Science.gov

Sample records for temperature cycle tests

  1. Angular Alignment Testing of Laser Mirror Mounts Under Temperature Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, K. T.; DeYoung, R. J.; Sandford, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A number of commercial and custom-built laser mirror mounts were tested for angular alignment sensitivity during temperature cycling from room temperature (20 C) to 40 C. A Nd:YAG laser beam was reflected off a mirror that was held by the mount under test and was directed to a position-sensitive detector. Horizontal and vertical movement of the reflected beam was recorded, and the angular movement, as a function of temperature (coefficient of thermal tilt (CTT)) was calculated from these data. In addition, the amount of hysteresis in the movement after cycling from room temperature to 40 C and back was determined. All commercial mounts showed greater angular movement than the simpler National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (NASA LASE) custom mirror mounts.

  2. Phase 9 Fiber Optic Cable Microbending and Temperature Cycling Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abushagur, Mustafa A.G.; Huang, Po T.; Hand, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Optical fibers represent the back bone of the current communications networks. Their performance in the field lacks long term testing data because of the continuous evolution of the manufacturing of fibers and cables. An optical fiber cable that is installed in NASA's KSC has experienced a dramatic increase in attenuation after three years of use from 0.7 dB/km to 7 dB/km in some fibers. A thorough study is presented to assess the causes of such an attenuation increase. Material and chemical decomposition testing showed that there are no changes in the composition of the fiber which might have caused the increase in attenuation. Microbending and heat cycling tests were performed on the cable and individual fibers. It was found that the increase in attenuation is due to microbending caused by excessive stress exerted on the fibers. This was the result of manufacturing and installation irregularities.

  3. Closed Cycle Cryocooler for Low Temperature Electronics Circuits: Cold End Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    more isolated from the electrical load. -l A Stirling cryocooler is sensitive to the total amount of void volume associ- ated with the working gas...ID-Ai34 043 CLOSED CYCLE CRYOCOOLER FOR LOU TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICS i/i CIRCUITS: COLD END TEST(U) CT1-CRYOGENICS WALTHAM MA F N PIRTLE AUG 83...CRYOGENICS CLOSED CYCLE CRYOCOOLER FOR LOW TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICS CIRCUITS COLD END TEST CONTRACT N00014-82-C-0326 ’Ilk LAJ FELI d1XV10.601 nd cam u wt

  4. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  5. Vacuum thermal cycle life testing of high temperature thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnappan, Rengasamy; Beam, Jerry E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the corrosion compatibility of the high temperature thermal energy storage (TES) salts with Inconel-617 container was initiated at the Thermal Laboratory of the Wright Research and Development Center (WRDC) in 1985. Three fluoride eutectic mixtures: LiF-MgF2-KF, LiF-MgF2-NaF, and LiF-MgF2 having melting points in the neighborhood of 1000 K and heats of fusion above 750 kJ/kg were chosen. High purity analytical grade component salts were processed in oxygen and moisture-free inert atmosphere, and melted in situ in the Inconel-617 containers. The containers were sealed by electron beam-welding of the end caps thereby evacuating the void volume. The TES capsules thus formed were placed in a tubular vacuum furnace for continuous thermal cycle life testing by cycling them ±100 K from the eutectic temperature every 2 hours. The capsules have successfully undergone 40,000 hours and 10,000 cycles of testing as of April 1990 and continuing on the test. This is believed to be the longest record available on the TES corrosion compatibility data. The present results clearly indicate that careful processing and proper welding are key factors in obtaining a longlife TES salt-containment system.

  6. Current activities in standardization of high-temperature, low-cycle-fatigue testing techniques in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Ellis, J. Rodney; Swindeman, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E606-80 is the most often used recommended testing practice for low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) testing in the United States. The standard was first adopted in 1977 for LCF testing at room temperature and was modified in 1980 to include high-temperature testing practices. Current activity within ASTM is aimed at extending the E606-80 recommended practices to LCF under thermomechanical conditions, LCF in high-pressure hydrogen, and LCF in metal-matrix composite materials. Interlaboratory testing programs conducted to generate a technical base for modifying E606-80 for the aforementioned LCF test types are discussed.

  7. Low Temperature Life-cycle Testing of a Lithium-ion Battery for Low-earth-orbiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2004-01-01

    A flight-qualified, lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery developed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 lander is undergoing life-testing at low temperature under a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) profile to assess its capability to provide long term energy storage for aerospace missions. NASA has embarked upon an ambitious course to return humans to the moon by 2015-2020 in preparation for robotic and human exploration of Mars and robotic exploration of the moons of outer planets. Li-ion batteries are excellent candidates to provide power and energy storage for multiple aspects of these missions due to their low specific energy, low energy density, and excellent low temperature performance. Laboratory testing of Li-ion technology is necessary in order to assess lifetime, characterize multi-cell battery-level performance under aerospace conditions, and to gauge safety aspects of the technology. Life-cycle testing provides an opportunity to examine battery-level performance and the dynamics of individual cells in the stack over the entire life of the battery. Data generated through this testing will be critical to establish confidence in the technology for its widespread use in manned and unmanned mission. This paper discusses the performance of the 28 volt, 25 ampere-hour battery through 6000 LEO cycles, which corresponds to one year on LEO orbit. Testing is being performed at 0 C and 40% depth-of-discharge. Individual cell behaviors and their effect on the performance of the battery are described. Capacity, impedance, energy efficiency and end-of-discharge voltage at 1000 cycle intervals are reported. Results from this life-testing will help contribute to the database on battery-level performance of aerospace Li-ion batteries and low temperature cycling under LEO conditions.

  8. Effects of test design and temperature in a partial life-cycle study with the freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Macken, Ailbhe; Le Page, Gareth; Hayfield, Amanda; Williams, Timothy D; Brown, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    Potamopyrgus antipodarum is a candidate for a standardized mollusk partial life-cycle study. This is a comparative study of two test designs (microplate and beaker), with additional endpoints to the proposed guideline methods, for example, tracking of continuous reproductive output over 28 d and attributing it to individual female snails. In addition, an investigation of the effects of temperature (16, 20, and 25°C) on reproduction was also conducted employing the microplate design.

  9. Low Temperature Life-Cycle Testing of a Lithium-Ion Battery for Low-Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2006-01-01

    A flight-qualified, lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery developed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Landeris undergoing life-testing at low temperature under a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) profile to assess its capability to provide long term energy storage for aerospace missions. NASA has embarked upon an ambitious course to return humans to the moon by 2015-2020 in preparation for robotic and human exploration of Mars and robotic exploration of the moons of outer planets. Li-ion batteries are excellent candidates to provide power and energy storage for multiple aspects of these missions due to their high specific energy, high energy density, and excellent low temperature performance. Laboratory testing of Li-ion technology is necessary in order to assess lifetime, characterize multi-cell battery-level performance under aerospace conditions, and to gauge safety aspects of the technology. Life-cycle testing provides an opportunity to examine battery-level performance and the dynamics of individual cells in the stack over the entire life of the battery. Data generated through this testing will be critical to establish confidence in the technology for its widespread use in manned and unmanned missions.

  10. Reliability testing of the Hughes temperature controlled 1/4 watt split cycle cryogenic cooler (HD-1045 (V)/UA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James; Dunmire, Howard; Samuels, Raemon; Trively, Martin

    1989-12-01

    The U.S. Army CECOM Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics (C2NVEO) is responsible for developing cryogenic coolers for all infrared imaging systems for the Army. C2NVEO also maintains configuration management control of the forward-looking infrared (FLIR) Common Module coolers used in thermal imagers in fielded Army weapon systems such as: M60A3 and M1 Tanks, Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) System, tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided (TOW) Missile System, and Army Attack Helicopters. Currently, there are over 30,000 coolers in fielded systems and several thousand more are added each year. C2NVEO conducts development programs and monitors contractor internal research and development efforts to improve cooler performance such as reliability, audio noise, power consumption, and output vibration. The HD-1045 1/4-Watt Split Stirling Cooler was originally designed and developed by the C2NVEO in the early 1970s as a replacement for the gas bottle/cryostat used on the Manportable Common Thermal Night Sights. To date, however, the HD-1045 cooler has been used in the field in the Integrated Sight Unit (ISU) of the BFV System and is currently being used in the Driver Thermal Viewer (DTV) full scale development program. This document describes and reports the results of reliability testing done on Hughes Temperature Controlled 1/4 Watt split Cycle Cryogenic Coolers (HD-1045 (V)/UA), referred to herein as the coolers.

  11. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  12. High-Temperature, Low-Cycle Fatigue of Copper-Base Alloys for Rocket Nozzles. Part 1: Data Summary for Materials Tested in Prior Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A more detailed analysis of the results obtained in 188 previously reported low-cycle fatigue tests of various candidate materials for regeneratively-cooled, reusable rocket nozzle liners was reported. Plots of load range versus cycles were reported for each test along with a stress-strain hysteresis loop near half-life. In addition, a summary table was provided to compare N5 (cycles to a five percent load range drop) and Nf (cycles to complete specimen separation) values for each test.

  13. Integrity of sulfur concrete subjected to simulated lunar temperature cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-11-01

    In view of potential application as a construction material on the lunar surface the mechanical integrity of sulfur concrete was evaluated after being subjected to simulated temperature cycles. Here, small cubes of sulfur concrete were repeatedly cycled between room (20 °C) and liquid nitrogen (-191 °C) temperatures after which they, and non-cycled cubes, were evaluated by compression testing. The compression strength of the non-cycled samples averaged ˜35 MPa (5076 psi) before failing whereas the cycled samples fractured at about 7 MPa (1015 psi). Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate whereas it was seen adhering in those non-cycled. Based on a simple analysis it was concluded that the large strength discrepancy between cycled and non-cycled samples is due to differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials constituting the concrete.

  14. The annual temperature cycle in shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, D.; Lane, A.

    1995-05-01

    and Tv. Stratification will have a significant influence on the annual cycle and will be accompanied by autumnal overturning for values of Tv > 40days. Overall, stratification insulates the sea, (especially at greater depths) from atmospheric influences (in more complex models where E is reduced by vertical density gradients this effect would be further enhanced). In combination with autumnal overturning the effect is to lower both the variability and mean of the temperature in deeper water. The above model is used to simulate the annual temperature cycle for an off-shore cross section of constant slope (increasing in the example chosen from 25 to 250 m). The results indicate that horizontal gradients in temperature at the sea surface may be significantly smaller than those at lower depths. Sensitivity tests of the effects of both horizontal dispersion and advection showed that the "localized-equilibrium" for thermal exchanges assumed throughout the above analyses will be valid in many seas where bathymetry changes gradually. The dynamic response to the horizontal density gradients associated with these modelled cross-shore temperature structures are calculated. These responses are generally small with (steady) currents much less than 1 cm s -1 and changes in elevation less than 1 mm (except in fully enclosed seas where volume changes associated with thermal expansion cannot be balanced by oceanic exchanges).

  15. Damage Assessment of Stress-Thermal Cycled High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Jach-Yung; Prochazka, Michael; Ronke, Ben; Morgan, Roger; Shin, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    We report on the characterization of bismaleimide and polyimide carbon fiber composite, microcrack development under stress thermal cycling loading. Such cycle range from cryogenic temperatures associated with cryogenic fuel (LN, LOX) containment to high temperatures of 300 degrees associated with future hypervelocity aeropropulsion systems. Microcrack development thresholds as a function of temperature range of the thermal cycle, the number of cycles, and the applied stress level imposed on the composite are reported. We have conducted stress-thermal cycles on thin bismaleimide-woven carbon fiber foils for three temperature range cycles. The principle findings are that the full cycles from -196 degree celsius up to 250 degree celsius cause the most significant microcrack development. These observations indicate that the high temperature portion of the cycle under load causes fiber-matrix interface failure and subsequent exposure to higher stresses at the cryogenic, low temperature region results in composite matrix microcracking as a result of the additional stresses associated with the fiber-matrix thermal expansion mismatch. Our initial studies for 12 ply PMR-II-50 polyimide/M6OJB carbon fabric [0f, 90f, 90f, 0f, 0f, 90f] composites will be presented. The stress-thermal cycle test procedure for these will be described. Moisture absorption characteristics between cycles will be used to monitor interconnected microcrack development. The applied stress level will be 75 percent of the composite cryogenic -196 degree celsius ultimate strength.

  16. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  17. Power Cycle Testing of Power Switches: A Literature Survey

    DOE PAGES

    GopiReddy, Lakshmi Reddy; Tolbert, Leon M.; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-09-18

    Reliability of power converters and lifetime prediction has been a major topic of research in the last few decades, especially for traction applications. The main failures in high power semiconductors are caused by thermomechanical fatigue. Power cycling and temperature cycling are the two most common thermal acceleration tests used in assessing reliability. The objective of this paper is to study the various power cycling tests found in the literature and to develop generalized steps in planning application specific power cycling tests. A comparison of different tests based on the failures, duration, test circuits, and monitored electrical parameters is presented.

  18. Damage Assessment of Stress-Thermal Cycled high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Jae-Hyung; Prochazka, Michael; Ronke, Ben; Morgan, Roger; Shin, Eugence

    2004-01-01

    We report on the characterization of bismaleimide and polyimide carbon fiber composite, microcrack development under stress thermal cycling loading. Such cycles range from cryogenic temperatures associated with cryogenic fuel (LN, LOX) containment to high temperatures of 300 degrees Celsius associated with future hypervelocity aeropropulsion systems. Microcrack development thresholds as a function of temperature range of the thermal cycle; the number of cycles; the applied stress level imposed on the composite are reported. We have conducted stress-thermal cycles on thin bismaleimide-woven carbon fiber foils for three temperature range cycles: 1. Ambient temperature - -196 degrees celsius. 2. Ambient temperature - 150 degrees Celsius; 200 degrees Celsius; 250 degrees Celsius. 3. -196 degrees Celsius - 250 degrees Celsius. The Principle findings are that the full cycles from -196 degrees Celsius to to 250 degrees Celsius cause the most significant microcrack of development. These observations indicate that the high temperature portion of the cycle under load causes fiber-matrix interface failure and subsequent exposure to higher stresses at the cryogenic, low temperature region results in composite matrix microcracking as a result of the additional stresses associate with the fiber-matrix thermal expansion mismatch. Our initial studies for 12 ply PMR-II-50 polyimide/M60JB carbon fabric [0f,90f,90f,0f,0f,90f]ls composites will be presented. The stress-thermal cycle test procedure for these will be described. Moisture absorption characteristics between cycles will be used to monitor interconnected microcrack development. The applied stress level will be 75% of the composite cryogenic (-196 degrees Celsius) ultimate strength.

  19. Electronic assembly thermal testing - Dwell/duration/cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Clawson, James F.

    1990-01-01

    Testing of electronic assemblies varies throughout industry, NASA, and the military. Differences include test levels, atmospheric versus vacuum testing of assemblies, dwell durations at temperature extremes (especially high temperature), and thermal cycling versus dwell testing. Of particular interest are the different philosophies of thermal cycling versus single-cycle thermal dwell. An examination of the various failure physics for electronic assemblies has been initiated at JPL. The intent is to determine which failure modes are best revealed by thermal cycling testing and which are susceptible to high-temperature dwell physics. Preliminary results of this study are presented, along with discussions of testing goals, flight environments, reliability models, and the differences between industry and JPL design/test approaches.

  20. Single-Cycle Versus Multicycle Proof Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Mcclung, R. C.; Bartlett, M. L.; Fitzgerald, J. H.; Russell, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report compares single-cycle with multiple-cycle mechanical-stress tests of parts under mechanical stresses. Objective of proof testing: to screen out gross manufacturing or material deficiencies and provide additional assurance of quality. Report concludes that changes in distribution of crack sizes during multicycle proof testing depend on initial distribution, number of cycles, relationship between resistance of material and elastic/plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, relationship between load control and displacement control, and magnitude of applied load or displacement. Whether single-cycle or multicycle testing used depends on shape, material, and technique of fabrication of components tested.

  1. Entrainment of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Fibroblasts by Temperature Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the circadian system of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) differs in several characteristics from the functional state of normotensive Wistar rats. Some of these changes might be due to the compromised ability of the central pacemaker to entrain the peripheral clocks. Daily body temperature cycles represent one of the important cues responsible for the integrity of the circadian system, because these cycles are driven by the central pacemaker and are able to entrain the peripheral clocks. This study tested the hypothesis that the aberrant peripheral clock entrainment of SHR results from a compromised peripheral clock sensitivity to the daily temperature cycle resetting. Using cultured Wistar rat and SHR fibroblasts transfected with the circadian luminescence reporter Bmal1-dLuc, we demonstrated that two consecutive square-wave temperature cycles with amplitudes of 2.5°C are necessary and sufficient to restart the dampened oscillations and entrain the circadian clocks in both Wistar rat and SHR fibroblasts. We also generated a phase response curve to temperature cycles for fibroblasts of both rat strains. Although some of the data suggested a slight resistance of SHR fibroblasts to temperature entrainment, we concluded that the overall effect it too weak to be responsible for the differences between the SHR and Wistar in vivo circadian phenotype. PMID:24116198

  2. A combined cycle engine test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C.

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  3. A combined cycle engine test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C.

