to evaluate such areas as the operations and long-term reliability of active optics, radiation protection of instruments, lunar dust mitigation, and thermal shielding of the telescope systems. For a manned lunar outpost or an LLT to become a reality, a low-cost dependable transportation system must be developed.

  20. The readout and control system of the mid-size telescope prototype of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Anguner, O.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Fuessling, M.; Melkumyan, D.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Sternberger, R.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.; Cta Consortium,the

    2014-06-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is one of the major ground-based astronomy projects being pursued and will be the largest facility for ground-based y-ray observations ever built. CTA will consist of two arrays: one in the Northern hemisphere composed of about 20 telescopes, and the other one in the Southern hemisphere composed of about 100 telescopes, both arrays containing telescopes of different type and size. A prototype for the Mid-Size Telescope (MST) with a diameter of 12 m has been installed in Berlin and is currently being commissioned. This prototype is composed of a mechanical structure, a drive system and mirror facets mounted with powered actuators to enable active control. Five Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) cameras, and a wide set of sensors allow the evaluation of the performance of the instrument. The design of the control software is following concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium in order to provide a realistic test-bed for the middleware: 1) The readout and control system for the MST prototype is implemented with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) distributed control middleware; 2) the OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture (OPC UA) is used for hardware access; 3) the document oriented MongoDB database is used for an efficient storage of CCD images, logging and alarm information: and 4) MySQL and MongoDB databases are used for archiving the slow control monitoring data and for storing the operation configuration parameters. In this contribution, the details of the implementation of the control system for the MST prototype telescope are described.

  1. Simulated Guide Stars: Adapting the Robo-AO Telescope Simulator to UH 88”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcraft, Jaren; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Robo-AO is an autonomous adaptive optics system that is in development for the UH 88” Telescope on the Mauna Kea Observatory. This system is capable of achieving near diffraction limited imaging for astronomical telescopes, and has seen successful deployment and use at the Palomar and Kitt Peak Observatories previously. A key component of this system, the telescope simulator, will be adapted from the Palomar Observatory design to fit the UH 88” Telescope. The telescope simulator will simulate the exit pupil of the UH 88” telescope so that the greater Robo-AO system can be calibrated before observing runs. The system was designed in Code V, and then further improved upon in Zemax for later development. Alternate design forms were explored for the potential of adapting the telescope simulator to the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, where simulating the exit pupil of the telescope proved to be more problematic. A proposed design composed of solely catalog optics was successfully produced for both telescopes, and they await assembly as time comes to construct the new Robo-AO system.

  2. Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with A Modern Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Anthony J.; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    We are in the middle of a cooperative astronomy education project to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). We have completed an overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, and have made it available for hundreds of students at both schools, and once per week to the public. We have written an assessment test which was distributed to the students at the beginning and end of the Fall 2006 semester, which will be used as a baseline to determine whether the laboratory activities, which are currently under development, improve student learning in the Fall 2007 semester next year. The studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories will be designed to challenge student misconceptions. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we will cycle students through concurrent activities. This is enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We demonstrate the productivity of our newly refurbished telescope, show the baseline results of our assessment, and present samples of activities under development. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

  3. A scientific operations plan for the NASA space telescope. [ground support systems, project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, D. K.; Costa, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A ground system is described which is compatible with the operational requirements of the space telescope. The goal of the ground system is to minimize the cost of post launch operations without seriously compromising the quality and total throughput of space telescope science, or jeopardizing the safety of the space telescope in orbit. The resulting system is able to accomplish this goal through optimum use of existing and planned resources and institutional facilities. Cost is also reduced and efficiency in operation increased by drawing on existing experience in interfacing guest astronomers with spacecraft as well as mission control experience obtained in the operation of present astronomical spacecraft.

  4. The Busot Observatory: towards a robotic autonomous telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lozano, R.; Rodes, J. J.; Torrejón, J. M.; Bernabéu, G.; Berná, J. Á.

    2016-12-01

    We describe the Busot observatory, our project of a fully robotic autonomous telescope. This astronomical observatory, which obtained the Minor Planet Centre code MPC-J02 in 2009, includes a 14 inch MEADE LX200GPS telescope, a 2 m dome, a ST8-XME CCD camera from SBIG, with an AO-8 adaptive optics system, and a filter wheel equipped with UBVRI system. We are also implementing a spectrograph SGS ST-8 for the telescope. Currently, we are involved in long term studies of variable sources such as X-ray binaries systems, and variable stars. In this work we also present the discovery of W UMa systems and its orbital periods derived from the photometry light curve obtained at Busot Observatory.

  5. An Automated Telescope for Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, G. S.; Guzik, T. G.; Tohline, J. E.; Landolt, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this time of limited resources, the problem of providing an up to date facility for education and outreach needs to be addressed. One solution to this problem is a joint venture between Louisiana State University, BREC (the Park and creation Commission of East Baton Rouge Parish), and BRAS (the Baton Rouge Astronomical Society). The result of this collaboration is a facility with outreach and educational space, a 20 inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope with CCD camera, and volunteers from the amateur community for help with the outreach mission. We present an overview of the project, and show how the telescope will be completely automated to allow use of the telescope by LSU students and our outreach partners on the Internet. We explore the possibility for use of this facility by a world wide audience over the web.

  6. DAG: a new observatory and a prospective observing site for other potential telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilyaprak, Cahit; Yerli, Sinan K.; Keskin, Onur; Güçsav, B. Bülent

    2016-07-01

    DAG (Eastern Anatolia Observatory is read as "Doğu Anadolu Gözlemevi" in Turkish) is the newest and largest observatory of Turkey, constructed at an altitude of 3150 m in Konaklı/Erzurum provenience, with an optical and nearinfrared telescope (4 m in diameter) and its robust observing site infrastructure. This national project consists of three main phases: DAG (Telescope, Enclosure, Buildings and Infrastructures), FPI (Focal Plane Instruments and Adaptive Optics) and MCP (Mirror Coating Plant). All these three phases are supported by the Ministry of Development of Turkey and funding is awarded to Atatürk University. Telescope, enclosure and building tenders were completed in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. The final design of telescope, enclosure and building and almost all main infrastructure components of DAG site have been completed; mainly: road work, geological and atmospheric surveys, electric and fiber cabling, water line, generator system, cable car to summit. This poster explains recent developments of DAG project and talks about the future possible collaborations for various telescopes which can be constructed at the site.

  7. Status of Technology Development to enable Large Stable UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; MSFC AMTD Team

    2017-01-01

    NASA MSFC has two funded Strategic Astrophysics Technology projects to develop technology for potential future large missions: AMTD and PTC. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is developing technology to make mechanically stable mirrors for a 4-meter or larger UVOIR space telescope. AMTD is demonstrating this technology by making a 1.5 meter diameter x 200 mm thick ULE(C) mirror that is 1/3rd scale of a full size 4-m mirror. AMTD is characterizing the mechanical and thermal performance of this mirror and of a 1.2-meter Zerodur(R) mirror to validate integrate modeling tools. Additionally, AMTD has developed integrated modeling tools which are being used to evaluate primary mirror systems for a potential Habitable Exoplanet Mission and analyzed the interaction between optical telescope wavefront stability and coronagraph contrast leakage. Predictive Thermal Control (PTC) project is developing technology to enable high stability thermal wavefront performance by using integrated modeling tools to predict and actively control the thermal environment of a 4-m or larger UVOIR space telescope.

  8. A retrospective of the GREGOR solar telescope in scientific literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; von der Lühe, O.; Feller, A.; Arlt, K.; Balthasar, H.; Bauer, S.-M.; Bello González, N.; Berkefeld, Th.; Caligari, P.; Collados, M.; Fischer, A.; Granzer, T.; Hahn, T.; Halbgewachs, C.; Heidecke, F.; Hofmann, A.; Kentischer, T.; Klva{ňa, M.; Kneer, F.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Popow, E.; Puschmann, K. G.; Rendtel, J.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; Waldmann, T.; Wiehr, E.; Wittmann, A. D.; Woche, M.

    2012-11-01

    In this review, we look back upon the literature, which had the GREGOR solar telescope project as its subject including science cases, telescope subsystems, and post-focus instruments. The articles date back to the year 2000, when the initial concepts for a new solar telescope on Tenerife were first presented at scientific meetings. This comprehensive bibliography contains literature until the year 2012, i.e., the final stages of commissioning and science verification. Taking stock of the various publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings also provides the ``historical'' context for the reference articles in this special issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes.

  9. Using Internet-Based Robotic Telescopes to Engage Non-Science Majors in Astronomical Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, K. J.; Coble, K.; Slater, T. F.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Responding to national science education reform documents calling for students to have more opportunities for authentic research experiences, several national projects have developed online telescope networks to provide students with Internet-access to research grade telescopes. The nature of astronomical observation (e.g., remote sites, expensive equipment, and odd hours) has been a barrier in the past. Internet-based robotic telescopes allow scientists to conduct observing sessions on research-grade telescopes half a world away. The same technology can now be harnessed by STEM educators to engage students and reinforce what is being taught in the classroom, as seen in some early research in elementary schools (McKinnon and Mainwaring 2000 and McKinnon and Geissinger 2002), middle/high schools (Sadler et al. 2001, 2007 and Gehret et al. 2005) and undergraduate programs (e.g., McLin et al. 2009). This project looks at the educational value of using Internet-based robotic telescopes in a general education introductory astronomy course at the undergraduate level. Students at a minority-serving institution in the midwestern United States conducted observational programs using the Global Telescope Network (GTN). The project consisted of the use of planetarium software to determine object visibility, observing proposals (with abstract, background, goals, and dissemination sections), peer review (including written reviews and panel discussion according to NSF intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria), and classroom presentations showing the results of the observation. The GTN is a network of small telescopes funded by the Fermi mission to support the science of high energy astrophysics. It is managed by the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University and is controlled using SkyNet. Data includes course artifacts (proposals, reviews, panel summaries, presentations, and student reflections) for six semesters plus student interviews. Using a grounded theory approach

  10. Computerization of a telescope at secondary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Santiago, A.; Martos Jumillas, J.

    2017-03-01

    The work we are presenting in this paper is the computerization of a refractor telescope on an EQ3 type equatorial mount through Arduino. The control of the mount is done via three different interfaces: Stellarium, an Android interface for mobile phones and a second interface for PC made with Processing. The aforementioned work was done by the authors with a double purpose: presenting the interest in astronomy in the Mathematics department, and the development of applications within the subject of Technology in 4th ESO. So, it is a collaborative project between both departments. Except for the telescope and the mount, all the resources we have used can be found in any high school: free software (Guadalinex v9), App Inventor and Processing.The project was carried out under the principle of reducing all possible costs given the economic possibilities of the institution.

  11. Twin-Telescope Wettzell (TTW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.; Dassing, R.; Kronschnabl, G.; Schlüter, W.; Schwarz, W.; Lauber, P.; Kilger, R.

    2007-07-01

    Following the recommendations made by the VLBI2010 vision report of the IVS, a proposal has been made to construct a Twin Telescope for the Fundamental Station Wettzell in order to meet the future requirements of the next VLBI generation. The Twin Telescope consists of two identical radiotelescopes. It is a project of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG). This article summarizes the project and some design ideas for the Twin-Telescope. %ZALMA (2005). Technical Specification for Design, Manufacturing, Transport and Integration on Site of the ALMA ANTENNAS, Doc. ALMA-34.00.00.00.006-BSPE. Behrend, D. (2006). VLBI2010 Antenna Specs, Data sheet. DeBoer, D. (2001). The ATA Offset Gregorian Antenna, ATA Memo #16, February 10. Imbriale, W.A. (2006). Design of a Wideband Radio Telescope, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and S. Weinreb and H. Mandi, California Institute of Technology. Kilger, R. (2007). TWIN-Design studies, Presentation for the IVS board members (internal document),Wettzell. Kronschnabl, G. (2006). Subject: Memo from Bill Petrachenko, E-mail to the Twin-Working Group (in German), July. Lindgren, ETS-Lindgren (2005). The Model 3164-05 Open Boundary Quadridge Horn, Data Sheet. Niell, A., A. Whitney, W. Petrachenko, W. Schlüter, N. Vandenberg, H.Hase, Y. Koyama, C. Ma, H. Schuh, G. Tucari (2006). in: IVS Annual Report 2005, pg. 13-40, NASA/TP-2006-214136, April. Olsson, R., Kildal, P.-S., and Weinreb, S. (2006). IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, Vol. 54, No. 2, February. Petrachenko, B. (2006). The Case For and Against Multiple Antennas at a Site, IVS Memorandum, 2006-019v01. Petrachenko, B. (2006). IVS Memorandum, 2006-016v01. RFSpin (2004). Double Ridged Waveguide Horn-Model DRH20, Antenna Specifications, Data Sheet. Rohde&Schwarz (2004). SHF Antennas Crossed Log- Periodic Antennas HL024A1/S1, Data Sheet. Rohde&Schwarz (2004). SHF Antennas Log-Periodic Antennas HL050/HL050S1, Data Sheet. Rogers, A.E.E. (2006). Simulations of broadband

  12. Active optics for next generation space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, V.; Perret, L.; Laubier, D.; Delvit, J. M.; Imbert, C.; Cadiergues, L.; Faure, C.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution observation systems need bigger and bigger telescopes. The design of such telescopes is a key issue for the whole satellite. In order to improve the imaging resolution with minimum impact on the satellite, a big effort must be made to improve the telescope compactness. Compactness is also important for the agility of the satellite and for the size and cost of the launcher. This paper shows how compact a high resolution telescope can be. A diffraction limited telescope can be less than ten times shorter than its focal length. But the compactness impacts drastically the opto-mechanical sensitivity and the optical performances. Typically, a gain of a factor of 2 leads to a mechanical tolerance budget 6 times more difficult. The need to implement active optics for positioning requirements raises very quickly. Moreover, the capability to compensate shape defaults of the primary mirror is the way to simplify the mirror manufacture, to mitigate the development risks and to minimize the cost. The larger the primary mirror is, the more interesting it is to implement active optics for shape compensations. CNES is preparing next generation of earth observation satellite in the frame of OTOS (Observation de la Terre Optique Super-Résolue; High resolution earth observing optical system). OTOS is a technology program. In particular, optical technological developments and breadboards dedicated to active optics are on-going. The aim is to achieve TRL 5 to TRL6 for these new technologies and to validate the global performances of such an active telescope.

  13. Student and Staff Perceptions of Key Aspects of Computer Science Engineering Capstone Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olarte, Juan José; Dominguez, César; Jaime, Arturo; Garcia-Izquierdo, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    In carrying out their capstone projects, students use knowledge and skills acquired throughout their degree program to create a product or provide a technical service. An assigned advisor guides the students and supervises the work, and a committee assesses the projects. This study compares student and staff perceptions of key aspects of…

  14. Bernhard Schmidt and the Schmidt Telescope for Mapping the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, G.

    Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt (1879--1935) was born in Estonia. He ran an optical workshop in Mittweida, Saxonia, between 1901 and 1927. Astronomers appreciated the quality of his telescopes. Starting in 1925, working freelance in Hamburg Observatory, he developed a short focal length optical system with a large field of view. He succeeded in inventing the ``Schmidt Telescope'' in 1930, which allows the imaging a large field of the sky without any distortions. Shortly after Schmidt's death, the director of the observatory published details on the invention and production of the Schmidt Telescope. After World War II, Schmidt telescopes have been widely used. The first large Schmidt telescope was built in 1948, the ``Big Schmidt'' (126 cm), Mount Palomar, USA. Schmidt telescopes are also important tools for cosmology. The result of the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys (1949--1958, 1985--1999) is a data base of about 20 million galaxies and over 100 million stars, supplemented in 1971 by the ESO Schmidt for the southern sky. Also high resolution spectrometers can be fitted to the Schmidt telescope. The 80 cm Schmidt telescope of Hamburg Observatory, planned since 1936, finished 1955, is on Calar Alto, Spain, since 1975. Combined with two objective prisms, it was used for a Quasar survey project.

  15. Silicon Carbide Telescope Investigations for the LISA Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanjuan, J.; Spannagel, R.; Braxmaier, C.; Korytov, D.; Mueller, G.; Preston, A.; Livas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors are conceived to detect GWs in the low frequency range (mili-Hertz) by measuring the distance between free-falling proof masses in spacecraft (SC) separated by 5 Gm. The reference in the last decade has been the joint ESA-NASA mission LISA. One of the key elements of LISA is the telescope since it simultaneously gathers the light coming from the far SC (approximately or equal to 100 pW) and expands, collimates and sends the outgoing beam (2 W) to the far SC. Demanding requirements have been imposed on the telescope structure: the dimensional stability of the telescope must be approximately or equal to 1pm Hz(exp-1/2) at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 micrometer over the mission lifetime to prevent defocussing. In addition the telescope structure must be light, strong and stiff. For this reason a potential on-axis telescope structure for LISA consisting of a silicon carbide (SiC) quadpod structure has been designed, constructed and tested. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the LISA expected temperature range has been measured with a 1% accuracy which allows us to predict the shrinkage/expansion of the telescope due to temperature changes, and pico-meter dimensional stability has been measured at room temperature and at the expected operating temperature for the LISA telescope (around -6[deg]C). This work is supported by NASA Grants NNX10AJ38G and NX11AO26G,

  16. The 4-meter lunar engineering telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, Keith; Giannini, Judith A.; Kilgus, Charles C.; Bely, Pierre Y.; May, B. Scott; Cooper, Shannon A.; Schlimm, Gerard H.; Sounder, Charles; Ormond, Karen; Cheek, Eric

    1991-01-01

    The 16-meter diffraction limited lunar telescope incorporates a primary mirror with 312 one-meter segments; 3 nanometer active optics surface control with laser metrology and hexapod positioners; a space frame structure with one-millimeter stability; and a hexapod mount for pointing. The design data needed to limit risk in this development can be obtained by building a smaller engineering telescope on the moon with all of the features of the 16-meter design. This paper presents a 4.33-meter engineering telescope concept developed by the Summer 1990 Student Program of the NASA/JHU Space Grant Consortium Lunar Telescope Project. The primary mirror, made up of 18 one-meter hexagonal segments, is sized to provide interesting science as well as engineering data. The optics are configured as a Ritchey-Chretien with a coude relay to the focal plane beneath the surface. The optical path is continuously monitored with 3-nanometer precision interferometrically. An active optics processor and piezoelectric actuators operate to maintain the end-to-end optical configuration established by wave front sensing using a guide star. The mirror segments, consisting of a one-centimeter thick faceplate on 30-cm deep ribs, maintain the surface figure to a few nanometers under lunar gravity and thermal environment.

  17. Aluminization and mirror removal of the Magellan 6.5-meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Frank S.

    1994-06-01

    The Magellan Project 6.5-meter telescope is a collaboration of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Arizona. The telescope will be located on Cerro Manqui, at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. At the beginning of the Magellan Project several schemes were investigated for realuminizing the primary mirror. We have chosen to leave the primary mirror in its cell with the mirror support system intact. Two major advantages of leaving the mirror in its cell are that it does not have to be lifted or handled and the support system does not have to be removed or reinstalled for aluminization.

  18. Education and outreach using the falcon telescope network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresham, Kimberlee C.; Palma, Christopher; Polsgrove, Daniel E.; Chun, Francis K.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Tippets, Roger D.

    2016-12-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is a global network of small aperture telescopes developed by the Center for Space Situational Awareness Research in the Department of Physics at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). Consisting of commercially available equipment, the FTN is a collaborative effort between USAFA and other educational institutions ranging from two- and four-year colleges to major research universities. USAFA provides the equipment (e.g. telescope, mount, camera, filter wheel, dome, weather station, computers and storage devices) while the educational partners provide the building and infrastructure to support an observatory. The user base includes USAFA along with K-12 and higher education faculty and students. The diversity of the users implies a wide variety of observing interests, and thus the FTN collects images on diverse objects, including satellites, galactic and extragalactic objects, and objects popular for education and public outreach. The raw imagery, all in the public domain, will be accessible to FTN partners and will be archived at USAFA. Currently, there are five Falcon telescopes installed, two in Colorado and one each in Pennsylvania, Chile, and Australia. These five telescopes are in various stages of operational capability but all are remotely operable via a remote desktop application. The FTN team has conducted STEM First Light Projects for three of the U.S. observatories, soliciting proposals from middle and high school students and teachers that suggest and then become what is observed as official STEM first-light objects. Students and teachers learn how to write and submit a proposal as well as how telescopes operate and take data, while university-level students at the U.S. Air Force Academy and The Pennsylvania State University learn how to evaluate proposals and provide feedback to the middle and high school students and teachers. In this paper, we present the current status of the FTN, details of and lessons

  19. A Research on the Primary Mirror Manipulator of Large Segmented-mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, H.

    2012-09-01

    Lagrange formulation is introduced, and the dynamic equations of the manipulator have been obtained by using the Lagrange method. Since the manipulator is a serious coupling system, the dynamic curve of the key joints is plotted by using the ADAMS software. According to the theoretical analysis, the manipulator for the primary mirror of LAMOST is designed and fabricated. The whole manipulator consists of three parts. The first part is the mechanical arm which is used to realize the high speed and the long distance location, and it is rebuilt from a small truck crane; The second part is a serial mechanical hand which is used to realize the low speed and the short distance location. It has six DOFs including the pitch, the rotate about the vertical axis, the elevation along the vertical axis, and two horizontal translations. Subsequently the structure is analyzed in the ANSYS software to confirm that the strength is enough and the displacement is in the tolerance; The third part is a mechanical wrist, in which part a hydraulic rod is used to keep the bottom of the mechanical hand horizontal. In chapter 6, the control characteristics of the whole manipulator are analyzed. Furthermore, the control method and flowchart are proposed. Based on this method the control device was selected. In the end of this paper, the main work and the results of this project are summarized. Further research is prospected and it provides a reference for the future large telescope projects.

  20. Implementing an interprofessional first-year teamwork project: some key reflections.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Susan Maree

    2013-09-01

    Implementing an interprofessional teamwork project for first-year students presents pedagogical and practical challenges. While transferable skills and attributes are important, engagement of students with limited professional experience in teamwork depends on relevance to current learning needs. This report outlines principles learned from planning and implementing a teamwork project for an interprofessional health administration and service development course. Practising interprofessional teamwork as leaders and teachers, aligning with previous, current and future teamwork content and processes and responding to student feedback and achievement have been the key factors in shaping the project over three semesters. Face-to-face and online interprofessional teamwork learning has necessitated developing resources that support self-direction, using familiar technology and providing enabling physical environments. Implications for first-year interprofessional teamwork are that structured well-resourced processes, responsiveness and alignment of learning all improve student outcomes.

  1. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, Leon

    1999-01-01

    The most important activity during this reporting period was the calibration of the AXAF High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and the analysis of the copious data which were obtained during that project. The calibration was highly successful, and will result in the AXAF being by far the best calibrated X-ray observatory ever flown, and more accurate results by all of its users. This period also included participation in the spacecraft alignment and assembly activities and final flight readiness reviews. The planning of the first year of Telescope Scientist AXAF observations also was accomplished. The Telescope Scientist team also served as a technical resource for various problems which were encountered during this period. Many of these contributions have been documented in memoranda sent to the project.

  2. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinskiy, I.; EUDET Consortium; AIDA Consortium

    Ahigh resolution(σ< 2 μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. EUDET was a coordinated detector R&D programme for the future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 μm or 10 μmand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  3. Lessons We Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenberg, Jonathan; Matthews, Gary; Atkinson, C.; Cohen, L.; Golisano, C.; Havey, K.; Hefner, K.; Jones, C.; Kegley, J.; Knollenberg, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the crystal (15th) anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This paper offers some of the major lessons learned by some of the key members of the Chandra Telescope team. We offer some of the lessons gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process.

  4. Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stull, Chris; Taylor, Stuart; Wren, James

    2010-11-30

    The RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) observatory network consists of several robotic astronomical telescopes primarily designed to search for astrophysical transients called a gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although intrinsically bright, GRBs are difficult to detect because of their short duration. Typically, they are first observed by satellites that then relay the coordinates of the GRB to a ground station which, in turn, distributes the coordinates over the internet so that ground based observers can perform follow-up observations. Typically the ground based observations begin after the GRB has ended and only residual emiSSion (the 'afterglow') is left. However, if the satellitemore » relays the GRB coordinates quickly enough, a 'fast' robotic telescope on the ground may be able to catch the GRB in progress. The RAPTOR telescope system is one of only a few in the world to have accomplished this feat. In order to achieve these results, the RAPTOR telescopes must operate autonomously at a high duty-cycle and in peak operating condition. Currently the telescopes are maintained in an ad hoc manner, often in a run-to-failure mode. The RAPTOR project could benefit greatly from a structural health monitoring (SHM) system, especially as more complex units are added to the suite of telescopes. This paper will summarize preliminary results from an SHM study performed on one of the RAPTOR telescopes. Damage scenarios that are of concern and that have been previously observed are first summarized. Then a specific study of damage to the telescope drive mechanism is presented where the data acquisition system is first described. Next, damage detection algorithms are developed with LANL's new publically available software SHMTools and the results of this process are discussed in detail. The paper will conclude with a summary of future planned refinemenls of the RAPTOR SHM system.« less

  5. Aluminum-made 5-cm reflecting telescope for Nano-JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Gouda, Naoteru; Yano, Taihei; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Yamauchi, Masahiro

    2006-06-01

    We report an outline and a current status of developing a small, all-aluminum made telescope for Nano-JASMINE. Nano-JASMINE is a nano-size astrometry satellite that will demonstrate some key technologies required for JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration) in a real space environment and will measure absolute positions of bright stars (z <= 8 mag) with accuracies about 1 milli-arcsecond in a few years mission. It has a Ritchey-Chretien type telescope with a 5-cm effective aperture, a 167-cm focal length and a field of view of 0.5x0.5 degree. The telescope only occupies a volume about 15x12x12 cm, and weighs two kilograms or less. Almost all of the structures and the optical elements of the telescope, including two aspherical mirrors three flat mirrors and a dual-angled flat mirror that combines the beam from a relative angle of 99.5 degrees into the primary mirror, are made out of aluminum alloy, being figured by diamond turning machines. The Bread Board Model (BBM) of the telescope was now measured to be achieving a diffraction-limited performance at room temperature.

  6. An application of artificial intelligence to automatic telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Keith; Drummond, Mark; Bresina, John

    1992-01-01

    Automatic Photoelectric Telescopes (APT's) allow an astronomer to be removed form the telescope site in both time and space. APT's 'execute' an observation program (a set of observation requests) expressed in an ASCII-based language (ATIS) and collect observation results expressed in this same language. The observation program is currently constructed by a Principal Astronomer from the requests of multiple users; the execution is currently controlled by a simple heuristic dispatch scheduler. Research aimed at improving the use of APT's is being carried out by the Entropy Reduction Engine (ERE) project at NASA Ames. The overall goal of the ERE project is the study and construction of systems that integrate planning, scheduling, and control. This paper discusses the application of some ERE technical results to the improvement of both the scheduling and the operation of APT's.

  7. Lunar-based optical telescopes: Planning astronomical tools of the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Nein, M. E.

    1995-02-01

    A succession of optical telescopes, ranging in aperture from 1 to 16 m or more, can be deployed and operated on the lunar surface over the next half-century. These candidates to succeed NASA's Great Observatories would capitalize on the unique observational advantages offered by the Moon. The Lunar Telescope Working Group and the LUTE Task Team of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have assessed the feasibility of developing and deploying these facilities. Studies include the 16-m Large Lunar Telescope (LLT); the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment (LCTE), a 4-m precursor to the LLT; the 2-m Lunar Transit Telescope (LTT); and its precursor, the 1-m Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE). The feasibility of developing and deploying each telescope was assessed and system requirements and options for supporting technologies, subsystems, transportation, and operations were detailed. Influences of lunar environment factors and site selection on telescope design and operation were evaluated, and design approaches and key tradeoffs were established. This paper provides an overview of the study results. Design concepts and brief system descriptions are provided, including subsystem and mission options selected for the concepts.

  8. Optical Studies of Space Debris at GEO: Survey and Follow-up with Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercomby, K. J.; Rodriquez, H. M.; Barker, E. S.

    2007-01-01

    For 14 nights in March 2007, we used two telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile to study the nature of space debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). In this project one telescope was dedicated to survey operations, while a second telescope was used for follow-up observations for orbits and colors. The goal was to obtain orbital and photometric information on every faint object found with the survey telescope. Thus we concentrate on objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude.

  9. The 3.5-m all-SiC telescope for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemont, Yves; Breysse, Jacques; Pierot, Dominique; Sein, Emmanuel; Nakagawa, Takao; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Sakuta, Hironobu; Miura, Shinji

    2004-10-01

    Placed on the L2 Lagrangian point, the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will operate in the 5 to 200 μm wavelength range, at 4.5K. The large aperture telescope (3.5m diameter in a single piece) requires a strong manufacturing mastering, associated with high technical performances. The background acquired by EADS-Astrium (France) on the 3.5m Silicone Carbide Herschel Telescope is a key for the success of the SPICA development. EADS-Astrium has been awarded by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries to assess the feasibility of the 3.5m all SiC telescope through a design phase contract. The Telescope driving requirements are the large diameter of 3.5m especially critical for the manufacturing aspects, and the Wave Front Error which has to be kept below 350nm rms over a large temperature range from ambient to the operational temperature of 4.5K which requires a strong mastering of the distortions.

  10. Yes, the James Webb Space Telescope Mirrors 'Can'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The powerful primary mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect the light from distant galaxies. The manufacturer of those mirrors, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo., recently celebrated their successful efforts as mirror segments were packed up in special shipping canisters (cans) for shipping to NASA. The Webb telescope has 21 mirrors, with 18 primary mirror segments working together as one large 21.3-foot (6.5-meter) primary mirror. The mirror segments are made of beryllium, which was selected for its stiffness, light weight and stability at cryogenic temperatures. Bare beryllium is not very reflective of near-infrared light, so each mirror is coated with about 0.12 ounce of gold. Northrop Grumman Corp. Aerospace Systems is the principal contractor on the telescope and commissioned Ball for the optics system's development, design, manufacturing, integration and testing. The Webb telescope is the world's next-generation space observatory and successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The most powerful space telescope ever built, the Webb telescope will provide images of the first galaxies ever formed, and explore planets around distant stars. It is a joint project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. For more information about the James Webb Space Telescope, visit: www.jwst.nasa.gov Credit: Ball Aerospace NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Designing a Telescope Mirror for Second-Semester Calculus Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.; Rogers, Robert R.; Parker, Andrew T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an interdisciplinary project, developed as a collaborative effort by the authors, involving the design of a telescope mirror as it was given to second semester calculus students. The goals of the project are to provide an applied setting for the topics typically covered in this type of course including the…

  12. NGST telescope aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghibaudo, J.-B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper is focused on the NGST telescope aspects and presents the main results of the ESA study "NGST Payload Suite and Telescope". The first part summarises the trade-off analyses on optical, mechanical and control telescope concepts, and eventually proposes a baseline design for the telescope. The second part describes the possible European contributions to the NGST telescope : invitations to tender based on the selected telescope design have been sent out to specialised European companies, and the results have been reported as well as the identified critical areas and needed associated developments. Alcatel is well known in the field of cryogenic optics through the realisation of the Infrared Space Observatory, and in the field of high resolution telescopes, notably in the framework of military programmes.

  13. Developing a Telescope Simulator Towards a Global Autonomous Robotic Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakoumidis, N.; Ioannou, Z.; Dong, H.; Mavridis, N.

    2013-05-01

    A robotic telescope network is a system that integrates a number of telescopes to observe a variety of astronomical targets without being operated by a human. This system autonomously selects and observes targets in accordance to an optimized target. It dynamically allocates telescope resources depending on the observation requests, specifications of the telescopes, target visibility, meteorological conditions, daylight, location restrictions and availability and many other factors. In this paper, we introduce a telescope simulator, which can control a telescope to a desired position in order to observe a specific object. The system includes a Client Module, a Server Module, and a Dynamic Scheduler module. We make use and integrate a number of open source software to simulate the movement of a robotic telescope, the telescope characteristics, the observational data and weather conditions in order to test and optimize our system.

  14. Undergraduate Research Possibilities with a 0.6m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, M. T.; Barnaby, D.; Gelderman, R.; Marchenko, S.; McGruder, C. H., III; Strolger, L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a discussion of the research projects that are being carried out by undergraduate students with the 0.6m telescope at the Bell Observatory, operated by Western Kentucky University. As a primarily undergraduate institution, our goal is to provide a meaningful undergraduate educational experience through both quality instruction and engagement of students in mentored research activities. Such activities not only enhance the student's educational experience, but also prepare them to be competitive in graduate school and/or the workplace. Using our modernized 0.6m telescope, our students pursue research projects which investigate a variety of astrophysically interesting problems: variability of Blazars, eclipsing binary stars, Gamma-ray burst identifications and follow up, photometric searches for extra-solar planets, supernova monitoring and survey programs, the relationship between morphological disturbances and activity in Seyfert nuclei, and variability in Wolf Rayet stars. We discuss the instrumentation, projects and results obtained by our undergraduate students, and the impact this has had on their undergraduate experience.

  15. Update on Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with a Modern Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Ian; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Milano, A. J.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

    2007-12-01

    We are completing a cooperative astronomy education project designed to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). Following the overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, we have made it available for use for hundreds of students at both schools and once per week to the public. This telescope has been integrated into studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories designed to challenge student misconceptions. An assessment test was designed and distributed to the students taking the course at the beginning and end of the Fall 2007 semester, the results of which we compare to a baseline study undertaken in Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 to determine the efficacy of the laboratories in improving undergraduate astronomy education. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we have cycled students through concurrent activites. This has been enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We show preliminary results of the Fall 2007 assessments and comparisons to the baseline assessment. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. Most recently, the complete refurbishment of Hubble in 2009 has given new life to the telescope and the new science instruments have already produced ground breaking science results, revealing some of the most distant galaxy candidates ever discovered. Despite the remarkable advances in astrophysics that Hubble has provided, the new questions that have arisen demand a new space telescope with new technologies and capabilities. I will present the exciting new technology development and science goals of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which is currently being built and tested and will be launched this decade.

  17. [Principles and methodology for ecological rehabilitation and security pattern design in key project construction].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Ding; Lu, Yi-He; Tian, Hui-Ying; Shi, Qian

    2007-03-01

    Global ecological security becomes increasingly important with the intensive human activities. The function of ecological security is influenced by human activities, and in return, the efficiency of human activities will also be affected by the patterns of regional ecological security. Since the 1990s, China has initiated the construction of key projects "Yangtze Three Gorges Dam", "Qinghai-Tibet Railway", "West-to-East Gas Pipeline", "West-to-East Electricity Transmission" and "South-to-North Water Transfer" , etc. The interaction between these projects and regional ecological security has particularly attracted the attention of Chinese government. It is not only important for the regional environmental protection, but also of significance for the smoothly implementation of various projects aimed to develop an ecological rehabilitation system and to design a regional ecological security pattern. This paper made a systematic analysis on the types and characteristics of key project construction and their effects on the environment, and on the basis of this, brought forward the basic principles and methodology for ecological rehabilitation and security pattern design in this construction. It was considered that the following issues should be addressed in the implementation of a key project: 1) analysis and evaluation of current regional ecological environment, 2) evaluation of anthropogenic disturbances and their ecological risk, 3) regional ecological rehabilitation and security pattern design, 4) scenario analysis of environmental benefits of regional ecological security pattern, 5) re-optimization of regional ecological system framework, and 6) establishment of regional ecosystem management plan.

  18. The Student Telescope Network (STN) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannahoe, Ryan M.; Stencel, Robert E.; Bisque, Steve; Rice, Mike

    2003-02-01

    Several factors make observational astronomy difficult for pre-college students and teachers. (1) not many schools have teachers trained to use and maintain astronomy equipment; (2) school usually happens during the day and observing normally is a night-time activity; (3) the scourge of light pollution has hidden the stars from many students living in or near cities; (4) there is a general lack of access to expertise when needed. In addition, physically disabled students cannot climb ladders, to access the telescope eyepiece. Internet access to computer-controlled telescopes equipped with digital cameras can solve many of these difficulties. This enables students and their teachers to access well-maintained, robust Internet-controllable telescopes in dark-site locations and to consult more readily with experts. We present the results of technical solutions to Internet-control of telescopes, by Software Bisque, the New Mexico Skies Guest Observatory and the Youth Activities Committee of the Astronomical League in collaboration with Denver University Astronomy. We jointly submitted a funding proposal to the Institute for Connecting Science Research to the Classroom, and conducted a pilot program allowing high school students to access a CCD-equipped, accurately-pointing and tracking telescope, controllable over the Web, with a user-friendly skymap browser tool. With suitably placed telescopes worldwide, observing from the classroom in daylight will become feasible, as we have demonstrated with Australian and Eurasian student users of the New Mexico Skies Internet telescope. We report here on a three-month pilot project exploring this solution, conducted Feb-May 2002. User interest proved phenomenal, while user statistics proved diverse and there were distinct lessons learned about how to enhance student participation in the research process. We thank the Institute for Connecting Science Research to the Classroom for a grant to the University of Denver in partial

  19. Project MINERVA's Follow-up on Wide-Field, Small Telescope Photometry to Identify Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Audrey; Henderson, Morgan; Johnson, Samson; Sergi, Anthony; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; McCrady, Nate

    2017-01-01

    MINERVA is an array of four 0.7-m telescopes equipped for high precision photometry and spectroscopy dedicated to exoplanet observations. During the first 18 months of science operations, MINERVA engaged in a program of photometric follow-up of potential transiting exoplanet targets identified by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). Robotically-obtained observations are passed through our data reduction pipeline and we extract light curves via differential photometry. We seek transit signals via a Markov chain Monte Carlo fit using BATMAN. We discuss results for over 100 target stars analyzed to date.

  20. Public Perceptions of the Structure and Function of Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstrom, Erika; Taylor, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    It is our conjecture that images of "the telescope” have become so ubiquitous in our culture that the majority of the general populace will exhibit the cognitive phenomenon known as "illusion of explanatory depth.” Our research builds upon the work by Keil and Wilson (2000) who demonstrated that individuals regularly over-estimate their understanding of common physical artifacts, such as how a toaster or car engine works. We have embarked on an exploratory project measuring the general public's perception of telescopes - of both their form and function. Participants in several astronomy outreach events were asked to produce accurate technical drawings of a telescope, such as "one that a scientist might make.” Some individuals were also asked to trace how light would traverse through the telescope in the diagram they produced. Entire families often attended these events, which allowed us to sample individuals across a wide age range. We identified several interesting patterns during the initial phase of this project, two of which we'll briefly discuss here. First, the vast majority of participants, regardless of age, chose to draw refracting telescopes situated on a tripod. This provides us with a baseline measure or "prototypical exemplar” of what members of the public envision when they encounter stories about astronomy. Second, tracing the pathway of light traveling through a telescope was surprisingly difficult. A task analysis of the problem revealed several features that make this aspect of astronomy education particularly challenging. We are currently testing alternative instructional intervention to help overcome this obstacle. This work is supported in part by grants from the Vanderbilt University Learning Sciences Institute (LSI) and the Institute of Educational Sciences (IES).

  1. Multiwavelength Opportunities for GeV and TeV Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    With AGILE and Fermi now in orbit and TeV telescopes continuing to improve their performance, a variety of multiwavelength opportunities is increasingly available. One goal of such programs is to take advantage of the complementary capabilities of the two types of telescopes: the wide field surveys of the satellite detectors and the high sensitivity and resolution of the ground-based telescopes. Some aspects of these multiwavelength efforts will be carried out in near-real-time but must be anticipated with advance preparation. These include gamma-ray burst follow-ups and flare campaigns. Other projects such as long-term variability studies and gammaray source identification require deep observations and cooperative work with astrophysicists at longer wavelengths, along with the theoretical studies that tie the observations together.

  2. VST: VLT Survey Telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Mancini, D.; Rafanelli, P.; Scaramella, R.; Sedmak, G.; Vettolani, G. P.

    1998-09-01

    The VLT era is rapidly approaching: the first instruments, ISAAC and FORS at UT1, will be available by the year 1999. Indeed, the beginning of the new millennium will witness fierce competition among quite a few 8-m telescopes, operated by different groups. As a consequence, there is a strong need to prepare, in a timely manner, suitable targetlists for the VLT, in order for it to play the leading role in ground-based optical and IR astronomy in the next decade. Preparation is one of the keys to success for the VLT observations.

  3. The Zadko Telescope: Exploring the Transient Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coward, D. M.; Gendre, B.; Tanga, P.; Turpin, D.; Zadko, J.; Dodson, R.; Devogéle, M.; Howell, E. J.; Kennewell, J. A.; Boër, M.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.; Moore, J. A.; Heary, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Zadko telescope is a 1 m f/4 Cassegrain telescope, situated in the state of Western Australia about 80-km north of Perth. The facility plays a niche role in Australian astronomy, as it is the only meter class facility in Australia dedicated to automated follow-up imaging of alerts or triggers received from different external instruments/detectors spanning the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Furthermore, the location of the facility at a longitude not covered by other meter class facilities provides an important resource for time critical projects. This paper reviews the status of the Zadko facility and science projects since it began robotic operations in March 2010. We report on major upgrades to the infrastructure and equipment (2012-2014) that has resulted in significantly improved robotic operations. Second, we review the core science projects, which include automated rapid follow-up of gamma ray burst (GRB) optical afterglows, imaging of neutrino counterpart candidates from the ANTARES neutrino observatory, photometry of rare (Barbarian) asteroids, supernovae searches in nearby galaxies. Finally, we discuss participation in newly commencing international projects, including the optical follow-up of gravitational wave (GW) candidates from the United States and European GW observatory network and present first tests for very low latency follow-up of fast radio bursts. In the context of these projects, we outline plans for a future upgrade that will optimise the facility for alert triggered imaging from the radio, optical, high-energy, neutrino, and GW bands.

  4. Constructing a dispersed fringe sensor prototype for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostig, Danielle; McLeod, Brian; AGWS Team

    2018-01-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be the world’s largest telescope upon completion. The GMT employs seven 8 m primary mirror segments and seven 1 m secondary mirror segments. One challenge of the GMT is keeping the seven pairs of mirror segments on the GMT in phase. In this project, we developed and began assembly on a design for a dispersed fringe sensor prototype consisting of an optical and basic mechanical layout. The prototype design will be tested on the Magellan Clay Telescope as an experiment for future phasing methods to be used on the GMT.

  5. The Lovell Telescope and its role in pulsar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, Andrew; Morison, Ian

    2017-12-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the commissioning of the 250-ft telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of pulsars at Cambridge. Both events resulted in enduring astronomical researches that have become intimately entwined, and here we celebrate them with a brief historical account of their relationship. We describe how the completion of the telescope in October 1957 coincided with the launch of Sputnik 1 at the start of the space race, a timely circumstance that was the financial saviour of Bernard Lovell's ambitious project. The telescope established a vital role in space tracking and, by the time that pulsars were discovered a decade later, was supported by an infrastructure that allowed their prompt, successful observation. Technical innovations to both the telescope and its receivers since then have continued to make it a superb tool for world-leading pulsar investigations and the study of the radio Universe.

  6. Monitoring of comets activity and composition with the TRAPPIST-North telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulane, Y.; Benkhaldoun, Z.; Jehin, E.; Opitom, C.; Gillon, M.; Daassou, A.

    2017-06-01

    TRAPPIST-North (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that was installed in May 2016 at the Oukaimeden Observatory [1]. The project is led by the University of Liège (Belgium) and the Caddi Ayad University of Marrakech (Morocco). This telescope is a twin of the TRAPPIST-South telescope, which was installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in 2010 [2]. The TRAPPIST telescopes are dedicated to the detection and characterization of planets orbiting stars other than our Sun (exoplanets) and the study of comets and other small bodies in our solar system. For the comets research, these telescopes have very sensitive CCD cameras with complete sets of narrow band filters to measure the production rates of several gases (OH, NH, CN, C3 and C2) and the dust [3]. With TRAPPIST-North we can also observe comets that would not be visible in the southern hemisphere. Therfore, with these two telescopes, we can now observe continuously the comets around their orbit. We project to study individually the evolution of the activity, chemical composition, dust properties, and coma morphology of several comets per year and of different origins (New comets and Jupiter Family comets) over a wide range of heliocentric distances, and on both sides of perihelion. We measure the production rates of each daughter molecules using a Haser model [4], in addition to the Afρ parameter to estimate the dust production in the coma. In this work, we present the first measurements of the production rates of comet C/2013 X1 (PANSTARRS) observed with TN in June 2016, and the measurements of comet C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) observed in 2014 with TRAPPIST-South.

  7. Orbit Refinement of Asteroids and Comets Using a Robotic Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz Caughey, Austin; Brown, Johnny; Puckett, Andrew W.; Hoette, Vivian L.; Johnson, Michael; McCarty, Cameron B.; Whitmore, Kevin; UNC-Chapel Hill SKYNET Team

    2016-01-01

    We report on a multi-semester project to refine the orbits of asteroids and comets in our Solar System. One of the newest fields of research for undergraduate Astrophysics students at Columbus State University is that of asteroid astrometry. By measuring the positions of an asteroid in a set of images, we can reduce the overall uncertainty in the accepted orbital parameters of that object. These measurements, using our WestRock Observatory (WRO) and several other telescopes around the world, are being published through the Minor Planet Center (MPC) and benefit the global community.Three different methods are used to obtain these observations. First, we use our own 24-inch telescope at WRO, located in at CSU's Coca-Cola Space Science Center in downtown Columbus, Georgia . Second, we have access to data from the 20-inch telescope at Stone Edge Observatory in El Verano, California. Finally, we may request images remotely using Skynet, an online worldwide network of robotic telescopes. Our primary and long-time collaborator on Skynet has been the "41-inch" reflecting telescope at Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin. Thus far, we have used these various telescopes to refine the orbits of more than 15 asteroids and comets. We have also confirmed the resulting reduction in orbit-model uncertainties using Monte Carlo simulations and orbit visualizations, using Find_Orb and OrbitMaster software, respectively.Before any observatory site can be used for official orbit refinement projects, it must first become a trusted source of astrometry data for the MPC. We have therefore obtained Observatory Codes not only for our own WestRock Observatory (W22), but also for 3 Skynet telescopes that we may use in the future: Dark Sky Observatory in Boone, North Carolina (W38) Hume Observatory in Santa Rosa, California (U54) and Athabasca University Geophysical Observatory in Athabasca, Alberta, Canada (U96).

  8. Muon imaging of volcanoes with Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Del Santo, Melania; La Parola, Valentina; La Rosa, Giovanni; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Mineo, Teresa; Pareschi, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Zuccarello, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The quantitative understanding of the inner structure of a volcano is a key feature to model the processes leading to paroxysmal activity and, hence, to mitigate volcanic hazards. To pursue this aim, different geophysical techniques are utilized, that are sensitive to different properties of the rocks (elastic, electrical, density). In most cases, these techniques do not allow to achieve the spatial resolution needed to characterize the shallowest part of the plumbing system and may require dense measurements in active zones, implying a high level of risk. Volcano imaging through cosmic-ray muons is a promising technique that allows to overcome the above shortcomings. Muons constantly bombard the Earth's surface and can travel through large thicknesses of rock, with an energy loss depending on the amount of crossed matter. By measuring the absorption of muons through a solid body, one can deduce the density distribution inside the target. To date, muon imaging of volcanic structures has been mainly achieved with scintillation detectors. They are sensitive to noise sourced from (i) the accidental coincidence of vertical EM shower particles, (ii) the fake tracks initiated from horizontal high-energy electrons and low-energy muons (not crossing the target) and (iii) the flux of upward going muons. A possible alternative to scintillation detectors is given by Cherenkov telescopes. They exploit the Cherenkov light emitted when charged particles (like muons) travel through a dielectric medium, with velocity higher than the speed of light. Cherenkov detectors are not significantly affected by the above noise sources. Furthermore, contrarily to scintillator-based detectors, Cherenkov telescopes permit a measurement of the energy spectrum of the incident muon flux at the installation site, an issue that is indeed relevant for deducing the density distribution inside the target. In 2014, a prototype Cherenkov telescope was installed at the Astrophysical Observatory of Serra

  9. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Small Projects Portfolio

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dawson, Kyle; Frieman, Josh; Heitmann, Katrin

    Understanding cosmic acceleration is one of the key science drivers for astrophysics and high-energy physics in the coming decade (2014 P5 Report). With the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and other new facilities beginning operations soon, we are entering an exciting phase during which we expect an order of magnitude improvement in constraints on dark energy and the physics of the accelerating Universe. This is a key moment for a matching Small Projects portfolio that can (1) greatly enhance the science reach of these flagship projects, (2) have immediate scientific impact, and (3)more » lay the groundwork for the next stages of the Cosmic Frontier Dark Energy program. In this White Paper, we outline a balanced portfolio that can accomplish these goals through a combination of observational, experimental, and theory and simulation efforts.« less

  10. A Decade of Hubble Space Telescope Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Noll, Keith; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2003-06-01

    1. HST studies of Mars J. F. Bell; 2. HST images of Jupiter's UV aurora J. T. Clarke; 3. Star formation J. Bally; 4. SN1987A: the birth of a supernova remnant R. McCray; 5. Globular clusters: the view from HST W. E. Harris; 6. Ultraviolet absorption line studies of the Galactic interstellar medium with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph B. D. Savage; 7. HST's view of the center of the Milky Way galaxy M. J. Rieke; 8. Stellar populations in dwarf galaxies: a review of the contribution of HST to our understanding of the nearby universe E. Tolstoy; 9. The formation of star clusters B. C. Whitmore; 10. Starburst galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope C. Leitherer; 11. Supermassive black holes F. D. Macchetto; 12. The HST Key Project to measure the Hubble Constant W. L. Freedman, R. C. Kennicutt, J. R. Mould and B. F. Madore; 13. Ho from Type Ia Supernovae G. A. Tammann, A. Sandage and A. Saha; 14. Strong gravitational lensing: cosmology from angels and redshifts A. Tyson.

  11. Design and construction of the Discovery Channel Telescope enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Heather K.; Teran, Jose U.; Bond, Kevin

    2010-07-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a project of Lowell Observatory, undertaken with support from Discovery Communications, Inc., to design and construct a 4-meter class telescope and support facility on a site approximately 40 miles southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. The Discovery Channel Telescope Enclosure was completed in November, 2009. The DCT Enclosure is an octagonal steel structure with insulated composite panel skin. The structure rotates on sixteen compliant bogie assemblies attached to the stationary facility. The shutter is composed of two independently actuated, bi-parting structures that provide a viewing aperture. To improve seeing, the skin is covered with adhesive aluminum foil tape and the enclosed observing area is passively ventilated via rollup doors. The observing area can also be actively ventilated using a downdraft fan, and there are provisions for upgrades to active air conditioning. The enclosure also includes operational equipment such as a bridge crane, personnel lift, and access platforms. This paper discusses some of the design trades as well as the construction challenges and lessons learned by the DCT Project, its designer M3 Engineering and Technology Corporation (M3), and its general contractor, Building and Engineering Contractors, Southwest (BEC Southwest).

  12. Hubble Space Telescope: The Telescope, the Observations & the Servicing Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Today the HST Archives contain more than 260 000 astronomical observations. More than 13 000 astronomical objects have been observed by hundreds of different groups of scientists. Direct proof of the scientific significance of this project is the record-breaking number of papers published : over 2400 to date. Some of HST's most memorable achievements are: * the discovery of myriads of very faint galaxies in the early Universe, * unprecedented, accurate measurements of distances to the farthest galaxies, * significant improvement in the determination of the Hubble constant and thus the age of the Universe, * confirmation of the existence of blacks holes, * a far better understanding of the birth, life and death of stars, * a very detailed look at the secrets of the process by which planets are created. Europe and HST ESA's contribution to HST represents a nominal investment of 15%. ESA provided one of the two imaging instruments - the Faint Object Camera (FOC) - and the solar panels. It also has 15 scientists and computer staff working at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore (Maryland). In Europe the astronomical community receives observational assistance from the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) located in Garching, Munich. In return for ESA's investment, European astronomers have access to approximately 15% of the observing time. In reality the actual observing time competitively allocated to European astronomers is closer to 20%. Looking back at almost ten years of operation, the head of ST-ECF, European HST Project Scientist Piero Benvenuti states: "Hubble has been of paramount importance to European astronomy, much more than the mere 20% of observing time. It has given the opportunity for European scientists to use a top class instrument that Europe alone would not be able to build and operate. In specific areas of research they have now, mainly due to HST, achieved international leadership." One of the major reasons for

  13. The Discovery Channel Telescope: Construction and Design Progress, June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bida, Thomas A.; Smith, B. W.; Millis, R. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Wiecha, O. M.; Marshall, H.

    2006-06-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2m telescope under construction in northern Arizona. The DCT is located at a new site near Happy Jack at 2361m elevation, which was selected following a lengthy site testing campaign that demonstrated median ground-level seeing of 0.84-arcsec FWHM. The DCT science mission includes targeted studies of astrophysical and solar system objects utilizing RC and Nasmyth-mounted imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation, and wide-field surveys of KBO’s, Centaurs, NEA’s, and other time-variable objects with a 2-degree FOV prime focus camera.The DCT facility enclosure and control building will be completed this year, including the supports for the telescope mount and dome, the major infrastructure for facility machinery, the instrument laboratory, control and computer rooms, and the auxiliary building for the mirror coating facility. Meanwhile, the 4.3m ULE meniscus primary mirror blank was completed at Corning, Inc., in October 2005, and the 2-3 year mirror figuring effort is due to begin June 2006. The primary mirror and its design support, and the preliminary integrated telescope mount model, were finite-element analyzed to optimize the design of the mirror and top-end support configurations. The prime focus camera design has been refined to achieve atmospheric dispersion-compensated 0.25-arcsec images at 1-degree field radius, from B to I-band, at reduced cost through simplification of glasses to standard types and utilization of spheres on all but two lens surfaces.The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately conducted with the DCT. Lowell Observatory is actively seeking additional partners in the project; interested parties should contact R. L. Millis, Director.

  14. Multi-use lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Hine, Butler; Genet, Russell; Genet, David; Talent, David; Boyd, Louis; Trueblood, Mark; Filippenko, Alexei V. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of multi-use telescopes is to reduce the initial and operational costs of space telescopes to the point where a fair number of telescopes, a dozen or so, would be affordable. The basic approach is to develop a common telescope, control system, and power and communications subsystem that can be used with a wide variety of instrument payloads, i.e., imaging CCD cameras, photometers, spectrographs, etc. By having such a multi-use and multi-user telescope, a common practice for earth-based telescopes, development cost can be shared across many telescopes, and the telescopes can be produced in economical batches.

  15. Science Opportunities with the Near-IR Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles A.; Rieke, Marcia; Eisenstein, Daniel; Greene, Thomas P.; Krist, John; McCarthy, Don; Meyer, Michael; Stansberry, John

    2012-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) offers revolutionary gains in sensitivity throughout the 1-5 micrometer region. NIRCam will enable great advances in all areas of astrophysics, from the composition of objects in our own Kuiper Belt and the physical properties of planets orbiting nearby stars to the formation of stars and the detection of the youngest galaxies in the Universe. NIRCam also plays an important role in initial alignment of JWST and the long term maintenance of its image quality. NIRCam is presently undergoing instrument Integration and Test in preparation for delivery to the JWST project. Key near-term milestones include the completion of cryogenic testing of the entire instrument; demonstration of scientific and wavefront sensing performance requirements; testing of replacement H2RG detectors arrays; and an analysis of coronagraphic performance in light of measured telescope wavefront characteristics. This paper summarizes the performance of NIRCam, the scientific and education/outreach goals of the science team, and some results of the on-going testing program.

  16. Optomechanical and thermal design of the Multi-Application Solar Telescope for USO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Stefan; Coucke, Pierre; Gabriel, Eric; Delrez, Christophe; Venkatakrishnan, Parameshwaran

    2008-07-01

    The Multi-Application Solar Telescope (MAST) is a 50 cm diameter class telescope to be installed on the Udaipur Solar Observatory's Island on the Lake Fatehsagar in Udaipur, India. It is dedicated to solar observation. The telescope is designed, manufactured, assembled and installed on-site by the belgian company AMOS SA for the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO), an academic division of the Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in India. Despite its limited size, the telescope is expected to be competitive with respect to worldwide large and costly projects thanks to its versatility regarding science goals and also thanks to its demanding optomechanical and thermal specification. This paper describes the optomechanical and thermal design of this telescope and presents solutions adopted by AMOS to meet the specific requirements. The optical configuration of the telescope is based on an afocal off-axis gregorian combination integrated on an Alt.-Az. mechanical mount, with a suite of flat folding mirrors to provide the required stationary collimated beam.

  17. The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope, an end-to end Schwarzschild-Couder telescope prototype proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, J. L.; Abchiche, A.; Allan, D.; Amans, J. P.; Armstrong, T. P.; Balzer, A.; Berge, D.; Boisson, C.; Bousquet, J.-J.; Brown, A. M.; Bryan, M.; Buchholtz, G.; Chadwick, P. M.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Dangeon, L.; Daniel, M. K.; De Franco, A.; De Frondat, F.; Dumas, D.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fasola, G.; Funk, S.; Gironnet, J.; Graham, J. A.; Greenshaw, T.; Hameau, B.; Hervet, O.; Hidaka, N.; Hinton, J. A.; Huet, J. M.; Jégouzo, I.; Jogler, T.; Kawashima, T.; Kraush, M.; Lapington, J. S.; Laporte, P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Markoff, S.; Melse, T.; Mohrmann, L.; Molyneux, P.; Nolan, S. J.; Okumura, A.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, R. D.; Rosen, S.; Ross, D.; Rowell, G.; Rulten, C. B.; Sato, Y.; Sayède, F.; Schmoll, J.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Servillat, M.; Sol, H.; Stamatescu, V.; Stephan, M.; Stuik, R.; Sykes, J.; Tajima, H.; Thornhill, J.; Tibaldo, L.; Trichard, C.; Vink, J.; Watson, J. J.; White, R.; Yamane, N.; Zech, A.; Zink, A.

    2016-08-01

    The GCT (Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope) is a dual-mirror prototype of Small-Sized-Telescopes proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and made by an Australian-Dutch-French-German-Indian-Japanese-UK-US consortium. The integration of this end-to-end telescope was achieved in 2015. On-site tests and measurements of the first Cherenkov images on the night sky began on November 2015. This contribution describes the telescope and plans for the pre-production and a large scale production within CTA.

  18. Exploring the Universe with the Worldwide Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Microsoft Research WorldWide Telescope is a software platform for exploring the universe. Whether you are a researcher, student or just a casual explorer WorldWide Telescope uses cutting edge technology to take you anywhere in the universe and visualize data collected by science programs from across the globe, including NASA great observatories and planetary probes. WWT leverages technologies such as Virtual reality headsets, multi-channel full dome projection and HTML5/WebGL to bring the WWT experience to any device and any scale. We will discuss how to use WWT to browse previously curated data, as well as how to process and visualize your own data, using examples from NASA Mars missions.

  19. Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) Project TPACK Survey: Summary of the Key Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Glenn; Jamieson-Proctor, Romina; Cavanagh, Rob; Albion, Peter; Grimbeek, Peter; Bond, Trevor; Fitzgerald, Robert; Romeo, Geoff; Lloyd, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the key findings of the TTF TPACK Survey developed and administered for the Teaching the Teachers for the Future (TTF) Project implemented in 2011. The TTF Project, funded by an Australian Government ICT Innovation Fund grant, involved all 39 Australian Higher Education Institutions which provide initial teacher…

  20. MROI Array telescopes: the relocatable enclosure domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Busatta, A.; Payne, I.

    2016-07-01

    The MROI - Magdalena Ridge Interferometer is a project which comprises an array of up to 10 1.4m diameter mirror telescopes arranged in a "Y" configuration. Each of these telescopes will be housed inside a Unit Telescope Enclosure (UTE) which are relocatable onto any of 28 stations. EIE GROUP Srl, Venice - Italy, was awarded the contract for the design, the construction and the erection on site of the MROI by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The close-pack array of the MROI - including all 10 telescopes, several of which are at a relative distance of less than 8m center to center from each other - necessitated an original design for the Unit Telescope Enclosure (UTE). This innovative design enclosure incorporates a unique dome/observing aperture system to be able to operate in the harsh environmental conditions encountered at an altitude of 10,460ft (3,188m). The main characteristics of this Relocatable Enclosure Dome are: a Light insulated Steel Structure with a dome made of composites materials (e.g. glass/carbon fibers, sandwich panels etc.), an aperture motorized system for observation, a series of louvers for ventilation, a series of electrical and plants installations and relevant auxiliary equipment. The first Enclosure Dome is now under construction and the completion of the mounting on site id envisaged by the end of 2016. The relocation system utilizes a modified reachstacker (a transporter used to handle freight containers) capable of maneuvering between and around the enclosures, capable of lifting the combined weight of the enclosure with the telescope (30tons), with minimal impacts due to vibrations.

  1. The James Webb Telescope Instrument Suite Layout: Optical System Engineering Considerations for a Large, Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Davila, Pam; Jurotich, Matthew; Hobbs, Gurnie; Lightsey, Paul; Contreras, Jim; Whitman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space-based, infrared observatory designed to study the early stages of galaxy formation in the Universe. The telescope will be launched into an elliptical orbit about the second Lagrange point and passively cooled to 30-50 K to enable astronomical observations from 0.6 to 28 microns. A group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Northrop Grumman Space Technology prime contractor team has developed an optical and mechanical layout for the science instruments within the JWST field of view that satisfies the telescope s high-level performance requirements. Four instruments required accommodation within the telescope's field of view: a Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) provided by the University of Arizona; a Near-Mared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) provided by the European Space Agency; a Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a European consortium; and a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) with a tunable filter module provided by the Canadian Space Agency. The size and position of each instrument's field of view allocation were developed through an iterative, concurrent engineering process involving the key observatory stakeholders. While some of the system design considerations were those typically encountered during the development of an infrared observatory, others were unique to the deployable and controllable nature of JWST. This paper describes the optical and mechanical issues considered during the field of view layout development, as well as the supporting modeling and analysis activities.

  2. Using Telescopic Observations to Mentor High School Students in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2011-09-01

    Over the past two summers (2009 and 2010) the NASA EPO Group at Sonoma State University (SSU) has sponsored local high school students in a summer science internship program at the University. The students, chosen from Sonoma County high schools in a competitive selection process, work in various science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields throughout the School of Science and Technology at SSU. The two interns sponsored by the EPO Group each summer monitor active galaxies using GORT, the NASA/Fermi-sponsored optical robotic telescope operated by the Group. They are mentored in their projects by EPO Group personnel and by SSU undergraduates who have experience with the telescope. The students learn about the sky, telescopes and the active galaxies they observe. They also learn how to make telescopic observations and how to reduce the CCD images obtained. Interns also participate in weekly meetings with other interns working on different projects around campus. At the end of the summer all the interns present their research results at a symposium held on campus.The symposium is attended by the interns themselves, their parents, their high school science teachers, and university faculty and administrators.The program has had a positive impact on how our interns view science, and specifically on their view of astronomy, as reported by the interns themselves in the first two years of the program.

  3. Surface Accuracy and Pointing Error Prediction of a 32 m Diameter Class Radio Astronomy Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azankpo, Severin

    2017-03-01

    The African Very-long-baseline interferometry Network (AVN) is a joint project between South Africa and eight partner African countries aimed at establishing a VLBI (Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry) capable network of radio telescopes across the African continent. An existing structure that is earmarked for this project, is a 32 m diameter antenna located in Ghana that has become obsolete due to advances in telecommunication. The first phase of the conversion of this Ghana antenna into a radio astronomy telescope is to upgrade the antenna to observe at 5 GHz to 6.7 GHz frequency and then later to 18 GHz within a required performing tolerance. The surface and pointing accuracies for a radio telescope are much more stringent than that of a telecommunication antenna. The mechanical pointing accuracy of such telescopes is influenced by factors such as mechanical alignment, structural deformation, and servo drive train errors. The current research investigates the numerical simulation of the surface and pointing accuracies of the Ghana 32 m diameter radio astronomy telescope due to its structural deformation mainly influenced by gravity, wind and thermal loads.

  4. A site evaluation campaign for a ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Aurelian Andrei; Angelescu, Tatiana; Curtef, Valentin; Delia, Florin; Felea, Daniel; Goia, Ioana; Haşegan, Dumitru; Lucaschi, Bogdan; Manea, Ancuta; Popa, Vlad; Raliţă, Ioan; Văcăreanu, Radu

    2012-07-01

    Around the world, several scientific projects share the interest of a global network of small Cherenkov telescopes for monitoring observations of the brightest blazars—the DWARF network. A small, ground based, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of last generation is intended to be installed and operated in Romania as a component of the DWARF network. To prepare the construction of the observatory, two support projects have been initiated. Within the framework of these projects, we have assessed a number of possible sites where to settle the observatory. In this paper we submit a brief report on the general characteristics of the best four sites selected after the local infrastructure, the nearby facilities and the social impact criteria have been applied.

  5. Where size does matter: foldable telescope design for microsat application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segert, Tom; Danziger, Björn; Lieder, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The DOBSON SPACE TELESCOPE Project (DST) at the Technical University of Berlin (TUB) believes that micro satellites can be a challenging competitor in the high resolution remote sensing market. Using a micro satellite as basis for a remote sensing platform will dramatically reduce the cost for the end users thereby initiating the predicted remote sensing boom. The Challenging task is that an optic required for a GSD smaller than 1m is much bigger than the given room for secondary payload. In order to break the volume limits of hitchhiker payloads the DST team develops an optical telescope with deployable structures. The core piece of DST is a 20 inch modified Cassegrain optic. Stored during ascend the instrument fits in a box measuring 60 x 60 x 30cm (including telescope and optical plane assembly). After the satellite was released into free space the telescope unfolds and collimates automatically.