    1995-09-01

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  4. Fast Response Temperature Measurements in Stirling Cycle Cryocooler Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, K.; Dadd, M. W.; Bailey, P. B.; Stone, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    One reason that heat transfer processes are not well understood is the difficulty of obtaining reliable temperature measurements when gas temperatures vary rapidly. In the work described here gas temperatures have been measured using a fine wire resistance thermometer with a 3.8 micron active sensor. The equipment represented the basic elements of a cryocooler: a clearance seal linear compressor and a wire mesh regenerator. Both were operated close to ambient temperature, with gas temperatures being measured close to the regenerator. The test rig was run at different volume ratios, frequencies (8-50 Hz), gases and filling pressures (1-26 bar). The waveforms of the gas temperature were found to vary dramatically for differing flow regimes. The results suggested that the thermometer was measuring the temperatures of two distinct volumes of gas, and that the gas must remain stratified in the compression space. A flow transition was identified from the cycle-by-cycle variations in temperature. The critical Reynolds number was determined to be 9.6-11. At the critical condition, the temperature was so unstable that fluctuations up to 250 Hz were observed. A series of validation tests have confirmed that the observed temperatures were not artifacts.

  5. Ni-MH storage test and cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dell, R. Dan; Klein, Glenn C.; Schmidt, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Gates Aerospace Batteries is conducting two long term test programs to fully characterize the NiMH cell technology for aerospace applications. The first program analyzes the effects of long term storage upon cell performance. The second program analyzes cycle life testing and preliminary production lot testing. This paper summarizes these approaches to testing the NiMH couple and culminates with initial storage and testing recommendations. Long term storage presents challenges to deter the adverse condition of capacity fade in NiMH cells. Elevated but stabilized pressures and elevated but stabilized end-of-charge voltages also appear to be a characteristic phenomenon of long term storage modes. However, the performance degradation is dependent upon specific characteristics of the metal-hydride alloy. To date, there is no objective evidence with which to recommend the proper method for storage and handling of NiMH cells upon shipment. This is particularly critical due to limited data points that indicate open circuit storage at room temperature for 60 to 90 days will result in irrecoverable capacity loss. Accordingly a test plan was developed to determine what method of mid-term to long-term storage will prevent irrecoverable capacity loss. The explicit assumption is that trickle charging at some rate above the self-discharge rate will prevent the irreversible chemical changes to the negative electrode that result in the irrecoverable capacity loss. Another premise is that lower storage temperatures, typically 0 C for aerospace customers, will impede any negative chemical reactions. Three different trickle charge rates are expected to yield a fairly flat response with respect to recoverable capacity versus baseline cells in two different modes of open circuit. Specific attributes monitored include: end-of-charge voltage, end-of-charge pressure, mid-point discharge voltage, capacity, and end-of-discharge pressure. Cycle life testing and preliminary production lot

  6. Entrainment of circadian rhythm by ambient temperature cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Much is known about how environmental light-dark cycles synchronize circadian rhythms in animals. The ability of environmental cycles of ambient temperature to synchronize circadian rhythms has also been investigated extensively but mostly in ectotherms. In the present study, the synchronization of the circadian rhythm of running-wheel activity by environmental cycles of ambient temperature was studied in laboratory mice. Although all mice were successfully entrained by a light-dark cycle, only 60% to 80% of the mice were entrained by temperature cycles (24-32 degrees C or 24-12 degrees C), and attainment of stable entrainment seemed to take longer under temperature cycles than under a light-dark cycle. This suggests that ambient temperature cycles are weaker zeitgebers than light-dark cycles, which is consistent with the results of the few previous studies using mammalian species. Whereas 80% of the mice were entrained by 24-h temperature cycles, only 60% were entrained by 23-h cycles, and none was entrained by 25-h cycles. The results did not clarify whether entrainment by temperature cycles is caused directly by temperature or indirectly through a temperature effect on locomotor activity, but it is clear that the rhythm of running-wheel activity in mice can be entrained by ambient temperature cycles in the nonnoxious range.

  7. Impact of cycling at low temperatures on the safety behavior of 18650-type lithium ion cells: Combined study of mechanical and thermal abuse testing accompanied by post-mortem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Alex; Horsthemke, Fabian; Mönnighoff, Xaver; Brunklaus, Gunther; Krafft, Roman; Börner, Markus; Risthaus, Tim; Winter, Martin; Schappacher, Falko M.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of cycling at low temperatures on the thermal and mechanical abuse behavior of commercial 18650-type lithium ion cells was compared to fresh cells. Post-mortem analyses revealed a deposition of high surface area lithium (HSAL) metal on the graphite surface accompanied by severe electrolyte decomposition. Heat wait search (HWS) tests in an accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were performed to investigate the thermal abuse behavior of aged and fresh cells under quasi-adiabatic conditions, showing a strong shift of the onset temperature for exothermic reactions. HSAL deposition promotes the reduction of the carbonate based electrolyte due to the high reactivity of lithium metal with high surface area, leading to a thermally induced decomposition of the electrolyte to produce volatile gaseous products. Nail penetration tests showed a change in the thermal runaway (TR) behavior affected by the decomposition reaction. This study indicates a greater thermal hazard for LIB cells at higher SOC and experiencing aging at low temperature.

  8. Plasma-Catalysis During Temperature Transient Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, John

    2001-08-05

    A combination of catalysts is used together with nonthermal plasma in simulated diesel exhaust, while the gas temperature is varied. The catalysts both store and convert pollutants. As a result, pollutant concentrations during temperature ramps are different than those at steady state conditions. The data are presented for plasma followed by BaY, alumina, and Pt catalysts in simulated exhaust. When temperature ramps from high to low, apparent NOx conversion is quite high. However, when temperature is ramped from low to high, lower apparent conversions are seen. In a typical test cycle, average NOx conversion between 100 and 400 C is 60%. Peak conversion during the down ramp is over 90%, and minimum conversion during the up ramp is 30%. The composition of the effluent gas also varies during the temperature cycle. Intermediates such as methyl nitrate and hydrogen cyanide are not present following the combination of catalysts.

  9. Low-cycle fatigue testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurade, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The good design of highly stressed mechanical components requires accurate knowledge of the service behavior of materials. The main methods for solving the problems of designers are: determination of the mechanical properties of the material after cyclic stabilization; plotting of resistance to plastic deformation curves; effect of temperature on the life on low cycle fatigue; and simulation of notched parts behavior.

  10. Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Robin; Davenport, Roger; Talbot, Jan; Herz, Richard; Genders, David; Symons, Peter; Brown, Lloyd

    2014-04-25

    A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are

  11. Statistical tests of simple earthquake cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, Phoebe M. R.; Evans, Eileen L.

    2016-12-01

    A central goal of observing and modeling the earthquake cycle is to forecast when a particular fault may generate an earthquake: a fault late in its earthquake cycle may be more likely to generate an earthquake than a fault early in its earthquake cycle. Models that can explain geodetic observations throughout the entire earthquake cycle may be required to gain a more complete understanding of relevant physics and phenomenology. Previous efforts to develop unified earthquake models for strike-slip faults have largely focused on explaining both preseismic and postseismic geodetic observations available across a few faults in California, Turkey, and Tibet. An alternative approach leverages the global distribution of geodetic and geologic slip rate estimates on strike-slip faults worldwide. Here we use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for similarity of distributions to infer, in a statistically rigorous manner, viscoelastic earthquake cycle models that are inconsistent with 15 sets of observations across major strike-slip faults. We reject a large subset of two-layer models incorporating Burgers rheologies at a significance level of α = 0.05 (those with long-term Maxwell viscosities ηM < 4.0 × 1019 Pa s and ηM > 4.6 × 1020 Pa s) but cannot reject models on the basis of transient Kelvin viscosity ηK. Finally, we examine the implications of these results for the predicted earthquake cycle timing of the 15 faults considered and compare these predictions to the geologic and historical record.

  12. A cycle timer for testing electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A cycle timer was developed to assist the driver of an electric vehicle in more accurately following and repeating SAE driving schedules. These schedules require operating an electric vehicle in a selected stop-and-go driving cycle and repeating this cycle pattern until the vehicle ceases to meet the requirements of the cycle. The heart of the system is a programmable read-only memory (PROM) that has the required test profiles permanently recorded on plug-in cards, one card for each different driving schedule. The PROM generates a direct current analog signal that drives a speedometer displayed on one scale of a dual movement meter. The second scale of the dual movement meter displays the actual speed of the vehicle as recorded by the fifth wheel. The vehicle operator controls vehicle speed to match the desired profile speed. The PROM controls the recycle start time as well as the buzzer activation. The cycle programmer is powered by the test vehicle's 12-volt accessory battery, through a 5-volt regulator and a 12-volt dc-to-dc converter.

  13. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  15. Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures in a research engine for gas stream temperatures cycling between 1067 and 1567 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled blades in a research turbojet engine, cycling between cruise and idle conditions. Transient data were recorded by a high speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 3.9 K (7 F). Turbine inlet pressures were repeatable between cycles to within 0.32 N/sq cm (0.47 psia). The tests were conducted at a gas stream temperature of 1567 K (2360 F) at cruise, and 1067 K (1460 F) at idle conditions. The corresponding gas stream pressures were about 26.2 and 22.4 N/sq cm (38 and 32.5 psia) respectively. The nominal coolant inlet temperature was about 811 K (1000 F).

  16. PDP cycle 1 tests at INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D.; Twedell, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a participant in the nondestructive assay Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) as part of the U.S. TRU Waste Characterization Program. The PDP program was designed to help ensure compliance with the quality assurance objectives (QAO`s) in the TRU Waste Characterization Program Plan. In June, 1996, cycle 1 of PDP program was completed at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) at INEL. The assay capability at INEL/SWEPP consists of a passive active neutron (PAN) radioassay system (for bulk fissile material assay) and a passive gamma spectrometry system (for isotopic mass ratio determination). The results from the two systems are combined to produce a single assay report which contains isotopic information ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu), density, total activity, alpha activity, TRU activity, TRU activity concentration, Pu equivalent Curies and fissile gram equivalent. The PDP cycle 1 tests were expected to test bias and precision of the assay systems under nearly ideal conditions; ie., non-interfering matrices and little or no source self shielding. The test consisted of two drums in which the source loading was not known by the site. One drum was essentially empty and the other was filled with ethafoam. As per PDP`s instructions, the tests were to be conducted using the same procedures and equipment that normally would be used by SWEPP to assay real waste drums. This paper will discuss the lessons learned from these tests and INEL`s plans to improve the capabilities of the SWEPP assay systems. 7 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  18. CPL Materials Life Cycle Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchko, Matthew T.

    1992-07-01

    The Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) Materials Life Cycle Test Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) will identify the operational parameters controlling the performance of a CPL over an extended period of time. The primary purpose of the facility is to investigate the long-term chemical compatibility between the anhydrous ammonia working fluid and the CPL materials of construction. Chemical reactions occurring within the system may produce non-condensable gases or particulate debris that can lead to a degradation in system performance. Small liquid samples will be drawn from the system at specific time intervals and analyzed to check for the presence of non-condensable gases. Periodic maximum and minimum heat load tests will be performed on the CPL to monitor trends in the overall system performance.

  19. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  20. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  1. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  2. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  3. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Emissions shall be measured using one of the test cycles...

  4. 12 CFR 252.145 - Mid-cycle stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mid-cycle stress test. 252.145 Section 252.145... (CONTINUED) ENHANCED PRUDENTIAL STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.145 Mid-cycle stress test. (a) Mid-cycle stress test requirement. In addition to the...

  5. 12 CFR 252.145 - Mid-cycle stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mid-cycle stress test. 252.145 Section 252.145... (CONTINUED) ENHANCED PRUDENTIAL STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.145 Mid-cycle stress test. (a) Mid-cycle stress test requirement. In addition to the...

  6. Titan's latitudinal temperature distribution and seasonal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Potter, B. E.

    1986-02-01

    Voyager IRIS brightness temperature measurements of Titan at a wavelength of 530/cm are crudely indicative of ground or lower tropospheric temperatures and indicate 93 K for the equator and 91 K for both northern and southern high latitudes. The symmetry between north and south is unexpected for the time of Voyager encounter (Northern Titan spring). It is shown that this near-symmetry can arise naturally in a model where the poles are 'pinned' year-round at the dew point of CH4-N2 lakes or, more probably, a CH4-N2 rich surface layer on a deep ethane-rich ocean. For a polar temperature of 91 K, the model implies that the atmosphere contains somewhat less than 8 percent mole fraction of CH4.

  7. Dynamic response of temperature cycled pipework

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The pipework designer shall consider instantaneous maximum value of forces and moments in the original and extreme displacement conditions in evaluating the temperature effect. The layout should be directed toward preventing resonance with imposed or fluid-induced vibrations. However, considerable difference in dynamic response may be encountered when the same excitation is applied to the system in the original and in the extreme temperature conditions. This may occur even if the static state of stress in the pipework is kept within allowable limits. It is shown that when changes in axial forces arise in pipework a spectrum of natural frequencies rather than a single frequency should be dealt with in resonance calculations. It appears that wall stress changes following temperature increases are noticeable.

  8. Non-Nuclear Validation Test Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Both NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, or for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. Although open Brayton cycles are in use for many applications (combined cycle power plants, aircraft engines), only a few closed Brayton cycles have been tested. Experience with closed Brayton cycles coupled to nuclear reactors is even more limited and current projections of Brayton cycle performance are based on analytic models. This report describes and compares experimental results with model predictions from a series of non-nuclear tests using a small scale closed loop Brayton cycle available at Sandia National Laboratories. A substantial amount of testing has been performed, and the information is being used to help validate models. In this report we summarize the results from three kinds of tests. These tests include: 1) test results that are useful for validating the characteristic flow curves of the turbomachinery for various gases ranging from ideal gases (Ar or Ar/He) to non-ideal gases such as CO2, 2) test results that represent shut down transients and decay heat removal capability of Brayton loops after reactor shut down, and 3) tests that map a range of operating power versus shaft speed curve and turbine inlet temperature that are useful for predicting stable operating conditions during both normal and off-normal operating behavior. These tests reveal significant interactions between the reactor and balance of plant. Specifically these results predict limited speed up behavior of the turbomachinery caused by loss of load, the conditions for stable operation, and for direct cooled reactors, the tests reveal that the coast down behavior during loss of power events can extend for hours provided the ultimate heat sink remains available.

  9. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part I. Cycling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    The capacity fade of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled at RT and 45 °C showed a capacity fade of 30 and 36%, respectively. The cell cycled at 55 °C showed a capacity loss of about 70% after 490 cycles. The rate capability of the cells continues to decrease with cycling. Impedance measurements showed an overall increase in the cell resistance with cycling and temperature. Impedance studies of the electrode materials showed an increased positive electrode resistance when compared to that of the negative electrode for cells cycled at RT and 45 °C. However, cells cycled at 50 and 55 °C exhibit higher negative electrode resistance. The increased capacity fade for the cells cycled at high temperatures can be explained by taking into account the repeated film formation over the surface of anode, which results in increased rate of lithium loss and also in a drastic increase in the negative electrode resistance with cycling.

  10. Thermal cycling tests on surface-mount assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.W.

    1988-03-01

    The capability of surface-mount (SM) solder joints to withstand various thermal cycle stresses was evaluated through electrical circuit resistance changes of a test pattern and by visual examination for cracks in the solder after exposure to thermal cycling. The joints connected different electrical components, primarily leadless-chip carriers (LCCs), and printed wiring-board (PWB) pads on different laminate substrates. Laminate compositions were epoxy-glass and polyimide-glass with and without copper/Invar/copper (CIC) inner layers, polyimide-quartz, epoxy-Kevlar, and polyimide-Kevlar. The most resistant joints were between small LCCs (24 and 48 pins) and polyimide-glass laminate with CIC inner layers. Processing in joint formation was found to be an important part of joint resistant. Thermal cycling was varied with respect to both time and temperature. A few resistors, capacitors, and inductors showed opens after 500 30-min cycles between -65/degree/C and 125/degree/C. Appreciable moisture contents were measured for laminate materials, especially those of polyimide-Kevlar after equilibration in 100/percent/ relative humidity at room temperature. If not removed or reduced, moisture can cause delamination in vapor-phase soldering. 17 refs, 12 figs.,10 tabs.