  6. Projected Near-Earth Object Discovery Performance of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Veres, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of an assessment study of the performance of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in its planned efforts to detect and catalog near-Earth objects (NEOs).

  7. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: camera DAQ software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Vito; Trifoglio, Massimo; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Fioretti, Valentina; Tacchini, Alessandro; Zoli, Andrea; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Capalbi, Milvia; Catalano, Osvaldo

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size dual-mirror Telescope. In a second phase the ASTRI project foresees the installation of the first elements of the array at CTA southern site, a mini-array of 7 telescopes. The ASTRI Camera DAQ Software is aimed at the Camera data acquisition, storage and display during Camera development as well as during commissioning and operations on the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype that will operate at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on the Mount Etna (Sicily). The Camera DAQ configuration and operations will be sequenced either through local operator commands or through remote commands received from the Instrument Controller System that commands and controls the Camera. The Camera DAQ software will acquire data packets through a direct one-way socket connection with the Camera Back End Electronics. In near real time, the data will be stored in both raw and FITS format. The DAQ Quick Look component will allow the operator to display in near real time the Camera data packets. We are developing the DAQ software adopting the iterative and incremental model in order to maximize the software reuse and to implement a system which is easily adaptable to changes. This contribution presents the Camera DAQ Software architecture with particular emphasis on its potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  8. Teaching with Internet Telescopes: Some Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, Robert

    Observational astronomy is often difficult for pre-college students and teachers because: (1) school occurs in daytime and visual observing at night; (2) light pollution hides the stars from students living in cities; (3) few schools have teachers trained to use and maintain astronomy equipment; (4) there is lack of access to expertise when needed; (5) physically disabled students cannot easily access a telescope eypiece. Internet access to computer controlled telescopes with digital cameras can solve many of these difficulties. The Web enables students and teachers to access well-maintained internet-controllable telescopes at dark-site locations and to consult more readily with experts. This paper reports on a three-month pilot project exploring this situation conducted Feb-May 2002 which allowed high school students to access a CCD-equipped accurately-pointing and tracking telescope located in New Mexico controllable over the Web with a user-friendly skymap browser tool. User interest proved phenomenal and user statistics proved diverse. There were distinct lessons learned about how to enhance student participation in the research process. Details available at website www.du.edu/~rstencel/stn.htm. We thank the ICSRC for a grant to Denver University and acknowledge in-kind support from the estate of William Herschel Womble.

  9. Development of a very small telescope for space astrometry surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Yamada, Y.; Takato, N.; Yamauchi, M.

    2006-08-01

    We report an outline and a current status of developing a small, all-aluminum made telescope for Nano-JASMINE. Nano-JASMINE is a nano-size astrometry satellite that is to be launched in 2008 and will demonstrate some key technologies required for JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared Exploration) in a real space environment. It also measures absolute positions of bright stars (z≤8 mag) with accuracies about 1 milli-arcsecond in a few years mission. It has a Ritchey-Chretien type telescope with a 5-cm effective aperture, a 167-cm focal length and a field of view of 0.5x0.5 degree. The telescope only occupies a volume about 15x12x12 cm, and weighs two kilograms or less. Almost all of the structures and the optical elements of the telescope, including two aspherical mirrors three flat mirrors and a dual-angled flat mirror that combines the beam from a relative angle of 99.5 degrees into the primary mirror, are made out of aluminum alloy, being figured by diamond turning machines. The Bread Board Model (BBM) of the telescope was now measured to be achieving a diffraction-limited performance.

  10. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. Current and foreseeable launch vehicles will be limited to carrying around 4-5 meter diameter objects. Thus, if a large, filled-aperture telescope (6-20 meters in diameter) is to be placed in space, it will be required to have a deployable primary mirror. Such a mirror may be an inflatable membrane or a segmented mirror consisting of many smaller pieces. In any case, it is expected that the deployed primary will not be of sufficient quality to achieve diffraction-limited performance for its aperture size. Thus, an active optics system will be needed to correct for initial as well as environmentally-produced primary figure errors. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed considerable expertise in the area of active optics with the PAMELA test-bed. The combination of this experience along with the Marshall optical shop's work in mirror fabrication made MSFC the logical choice to lead NASA's effort to develop active optics technology for large, space-based, astronomical telescopes. Furthermore, UAH's support of MSFC in the areas of optical design, fabrication, and testing of space-based optical systems placed us in a key position to play a major role in the development of this future-generation telescope. A careful study of the active optics components had to be carried out in order to determine control segment size, segment quality, and segment controllability required to achieve diffraction-limited resolution with a given primary mirror. With this in mind, UAH undertook the following effort to provide NASA/MSFC with optical design and analysis support for the large telescope study. All of the work performed under this contract has already been reported, as a team member with MSFC, to NASA Headquarters in a series of presentations given between May and December of 1995. As specified on the delivery

  11. Hoku Kea - Educational 1meter Telescope on Mauna Kea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, John; Fox, R.

    2008-03-01

    Hoku Ke'a is the newest (and smallest) telescope to join the pantheon of great telescopes on Mauna Kea. A one-meter class telescope will be installed at the current site of the University of Hawaii - Manoa (UHM) Institute for Astronomy (IfA) 0.6-meter (24") telescope. The building and dome will be replaced with a similar sized facility and a 0.9-meter (36") reflector installed. Equinox Interscience of Golden Colorado is the manufacturer and installer. Operated by the University of Hawaii - Hilo (UHH), this 0.9 meter reflector will be a remotely operated facility solely dedicated to teaching undergraduate astronomy majors the skills and practices of observational astronomy. This is in contrast to all other observatories on Mauna Kea, where research opportunities to select user communities are made available. Learning by doing: Students (under UHH faculty direction) will perform research on a variety of sources, such as variable stars, supernovae, asteroids, etc. Incorporation of the telescope into the academic curriculum is currently underway, making the telescope a central focus of most of the courses offered by the UHH Department of Physics and Astronomy. Collaborations and instrument sharing with other institutions will be available, as well as time-sharing arrangements. We would like to acknowledge and thank the National Science Foundation for its support and funding of this project.

  12. The Argus+ Project: Wide-field, high-resolution 3mm molecular imaging with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.

    2018-06-01

    Argus+ is a large format radio camera system for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) that will carry out high-fidelity spectroscopic mapping in the molecule-rich 3mm band. The project builds on the success of the prototype 16-pixel Argus 3mm receiver. Argus+ will be nine copies of Argus in a single dewer, with lower noise amplifiers, for an increase of a factor of ten in mapping speed. The Argus+ project includes a dedicated spectrometer and improvements to the GBT metrology that will more than double the amount of useful observing time at 3mm. With a footprint of 6'x6’, 144 pixels, an angular resolution of 6″ to 8″, and the sensitivity of a filled aperture, Argus+ will map fundamental transitions of important species over hundreds of square arc-min with a spatial dynamic range of 104 to 105. The Argus+ project includes two legacy surveys: a survey of molecules in the Gould Belt molecular clouds, and a survey of dense gas in nearby galaxies. These will be carried out by the scientific community and will be defined through a series of workshops. The Project has a strong educational component and will involve undergraduates at every stage. It will be incorporated into new and existing outreach programs, and will produce materials for the Green Bank Science Center. Argus+ will be operated as an open skies facility of the Green Bank Observatory, with the majority of its use being allocated through the normal proposal review process.

  13. Design and Status of the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): An Interferometer at the Edge of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.; Barclay, Richard B.; Barry, R. K.; Benford, D. J.; Calhoun, P. C.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gorman, E. T.; Jackson, M. L.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Leisawitz, D. T.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infraredinterferometer designed to fly on a high altitude balloon. BETTII uses a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer tosimultaneously obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets; the long baseline permits subarcsecond angular resolution, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. Here, we present key aspects of the overall design of the mission and provide an overview of the current status of the project. We also discuss briefly the implications of this experiment for future space-based far-infrared interferometers.

  14. Design Evolution of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Peters, Carlton; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Content, David A.; Jackson, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) continues to evolve as each design cycle is analyzed. In 2012, two Hubble sized (2.4 m diameter) telescopes were donated to NASA from elsewhere in the Federal Government. NASA began investigating potential uses for these telescopes and identified WFIRST as a mission to benefit from these assets. With an updated, deeper, and sharper field of view than previous design iterations with a smaller telescope, the optical designs of the WFIRST instruments were updated and the mechanical and thermal designs evolved around the new optical layout. Beginning with Design Cycle 3, significant analysis efforts yielded a design and model that could be evaluated for Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) purposes for the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and provided the basis for evaluating the high level observatory requirements. Development of the Cycle 3 thermal model provided some valuable analysis lessons learned and established best practices for future design cycles. However, the Cycle 3 design did include some major liens and evolving requirements which were addressed in the Cycle 4 Design. Some of the design changes are driven by requirements changes, while others are optimizations or solutions to liens from previous cycles. Again in Cycle 4, STOP analysis was performed and further insights into the overall design were gained leading to the Cycle 5 design effort currently underway. This paper seeks to capture the thermal design evolution, with focus on major design drivers, key decisions and their rationale, and lessons learned as the design evolved.

  15. Design Evolution of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope Using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume L.; Peters, Carlton V.; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan E.; McDonald, Carson S.; Content, David A.; Jackson, Clifton E.

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) continues to evolve as each design cycle is analyzed. In 2012, two Hubble sized (2.4 m diameter) telescopes were donated to NASA from elsewhere in the Federal Government. NASA began investigating potential uses for these telescopes and identified WFIRST as a mission to benefit from these assets. With an updated, deeper, and sharper field of view than previous design iterations with a smaller telescope, the optical designs of the WFIRST instruments were updated and the mechanical and thermal designs evolved around the new optical layout. Beginning with Design Cycle 3, significant analysis efforts yielded a design and model that could be evaluated for Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) purposes for the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and provided the basis for evaluating the high level observatory requirements. Development of the Cycle 3 thermal model provided some valuable analysis lessons learned and established best practices for future design cycles. However, the Cycle 3 design did include some major liens and evolving requirements which were addressed in the Cycle 4 Design. Some of the design changes are driven by requirements changes, while others are optimizations or solutions to liens from previous cycles. Again in Cycle 4, STOP analysis was performed and further insights into the overall design were gained leading to the Cycle 5 design effort currently underway. This paper seeks to capture the thermal design evolution, with focus on major design drivers, key decisions and their rationale, and lessons learned as the design evolved.

  16. Arrays vs. single telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. L.

    The question of the relative efficiencies of telescope arrays versus an equivalent mirror-area very large telescope is re-examined and summarized. Four separate investigations by Bowen, Johnson and Richards, Code, and Disney all came to the same conclusion: that an array of telescopes is superior, both scientifically and economically, to a single very large telescope. The costs of recently completed telescopes are compared. The costs of arrays of telescopes are shown to be significantly lower than that of a single, very large telescope, with the further advantage that because existing, proven, designs can be used, no engineering 'break-throughs' are needed.

  17. SIFTER: Scintillating Fiber Telescopes for Energetic Radiation, Gamma-Ray Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    The research project "SIFTER: Scintillating Fiber Telescopes for Energetic Radiation, Gamma-Ray Applications" approved under the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Research Program. The principal investigator of the proposal was Prof. Geoffrey N. Pendleton, who is currently on extended leave from UAH. Prof. William S. Paciesas administered the grant during Dr. Pendleton's absence. The project was originally funded for one year from 6/8/2000 to 6/7/2001. Due to conflicts with other commitments by the PI, the period of performance was extended at no additional cost until 6/30/2002. The goal of this project was to study scintillating fiber pair-tracking gamma-ray telescope configurations specifically designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy in the 5 - 250 MeV energy range. The main efforts were concentrated in two areas: 1) development of tracking techniques and event reconstruction algorithms, with particular emphasis on angular resolution; and 2) investigation of coded apertures as a means to improve the instrument angular resolution at low energies.

  18. Ares V Launch Capability Enables Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle offers the potential to completely change the paradigm of future space science mission architectures. A major finding of the NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap Study was that current launch vehicle mass and volume constraints severely limit future space science missions. And thus, that significant technology development is required to package increasingly larger collecting apertures into existing launch shrouds. The Ares V greatly relaxes these constraints. For example, while a Delta IV has the ability to launch approximate a 4.5 meter diameter payload with a mass of 13,000 kg to L2, the Ares V is projected to have the ability to launch an 8 to 12 meter diameter payload with a mass of 60,000 kg to L2 and 130,000 kg to Low Earth Orbit. This paper summarizes the Ares V payload launch capability and introduces how it might enable new classes of future space telescopes such as 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror observatories, 15 meter class segmented telescopes, 6 to 8 meter class x-ray telescopes or high-energy particle calorimeters.

  19. Development of technology for lightweight Beryllium Cassegrain Telescope for space applications and lessons learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greger, R.; Rugi, E.; Hausner, Th.; Jahnen, W.; Frei, S.; Pellaton, D.; Mueller, P.; Hollenbach, I.

    2017-11-01

    This paper gives an overview on the development of a light weighted Cassegrain telescope with a 200 mm optical aperture as one key element of the Laser Altimeter which will fly on the BepiColombo mission to Mercury (BELA).The Receiver Telescope (RTL) collects the light pulse transmitted to Mercury and reflected from the planet's surface. Mercury's challenging thermal environment, the thermo-mechanical stability of the telescope and the stringent instrument's mass budget require the implementation of an innovative design solution to achieve the requested optical performance over an extended temperature range.

  20. New Radio Telescope Makes First Scientific Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    The world's two largest radio telescopes have combined to make detailed radar images of the cloud-shrouded surface of Venus and of a tiny asteroid that passed near the Earth. The images mark the first scientific contributions from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) new Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, which worked with the NSF's recently-upgraded Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. The project used the radar transmitter on the Arecibo telescope and the huge collecting areas of both telescopes to receive the echoes. GBT-Arecibo Radar Image of Maxwell Montes on Venus "These images are the first of many scientific contributions to come from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a great way for it to begin its scientific career," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Our congratulations go to the scientists involved in this project as well as to the hard-working staffs at Green Bank and Arecibo who made this accomplishment possible," Vanden Bout added. To the eye, Venus hides behind a veil of brilliant white clouds, but these clouds can be penetrated by radar waves, revealing the planet's surface. The combination of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the world's largest fully-steerable radio telescope, and the Arecibo telescope, the world's most powerful radar, makes an unmatched tool for studying Venus and other solar-system bodies. "Having a really big telescope like the new Green Bank Telescope to receive the radar echoes from small asteroids that are really close to the Earth and from very distant objects like Titan, the large moon of Saturn, will be a real boon to radar studies of the solar system." said Cornell University professor Donald Campbell, leader of the research team. Ten years ago, the radar system on NASA's Magellan spacecraft probed though the clouds of Venus to reveal in amazing detail the surface of the Earth's twin planet. These new studies using the GBT and Arecibo, the

  1. The space telescope: A study of NASA, science, technology, and politics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert William

    1989-01-01

    Scientific, technological, economic, and political aspects of NASA efforts to orbit a large astronomical telescope are examined in a critical historical review based on extensive interviews with participants and analysis of published and unpublished sources. The scientific advantages of large space telescopes are explained; early plans for space observatories are summarized; the history of NASA and its major programs is surveyed; the redesign of the original Large Space Telescope for Shuttle deployability is discussed; the impact of the yearly funding negotiations with Congress on the development of the final Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described; and the implications of the HST story for the future of large space science projects are explored. Drawings, photographs, a description of the HST instruments and systems, and lists of the major contractors and institutions participating in the HST program are provided.

  2. The Next-Generation Infrared Space Mission Spica: Project Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takao; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Onaka, Takashi; Roelfsema, Peter; SPICA Team

    2017-03-01

    We present project updates of the next-generation infrared space mission SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) as of November 2015. SPICA is optimized for mid- and far-infrared astronomy with unprecedented sensitivity, which will be achieved with a cryogenically cooled (below 8 K), large (2.5~m) telescope. SPICA is expected to address a number of key questions in various fields of astrophysics, ranging from studies of the star-formation history in the universe to the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The international collaboration framework of SPICA has been revisited. SPICA under the new framework passed the Mission Definition Review by JAXA in 2015. A proposal under the new framework to ESA is being prepared. The target launch year in the new framework is 2027/28.

  3. Pulsar Observations with Radio Telescope FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhu, Li-Chun; Zhu, Wen-Bai; Jin, Cheng-Jin; Gan, Heng-Qian

    2006-12-01

    FAST, Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is the Chinese effort for the international project SKA, Square Kilometer Array. An innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Besides a general coverage of those critical technologies involved in FAST concept, the progresses in demonstrating model being constructed at the Miyun Radio Observatory of the NAOC is introduced. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of science goals, for example, the natural hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies, looking for the first generation of shining objects, hearing the possible signal from other civilizations, etc. Among these subjects, the most striking one could be pulsar study. Large scale survey by FAST will not only improve the statistics of the pulsar population, but also may offer us a good fortune to pick up more of the most exotic, even unknown types like a sub-millisecond pulsar or a neutron star -- black hole binary as the telescope is put into operation.

  4. Calibration of the Auger Fluorescence Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, H.; Pierre Auger Observatory Collaboration

    Thirty fluorescence telescopes in four stations will overlook the detector array of the southern hemisphere experiment of the Pierre Auger project. The main aim of these telescopes is tracking of EHE air showers, measurement of the longitudinal shower development (Xmax) and determination of the absolute energy of EHE events. A telescope camera contains 440 PMTs each covering a 1.5 x 1.5 degree pixel of the sky. The response of every pixel is converted into the number of charged particles at the observed part of the shower. This reconstruction includes the shower/observer geometry and the details of the atmospheric photon production and transport. The remaining experimental task is to convert the ADC counts of the camera pixel electronics into the light flux entering the Schmidt aperture. Three types of calibration and control are necessary : a) Monitoring of time dependent variations has to be performed for all parts of the optics and for all pixels frequently. Common illumination for all pixels of a camera allows the detection of individual deviations. Properties of windows, filters and mirrors have to be measured separately. b) Differences in pixel-to-pixel efficiency are mainly due to PMT gain and to differences in effective area (camera shadow, mirror size limits). Homogeneous and isotropic illumination will enable cross calibration. c) An absolute calibration has to be performed once in a while using trusted light monitors. The calibration methods used for the Pierre Auger FD telescopes in Argentina are discussed.

  5. Cherenkov Telescope Array: the next-generation gamma ray observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebr, Jan

    2017-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a project to build the next generation ground-based observatory for gamma-ray astronomy at very-high energies in the range from 20 GeV to 300 TeV, which will both surpass the sensitivity of existing instruments in their energy domains and extend the limits of the observed energy spectrum. It will probe some of the most energetic processes in the Universe and provide insight into topics such as the acceleration of charged cosmic rays and their role in galaxy evolution, processes in relativistic jets, wind and explosions and the nature and distribution of dark matter. The CTA Observatory will consist of more than a hundred imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) of three different size classes, installed at two premier astronomical locations, one in each hemisphere. It is foreseen that the telescopes will use a variety of optical designs including parabolic primary mirrors, variations of the Davies-Cotton design and two-mirror setups such as the Schwarzschild-Couder telescope, and several camera designs, using both photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for detection of the nanosecond-scale Cherenkov flashes. Each telescope will feature a precise but lightweight and agile mount, allowing even the largest telescopes to change targets within 20 seconds, with systems of sensors and actuators actively controlling the shape of the reflecting surfaces. As an integral part, the Observatory will feature extensive calibration facilities, closely monitoring both the detectors themselves and the surrounding atmosphere. Several telescope prototypes already exist and the installation works at the northern site have started.

  6. Appendange deployment mechanism for the Hubble Space Telescope program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    The key requirements, a design overview, development testing (qualification levels), and two problems and their solutions resolved during the mechanism development testing phase are presented. The mechanism described herein has demonstrated its capability to deploy/restow two large Hubble Space Telescope deployable appendages in a varying but controlled manner.

  7. The MAGIC telescope for gamma-ray astronomy above 30 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralejo, A.; MAGIC Collaboration

    The MAGIC telescope is presently at its commissioning phase at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) on the island of La Palma. MAGIC will become the largest ground-based gamma ray telescope in the world, being sensitive to photons of energies as low as 30 GeV. The spectral range between 10 and 300 GeV remains to date mostly unexplored. Observations in this region of the spectrum are expected to provide key data for the understanding of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena belonging to the so-called ``non thermal Universe'', like the processes in the nuclei of active galaxies, the radiation mechanisms of pulsars and supernova remnants, and the enigmatic gamma-ray bursts. And overview of the telescope and its Physics goals is presented.

  8. Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Brian; Conti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The "Search for Life" via imaging of exoplanets is a mission that requires extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. The High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) envisioned for this mission would have an aperture >10 m, which is a larger payload than what can be delivered to space using a single launch vehicle. Building and assembling the mirror segments enabling large telescopes will likely require multiple launches and assembly in space. Space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to system architectures.The Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) for HDST is a primary mission cost driver. Enabling and affordable solutions for this next generation of large aperture space-based telescope are needed.This paper reports on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST), which demonstrates on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of a precision optical telescope in space. It will also facilitate demonstration of active correction of phase and mirror shape. MODEST is proposed to be delivered to the ISS using standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets. Post-assembly value includes space, ground, and environmental studies, and a testbed for new instruments. This demonstration program for next generation mirror technology provides significant risk reduction and demonstrates the technology in a six-mirror phased telescope. Other key features of the demonstration include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control that allows on-orbit optimization and demonstration of precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal

  9. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  10. Planning, scheduling, and control for automatic telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Swanson, Keith; Philips, Andy; Levinson, Rich; Bresina, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an argument for the appropriateness of Entropy Reduction Engine (ERE) technology to the planning, scheduling, and control components of Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) management. The paper is organized as follows. In the next section, we give a brief summary of the planning and scheduling requirements for APTs. Following this, in section 3, we give an ERE project precis, couched primarily in terms of project objectives. Section 4 gives a sketch of the match-up between problem and technology, and section 5 outlines where we want to go with this work.

  11. Progress on the New York State Observatory: a new 12-meter astronomical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebring, T.; O'Dea, C.; Baum, S.; Teran, J.; Loewen, N.; Stutzki, C.; Egerman, R.; Bonomi, G.

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two years, the New York Astronomical Corporation (NYAC), the business arm of the Astronomical Society of New York (ASNY), has continued planning and technical studies toward construction of a 12-meter class optical telescope for the use of all New York universities and research institutions. Four significant technical studies have been performed investigating design opportunities for the facility, the dome, the telescope optics, and the telescope mount. The studies were funded by NYAC and performed by companies who have provided these subsystems for large astronomical telescopes in the past. In each case, innovative and cost effective approaches were identified, developed, analyzed, and initial cost estimates developed. As a group, the studies show promise that this telescope could be built at historically low prices. As the project continues forward, NYAC intends to broaden the collaboration, pursue funding, to continue to develop the telescope and instrument designs, and to further define the scientific mission. The vision of a historically large telescope dedicated to all New York institutions continues to grow and find new adherents.

  12. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched in about 5 years into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Proto planetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  13. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  14. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes, and is currently the largest scientific project under construction in the United States. It will be a large (6.6m) cold (50K) telescope launched in about 5 years into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Science with the James Webb Space Telescope falls into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and investigate the potential for life in those systems. Webb will have four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Tunable Filter Imager will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. I will conclude the talk with a description of recent technical progress in the construction of the observatory.

  15. LSST Telescope and Optics Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Victor; Gressler, W. J.; Andrew, J. R.; Barr, J. D.; DeVries, J.; Hileman, E.; Liang, M.; Neill, D. R.; Sebag, J.; Wiecha, O.; LSST Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The LSST Project continues to advance the design and development of an observatory system capable of capturing 20,000 deg2 of the sky in six wavebands over ten years. Optical fabrication of the unique M1/M3 monolithic mirror has entered final front surface optical processing. After substantial grinding to remove 5 tons of excess glass above the M3 surface, a residual of a single spin casting, both distinct optical surfaces are now clearly evident. Loose abrasive grinding has begun and polishing is to occur during 2011 and final optical testing is planned in early 2012. The M1/M3 telescope cell and internal component designs have matured to support on telescope operational requirements and off telescope coating needs. The mirror position system (hardpoint actuators) and mirror support system (figure actuator) designs have developed through internal laboratory analysis and testing. Review of thermal requirements has assisted with definition of a thermal conditioning and control system. Pre-cooling the M1/M3 substrate will enable productive observing during the large temperature swing often seen at twilight. The M2 ULE™ substrate is complete and lies in storage waiting for additional funding to enable final optical polishing. This 3.5m diameter, 100mm thick meniscus substrate has been ground to within 40 microns of final figure. Detailed design of the telescope mount, including subflooring, has been developed. Finally, substantial progress has been achieved on the facility design. In early 2010, LSST contracted with ARCADIS Geotecnica Consultores, a Santiago based engineering firm to lead the formal architectural design effort for the summit facility.

  16. Camera Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Roberto Jose

    2017-01-01

    With the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the very-high-energy gamma-ray universe, between 30 GeV and 300 TeV, will be probed at an unprecedented resolution, allowing deeper studies of known gamma-ray emitters and the possible discovery of new ones. This exciting project could also confirm the particle nature of dark matter by looking for the gamma rays produced by self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The telescopes will use the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) to record Cherenkov photons that are produced by the gamma-ray induced extensive air shower. One telescope design features dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optics that allows the light to be finely focused on the high-resolution silicon photomultipliers of the camera modules starting from a 9.5-meter primary mirror. Each camera module will consist of a focal plane module and front-end electronics, and will have four TeV Array Readout with GSa/s Sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET) chips, giving them 64 parallel input channels. The TARGET chip has a self-trigger functionality for readout that can be used in higher logic across camera modules as well as across individual telescopes, which will each have 177 camera modules. There will be two sites, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, for full sky coverage, each spanning at least one square kilometer. A prototype SC telescope is currently under construction at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF award AST-1560016.

  17. Mexican Infrared-Optical New Technology Telescope: The TIM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, L.

    1998-11-01

    The scientific goals for TIM are an image quality of 0.25", consistent with the seeing at our site, optimization for the infrared as many scientific programs are going in that region of the spectrum, a M1 diameter in excess of 6.5 meters and a field of view limited to 10 arc minutes. Practical reasons, such as the limited funding available and the requirement of mexican financial agencies that the telescope should be built and installed in Mexico, lead us to decide for a segmented telescope, with a single secondary mirror, a single cassegrain focus and a light high stifness tubular structure. ALthough we are still working on the conceptual design of the telescope, there are some concepts that we are pursuing. The optical desing (M1+M2) is Ritchey-Cretien type with an hyperbolic primary 7.8 m od F/1.5 and a 0.9 m diameter f/15 secondary mirror. This will give a plate scale of 1.7 "/mm. This is 0.03 "/pix in direct mode, enough for AO goals. As for direct imaging, a factor of 5 reduction with 20 cm diam optical components would be able to produce 5' fields on a 2048, 20 microns type detector with 0.17"/pix. This implies that, with the use of auxiliary optics which is a common need for each particular instrument anyway, a wide variety of needs can be accomodated with a single secondary mirror. Choping for infrared observations would however introduce a additional cost in the secondary mirror. Alternatively the use of cold tertiary choping mirror is currently under study. The M1+M2 design currently aquires d80 of 0.17" in a 5' field without correction and 1" in a 10' field, that would require a field correcting lens. The M1 mirror will be segmented into 19 1.8 m diameter segments. There are 4 kinds of segments, the central, which we have kept to provide a reference for phasing, 6 more segments for the first ring and 12 in the outer ring, of two different kinds. The spacing between the segments is 5 mm, enough to reduce the inter-segment thermal background to half a

  18. DSLR Double Star Astrometry Using an Alt-Az Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Thomas; Haworth, David

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this project was to determine if the double star's angular separation and position angle measurements could be successfully measured with a motor driven, alt-azimuth Dobsonian-mounted Newtonian telescope (without a field rotator), and a digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera. Additionally, the project was constrained by using as much existing equipment as much as possible, including an Apple MacBook Pro laptop and a Canon T2i camera. This project was additionally challenging because the first author had no experience with astrophotography.

  19. High resolution telescope

    DOEpatents

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  20. Station report on the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 1.2 meter telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Jan F.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Abbott, Arnold; Degnan, John J.; Cheek, Jack W.; Chabot, Richard S.; Grolemund, David A.; Fitzgerald, Jim D.

    1993-01-01

    The 1.2 meter telescope system was built for the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in 1973-74 by the Kollmorgen Corporation as a highly accurate tracking telescope. The telescope is an azimuth-elevation mounted six mirror Coude system. The facility has been used for a wide range of experimentation including helioseismology, two color refractometry, lunar laser ranging, satellite laser ranging, visual tracking of rocket launches, and most recently satellite and aircraft streak camera work. The telescope is a multi-user facility housed in a two story dome with the telescope located on the second floor above the experimenter's area. Up to six experiments can be accommodated at a given time, with actual use of the telescope being determined by the location of the final Coude mirror. The telescope facility is currently one of the primary test sites for the Crustal Dynamics Network's new UNIX based telescope controller software, and is also the site of the joint Crustal Dynamics Project / Photonics Branch two color research into atmospheric refraction.

  1. Integrating WorldWide Telescope with Wordpress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Mark; Luebbert, J.; Fay, J.; Gay, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    In this project we unite three major components of astronomy and new media: World Wide Telescope, Wordpress, and user supplied audio. Through an easy to use Wordpress plug-in users can create WorldWide Telescope sky tours that allow: a) astronomers and educators to spread the facts and awareness of astronomy, potentially bringing new and interested individuals into the astronomy community; b) bloggers/podcasters to create dynamic, virtual tours of the universe that are nearly boundless; and, c) readers to benefit from the alluring WorldWide Telescope tours by gaining a new and dramatic outlook on our universe. This software has the potential to augment, and in some cases replace, traditional methods of astronomy centered online lectures. With this plugin, it is possible to combine Wordpress-based website content with audio, and a sky tour that can be paused at any object. This ability to pause a sky tour allows the user to further explore the wealth of data provided within WWT. This fully customizable solution includes all of the necessary features required to reproduce a lecture in a more creative and appealing format then some of the standard, typically non-interactive, movies and podcasts currently found online. Through the creation of effective WorldWide Telescope tours, astronomers and educators can better extend astronomy content to astronomy-interested, but not yet engaged, members of the new media community. These tours will provide a better understanding and appreciation for what our universe has to offer. Through this new media approach of integrating WorldWide Telescope with blogs and podcasts, users can now extend their interest in astronomy by exploring the universe themselves, moving beyond provided content to gain a better understanding all on their own.

  2. Note: Silicon Carbide Telescope Dimensional Stability for Space-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanjuah, J.; Korytov, D.; Mueller, G.; Spannagel, R.; Braxmaier, C.; Preston, A.; Livas, J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave detectors are conceived to detect gravitational waves in the low frequency range by measuring the distance between proof masses in spacecraft separated by millions of kilometers. One of the key elements is the telescope which has to have a dimensional stability better than 1 pm Hz(exp -1/2) at 3 mHz. In addition, the telescope structure must be light, strong, and stiff. For this reason a potential telescope structure consisting of a silicon carbide quadpod has been designed, constructed, and tested. We present dimensional stability results meeting the requirements at room temperature. Results at -60 C are also shown although the requirements are not met due to temperature fluctuations in the setup.

  3. Note: silicon carbide telescope dimensional stability for space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, J; Korytov, D; Mueller, G; Spannagel, R; Braxmaier, C; Preston, A; Livas, J

    2012-11-01

    Space-based gravitational wave detectors are conceived to detect gravitational waves in the low frequency range by measuring the distance between proof masses in spacecraft separated by millions of kilometers. One of the key elements is the telescope which has to have a dimensional stability better than 1 pm Hz(-1/2) at 3 mHz. In addition, the telescope structure must be light, strong, and stiff. For this reason a potential telescope structure consisting of a silicon carbide quadpod has been designed, constructed, and tested. We present dimensional stability results meeting the requirements at room temperature. Results at -60 °C are also shown although the requirements are not met due to temperature fluctuations in the setup.

  4. The space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers concerning the development of the Space Telescope which were presented at the Twenty-first Annual Meeting of the American Astronautical Society in August, 1975 are included. Mission planning, telescope performance, optical detectors, mirror construction, pointing and control systems, data management, and maintenance of the telescope are discussed.

  5. The Discovery Channel Telescope: Construction and Design Progress, January 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bida, Thomas A.; Millis, R. L.; Smith, B. W.; Dunham, E. W.; Marshall, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2m telescope under construction in northern Arizona. The DCT is located at a new site near Happy Jack at 2361m elevation, which was selected following a lengthy site testing campaign that demonstrated DIMM-characterized median ground-level seeing of 0.84-arcsec FWHM. The DCT science mission includes targeted studies of astrophysical and solar system objects utilizing RC and Nasmyth-mounted imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation, and wide-field surveys of KBO’s, NEA’s, and astrophysical objects with a 2-degree FOV prime focus camera. The DCT facility enclosure and control buildings will be completed soon, including the telescope mount and dome supports, major machinery infrastructure, the instrument laboratory, control and computer rooms, and the auxiliary building for the mirror coating plant. Meanwhile, the effort for final figuring and polishing of the 4.3m ULE meniscus primary mirror blank began in August 2006 at the University of Arizona College of Optical Sciences. The primary mirror and its design support, and the integrated telescope mount model, were finite-element analyzed to optimize the design of the mirror and top-end support configurations. The primary mirror axial and tangential actuators will be fabricated in early 2007 and utilized in the final figure and polish cycle. The prime focus camera design has been refined to achieve atmospheric dispersion-compensated 0.25-arcsec images at 1-degree field radius, from B to I-band, at reduced cost through simplification of glasses to standard types and utilization of spheres on all but two lens surfaces. The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately conducted with the DCT. Lowell Observatory and Discovery Communications are actively seeking additional

  6. Toward first light for the 6.5-m MMT Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Steve C.; Callahan, Shawn; Chaffee, Frederic H.; Davison, Warren B.; Derigne, S. T.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Foltz, Craig B.; Hill, John M.; Nagel, Robert H.; Poyner, Anthony D.; Williams, Joseph T.

    1997-03-01

    Operated by the Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory (MMTO), the multiple mirror telescope (MMT) is funded jointly by the Smithsonian Institution (SAO) and the University of Arizona (UA). The two organizations equally share observing time on the telescope. The MMT was dedicated in May 1979, and is located on the summit of Mt. Hopkins (at an altitude of 2.6 km), 64 km south of Tucson, Arizona, at the Smithsonian Institution's Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO). As a result of advances in the technology at the Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory for the casting of large and fast borosilicate honeycomb astronomical primary mirrors, in 1987 it was decided to convert the MMT from its six 1.8 m mirror array (effective aperture of 4.5 m) to a single 6.5 m diameter primary mirror telescope. This conversion will more than double the light gathering capacity, and will by design, increase the angular field of view by a factor of 15. Because the site is already developed and the existing building and mount will be used with some modification, the conversion will be accomplished for only about $20 million. During 1995, several major technical milestones were reached: (1) the existing building was modified, (2) the major steel telescope structures were fabricated, and (3) the mirror blank was diamond wheel ground (generated). All major mechanical hardware required to affect the conversion is now nearly in hand. Once the primary mirror is polished and lab-tested on its support system, the six-mirror MMT will be taken out of service and the conversion process begun. We anticipate that a 6 - 12 month period will be required to rebuild the telescope, install its optics and achieve f/9 first light, now projected to occur in early 1998. The f/5.4 and f/15 implementation will then follow. We provide a qualitative and brief update of project progress.

  7. The Multiple-Mirror Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, Nathaniel P.; Hoffmann, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the basic design and principle of operating an optical-infrared telescope, the MMT. This third largest telescope in the world represents a new stage in telescope design; it uses a cluster of six reflecting telescopes, and relies on an automatic sensing and control system. (GA)

  8. Introduction to Small Telescope Research Communities of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.

    2016-06-01

    Communities of practice are natural, usually informal groups of people who work together. Experienced members teach new members the “ropes.” Social learning theorist Etienne Wenger’s book, Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity, defined the field. There are, in astronomy, many communities of practice. One set of communities uses relatively small telescopes to observe brighter objects such as eclipsing binaries, intrinsically variable stars, transiting exoplanets, tumbling asteroids, and the occultation of background stars by asteroids and the Moon. Advances in low cost but increasingly powerful instrumentation and automation have greatly increased the research capabilities of smaller telescopes. These often professional-amateur (pro-am) communities engage in research projects that require a large number of observers as exemplified by the American Association of Variable Star Observers. For high school and community college students with an interest in science, joining a student-centered, small telescope community of practice can be both educational and inspirational. An example is the now decade-long Astronomy Research Seminar offered by Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo, California. Each student team is required to plan a project, obtain observations (either locally or via a remote robotic telescope), analyze their data, write a paper, and submit it for external review and publication. Well over 100 students, composed primarily of high school juniors and seniors, have been coauthors of several dozen published papers. Being published researchers has boosted these students’ educational careers with admissions to choice schools, often with scholarships. This seminar was recently expanded to serve multiple high schools with a volunteer assistant instructor at each school. The students meet regularly with their assistant instructor and also meet online with other teams and the seminar’s overall community college instructor. The seminar

  9. Parkes Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-08

    This image shows the Parkes telescope in Australia, part of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. Researchers used the telescope to detect the first population of radio bursts known to originate from beyond our galaxy.

  10. Towards a Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Model for Ground and Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost approximately (X) D(exp (1.75 +/- 0.05)) lambda(exp(-0.5 +/- 0.25) T(exp -0.25) e (exp (-0.04)Y). Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  11. Development of a Multivariable Parametric Cost Analysis for Space-Based Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollinger, Courtnay

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 400 years, the telescope has proven to be a valuable tool in helping humankind understand the Universe around us. The images and data produced by telescopes have revolutionized planetary, solar, stellar, and galactic astronomy and have inspired a wide range of people, from the child who dreams about the images seen on NASA websites to the most highly trained scientist. Like all scientific endeavors, astronomical research must operate within the constraints imposed by budget limitations. Hence the importance of understanding cost: to find the balance between the dreams of scientists and the restrictions of the available budget. By logically analyzing the data we have collected for over thirty different telescopes from more than 200 different sources, statistical methods, such as plotting regressions and residuals, can be used to determine what drives the cost of telescopes to build and use a cost model for space-based telescopes. Previous cost models have focused their attention on ground-based telescopes due to limited data for space telescopes and the larger number and longer history of ground-based astronomy. Due to the increased availability of cost data from recent space-telescope construction, we have been able to produce and begin testing a comprehensive cost model for space telescopes, with guidance from the cost models for ground-based telescopes. By separating the variables that effect cost such as diameter, mass, wavelength, density, data rate, and number of instruments, we advance the goal to better understand the cost drivers of space telescopes.. The use of sophisticated mathematical techniques to improve the accuracy of cost models has the potential to help society make informed decisions about proposed scientific projects. An improved knowledge of cost will allow scientists to get the maximum value returned for the money given and create a harmony between the visions of scientists and the reality of a budget.

  12. Britain Approaches ESO about Installation of Major New Telescope at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    The Executive Board of the UK Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope (VISTA) project announced today [1] that it is aiming at the installation of a new and powerful astronomical telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). This 4-metre telescope is a specialised wide-angle facility equipped with powerful cameras and efficient detectors that will enable it to obtain deep images of large sky areas in short time. These survey observations will be made in several wavebands in the optical and, in particular, the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. VISTA will become the largest and most effective telescope of its type when it enters into operation in 2004. It is a project of a consortium of 18 UK universities [2]. Construction is expected to start in spring 2000. Funding of the project was announced in May 1999, as one of the first allocations from the "Joint Infrastructure Fund (JIF)", an initiative of the UK Government's Department of Trade and Industry, the Wellcome Trust, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. ESO's Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , is very pleased with this decision. She received a mandate from the ESO Council in December 1999 to negotiate a contract with the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) , acting on behalf of the VISTA Executive Board, for the installation of VISTA at Paranal and now looks forward to settle the associated legal and operational details with her British counterparts at good pace. "The installation of VISTA at Paranal will be of great benefit to all European astronomers", she says. "The placement of a survey telescope of this size next to ESO's VLT, the world's largest optical telescope, opens a plethora of exciting opportunities for joint research projects. Deep observations with VISTA, especially in infrared wavebands, will provide a most valuable, first census of large regions of space. This will most certainly lead to the discoveries of many new and

  13. Management Of Optical Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter S.; Olson, David R.

    1981-03-01

    This paper discusses the management of optical projects from the concept stage, beginning with system specifications, through design, optical fabrication and test tasks. Special emphasis is placed on effective coupling of design engineering with fabrication development and utilization of available technology. Contrasts are drawn between accepted formalized management techniques, the realities of dealing with fragile components and the necessity of an effective project team which integrates the special characteristics of highly skilled optical specialists including lens designers, optical engineers, opticians, and metrologists. Examples are drawn from the HEAO-2 X-Ray Telescope and Space Telescope projects.

  14. The design and assembly of aluminum mirrors of a three-mirror-anastigmat telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Wu, Kun-Huan; Lien, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Ting-Ming; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Chan, Chia-Yen

    2017-09-01

    Better ground sampling distance (GSD) has been a trend for earth observation satellites. A long-focal-length telescope is required accordingly in systematic point of view. On the other hand, there is size constraint for such long-focal-length telescope especially in space projects. Three-mirror-anastigmat (TMA) was proven to have excellent features of correcting aberrations, wide spectral range and shorter physical requirement [1-3].

  15. 2010 Space Telescope Science Institute Calibration Workshop - Hubble after SM4. Preparing JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana; Oliveira, Cristina

    2010-07-01

    After the successful servicing mission in May 2009 (SM4), the Hubble Space Telescope now has five working science instruments: COS, WFC3, STIS, ACS, FGS. NICMOS is currently on hold. Construction has started on the James Webb Space Telescope and its instruments. Conducting research projects at the vanguard often means pushing the instruments to their limits and requires understanding and calibrating complex instrument effects.

  16. Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0) with automatic observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Tae-Geun; Byeon, Seoyeon; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Lee, Sang-Yun; Hwang, Sungyong; Choi, Changsu; Gibson, Coyne Andrew; Kuehne, John W.; Prochaska, Travis; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2018-01-01

    We introduce Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0), with an automatic observing system. It is developed for monitoring the variabilities of many sources at a time, e.g. young stellar objects and active galactic nuclei. It can also find the locations of transient sources such as a supernova or gamma-ray bursts. In 2017 February, we installed the wide-field 10-inch telescope (Takahashi CCA-250) as a piggyback system on the 30-inch telescope at the McDonald Observatory in Texas, US. The 10-inch telescope has a 2.35 × 2.35 deg field-of-view with a 4k × 4k CCD Camera (FLI ML16803). To improve the observational efficiency of the system, we developed a new automatic observing software, KAOS30 (KHU Automatic Observing Software for McDonald 30-inch telescope), which was developed by Visual C++ on the basis of a windows operating system. The software consists of four control packages: the Telescope Control Package (TCP), the Data Acquisition Package (DAP), the Auto Focus Package (AFP), and the Script Mode Package (SMP). Since it also supports the instruments that are using the ASCOM driver, the additional hardware installations become quite simplified. We commissioned KAOS30 in 2017 August and are in the process of testing. Based on the WIT0 experiences, we will extend KAOS30 to control multiple telescopes in future projects.

  17. What's Educational about Online Telescopes? Evaluating 10 Years of MicroObservatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Roy; Dussault, Mary; Sadler, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The MicroObservatory network of five online telescopes has been used by middle and high school students, their teachers, and the public in all 50 states to carry out a wide variety of inquiry-driven projects. From an analysis of 475 student projects and other data, we report substantial gains in students' conceptual understanding of what…

  18. Research on scheduling of robotic transient survey for Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Wei, Peng; Shang, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3) are designed to be fully robotic telescopes at Dome A, Antarctica, which aim for highly efficient time-domain sky surveys as well as rapid response to special transient events (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, near-Earth asteroids, supernovae, etc.). Unlike traditional observations, a well-designed real-time survey scheduler is needed in order to implement an automatic survey in a very efficient, reliable and flexible way for the unattended telescopes. We present a study of the survey strategy for AST3 and implementation of its survey scheduler, which is also useful for other survey projects.

  19. Seven Key Principles of Program and Project Success: A Best Practices Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilardo, Vincent J.; Korte, John J.; Dankhoff, Walter; Langan, Kevin; Branscome, Darrell R.; Fragola, Joseph R.; Dugal, Dale J.; Gormley, Thomas J.; Hammond, Walter E.; Hollopeter, James J.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Organization Design Team (ODT), consisting of 20 seasoned program and project managers and systems engineers from a broad spectrum of the aerospace industry, academia, and government, was formed to support the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program and the Constellation Systems Program. The purpose of the ODT was to investigate organizational factors that can lead to success or failure of complex government programs, and to identify tools and methods for the design, modeling, and analysis of new and more-efficient program and project organizations. The ODT conducted a series of workshops featuring invited lectures from seasoned program and project managers representing 25 significant technical programs spanning 50 years of experience. The result was the identification of seven key principles of program success that can be used to help design and operate future program organizations. This paper presents the success principles and examples of best practices that can significantly improve the design of program, project, and performing technical line organizations, the assessment of workforce needs and organization performance, and the execution of programs and projects.

  20. The HST/WFC3 Quicklook Project: A User Interface to Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Bowers, Ariel; Dulude, Michael; Durbin, Meredith; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Gunning, Heather; Khandrika, Harish; Martlin, Catherine; Sunnquist, Ben; Viana, Alex

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument, comprised of two detectors, UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) and IR (Infrared), has been acquiring ~ 50-100 images daily since its installation in 2009. The WFC3 Quicklook project provides a means for instrument analysts to store, calibrate, monitor, and interact with these data through the various Quicklook systems: (1) a ~ 175 TB filesystem, which stores the entire WFC3 archive on disk, (2) a MySQL database, which stores image header data, (3) a Python-based automation platform, which currently executes 22 unique calibration/monitoring scripts, (4) a Python-based code library, which provides system functionality such as logging, downloading tools, database connection objects, and filesystem management, and (5) a Python/Flask-based web interface to the Quicklook system. The Quicklook project has enabled large-scale WFC3 analyses and calibrations, such as the monitoring of the health and stability of the WFC3 instrument, the measurement of ~ 20 million WFC3/UVIS Point Spread Functions (PSFs), the creation of WFC3/IR persistence calibration products, and many others.

  1. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are joining with an international consortium of space agencies to support the launch of a Japanese satellite next week that will create the largest astronomical "instrument" ever built -- a radio telescope more than two-and-a-half times the diameter of the Earth that will give astronomers their sharpest view yet of the universe. The launch of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 11:50 p.m. EST (1:50 p.m. Feb. 11, Japan time.) The satellite is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA; the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Socorro, NM; the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. Very long baseline interferometry is a technique used by radio astronomers to electronically link widely separated radio telescopes together so they work as if they were a single instrument with extraordinarily sharp "vision," or resolving power. The wider the distance between telescopes, the greater the resolving power. By taking this technique into space for the first time, astronomers will approximately triple the resolving power previously available with only ground-based telescopes. The satellite system will have resolving power almost 1,000 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope at optical wavelengths. The satellite's resolving power is equivalent to being able to see a grain of rice in Tokyo from Los Angeles. "Using space VLBI, we can probe the cores of quasars and active galaxies, believed to be powered by super massive black holes," said Dr. Robert Preston, project scientist for the U.S. Space Very Long

  2. Simultaneous operation and control of about 100 telescopes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, P.; Colomé, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Houles, J.; Köppel, H.; Lamanna, G.; Le Flour, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lyard, E.; Melkumyan, D.; Oya, I.; Panazol, L.-I.; Punch, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Stegmann, C.; Schwanke, U.; Walter, R.; Consortium, CTA

    2012-12-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project is an initiative to build the next generation ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray instrument. Compared to current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope experiments CTA will extend the energy range and improve the angular resolution while increasing the sensitivity up to a factor of 10. With about 100 separate telescopes it will be operated as an observatory open to a wide astrophysics and particle physics community, providing a deep insight into the non-thermal high-energy universe. The CTA Array Control system (ACTL) is responsible for several essential control tasks supporting the evaluation and selection of proposals, as well as the preparation, scheduling, and finally the execution of observations with the array. A possible basic distributed software framework for ACTL being considered is the ALMA Common Software (ACS). The ACS framework follows a container component model and contains a high level abstraction layer to integrate different types of device. To achieve a low-level consolidation of connecting control hardware, OPC UA (OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture) client functionality is integrated directly into ACS, thus allowing interaction with other OPC UA capable hardware. The CTA Data Acquisition System comprises the data readout of all cameras and the transfer of the data to a camera server farm, thereby using standard hardware and software technologies. CTA array control is also covering conceptions for a possible array trigger system and the corresponding clock distribution. The design of the CTA observations scheduler is introducing new algorithmic technologies to achieve the required flexibility.

  3. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) science instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, R.; Hing, S. M.; Leidich, C. A.; Fazio, G.; Houck, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Concepts of scientific instruments designed to perform infrared astronomical tasks such as imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy are discussed as part of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) project under definition study at NASA/Ames Research Center. The instruments are: the multiband imaging photometer, the infrared array camera, and the infrared spectograph. SIRTF, a cryogenically cooled infrared telescope in the 1-meter range and wavelengths as short as 2.5 microns carrying multiple instruments with high sensitivity and low background performance, provides the capability to carry out basic astronomical investigations such as deep search for very distant protogalaxies, quasi-stellar objects, and missing mass; infrared emission from galaxies; star formation and the interstellar medium; and the composition and structure of the atmospheres of the outer planets in the solar sytem.

  4. Mapping Compound Cosmic Telescopes Containing Multiple Projected Cluster-scale Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. Mark; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Keeton, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Lines of sight with multiple projected cluster-scale gravitational lenses have high total masses and complex lens plane interactions that can boost the area of magnification, or étendue, making detection of faint background sources more likely than elsewhere. To identify these new "compound" cosmic telescopes, we have found directions in the sky with the highest integrated mass densities, as traced by the projected concentrations of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). We use new galaxy spectroscopy to derive preliminary magnification maps for two such lines of sight with total mass exceeding ~3 × 1015 M ⊙. From 1151 MMT Hectospec spectra of galaxies down to i AB = 21.2, we identify two to three group- and cluster-scale halos in each beam. These are well traced by LRGs. The majority of the mass in beam J085007.6+360428 (0850) is contributed by Zwicky 1953, a massive cluster at z = 0.3774, whereas beam J130657.5+463219 (1306) is composed of three halos with virial masses of 6 × 1014-2 × 1015 M ⊙, one of which is A1682. The magnification maps derived from our mass models based on spectroscopy and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry alone display substantial étendue: the 68% confidence bands on the lens plane area with magnification exceeding 10 for a source plane of zs = 10 are [1.2, 3.8] arcmin2 for 0850 and [2.3, 6.7] arcmin2 for 1306. In deep Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging of beam 0850, we serendipitously discover a candidate multiply imaged V-dropout source at z phot = 5.03. The location of the candidate multiply imaged arcs is consistent with the critical curves for a source plane of z = 5.03 predicted by our mass model. Incorporating the position of the candidate multiply imaged galaxy as a constraint on the critical curve location in 0850 narrows the 68% confidence band on the lens plane area with μ > 10 and zs = 10 to [1.8, 4.2] arcmin2, an étendue range comparable to that of MACS 0717+3745 and El Gordo, two of the most powerful single cluster lenses known

  5. Filtered back-projection algorithm for Compton telescopes

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Donald L [Lisle, IL

    2008-03-18

    A method for the conversion of Compton camera data into a 2D image of the incident-radiation flux on the celestial sphere includes detecting coincident gamma radiation flux arriving from various directions of a 2-sphere. These events are mapped by back-projection onto the 2-sphere to produce a convolution integral that is subsequently stereographically projected onto a 2-plane to produce a second convolution integral which is deconvolved by the Fourier method to produce an image that is then projected onto the 2-sphere.

  6. Adaptive beam shaping for improving the power coupling of a two-Cassegrain-telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haotong; Hu, Haojun; Xie, Wenke; Zhao, Haichuan; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the adaptive beam shaping for improving the power coupling of a two-Cassegrain-telescope based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs). Adaptive pre-compensation the wavefront of projected laser beam at the transmitter telescope is chosen to improve the power coupling efficiency. One phase only LC-SLM adaptively optimizes phase distribution of the projected laser beam and the other generates turbulence phase screen. The intensity distributions of the dark hollow beam after passing through the turbulent atmosphere with and without adaptive beam shaping are analyzed in detail. The influence of propagation distance and aperture size of the Cassegrain-telescope on coupling efficiency are investigated theoretically and experimentally. These studies show that the power coupling can be significantly improved by adaptive beam shaping. The technique can be used in optical communication, deep space optical communication and relay mirror.

  7. The Telescoping Phenomenon: Origins in Gender Bias and Implications for Contemporary Scientific Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Marks, Katherine R; Clark, Claire D

    2018-05-12

    In an article published in International Journal of the Addictions in 1989, Nick Piazza and his coauthors described "telescoping," an accelerated progression through "landmark symptoms" of alcoholism, among a sample of recovering women. The aim of this critical analysis is to apply a feminist philosophy of science to examine the origins of the framework of telescoping research and its implications for contemporary scientific inquiry. A feminist philosophy of science framework is outlined and applied to key source publications of telescoping literature drawn from international and United States-based peer-reviewed journals published beginning in 1952. A feminist philosophy of science framework identifies gender bias in telescoping research in three ways. First, gender bias was present in the early conventions that laid the groundwork for telescoping research. Second, a "masculine" framework was present in the methodology guiding telescoping research. Third, gender bias was present in the interpretation of results as evidenced by biased comparative language. Telescoping research contributed to early evidence of critical sex and gender differences helping to usher in women's substance abuse research more broadly. However, it also utilized a "masculine" framework that perpetuated gender bias and limited generative, novel research that can arise from women-focused research and practice. A feminist philosophy of science identifies gender bias in telescoping research and provides an alternative, more productive approach for substance abuse researchers and clinicians.

  8. Antares reference telescope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    Antares is a 24 beam, 40 TW carbon dioxide laser fusion system currently nearing completion. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target. It is to position the targets to within 10 (SIGMA)m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares reference telescope system is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares reference telescope system consists of two similar electrooptical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9% optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and tradeoffs are discussed. The final system chosen and its current status are described.

  9. Using Group Research Projects to Stimulate Undergraduate Astronomy Major Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Turner, J. D.; Shirley, Y. L.; Walker-LaFollette, A. M.; Robertson, A. N.; Carleton, T. M.; Smart, B. M.; Towner, A. P. M.; Wallace, S. C.; Smith, C. W.; Small, L. C.; Daugherty, M. J.; Guvenen, B. C.; Crawford, B. E.; Austin, C. L.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2012-05-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar planet project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting exoplanets, TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kupier Telescope in near-UV and optical filters in order to detect any asymmetries between filters. The second project is a radio astronomy survey utilizing the Arizona Radio Observatory 12m telescope on Kitt Peak to study molecular gas in cold cores identified by the Planck all sky survey. This project provides a unique opportunity for a large group of students to get hands-on experience observing with a world-class radio observatory. These projects involve students in every single step of the process including: proposal writing to obtain telescope time on various Southern Arizona telescopes, observing at these telescopes, data reduction and analysis, managing large data sets, and presenting results at scientific meetings and in journal publications. The primary goal of these projects is to involve students in cutting-edge research early on in their undergraduate studies. The projects are designed to be continuous long term projects so that new students can easily join. As of January 2012 the extrasolar planet project became an official independent study class. New students learn from the more experienced students on the projects creating a learner-centered environment.

  10. ESO Telescope Designer Raymond Wilson Wins Prestigious Kavli Award for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    with four individual telescopes with 17.5 cm thick 8.2-metre mirrors. Active optics has contributed towards making the VLT the world's most successful ground-based observatory and will be an integral part of ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) project. Active optics technology is also part of the twin 10-metre Keck telescopes, the Subaru telescope's 8.2-metre mirror and the two 8.1-metre Gemini telescopes. Co-prize winners Jerry Nelson and Roger Angel respectively pioneered the use of segmentation in telescope primary mirrors - as used on the Keck telescopes, and the development of lightweight mirrors with short focal ratios. A webcast from Oslo, Norway, announcing the prize winners is available at www.kavlifoundation.org and www.kavliprize.no. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the world's largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  11. Subaru Telescope, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Subaru Telescope, Hawaii is an 8.2 m aperture optical infrared telescope being operated by the NATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY, JAPAN (NAOJ) atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. It is one of the new-generation telescopes with an actively controlled large monolithic mirror, and has been producing testing-phase observational results on solar system, star formation, active galactic nuclei and quasars, grou...

  12. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  13. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope WFIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Fan, X.; Rauscher, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    In December 2010, NASA created a Science Definition Team (SDT) for WFIRST, the Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope, recommended by the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey as the highest priority for a large space mission. The SDT was chartered to work with the WFIRST Project Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL to produce a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for WFIRST. Part of the original charge was to produce an interim design reference mission by mid-2011. That document was delivered to NASA and widely circulated within the astronomical community. In late 2011 the Astrophysics Division augmented its original charge, asking for two design reference missions. The first of these, DRM1, was to be a finalized version of the interim DRM, reducing overall mission costs where possible. The second of these, DRM2, was to identify and eliminate capabilities that overlapped with those of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (henceforth JWST), ESA's Euclid mission, and the NSF's ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (henceforth LSST), and again to reduce overall mission cost, while staying faithful to NWNH. This report presents both DRM1 and DRM2.

  14. The Sardinia Radio Telescope . From a technological project to a radio observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Murgia, M.; Tarchi, A.; Burgay, M.; Castangia, P.; Egron, E.; Govoni, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Ricci, R.; Righini, S.; Bartolini, M.; Casu, S.; Corongiu, A.; Iacolina, M. N.; Melis, A.; Nasir, F. T.; Orlati, A.; Perrodin, D.; Poppi, S.; Trois, A.; Vacca, V.; Zanichelli, A.; Bachetti, M.; Buttu, M.; Comoretto, G.; Concu, R.; Fara, A.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Loi, F.; Migoni, C.; Orfei, A.; Pilia, M.; Bolli, P.; Carretti, E.; D'Amico, N.; Guidetti, D.; Loru, S.; Massi, F.; Pisanu, T.; Porceddu, I.; Ridolfi, A.; Serra, G.; Stanghellini, C.; Tiburzi, C.; Tingay, S.; Valente, G.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the new 64 m dish operated by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). Its active surface, comprised of 1008 separate aluminium panels supported by electromechanical actuators, will allow us to observe at frequencies of up to 116 GHz. At the moment, three receivers, one per focal position, have been installed and tested: a 7-beam K-band receiver, a mono-feed C-band receiver, and a coaxial dual-feed L/P band receiver. The SRT was officially opened in September 2013, upon completion of its technical commissioning phase. In this paper, we provide an overview of the main science drivers for the SRT, describe the main outcomes from the scientific commissioning of the telescope, and discuss a set of observations demonstrating the scientific capabilities of the SRT. Aims: The scientific commissioning phase, carried out in the 2012-2015 period, proceeded in stages following the implementation and/or fine-tuning of advanced subsystems such as the active surface, the derotator, new releases of the acquisition software, etc. One of the main objectives of scientific commissioning was the identification of deficiencies in the instrumentation and/or in the telescope subsystems for further optimization. As a result, the overall telescope performance has been significantly improved. Methods: As part of the scientific commissioning activities, different observing modes were tested and validated, and the first astronomical observations were carried out to demonstrate the science capabilities of the SRT. In addition, we developed astronomer-oriented software tools to support future observers on site. In the following, we refer to the overall scientific commissioning and software development activities as astronomical validation. Results: The astronomical validation activities were prioritized based on technical readiness and scientific impact. The highest priority was to make the SRT available for joint observations as

  15. A Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Alberto; Arenberg, Jonathan; Baldauf, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The “Search for Life” (direct imaging of earth-like planets) will require extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. Such apertures are larger than what can be delivered to space using current or planned future launch vehicles. Building and assembling large telescopes in space is therefore likely to require not only multiple launches but importantly assembly in spce. As a result, space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to our conventional telescope design and architecture.Here we report on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST) to demonstrates the on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of an optical telescope in space. MODEST is a proposed International Space Station (ISS demonstration that will make use of the standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets.MODEST will provides significant risk reduction for the next generation of space observatories, and demonstrates the technology needed to assemble a six-mirror phased telescope. Key modest features include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control to allow on-orbit optimization, and the precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion. Mirrors built from these materials can be rapidly replicated in a highly cost effective manner, making them an excellent candidate for a low cost, high performance Optical Telescope Assembly paving the way for enabling affordable solutions for the next generation of large aperture space-based telescope.MODEST post-assembly value includes space, ground, and

  16. Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

  17. Webb Telescope Tested for Space, Ready for Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-10

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is a civilization scale mission, set to look back to the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang and help answer the question “are we alone in the universe?” After passing a key test at Johnson Space Center designed to simulate the cold vacuum of space, Webb is ready for the next step ahead of a launch in 2019

  18. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The science of astronomy depends on modern-day temples called telescopes. Astronomers make pilgrimages to remote mountaintops where these large, intricate, precise machines gather light that rains down from the Universe. Bit, since Earth is a bright, turbulent planet, our finest telescopes are those that have been launched into the dark stillness of space. These space telescopes, named after heroes of astronomy (Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, Herschel), are some of the best ideas our species has ever had. They show us, over 13 billion years of cosmic history, how galaxies and quasars evolve. They study planets orbiting other stars. They've helped us determine that 95% of the Universe is of unknown composition. In short, they tell us about our place in the Universe. The next step in this journey is the James Webb Space Telescope, being built by NASA, Europe, and Canada for a 2018 launch; Webb will reveal the first galaxies that ever formed.

  19. Using WorldWide Telescope in Observing, Research and Presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Douglas A.; Fay, J.

    2014-01-01

    WorldWide Telescope (WWT) is free software that enables researchers to interactively explore observational data using a user-friendly interface. Reference, all-sky datasets and pointed observations are available as layers along with the ability to easily overlay additional FITS images and catalog data. Connections to the Astrophysics Data System (ADS) are included which enable visual investigation using WWT to drive document searches in ADS. WWT can be used to capture and share visual exploration with colleagues during observational planning and analysis. Finally, researchers can use WorldWide Telescope to create videos for professional, education and outreach presentations. I will conclude with an example of how I have used WWT in a research project. Specifically, I will discuss how WorldWide Telescope helped our group to prepare for radio observations and following them, in the analysis of multi-wavelength data taken in the inner parsec of the Galaxy. A concluding video will show how WWT brought together disparate datasets in a unified interactive visualization environment.

  20. The MAGIC telescope for gamma-ray astronomy above 30 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralejo, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bastieri, D.; Bednarek, W.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Böck, R.; Bretz, T.; Chilingarian, A.; Coarasa, J. A.; Colombo, E.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; de Angelis, A.; de los Reyes, R.; de Lotto, B.; Domingo, C.; Domingo, E.; Dorner, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Flix, J.; Fonseca, V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; Gaug, M.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gebauer, J.; Giannitrapani, R.; Giller, M.; Goebel, F.; Hengstebeck, T.; Jacon, P.; de Jager, O. C.; Kalekin, O.; Kestel, M.; Kim, K.-S.; Kneiske, T.; Laatiaoui, M.; Laille, A.; Lindfors, E.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López, J.; Lorenz, E.; Lucarelli, F.; Mannheim, K.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mase, K.; Merck, M.; Meucci, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mizobuchi, S.; Moralejo, A.; Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Orduña, R.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pavel, N.; Pegna, R.; Peruzzo, L.; Piccioli, A.; Pin, M.; Robert, A.; Saggion, A.; Sánchez, A.; Sartori, P.; Scalzotto, V.; Shinozaki, K.; Sillanpaa, A.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Stark, L. S.; Stepanian, A.; Stiehler, R.; Takalo, L.; Teshima, M.; Tonello, N.; Torres, A.; Turini, N.; Viertel, G.; Vitale, V.; Volkov, S.; Wagner, R.; Wibig, T.; Wittek, W.

    2003-12-01

    The MAGIC telescope, presently at its commissioning phase, will become fully operative by the end of 2003. Placed at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) on the island of La Palma, MAGIC is the largest among new generation ground-based gamma ray telescopes, and will reach an energy threshold as low as 30 GeV. The range of the electromagnetic spectrum between 10 and 250 GeV remains to date mostly unexplored. Observations in this energy region are expected to provide key data for the understanding of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena belonging to the so-called ``non thermal Universe'', like the processes in the nuclei of active galaxies, the radiation mechanisms of pulsars and supernova remnants, and the enigmatic gamma-ray bursts. An overview of the telescope and its physics goals is presented.