  11. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty-cycle exhaust testing. 1037.510... Duty-cycle exhaust testing. This section applies where exhaust emission testing is required, such as... type of vehicle and for each duty cycle as described in the following table: Table 1 to §...

  12. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty-cycle exhaust testing. 1037.510... Duty-cycle exhaust testing. This section applies where exhaust emission testing is required, such as... type of vehicle and for each duty cycle as described in the following table: Table 1 to §...

  13. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty-cycle exhaust testing. 1037.510... Duty-cycle exhaust testing. This section applies where exhaust emission testing is required, such as... type of vehicle and for each duty cycle as described in the following table: Table 1 to §...

  14. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  15. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  16. Synchronization of the Drosophila circadian clock by temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Glaser, F T; Stanewsky, R

    2007-01-01

    The natural light/dark and temperature cycles are considered to be the most prominent factors that synchronize circadian clocks with the environment. Understanding the principles of temperature entrainment significantly lags behind our current knowledge of light entrainment in any organism subject to circadian research. Nevertheless, several effects of temperature on circadian clocks are well understood, and similarities as well as differences to the light-entrainment pathways start to emerge. This chapter provides an overview of the temperature effects on the Drosophila circadian clock with special emphasis on synchronization by temperature cycles. As in other organisms, such temperature cycles can serve as powerful time cues to synchronize the clock. Mutants that specifically interfere with aspects of temperature entrainment have been isolated and will likely help to reveal the underlying mechanisms. These mechanisms involve transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of clock genes. For synchronization of fly behavior by temperature cycles, the generation of a whole organism or systemic signal seems to be required, even though individual fly tissues can be synchronized under isolated culture conditions. If true, the requirement for such a signal would reveal a fundamental difference to the light-entrainment mechanism.

  17. Thermal Cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) Test Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994 - March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles (+80 C to -100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  18. Thermal cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) test panels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Scheiman, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994--March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array mini panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24000 thermal cycles (+80 C to {minus}100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  19. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. This paper presents the cycle life test results and also results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  20. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  1. High Cycle-life Shape Memory Polymer at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Deyan; Xiao, Xinli

    2016-09-01

    High cycle-life is important for shape memory materials exposed to numerous cycles, and here we report shape memory polyimide that maintained both high shape fixity (Rf) and shape recovery (Rr) during the more than 1000 bending cycles tested. Its critical stress is 2.78 MPa at 250 °C, and the shape recovery process can produce stored energy of 0.218 J g‑1 at the efficiency of 31.3%. Its high Rf is determined by the large difference in storage modulus at rubbery and glassy states, while the high Rr mainly originates from its permanent phase composed of strong π-π interactions and massive chain entanglements. Both difference in storage modulus and overall permanent phase were preserved during the bending deformation cycles, and thus high Rf and Rr were observed in every cycle and the high cycle-life will expand application areas of SMPs enormously.

  2. High Cycle-life Shape Memory Polymer at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Deyan; Xiao, Xinli

    2016-01-01

    High cycle-life is important for shape memory materials exposed to numerous cycles, and here we report shape memory polyimide that maintained both high shape fixity (Rf) and shape recovery (Rr) during the more than 1000 bending cycles tested. Its critical stress is 2.78 MPa at 250 °C, and the shape recovery process can produce stored energy of 0.218 J g−1 at the efficiency of 31.3%. Its high Rf is determined by the large difference in storage modulus at rubbery and glassy states, while the high Rr mainly originates from its permanent phase composed of strong π-π interactions and massive chain entanglements. Both difference in storage modulus and overall permanent phase were preserved during the bending deformation cycles, and thus high Rf and Rr were observed in every cycle and the high cycle-life will expand application areas of SMPs enormously. PMID:27641148

  3. Effect of perspiration on skin temperature measurements by infrared thermography and contact thermometry during aerobic cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Martínez Guillamón, Natividad; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.a.; Psikuta, Agnes; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René Michel; Corberán Salvador, José Miguel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Salvador Palmer, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors for measuring skin temperature during cycling in a moderate environment. Fourteen cyclists performed a 45-min cycling test at 50% of peak power output. Skin temperatures were simultaneously recorded by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors before and immediately after cycling activity as well as after 10 min cooling-down, representing different skin wetness and blood perfusion states. Additionally, surface temperature during well controlled dry and wet heat exchange (avoiding thermoregulatory responses) using a hot plate system was assessed by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors. In human trials, the inter-method correlation coefficient was high when measured before cycling (r = 0.92) whereas it was reduced immediately after the cycling (r = 0.82) and after the cooling-down phase (r = 0.59). Immediately after cycling, infrared thermography provided lower temperature values than thermal contact sensors whereas it presented higher temperatures after the cooling-down phase. Comparable results as in human trials were observed for hot plate tests in dry and wet states. Results support the application of infrared thermography for measuring skin temperature in exercise scenarios where perspiration does not form a water film.

  4. Effect of Temperature Cycling and Exposure to Extreme Temperatures on Reliability of Solid Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this work, results of multiple temperature cycling (TC) (up to 1,000 cycles) of different types of solid tantalum capacitors are analyzed and reported. Deformation of chip tantalum during temperature variations simulating reflow soldering conditions was measured to evaluate the possibility of the pop-corning effect in the parts. To simulate the effect of short-time exposures to solder reflow temperatures on the reliability of tantalum capacitors, several part types were subjected to multiple cycles (up to 100) between room temperature and 240 C with periodical measurements of electrical characteristics of the parts. Mechanisms of degradation caused by temperature cycling and exposure to high temperatures, and the requirements of MIL-PRF-55365 for assessment of the resistance of the parts to soldering heat are discussed.

  5. Temperature-cycle single-molecule FRET microscopy on polyprolines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haifeng; Xia, Ted; Schuler, Benjamin; Orrit, Michel

    2011-02-07

    Accessing the microsecond dynamics of a single fluorescent molecule in real time is difficult because molecular fluorescence rates usually limit the time resolution to milliseconds. We propose to apply single-molecule temperature-cycle microscopy to probe molecular dynamics at microsecond timescales. Here, we follow donor and acceptor signals of single FRET-labeled polyprolines in glycerol to investigate their conformational dynamics. We observe a steady-state FRET efficiency distribution which differs from theoretical distributions for isotropically orientated fluorescent labels. This may indicate that the orientation of fluorescent labels in glycerol is not isotropic and may reflect the influence of the dye linkers. With proper temperature-cycle parameters, we observed large FRET changes in long series of cycles of the same molecule. We attribute the main conformational changes to reorientations of the fluorescent labels with respect to the oligopeptide chain, which take place in less than a few microseconds at the highest temperature of the cycle (250 K). We were able to follow the FRET efficiency of a particular construct for more than 2000 cycles. This trajectory displays switching between two conformations, which give rise to maxima in the FRET efficiency histogram. Our experiments open the possibility to study biomolecular dynamics at a time scale of a few microseconds at the single-molecule level.

  6. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  7. Cold startup and low temperature performance of the Brayton cycle electrical subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J. E.; Bainbridge, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Cold performance tests and startup tests were conducted on the Brayton-cycle inverter, motor-driven pump, dc supply, speed control with parasitic load resistor and the Brayton control system. These tests were performed with the components in a vacuum and mounted on coldplates. A temperature range of ?25 to -50 C was used for the tests. No failures occurred, and component performance gave no indication that there would be any problem with the safe operation of the Brayton power generating system.

  8. Temperature cycles trigger nocturnalism in the diurnal homeotherm Octodon degus.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Pablo; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Body temperature regulation within a physiological range is a critical factor for guaranteeing the survival of living organisms. The avoidance of high ambient temperatures is a behavioral mechanism used by homeothermic animals living in extreme environmental conditions. As the circadian system is involved in these thermoregulatory responses, precise phase shifts and even complete temporal niche inversion have been reported. Octodon degus, a mainly diurnal rodent from Chile, has the ability to switch its phase preference for locomotor activity to coincide with the availability of a running wheel. The aims of this work are twofold: to determine whether ambient temperature cycles, with high values during the day and low values at night (HLT(a)), can induce nocturnal chronotypes in degus previously characterized as diurnal; and to learn whether HLT(a) cycles are able to act as a zeitgeber in this dual-phase species. To this end, degus were subjected to 24 h HLT(a) cycles under both 12:12 LD and DD conditions. Two experimental groups were used, one with previous wheel running experience and another naïve group, to study the influence of the thermal cycles and previous wheel running experience on the degus' dual-phasing behavior. Temperature cycles (31.3 +/- 1.5 degrees C during the day and 24.2 +/- 1.6 degrees C at night) induced a 100% nocturnalism in previously diurnal individuals. Indeed, both entrainment with nocturnal phase angle to LD and nocturnal rhythmicity induced by masking were observed. Moreover, HLT(a) cycles acted by masking, confining wheel-running activity to the cooler phase under DD conditions, with the naïve group being more sensitive than the experienced one.

  9. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

    2005-02-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

  10. Zebrafish temperature selection and synchronization of locomotor activity circadian rhythm to ahemeral cycles of light and temperature.

    PubMed

    López-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2009-02-01

    In addition to light cycles, temperature cycles are among the most important synchronizers in nature. Indeed, both clock gene expression and circadian activity rhythms entrain to thermocycles. This study aimed to extend our knowledge of the relative strength of light and temperature as zeitgebers for zebrafish locomotor activity rhythms. When the capacity of a 24:20 degrees C (thermophase:cryophase, referred to as TC) thermocycle to synchronize activity rhythms under LL was evaluated, it was found that most groups (78%) synchronized to these conditions. Under LD, when zebrafish were allowed to select the water temperature (24 degrees C vs. 20 degrees C), most fish selected the higher temperature and showed diurnal activity, while a small (25%) percentage of fish that preferred the lower temperature displayed nocturnal activity. Under conflicting LD and TC cycles, fish showed diurnal activity when the zeitgebers were in phase or in antiphase, with a high percentage of activity displayed around dawn and dusk (22% and 34% of the total activity for LD/TC and LD/CT, respectively). Finally, to test the relative strength of each zeitgeber, fish were subjected to ahemeral cycles of light (T=25 h) and temperature (T=23 h). Zebrafish synchronized mostly to the light cycle, although they displayed relative coordination, as their locomotor activity increased when light and thermophase coincided. These findings show that although light is a stronger synchronizer than temperature, TC cycles alone can entrain circadian rhythms and interfere in their light synchronization, suggesting the existence of both light- and temperature-entrainable oscillators that are weakly coupled.

  11. Draft Test Guideline: Fish Life Cycle Toxicity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  12. Life cycle testing of sodium/sulfur satellite battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flake, Richard A.

    Test results on sodium sulfur cells developed presently by the Air Force for NaS rechargeable batteries for baseload power applications are summarized. Cycle life data are presented on fourteen cells, some of which have accumulated more than 1900 days on test and/or more than 6000 cycles. Results demonstrated cycle life times to be sufficient for use on satellites in high-altitude orbits.

  13. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that the test is valid. (c) Warm up the test engine as follows before running a transient test: (1... operates over the prescribed duty cycle. For severe-duty engines, this engine warm-up procedure may include.... For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to...

  14. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that the test is valid. (c) Warm up the test engine as follows before running a transient test: (1... operates over the prescribed duty cycle. For severe-duty engines, this engine warm-up procedure may include.... For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to...

  15. High-Temperature Test Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. Unclassif iedm"M SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE FORWORD The work documented in this report was performed...and turbine blades of jet engines. The objective of much of this work is a reliable, high- temperature, fast -response thermocouple which interferes as...In the latter case, durability, reasonable accuracy at high temperature and relatively small size are all important; fast response is perhaps less

  16. Performing microchannel temperature cycling reactions using reciprocating reagent shuttling along a radial temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ji-Yen; Hsieh, Chien-Ju; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Hsieh, Jing-Ru

    2005-06-01

    This study develops a novel temperature cycling strategy for executing temperature cycling reactions in laser-etched poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips. The developed microfluidic chip is circular in shape and is clamped in contact with a circular ITO heater chip of an equivalent diameter. Both chips are fabricated using an economic and versatile laser scribing process. Using this arrangement, a self-sustained radial temperature gradient is generated within the microfluidic chip without the need to thermally isolate the different temperature zones. This study demonstrates the temperature cycling capabilities of the reported microfluidic device by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) gene as a template. The temperature ramping rate of the sample inside the microchannel is determined from the spectral change of a thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) solution pumped into the channel. The present results confirm that a rapid thermal cycling effect is achieved despite the low thermal conductivity of the PMMA substrate. Using IR thermometry, it is found that the radial temperature gradient of the chip is approximately 2 degrees C mm(-1). The simple system presented in this study has considerable potential for miniaturizing complex integrated reactions requiring different cycling parameters.

  17. Relationship between skin temperature and muscle activation during incremental cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, Jose I; Carpes, Felipe P; Bini, Rodrigo R; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M

    2015-02-01

    While different studies showed that better fitness level adds to the efficiency of the thermoregulatory system, the relationship between muscular effort and skin temperature is still unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the relationship between neuromuscular activation and skin temperature during cycle exercise. Ten physically active participants performed an incremental workload cycling test to exhaustion while neuromuscular activations were recorded (via surface electromyography - EMG) from rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis. Thermographic images were recorded before, immediately after and 10 min after finishing the cycling test, at four body regions of interest corresponding to the muscles where neuromuscular activations were monitored. Frequency band analysis was conducted to assess spectral properties of EMG signals in order to infer on priority in recruitment of motor units. Significant inverse relationship between changes in skin temperature and changes in overall neuromuscular activation for vastus lateralis was observed (r<-0.5 and p<0.04). Significant positive relationship was observed between skin temperature and low frequency components of neuromuscular activation from vastus lateralis (r>0.7 and p<0.01). Participants with larger overall activation and reduced low frequency component for vastus lateralis activation presented a better adaptive response of their thermoregulatory system by showing fewer changes in skin temperature after incremental cycling test.

  18. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  19. A comparison of single-cycle versus multi-cycle proof testing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.; Russell, Dale A.

    1988-01-01

    Proof testing was a useful supplement to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of space shuttle main engine (SSME) components. Since many of these components involve thin sections and high toughness materials, such as Inconel 718, conventional single-cycle proof test logic is not applicable due to the propensity for stable crack growth during the proof tests. Experience with five-cycle proof testing of SSME components is summarized and a framework is outlined for understanding multi-cycle proof testing using the fracture mechanics concept of a resistance curve. Extreme value statistics are also used to propose an empirical approach to compare the advantages and disadvantages of single- versus multi-cycle proof testing. The importance of the initial flaw size distribution and specimen thickness in such a comparison is also discussed.

  20. Assignment of an essential role for the Neurospora frequency gene in circadian entrainment to temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Pregueiro, Antonio M; Price-Lloyd, Nathan; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Heintzen, Christian; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2005-02-08

    Circadian systems include slave oscillators and central pacemakers, and the cores of eukaryotic circadian clocks described to date are composed of transcription and translation feedback loops (TTFLs). In the model system Neurospora, normal circadian rhythmicity requires a TTFL in which a White Collar complex (WCC) activates expression of the frequency (frq) gene, and the FRQ protein feeds back to attenuate that activation. To further test the centrality of this TTFL to the circadian mechanism in Neurospora, we used low-amplitude temperature cycles to compare WT and frq-null strains under conditions in which a banding rhythm was elicited. WT cultures were entrained to these temperature cycles. Unlike those normal strains, however, frq-null mutants did not truly entrain to the same cycles. Their peaks and troughs always occurred in the cold and warm periods, respectively, strongly suggesting that the rhythm in Neurospora lacking frq function simply is driven by the temperature cycles. Previous reports suggested that a FRQ-less oscillator (FLO) could be entrained to temperature cycles, rather than being driven, and speculated that the FLO was the underlying circadian-rhythm generator. These inferences appear to derive from the use of a phase reference point affected by both the changing waveform and the phase of the oscillation. Examination of several other phase markers as well as results of additional experimental tests indicate that the FLO is, at best, a slave oscillator to the TTFL, which underlies circadian rhythm generation in Neurospora.

  1. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  2. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Daxi; Beach, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test Data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range.Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  3. 40 CFR 86.1333 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix I((f) (1...) in these listings. (1) To unnormalize rpm, use the following equations: (i) For diesel engines... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Exhaust Test Procedures...

  4. Test of US Federal Life Cycle Inventory Data Interoperability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life cycle assessment practitioners must gather data from a variety of sources. For modeling activities in the US, practitioners may wish to use life cycle inventory data from public databases and libraries provided by US government entities. An exercise was conducted to test if ...