  1. The role of space telescopes in the characterization of transiting exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Hatzes, Artie P

    2014-09-18

    Characterization studies now have a dominant role in the field of exoplanets. Such studies include the measurement of an exoplanet's bulk density, its brightness temperature and the chemical composition of its atmosphere. The use of space telescopes has played a key part in the characterization of transiting exoplanets. These facilities offer astronomers data of exquisite precision and temporal sampling as well as access to wavelength regions of the electromagnetic spectrum that are inaccessible from the ground. Space missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST), Spitzer Space Telescope, Convection, Rotation and Planetary Transits (CoRoT), and Kepler have rapidly advanced our knowledge of the physical properties of exoplanets and have blazed a trail for a series of future space missions that will help us to understand the observed diversity of exoplanets.

  2. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  3. Toward active x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-09-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (< 1") optics with very-large-aperture (> 25 m2) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kg/m2 or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, active optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom (UK) and the Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States (US). This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  4. First Light for USNO 1.3-meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monet, A. K. B.; Harris, F. H.; Harris, H. C.; Monet, D. G.; Stone, R. C.

    2001-11-01

    The US Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station has recently achieved first light with its newest telescope -- a 1.3--meter, f/4 modified Ritchey-Chretien,located on the grounds of the station. The instrument was designed to produce a well-corrected field 1.7--degrees in diameter, and is expected to provide wide-field imaging with excellent astrometric properties. A number of test images have been obtained, using a temporary CCD camera in both drift and stare mode, and the results have been quite encouraging. Several astrometric projects are planned for this instrument, which will be operated in fully automated fashion. This paper will describe the telescope and its planned large-format mosaic CCD camera, and will preview some of the research for which it will be employed.

  5. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  6. Aspherical mirrors for the Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope, a Schwarschild-Couder prototype proposed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, J. L.; Gironnet, J.; Huet, J. M.; Laporte, P.; Chadwick, P.; Dumas, D.; Pech, M.; Rulten, C. B.; Sayède, F.; Schmoll, J.; Sol, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project, led by an international collaboration of institutes, aims to create the world's largest next generation Very High-Energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescope array, devoted to observations in a wide band of energy, from a few tens of GeV to more than 100 TeV. The Small-Sized Telescopes (SSTs) are dedicated to the highest energy range. Seventy SSTs are planned in the baseline array design with a required lifetime of about 30 years. The GCT (Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope) is one of the prototypes proposed for CTA's SST sub-array. It is based on a Schwarzschild-Couder dual-mirror optical design. This configuration has the benefit of increasing the field-of-view and decreasing the masses of the telescope and of the camera. But, in spite of these many advantages, it was never implemented before in ground-based Cherenkov astronomy because of the aspherical and highly curved shape required for the mirrors. The optical design of the GCT consists of a primary 4 meter diameter mirror, segmented in six aspherical petals, a secondary monolithic 2-meter mirror and a light camera. The reduced number of segments simplifies the alignment of the telescope but complicates the shape of the petals. This, combined with the strong curvature of the secondary mirror, strongly constrains the manufacturing process. The Observatoire de Paris implemented metallic lightweight mirrors for the primary and the secondary mirrors of GCT. This choice was made possible because of the relaxed requirements of optical Cherenkov telescopes compared to optical ones. Measurements on produced mirrors show that these ones can fulfill requirements in shape, PSF and reflectivity, with a clear competition between manufacturing cost and final performance. This paper describes the design of these mirrors in the context of their characteristics and how design optimization was used to produce a lightweight design. The manufacturing process used for the prototype and planned for the

  7. Overview of diffraction gratings technologies for spaceflight satellites and ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, A.; Liard, A.; Desserouer, F.; Pichon, P.

    2017-11-01

    The diffraction gratings are widely used in Space-flight satellites for spectrograph instruments or in ground-based telescopes in astronomy. The diffraction gratings are one of the key optical components of such systems and have to exhibit very high optical performances. HORIBA Jobin Yvon S.A.S. (part of HORIBA Group) is in the forefront of such gratings development for more than 40 years. During the past decades, HORIBA Jobin Yvon (HJY) has developed a unique expertise in diffraction grating design and manufacturing processes for holographic, ruled or etched gratings. We will present in this paper an overview of diffraction grating technologies especially designed for space and astronomy applications. We will firstly review the heritage of the company in this field with the space qualification of different grating types. Then, we will describe several key grating technologies developed for specific space or astronomy projects: ruled blazed low groove density plane reflection grating, high-groove density holographic toroidal and spherical grating, and finally transmission Fused Silica Etched (FSE) grism-assembled grating. We will not present the Volume Phase Holographic (VPHG) grating type which is used in Astronomy.

  8. The single mirror small sized telescope for the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, M.; Schioppa, E., Jr.; Porcelli, A.; Pujadas, I. Troyano; Ziętara, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Montaruli, T.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Aguilar, J. A.; Christov, A.; Prandini, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Bilnik, W.; Błocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Borkowski, J.; Bulik, T.; Frankowski, A.; Grudzińska, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Lyard, E.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Marszałek, A.; Miranda, L. D. Medina; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P.; Seweryn, K.; Sliusar, V.; Skowron, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Walter, R.; Więcek, M.; Zagdański, A.; CTA Consortium

    2017-01-01

    The Small Size Telescope with Single Mirror (SST-1M) is one of the proposed types of Small Size Telescopes (SST) for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). About 70 SST telescopes will be part the CTA southern array which will also include Medium Sized Telescopes (MST) in its threshold configuration. Optimized for the detection of gamma rays in the energy range from 5 TeV to 300 TeV, the SST-1M uses a Davies-Cotton optics with a 4 m dish diameter with a field of view of 9°. The Cherenkov light resulting from the interaction of the gamma-rays in the atmosphere is focused onto a 88 cm side-to-side hexagonal photo-detection plane. The latter is composed of 1296 hollow light guides coupled to large area hexagonal silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The SiPM readout is fully digital readout as for the trigger system. The compact and lightweight design of the SST-1M camera offiers very high performance ideal for gamma-ray observation requirement. In this contribution, the concept, design, performance and status of the first telescope prototype are presented.

  9. Baseline projections for Latin America: base-year assumptions, key drivers and greenhouse emissions

    DOE PAGES

    van Ruijven, Bas J.; Daenzer, Katie; Fisher-Vanden, Karen; ...

    2016-02-14

    This article provides an overview of the base-year assumptions and core baseline projections for the set of models participating in the LAMP and CLIMACAP projects. Here we present the range in core baseline projections for Latin America, and identify key differences between model projections including how these projections compare to historic trends. We find relatively large differences across models in base year assumptions related to population, GDP, energy and CO 2 emissions due to the use of different data sources, but also conclude that this does not influence the range of projections. We find that population and GDP projections acrossmore » models span a broad range, comparable to the range represented by the set of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). Kaya-factor decomposition indicates that the set of core baseline scenarios mirrors trends experienced over the past decades. Emissions in Latin America are projected to rise as result of GDP and population growth and a minor shift in the energy mix toward fossil fuels. Most scenarios assume a somewhat higher GDP growth than historically observed and continued decline of population growth. Minor changes in energy intensity or energy mix are projected over the next few decades.« less

  10. 4MOST: the 4-metre Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope project at preliminary design review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Roelof S.; Barden, Samuel C.; Bellido-Tirado, Olga; Brynnel, Joar G.; Frey, Steffen; Giannone, Domenico; Haynes, Roger; Johl, Diana; Phillips, Daniel; Schnurr, Olivier; Walcher, Jakob C.; Winkler, Roland; Ansorge, Wolfgang R.; Feltzing, Sofia; McMahon, Richard G.; Baker, Gabriella; Caillier, Patrick; Dwelly, Tom; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Iwert, Olaf; Mandel, Holger G.; Piskunov, Nikolai A.; Pragt, Johan H.; Walton, Nicholas A.; Bensby, Thomas; Bergemann, Maria; Chiappini, Cristina; Christlieb, Norbert; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Driver, Simon; Finoguenov, Alexis; Helmi, Amina; Irwin, Michael J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Liske, Jochen; Merloni, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Richard, Johan; Starkenburg, Else

    2016-08-01

    We present an overview of the 4MOST project at the Preliminary Design Review. 4MOST is a major new wide-field, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility under development for the VISTA telescope of ESO. 4MOST has a broad range of science goals ranging from Galactic Archaeology and stellar physics to the high-energy physics, galaxy evolution, and cosmology. Starting in 2021, 4MOST will deploy 2436 fibres in a 4.1 square degree field-of-view using a positioner based on the tilting spine principle. The fibres will feed one high-resolution (R 20,000) and two medium resolution (R 5000) spectrographs with fixed 3-channel designs and identical 6k x 6k CCD detectors. 4MOST will have a unique operations concept in which 5-year public surveys from both the consortium and the ESO community will be combined and observed in parallel during each exposure. The 4MOST Facility Simulator (4FS) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of this observing concept, showing that we can expect to observe more than 25 million objects in each 5-year survey period and will eventually be used to plan and conduct the actual survey.

  11. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wood, M. D.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.

    In this paper, we present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parametersmore » including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies–Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild–Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30–40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. Finally, we attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.« less

  12. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, M. D.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.; ...

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, we present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parametersmore » including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies–Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild–Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30–40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. Finally, we attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.« less

  13. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  14. Integrated Modeling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project: Structural Analysis Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John; Mosier, Mark; Howard, Joe; Hyde, Tupper; Parrish, Keith; Ha, Kong; Liu, Frank; McGinnis, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs about structural analysis activities and integrated modeling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The topics include: 1) JWST Overview; 2) Observatory Structural Models; 3) Integrated Performance Analysis; and 4) Future Work and Challenges.

  15. Lunar transit telescope lander design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Husam A.

    1991-01-01

    The Program Development group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been involved in studying the feasibility of placing a 16 meter telescope on the lunar surface to scan the skies using visible/ Ultraviolet/ Infrared light frequencies. The precursor telescope is now called the TRANSIT LUNAR TELESCOPE (LTT). The Program Development Group at Marshall Space Flight Center has been given the task of developing the basic concepts and providing a feasibility study on building such a telescope. The telescope should be simple with minimum weight and volume to fit into one of the available launch vehicles. The preliminary launch date is set for 2005. A study was done to determine the launch vehicle to be used to deliver the telescope to the lunar surface. The TITAN IV/Centaur system was chosen. The engineering challenge was to design the largest possible telescope to fit into the TITAN IV/Centaur launch system. The telescope will be comprised of the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors and their supporting system in addition to the lander that will land the telescope on the lunar surface and will also serve as the telescope's base. The lunar lander should be designed integrally with the telescope in order to minimize its weight, thus allowing more weight for the telescope and its support components. The objective of this study were to design a lander that meets all the constraints of the launching system. The basic constraints of the TITAN IV/Centaur system are given.

  16. Lunar transit telescope lander design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Husam A.

    1992-01-01

    The Program Development group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been involved in studying the feasibility of placing a 16 meter telescope on the lunar surface to scan the skies using visible/ Ultraviolet/ Infrared light frequencies. The precursor telescope is now called the TRANSIT LUNAR TELESCOPE (LTT). The Program Development Group at Marshall Space Flight Center has been given the task of developing the basic concepts and providing a feasibility study on building such a telescope. The telescope should be simple with minimum weight and volume to fit into one of the available launch vehicles. The preliminary launch date is set for 2005. A study was done to determine the launch vehicle to be used to deliver the telescope to the lunar surface. The TITAN IV/Centaur system was chosen. The engineering challenge was to design the largest possible telescope to fit into the TITAN IV/Centaur launch system. The telescope will be comprised of the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors and their supporting system in addition to the lander that will land the telescope on the lunar surface and will also serve as the telescope's base. The lunar lander should be designed integrally with the telescope in order to minimize its weight, thus allowing more weight for the telescope and its support components. The objective of this study were to design a lander that meets all the constraints of the launching system. The basic constraints of the TITAN IV/Centaur system are given.

  17. Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture, space telescope designed to provide imaging and spectroscopy over the near and mid-infrared from 1.0 μm to 28 μm. JWST is a passively cooled infrared telescope, employing a five layer sunshield to achieve an operating temperature of ~40 K. JWST will be launched to an orbit at L2 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher in 2013. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is the lead center for the JWST program and manages the project for NASA. The prime contractor for JWST is Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGST). JWST is an international partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). ESA will contribute the Ariane 5 launch, and a multi-object infrared spectrograph. CSA will contribute the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), which includes the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI). A European consortium, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), builds the mid-infrared imager (MIRI). In this paper we present an overview of the JWST science program, and discuss recent progress in the development of the observatory. In this paper we will discuss the scientific motivations for JWST, and discuss recent progress in the construction of the observatory, focusing on the telescope and its optics, which have recently completed polishing.

  18. "State of the Nation": A Discussion of Some of the Project's Key Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers several of the key findings of the State of the Nation research. Specific reference is made to three areas--impact evaluation, strategic leadership of professional development, and barriers and constraints to effective CPD practice--which are considered with reference to findings from the other TDA-funded projects conducted at…

  19. The Development of Thai Learners' Key Competencies by Project-Based Learning Using ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soparat, Sasithorn; Arnold, Savitree Rochanasmita; Klaysom, Saowadee

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to study the use of Project-based Learning using ICT (PBL using ICT) to develop learners' five key competencies based on Thai Basic Education Curriculum 2008, which consists of 1) communication capability 2) thinking capability 3) problem solving capability 4) capability in applying life skills and 5) capability in…

  20. LUTE telescope structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (LUTE) Telescope Structural Design Study was to investigate the feasibility of designing an ultralightweight 1-m aperture system within optical performance requirements and mass budget constraints. This study uses the results from our previous studies on LUTE as a basis for further developing the LUTE structural architecture. After summarizing our results in Section 2, Section 3 begins with the overall logic we used to determine which telescope 'structural form' should be adopted for further analysis and weight estimates. Specific telescope component analysis showing calculated fundamental frequencies and how they compare with our derived requirements are included. 'First-order' component stress analyses to ensure telescope optical and structural component (i.e. mirrors & main bulkhead) weights are realistic are presented. Layouts of both the primary and tertiary mirrors showing dimensions that are consistent with both our weight and frequency calculations also form part of Section 3. Section 4 presents our calculated values for the predicted thermally induced primary-to-secondary mirror despace motion due to the large temperature range over which LUTE must operate. Two different telescope design approaches (one which utilizes fused quartz metering rods and one which assumes the entire telescope is fabricated from beryllium) are considered in this analysis. We bound the secondary mirror focus mechanism range (in despace) based on these two telescope configurations. In Section 5 we show our overall design of the UVTA (Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) via an 'exploded view' of the sub-system. The 'exploded view' is annotated to help aid in the understanding of each sub-assembly. We also include a two view layout of the UVTA from which telescope and telescope component dimensions can be measured. We conclude our study with a set of recommendations not only with respect to the LUTE structural architecture

  1. James Webb Space Telescope: Large Deployable Cryogenic Telescope in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Atkinson, Charles; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an infrared space telescope designed to explore four major science themes: first light and reionization, the assembly of galaxies, the birth of stars and protoplanetary systems, and planetary systems and origins of life. JWST is a segmented architecture telescope with an aperture of 6.6 m. It will operate at cryogenic temperature (40 K), achieved via passive cooling, in an orbit about the Earth-Sun second Lagrange point (L2). Passive cooling is facilitated by means of a large sunshield that provides thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the Sun. The large size of the telescope and spacecraft systems require that they are stowed for launch in a configuration that fits the Ariane 5 fairing, and then deployed after launch. Routine wavefront sensing and control measurements are used to achieve phasing of the segmented primary mirror and initial alignment of the telescope. A suite of instruments will provide the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6- to 27-micron wavelengths with imaging and spectroscopic configurations. An overview is presented of the architecture and selected optical design features of JWST are described

  2. TALON: the telescope alert operation network system: intelligent linking of distributed autonomous robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert R.; Wren, James; Davis, Heath R.; Galassi, Mark; Starr, Daniel; Vestrand, W. T.; Wozniak, P.

    2004-09-01

    The internet has brought about great change in the astronomical community, but this interconnectivity is just starting to be exploited for use in instrumentation. Utilizing the internet for communicating between distributed astronomical systems is still in its infancy, but it already shows great potential. Here we present an example of a distributed network of telescopes that performs more efficiently in synchronous operation than as individual instruments. RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) is a system of telescopes at LANL that has intelligent intercommunication, combined with wide-field optics, temporal monitoring software, and deep-field follow-up capability all working in closed-loop real-time operation. The Telescope ALert Operations Network (TALON) is a network server that allows intercommunication of alert triggers from external and internal resources and controls the distribution of these to each of the telescopes on the network. TALON is designed to grow, allowing any number of telescopes to be linked together and communicate. Coupled with an intelligent alert client at each telescope, it can analyze and respond to each distributed TALON alert based on the telescopes needs and schedule.

  3. Simulation of Twin Telescopes at Onsala and Wettzell for the VLBI Global Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönberger, Caroline; Gnilsen, Paul; Böhm, Johannes; Haas, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    The VLBI2010 committee of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) developed a concept to achieve an improvement of the accuracy of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) to 1 mm for station positions and 0.1 mm/yr for station velocities. This so-called VLBI2010 concept includes broadband observations with fast slewing telescopes and proposes twin telescopes to improve the handling of atmospheric turbulence that has been identified as a limiting factor for geodetic VLBI. There are several VLBI sites that have projects to install a Twin Telescope. The Wettzell Twin Telescope in Germany has already been constructed, and Twin Telescopes will be installed in the coming years at Onsala (Sweden), Ny-Ålesund (Spitsbergen, Norway) and Kazan (Russia). In this study, the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) is used to schedule and simulate a global VLBI network following the example of the CONT11 campaign, with and without the Twin Telescopes in Onsala and Wettzell. Different scheduling approaches (e.g., source-based scheduling, Twin Telescope observing in multidirectional mode, Twin Telescopes in continuous mode) were compared by evaluating the numbers of observations and scans as well as baseline length repeatabilities, station positions, Earth orientation parameters, atmospheric parameters and clock estimates. Comparison of the results show an improvement in estimated parameters with Twin Telescopes, especially with the Onsala Twin Telescope in a continuous observing mode and a strategy with four sources observed simultaneously.

  4. A 16-m Telescope for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Telescope (ATLAST) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, Charles F.; Dailey, D. R.; Polidan, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Future space observatories will require increasingly large telescopes to study the earliest stars and galaxies, as well as faint nearby objects. Technologies now under development will enable telescopes much larger than the 6.5-meter diameter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to be developed at comparable costs. Current segmented mirror and deployable optics technology enables the 6.5 meter JWST telescope to be folded for launch in the 5-meter diameter Ariane 5 payload fairing, and deployed autonomously after reaching orbit. Late in the next decade, when the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle payload fairing becomes operational, even larger telescope can be placed in orbit. In this paper we present our concept for a 16-meter JWST derivative, chord-fold telescope which could be stowed in the 10-m diameter Ares V fairing, plus a description of the new technologies that enable ATLAST to be developed at an affordable price.

  5. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: Design and Project Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murowinski, Rick

    2015-08-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) will be a 10-m class telescope feeding a dedicated massively-multiplexed multi-object spectrometer. The project formally kicked off in March 2014, with a Project Office hosted at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope's (CFHT's) Waimea office facility. The MSE observatory will be ultimately realized my means of an upgrade to the CFHT telescope and partnership, resulting in a new observatory with forefront transformational capability and serving a new international partnership. This new observatory will be housed within the facade of the current CFHT and using the same summit site that CFHT now occupies. We present a description, and the status, of the project. We will show the level one design choices that have been made and those under consideration. We will show our progress in gaining permitting permission as the first major observatory that will re-use an existing Maunakea telescope site.

  6. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  7. Eastern Anatolia Observatory (DAG): Recent developments and a prospective observing site for robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyaprak, C.; Yerli, S. K.; Keskin, O.

    2016-12-01

    This document (Eastern Anatolia Observatory (DAG) is the new observatory of Turkey with the optical and near-infrared largest telescope (4 m class) and its robust observing site infrastructure. This national project consists of three phases with DAG (Telescope, Enclosure, Buildings and Infrastructures), FPI (Focal Plane Instruments and Adaptive Optics) and MCP (Mirror Coating Plant) and is supported by the Ministry of Development of Turkey. The tenders of telescope and enclosure have been made and almost all the infrastructure (roads, geological and atmospherical surveys, electricity, fiber optics, cable car, water, generator, etc.) of DAG site (Erzurum/Turkey, 3,170 m altitude) have been completed. This poster is about the recent developments of DAG and about the future possible collaborations for various robotic telescopes which can be set up in DAG site.

  8. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  9. High-Tech 'Heart' of New-Generation Radio Telescope Passes First Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), took a giant step toward completion on August 7 with successful testing of advanced digital hardware designed to combine signals from its upgraded radio-telescope antennas to produce high resolution images of celestial objects. Successful Moment NRAO Crew Views Successful Computer Display Of WIDAR "First Fringes" Seated, front to back: Barry Clark, Ken Sowinski, Michael Rupen, Kevin Ryan. Standing, front to rear: Mark McKinnon, Rick Perley, Hichem Ben Frej. CREDIT: Dave Finley, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for larger file. By upgrading the 1970s-era electronics of its original Very Large Array (VLA), NRAO is creating a major new radio telescope that is ten times more sensitive than before. Using the EVLA, astronomers will observe fainter and more-distant objects than previously possible and use vastly improved analysis tools to decipher their physics. The heart of the new electronics that makes this transformation possible is a high-performance, special-purpose supercomputer, called the WIDAR Correlator. It has been designed and is being built by the National Research Council of Canada at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) of the Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, and serves as Canada's contribution to the EVLA project. The design of the correlator incorporates an NRC-patented new digital electronic architecture. The successful test, at the VLA site 50 miles west of Socorro, New Mexico, used prototype correlator electronics to combine the signals from two upgraded VLA antennas to turn them into a single, high-resolution telescope system, called an interferometer. The technical term for this achievement is called "first fringes." Each upgraded EVLA antenna produces 100 times more data than an original VLA antenna. When all 27 antennas are upgraded, they will pump data into the WIDAR correlator at a rate equal to 48 million digital telephone calls. To

  10. Telescope Kits: A Teaching Vehicle for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Fienberg, R. T.; Isbell, D.; Deustua, S.

    2007-12-01

    We are examining a variety of telescope kits suitable for assembly by school-age children in order to design a cornerstone educational program for the International Year of Astronomy 2009-400 years after Galileo's observations. In our experience, telescope kits are superior to pre-assembled telescopes for use in an educational setting as the students feels a stronger sense of ownership and have a better understanding of the components and how they work. We examined several low to medium power refracting telescope kits including one kit used in the Hands-On Optics project at NOAO. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of each kit from an educational and optical perspective and what modifications may be made to enhance their educational utility. We also describe the optical and education requirements for a low-powered "Galileoscope", to be distributed widely during the IYA. We also describe how the "Galileoscope” will be embedded in an educational program disseminated through science centers, amateur astronomy clubs and other Hands-On Optics centers and partners.

  11. FOREST unbiased Galactic plane imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (FUGIN). I. Project overview and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Tomofumi; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Kuno, Nario; Fujita, Shinji; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Nishimura, Atsushi; Torii, Kazufumi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Kohno, Mikito; Kuriki, Mika; Tsuda, Yuya; Hirota, Akihiko; Ohashi, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Handa, Toshihiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Koide, Nagito; Matsumoto, Naoko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuki; Seta, Masumichi; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Tachihara, Kengo; Sano, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Yusuke; Onodera, Sachiko; Oasa, Yumiko; Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Tsuboi, Masato; Sofue, Yoshiaki; Higuchi, Aya E.; Chibueze, James O.; Mizuno, Norikazu; Honma, Mareki; Muller, Erik; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yoshiike, Satoshi; Costes, Jean; Kuwahara, Sho

    2017-10-01

    The FUGIN project is one of legacy projects using a new multi-beam FOREST (four-beam receiver system on the 45 m telescope). This project aims to simultaneously investigate the distribution, kinematics, and physical properties of both diffuse and dense molecular gases in the Galaxy by observing 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 1-0 lines simultaneously. Mapping regions are parts of the first quadrant (10° ≤ l ≤ 50°, |b| ≤ 1°) and the third quadrant (198° ≤ l ≤ 236°, |b| ≤ 1°) of the Galaxy, where spiral arms, bar structure, and the molecular gas ring are included. This survey achieves the highest angular resolution to date (˜20″) for the Galactic plane survey in the CO J = 1-0 lines, which makes it possible to find dense clumps located farther away than the previous surveys. FUGIN will provide us an invaluable dataset for investigating the physics of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), particularly the evolution of interstellar gas covering galactic-scale structures to the internal structures of giant molecular clouds, such as small filaments/clumps/cores. We present an overview of the FUGIN project, the observation plan and initial results. These results reveal wide-field and detailed structures of molecular clouds, such as entangled filaments that have not been obvious in previous surveys, and large-scale kinematics of molecular gas, such as spiral arms.

  12. The Lunar Transit Telescope (LTT) - An early lunar-based science and engineering mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgraw, John T.

    1992-01-01

    The Sentinel, the soft-landed lunar telescope of the LTT project, is described. The Sentinel is a two-meter telescope with virtually no moving parts which accomplishes an imaging survey of the sky over almost five octaves of the electromagnetic spectrum from the ultraviolet into the infrared, with an angular resolution better than 0.1 arsec/pixel. The Sentinel will incorporate innovative techniques of interest for future lunar-based telescopes and will return significant engineering data which can be incorporated into future lunar missions. The discussion covers thermal mapping of the Sentinel, measurement of the cosmic ray flux, lunar dust, micrometeoroid flux, the lunar atmosphere, and lunar regolith stability and seismic activity.

  13. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  14. VISTA: Pioneering New Survey Telescope Starts Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    A new telescope - VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) - has just started work at ESO's Paranal Observatory and has made its first release of pictures. VISTA is a survey telescope working at infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest telescope dedicated to mapping the sky. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. Spectacular new images of the Flame Nebula, the centre of our Milky Way galaxy and the Fornax Galaxy Cluster show that it is working extremely well. VISTA is the latest telescope to be added to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. It is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA's main mirror is 4.1 metres across and is the most highly curved mirror of this size and quality ever made - its deviations from a perfect surface are less than a few thousandths of the thickness of a human hair - and its construction and polishing presented formidable challenges. VISTA was conceived and developed by a consortium of 18 universities in the United Kingdom [1] led by Queen Mary, University of London and became an in-kind contribution to ESO as part of the UK's accession agreement. The telescope design and construction were project-managed by the Science and Technology Facilities Council's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (STFC, UK ATC). Provisional acceptance of VISTA was formally granted by ESO at a ceremony at ESO's Headquarters in Garching, Germany, attended by representatives of Queen Mary, University of London and STFC, on 10 December 2009 and the telescope will now be operated by ESO. "VISTA is a unique addition to ESO's observatory on Cerro Paranal. It will play a pioneering role in surveying the southern sky at infrared wavelengths and will find many interesting targets for further study by the Very Large Telescope, ALMA and

  15. Decision Announced in Green Bank Telescope Arbitration Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    A decision has been reached by the arbitrator in the dispute between COMSAT Corporation, now part of Lockheed-Martin Global Telecommunications, and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) regarding additional costs on the contract to design and construct the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The GBT, in West Virginia, is the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope, the newest facility in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) suite of astronomical instruments. The decision, released by the American Arbitration Association (AAA), calls for AUI, which operates the NRAO, to pay COMSAT 4.07 million over the fixed-price contract amount. The contract had standard provisions for disputes, which specify binding arbitration through the AAA for matters that could not be resolved in negotiation. The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope The contract to design and construct the GBT had an agreed fixed price of 55 million, with work to begin on December 19, 1990 and to be completed by the end of 1994. The contract terms required the telescope to be designed and built to performance specifications, placing most of the performance risks associated with the project on the contractor. The telescope was accepted from the contractor on October 13, 2000, nearly six years later than the original contract delivery date. During the entire period of contract work the only agreed change in scope was a single change order for 150,000 executed in August of 1993. In 1998, COMSAT sought an additional payment of approximately 29 million above the contracted amount, alleging that AUI/NRAO had forced it to conduct unnecessary work on the telescope design and to build the telescope to an unreasonable life cycle (fatigue) specification. COMSAT also claimed that AUI/NRAO was obligated to pay the costs of accommodating what it claimed to be additional wind loads. COMSAT blamed these circumstances for its delay in completing the project on time and within the contract price. AUI

  16. The solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Objectives of the Solar Optical Telescope are to study the physics of the Sun on the scale at which many of the important physical processes occur and to attain a resolution of 73km on the Sun or 0.1 arc seconds of angular resolution. Topics discussed in this overview of the Solar Optical Telescope include: why is the Solar Optical Telescope needed; current picture of the Sun's atmosphere and convection zone; scientific problems for the Solar Optical Telescope; a description of the telescope; the facility - science management, contamination control, and accessibility to the instruments; the scientific instruments - a coordinated instrument package for unlocking the Sun's secrets; parameters of the coordinated instrument package; science operations from the Space Shuttle; and the dynamic solar atmosphere.

  17. Operating performance of the gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope: An end-to-end Schwarzschild-Couder telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, J. L.; De Franco, A.; Laporte, P.; White, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Sol, H.; Abchiche, A.; Allan, D.; Amans, J. P.; Armstrong, T. P.; Balzer, A.; Berge, D.; Boisson, C.; Bousquet, J. J.; Brown, A. M.; Bryan, M.; Buchholtz, G.; Chadwick, P. M.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Daniel, M.; De Frondat, F.; Dumas, D.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fasola, G.; Funk, S.; Gaudemard, J.; Graham, J. A.; Gironnet, J.; Hervet, O.; Hidaka, N.; Hinton, J. A.; Huet, J. M.; Jégouzo, I.; Jogler, T.; Kawashima, T.; Kraus, M.; Lapington, J. S.; Lefaucheur, J.; Markoff, S.; Melse, T.; Morhrmann, L.; Molnyeux, P.; Nolan, S. J.; Okumura, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Ross, D.; Rowell, G.; Sato, Y.; Sayède, F.; Schmoll, J.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Servillat, M.; Stamatescu, V.; Stephan, M.; Stuik, R.; Sykes, J.; Tajima, H.; Thornhill, J.; Tibaldo, L.; Trichard, C.; Vink, J.; Watson, J.; Yamane, N.; Zech, A.; Zink, A.; CTA Consortium

    2017-02-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) consortium aims to build the next-generation ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray observatory. The array will feature different sizes of telescopes allowing it to cover a wide gamma-ray energy band from about 20 GeV to above 100 TeV. The highest energies, above 5 TeV, will be covered by a large number of Small-Sized Telescopes (SSTs) with a field-of-view of around 9°. The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT), based on Schwarzschild-Couder dual-mirror optics, is one of the three proposed SST designs. The GCT is described in this contribution and the first images of Cherenkov showers obtained using the telescope and its camera are presented. These were obtained in November 2015 in Meudon,

  18. WorldWide Telescope in High School Astronomy Competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Ana-Maria; Goodman, A. A.; Udomprasert, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to improve astronomy education at the high school level, and to increase awareness in astronomy for pre-university students, on an international scale. In 2013, the WorldWide Telescope Ambassadors Program began a collaboration with the International Olympiad in Astronomy and Astrophysics (IOAA), which was held in the city of Volos, Greece in August 2013. Now at its VIIth edition, IOAA is the largest annual astronomy competition for high school students, and it consists of one team task and three individual ones - Theoretical, Data Analysis, and Observational. Each of the participating countries (35 in 2013, compared to 21 in 2007) is responsible for selecting up to five representative students for the International round. IOAA is meant to promote future collaborations between these students, and to encourage friendships inside a global scientific community. Ana-Maria Constantin, a current Harvard undergraduate student and a former medalist of IOAA, represented WorldWide Telescope Ambassadors in Greece by giving a talk on the advantages of using WWT as a tool for research and education. As a result, the President and the International Board of the Olympiad have expressed support for including WWT in the competition for future editions. WWTA is working with the Organizing Board for next year’s competition in Romania, to include WWT as a testing tool. This poster will summarize key points from the WWTA presentation in Greece, present ideas for WWT-based activities in future IOAA competitions, and outline plans for new collaborations from representatives of Sri Lanka, Poland, Bangladesh, and Colombia. Given the positive feedback we have received after the presentation in Greece, we are also considering future implementations of WWT in summer research camps for high school students, such as the Summer Science Program.

  19. Using Telescopic Observations to Mentor High School Students in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, Kevin M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2011-03-01

    Over the past two summers (2009/2010) the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University has sponsored local high school students in a summer science internship program at the University. The students, chosen from Sonoma County high schools in a competitive selection process, work in various STEM fields throughout the School of Science and Technology at SSU. The two interns sponsored by the E/PO Group each summer use GORT, the NASA/Fermi-sponsored robotic observatory operated by the Group, to monitor active galaxies. They are mentored in their projects by E/PO Group personnel and by SSU undergraduates who have experience with the telescope. The students learn about the sky, telescopes and the active galaxies they observe. They also learn how to make telescopic observations and how to reduce the CCD images obtained. Interns also participate in weekly meetings with other interns working on different projects around campus. At the end of the summer all the interns present their research results at a symposium held on campus.The symposium is attended by the interns themselves, their parents and sponsoring high school science teachers, and university faculty and administrators.The program has had a positive impact on how our interns view science, as reported by themselves, and specifically on their view of astronomy, in the first year of the program.