  5. Elevated temperature alters carbon cycling in a model microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, A.; Li, Z.; Thomas, B. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Pan, C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's climate is regulated by biogeochemical carbon exchanges between the land, oceans and atmosphere that are chiefly driven by microorganisms. Microbial communities are therefore indispensible to the study of carbon cycling and its impacts on the global climate system. In spite of the critical role of microbial communities in carbon cycling processes, microbial activity is currently minimally represented or altogether absent from most Earth System Models. Method development and hypothesis-driven experimentation on tractable model ecosystems of reduced complexity, as presented here, are essential for building molecularly resolved, benchmarked carbon-climate models. Here, we use chemoautotropic acid mine drainage biofilms as a model community to determine how elevated temperature, a key parameter of global climate change, regulates the flow of carbon through microbial-based ecosystems. This study represents the first community proteomics analysis using tandem mass tags (TMT), which enable accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification of proteins. We compare protein expression levels of biofilms growing over a narrow temperature range expected to occur with predicted climate changes. We show that elevated temperature leads to up-regulation of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein modification, and down-regulation of proteins involved in growth and reproduction. Closely related bacterial genotypes differ in their response to temperature: Elevated temperature represses carbon fixation by two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation is significantly up-regulated at higher temperature by a third closely related genotypic group. Leptospirillum group III bacteria are more susceptible to viral stress at elevated temperature, which may lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, this proteogenomics approach revealed the effects of climate change on carbon cycling pathways and other

  6. Cycle life estimation of lithium secondary battery by extrapolation method and accelerated aging test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, K.; Kumai, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Miyashiro, H.; Terada, N.; Iwahori, T.; Tanaka, T.

    The testing methods to estimate the life cycles of lithium ion batteries for a short period, have been developed using a commercialized cell with LiCoO 2/hard carbon cell system. The degradation reactions with increasing cycles were suggested to occur predominantly above 4 V from the results of operating voltage range divided tests. In the case of the extrapolation method using limited cycle data, the straight line approximation was useful as the cycle performance has the linearity, but the error is at most 40% in using the initial short cycle data. In the case of the accelerated aging tests using the following stress factors, the charge and/or discharge rate, large accelerated coefficients were obtained in the high charge rate and the high temperature thermal stress.

  7. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  8. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  9. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  10. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  11. Circadian cycles of central temperature in hot climate in man.

    PubMed

    Cisse, F; Martineaud, R; Martineaud, J P

    1991-04-01

    In order to appreciate eventual changes of the circadian rhythm of the body core temperature induced by hot climates, we measured for 24 h periods in summer (June) and in winter (December), in Senegal (latitude, 25 degrees north), the central temperature in two groups of 45 and 58 young soldiers living permanently in the Sahelian area. The subjects were free-running but without any strong activity during the experiments. Rectal temperatures were measured at rest each 3 h, in natural environment: in winter ambient temperature varied from 21 to 25 degrees C and in summer from 28 to 42 degrees C. We observed no change in the shape of the circadian cycle: minimal values were seen at 3 AM and maximal at 3 or 6 PM. But during the hot season, we observed increase of the mesor (36.85 and 37.10 degrees C, in december and june respectively) and of the amplitude of the nycthemeral variation (0.85 and 1.37 degrees C respectively). These results demonstrate a clear adaptation to high ambient temperatures in man, similar to that observed in other mammals.

  12. Effect of drink temperature on core temperature and endurance cycling performance in warm, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona; O'Connor, Helen; Gifford, Janelle; Shirreffs, Susan; Chapman, Phillip; Johnson, Nathan

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of cold (4 °C) and thermoneutral (37 °C) beverages on thermoregulation and performance in the heat and to explore sensory factors associated with ingesting a cold stimulus. Seven males (age 32.8 ± 6.1 years, [V(.)]O(2peak) 59.4 ± 6.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed cold, thermoneutral, and thermoneutral + ice trials in randomized order. Participants cycled for 90 min at 65%[V(.)]O(2peak) followed by a 15-min performance test at 28 °C and 70% relative humidity. They ingested 2.3 ml x kg(-1) of a 7.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution every 10 min during the 90-min steady-state exercise including 30 ml ice puree every 5 min in the ice trial. Absolute changes in skin temperature (0.22 ± 1.1 °C vs. 1.14 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.02), mean body temperature (1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 °C; P = 0.03), and heat storage were lower across the 90-min exercise bout for the cold compared with the thermoneutral trial. Significant improvements (4.9 ± 2.4%, P < 0.01) in performance were observed with cold but no significant differences were detected with ice. Consumption of cold beverages during prolonged exercise in the heat improves body temperature measures and performance. Consumption of ice did not reveal a sensory response, but requires further study. Beverages consumed by athletes exercising in the heat should perhaps be cold for performance and safety reasons.

  13. Improvements on APTC (Ambient Pressure Thermal Cycling) Chamber Regarding Temperature Homogeneity and Energy Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollner, B.; Doring, D.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the working principles of IABG's Ambient Pressure Thermal Cycling chamber (an alternative to thermal-vacuum tests for some cases) and our activities to characterize and improve the system. For example a 3D grid of 64 temperature sensors was installed inside the test volume, in order to determine reliable temperature distribution data for standard operating conditions. Camera monitoring inside the temperature control / fan box allowed us to study the processes. A modification of the direct injection of liquid nitrogen (for efficient cooling) by installation of defined spray nozzles improved the temperature distribution. The characteristics of the original LN2 injection valve caused enormous consumption of liquid nitrogen and electrical power even at constant chamber temperatures. A new valve with a different control characteristic reduced this standby consumption remarkably.

  14. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-05-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.

  15. a Low Temperature Regenerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.

    2008-03-01

    Testing regenerators presents an interesting challenge. When incorporated into a cryocooler, a regenerator is intimately coupled to the other components: expander, heat exchangers, and compressor. It is difficult to isolate the performance of any single component. We have developed a low temperature test facility that will allow us to separate the performance of the regenerator from the rest of the cryocooler. The purpose of the facility is the characterization of test regenerators using novel materials and/or geometries in temperature ranges down to 15 K. It consists of the following elements: The test column has two regenerators stacked in series. The coldest stage regenerator is the device under test. The warmer stage regenerator contains a stack of stainless steel screen, a well-characterized material. A commercial cryocooler is used to fix the temperatures at both ends of the test regenerator, cooling both heat exchangers flanging the regenerator stack. Heaters allow varying the temperatures and allow measurement of the remaining cooling power, and thus, regenerator effectiveness. A linear compressor delivers an oscillating pressure to the regenerator assembly. An inertance tube and reservoir provide the proper phase difference between mass flow and pressure. This phase shift, along with the imposed temperature differential, simulates the conditions of the test regenerator when used in an actual pulse tube cryocooler. This paper presents development details of the regenerator test facility, and test results on a second stage, stainless steel screen test regenerator.

  16. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  17. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  18. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  19. Elevated temperature static and fatigue testing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, D. M.; Coffey, F. J.; Antolovich, S. D.; Brown, R. C.

    Aircraft of the future, such as an aerospace vehicle or an advanced fighter, will have expanded operating envelopes and therefore, will be subject to extreme environmental conditions. They will experience high temperatures combined with high external loads. Due to the complexity of full scale testing with combined thermal and mechanical loads, subcomponent and coupon testing play an extremely important role in the verification of structural integrity. This paper describes testing facilities designed for elevated temperature testing of coupon specimens. These facilities are capable of simultaneously applying spectrum loads and a detailed thermal profile. A method is also outlined for developing realistic thermal and mechanical load profiles for advanced aircraft.

  20. Test Plan for the Bearing Dust Cycle Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunderson, Katelyn; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of these experiments is to test the dust-resistant seal on the high performance glove disconnect system (HPGD), to analyze the response of the bearing to lunar regolith simulant effects.

  1. Analysis of a Temperature-Controlled Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator During a Driving Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, F. P.; Alves, A.; Pires, J. M.; Martins, L. B.; Martins, J.; Oliveira, J.; Teixeira, J.; Goncalves, L. M.; Hall, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators can be used in automotive exhaust energy recovery. As car engines operate under wide variable loads, it is a challenge to design a system for operating efficiently under these variable conditions. This means being able to avoid excessive thermal dilution under low engine loads and being able to operate under high load, high temperature events without the need to deflect the exhaust gases with bypass systems. The authors have previously proposed a thermoelectric generator (TEG) concept with temperature control based on the operating principle of the variable conductance heat pipe/thermosiphon. This strategy allows the TEG modules’ hot face to work under constant, optimized temperature. The variable engine load will only affect the number of modules exposed to the heat source, not the heat transfer temperature. This prevents module overheating under high engine loads and avoids thermal dilution under low engine loads. The present work assesses the merit of the aforementioned approach by analysing the generator output during driving cycles simulated with an energy model of a light vehicle. For the baseline evaporator and condenser configuration, the driving cycle averaged electrical power outputs were approximately 320 W and 550 W for the type-approval Worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure Class 3 driving cycle and for a real-world highway driving cycle, respectively.

  2. High-Cycle Fatigue Properties at Cryogenic Temperatures in INCONEL 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Y.; Yuri, T.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takeuchi, E.; Matsuoka, S.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-01

    High-cycle fatigue properties at 4 K, 20 K, 77 K and 293 K were investigated in forged-INCONEL 718 nickel-based superalloy with a mean gamma (γ) grain size of 25 μm. In the present material, plate-like delta phase precipitated at γ grain boundaries and niobium (Nb)-enriched MC type carbides precipitated coarsely throughout the specimens. The 0.2% proof stress and the tensile strength of this alloy increased with decreasing temperature, without decreasing elongation or reduction of area. High-cycle fatigue strengths also increased with decreasing temperature although the fatigue limit at each temperature didn't appear even around 107 cycles. Fatigue cracks initiated near the specimen surface and formed faceted structures around crack initiation sites. Fatigue cracks predominantly initiated from coarse Nb-enriched carbides and faceted structures mainly corresponded to these carbides. In lower stress amplitude tests, however, facets were formed through transgranular crack initiation and growth. These kinds of distinctive crack initiation behavior seem to lower the high-cycle fatigue strength below room temperature in the present material.

  3. A comparison of single-cycle versus multiple-cycle proof testing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Mcclung, R. C.; Bartlett, M. L.; Fitzgerald, J. H.; Russell, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (MCPT) strategies for SSME components is described. Data for initial sizes and shapes of actual SSME hardware defects are analyzed statistically. Closed-form estimates of the J-integral for surface flaws are derived with a modified reference stress method. The results of load- and displacement-controlled stable crack growth tests on thin IN-718 plates with deep surface flaws are summarized. A J-resistance curve for the surface-cracked configuration is developed and compared with data from thick compact tension specimens. The potential for further crack growth during large unload/reload cycles is discussed, highlighting conflicting data in the literature. A simple model for ductile crack growth during MCPT based on the J-resistance curve is used to study the potential effects of key variables. The projected changes in the crack size distribution during MCPT depend on the interactions between several key parameters, including the number of proof cycles, the nature of the resistance curve, the initial crack size distribution, the component boundary conditions (load vs. displacement control), and the magnitude of the applied load or displacement. The relative advantages of single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing appear to be specific, therefore, to individual component geometry, material, and loading.

  4. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  5. Loss of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 Function Affects "Siesta" Behavior but Not Synchronization to Temperature Cycles.

    PubMed

    Roessingh, Sanne; Wolfgang, Werner; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    To maintain synchrony with the environment, circadian clocks use a wide range of cycling sensory cues that provide input to the clock (zeitgebers), including environmental temperature cycles (TCs). There is some knowledge about which clock neuronal groups are important for temperature synchronization, but we currently lack knowledge on the temperature receptors and their signaling pathways that feed temperature information to the (neuronal) clock. Since TRPA1 is a well-known thermosensor that functions in a range of temperature-related behaviors, and it is potentially expressed in clock neurons, we set out to test the putative role of TRPA1 in temperature synchronization of the circadian clock. We found that flies lacking TRPA1 are still able to synchronize their behavioral activity to TCs comparable to wild-type flies, both in 16°C : 25°C and 20°C : 29°C TCs. In addition, we found that flies lacking TRPA1 show higher activity levels during the middle of the warm phase of 20°C : 29°C TCs, and we show that this TRPA1-mediated repression of locomotor activity during the "siesta" is caused by a lack of sleep. Based on these data, we conclude that the TRPA1 channel is not required for temperature synchronization in this broad temperature range but instead is required to repress activity during the warm part of the day.

  6. Temperature and Strain-Rate Effects on Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Schiffers, H.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of strain rate (4 x 10(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -3)/s) and temperature on the Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H have been evaluated in the range 750 C to 950 C. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted in air at a strain amplitude of +/- 0.30 pct. LCF life decreased with decreasing strain rate and increasing temperature. The cyclic stress response behavior showed a marked variation with temperature and strain rate. The time- and temperature- dependent processes which influence the cyclic stress response and life have been identified and their relative importance assessed. Dynamic strain aging, time-dependent deformation, precipitation of parallel platelets of M(23)C6 on grain boundaries and incoherent ledges of twins, and oxidation were found to operate depending on the test conditions. The largest effect on life was shown by oxidation processes.

  7. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of two iron base high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum elevated temperature low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue tests of 304 stainless steel and A-286 alloy have shown significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. At constant temperature, the cyclic life of both alloys was lower at lower frequencies. Combined temperature-strain cycling reduced fatigue life with respect to isothermal life at the maximum temperature of the thermal cycle. Life reductions with in-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature, compression at low temperature) were attributed to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed tensile grain boundary sliding. The proposed mechanism for out-of-phase cavity generation involved accumulation of unreversed compressive grain boundary displacements which could not be geometrically accomodated by intragranular deformation in the low-ductility A-286 alloy.

  8. Off temperature ambient FTP (Federal Test Procedure) (Tasks 1 and 2): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allsup, J.R.

    1988-07-01

    Twenty-four late model fuel-injected vehicles were tested for exhaust emissions and fuel economy at temperatures of 20/degree/, 50/degree/, and 75/degree/ F using a commercial fuel of 11.8 lbs. RVP. The vehicles were tested using the FTP and a cold and hot-start, low-speed short test cycle. The data will be used in EPA's air quality model to estimate emissions at varied temperatures and varied driving cycles.

  9. Acoustic testing of high temperature panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Clevenson, Sherman A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Daniels, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of thermal-acoustic tests conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center Thermal-Acoustic Test Apparatus to (1) investigate techniques for obtaining strain measurements on metallic and carbon-carbon materials at elevated temperature; (2) document the dynamic strain response characteristics of several superalloy honeycomb thermal protection system panels at elevated temperatures of up to 1200 F; and (3) determine the strain response and sonic fatigue behavior of four carbon-carbon panels at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A second study tested four carbon-carbon panels to document panel dynamic response characteristics at ambient and elevated temperature, determine time to failure and faliure modes, and collect continuous strain data up to panel failure. Strain data are presented from both types of panels, and problems encountered in obtaining reliable strain data on the carbon-carbon panels are described. The failure modes of the carbon-carbon panels are examined.

  10. The influence of cycling temperature and cycling rate on the phase specific degradation of a positive electrode in lithium ion batteries: A post mortem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darma, Mariyam Susana Dewi; Lang, Michael; Kleiner, Karin; Mereacre, Liuda; Liebau, Verena; Fauth, Francois; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The influence of cycling temperatures and cycling rates on the cycling stability of the positive electrode (cathode) of commercial batteries are investigated. The cathode is a mixture of LiMn2O4 (LMO), LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM) and LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA). It is found that increasing the cycling temperature from 25 °C to 40 °C is detrimental to the long term cycling stability of the cathode. Contrastingly, the improved cycling stability is observed for the cathodes cycled at higher charge/discharge rate (2C/3C instead of 1C/2C). The microstructure analysis by X-ray powder diffraction reveals that a significant capacity fading and an increased overvoltage is observed for NCM and NCA in all the fatigued cathodes. After high number of cycling (above 1500 cycles), NCM becomes partially inactive. In contrast to NCM and NCA, LMO shows a good cycling stability at 25 °C. A pronounced degradation of LMO is only observed for the fatigued cathodes cycled at 40 °C. The huge capacity losses of NCM and NCA are most likely because the blended cathodes were cycled up to 4.12 V vs. the graphite anode during the cycle-life test (corresponds to 4.16 V vs. Li+/Li); which is beyond the stability limit of the layered oxides below 4.05 V vs. Li+/Li.

  11. Temperature distortion generator for turboshaft engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, G. A.; Barth, R. L.; Biesiadny, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures and unique hardware used to conduct an experimental investigation into the response of a small-turboshaft-engine compression system to various hot gas ingestion patterns are presented. The temperature distortion generator described herein uses gaseous hydrogen to create both steady-state and time-variant, or transient, temperature distortion at the engine inlet. The range of transient temperature ramps produced by the distortion generator during the engine tests was from less than 111 deg K/sec (200 deg R/sec) to above 611 deg K/sec (1100 deg R/sec); instantaneous temperatures to 422 deg K (760 deg R) above ambient were generated. The distortion generator was used to document the maximum inlet temperatures and temperature rise rates that the compression system could tolerate before the onset of stall for various circumferential distortions as well as the compressor system response during stall.

  12. Parametric and cycle tests of a 40-AH bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a 12 V, 40 ampere-hour bipolar battery during various charge current, discharge current, temperature, and pressure operating conditions is investigated. The cell voltages, temperatures, ampere-hours, and watt-hours derived from the charge/discharge cycle tests are studied. Consideration is given to battery voltage and discharge capacity as a function of discharge current, the correlation between energy delivered on a discharge and battery temperature, battery voltage response to pulse discharges, and the voltage-temperature relationship. The data reveal that the bipolar Ni-H battery is applicable to high power systems.

  13. Effect of an aerodynamic helmet on head temperature, core temperature, and cycling power compared with a traditional helmet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua F; Brown, Skyler R; Lange, Andrew P; Brothers, R Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Nonvented "aerodynamic helmets" reduce wind resistance but may increase head (Th) and gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature and reduce performance when worn in hot conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that Th and Tgi would be greater during low-intensity cycling (LIC) in the heat while wearing an aero helmet (AERO) vs. a traditional vented racing helmet (REG). This study also tested the hypothesis that Th, Tgi, and finish time would be greater, and power output would be reduced during a self-paced time trial in the heat with AERO vs. REG. Ten highly trained heat-acclimated endurance athletes conducted LIC (50% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, LIC) and a high-intensity 12-km self-paced time trial (12-km TT) on a cycle ergometer in 39° C on 2 different days (AERO and REG), separated by >48 hours. During LIC, Th was higher at minute 7.5 and all time points thereafter in AERO vs. REG (p < 0.05). Similarly, during the 12-km TT, Th was higher at minutes 12.5, 15, and 17.5 in AERO vs. REG (p < 0.05). Heart rate (HR) and Tgi increased during LIC and during 12-km TT (both p < 0.001); however, no significant interaction (helmet × time) existed for HR or Tgi at either intensity (all p > 0.05). No group differences existed for finish time or power output during the 12-km TT (both p > 0.05). In conclusion, Th becomes elevated during cycling in the heat with an aero helmet compared with a traditional vented racing helmet during LIC and high-intensity cycling, yet Tgi and HR responses are similar irrespective of helmet type and Th. Furthermore, the higher Th that develops when an aero helmet is worn during cycling in the heat does not affect power output or cycling performance during short-duration high-intensity events.

  14. Low cycle fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Nagasaka, T.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.; Namba, C.

    2000-12-01

    To investigate fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (9Cr-2W steel, JLF-1), low cycle fatigue tests were performed in air at room temperature under axial strain control for a complete push-pull condition. The strain rate was 0.4% s-1. Cyclic strain-hardening was observed within the initial 20 cycles, and then cyclic strain-softening occurred gradually until the final failure, though the plastic strain range did not change significantly. Tensile peak stresses in hysteresis curves measured at around half the number of cycles to failure depended on the total strain range. The drop in the peak stress by the cyclic strain-softening increased with decreasing total strain range. The regression curve of the total strain range against the fatigue life was formulated using the Manson-Coffin equation and the fatigue life of JLF-1 steel was compared with that of 8Cr-2W steel.

  15. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test...-fueled and methanol-fueled diesel engines Standard error of estimate (SE) of Y on X 100 rpm 13 pct. of...-fueled diesel engines, all reference torque values specified (in paragraph (f)(2) of appendix I to...

  16. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells: Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The service life and storage stability for several storage batteries were determined. The batteries included silver-zinc batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and silver-cadmium batteries. The cell performance characteristics and limitations are to be used by spacecraft power systems planners and designers. A statistical analysis of the life cycle prediction and cause of failure versus test conditions is presented.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test...-fueled and methanol-fueled diesel engines Standard error of estimate (SE) of Y on X 100 rpm 13 pct. of...-fueled diesel engines, all reference torque values specified (in paragraph (f)(2) of appendix I to...

  18. Component test program for variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, A. G.; Whitlow, J. B.; Stitt, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Variable cycle engine (VCE) concepts for a supersonic cruise aircraft were studied. These VCE concepts incorporate unique critical components and flow path arrangements that provide good performance at both supersonic and subsonic cruise and appear to be economically and environmentally viable. Certain technologies were identified as critical to the successful development of these engine concepts and require considerable development and testing. The feasibility and readiness of the most critical VCE technologies, was assessed, a VCE component test program was initiated. The variable stream control engine (VSCE) component test program, tested and evaluated an efficient low emission duct burner and a quiet coannular ejector nozzle at the rear of a rematched F100 engine.

  19. Temperature Oscillations Drive Cycles in the Activity of MMP-2,9 Secreted by a Human Trabecular Meshwork Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Stanley Ka-lok; Banerjee, Juni; Jang, Christopher; Sehgal, Amita; Stone, Richard A.; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Aqueous humor inflow falls 50% during sleeping hours without proportional fall in IOP, partly reflecting reduced outflow facility. The mechanisms underlying outflow facility cycling are unknown. One outflow facility regulator is matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release from trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Because anterior segment temperature must oscillate due to core temperature cycling and eyelid closure during sleep, we tested whether physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive cycles in the activity of secreted MMP. Methods. Temperature of transformed normal human TM cells (hTM5 line) was fixed or alternated 12 hours/12 hours between 33°C and 37°C. Activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 was measured by zymography, and gene expression by RT-PCR and quantitative PCR. Results. Raising temperature to 37°C increased, and lowering to 33°C reduced, activity of secreted MMP. Switching between 37°C and 33°C altered MMP-9 by 40% ± 3% and MMP-2 by 22% ± 2%. Peripheral circadian clocks did not mediate temperature-driven cycling of MMP secretion because MMP-release oscillations did not persist at constant temperature after 3 to 6 days of alternating temperatures, and temperature cycles did not entrain clock-gene expression in these cells. Furthermore, inhibiting heat shock transcription factor 1, which links temperature and peripheral clock-gene oscillations, inhibited MMP-9 but not MMP-2 temperature-driven MMP cycling. Inhibition of heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels altered total MMP secretion but not temperature-induced modulations. Inhibiting cold-sensitive TRPM-8 channels had no effect. Conclusions. Physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive fluctuations of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in hTM5 cells independent of peripheral clock genes and temperature-sensitive TRP channels. PMID:25655795

  20. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Bonner, Richard W.; Dussinger, Peter M.; Hartenstine, John R.; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 725 K (170 to 450 C), including space nuclear power system radiators, fuel cells, and high temperature electronics cooling. Historically, water has been used in heat pipes at temperatures up to about 425 K (150 C). Recent life tests, updated below, demonstrate that titanium/water and Monel/water heat pipes can be used at temperatures up to 550 K (277 C), due to water's favorable transport properties. At temperatures above roughly 570 K (300 C), water is no longer a suitable fluid, due to high vapor pressure and low surface tension as the critical point is approached. At higher temperatures, another working fluid/envelope combination is required, either an organic or halide working fluid. An electromotive force method was used to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This procedure was used to reject aluminum and aluminum alloys as envelope materials, due to their high decomposition potential. Titanium and three corrosion resistant superalloys were chosen as envelope materials. Life tests were conducted with these envelopes and six different working fluids: AlBr3, GaCl3, SnCl4, TiCl4, TiBr4, and eutectic diphenyl/diphenyl oxide (Therminol VP-1/Dowtherm A). All of the life tests except for the GaCl3 are ongoing; the GaCl3 was incompatible. As the temperature approaches 725 K (450 C), cesium is a potential heat pipe working fluid. Life tests results are also presented for cesium/Monel 400 and cesium/70-30 copper/nickel heat pipes operating near 750 K (477 C). These materials are not suitable for long term operation, due to copper transport from the condenser to the evaporator.

  1. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: Strainrange partitioning and low-cycle fatigue results at 538 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Low-cycle fatigue tests of 1/2 Hard AMZIRC Copper and NARloy Z were performed in argon at 538 C to determine partitioned strain range versus life relationships. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests of a Zr-Cr-Mg copper-base alloy were also performed. Strain ranges, lower than those employed in previous tests, were imposed in order to extend the fatigue life curve out to approximately 400,000 cycles. An experimental copper alloy and an experimental silver alloy were also studied. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature and in argon at 538 C. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed at 538 C in argon to define the fatigue life over the regime from 300 to 3,000 cycles. For the silver alloy, three additional heat treatments were introduced, and a limited evaluation of the short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior at 538 C was performed.

  2. Accelerated cycle-life testing of small sealed lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.; Oh, S. H.; Kang, H. Y.

    An attempt has been made to devise methods for reducing the cycle-testing time of long-life sealed lead/acid batteries. In order for the accelerated test results to equate to the actual field operations, it is assumed that the failure modes under both normal and accelerated conditions must be the same. As a first step in the search for a reliable accelerated test, observations of the battery ageing process have been made under different daily duty cycles, viz., 1 (normal), 8 and 16 cycles/day at ambient temperature and 80% depth-of-discharge. It has been found that the main cause of failure is different for a given duty cycle. This complicates the task of applying accelerated test results to field operations. For the 8 cycles/day schedule, the main cause of failure is degradation of the positive active material. Positive grid corrosion is the main factor in the 16 cycles/day case. Under normal conditions, both grid corrosion and PbO 2 degradation appear to be equally significant.

  3. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  4. Recent geographic convergence in diurnal and annual temperature cycling flattens global thermal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, George; Dillon, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    Warming mean temperatures over the past century have probably shifted distributions, altered phenologies, increased extinction risks, and impacted agriculture and human health. However, knowledge of mean temperatures alone does not provide a complete understanding either of changes in the climate itself or of how changing climate will affect organisms. Temporal temperature variation, primarily driven by daily and annual temperature cycles, has profound effects on organism physiology and ecology, yet changes in temperature cycling over the past 40 years are still poorly understood. Here we estimate global changes in the magnitudes of diurnal and annual temperature cycles from 1975 to 2013 from an analysis of over 1.4 billion hourly temperature measurements from 7,906 weather stations. Increases in daily temperature variation since 1975 in polar (1.4 °C), temperate (1.0 °C) and tropical (0.3 °C) regions parallel increases in mean temperature. Concurrently, magnitudes of annual temperature cycles decreased by 0.6 °C in polar regions, increased by 0.4 °C in temperate regions, and remained largely unchanged in tropical regions. Stronger increases in daily temperature cycling relative to changes in annual temperature cycling in temperate and polar regions mean that, with respect to diurnal and annual cycling, the world is flattening as temperate and polar regions converge on tropical temperature cycling profiles.

  5. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  6. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  7. Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cabet, Celine; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the Very High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 degrees C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanism/s and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 degrees C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens, although evidence of grain boundary cavitation was not observed. Despite the absence of grain boundary cavitation to accelerate crack propagation, the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain was detrimental to cycle life. This suggests that creepfatigue interaction may occur by a different mechanism or that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

  8. Developing and Testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Houser, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Is the water cycle intensifying in response to global warming due to temperature-driven changes in atmospheric water holding capacity? To address this question, we are developing and testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) to quantify the current and future change in the strength of the water cycle across the conterminous U.S. in support of the National Climate Assessment (NCA). The WCI consists of a suite of primary water cycle trend and extreme composites that are spatially- and temporally-scalable for summarizing how the climate changes results in stronger or more extreme water cycling over the nation. We calculated trend and extreme in water cycle components using NASA-produced data and modeling products. Six water cycle variables are chosen, including precipitation, evaporation, runoff, moisture convergence flux, terrestrial storage and water vapor. Our preliminary results showed that the strength of water cycle depends on specific regions and variables, even different datasets. For instance, precipitation from MERRA-Land offline simulation is consistent with the CPC unified precipitation dataset in showing positive trend over the northeastern, northwestern and west north central, but negative trend over the western and central regions. However, negative trends are observed in MERRA-land over the southern Texas and some parts of the southern coast, contrary to the positive trend revealed by the unified dataset in the same area. Next, we are going to integrate and combine the trends and extremes of these water cycle components to develop a suite of climate indicators to monitor the changes of water cycle as result of climate change. These indicators will be implemented and tested over the nation for further optimization. Moreover, we will also be developing innovative WCI visualization, documentation and distribution methods to disseminate WCI products to the public and stakeholders.

  9. Ceramic high temperature receiver design and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    The High Temperature Solar Thermal Receiver, which was tested a Edwards AFB, CA during the winter of 1980-1981, evolved from technologies developed over a five year period of work. This receiver was tested at the Army Solar Furnace at White Sands, NM in 1976. The receiver, was tested successfully at 1768 deg F and showed thermal efficiencies of 85%. The results were sufficiently promising to lead ERDA to fund our development and test of a 250 kW receiver to measure the efficiency of an open cavity receiver atop a central tower of a heliostat field. This receiver was required to be design scalable to 10, 50, and 100 MW-electric sizes to show applicability to central power tower receivers. That receiver employed rectagular silicon carbide panels and vertical stanchions to achieve scalability. The construction was shown to be fully scalable; and the receiver was operated at temperatures up to 2000 deg F to achieve the performance goals of the experiment during tests at the GIT advanced components test facility during the fall of 1978.

  10. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  11. The Impact of Elevated Temperatures on Continental Carbon Cycling in the Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancost, R. D.; Handley, L.; Taylor, K. W.; Collinson, M. E.; Weijers, J.; Talbot, H. M.; Hollis, C. J.; Grogan, D. S.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Recent climate and biogeochemical modelling suggests that methane flux from wetlands and soils was greater during past greenhouse climates, due to a combination of higher continental temperatures, an enhanced hydrological cycle, and elevated primary production. Here, we examine continental environments in the Paleogene using a range of biomarker proxies (complemented by palaeobotanical approaches), including air temperatures derived from the distribution of soil bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (the MBT/CBT proxy), as well as evidence from wetland and lacustrine settings for enhanced methane cycling. Previously published and new MBT/CBT records parallel sea surface temperature records, suggesting elevated continental temperatures during the Eocene even at mid- to high latitudes (New Zealand, 20-28°C; the Arctic, 17°C; across the Sierra Nevada, 15-25°C; and SE England, 20-30°C). Such temperatures are broadly consistent with paleobotanical records and would have directly led to increased methane production via the metabolic impact of temperature on rates of methanogenesis. To test this, we have determined the distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of archaeal ether lipids and bacterial hopanoids in thermally immature Eocene lignites. In particular, the Cobham lignite, deposited in SE England and spanning the PETM, is characterised by markedly higher concentrations of both methanogen and methanotroph biomarkers compared to modern and Holocene temperate peats. Elevated temperatures, by fostering either stratification and/or decreased oxygen solubility, could have also led to enhanced methane production in Paleogene lakes. Both the Messel Shale (Germany) and Green River Formation, specifically the Parachute Creek oil shale horizons (Utah and Wyoming), are characterised by strongly reducing conditions (including euxinic conditions in the latter), as well as abundant methanogen and methanotroph biomarkers. Such results confirm model predictions

  12. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  13. Life-cycle testing of receiving waters with Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Konetsky, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia are commonly used to estimate toxicity of effluents or receiving waters but can sometimes yield {open_quotes}no toxicity{close_quotes} outcomes even if pollutants are present. We conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) see if tests with longer exposure periods would reveal evidence for toxicity that might not be evident from 7-day tests, and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia reproduction. In the first set of tests, C. dubia was reared in diluted mineral water (negative control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a retention basin containing sediments contaminated with mercury, other metals and polychlorinated biphenyls. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only, but this water was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added, prior to testing. C. dubia survival and reproduction did not differ much among the three water types in the first set of tests, but these two parameters were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia appeared to be relatively insensitive to general water-quality factors, but quite sensitive to food-related factors. Regression analyses showed that the predictability of life-time reproduction by C. dubia from the results of 7-day tests was very low (R{sup 2}< 0.35) in five of the six experiments. The increase in predictability as a function of test duration also differed among water types in the first set of tests, and among treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, 7-day tests with C. dubia may be used to quantify water-quality problems, but it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of these tests to longer time scales.