  20. Aluminum Mirror Coatings for UVOIR Telescope Optics Including the Far UV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Hennessy, John; Raouf, Nasrat; Nikzad, Shouleh; Ayala, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Scowen, Paul; Del Hoyo, Javier; Quijada, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    NASA Cosmic Origins (COR) Program identified the development of high reflectivity mirror coatings for large astronomical telescopes particularly for the far ultra violet (FUV) part of the spectrum as a key technology requiring significant materials research and process development. In this paper we describe the challenges and accomplishments in producing stable high reflectance aluminum mirror coatings with conventional evaporation and advanced Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) techniques. We present the current status of process development with reflectance of approx. 55 to 80% in the FUV achieved with little or no degradation over a year. Keywords: Large telescope optics, Aluminum mirror, far UV astrophysics, ALD, coating technology development.

  1. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) is a segmented, cryogenic telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. In September of 2002, NASA selected prime contractor Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to build the observatory including management of the OTE. NGST is teamed with subcontractors Ball Aerospace, Alliant Techsystems (ATK). and Kodak. The team has completed several significant design, technology, architecture definition, and manufacturing milestones in the past year that are summarized in this paper.

  3. Advanced Source Deconvolution Methods for Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoglauer, Andreas

    The next generation of space telescopes utilizing Compton scattering for astrophysical observations is destined to one day unravel the mysteries behind Galactic nucleosynthesis, to determine the origin of the positron annihilation excess near the Galactic center, and to uncover the hidden emission mechanisms behind gamma-ray bursts. Besides astrophysics, Compton telescopes are establishing themselves in heliophysics, planetary sciences, medical imaging, accelerator physics, and environmental monitoring. Since the COMPTEL days, great advances in the achievable energy and position resolution were possible, creating an extremely vast, but also extremely sparsely sampled data space. Unfortunately, the optimum way to analyze the data from the next generation of Compton telescopes has not yet been found, which can retrieve all source parameters (location, spectrum, polarization, flux) and achieves the best possible resolution and sensitivity at the same time. This is especially important for all sciences objectives looking at the inner Galaxy: the large amount of expected sources, the high background (internal and Galactic diffuse emission), and the limited angular resolution, make it the most taxing case for data analysis. In general, two key challenges exist: First, what are the best data space representations to answer the specific science questions? Second, what is the best way to deconvolve the data to fully retrieve the source parameters? For modern Compton telescopes, the existing data space representations can either correctly reconstruct the absolute flux (binned mode) or achieve the best possible resolution (list-mode), both together were not possible up to now. Here we propose to develop a two-stage hybrid reconstruction method which combines the best aspects of both. Using a proof-of-concept implementation we can for the first time show that it is possible to alternate during each deconvolution step between a binned-mode approach to get the flux right and a

  4. TALON - The Telescope Alert Operation Network System : intelligent linking of distributed autonomous robotic telescopes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    White, R. R.; Wren, J.; Davis, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    The internet has brought about great change in the astronomical community, but this interconnectivity is just starting to be exploited for use in instrumentation. Utilizing the internet for communicating between distributed astronomical systems is still in its infancy, but it already shows great potential. Here we present an example of a distributed network of telescopes that performs more efficienfiy in synchronous operation than as individual instruments. RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) is a system of telescopes at LANL that has intelligent intercommunication, combined with wide-field optics, temporal monitoring software, and deep-field follow-up capability all working in closed-loop real-time operation.more » The Telescope ALert Operations Network (TALON) is a network server that allows intercommunication of alert triggers from external and internal resources and controls the distribution of these to each of the telescopes on the network. TALON is designed to grow, allowing any number of telescopes to be linked together and communicate. Coupled with an intelligent alert client at each telescope, it can analyze and respond to each distributed TALON alert based on the telescopes needs and schedule.« less

  5. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  6. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Welch, William J.; Dreher, John; Tarter, Jill; Blitz, Leo; Davis, Michael; Fleming, Matt; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey; Lugten, John; Girmay-Keleta, G.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Harp, Gerry R.; Ackermann, Rob; Weinreb, Sander; Engargiola, Greg; Thornton, Doug; Wadefalk, Niklas

    2004-10-01

    The Allen Telescope Array, originally called the One Hectare Telescope (1hT) [1] will be a large array radio telescope whose novel characteristics will be a wide field of view (3.5 deg-GHz HPBW), continuous frequency coverage of 0.5 - 11 GHz, four dual-linear polarization output bands of 100 MHz each, four beams in each band, two 100 MHz spectral correlators for two of the bands, and hardware for RFI mitigation built in. Its scientific motivation is for deep SETI searches and, at the same time, a variety of other radio astronomy projects, including transient (e.g. pulsar) studies, HI mapping of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, Zeeman studies of the galactic magnetic field in a number of transitions, mapping of long chain molecules in molecular clouds, mapping of the decrement in the cosmic background radiation toward galaxy clusters, and observation of HI absorption toward quasars at redshifts up to z=2. The array is planned for 350 6.1-meter dishes giving a physical collecting area of about 10,000 square meters. The large number of components reduces the price with economies of scale. The front end receiver is a single cryogenically cooled MIMIC Low Noise Amplifier covering the whole band. The feed is a wide-band log periodic feed of novel design, and the reflector system is an offset Gregorian for minimum sidelobes and spillover. All preliminary and critical design reviews have been completed. Three complete antennas with feeds and receivers are under test, and an array of 33 antennas is under construction at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the end of 2004. The present plan is to have a total of about 200 antennas completed by the summer of 2006 and the balance of the array finished before the end of the decade.

  7. NASA Science Leaders: Webb Telescope Complex and Unprecedented

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-06-27

    Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, and John Mather, senior project scientist, comment on an independent review board’s findings on the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope. Webb is now targeting March 2021 as a new launch date, after the board assessed delays in integration and testing. NASA and the board unanimously agree that Webb can still achieve mission success.

  8. A 1.2m Deployable, Transportable Space Surveillance Telescope Designed to Meet AF Space Situational Awareness Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, J.; Ackermann, M.

    Recent years have seen significant interest in optical-infrared (OIR) space surveillance capabilities to complement and supplement radar-based sensors. To address this legitimate need for OIR sensors, the Air Force Research Laboratory has been working on several projects intended to meet SSA requirements in practical, fieldable and affordable packages. In particular, while the PanStarrs system is primarily an astronomy project, their well-designed telescope(s) will have substantial SSA capability, but the system, based on four 1.8m apertures on the same mount, will be a fixed location asset. For world-wide deployment, we are studying a smaller "PanStarrs derived" system which would be replicable and inexpensive. A fixed set of telescope arrays would provide substantial SSA search and monitor capability. These telescopes are also designed to be deployed in pairs in a standard cargo container package for theater SSA. With a 1.2m aperture and a 4.5deg FOV, each telescope would have the same etendue as its big brother PanStarrs telescope, but with image quality optimized for space surveillance rather than astronomy. The telescope is even scaled to use production PanStarrs focal plane arrays. A single 1.2m system has almost the same search rate for dim targets as any other system in development. Two such telescopes working together will exceed the performance of any SSA asset either in production or on the drawing boards. Because they are small they can be designed to be replicable and inexpensive and thus could be abandoned in place should the political climate at their deployment sites change for the worse.

  9. Astronomy Remote Observing Research Projects of US High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, M.; Meech, K. J.

    2006-08-01

    In order to address the challenging climate for promoting astronomy education in the high schools we have used astronomy projects to give students authentic research experiences in order to encourage their pursuit of science and technology careers. Initially, we conducted teacher workshops to develop a cadre of teachers who have been instrumental in recruiting students to work on projects. Once identified, these students have been motivated to conduct astronomy research projects with appropriate guidance. Some have worked on these projects during non-school hours and others through a research course. The goal has been for students to meet the objectives of inquiry-based learning, a major US National Science Standard. Case studies will be described using event-based learning with the NASA Deep Impact mission. Hawaii students became active participants investigating comet properties through the NASA Deep Impact mission. The Deep Impact Education and Public Outreach group developed materials which were used by our students. After learning how to use image processing software, these students obtained Comet 9P/ Tempel 1 images in real time from the remote observing Faulkes Telescope North located on Haleakala, Maui for their projects. Besides conducting event-based projects which are time critical, Oregon students have worked on galaxies and sunspots projects. For variable star research, they used images obtained from the remote observing offline mode of Lowell Telescope located in Flagstaff, Arizona. Essential to these projects has been consistent follow-up required for honing skills in observing, image processing, analysis, and communication of project results through Science Fair entries. Key to our success has been the network of professional and amateur astronomers and educators collaborating in a multiplicity of ways to mentor our students. This work-in-progress and process will be shared on how to inspire students to pursue careers in science and technology with

  10. Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope: Telescope and Systems Specifications and Commissioning Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Stephen; Hall, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Lowell Observatory's 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope is in the process of being commissioned now. The telescope is located 40 miles southeast of Flagstaff,AZ at an elevation of 7,800 feet. On sky testing of the major subsystems began in early fall 2011, with commissioning work leading up to first light in late spring of 2012. We present a review of the design specifications of the telescope and its major subsystems. This is followed by a discussion of the commissioning time-line, and current status and performance of the telescope, and optics (including the active optics support system for the primary mirror).

  11. Kiso Multi-Fiber Spectroscope Project (C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadoumaru, Yasushi; Itoh, Nobunari; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Soyano, Takao; Mito, Hiroyuki

    A Multi-FIBER Spectroscope at Kiso Observatory is under consideration as our next instrument. In this paper we report an overview of our instrument and a scientific target of our survey project. We are going to attach multi-fiber system at the prime focus of Kiso 105cm Schmidt telescope. This telescope has some advantages for our project. First, the efficiency in survey for the object, which number density is 0.1 to 10 degree2, is higher than other multi object system due to the wide field of view (6 degree x 6 degree). Second, an optics of telescope is well-matched to fiber numerical aperture (NA) at an input end of fiber. Moreover, taking a focal ratio degradation (FRD) and scrambling property into account, since the light from object dose not move at the entrance slit of spectroscope, we could get spectroscopic data stably with this system. We select a fiber with 100 micron meter core which is correspond to 6 arcsec on focal plane, that is matched with a typical seeing (about 3 arcsec) of Kiso Observatory and set 150 fibers to one field. For efficient observations, it is necessary to arrange fibers accurately within an accuracy of +/- 25 micron meter on the curved focal plane during a typical exposure time (1 hour). Therefore we examine a particular positioner specialized for curved surface. We also develop a spectroscope that is suited for a fast focal ratio and proceed with making its design. One of our main key projects with this system is a non-biased metallicity survey for solar neighbor stars. We are now establishing a new metallicity determination method that easily and reliably measures a metallicity from low-dispersion spectra. (see Itoh et al.). As we consider our main target as Galactic objects and low resolution (R is around 1000), we could observe a star with 17 mag at V-band (1 hour exposure).

  12. Engaging Undergraduate Students in Transiting Exoplanet Research with Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Denise C.; Stoker, E.; Gaillard, C.; Ranquist, E.; Lara, P.; Wright, K.

    2013-10-01

    Brigham Young University has a relatively large undergraduate physics program with 300 to 360 physics majors. Each of these students is required to be engaged in a research group and to produce a senior thesis before graduating. For the astronomy professors, this means that each of us is mentoring at least 4-6 undergraduate students at any given time. For the past few years I have been searching for meaningful research projects that make use of our telescope resources and are exciting for both myself and my students. We first started following up Kepler Objects of Interest with our 0.9 meter telescope, but quickly realized that most of the transits we could observe were better analyzed with Kepler data and were false positive objects. So now we have joined a team that is searching for transiting planets, and my students are using our 16" telescope to do ground based follow-up on the hundreds of possible transiting planet candidates produced by this survey. In this presentation I will describe our current telescopes, the observational setup, and how we use our telescopes to search for transiting planets. I'll describe some of the software the students have written. I'll also explain how to use the NASA Exoplanet Archive to gather data on known transiting planets and Kepler Objects of Interests. These databases are useful for determining the observational limits of your small telescopes and teaching your students how to reduce and report data on transiting planets. Once that is in place, you are potentially ready to join existing transiting planet missions by doing ground-based follow-up. I will explain how easy it can be to implement this type of research at any high school, college, or university with a small telescope and CCD camera.

  13. Using New Media to Spread the Word About the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, Maggie; Krishnamurthi, A.

    2008-05-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is a 6.5 m infrared telescope that will be launched in 2013. This modern telescope will look very different from the simple telescope Galileo used to look up at the skies 400 years ago. Modern technology, coupled with scientific curiosity, is enabling science to help us understand a Universe Galileo had not dreamed of in his time. The International Year of Astronomy presents an excellent opportunity to take the public along on the journey of the development of the Webb Telescope and its technological innovations. In keeping with the cutting-edge nature of the Webb, its education and public outreach (EPO) team is using a variety of new media to engage the public. We will discuss several of our EPO projects including our website, exhibits and displays in Second Life (an internet-based virtual world), and involvement in podcasts. Webb's EPO team is looking to expand past a passive web presence to engage the new and growing internet-savvy audiences. We are making our website more interactive through a variety of means, including a Flash game that allows the user to compare the Webb to a common reflecting telescope. This will enable the user to learn about the changes in telescopes that have come about since Galileo's time. We are also taking advantage of other new media opportunities as they present themselves - we participate in podcasts and have an engaging presence for the Webb Telescope on NASA's "islands” in Second Life.

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions: Past, present, and future operational challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochs, William R.; Barbehenn, George M.; Crabb, William G.

    1996-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope was designed to be serviced by the Space Shuttle to upgrade systems, replace failed components and boost the telescope into higher orbits. There exists many operational challenges that must be addressed in preparation for the execution of a servicing mission, including technical and managerial issues. The operational challenges faced by the Hubble operations and ground system project for the support of the first servicing mission and future servicing missions, are considered. The emphasis is on those areas that helped ensure the success of the mission, including training, testing and contingency planning.

  15. Telescopes and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    The necessity for different types of telescopes for astronomical investigations is discussed. Major findings in modern astronomy by ground-based and spaceborne telescopes are presented. Observations of the Crab Nebula, solar flares, interstellar gas, and the Black Hole are described. The theory of the oscillating universe is explored. Operating and planned telescopes are described.

  16. Performance measurement of HARPO: A time projection chamber as a gamma-ray telescope and polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, P.; Amano, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Baudin, D.; Bernard, D.; Bruel, P.; Calvet, D.; Colas, P.; Daté, S.; Delbart, A.; Frotin, M.; Geerebaert, Y.; Giebels, B.; Götz, D.; Hashimoto, S.; Horan, D.; Kotaka, T.; Louzir, M.; Magniette, F.; Minamiyama, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Ohkuma, H.; Poilleux, P.; Semeniouk, I.; Sizun, P.; Takemoto, A.; Yamaguchi, M.; Yonamine, R.; Wang, S.

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the performance of a gas time projection chamber (TPC) as a high-performance gamma-ray telescope and polarimeter in the e+e- pair-creation regime. We use data collected at a gamma-ray beam of known polarisation. The TPC provides two orthogonal projections (x, z) and (y, z) of the tracks induced by each conversion in the gas volume. We use a simple vertex finder in which vertices and pseudo-tracks exiting from them are identified. We study the various contributions to the single-photon angular resolution using Monte Carlo simulations, compare them with the experimental data and find that they are in excellent agreement. The distribution of the azimuthal angle of pair conversions shows a bias due to the non-cylindrical-symmetric structure of the detector. This bias would average out for a long duration exposure on a space mission, but for this pencil-beam characterisation we have ensured its accurate simulation by a double systematics-control scheme, data taking with the detector rotated at several angles with respect to the beam polarisation direction and systematics control with a non-polarised beam. We measure, for the first time, the polarisation asymmetry of a linearly polarised gamma-ray beam in the low energy pair-creation regime. This sub-GeV energy range is critical for cosmic sources as their spectra are power laws which fall quickly as a function of increasing energy. This work could pave the way to extending polarised gamma-ray astronomy beyond the MeV energy regime.

  17. The Large Binocular Telescope's ARGOS ground-layer AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Rabien, S.; Busoni, L.; Barl, L.; Bechmann, U.; Bonaglia, M.; Boose, Y.; Borelli, J.; Bluemchen, T.; Carbonaro, L.; Connot, C.; Deysenroth, M.; Davies, R.; Durney, O.; Elberich, M.; Ertl, T.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Gasho, V.; Gemperlein, H.; Hubbard, P.; Kanneganti, S.; Kulas, M.; Newman, K.; Noenickx, J.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Qirrenback, A.; Rademacher, M.; Schwab, C.; Storm, J.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Weigelt, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2011-09-01

    ARGOS, the laser-guided adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is now under construction at the telescope. By correcting atmospheric turbulence close to the telescope, the system is designed to deliver high resolution near infrared images over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. ARGOS is motivated by a successful prototype multi-laser guide star system on the 6.5 m MMT telescope, results from which are presented in this paper. At the LBT, each side of the twin 8.4 m aperture is being equipped with three Rayleigh laser guide stars derived from six 18 W pulsed green lasers and projected into two triangular constellations matching the size of the corrected field. The returning light is to be detected by wavefront sensors that are range gated within the seeinglimited depth of focus of the telescope. Wavefront correction will be introduced by the telescope’s deformable secondary mirrors driven on the basis of the average wavefront errors computed from the respective guide star constellation. Measured atmospheric turbulence profiles from the site lead us to expect that by compensating the ground-layer turbulence, ARGOS will deliver median image quality of about 0.2 arc sec in the near infrared bands. This will be exploited by a pair of multi-object near-IR spectrographs, LUCI1 and LUCI2, each with 4 arc minute field already operating on the telescope. In future, ARGOS will also feed two interferometric imaging instruments, the LBT Interferometer operating in the thermal infrared, and LINC-NIRVANA, operating at visible and near infrared wavelengths. Together, these instruments will offer very broad spectral coverage at the diffraction limit of the LBT’s combined aperture, 23 m in size.

  18. NASA Prepares Webb Telescope Pathfinder for Famous Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-13

    Engineers and technicians manually deployed the secondary mirror support structure (SMSS) of the James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model, outside of a giant space simulation chamber called Chamber A, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. This historic test chamber was previously used in manned spaceflight missions and is being readied for a cryogenic test of a Webb telescope component. In the weightless environment of space, the SMSS is deployed by electric motors. On the ground, specially trained operators use a hand crank and a collection of mechanical ground support equipment to overcome the force of gravity. "This structure needs to be in the deployed configuration during the cryogenic test to see how the structure will operate in the frigid temperatures of space," said Will Rowland, senior mechanical test engineer for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California. "The test also demonstrates that the system works and can be successfully deployed." After the deployment was completed, Chamber A's circular door was opened and the rails (seen in the background of the photo) were installed so that the Pathfinder unit could be lifted, installed and rolled into the chamber on a cart. The team completed a fit check for the Pathfinder. Afterwards they readied the chamber for the cryogenic test, which will simulate the frigid temperatures the Webb telescope will encounter in space. “The team has been doing a great job keeping everything on schedule to getting our first optical test results, " said Lee Feinberg, NASA Optical Telescope Element Manager. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. Image credit: NASA/Desiree Stover Text credit: Laura Betz, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt

  19. Building large telescopes in orbit using small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Chris; Lobb, Dan; Sweeting, Martin; Gao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    In many types of space mission there is a constant desire for larger and larger instrument apertures, primarily for the purposes of increased resolution or sensitivity. In the Radio Frequency domain, this is currently addressed by antennas that unfold or deploy on-orbit. However, in the optical and infrared domains, this is a significantly more challenging problem, and has up to now either been addressed by simply having large monolithic mirrors (which are fundamentally limited by the volume and mass lifting capacity of any launch vehicle) or by complex 'semi-folding' designs such as the James Webb Space Telescope. An alternative is to consider a fractionated instrument which is launched as a collection of individual smaller elements which are then assembled (or self-assemble) once in space, to form a much larger overall instrument. SSTL has been performing early concept assessment work on such systems for high resolution science observations from high orbits (potentially also for persistent surveillance of Earth). A point design of a 25 m sparse aperture (annular ring) telescope is presented. Key characteristics of 1) multiple small elements launched separately and 2) on-orbit assembly to form a larger instrument are included in the architecture. However, on-orbit assembly brings its own challenges in terms of guidance navigation and control, robotics, docking mechanisms, system control and data handling, optical alignment and stability, and many other elements. The number and type of launchers used, and the technologies and systems used heavily affect the outcome and general cost of the telescope. The paper describes one of the fractionated architecture concepts currently being studied by SSTL, including the key technologies and operational concepts that may be possible in the future.

  20. The Thirty Meter Telescope Site Testing Robotic Computer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Schöck, M.; Skidmore, W.; Els, S.; Travouillon, T.

    2008-03-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project is currently testing five remote sites as candidates for the final location of the telescope. Each site has several instruments, including seeing monitors, weather stations, and turbulence profile measuring systems, each of which is computer controlled. As the sites are remote, they require a control system that can automatically manage the operations of all the varied subsystems, keep the systems safe from damage and recover from errors during operation. The robotic system must also be robust enough to operate without human intervention and when internet connections are lost. It is also critical that a data archiving system diligently records all data as gathered. This is a discussion of the TMT site testing robotic computer system as implemented.

  1. An innovative telescope control system architecture for SST-GATE telescopes at the CTA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasola, Gilles; Mignot, Shan; Laporte, Philippe; Abchiche, Abdel; Buchholtz, Gilles; Jégouzo, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    SST-GATE (Small Size Telescope - GAmma-ray Telescope Elements) is a 4-metre telescope designed as a prototype for the Small Size Telescopes (SST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a major facility for the very high energy gamma-ray astronomy of the next three decades. In this 100-telescope array there will be 70 SSTs, involving a design with an industrial view aiming at long-term service, low maintenance effort and reduced costs. More than a prototype, SST-GATE is also a fully functional telescope that shall be usable by scientists and students at the Observatoire de Meudon for 30 years. The Telescope Control System (TCS) is designed to work either as an element of a large array driven by an array controller or in a stand-alone mode with a remote workstation. Hence it is built to be autonomous with versatile interfacing; as an example, pointing and tracking —the main functions of the telescope— are managed onboard, including astronomical transformations, geometrical transformations (e.g. telescope bending model) and drive control. The core hardware is a CompactRIO (cRIO) featuring a real-time operating system and an FPGA. In this paper, we present an overview of the current status of the TCS. We especially focus on three items: the pointing computation implemented in the FPGA of the cRIO —using CORDIC algorithms— since it enables an optimisation of the hardware resources; data flow management based on OPCUA with its specific implementation on the cRIO; and the use of an EtherCAT field-bus for its ability to provide real-time data exchanges with the sensors and actuators distributed throughout the telescope.

  2. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Optical Telescope Assembly for the Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Brooks, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) project is an effort to design, build, and fly a balloon-borne platform for planetary science missions. GHAPS observations will be in the 300 nm to 5 micron wavelength region covering UV, visible, and near-mid IR. The primary element of the project is the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). It is a one meter aperture narrow-field-of-view telescope that contains the primary and secondary mirrors, the support system/metering structure, a secondary mirror focusing system, baffles, and insulation. This paper presents the thermal design and analysis that has been done to support the design of the OTA. A major part of the thermal analysis was bounding the flight environment for the six potential Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility launch sites. These analyses were used to give input into the Structural Thermal Optical Performance (STOP) analysis of the telescope. Also the analysis was used to select heater sizes for the few OTA associated electronic components. Currently the telescope is scheduled to have its first flight in 2019.

  3. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  4. Extreme Adaptive Optics for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Macintosh, B; al., e

    2006-05-02

    Direct detection of extrasolar Jovian planets is a major scientific motivation for the construction of future extremely large telescopes such as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Such detection will require dedicated high-contrast AO systems. Since the properties of Jovian planets and their parent stars vary enormously between different populations, the instrument must be designed to meet specific scientific needs rather than a simple metric such as maximum Strehl ratio. We present a design for such an instrument, the Planet Formation Imager (PFI) for TMT. It has four key science missions. The first is the study of newly-formed planets on 5-10more » AU scales in regions such as Taurus and Ophiucus--this requires very small inner working distances that are only possible with a 30m or larger telescope. The second is a robust census of extrasolar giant planets orbiting mature nearby stars. The third is detailed spectral characterization of the brightest extrasolar planets. The final targets are circumstellar dust disks, including Zodiacal light analogs in the inner parts of other solar systems. To achieve these, PFI combines advanced wavefront sensors, high-order MEMS deformable mirrors, a coronagraph optimized for a finely-segmented primary mirror, and an integral field spectrograph.« less

  5. Planet detection and spectroscopy in visible light with a single aperture telescope and a nulling coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; Levine, Bruce Martin; Beichman, Charles; Liu, Duncan; Martin, Stefan; Orton, Glen; Mennesson, Bertrand; Morgan, Rhonda; Velusamy, Thangasamy; hide

    2003-01-01

    This talk describes a new concept for visible direct detection of Earth like extra solar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a 4m telescope in space. In the baseline design, a 4 beam nulling interferometer is synthesized from the telescope pupil, producing a very deep theta^4null which is then filtered by a coherent array of single mode fibers to suppress the residual scattered light. With perfect optics, the stellar leakage is less than 1e-11 of the starlight at the location of the planet. With diffraction limited telescope optics (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is possible. The concept is described along with the key advantages over more traditional approaches such as apodized aperture telescopes and Lyot type coronagraphs.

  6. Alignment and phasing of deployable telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, N. J.; Ulich, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    The experiences in coaligning and phasing the Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT), together with studies in setting up radio telescopes, are presented. These experiences are discussed, and on the basis they furnish, schemes are suggested for coaligning and phasing four large future telescopes with complex primary mirror systems. These telescopes are MT2, a 15-m-equivalent MMT, the University of California Ten Meter Telescope, the 10 m sub-mm wave telescope of the University of Arizona and the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, and the Large Deployable Reflector, a future space telescope for far-IR and sub-mm waves.

  7. Overview of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Receiver, Instrumentation, and Telescope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetz, D. S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Battistelli, E. S.; Burger, B.; Chervenak, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fisher, R. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Irwin, K. D.; Jarosik, N.; Kaul, M.; Klein, J.; Lau, J. M.; Limon, M.; Marriage, T. A.; Marsden, D.; Martocci, K.; Mauskopf, P.; Moseley, H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Niemack, M. D.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L.; Staggs, S. T.; Stryzak, O.; Switzer, E. R.; Thornton, R.; Tucker, C.; Wollack, E.; Zhao, Y.

    2011-06-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope was designed to measure small-scale anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and detect galaxy clusters through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The instrument is located on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert, at an altitude of 5190 m. A 6 m off-axis Gregorian telescope feeds a new type of cryogenic receiver, the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera. The receiver features three 1000-element arrays of transition-edge sensor bolometers for observations at 148 GHz, 218 GHz, and 277 GHz. Each detector array is fed by free space millimeter-wave optics. Each frequency band has a field of view of approximately 22' × 26'. The telescope was commissioned in 2007 and has completed its third year of operations. We discuss the major components of the telescope, camera, and related systems, and summarize the instrument performance.

  8. Impacts of a Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience in Introductory Astronomy Using Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaria, Archana S.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Alejandra, Le; Berryhill, Katie; McLin, Kevin M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2018-06-01

    As part of a general education undergraduate astronomy course at a minority-serving university in the Midwestern US, students completed an observing project with the Global Telescope Network (GTN), where they participated in realistic practices used by professional astronomers, including proposal writing and peer review. First, students went through the process of applying for telescope time by choosing an astronomical object and writing an observing proposal. Then they performed an NSF-style review of classmates’ proposals, including written peer reviews and a review panel. After obtaining images from GTN telescopes, students presented their project and findings in front of the class.This study investigates students’ experiences and perceived impacts of participation in the project. The data analyzed includes an essay assignment [N = 59] administered over seven semesters and individual interviews [N = 8] collected over two semesters. Students were prompted to address what they liked, disliked, or would change about the project experience. These data were coded iteratively into nine categories. A Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test was used to determine that essay results from different semesters could be combined. We find that students expressed an overall strong positive affect, increased perception of self-efficacy, enjoyment of the experience of peer review, an appreciation for being able to use real scientific tools and to take on the role of astronomers, as well as a small number of dislikes such as real-world constraints on observing.

  9. The Green Bank Telescope: Transformational Science for the Next Decade.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootten, Al; GBO Staff

    2018-01-01

    The Robert C Byrd Green Bank Telescope has met its design goal of providing high-quality observations at 115 GHz. The accurate small beam of the telescope at high frequencies is leveraged by deployment of multi beam receivers. An overview is presented. Observers now have access to the new, 16-pixel, 3-mm Argus receiver, which is providing high-dynamic range images over wide fields for the multitude of spectral lines between 85 and 115 GHz. The successful performance of Argus, and its modular design, demonstrates that receivers with many more pixels could be built for the GBT. A 12 x 12 array of the Argus design would have mapping speeds about nine times faster than Argus without suffering any degradation in performance for the outer pixels in the array. The Observatory plans to build the next-generation Argus instrument (Argus+) with 144-pixels, a footprint 5'x5', and 7" resolution at 110 GHz. The project will be a collaboration between the Green Bank Observatory and university groups, who will supply key components. The key science drivers for Argus+ are studies of molecular filaments in the Milky Way, studies of molecular clouds in nearby galaxies, and the observations of rapidly evolving solar system objects. Observers also have access to MUSTANG-2, a 223-feedhorn bolometer camera which was commissioned on the GBT in spring 2016, and was offered for observations on a shared risk basis, in collaboration with the instrument team, in the 2018A GBO proposal call. Several features distinguish it from its predecessor, MUSTANG: A new, microstrip-coupled detector design yields higher sensitivity and less susceptibility to environmental microphonics. Detectors are feedhorn coupled, with the sum of two linear polarizations measured by a single TES per feed. The instantaneous field of view is 4 arcminutes (vs 42 arcseconds for MUSTANG) The receiver design incorporates a tilted refrigerator and receiver rotator, resulting in much lower dependence of cooling performance on

  10. Primary Objective Grating Astronomical Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    It has been 370 years since a seventeenth century French mathematician, Mersenne, presciently sketched out an astronomical telescope based on dual parabolic reflectors. Since that time the concept of the primary objective has been virtually unchanged. Now a new class of astronomical telescope with a primary objective grating (POG) has been studied as an alternative. The POG competes with mirrors, in part, because diffraction gratings provide the very chromatic dispersion that mirrors defeat. The resulting telescope deals effectively with long-standing restrictions on multiple object spectroscopy (MOS). Other potential benefits include unprecedented apertures and collection areas. The new design also favors space deployment as a gossamer membrane. The inventor, Tom Ditto, first discovered that higher-order diffraction images contain hidden depth cues, for which he was granted a seminal range finding patent in 1987. Subsequently, he invented and patented 3D localizers, profilometers and microscopes using POGs. The POG telescope was placed in the public domain to expedite research. The function of a telescopes primary objective is to collect flux and to deliver images. Both functions dictate that size matters, and bigger is better. For that reason, there has been a steady push over the past century to ramp up the size of the primary mirror. However, for every doubling of mirror diameter, the elapsed time between initial effort and first light has also doubled. Meanwhile, costs escalated beyond the mirror alone, because larger instruments required larger enclosures and better pointing mechanisms. One key catalog of observation, spectrographic data, is far more difficult to amass than two-dimensional imagery. While the number of observable objects has increased with mirror size, the capacity to take spectra has not increased proportionately. In the best of circumstances, spectrograms are available for one per cent of the all objects surveyed. Spectroscopy was a

  11. Liverpool telescope 2: a new robotic facility for rapid transient follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Carter, D.; Clay, N. R.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Davis, C. J.; Gutierrez, C. M.; Harman, D. J.; James, P. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Kobayashi, S.; Marchant, J. M.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Newsam, A.; Oscoz, A.; Palle, E.; Piascik, A.; Rebolo, R.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope is one of the world's premier facilities for time domain astronomy. The time domain landscape is set to radically change in the coming decade, with synoptic all-sky surveys such as LSST providing huge numbers of transient detections on a nightly basis; transient detections across the electromagnetic spectrum from other major facilities such as SVOM, SKA and CTA; and the era of `multi-messenger astronomy', wherein astrophysical events are detected via non-electromagnetic means, such as neutrino or gravitational wave emission. We describe here our plans for the Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic telescope designed to capitalise on this new era of time domain astronomy. LT2 will be a 4-metre class facility co-located with the Liverpool Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. The telescope will be designed for extremely rapid response: the aim is that the telescope will take data within 30 seconds of the receipt of a trigger from another facility. The motivation for this is twofold: firstly it will make it a world-leading facility for the study of fast fading transients and explosive phenomena discovered at early times. Secondly, it will enable large-scale programmes of low-to-intermediate resolution spectral classification of transients to be performed with great efficiency. In the target-rich environment of the LSST era, minimising acquisition overheads will be key to maximising the science gains from any follow-up programme. The telescope will have a diverse instrument suite which is simultaneously mounted for automatic changes, but it is envisaged that the primary instrument will be an intermediate resolution, optical/infrared spectrograph for scientific exploitation of transients discovered with the next generation of synoptic survey facilities. In this paper we outline the core science drivers for the telescope, and the requirements for the optical and mechanical design.