  14. A cycle ergometer test of maximal aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Myles, W S; Toft, R J

    1982-01-01

    An indirect test of maximal aerobic power (IMAP) was evaluated in 31 healthy male subjects by comparing it with a direct treadmill measurement of maximal aerobic power (VO2 max), with the prediction of VO2 max from heart rate during submaximal exercise on a cycle ergometer using Astrand's nomogram, with the British Army's Basic Fitness Test (BFT, a 2.4 km run performed in boots and trousers), and with a test of maximum anaerobic power. For the IMAP test, subjects pedalled on a cycle ergometer at 75 revs X min-1. The workload was 37.5 watts for the first minute, and was increased by 37.5 watts every minute until the subject could not continue. Time to exhaustion was recorded. Predicted VO2 max and times for BFT and IMAP correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the direct VO2 max: r = 0.70, r = 0.67 and r = 0.79 respectively. The correlation between direct VO2 max and the maximum anaerobic power test was significant (p less than 0.05) but lower, r = 0.44. Although lactate levels after direct VO2 max determination were significantly higher than those after the IMAP test, maximum heart rates were not significantly different. Submaximal VO2 values measured during the IMAP test yielded a regression equation relating VO2 and pedalling time. When individual values for direct and predicted VO2 max and times for BFT and IMAP were compared with equivalent standards, the percentages of subjects able to exceed the standard were 100, 65, 87, and 87 respectively. These data demonstrate that the IMAP test provides a valid estimate of VO2 max and indicate that it may be a practical test for establishing that an individual meets a minimum standard.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  16. 11S4P ABSL18650 Module High DoD Cycling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, E.; Buckle, R.; Simmons, N.; Thwaite, C.

    2011-10-01

    An 11s4p ABSL18650HC module is tested under high Depth of Discharge (DoD) continuous cycling at 20°C. The module is charged up to 90% State of Charge (SoC). After 3300 cycles, the capacity loss observed is 17%, the internal cell resistance has increased by 60 to 85%, the end of discharge temperature has increased by about 4°C. The cells degradation observed is not as high as the degradation predicted by ABSL tools, LIFE and BEAST. The four strings exhibit different behaviour. The cells remain balanced, with a maximum end of charge voltage spread around 70 mV. A second 11s 4p ABSL18650HC module is tested under GEO (GEOsynchronous) conditions. After 264 days of GEO cycling, the EOCV dispersion is around 9 mV for the four strings.

  17. Feasibility Investigation for Performing Fireball Temperature Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Kurtz, Joe

    1997-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested by the Launch Abort Subpanel and the Power Systems Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to investigate the feasibility of using spectroscopic techniques to measure propellant fireball gas temperatures. This report outlines the modeling and experimental approaches and results of this investigation. Descriptions of the theoretical particle temperature and mass effusion models are presented along with the results of the survivability of small plutonium dioxide (less than or equal to 1000 microns diameter) particles entrained in various propellant fireball scenarios. The experimental test systems used to measure the hydroxide radical, water, and particle graybody spectral emissions and absorptions are discussed. Spectral results along with temperatures extracted by analyzing the spectral features are presented for the flames investigated in the laboratory environment. Methods of implementing spectroscopic measurements for future testing using the WSTF Large-scale Hydrogen/Oxygen Explosion Facility are discussed, and the accuracy expected for these measurements is estimated from laboratory measurements.

  18. Cycle life testing of a 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vutetakis, D.G.; Viswanathan, V.V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of cycle life testing of 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid batteries intended for use in the B-1B aircraft. Test samples were procured from two different manufacturers and subjected to cycle testing at 33% and 100% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The cycle life at 33% DOD ranged from 500 to 750 cycles. The cycle life at 100% DOD ranged from 160 to 260 cycles.

  19. Life-cycle testing of receiving waters with Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Beane, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia are commonly used to estimate the toxicity of effluents or receiving waters, but may yield no toxicity outcomes even when pollutants are present (a possible type II error). The authors conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) see if tests with longer exposure periods revealed evidence for toxicity that might not be evident from shorter tests, and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia reproduction. In the first set of tests, daphnids were reared in diluted mineral water (control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a mercury-contaminated retention basin. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only, but this water was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added. C. dubia survival and reproduction did not differ much among the three waters in the first set of tests. However, both parameters were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia seems to be moderately insensitive to general water-quality factors, but quite sensitive to food-related parameters. Regression analysis showed that the predictability of life-time reproduction of C. dubia from 7-day test results was low in five of six cases. The increase in predictability as a function of test duration also differed among water types (first set of tests), and among treatments (second set of tests). Thus, 7-day tests with C. dubia may be used to quantify water-quality problems, but it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of such tests to longer time scales.

  20. Thermal cycling for restorative materials: does a standardized protocol exist in laboratory testing? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Morresi, Anna Lucia; D'Amario, Maurizio; Capogreco, Mario; Gatto, Roberto; Marzo, Giuseppe; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tests continue to be an indispensable method for the initial screening of dental materials. Thermal cycling is one of the most widely used procedures to simulate the physiological aging experienced by biomaterials in clinical practice. Consequently it is routinely employed in experimental studies to evaluate materials' performance. A literature review aimed to elucidate test parameters for in vitro aging of adhesive restorations was performed. This study aims to assess whether or not a standardized protocol of thermal cycling has been acknowledged from a review of the literature. An exhaustive literature search, examining the effect of thermal cycling on restorative dental materials, was performed with electronic database and by hand. The search was restricted to studies published from 1998 to August 2013. No language restrictions were applied. The search identified 193 relevant experimental studies. Only twenty-three studies had faithfully applied ISO standard. The majority of studies used their own procedures, showing only a certain consistency within the temperature parameter (5-55°C) and a great variability in the number of cycles and dwell time chosen. A wide variation in thermal cycling parameters applied in experimental studies has been identified. The parameters selected amongst these studies seem to be done on the basis of convenience for the authors in most cases. A comparison of results between studies would appear to be impossible. The available data suggest that further investigations will be required to ultimately develop a standardized thermal cycling protocol.

  1. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and

  2. Closed Cycle Cryocooler for Low Temperature Electronic Circuits. Phase I. Concept Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    4 III. METHOD OF" APPROACH, MODELING TECHNIQUE .. .. .... .......... ... 6 Modeling of Stirling Cycle...results of the Phase I study to develop concepts for closed cycle cryocoolers for low temperature electronic circuits. Technical contributions to the...conceptual study of small, low power, very low magnetic signature, lightweight, efficient closed cycle, cryocoolers suitable for use with superconductive and

  3. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  4. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  5. Testing of reciprocating seals for application in a Stirling cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curulla, J. F.; Beck, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Six single stage reciprocating seal configurations to the requirements of the Stirling cycle engine were evaluated. The seals tested were: the Boeing Footseal, NASA Chevron polyimide seal, Bell seal, Quad seal, Tetraseal, and Dynabak seal. None of these seal configurations met the leakage goals of .002 cc/sec at helium gas pressure of 1.22 x 10 to the 7th power PA, rod speed of 7.19 m/sec peak, and seal environmental temperature of 408 K for 1500 hours. Most seals failed due to high temperatures. Catastrophic failures were observed for a minimum number of test runs characterized by extremely high leakage rates and large temperature rises. The Bell seal attained 63 hours of run time at significantly lowered test conditions.

  6. The influence of temperature on the cycle life performance of rechargeable Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Huang, C.-K.; Deligiannis, F.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report studies on the influence of low temperature on the properties and cycling performance of six selected electrolytes. The electrolytes investigated were 2-MeTHF, EC/2-MeTHF, THF, THF/2-MeTHF, EC/THF, and EC/THF/2-MeTHF. All the electrolytes contained 1.5M LiAsF6. Open circuit stand tests indicated that organic electrolytes exhibited improved stability towards lithium at 10 C. However, cycling of the cells at 10 C did not result in improved cycle life performance.

  7. Advanced Low Temperature Geothermal Power Cycles (The ENTIV Organic Project) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mugerwa, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Feasibility study of advanced low temperature thermal power cycles for the Entiv Organic Project. Study evaluates amonia-water mixed working fluid energy conversion processes developed and licensed under Kalex in comparison with Kalina cycles. Both cycles are developed using low temperature thermal resource from the Lower Klamath Lake Geothermal Area. An economic feasibility evaluation was conducted for a pilot plant which was deemed unfeasible by the Project Sponsor (Entiv).

  8. A Comparison of Single-Cycle Versus Multiple-Cycle Proof Testing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Millwater, H. R.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (SCPT and MCPT) strategies for reusable aerospace propulsion system components are critically evaluated and compared from a rigorous elastic-plastic fracture mechanics perspective. Earlier MCPT studies are briefly reviewed. New J-integral estimation methods for semi-elliptical surface cracks and cracks at notches are derived and validated. Engineering methods are developed to characterize crack growth rates during elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the tear-fatigue interaction near instability. Surface crack growth experiments are conducted with Inconel 718 to characterize tearing resistance, FCG under small-scale yielding and elastic-plastic conditions, and crack growth during simulated MCPT. Fractography and acoustic emission studies provide additional insight. The relative merits of SCPT and MCPT are directly compared using a probabilistic analysis linked with an elastic-plastic crack growth computer code. The conditional probability of failure in service is computed for a population of components that have survived a previous proof test, based on an assumed distribution of initial crack depths. Parameter studies investigate the influence of proof factor, tearing resistance, crack shape, initial crack depth distribution, and notches on the MCPT vs. SCPT comparison. The parameter studies provide a rational basis to formulate conclusions about the relative advantages and disadvantages of SCPT and MCPT. Practical engineering guidelines are proposed to help select the optimum proof test protocol in a given application.

  9. A Comparison of Single-Cycle Versus Multiple-Cycle Proof Testing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Millwater, H. R.; Russell, D. A.; Millwater, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    Single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (SCPT and MCPT) strategies for reusable aerospace propulsion system components are critically evaluated and compared from a rigorous elastic-plastic fracture mechanics perspective. Earlier MCPT studies are briefly reviewed. New J-integral estimation methods for semielliptical surface cracks and cracks at notches are derived and validated. Engineering methods are developed to characterize crack growth rates during elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the tear-fatigue interaction near instability. Surface crack growth experiments are conducted with Inconel 718 to characterize tearing resistance, FCG under small-scale yielding and elastic-plastic conditions, and crack growth during simulated MCPT. Fractography and acoustic emission studies provide additional insight. The relative merits of SCPT and MCPT are directly compared using a probabilistic analysis linked with an elastic-plastic crack growth computer code. The conditional probability of failure in service is computed for a population of components that have survived a previous proof test, based on an assumed distribution of initial crack depths. Parameter studies investigate the influence of proof factor, tearing resistance, crack shape, initial crack depth distribution, and notches on the MCPT versus SCPT comparison. The parameter studies provide a rational basis to formulate conclusions about the relative advantages and disadvantages of SCPT and MCPT. Practical engineering guidelines are proposed to help select the optimum proof test protocol in a given application.

  10. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  11. A model for life predictions of nickel-base superalloys in high-temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoski, Glenn R.; Pelloux, Regis M.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive characterization of low-cycle fatigue damage mechanisms was performed on polycrystalline Rene 80 and IN100 tested in the temperature range from 871 to 1000 C. Low-cycle fatigue life was found to be dominated by propagation of microcracks to a critical size governed by the maximum tensile stress. A model was developed which incorporates a threshold stress for crack extension, a stress-based crack growth expression, and a failure criterion. The mathematical equivalence between this mechanistically based model and the strain-life low-cycle fatigue law was demonstrated using cyclic stress-strain relationships. The model was shown to correlate the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue data of the different nickel-base superalloys considered in this study.

  12. Regenerable Microbial Check Valve - Life cycle tests results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Olivadoti, J. T.; Sauer, Richard L.; Flanagan, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Life cycle regeneration testing of the Microbial Check Valve (MCV) that is used on the Shuttle Orbiter to provide microbial control of potable water is currently in progress. Four beds are being challenged with simulated reclaimed waters and repeatedly regenerated. Preliminary results indicate that contaminant systems exhibit unique regeneration periodicities. Cyclic throughput diminishes with increasing cumulative flow. It is considered to be feasible to design a regenerable MCV system which will function without human intervention and with minimal resupply penalty for the 30 year life of the Space Station.

  13. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  14. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  15. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  16. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  17. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  18. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  19. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  20. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  1. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  2. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  3. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  4. Automatic 300-4 K temperature cycling apparatus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, C A

    1978-05-01

    The apparatus described here automatically cycles small samples between 300 and 4 K by alternately raising and lowering the sample through the neck of a commercial liquid helium storage Dewar. A bellows, which is pressurized by the helium boil-off gas, provides all of the required mechanical motion. By utilizing the cooling available from the boil-off gas, liquid helium helium consumption is limited to 0.03 l/cyc for a 12-g sample. Cycle times can be as short as 5 min.

  5. Low-cycle fatigue of two austenitic alloys in hydrogen gas and air at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Rice, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue resistance of type 347 stainless steel and Hastelloy Alloy X was evaluated in constant-amplitude, strain-controlled fatigue tests conducted under continuous negative strain cycling at a constant strain rate of 0.001 per sec and at total axial strain ranges of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 percent in both hydrogen gas and laboratory air environments in the temperature range 538-871 C. Elevated-temperature, compressive-strain hold-time experiments were also conducted. In hydrogen, the cyclic stress-strain behavior of both materials at 538 C was characterized by appreciable cyclic hardening at all strain ranges. At 871 C neither material hardened significantly; in fact, at 5% strain range 347 steel showed continuous cyclic softening until failure. The fatigue resistance of 347 steel was slightly higher than that of Alloy X at all temperatures and strain ranges. Ten-minute compressive hold time experiments at 760 and 871 C resulted in increased fatigue lives for 347 steel and decreased fatigue lives for Alloy X. Both alloys showed slightly lower fatigue resistance in air than in hydrogen. Some fractographic and metallographic results are also given.

  6. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  7. Emission performance of ceramic preconverters evaluated by FTP and Euro Stage III emission test cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Locker, R.J.; Then, P.M.; Zink, U.

    1996-09-01

    Preconverters and close-coupled main converters are viewed as key components in advanced emission systems to help the auto industry comply with tightened emission regulations in North America and Europe. Due to their close position to the exhaust manifold when compared to current main catalysts, the mechanical and thermal durability requirements on such close-coupled converters are significantly increased. A set of representative preconverter systems, with respect to back pressure and surface area, ceramic and metal substrate material was exposed to a 100 hour engine aging cycle, which is equivalent to approximately 80,000 kilometers under European driving conditions. This aging cycle is used by the German Autoconsortium (ZDAKW). In order to address the high thermal load in a close-coupled position, the preconverter inlet gas temperature has been elevated to a maximum of 950 C at stoichiometry. Maximum preconverter midbed temperature has been found close to 1,000 C. State-of-the-art catalytic coatings were used on the preconverters (Pd-only) and main converters (Trimetal). Emission tests using the new European test cycle (EDC 99), as well as the FTP 75 test cycle have been used to evaluate the catalytic performance. These tests were done during the aging at 20, 60 and 100 hours on the preconverters alone and on the combination of pre- and main converters. The impact of air injection has been studied on the complete preconverter/mainconverter system. The Celcor XT{trademark} ceramic preconverter proved mechanically and catalytically intact during the severe 100 hour aging cycle. The metallic and ceramic preconverter systems demonstrated equivalent catalytic performance.

  8. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle

  9. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G.

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  10. Temperature Cycles Induce Early Maturation in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major impediment in improvement of channel catfish by selective breeding is that a high percent of fish do not spawn until the third year. The conditions that lead to sexual maturation in fish have not been established. Size, nutritional state and number of seasonal cycles have all been suggeste...

  11. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  12. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  13. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  14. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  15. Low cycle fatigue behavior of polycrystalline Ni3Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Graham; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1994-11-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance of polycrystalline Ni3Al has been evaluated at ambient, intermediate (300 °C), and elevated (600 °C) temperatures using strain rates of 10-2/s and 10-4/s. Testing was conducted on a binary and a Cr-containing alloy of similar stoichiometry and B content (hypostoichiometric, 200 wppm B). Test results were combined with electron microscope investigations in order to evaluate microstructural changes during LCF. At ambient and intermediate temperatures, the cyclic constitutive response of both alloys was similar, and the LCF behavior was virtually rate independent. Under these conditions, the alloys rapidly hardened and then gradually softened for the remainder of the life. Initial hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris within the deformed microstructure, whereas softening was related to localized disordering. For these experimental conditions, crack initiation resulted within persistent slip bands (PSBs). At the elevated temperature, diffusion-assisted deformation resulted in a rate-dependent constitutive response and crack-initiation characteristics. At the high strain rate (10-2/s), continuous cyclic hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris. At the low strain rate (10-4/s), the diffusion of dislocation debris to grain boundaries resulted in cyclic softening. The elevated temperature LCF resistance was determined by the effect of the constitutive response on the driving force for environmental embrittlement. Chromium additions were observed to enhance LCF performance only under conditions where crack initiation was environmentally driven.

  16. The Correlation of the TBC Lifetimes in Burner Cycling Test with Thermal Gradient and Furnace Isothermal Cycling Test by TGO Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Dong, Hui; Ding, Hang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    Two types of typical thermal cycling tests are used for the evaluation of thermal cycling lifetime of thermal barrier coatings. Those are the burner cycling test with a thermal gradient and the isothermal furnace cycling test. There are diverse explanations to test results up to now. Although certain correlations should exist between the results obtained by two types of the tests, no evident parameters in two tests were directly related, possibly due to large range of difference test conditions. In this investigation, a series of TBC samples with carefully prepared Al2O3-based TGO of different thicknesses were used for both the burner cycling and the furnace cycling tests. The relationships between thermal cycling lifetime and TGO thickness were obtained for two types of the tests. It was found that TGO thickness presents the same influence tendency despite of different types of thermal cycling test. The results reveal the existence of the critical TGO thickness by which the transition of failure mode takes place. Moreover, the values of the critical TGO thickness for two tests are comparable. The results evidently suggest that the lifetimes during different thermal cycling tests can be correlated by TGO effects on failure behavior. However, it is clear that the apparent dominant driving factors to TBC failure are different in two types of tests. Accordingly, the burner cycling test could be used for optimizing the durability of ceramic top coat by separating the effect of individual factors through test condition design, while the furnace cycling test results represent the integrated TBC durable performance of the bond coat and top ceramic coating.

  17. Thermal Cycle Testing of the Powersphere Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Mike; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Peterson, Todd T.; Scheiman, David A.; Simburger, Edward J.; Giants, Thomas W.; Matsumoto, James H.; Garcia, Alexander; Liu, Simon H.; Lin, John K.; Scarborough, Stephen E.; Gleeson, Daniel J.; Rawal, Suraj P.; Perry, Alan R.; Marshall, Craig H.

    2007-01-01

    During the past three years the team of The Aerospace Corporation, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, NASA Glenn Research Center, and ILC Dover LP have been developing a multifunctional inflatable structure for the PowerSphere concept under contract with NASA (NAS3-01115). The PowerSphere attitude insensitive solar power-generating microsatellite, which could be used for many different space and Earth science purposes, is ready for further refinement and flight demonstration. The development of micro- and nanosatellites requires the energy collection system, namely the solar array, to be of lightweight and small size. The limited surface area of these satellites precludes the possibility of body mounting the solar array system for required power generation. The use of large traditional solar arrays requires the support of large satellite volumes and weight and also requires a pointing apparatus. The current PowerSphere concept (geodetic sphere), which was envisioned in the late 1990 s by Mr. Simburger of The Aerospace Corporation, has been systematically developed in the past several years.1-7 The PowerSphere system is a low mass and low volume system suited for micro and nanosatellites. It is a lightweight solar array that is spherical in shape and does not require a pointing apparatus. The recently completed project culminated during the third year with the manufacturing of the PowerSphere Engineering Development Unit (EDU). One hemisphere of the EDU system was tested for packing and deployment and was subsequently rigidized. The other hemisphere was packed and stored for future testing in an uncured state. Both cured and uncured hemisphere components were delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center for thermal cycle testing and long-term storage respectively. This paper will discuss the design, thermal cycle testing of the PowerSphere EDU.

  18. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  19. Thermoregulation and energetics in hibernating black bears: metabolic rate and the mystery of multi-day body temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Barnes, Brian M

    2015-05-01

    Black bears overwintering in outdoor hibernacula in Alaska decrease metabolism to as low as 25 % basal rates, while core body temperature (T(b)) decreases from 37 to 38 °C to a mid-hibernation average of 33 °C. T b develops cycles of 1.6-7.3 days length within a 30-36 °C range, with no circadian component. We do not know the mechanism or function underlying behind the T(b) cycles, although bears avoid T(b) of <30 °C and shorter cycles are predicted from higher rates of heat loss in colder conditions. To test this we manipulated den temperatures (T(den)) of 12 hibernating bears with body mass (BM) from 35.5 to 116.5 kg while recording T(b), metabolic rate (M), and shivering. T b cycle length (0.8-11.2 days) shortened as T den decreased (partial R(2) = 0.490, p < 0.001). Large bears with low thermal conductance (TC) showed more variation in T b cycle length with changes in T(den) than did smaller bears with high TC. Minimum T b across cycles was not consistent. At low T(den) bears shivered both during rising and decreasing phases of T(b) cycles, with minimum shivering during the fastest drop in T(b). At higher T den the T b pattern was more irregular. Mean M through T(b) cycles was negatively correlated to T den below lower critical temperatures (1.4-10.4 °C). Minimum M (0.3509 W/kg ± 0.0121 SE) during mid-hibernation scaled to BM [M (W) = 1.217 × BM (kg)(0.6979), R(2) = 0.855, p < 0.001]. Hibernating thermal conductance (TC) was negatively correlated to BM (R(2) = 0.721, p < 0.001); bears with high TC had the same T(b) cycle length as bears with low TC except at high T(den), thus not supporting the hypothesis that cooling rate alone determines T(b) cycle length. We conclude that T(b) cycling is effected by control of thermoregulatory heat production, and T(b) cycling may not be present when hibernating bears use passive thermoregulation. More intense shivering in the rising phase of cycles may contribute to the prevention of muscle disuse atrophy. Bears

  20. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart S of... - Transient Test Driving Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transient Test Driving Cycle E Appendix... Driving Cycle (I) Driver's trace. All excursions in the transient driving cycle shall be evaluated by the... determine a valid test. (II) Driving cycle. The following table shows the time speed relationship for...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart S of... - Transient Test Driving Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transient Test Driving Cycle E Appendix... Driving Cycle (I) Driver's trace. All excursions in the transient driving cycle shall be evaluated by the... determine a valid test. (II) Driving cycle. The following table shows the time speed relationship for...

  2. Effects of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Lazaro, C.; Valdemarsen, T.; Holmer, M.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing ocean temperature due to climate change is an important anthropogenic driver of ecological change in coastal systems. In these systems sediments play a major role in nutrient cycling. Our ability to predict ecological consequences of climate change is enhanced by simulating real scenarios. Based on predicted climate change scenarios, we tested the effect of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient release from coastal sediments to the water column in a mesocosm experiment. PO43- release rates from sediments followed the same trends as organic matter mineralization rates, increased linearly with temperature and were significantly higher under organic pollution than under nonpolluted conditions. NH4+ release only increased significantly when the temperature rise was above 6 °C, and it was significantly higher in organic polluted compared to nonpolluted sediments. Nutrient release to the water column was only a fraction from the mineralized organic matter, suggesting PO43- retention and NH4+ oxidation in the sediment. Bioturbation and bioirrigation appeared to be key processes responsible for this behavior. Considering that the primary production of most marine basins is N-limited, the excess release of NH4+ at a temperature rise > 6 °C could enhance water column primary productivity, which may lead to the deterioration of the environmental quality. Climate change effects are expected to be accelerated in areas affected by organic pollution.

  3. High temperature triaxial tests on Rochester shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijn, Rolf; Burlini, Luigi; Misra, Santanu

    2010-05-01

    Phyllosilicates are one of the major components of the crust, responsible for strength weakening during deformation. High pressure and temperature experiments of natural samples rich in phyllosilicates are needed to test the relevance of proposed weakening mechanisms induced by phyllosilicates, derived from lab experiments on single phase and synthetic polyphase rocks and single crystals. Here, we present the preliminary results of a series of high temperature triaxial tests performed on the illite-rich Rochester Shale (USA - New York) using a Paterson type gas-medium HPT testing machine. Cylindrical samples with homogeneous microstructure and 12-14% porosity were fabricated by cold and hot-isostatically pressing, <150 μm crushed Rochester Shale particles. Experiments were conducted at 500- 700 °C temperature and varying strain rate from 5x10-6 to 7x10-4 s-1, while keeping confining pressure constant at 300 MPa. Synthetic hot-pressed samples were deformed up to a total shortening of 7.5 to 13%. To study the significance of mica dehydration, iron or copper jackets were used in combination with non-porous or porous spacers. Water content was measured before and after experiments using Karl Fischer Titration (KFT). All experiments show, after yielding at 0.6% strain, rapid hardening in nearly linear fashion until about 4-5% strain, from where stress increases at reducing rates to values at 10% strain, between 400 and 675 MPa, depending on experimental conditions. Neither failure nor steady state however, is achieved within the maximum strain of 13%. Experiments performed under 500 °C and 300 MPa confining pressure show weak strain rate dependence. In addition, iron-jacketed samples appear harder than copper-jacketed ones. At 700 °C samples are 17 to 37% weaker and more sensitive to strain rate than during 500 °C experiments. Although, iron-jacketed samples behave stronger than copper-jacketed ones. By visual inspection, samples appear homogeneously shortened

  4. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... cycles. The heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... cycles. The heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... cycles. The heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... cycles. The heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix...

  8. Influence of temperature, environment, and thermal aging on the continuous cycle fatigue behavior of Hastelloy X and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Strizak, J.P.; Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Rittenhouse, P.L.

    1982-04-01

    Results are presented for strain-controlled fatigue and tensile tests for two nickel-base, solution-hardened reference structural alloys for use in several High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts. These alloys, Hastelloy X and Inconel 617, were tested from room temperature to 871/sup 0/C in air and impure helium. Materials were tested in both the solution-annealed and the preaged conditios, in which aging consisted of isothermal exposure at one of several temperatures for periods of up to 20,000 h. Comparisons are given between the strain-controlled fatigue lives of these and several other commonly used alloys, all tested at 538/sup 0/C. An analysis is also presented of the continuous cycle fatigue data obtained from room temperature to 427/sup 0/C for Hastelloy G, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy C-276, and Hastelloy C-4, an effort undertaken in support of ASME code development.

  9. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  10. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  11. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  12. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  13. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  14. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  15. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  16. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Qiu, Shipeng; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape memory alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently we have shown that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt% Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. The investigation we report here extends that original work to ascertain whether further increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional changes in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free austenite finish temperature of 113 C, and to determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted on the aforementioned alloy at various stresses from 50-300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 165, 200, 230, 260, 290, 320 and 350 C. The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays an equally significant role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain observed during thermal cycling to 290 C. In situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature showed that the differences in transformation strain were mostly related to changes in martensite texture when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape memory alloys for optimal performance.

  17. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, Santo; Qiu, Shipeng; Gaydosh, Darrell; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Garg, Anita; Vaidyanathan, Raj

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape-memory-alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently, we showed that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt pct Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. The investigation we report here extends that original work to (1) ascertain whether increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional changes in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free austenite finish temperature of 386 K (113 °C), and (2) determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted on the aforementioned alloy at various stresses from 50 to 300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 438 K, 473 K, 503 K, 533 K, 563 K, 593 K, and 623 K (165 °C, 200 °C, 230 °C, 260 °C, 290 °C, 320 °C, and 350 °C). The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays an equally significant role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain observed during thermal cycling to 563 K (290 °C). In situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature showed that the differences in transformation strain were mostly related to changes in martensite texture when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape-memory alloys for optimal performance.

  18. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an...

  19. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an...

  20. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an...

  1. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an...

  2. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations of clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including LCO behavior.

  3. Long-term stability testing of optical fibre Fabry-Perot temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Applications of fibre optic sensors at high temperatures have gained a huge interest recently, as they appeared to be suitable for temperature recording in harsh environments. In this paper, we are demonstrating two intrinsic Fabry-Perot (F-P) fibre optic sensors for high temperature monitoring. The sensors are consisting of a 125μm diameter single mode fibre (SMF28) and a 125μm diameter PCF ESM-12B pure fused silica fibre spliced to a SMF28, respectively. The result was a low finesse optical SMF-Cr-SMF, and SMF-Cr-PCF, sensor with cavity lengths varying from 50μm to 100μm. Both types of Fabry-Perot sensors were tested in a tube furnace over a temperature range from room temperature up to 1100°C. Following a number of annealing cycles, between the above mentioned temperatures range, very good repeatability of the phase response was achieved. During the cycling process, thermal stress relief takes place which makes the sensors suitable for temperature testing at temperatures just in excess of 1000°C. After initial cycling the sensors are subjected to long term stability tests. The phase response is stable, less than 4°C, over a period of 5 days at a temperature of 1050°C for both sensors. The temperature resolution is around 3°C.

  4. Life cycle assessment of Japanese high-temperature conductive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Andrae, Anders S G; Itsubo, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Inaba, Atsushi

    2008-04-15

    The electrically conductive adhesives (ECA) are on the verge of a breakthrough as reliable interconnection materials for electronic components. As the ban of lead (Pb) in the electronics industry becomes a reality, the ECA's could be attractive overall alternatives to high melting point (HMP) Pb-based solder pastes. Environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to estimate trade-offs between the energy use and the potential toxicity of two future types of ECA's and one HMP Pb-based. The probability is around 90% that the overall CO2 emissions from an ECA based on a tin-bismuth alloy are lower than for a silver-epoxy based ECA, whereas the probability is about 80% that the cumulative energy demand would be lower. It is more uncertain whether the tin-bismuth ECA would contribute to less CO2, or consume less energy, than a HMP Pb-based solder paste. Moreover, for the impact categories contributing to the life-cycle impact assessment method based on end point modeling (LIME) damage category of human health, the tin-bismuth ECA shows a 25 times lower score, and a silver-epoxy based ECA shows an 11 times lower score than the HMP Pb-based solder paste. In order to save resources and decrease CO2 emissions it is recommended to increase the collection and recycling of printed board assemblies using silver-epoxy based ECA.

  5. High-Temperature Low-Cycle Fatigue Property of Heat-Resistant Ductile-Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Jang, Ho; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the high-temperature degradation behavior of two types of heat-resistant Si-Mo ductile cast iron (Fe-3.4C-3.7Si-0.4Mo and Fe-3.1C-4.5Si-1.0Mo) with particular attention paid to the mechanical properties and overall oxidation resistance. Tension and low-cycle fatigue properties were examined at 600 °C and 800 °C. The mechanical tests and metallographic and fractographic analyses showed that cast iron containing higher Si and Mo contents had a higher tensile strength and longer fatigue life at both temperatures than cast iron with lower levels due to the phase transformations of pearlite and carbide. The Coffin-Manson type equation was used to assess the fatigue mechanism suggesting that the higher Si-Mo alloy was stronger but less ductile than the lower Si-Mo alloy at 600 °C. However, similar properties for both alloys were observed at 800 °C because of softening and oxidation effects. Analysis of the isothermal oxidation behavior at those temperatures showed that mixed Fe2SiO4 layers were formed and the resulting scaling kinetics was much faster for low Si-Mo containing iron. With increasing temperature, subsurface degradation such as decarburization, voids, and cracks played a significant role in the overall oxidation resistance.

  6. High temperature erosion testing in a gasifier environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Adler, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of materials with the ability to operate in adverse conditions while resisting the effects of erosion and corrosion is essential to the future success of high efficiency power plants. Many next generation coal power plants are envisioned as combined cycle, with gasifiers used to produce both steam and syngas. The gasifier sections of these plants require materials of construction that are resistant to the effects of erosion from silica found in the gas streams and corrosion caused by a reducing atmosphere that may contain sulfur and chloride compounds. The Albany Research Center has developed a test apparatus designed to test the erosion-resistance of candidate materials under a range of environmental conditions, including those found in gasifiers. This Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear test apparatus (HAET) has been used to evaluate a group of high alloy candidate materials such as iron aluminide and Haynes HR 160, and compare them to a conventional 310 stainless steel. Erosion tests were conducted using 270μm silica abrasive, a typical impact velocities of 20 m/sec at temperatures up to 700°C in an atmosphere simulating gasifier conditions. The effects of erosion under these conditions on the surface scales that form are described. The total loss rate, loss rates due to erosion and corrosion for the test materials are compared.

  7. The relationship of air temperature variations over the northern hemisphere during the secular and 11-year solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhakov, L. Y.; Tomskaya, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison was made of air temperature anomaly maps for the months of January and July against a background of high and low secular solar activity, with and without regard for the 11 year cycle. By comparing temperature variations during the 11 year and secular cycles, it is found that the 11 year cycle influences thermal conditions more strongly than the secular cycle, and that temperature differences between extreme phases of the solar cycles are greater in January than in July.

  8. Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jinling; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Shijie; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis of the CLC reactor system was conducted, which shows that the parameters that influence the temperatures of the CLC reactors most are the flow rate and temperature of air entering the air reactor. For the ambient temperature variation, three off-design control strategies have been assumed and compared: 1) without any Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) control, 2) IGV control to maintain air reactor temperature and 3) IGV control to maintain constant fuel reactor temperature, aside from fuel flow rate adjusting. Results indicate that, compared with the conventional combined cycle, due to the requirement of pressure balance at outlet of the two CLC reactors, CLC combined cycle shows completely different off-design thermodynamic characteristics regardless of the control strategy adopted. For the first control strategy, temperatures of the two CLC reactors both rise obviously as ambient temperature increases. IGV control adopted by the second and the third strategy has the effect to maintain one of the two reactors' temperatures at design condition when ambient temperature is above design point. Compare with the second strategy, the third would induce more severe decrease of efficiency and output power of the CLC combined cycle.