  12. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the next generation of Cherenkov telescopes: a single framework approach from requirement analysis to integration and verification strategy definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Stringhetti, Luca; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Catalano, Osvaldo; Giro, Enrico; Leto, Giuseppe; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Pareschi, Giovanni; Tosti, Gino; Vercellone, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    ASTRI is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, which aims to develop an endto- end prototype of one of the three types of telescopes to be part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), an observatory which will be the main representative of the next generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The ASTRI project, led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF), has proposed an original design for the Small Size Telescope, which is aimed to explore the uppermost end of the Very High Energy domain up to about few hundreds of TeV with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution and imaging quality. It is characterized by challenging and innovative technological solutions which will be adopted for the first time in a Cherenkov telescope: a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder configuration, a modular, light and compact camera based on silicon photomultipliers, and a front-end electronic based on a specifically designed ASIC. The end-to-end project is also including all the data-analysis software and the data archive. In this paper we describe the process followed to derive the ASTRI specifications from the CTA general requirements, a process which had to take into proper account the impact on the telescope design of the different types of the CTA requirements (performance, environment, reliability-availability-maintenance, etc.). We also describe the strategy adopted to perform the specification verification, which will be based on different methods (inspection, analysis, certification, and test) in order to demonstrate the telescope compliance with the CTA requirements. Finally we describe the integration planning of the prototype assemblies (structure, mirrors, camera, control software, auxiliary items) and the test planning of the end-to-end telescope. The approach followed by the ASTRI project is to have all the information needed to report the verification process along all project stages in a single

  13. ESO Successfully Tests Automation of Telescope Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-02-01

    referred to as the VLT Data Flow System , now being perfected by the ESO Data Management Division for use on ESO's Very Large Telescope project. First tests at the NTT On February 5, a team of software engineers and astronomers from ESO used a first version of the new VLT Data Flow System to perform observations on ESO's New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. A computer file containing a complete description of an observation (for instance, object position in the sky, filtres and exposure time, and other relevant information) prepared in advance by an astronomer was transferred via the satellite link from the ESO Headquarters in Germany to the NTT computers at La Silla and executed on the control system of the telescope. The telescope then moved to the correct position in the sky, the camera was activated and a few minutes later, a processed image a distant galaxy appeared on the screen in front of the observers. The image was saved in an automatic archive system that writes the astronomical data on CD-ROM. The entire process took place automatically and demonstrated that this system is capable of taking high quality data from the sky at the best possible time and delivering the results to the astronomer, efficiently and in the most convenient form. Further developments This is the first time that a ground-based telescope has been operated under the new system. This successful initial test bodes well for the start-up of the VLT. During 1997, ESO will further develop the data flow system in preparation for the beginning of commissioning of the first VLT 8.2-metre unit, less then 12 months from now. How to obtain ESO Press Information ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http://www.eso.org../). ESO Press Photos may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory.

  14. Status of the photomultiplier-based FlashCam camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühlhofer, G.; Bauer, C.; Eisenkolb, F.; Florin, D.; Föhr, C.; Gadola, A.; Garrecht, F.; Hermann, G.; Jung, I.; Kalekin, O.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kasperek, J.; Kihm, T.; Koziol, J.; Lahmann, R.; Manalaysay, A.; Marszalek, A.; Rajda, P. J.; Reimer, O.; Romaszkan, W.; Rupinski, M.; Schanz, T.; Schwab, T.; Steiner, S.; Straumann, U.; Tenzer, C.; Vollhardt, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Winiarski, K.; Zietara, K.

    2014-07-01

    The FlashCam project is preparing a camera prototype around a fully digital FADC-based readout system, for the medium sized telescopes (MST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The FlashCam design is the first fully digital readout system for Cherenkov cameras, based on commercial FADCs and FPGAs as key components for digitization and triggering, and a high performance camera server as back end. It provides the option to easily implement different types of trigger algorithms as well as digitization and readout scenarios using identical hardware, by simply changing the firmware on the FPGAs. The readout of the front end modules into the camera server is Ethernet-based using standard Ethernet switches and a custom, raw Ethernet protocol. In the current implementation of the system, data transfer and back end processing rates of 3.8 GB/s and 2.4 GB/s have been achieved, respectively. Together with the dead-time-free front end event buffering on the FPGAs, this permits the cameras to operate at trigger rates of up to several ten kHz. In the horizontal architecture of FlashCam, the photon detector plane (PDP), consisting of photon detectors, preamplifiers, high voltage-, control-, and monitoring systems, is a self-contained unit, mechanically detached from the front end modules. It interfaces to the digital readout system via analogue signal transmission. The horizontal integration of FlashCam is expected not only to be more cost efficient, it also allows PDPs with different types of photon detectors to be adapted to the FlashCam readout system. By now, a 144-pixel mini-camera" setup, fully equipped with photomultipliers, PDP electronics, and digitization/ trigger electronics, has been realized and extensively tested. Preparations for a full-scale, 1764 pixel camera mechanics and a cooling system are ongoing. The paper describes the status of the project.

  15. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, David S.; Buckley, J. H.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Kaaret, P.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Konopelko, A.; Romani, R.; Vassilliev, V.; Optical System Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV-200 TeV is based on an array of 50-200 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission we will focus on the optical system (OS) of AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime-focus telescope designs, as well as the novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. The emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We initially evaluate capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  16. NASA’s Webb Telescope Completes Goddard Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has successfully passed the center of curvature test, an important optical measurement of Webb’s fully assembled primary mirror prior to cryogenic testing, and the last test held at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, before the spacecraft is shipped to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for more testing. After undergoing rigorous environmental tests simulating the stresses of its rocket launch, the Webb telescope team at Goddard analyzed the results from this critical optical test and compared it to the pre-test measurements. The team concluded that the mirrors passed the test with the optical system unscathed. “The Webb telescope is about to embark on its next step in reaching the stars as it has successfully completed its integration and testing at Goddard. It has taken a tremendous team of talented individuals to get to this point from all across NASA, our industry and international partners, and academia,” said Bill Ochs, NASA’s Webb telescope project manager. “It is also a sad time as we say goodbye to the Webb Telescope at Goddard, but are excited to begin cryogenic testing at Johnson.” Rocket launches create high levels of vibration and noise that rattle spacecraft and telescopes. At Goddard, engineers tested the Webb telescope in vibration and acoustics test facilities that simulate the launch environment to ensure that functionality is not impaired by the rigorous ride on a rocket into space. Before and after these environmental tests took place, optical engineers set up an interferometer, the main device used to measure the shape of the Webb telescope’s mirror. An interferometer gets its name from the process of recording and measuring the ripple patterns that result when different beams of light mix and their waves combine or “interfere.” Waves of visible light are less than a thousandth of a millimeter long and optics on the Webb telescope need to be shaped and aligned

  17. Equal-Curvature X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a new type of x-ray telescope design; an Equal-Curvature telescope. We simply add a second order axial sag to the base grazing incidence cone-cone telescope. The radius of curvature of the sag terms is the same on the primary surface and on the secondary surface. The design is optimized so that the on-axis image spot at the focal plane is minimized. The on-axis RMS (root mean square) spot diameter of two studied telescopes is less than 0.2 arc-seconds. The off-axis performance is comparable to equivalent Wolter type 1 telescopes.

  18. Self-Referencing Hartmann Test for Large-Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korechoff, Robert P.; Oseas, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for end-to-end, full aperture testing of large-aperture telescopes using an innovative variation of a Hartmann mask. This technique is practical for telescopes with primary mirrors tens of meters in diameter and of any design. Furthermore, it is applicable to the entire optical band (near IR, visible, ultraviolet), relatively insensitive to environmental perturbations, and is suitable for ambient laboratory as well as thermal-vacuum environments. The only restriction is that the telescope optical axis must be parallel to the local gravity vector during testing. The standard Hartmann test utilizes an array of pencil beams that are cut out of a well-corrected wavefront using a mask. The pencil beam array is expanded to fill the full aperture of the telescope. The detector plane of the telescope is translated back and forth along the optical axis in the vicinity of the nominal focal plane, and the centroid of each pencil beam image is recorded. Standard analytical techniques are then used to reconstruct the telescope wavefront from the centroid data. The expansion of the array of pencil beams is usually accomplished by double passing the beams through the telescope under test. However, this requires a well-corrected, autocollimation flat, the diameter or which is approximately equal to that of the telescope aperture. Thus, the standard Hartmann method does not scale well because of the difficulty and expense of building and mounting a well-corrected, large aperture flat. The innovation in the testing method proposed here is to replace the large aperture, well-corrected, monolithic autocollimation flat with an array of small-aperture mirrors. In addition to eliminating the need for a large optic, the surface figure requirement for the small mirrors is relaxed compared to that required of the large autocollimation flat. The key point that allows this method to work is that the small mirrors need to operate as a monolithic flat only with regard to

  19. Mechanical conceptual design of 6.5 meter telescope: Telescopio San Pedro Mártir (TSPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Jorge; Bringas, Vicente; Reyes, Noe; Tovar, Carlos; López, Aldo; Caballero, Xóchitl; Martínez, César; Toledo, Gengis; Lee, William; Carramiñana, Alberto; González, Jesús; Richer, Michael; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lucero, Diana; Manuel, Rogelio; Rubio, Saúl; González, Germán.; Hernández, Obed; Segura, José; Macias, Eduardo; García, Mary; Lazaro, José; Rosales, Fabián.; del Llano, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Telescopio San Pedro Mártir (TSPM) project intends to build a 6.5 meters telescope with alt-azimuth design, currently at the conceptual design. The project is an association between Instituto de Astronomía de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (IA-UNAM) and the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica Electrónica (INAOE) in partnership with department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory of University of Arizona and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory of Harvard University. Conceptual design of the telescope is lead and developed by the Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI). An overview of the feasibility study and the structural conceptual design are summarized in this paper. The telescope concept is based on telescopes already commissioned such as MMT and the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, building up on these proven concepts. The main differences relative to the Magellan pair are; the elevation axis is located 1 meter above the primary mirror vertex, allowing for a similar field of view at the Cassegrain and both Nasmyth focal stations; instead of using a vane ends to position the secondary mirror TSPM considers an Steward platform like MMT; finally TSPM has a larger floor distance to m1 cell than Magellans and MMT. Initially TSPM will operate with an f/5 Cassegrain station, but the design considers further Nasmyth configurations from a Cassegrain f/5 up to a Gregorian f/11. The telescope design includes 7 focal stations: 1 Cassegrain; 2 Nasmyth; and 4 folded-Cassegrain. The telescope will be designed and manufactured in Mexico, will be design in Queretaro by CIDESI and built between Queretaro and Michoacán manufacturing facilities; it will be preassembled in these facilities and disassembled to send it to the San Pedro Mártir Observatory for final integration. The azimuth and altitude structure is planned to be constructed in modules and transported by truck and shipped to Ensenada and finally to the OAN where is going

  20. Time to Revisit the Heterogeneous Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    The "Heterogeneous Telescope Network" (HTN) was founded in 2005 as a loose collaboration of people somehow associated with robotic telescopes and/or projects interested in the transient universe. Other than being a very interesting forum for the exchange of ideas, the only lasting contribution of the HTN was a proposed protocol for the operation of a loose e-market for the exchange of telescope time (Allan et al. 2006; White & Allan 2007). Since the last formal meeting in 2007, the HTN has gone into a "Dornröschenschlaf" (a better word than "hibernation") : the players and interest are there, but the public visibility and activity is not. Although the participants knew and know that global networking is the way of the future for many types of science, various things have kept the HTN from taking the idea and actually implementing it: work on simply getting one's own system to work (e.g. myself), career paths of major players (e.g. Allan), dealing with the complexity of ones' own network (TALONS, RoboNet, LCO), and - most importantly - no common science driver big enough to push the participants to try it in earnest. Things have changed, however: robotic telescopes have become easier to create and operate, private networks have matured, large-scale consortia have become more common, event reporting using VOEvent has become the global standard and has a well-defined infrastructure, and large-scale sources of new objects and events are operating or will soon be operating (OGLE, CSS, Pan-STARRs, GAIA). I will review the scientific and sociological prospects for re-invigorating the HTN idea and invite discussion.

  1. Alignment telescope for Antares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert, Q. D.; Swann, T. A.; Ward, J. H.; Hardesty, C.; Wright, L.

    The Antares Automatic Alignment System employs a specially designed telescope for alignment of its laser beamlines. There are two telescopes in the system, and since each telescope is a primary alignment reference, stringent boresight accuracy and stability over the focus range were required. Optical and mechanical designs, which meet this requirements as well as that of image quality over a wide wavelength band, are described. Special test techniques for initial assembly and alignment of the telescope are also presented. The telescope, which has a 180-mm aperture FK51-KZF2 type glass doublet objective, requires a boresight accuracy of 2.8 (SIGMA)rad at two focal lengths, and object distances between 11 meters and infinity. Travel of a smaller secondary doublet provides focus from 11 m to infinity with approximately 7.8 m effective focal length. By flipping in a third doublet, the effective focal length is reduced to 2.5 m. Telescope alignment was accomplished by using a rotary air bearing to establish an axis in front of the system and placing the focus of a Laser Unequal Path Interferometer (LUPI) at the image plane.

  2. Alignment Telescope For Antares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert, Q. D.; Swann, T. A.; Ward, J. H.; Hardesty, C.; Wrignt, L.

    1983-11-01

    The Antares Automatic Alignment System employs a specially designed telescope for alignment of its laser beamlines. There are two telescopes in the system, and since eacn telescope is a primary alignment reference, stringent boresight accuracy and stability over the focus range were required. Optical and mechanical designs, which meet this requirement as well as that of image quality over a wide wavelength band, are described. Special test techniques for initial assembly and alignment of the telescope are also presented. The telescope, which has a 180-mm aperture FK51-KZF2 type glass doublet objective, requires a boresight accuracy of 2.8 prad at two focal lengths, and object distances between 11 meters and infinity. Travel of a smaller secondary doublet provides focus from 11 m to infinity with approximately 7.8 m effective focal length. By flipping in a third doublet, the effective focal length is reduced to 2.5 m. Telescope alignment was accomplished by using a rotary air bearing to establish an axis in front of the system and placing the focus of a Laser Unequal Path Interferometer (LUPI) at the image plane.

  3. The Young Solar Analogs Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Saken, J. M.; Corbally, C. J.; Fuller, V.; Kahvaz, Y.; Lambert, R.; Newsome, I.; Seeds, M.

    2013-01-01

    We are carrying out a long-term project of measuring chromospheric activity and brightness variations in 31 young solar analogs (YSAs) using facilities at the Dark Sky Observatory (DSO - Appalachian State University) and the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT). These YSAs are solar-type (spectral types F8 - K2) stars with ages ranging from 0.3 - 1.5 Gyr. The goal of this project is to gain better understanding of the magnetic activity of the early Sun, and especially how that activity may have impacted the development of life on the Earth. This project will also yield insights into the space environments experienced by young Earth analogs. We are currently in the 6th year of spectroscopic measurements of these stars: these data include Ca II H & K chromospheric flux measurements, and narrow-band measurements in the photospheric G-band, both obtained with the G/M spectrograph on the DSO 32-inch telescope. We will present evidence of activity cycles in a number of our stars, as well as periods determined from rotational modulation of the spectroscopic indices. The relationship between the Ca II activity index and the G-band index will be explored. NSF support for our project has provided funds for the construction of a robotic photometric telescope to monitor the program stars in a 5-passband system (Strömgren-v, Johnson-Cousins B, V, and R, and a 3-nm wide Hα filter). The robotic telescope has been functional since April 2012 and observes the program stars on every clear night; combined with the Piggy-back telescope attached to the DSO 32-inch, we now have photometric observations on over 130 nights stretching over nearly 2 years. We will examine the relationships between variations in the Ca II H & K index, the G-band index and the photometric bands. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation, grant AST-1109158.

  4. Current Status of the LOFAR EoR Key Science Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, L. V. E.; LOFAR EoR KSP Team

    2018-05-01

    A short status update on the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization (EoR) Key Science Project (KSP) is given, regarding data acquisition, data processing and analysis, and current power-spectrum limits on the redshifted 21-cm signal of neutral hydrogen at redshifts z = 8 - 10. With caution, we present a preliminary astrophysical analysis of ~60 hr of processed LOFAR data and their resulting power spectrum, showing that potentially already interesting limits on X-ray heating during the Cosmic Dawn can already be gained. This is by no means the final analysis of this sub-set of data, but illustrates the future potential when all nearly 3000 hr of data in hand on two EoR windows will have been processed.

  5. The new 64m Sardinia Radio Telescope and VLBI facilities in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Gabriele; Feretti, Luigina; Prandoni, Isabella; Giroletti, Marcello

    2015-08-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is a new major radio astronomical facility available in Italy for single dish and interferometric observations. It represents a flexible instrument for Radio Astronomy, Geodynamical studies and Space Science, either in single dish or VLBI mode. The SRT combines a 64m steerable collecting area, one of the largest all over the World with state-of-the-art technology (including an active surface) to enable high efficiency observations up to the 3-mm band.This new radio telescope together with the two 32m antennas in Noto and Medicina can be used for VLBI observations on a national basis (VLBIT). Data can be correlated in a short time (in real time soon) thanks to fiber-optics connection among the radio telescopes and the software correlator installed at the Radio Astronomy Institute in Bologna (IRA/INAF). In the poster I will present capabilities of the SRT telescope as well as the VLBIT project and I will shortly discuss the scientific prospects of the VLBIT.

  6. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steven; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William; Hailey, Charles; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William; Angelini, Lorella; An, Hong Jun; Bhalereo, Varun; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5 - 80 keV) telescope to orbit. NuSTAR will offer a factor 50 - 100 sensitivity improvement compared to previous collimated or coded mask imagers that have operated in this energy band. In addition, NuSTAR provides sub-arcminute imaging with good spectral resolution over a 12-arcminute field of view. After launch, NuSTAR will carry out a two-year primary science mission that focuses on four key programs: studying the evolution of massive black holes through surveys carried out in fields with excellent multiwavelength coverage, understanding the population of compact objects and the nature of the massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, constraining explosion dynamics and nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and probing the nature of particle acceleration in relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. A number of additional observations will be included in the primary mission, and a. guest observer program will be proposed for an extended mission to expand the range of scientific targets. The payload consists of two co-aligned depth-graded multilayer coated grazing incidence optics focused onto solid state CdZnTe pixel detectors. To be launched in early 2012 on a Pegasus rocket into a low-inclination Earth orbit. NuSTAR largely avoids SAA passages, and will therefore have low and stable detector backgrounds. The telescope achieves a 10.15-meter focal length through on-orbit deployment of all mast. An aspect and alignment metrology system enable reconstruction of the absolute aspect and variations in the telescope alignment resulting from mast flexure during ground data processing. Data will be publicly available at GSFC's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) following validation at the science operations center located at Caltech.

  7. Technology gap assessment for a future large-aperture ultraviolet-optical-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl M.; Thronson, Harley

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team identified five key technology areas to enable candidate architectures for a future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technology areas are internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescope systems, detectors, and mirror coatings. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current technology readiness level (TRL), thus identifying the current technology gap. We also report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  8. Position measurement of the direct drive motor of Large Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Daxing

    2010-07-01

    Along with the development of space and astronomy science, production of large aperture telescope and super large aperture telescope will definitely become the trend. It's one of methods to solve precise drive of large aperture telescope using direct drive technology unified designed of electricity and magnetism structure. A direct drive precise rotary table with diameter of 2.5 meters researched and produced by us is a typical mechanical & electrical integration design. This paper mainly introduces position measurement control system of direct drive motor. In design of this motor, position measurement control system requires having high resolution, and precisely aligning the position of rotor shaft and making measurement, meanwhile transferring position information to position reversing information corresponding to needed motor pole number. This system has chosen high precision metal band coder and absolute type coder, processing information of coders, and has sent 32-bit RISC CPU making software processing, and gained high resolution composite coder. The paper gives relevant laboratory test results at the end, indicating the position measurement can apply to large aperture telescope control system. This project is subsidized by Chinese National Natural Science Funds (10833004).

  9. Point-Focus Concentration Compact Telescoping Array: Extreme Environments Solar Power Base Phase Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEachen, Michael E.; Murphy, Dave; Meinhold, Shen; Spink, Jim; Eskenazi, Mike; O'Neill, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Orbital ATK, in partnership with Mark ONeill LLC (MOLLC), has developed a novel solar array platform, PFC-CTA, which provides a significant advance in performance and cost reduction compared to all currently available space solar systems. PFC refers to the Point Focus Concentration of light provided by MOLLCs thin, flat Fresnel optics. These lenses focus light to a point of approximately 100 times the intensity of the ambient light, onto a solar cell of approximately 125th the size of the lens. CTA stands for Compact Telescoping Array, which is the solar array blanket structural platform originally devised by NASA and currently being advanced by Orbital ATK and partners under NASA and AFRL funding to a projected TRL 5+ by late-2018.The NASA Game Changing Development Extreme Environment Solar Power (EESP) Base Phase study has enabled Orbital ATK to refine component designs, perform component level and system performance analyses, and test prototype hardware of the key elements of PFC-CTA, and increased the TRL of PFC-specific technology elements to TRL 4. Key performance metrics currently projected are as follows: Scalability from 5 kW to 300 kW per wing (AM0); Specific Power 500 Wkg (AM0); Stowage Efficiency 100 kWm3; 5:1 margin on pointing tolerance vs. capability; 50 launched cost savings; Wide range of operability between Venus and Saturn by active andor passive thermal management.

  10. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold (<50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral fie ld units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's k ey science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and miss ion status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limite d down to a wavelength of 2 micron. The MIRI instrument just complete d its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  11. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  12. First Light for ASTROVIRTEL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    Astronomical data archives increasingly resemble virtual gold mines of information. A new project, known as ASTROVIRTEL aims to exploit these astronomical treasure troves by allowing scientists to use the archives as virtual telescopes. The competition for observing time on large space- and ground-based observatories such as the ESA/NASA Hubble Space Telescope and the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is intense. On average, less than a quarter of applications for observing time are successful. The fortunate scientist who obtains observing time usually has one year of so-called proprietary time to work with the data before they are made publicly accessible and can be used by other astronomers. Precious data from these large research facilities retain their value far beyond their first birthday and may still be useful decades after they were first collected. The enormous quantity of valuable astronomical data now stored in the archives of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) is increasingly attracting the attention of astronomers. Scientists are aware that one set of observations can serve many different scientific purposes, including some that were not considered at all when the observations were first made. Data archives as "gold mines" for research [ASTROVIRTEL Logo; JPEG - 184 k] Astronomical data archives increasingly resemble virtual gold mines of information. A new project, known as ASTROVIRTEL or "Accessing Astronomical Archives as Virtual Telescopes" aims to exploit these astronomical treasure troves. It is supported by the European Commission (EC) within the "Access to Research Infrastructures" action under the "Improving Human Potential & the Socio-economic Knowledge Base" of the EC (under EU Fifth Framework Programme). ASTROVIRTEL has been established on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in response to rapid developments currently taking

  13. New National Telescope at La Silla - TRAPPIST to Scout the Sky and Uncover Exoplanets and Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    A new robotic telescope has had first light at ESO's La Silla Observatory, in Chile. TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is devoted to the study of planetary systems through two approaches: the detection and characterisation of planets located outside the Solar System (exoplanets) and the study of comets orbiting around the Sun. The 60-cm telescope is operated from a control room in Liège, Belgium, 12 000 km away. "The two themes of the TRAPPIST project are important parts of an emerging interdisciplinary field of research - astrobiology - that aims at studying the origin and distribution of life in the Universe," explains Michaël Gillon, who is in charge of the exoplanet studies. "Terrestrial planets similar to our Earth are obvious targets for the search for life outside the Solar System, while comets are suspected to have played an important role in the appearance and development of life on our planet," adds his colleague Emmanuël Jehin, who leads the cometary part of the project. TRAPPIST will detect and characterise exoplanets by making high precision measurements of "brightness dips" that might possibly be caused by exoplanet transits. During such a transit, the observed brightness of the star decreases slightly because the planet blocks a part of the starlight. The larger the planet, the more of the light is blocked and the more the brightness of the star will decrease [1]. "ESO's La Silla Observatory on the outskirts of the Atacama Desert is certainly one of the best astronomical sites in the world," says Gillon. "And because it is already home to two superb exoplanet hunters, we couldn't have found a better place to install our robotic telescope." The astronomers behind the TRAPPIST initiative will work very closely with the teams using HARPS on the 3.6-metre telescope and CORALIE attached to the Swiss 1.2-metre Leonhard Euler Telescope, both at La Silla. TRAPPIST is a collaboration between the University of Liège and the

  14. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects- Appendices

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kramer, Sharon; Previsic, Mirko; Nelson, Peter

    2010-06-17

    Marine wave and tidal energy technology could interact with marine resources in ways that are not well understood. As wave and tidal energy conversion projects are planned, tested, and deployed, a wide range of stakeholders will be engaged; these include developers, state and federal regulatory agencies, environmental groups, tribal governments, recreational and commercial fishermen, and local communities. Identifying stakeholders’ environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development will help developers address and minimize potential environmental effects. Identifying important concerns will also assist with streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles by the industry inmore » the U.S. today. In September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to conduct a scenario-based evaluation of emerging hydrokinetic technologies. The purpose of this evaluation is to identify and characterize environmental impacts that are likely to occur, demonstrate a process for analyzing these impacts, identify the “key” environmental concerns for each scenario, identify areas of uncertainty, and describe studies that could address that uncertainty. This process is intended to provide an objective and transparent tool to assist in decision-making for siting and selection of technology for wave and tidal energy development. RE Vision worked with H. T. Harvey & Associates, to develop a framework for identifying key environmental concerns with marine renewable technology. This report describes the results of this study. This framework was applied to varying wave and tidal power conversion technologies, scales, and locations. The following wave and tidal energy scenarios were considered: 4 wave energy generation technologies 3 tidal energy generation technologies 3 sites: Humboldt coast, California (wave); Makapu’u Point, Oahu, Hawaii (wave); and the Tacoma Narrows, Washington

  15. The Thirty Meter Telescope site testing robotic computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Schöck, Matthias; Skidmore, Warren

    2006-06-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project is currently testing six remote sites as candidates for the final location of the telescope. Each site has several instruments, including seeing monitors, weather stations, and turbulence profile measuring systems, each of which is computer controlled. As the sites are remote (usually hours from the nearest town), they requires a system that can control the operations of all the varied subsystems, keep the systems safe from damage and recover from errors during operation. The robotic system must also be robust enough to operate without human intervention and when internet connections are lost. It is also critical that a data archiving system diligently records all data as gathered. This paper is a discussion of the TMT site testing robotic computer system as implemented.

  16. The UTMOST - rebirth of the Molonglo Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne J.; Flynn, Chris

    2015-08-01

    The Molongo Radio Telescope, a large cylindrical paraboloid interferometer located near Canberra in Australia, has been redeveloped with a digital receiver system and optic fibre transmission network leading to a hybrid signal processor incorporating a GPU supercomputer and programmable-logic chip based filterbanks. Data rates up to 22 Gbytes/sec will be processed in real-time. The new configuration is 10 times more efficient than the previous system with substantially increased sensitivity and bandwidth (centred on 843 MHz) and a field of view of about 8 square degrees. The mechanical infrastructure has been retained; hence the angular resolution remains at 43 arcsec. The key science goals of the new instrument include increasing the Fast Radio Burst discovery rate by an order of magnitude or more over our long term rate with the Parkes Telescope, pulsar timing and commensal imaging of diffuse radio sources. Novel methods of RFI excision have been demonstrated. The talk will present the elements of the new system and some recent science results.

  17. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2017-08-01

    Athena (the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) is a next generation X-ray observatory currently under study by ESA for launch in 2028. Athena is designed to address the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme, which addresses two key questions: 1) How did ordinary matter evolve into the large scale structures we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe. To address these topics Athena employs an innovative X-ray telescope based on Silicon Pore Optics technology to deliver extremely light weight and high throughput, while retaining excellent angular resolution. The mirror can be adjusted to focus onto one of two focal place instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) which provides spatially-resolved, high resolution spectroscopy, and the Wide Field Imager (WFI) which provides spectral imaging over a large field of view, as well as high time resolution and count rate tolerance. Athena is currently in Phase A and the study status will be reviewed, along with the scientific motivations behind the mission.

  18. Status report on the Large Binocular Telescope's ARGOS ground-layer AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Rabien, S.; Busoni, L.; Barl, L.; Beckmann, U.; Bonaglia, M.; Boose, Y.; Borelli, J. L.; Bluemchen, T.; Carbonaro, L.; Connot, C.; Deysenroth, M.; Davies, R.; Durney, O.; Elberich, M.; Ertl, T.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Gasho, V.; Gemperlein, H.; Hubbard, P.; Kanneganti, S.; Kulas, M.; Newman, K.; Noenickx, J.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Peter, D.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rademacher, M.; Schwab, C.; Storm, J.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Weigelt, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2011-10-01

    ARGOS, the laser-guided adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is now under construction at the telescope. By correcting atmospheric turbulence close to the telescope, the system is designed to deliver high resolution near infrared images over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. Each side of the LBT is being equipped with three Rayleigh laser guide stars derived from six 18 W pulsed green lasers and projected into two triangular constellations matching the size of the corrected field. The returning light is to be detected by wavefront sensors that are range gated within the seeing-limited depth of focus of the telescope. Wavefront correction will be introduced by the telescope's deformable secondary mirrors driven on the basis of the average wavefront errors computed from the respective guide star constellation. Measured atmospheric turbulence profiles from the site lead us to expect that by compensating the ground-layer turbulence, ARGOS will deliver median image quality of about 0.2 arc sec across the JHK bands. This will be exploited by a pair of multi-object near-IR spectrographs, LUCIFER1 and LUCIFER2, with 4 arc minute field already operating on the telescope. In future, ARGOS will also feed two interferometric imaging instruments, the LBT Interferometer operating in the thermal infrared, and LINC-NIRVANA, operating at visible and near infrared wavelengths. Together, these instruments will offer very broad spectral coverage at the diffraction limit of the LBT's combined aperture, 23 m in size.

  19. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Vladimir; Buckley, Jim; Falcone, Abe; Fegan, Steven; Finley, John; Gaurino, Victor; Hanna, David; Kaaret, Philip; Konopelko, Alex; Krawczynski, Henric; Romani, Roger; Weekes, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory based on an array of ˜100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) with a sensitivity to gamma-rays in the energy range 40 GeV-100 TeV. The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. In this submission we focus on the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime- focus telescope designs, as well as a novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We evaluate the capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  20. Active x-ray optics for high resolution space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Brooks, D.; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Meggs, Carl; James, Ady; Willis, Graham; Smith, Andy

    2017-11-01

    The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project started in April 2006 and will end in October 2010. The aim is to develop new technologies in the field of X-ray focusing, in particular the application of active and adaptive optics. While very major advances have been made in active/adaptive astronomical optics for visible light, little was previously achieved for X-ray optics where the technological challenges differ because of the much shorter wavelengths involved. The field of X-ray astronomy has been characterized by the development and launch of ever larger observatories with the culmination in the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra missions which are currently operational. XMM-Newton uses a multi-nested structure to provide modest angular resolution ( 10 arcsec) but large effective area, while Chandra sacrifices effective area to achieve the optical stability necessary to provide sub-arc second resolution. Currently the European Space Agency (ESA) is engaged in studies of the next generation of X-ray space observatories, with the aim of producing telescopes with increased sensitivity and resolution. To achieve these aims several telescopes have been proposed, for example ESA and NASA's combined International X-ray Observatory (IXO), aimed at spectroscopy, and NASA's Generation-X. In the field of X-ray astronomy sub 0.2 arcsecond resolution with high efficiency would be very exciting. Such resolution is unlikely to be achieved by anything other than an active system. The benefits of a such a high resolution would be important for a range of astrophysics subjects, for example the potential angular resolution offered by active X-ray optics could provide unprecedented structural imaging detail of the Solar Wind bowshock interaction of comets, planets and similar objects and auroral phenomena throughout the Solar system using an observing platform in low Earth orbit. A major aim of the SXO project was to investigate the production of thin

  1. Thermal performance evaluation of the infrared telescope dewar subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal performance evaluations (TPE) were conducted with the superfluid helium dewar of the Infrared Telescope (IRT) experiment from November 1981 to August 1982. Test included measuring key operating parameters, simulating operations with an attached instrument cryostat and validating servicing, operating and safety procedures. Test activities and results are summarized. All objectives are satisfied except for those involving transfer of low pressure liquid helium (LHe) from a supply dewar into the dewar subsystem.

  2. Testing light concentrators prototypes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault, François; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Jocou, Laurent; Arezki, Brahim; Magnard, Yves; Khélifi, Bruno; Manigot, Pascal; Olive, Jean-François; Jean, Pierre; Punch, Michael

    2017-09-01

    With more than 30 Medium-Size Telescopes (MST) located in both North and South hemispheres, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) shall be the largest cosmic gamma ray detector ever built. Each MST focal plane consists in an array of some 1800 photomultipliers equipped with their own light concentrating optics in order to maximizing the amount of Cherenkov radiation collected by the telescope and to block stray light originating from ground environment. Within the CTA Consortium, the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) is in charge of designing, subcontracting the realization to industry, and testing the MST light concentrators. Two different optical solutions were pre-selected, respectively based on CPCs (Winston cones) and non-imaging concentrating lenses. Prototypes were manufactured by different industrial companies and tested in our laboratory on a test bench specifically built for the project. After shortly describing both optical designs, this communication is essentially focused at experimental results. Each type of concentrator has been submitted to extensive performance measurements, including radiometric efficiency at different wavelengths, rejection curves, and qualitative shape error test. The final selected concentrator is the CPC, although non-imaging lenses exhibit interesting properties in terms of radiometric performance.

  3. Planning the 8-meter Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jacques M.; Liu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Ji, H.

    2013-07-01

    -called “Partial Adaptive Optics” (PAO) mode (Applied Optics 31,424,1992) to obtain angular resolution twice that of a 4-meter telescope if their observations indicate that higher resolution is desirable. The CGST is a Chinese solar community project.

  4. James Webb Space Telescope in NASA's giant thermal vacuum chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-20

    Inside NASA's giant thermal vacuum chamber, called Chamber A, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, the James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model, is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Previously used for manned spaceflight missions, this historic chamber is now filled with engineers and technicians preparing for a crucial test. Exelis developed and installed the optical test equipment in the chamber. "The optical test equipment was developed and installed in the chamber by Exelis," said Thomas Scorse, Exelis JWST Program Manager. "The Pathfinder telescope gives us our first opportunity for an end-to-end checkout of our equipment." "This will be the first time on the program that we will be aligning two primary mirror segments together," said Lee Feinberg, NASA Optical Telescope Element Manager. "In the past, we have always tested one mirror at a time but this time we will use a single test system and align both mirrors to it as though they are a single monolithic mirror." The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. Image credit: NASA/Chris Gunn Text credit: Laura Betz, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Oversight: Space Telescope, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The oversight hearing of the House subcommittee on Space Science and Applications concerning the development of the Space Telescope is presented. Plans for future utilization of the telescope are discussed.

  6. Creation of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been the most successful space astronomy project to date, producing images that put the public in awe and images and spectra that have produced many scientific discoveries. It is the natural culmination of a dream envisioned when rocket flight into space was first projected and a goal set for the US space program soon after NASA was created. The design and construction period lasted almost two decades and its operations have already lasted almost as long. The capabilities of the observatory have evolved and expanded with periodic upgrading of its instrumentation, thus realizing the advantages of its unique design. The success of this long-lived observatory is closely tied to the availability of the Space Shuttle and the end of the Shuttle program means that the end of the Hubble program will follow before long.

  7. Wide-Angle, Flat-Field Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Howell, B. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    All-reflective system unvignetted. Wide-angle telescope uses unobstructed reflecting elements to produce flat image. No refracting elements, no chromatic aberration, and telescope operates over spectral range from infrared to far ultraviolet. Telescope used with such image detectors as photographic firm, vidicons, and solid-state image arrays.

  8. Science operations with Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacconi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The operation, instrumentation, and expected contributions of the Space Telescope are discussed. Space Telescope capabilities are described. The organization and nature of the Space Telescope Science Institute are outlined, including the allocation of observing time and the data rights and data access policies of the institute.

  9. Research Projects and Undergraduate Retention at the University of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Towner, A. P.; McGraw, A. M.; Biddle, L. I.; Robertson, A.; Turner, J.; Smith, C.

    2013-06-01

    The University of Arizona’s Astronomy Club utilizes its access to the many telescopes in and around Tucson, Arizona, to allow students to fully participate in a variety of research projects. Three current projects - the exoplanet project, the radio astronomy project, and the Kepler project - all work to give undergraduates who are interested in astronomy the opportunity to explore practical astronomy outside the classroom and in a peer-supported environment. The exoplanet project strives to teach students about the research process, including observing exoplanet transits on the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper telescope on Mt. Bigelow in Tucson, AZ, reducing the data into lightcurves with the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), modeling the lightcurves using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and writing and publishing a professional paper, and does it all with no faculty involvement. The radio astronomy project is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with a professor on a radio astronomy research project, and to learn about the research process, including observing molecules in molecular clouds using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter radio telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. The Kepler project is a new project designed in part to facilitate graduate-undergraduate interaction in the Astronomy Department, and in part to allow students (both graduate and undergraduate) to participate in star-spot cycle research using data from the Kepler Mission. All of these research projects and structures provide students with unique access to telescopes, peer mentoring, networking, and understanding the entire process of astronomical research.

  10. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  11. Origins Space Telescope: Telescope Design and Instrument Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Carter, Ruth; Leisawitz, David; Dipirro, Mike; Flores, Anel; Staguhn, Johannes; Kellog, James; Roellig, Thomas L.; Melnick, Gary J.; Bradford, Charles; Wright, Edward L.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, one of the four science and technology definition studies of NASA Headquarters for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey. The renaming of the mission reflects Origins science goals that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, nearby galaxies and the Milky Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. This poster will show the preliminary telescope design that will be a large aperture (>8 m in diameter), cryogenically cooled telescope. We will also present the specifications for the spectrographs and imagers over a potential wavelength range of ~10 microns to 1 millimeter. We look forward to community input into this mission definition over the coming year as we work on the concept design for the mission. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. We welcome you to contact the Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) with your science needs and ideas by emailing us at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu.

  12. NASA's Webb "Pathfinder Telescope" Successfully Completes First Super-Cold Optical Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Testing is crucial part of NASA's success on Earth and in space. So, as the actual flight components of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope come together, engineers are testing the non-flight equipment to ensure that tests on the real Webb telescope later goes safely and according to plan. Recently, the "pathfinder telescope," or just “Pathfinder,” completed its first super-cold optical test that resulted in many first-of-a-kind demonstrations. "This test is the first dry-run of the equipment and procedures we will use to conduct an end-to-end optical test of the flight telescope and instruments," said Mark Clampin, Webb telescope Observatory Project Scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "It provides confidence that once the flight telescope is ready, we are fully prepared for a successful test of the flight hardware." The Pathfinder is a non-flight replica of the Webb telescope’s center section backplane, or “backbone,” that includes mirrors. The flight backplane comes in three segments, a center section and two wing-like parts, all of which will support large hexagonal mirrors on the Webb telescope. The pathfinder only consists of the center part of the backplane. However, during the test, it held two full size spare primary mirror segments and a full size spare secondary mirror to demonstrate the ability to optically test and align the telescope at the planned operating temperatures of -400 degrees Fahrenheit (-240 Celsius). Read more: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/nasas-webb-pathfinder-telesc... Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-energy (approximately 5-200 Mega electron Volts) gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production kinematics limit (approximately 0.6 deg at 70 Mega electron Volts), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front detector (is less than 3 x 10(exp -6) Mega electron Volts per square centimeter per second at 70 Mega electron Volts), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% for a 10 milliCrab source in 10(exp 6) s.

  14. A 4-meter Telescope for the US Air Force Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, D.; Andersen, G.; Wetterer, C.

    2004-05-01

    The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs has obtained a 4m-diameter, lightweight telescope from the discontinued Space Based Laser project. Originally designed and constructed for space, this segmented telescope is being reconfigured for use in a ground-based facility. The current optical design is an afocal Mersenne configuration with an extremely thin (17mm) glass primary. The telescope has 312 fine figure actuators for active shaping of the primary, as well as 42 piston actuators for phasing of the segments and adaptive optics capability with a 300-actuator deformable mirror and wavefront sensor. We are recoating and redesigning the optics (with new secondary and tertiary mirrors) and constructing a new truss and an alt-az mount with two Nasmyth foci capable of both sidereal and low-Earth object tracking down to altitudes of 200km. The telescope will be located in a new facility to be built next to the current USAFA Observatory. The primary use of the telescope will be for education by involving cadets in a wide range of Air Force experiments including active ranging, communication, and imaging and characterization of satellites. We envision, however, that substantial time will also be available for astronomy. Although the Colorado Springs site is not ideal for many astronomical uses, it does lend itself to easy access by cadets, faculty, and visitors, and is appropriate for spectroscopy and bright-object work. Compared to similar facilities around the world, we expect to have a large amount of time available for outside users.

  15. The AMANDA neutrino telescope

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Andres, E.C.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.W.

    1999-04-01

    With an effective telescope area of order 10(4) m(2) for TeVneutrinos, a threshold near similar to 50 GeV and a pointing accuracy of2.5 degrees per muon track, the AMANDA detector represents the first of anew generation of high energy neutrino telescopes, reaching a scaleenvisaged over 25 years ago. We describe early results on the calibrationof natural deep ice as a particle detector as well as on AMANDA'sperformance as a neutrino telescope.

  16. Laboratory and balloon flight performance of the liquid xenon gamma ray imaging telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curioni, Alessandro

    2004-10-01

    This thesis presents the laboratory calibration and in- flight performance of the liquid xenon γ-ray imaging telescope (LXeGRIT). LXeGRIT is the prototype of a novel concept of Compton telescope, based on a liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXeTPC), developed through several years by Prof. Aprile and collaborators at Columbia. When I joined the collaboration in Spring 1999, LXeGRIT was getting ready for a balloon borne experiment with the goal of performing the key measurement of the background at balloon altitude. After the 1999 balloon flight, a good deal of work was devoted to a thorough calibration of LXeGRIT, both through several tests in the laboratory and through improving the analysis software and developing Monte Carlo simulations. After substantial advancements in our understanding of the detector performance, LXeGRIT was improved and calibrated before a long duration balloon campaign in the Fall of 2000. Data gathered in this flight have allowed a detailed study of the background at balloon altitude and of the sensitivity to celestial γ-ray sources, the focus of the second part of my thesis. As this dissertation is intended to show, “the LXeGRIT phase”—defined as the prototype work, the experimental demonstration of the LXeTPC concept as a Compton telescope, the measurement of the background and of the detection sensitivity—has been now successfully completed. We are now ready for future implementations of the LXeTPC technology for astrophysics observations. The detailed calibration of LXeGRIT, both as an imaging calorimeter and as a Compton telescope is described in Chapters 2, 3 and 4. In Chapter 5 more details are given of LXeGRIT as a balloon borne instrument and its flight performance in year 2000. The measurement of the background at balloon altitude, based on the data collected in year 2000, is presented in Chapter 6 and the sensitivity of the instrument is derived in Chapter 7. An overview of future developments for the LXe

  17. The TROPOMI Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijkerk, David; van Venrooy, Bart; Van Doorn, Peter; Henselmans, Rens; Draaisma, Folkert; Hoogstrate, André

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss the two-mirror pushbroom telescope for TROPOMI. Using freeform optics, it has unprecedented resolution. The complete cycle of freeform optical design, analysis, manufacturing, metrology and functional test on a breadboard setup is described, focusing on the specific complexities concerning freeforms. The TROPOMI flight telescope will be manufactured in summer 2012.

  18. Live from the Hubble Space Telescope: a possibility of astronomical education using Internet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, H.; Miura, H.; Ito, S.; Koyama, H.; Turuoka, N.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have joined in "Live from the Hubble Space Telescope" which was operated by a Passport to Knowledge Project team. The authors are sure that collaboration between scientists and teachers using Internet have an effect on science education.

  19. Vortex coronagraphs for the Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission concept: theoretical performance and telescope requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth; Mawet, Dimitri; Mennesson, Bertrand; Jewell, Jeffrey; Shaklan, Stuart

    2018-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission concept requires an optical coronagraph that provides deep starlight suppression over a broad spectral bandwidth, high throughput for point sources at small angular separation, and insensitivity to temporally varying, low-order aberrations. Vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that performs optimally on off-axis, monolithic telescopes and may also be designed for segmented telescopes with minor losses in performance. We describe the key advantages of vortex coronagraphs on off-axis telescopes such as (1) unwanted diffraction due to aberrations is passively rejected in several low-order Zernike modes relaxing the wavefront stability requirements for imaging Earth-like planets from <10 to >100 pm rms, (2) stars with angular diameters >0.1 λ / D may be sufficiently suppressed, (3) the absolute planet throughput is >10 % , even for unfavorable telescope architectures, and (4) broadband solutions (Δλ / λ > 0.1) are readily available for both monolithic and segmented apertures. The latter make use of grayscale apodizers in an upstream pupil plane to provide suppression of diffracted light from amplitude discontinuities in the telescope pupil without inducing additional stroke on the deformable mirrors. We set wavefront stability requirements on the telescope, based on a stellar irradiance threshold set at an angular separation of 3 ± 0.5λ / D from the star, and discuss how some requirements may be relaxed by trading robustness to aberrations for planet throughput.

  20. CFRP solutions for the innovative telescopes design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampini, Francesco; Marchiori, Gianpietro

    2006-02-01

    The new frontiers of the research in the astronomic field require the use of more and more advanced high-performance structures. Only an adequate technological innovation of conventional telescopes and radio-telescopes allow to obtain structures able to meet the new specification of the projects. Besides, technological innovation is founded not only on the identification of more and more sophisticated mechanisms and optical instruments, but also on the development of new materials and manufacturing processes for the entire structure that constitute an instrument such as a telescope or a radio-telescope. Among these materials, the use of the carbon fibre is highly important. This material, which is already widely used in the aerospace and automotive fields, shall join also the astronomic field for ground instruments. Thanks to the experience acquired with instruments like ALMA, the industry of composites is now able to guarantee different solutions at relatively low costs that allow the instruments of new generation to move extremely important steps in the development of scientific research. Not just materials, but also processes, through which the materials are worked and manufactured, are extremely important. The use of technologies, such as hand lay-up vacuum bag, compression moulding, table rolling of composite tubes, filament winding, poltrusion and Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), allow to identify the ideal solution both for big dimension objects, such as backup structure, main mirror structure of quadripod legs, and relatively small objects, such as actuators, adjusters system, etc. The wide choice, concerning the use of composite materials, and their techniques of production, allow the technicians to satisfy the exigencies of astronomers be they addressed to simple control of the weights or of the stiffness of the structures, or to specific thermal behaviour of the piece itself.

  1. The Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancitters, G. W., Jr.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Robinson, E. L.; White, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope will provide the opportunity to perform precise astronomical photometry above the disturbing effects of the atmosphere. The High Speed Photometer is designed to provide the observatory with a stable, precise photometer with wide dynamic range, broad wavelenth coverage, time resolution in the microsecond region, and polarimetric capability. Here, the scientific requirements for the instrument are examined, the unique design features of the photometer are explored, and the improvements to be expected over the performance of ground-based instruments are projected.

  2. A scientific assessment of a new technology orbital telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    As part of a program designed to test the Alpha chemical laser weapons system in space, the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) developed components of an agile, lightweight, 4-meter telescope, equipped with an advanced active-optics system. BMDO had proposed to make space available in the telescope's focal plane for instrumentation optimized for scientific applications in astrophysics and planetary astronomy for a potential flight mission. Such a flight mission could be undertaken if new or additional sponsorship can be found. Despite this uncertainty, BMDO requested assistance in defining the instrumentation and other design aspects necessary to enhance the scientific value of a pointing and tracking mission. In response to this request, the Space Studies Board established the Task Group on BMDO New Technology Orbital Observatory (TGBNTOO) and charged it to: (1) provide instrumentation, data management, and science-operations advice to BMDO to optimize the scientific value of a 4-meter mission; and (2) support a space studies board assessment of the relative scientific merit of the program. This report deals with the first of these tasks, assisting the Advanced Technology Demonstrator's (ATD's) program scientific potential. Given the potential scientific aspects of the 4-meter telescope, this project is referred to as the New Technology Orbital Telescope (NTOT), or as the ATD/NTOT, to emphasize its dual-use character. The task group's basic conclusion is that the ATD/NTOT mission does have the potential for contributing in a major way to astronomical goals.

  3. Technologies for the fabrication of the E-ELT mirrors within the T-REX project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, G.; Aliverti, M.; Bianco, A.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pariani, G.; Sironi, G.; Riva, M.; Vecchi, G.; Zerbi, F.

    With its primary mirror with 39 m of diameter, the E-ELT will be the largest optical/near-infrared telescope in the world and will gather 13 times more light than the largest optical telescopes existing today. The different optical sub-systems of E-ELT, including the primary mirror based on hundreds of reflecting tiles assembled together, represent key components for the implementation of the telescopes. A huge amount of aspherical reflecting elements have to be produced with "state of the art" figuring and polishing technologies and measured with proper metrological equipments. In the past couple of years, in the context of the T-REX project, a specific development program was carried out at the Brera Astronomical Observatory-INAF in order to address a numbers of technology aspects related to the fabrication of the E-ELT mirrors. In this paper we give a short overview of the activities that have been carried out. Other papers in this volume report on specific activities that have pursed within such a development program. skip=8pt

  4. The Young Solar Analogs Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Saken, J. M.; Corbally, C. J.; Seeds, M. F.; Morrison, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are carrying out a long-term project of measuring chromospheric activity and brightness variations in 31 young solar analogs (YSAs) using the Dark Sky Observatory (DSO -- Appalachian State University) 32-inch telescope and the G/M spectrograph. These YSAs are solar-type (spectral types F8 - K2) stars with ages ranging from 0.3 - 1.5 Gyr. The goal of this project is to gain better understanding of the magnetic activity of the early Sun, and especially how that activity may have impacted the development of life on the Earth. This project will also yield insights into the space environments experienced by young Earth analogs. We are currently in our 5th year of obtaining Ca II K & H chromospheric flux measurements, and are beginning to see signs of long-term activity cycles in a number of our stars. In addition, rotational modulation of the chromospheric fluxes is detectable in our data, and we have determined rotational periods for many of our stars. Short timescale increases in the K & H fluxes have been observed in a number of our stars; these events may be related to stellar flares. VATTSpec, a new moderate-resolution spectrograph on the 1.8-m Vatican Telescope in Arizona, has recently become involved with the project. This spectrograph will increase our ability to detect short-term changes in stellar activity on timescales of hours to minutes. We have been monitoring the program stars for one year in a multi-band photometric system consisting of Stromgren-v, and Johnson B, V, and R filters. We will soon add a narrow-band H-alpha filter to the system. Photometry is being carried out with a small piggy-back telescope on the 32-inch, but a robotic photometric telescope is currently being installed at DSO for this purpose. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    2003-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will extend the discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope by deploying a large cooled infrared telescope at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. It will have a 6 m aperture and three instruments covering the wavelength range from 0.6 to 28 microns.

  6. Thin film multilayer filters for solar EUV telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chkhalo, N I; Drozdov, M N; Kluenkov, E B; Kuzin, S V; Lopatin, A Ya; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, N N; Tsybin, N N; Zuev, S Yu

    2016-06-10

    Al, with a passband in the wavelength range of 17-60 nm, and Zr, with a passband in the wavelength range of 6.5-17 nm, thin films on a support grid or support membrane are frequently used as UV, visible, and near-IR blocking filters in solar observatories. Although they possess acceptable optical performance, these filters also have some shortcomings such as low mechanical strength and low resistance to oxidation. These shortcomings hinder meeting the requirements for filters of future telescopes. We propose multilayer thin film filters on the basis of Al, Zr, and other materials with improved characteristics. It was demonstrated that stretched multilayer films on a support grid with a mesh size up to 5 mm can withstand vibration loads occurring during spacecraft launch. A large mesh size is preferable for filters of high-resolution solar telescopes, since it allows image distortion caused by light diffraction on the support grid to be avoided. We have investigated the thermal stability of Al/Si and Zr/Si multilayers assuming their possible application as filters in the Intergelioprobe project, in which the observation of coronal plasma will take place close to the Sun. Zr/Si films show high thermal stability and may be used as blocking filters in the wavelength range of 12.5-17 nm. Al/Si films show lower thermal stability: a significant decrease in the film's transmission in the EUV spectral range and an increase in the visible spectrum have been observed. We suppose that the low thermal stability of Al/Si films restricts their application in the Intergelioprobe project. Thus, there is a lack of filters for the wavelength range of λ>17  nm. Be/Si and Cr/Si filters have been proposed for the wavelength range near 30.4 nm. Although these filters have lower transparency than Al/Si, they are superior in thermal stability. Multilayer Sc/Al filters with relatively high transmission at a wavelength of 58.4 nm (HeI line) and simultaneously sufficient rejection in the

  7. Hubble Space Telescope-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than is visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  8. Development in High-Density Cobra Fiber Positioners for the Subaru Telescope's Prime Focus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Braun, David F.; Kaluzny, Joel V.; Seiffert, Mic D.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ellis, Richard S.; Smith, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a fiber fed multi-object spectrometer for the Subaru Telescope that will conduct a variety of targeted surveys for studies of dark energy, galaxy evolution, and galactic archaeology. The key to the instrument is a high density array of fiber positioners placed at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope. The system, nicknamed "Cobra", will be capable of rapidly reconfiguring the array of 2394 optical fibers to the image positions of astronomical targets in the focal plane with high accuracy. The system uses 2394 individual "SCARA robot" mechanisms that are 7.7mm in diameter and use 2 piezo-electric rotary motors to individually position each of the optical fibers within its patrol region. Testing demonstrates that the Cobra positioner can be moved to within 5 micrometers of an astronomical target in 6 move iterations with a success rate of 95%. The Cobra system is a key aspect of PFS that will enable its unprecedented combination of high-multiplex factor and observing efficiency on the Subaru telescope. The requirements, design, and prototyping efforts for the fiber positioner system for the PFS are described here as are the plans for modular construction, assembly, integration, functional testing, and performance validation.

  9. JWST Telescope Integration and Test Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Whitman, Tony L.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Voyton, Mark F.; Lander, Juli A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. The JWST Optical Telescope Element (Telescope) integration and test program is well underway. The telescope was completed in the spring of 2016 and the cryogenic test equipment has been through two optical test programs leading up to the final flight verification program. The details of the telescope mirror integration will be provided along with the current status of the flight observatory. In addition, the results of the two optical ground support equipment cryo tests will be shown and how these plans fold into the flight verification program.

  10. Monitoring Cepheid variables using the new BYU Observation Deck Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Adam Garth; Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    In January 2017 work was completed on the new observation deck of the Eyring Science Center on the Brigham Young University campus. This deck was designed with pedestals to currently hold up to 5 robotic telescope systems. One of the first test projects was to monitor a sample of Classical Cepheid variables to watch for changes in the light curves. Starting with a sample of stars which had previously been monitored spectroscopically using the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m telescope, we collected photometric data in the H-alpha/H-beta system detailed in Joner & Hintz (2015). We will present a preliminary analysis of this data and the abilities of the new deck to monitor these type of objects.

  11. Very large Arecibo-type telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Frank D.

    1988-01-01

    The Arecibo-type radio telescope, based on a fixed spherical reflector, is a very effective design for a large radio telescope on the Moon. In such telescopes, major structural members are provided by the ground on which they are built, and thus are provided at no cost in materials or transportation. The strong compression members, the tall towers which support the suspended platform, are an expensive part of the Arecibo telescope. The need for such towers can be eliminated if a suitable valley or crater can be found wherein the rim of the depression can be used as the support point for the cables which support the suspended platform. With an Arecibo-type radio telescope on the Moon, there are no changing gravity loads because of the design and no changing wind loads because of the location; therefore, the only source of time variation in the telescope geometry is thermal changes. Calculations show that with conventional materials, such as steel, it should be possible to construct an Arecibo-type telescope with a reflector diameter of some 30 km on the Moon, and with a reflector diameter of some 60 to 90 km if materials of high specific strength are used.

  12. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons (NWNH) in Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey prioritized the community consensus for ground-based and space-based observatories. Recognizing that many of the community s key questions could be answered with a wide-field infrared survey telescope in space, and that the decade would be one of budget austerity, WFIRST was top ranked in the large space mission category. In addition to the powerful new science that could be accomplished with a wide-field infrared telescope, the WFIRST mission was determined to be both technologically ready and only a small fraction of the cost of previous flagship missions, such as HST or JWST. In response to the top ranking by the community, NASA formed the WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) and Project Office. The SDT was charged with fleshing out the NWNH scientific requirements to a greater level of detail. NWNH evaluated the risk and cost of the JDEM-Omega mission design, as submitted by NASA, and stated that it should serve as the basis for the WFIRST mission. The SDT and Project Office were charged with developing a mission optimized for achieving the science goals laid out by the NWNH re-port. The SDT and Project Office opted to use the JDEM-Omega hardware configuration as an initial start-ing point for the hardware implementation. JDEM-Omega and WFIRST both have an infrared imager with a filter wheel, as well as counter-dispersed moderate resolution spectrometers. The primary advantage of space observations is being above the Earth's atmosphere, which absorbs, scatters, warps and emits light. Observing from above the atmosphere enables WFIRST to obtain precision infrared measurements of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing, infrared light-curves of supernovae and exoplanet microlensing events with low systematic errors, and infrared measurements of the H hydrogen line to be cleanly detected in the 1

  13. Advanced technology optical telescopes IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 12-16, 1990. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Lawrence D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on the current status of large, advanced-technology optical telescope development and construction projects discusses topics on such factors as their novel optical system designs, the use of phased arrays, seeing and site performance factors, mirror fabrication and testing, pointing and tracking techniques, mirror thermal control, structural design strategies, mirror supports and coatings, and the control of segmented mirrors. Attention is given to the proposed implementation of the VLT Interferometer, the first diffraction-limited astronomical images with adaptive optics, a fiber-optic telescope using a large cross-section image-transmitting bundle, the design of wide-field arrays, Hartmann test data reductions, liquid mirrors, inertial drives for telescope pointing, temperature control of large honeycomb mirrors, evaporative coatings for very large telescope mirrors, and the W. M. Keck telescope's primary mirror active control system software.

  14. VST project: distributed control system overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Dario; Mazzola, Germana; Molfese, C.; Schipani, Pietro; Brescia, Massimo; Marty, Laurent; Rossi, Emilio

    2003-02-01

    The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) is a co-operative program between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the INAF Capodimonte Astronomical Observatory (OAC), Naples, for the study, design, and realization of a 2.6-m wide-field optical imaging telescope to be operated at the Paranal Observatory, Chile. The telescope design, manufacturing and integration are responsibility of OAC. The VST has been specifically designed to carry out stand-alone observations in the UV to I spectral range and to supply target databases for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). The control hardware is based on a large utilization of distributed embedded specialized controllers specifically designed, prototyped and manufactured by the Technology Working Group for VST project. The use of a field bus improves the whole system reliability in terms of high level flexibility, control speed and allow to reduce drastically the plant distribution in the instrument. The paper describes the philosophy and the architecture of the VST control HW with particular reference to the advantages of this distributed solution for the VST project.

  15. ALMA Telescope Reaches New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is the North American partner in ALMA. ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence, is a revolutionary telescope, comprising an array of 66 giant 40-foot and 23-foot diameter antennas. Russell noted that the first antenna's move to the high site illustrates the international nature of the project. "A Japanese antenna with North American electronics was carried by a European transporter," he explained.

  16. Antares Reference Telescopes System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    1983-11-01

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300-1000 pm in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m diameter by 9.3-m long vacuum (10-6 torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 μm of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: 1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; 2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; 3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates tne target; and 4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail.

  17. Collaborative engineering and design management for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollison, Nicholas T.; Hayes, Richard J.; Good, John M.; Booth, John A.; Savage, Richard D.; Jackson, John R.; Rafal, Marc D.; Beno, Joseph H.

    2010-07-01

    The engineering and design of systems as complex as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's* new tracker require that multiple tasks be executed in parallel and overlapping efforts. When the design of individual subsystems is distributed among multiple organizations, teams, and individuals, challenges can arise with respect to managing design productivity and coordinating successful collaborative exchanges. This paper focuses on design management issues and current practices for the tracker design portion of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Wide Field Upgrade project. The scope of the tracker upgrade requires engineering contributions and input from numerous fields including optics, instrumentation, electromechanics, software controls engineering, and site-operations. Successful system-level integration of tracker subsystems and interfaces is critical to the telescope's ultimate performance in astronomical observation. Software and process controls for design information and workflow management have been implemented to assist the collaborative transfer of tracker design data. The tracker system architecture and selection of subsystem interfaces has also proven to be a determining factor in design task formulation and team communication needs. Interface controls and requirements change controls will be discussed, and critical team interactions are recounted (a group-participation Failure Modes and Effects Analysis [FMEA] is one of special interest). This paper will be of interest to engineers, designers, and managers engaging in multi-disciplinary and parallel engineering projects that require coordination among multiple individuals, teams, and organizations.

  18. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  19. Imaging Stellar Surfaces with an Agile 12-Telescopes Visible Interferometer for the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, Julien

    2018-04-01

    Imaging stellar surfaces with an optical interferometer requires a large number of telescopes and the extensive use of the bootstrapping technique to reach the high spatial frequencies where the surface details are revealed. An idea would use all 6 dual-star delay lines of VLTI to deploy an agile 12-telescopes single-mode visible interferometer on the Paranal mountain. The concept relies on single-mode fiber technologies that have been demonstrated by the `OHANA and `OHANA IKI projects. We present the expected performance of this concept and explore its potential for the study of stellar surfaces.

  20. Two-mirror, three-reflection telescopes as candidates for sky surveys in ground and space applications. The MINITRUST: an active optics warping telescope for wide-field astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Roberto F.; La Padula, Cesare D.; Vignato, Agostino; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Dohlen, Kjetil

    2002-12-01

    A concept based on a two-mirror, three-reflection telescope has been investigated. Its anastigmatism and flat fielded properties, the compactness and optical performances over 2-2.5 arc deg field of view, make this optical system of high interest for the development of much larger telescopes than with Schmidt designs. The 2MTRT concept is a potential candidate for sky surveys with 2-3 meter class telescopes and particularily well adapted for UV space surveys. Preliminary developments have been carried out with the construction of a 30-cm prototype on Amoretti's design, providing encouraging results. At present, a 45-cm 2MTRT prototype has been realized for ground based sky survey of NEOs, based on active optics (MINITRUST), in order to overcome the difficulty of obtaining three aspherical surfaces. The primary and tertiary lie on the same double vase substrate, and have a rest profile. The hyperbolization is carried out in situ by air depressure. The secondary, in a tulip form substrate, has been hyperbolized by elastic relaxation. The project is planned for operation in 2003.

  1. Measuring Visual Double Stars with Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady; Genet, Russell M.; Faisal Al-Zaben, Dewei Li, Yongyao Li, Aren Dennis, Zhixin Cao, Junyao Li, Steven Qu, Jeff Li, Michael Fene, Allen Priest, Stephen Priest, Rex Qiu, , and, Bill Riley

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Research Seminars introduce students to scientific research by carrying out the entire process: planning a scientific research project, writing a research proposal, gathering and analyzing observational data, drawing conclusions, and presenting the research results in a published paper and presentation.In 2015 Cuesta College and Russell Genet sponsored a new hybrid format for the seminar enabling distance learning. Boyce Research Initiatives and Education Foundation (BRIEF) conducted the course at The Army and Navy Academy (ANA) in Carlsbad, California, in the spring and fall of 2015.The course objective is to complete the research and publish the paper within one semester. Our program schedule called for observations to be performed within a two week period. Measurement of visual binary stars was chosen because sufficient observations could be made in just two evenings of good weather. We quickly learned that our location by the ocean did not provide reliable weather to use local telescopes.The iTelescope network of robotic telescopes located in Australia, Spain and the U.S. solved the problem. Reservations for these systems are booked online and include date, time, exposure and filters. The high quality telescopes range from 4" to 27" in size with excellent cameras. By watching the weather forecasts for the sites, we were able to schedule our observations within the two week time frame required.Timely and reliable data reduction was the next hurdle. The students were using widely varying equipment (PCs, MACs, tablets, smart phones) with incompatible software. After wasting time trying to be computer technicians, we settled a on standard set of software relying on Mirametrics' Mira Pro x64. We installed the software on an old laptop, downloaded the iTelescope data files, gave the students remote access using GoToMyPC.These efficiencies enabled us to meet the demanding one semester schedule and assure a better learning experience. We have been able to

  2. Geodetic Observatory Wettzell - 20-m Radio Telescope and Twin Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Schatz, Raimund

    2013-01-01