  9. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Gaydosh, Darrell; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Garg, Anita

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape memory alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently we have shown that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt% Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. This investigation extends that original work to ascertain whether further increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional improvement in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free Af of 113 oC, and to determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted in the aforementioned alloy at various stress levels from 50-300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 165, 200, 230, 260, 290, 320 and 350 oC. The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain available in the system, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays a role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain being developed by thermal cycling to 290 oC. In situ, neutron diffraction showed that the differences in transformation strain were related to differences in martensite texture within the microstructure when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape memory alloys for optimal performance.

  10. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  11. The GISS sounding temperature impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Ghil, M.; Atlas, R.; Susskind, J.; Quirk, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of DST 5 and DST 6 satellite sounding data on mid-range forecasting was studied. The GISS temperature sounding technique, the GISS time-continuous four-dimensional assimilation procedure based on optimal statistical analysis, the GISS forecast model, and the verification techniques developed, including impact on local precipitation forecasts are described. It is found that the impact of sounding data was substantial and beneficial for the winter test period, Jan. 29 - Feb. 21. 1976. Forecasts started from initial state obtained with the aid of satellite data showed a mean improvement of about 4 points in the 48 and 772 hours Sub 1 scores as verified over North America and Europe. This corresponds to an 8 to 12 hour forecast improvement in the forecast range at 48 hours. An automated local precipitation forecast model applied to 128 cities in the United States showed on an average 15% improvement when satellite data was used for numerical forecasts. The improvement was 75% in the midwest.

  12. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  13. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  14. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  15. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  16. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  17. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  18. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  19. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  20. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  1. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  2. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  3. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  4. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  5. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  6. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  7. Weakening of annual temperature cycle over the Tibetan Plateau since the 1870s

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jianping; Esper, Jan; Büntgen, Ulf; Li, Lun; Xoplaki, Elena; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lily; Fang, Yongjie; Luterbacher, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The annual cycle of extra-tropical surface air temperature is an important component of the Earth's climate system. Over the past decades, a reduced amplitude of this mode has been observed in some regions. Although attributed to anthropogenic forcing, it remains unclear when dampening of the annual cycle started. Here we use a residual series of tree-ring width and maximum latewood density from the Tibetan Plateau >4,000 m asl to reconstruct changes in temperature seasonality over the past three centuries. The new proxy evidence suggests that the onset of a decrease in summer-to-winter temperature difference over the Tibetan Plateau occurred in the 1870s. Our results imply that the influence of anthropogenic forcing on temperature seasonality might have started in the late nineteenth century, and that future human influence may further contribute to a weakening of the annual temperature cycle, with subsequent effects on ecosystem functioning and productivity. PMID:28094791

  8. Weakening of annual temperature cycle over the Tibetan Plateau since the 1870s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianping; Esper, Jan; Büntgen, Ulf; Li, Lun; Xoplaki, Elena; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lily; Fang, Yongjie; Luterbacher, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The annual cycle of extra-tropical surface air temperature is an important component of the Earth's climate system. Over the past decades, a reduced amplitude of this mode has been observed in some regions. Although attributed to anthropogenic forcing, it remains unclear when dampening of the annual cycle started. Here we use a residual series of tree-ring width and maximum latewood density from the Tibetan Plateau >4,000 m asl to reconstruct changes in temperature seasonality over the past three centuries. The new proxy evidence suggests that the onset of a decrease in summer-to-winter temperature difference over the Tibetan Plateau occurred in the 1870s. Our results imply that the influence of anthropogenic forcing on temperature seasonality might have started in the late nineteenth century, and that future human influence may further contribute to a weakening of the annual temperature cycle, with subsequent effects on ecosystem functioning and productivity.

  9. Lowering Global Temperature by Enhancing the Natural Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingenter, O. W.; Elliot, S. M.; Blake, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a well leveraged approach to partially regulate climate using limited iron enhancement to stimulate the natural sulfur cycle resulting in increased cloud reflectivity that could cool large regions of our planet. Our plan differs greatly in size and intended outcome from full scale ocean iron fertilization of the Southern Ocean (SO) as proposed previously to help mitigate rising CO2 in the atmosphere. Some regions of the Earth's oceans are high in nutrients but low in primary productivity. The largest such region is the SO followed by the equatorial Pacific. Several mesoscale (100 km2) experiments have shown that the limiting nutrient to productivity is iron. Yet, the effectiveness of iron fertilization for sequestering significant amounts of atmospheric CO2 is still in question. However, marine microorganisms not only consume inorganic carbon but also produce and consume many climate relevant organic gases. The greatest climate effect of iron fertilization may be in enhancing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production, leading to changes in the optical properties of the atmosphere and cooling of the region. It appears that that full scale fertilization of the SO is not a viable solution because it would lead to over cooling of the region. Furthermore, our initial proposal differs from other solar shading plans as primary productivity may actually increase somewhat despite the slight loss in sunlight.

  10. The Diurnal Temperature Cycle and Its Relation to Boundary-Layer Structure During the Morning Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzler, G.

    2014-05-01

    The morning portion of the near-surface diurnal temperature cycle is analyzed in combination with heat-flux and vertical temperature-gradient data. During summer, mean diurnal cycles of temperature rates-of-change show periods that can be related to defined points of the morning transition (MT). The start of the MT is clearly marked with a temperature discontinuity, apparent even on individual days, while the end of the transition is apparent only when using averages over many days. The findings concerning the timing of the MT using temperature cycle analysis correspond well with studies using heat-flux measurements. Mean diurnal cycles of temperature rates-of-change for stations in different urban and valley positions show differences that can partly be explained by apparent effects of the surroundings. For the valley situation, the timing differences and their relation to station position in the valley are generally plausible, while urban effects on the diurnal cycle are apparent but less distinct, which may be due to the small number of stations used. The results indicate that warming already begins before heat-flux crossover, which is the current definition of the beginning of the MT. This definition should be extended to include the phase between the temperature rate-of-change crossover and heat-flux crossover, which represents the early part of the MT before warming reaches instrument level.

  11. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  12. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na+ into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles. PMID:22647608

  13. Ultraviolet irradiation at elevated temperatures and thermal cycling in vacuum of FEP-A covered silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broder, J. D.; Marsik, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were designed and performed on silicon solar cells covered with heat-bonded FEP-A in an effort to explain the rapid degeneration of open-circuit voltage and maximum power observered on cells of this type included in an experiment on the ATS-6 spacecraft. Solar cells were exposed to ultraviolet light in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 30 to 105 C. The samples were then subjected to thermal cycling from 130 to -130 C. Inspection following irradiation indicated that all the covers remained physically intact. However, during the temperature cycling heat-bonded covers showed cracking. The test showed that heat-bonded FEP-A covers embrittle during UV exposure and the embrittlement is dependent upon sample temperature during irradiation. The results of the experiment suggest a probable mechanism for the degradation of the FEP-A cells on ATS-6.

  14. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  15. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  17. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed...

  18. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed...

  19. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  20. Ovarian cycle approach by rectal temperature and fecal progesterone in a female killer whale, Orcinus orca.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Satoshi; Kakizoe, Yuka; Kanda, Koji; Sengoku, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yohei; Adachi, Itsuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Doi, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the measurements of body temperature and fecal progesterone concentrations as minimally invasive techniques for assessing ovarian cycle in a single sexually mature female killer whale. Rectal temperature data, fecal and blood samples were collected in the dorsal position using routine husbandry training on a voluntary basis. The correlations between rectal temperature and plasma progesterone concentration and between fecal and plasma progesterone concentrations were investigated. Fecal progesterone metabolites were identified by a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Plasma progesterone concentrations (range: 0.2-18.6 ng/ml) and rectal temperature (range: 35.3-35.9°C) changed cyclically, and cycle lengths were an average (±SD) of 44.9±4.0 days (nine cycles) and 44.6±5.9 days (nine cycles), respectively. Rectal temperature positively correlated with the plasma progesterone concentrations (r=0.641, P<0.01). There was a visual trend for fecal progesterone profiles to be similar to circulating plasma progesterone profiles. Fecal immunoreactive progestagen analysis resulted in a marked immunoreactive peak of progesterone. The data from the single killer whale indicate that the measurement of rectal temperature is suitable for minimally invasive assessment of the estrous cycle and monitoring the fecal progesterone concentration is useful to assess ovarian luteal activity.

  1. Effect of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition in PHB-producing sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Marang, Leonie; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Muyzer, Gerard; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-05-01

    The impact of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition between polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-producing populations enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was investigated at temperatures of 20 °C and 30 °C, and in a cycle length range of 1-18 h. In this study, the microbial community structure of the PHB-producing enrichments was found to be strongly dependent on temperature, but not on cycle length. Zoogloea and Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the SBRs operated at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Both enrichments accumulated PHB more than 75% of cell dry weight. Short-term temperature change experiments revealed that P. acidivorans was more temperature sensitive as compared with Zoogloea. This is particularly true for the PHB degradation, resulting in incomplete PHB degradation in P. acidivorans at 20 °C. Incomplete PHB degradation limited biomass growth and allowed Zoogloea to outcompete P. acidivorans. The PHB content at the end of the feast phase correlated well with the cycle length at a constant solid retention time (SRT). These results suggest that to establish enrichment with the capacity to store a high fraction of PHB, the number of cycles per SRT should be minimized independent of the temperature.

  2. Physiological and transcriptional responses of anaerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to diurnal temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Hebly, Marit; de Ridder, Dick; de Hulster, Erik A F; de la Torre Cortes, Pilar; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2014-07-01

    Diurnal temperature cycling is an intrinsic characteristic of many exposed microbial ecosystems. However, its influence on yeast physiology and the yeast transcriptome has not been studied in detail. In this study, 24-h sinusoidal temperature cycles, oscillating between 12°C and 30°C, were imposed on anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After three diurnal temperature cycles (DTC), concentrations of glucose and extracellular metabolites as well as CO2 production rates showed regular, reproducible circadian rhythms. DTC also led to waves of transcriptional activation and repression, which involved one-sixth of the yeast genome. A substantial fraction of these DTC-responsive genes appeared to respond primarily to changes in the glucose concentration. Elimination of known glucose-responsive genes revealed an overrepresentation of previously identified temperature-responsive genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle and de novo purine biosynthesis. In-depth analysis demonstrated that DTC led to a partial synchronization of the cell cycle of the yeast populations in chemostat cultures, which was lost upon release from DTC. Comparison of DTC results with data from steady-state cultures showed that the 24-h DTC was sufficiently slow to allow S. cerevisiae chemostat cultures to acclimate their transcriptome and physiology at the DTC temperature maximum and to approach acclimation at the DTC temperature minimum. Furthermore, this comparison and literature data on growth rate-dependent cell cycle phase distribution indicated that cell cycle synchronization was most likely an effect of imposed fluctuations of the relative growth rate (μ/μmax) rather than a direct effect of temperature.

  3. Evidence for Solar-Cycle Forcing and Secular Variation in the Armagh Observatory Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    A prominent feature of previous long-term temperature studies has been the appearance of warming since the 1880s, this often being taken as evidence for anthropogenic-induced global warming. In this investigation, the long-term, annual, mean temperature record (1844-1992) of the Armagh Observatory (Armagh, North Ireland), a set of temperature data based on maximum and minimum thermometers that predates the 1880s and correlates well with northern hemispheric and global standards, is examined for evidence of systematic variation, in particular, as related to solar-cycle forcing and secular variation. Indeed, both appear to be embedded within the Armagh data. Removal of these effects, each contributing about 8% to the overall reduction in variance, yields residuals that are randomly distributed. Application of the 10-year moving average to the residuals, furthermore, strongly suggests that the behavior of the residuals is episodic, inferring that (for extended periods of time) temperatures at Armagh sometimes were warmer or cooler (than expected), while at other times they were stable. Comparison of cyclic averages of annual mean temperatures against the lengths of the associated Hale cycles (i.e., the length of two, sequentially numbered, even-odd sunspot cycle pairs) strongly suggests that the temperatures correlate inversely (r = -0.886 at less than 2% level of significance) against the length of the associated Hale cycle. Because sunspot cycle 22 ended in 1996, the present Hale cycle probably will be shorter than average, implying that temperatures at Armagh over this Hale cycle will be warmer (about 9.31 q 0.23 C at the 90% confidence level) than average (= 9.00 C).

  4. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Anaerobic Chemostat Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subjected to Diurnal Temperature Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Hebly, Marit; de Ridder, Dick; de Hulster, Erik A. F.; de la Torre Cortes, Pilar; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal temperature cycling is an intrinsic characteristic of many exposed microbial ecosystems. However, its influence on yeast physiology and the yeast transcriptome has not been studied in detail. In this study, 24-h sinusoidal temperature cycles, oscillating between 12°C and 30°C, were imposed on anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After three diurnal temperature cycles (DTC), concentrations of glucose and extracellular metabolites as well as CO2 production rates showed regular, reproducible circadian rhythms. DTC also led to waves of transcriptional activation and repression, which involved one-sixth of the yeast genome. A substantial fraction of these DTC-responsive genes appeared to respond primarily to changes in the glucose concentration. Elimination of known glucose-responsive genes revealed an overrepresentation of previously identified temperature-responsive genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle and de novo purine biosynthesis. In-depth analysis demonstrated that DTC led to a partial synchronization of the cell cycle of the yeast populations in chemostat cultures, which was lost upon release from DTC. Comparison of DTC results with data from steady-state cultures showed that the 24-h DTC was sufficiently slow to allow S. cerevisiae chemostat cultures to acclimate their transcriptome and physiology at the DTC temperature maximum and to approach acclimation at the DTC temperature minimum. Furthermore, this comparison and literature data on growth rate-dependent cell cycle phase distribution indicated that cell cycle synchronization was most likely an effect of imposed fluctuations of the relative growth rate (μ/μmax) rather than a direct effect of temperature. PMID:24814792

  5. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  9. Evaluating the effects of sub-zero temperature cycling on mercury flux from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett-Hains, Hamish; Walters, Nicholas E.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    2012-12-01

    A number of mechanisms have been shown to facilitate the flux of mercury from soils, although at sub-zero temperatures, there is evidence to suggest that alternate mechanisms may exist. Field studies at sub-zero temperatures have observed spikes in flux under certain conditions however very little laboratory work has been done to characterize the specific effects or mechanisms. A Dynamic Flux Chamber (DFC) and Tekran Model 2537A were used to analyse mercury flux from a naturally enriched soil. Soil moisture contents were varied between 30%, 60%, and 75% of field capacity while temperatures were cycled between 0 and -25 °C. The results, which were compared to room temperature baseline runs, showed that, at sub-zero temperatures, the mercury flux was suppressed in general. However, during the temperature cycling runs, soil flux spikes were evident during positive temperature change or warming. A one-way ANOVA by ranks proved that statistically significant fluxes were occurring during the runs at 30% and 60% of field capacity for positive rates of temperature changes. Arrhenius plots showed that for positive soil temperatures flux and temperature correlated well with the Arrhenius relationship. At sub-zero conditions however, no relationship was present, indicating another mechanism was present. The proposed mechanism for this enhanced flux is the physical evacuation of interstitial pore space gaseous mercury by the expansion and contraction of the freeze-thaw cycle.

  10. The impact of component performance on the overall cycle performance of small-scale low temperature organic Rankine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M.; Sayma, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Low temperature organic Rankine cycles offer a promising technology for the generation of power from low temperature heat sources. Small-scale systems (∼10kW) are of significant interest, however there is a current lack of commercially viable expanders. For a potential expander to be economically viable for small-scale applications it is reasonable to assume that the same expander must have the ability to be implemented within a number of different ORC applications. It is therefore important to design and optimise the cycle considering the component performance, most notably the expander, both at different thermodynamic conditions, and using alternative organic fluids. This paper demonstrates a novel modelling methodology that combines a previously generated turbine performance map with cycle analysis to establish at what heat source conditions optimal system performance can be achieved using an existing turbine design. The results obtained show that the same turbine can be effectively utilised within a number of different ORC applications by changing the working fluid. By selecting suitable working fluids, this turbine can be used to convert pressurised hot water at temperatures between 360K and 400K, and mass flow rates between 0.45kg/s and 2.7kg/s, into useful power with outputs between 1.5kW and 27kW. This is a significant result since it allows the same turbine to be implemented into a variety of applications, improving the economy of scale. This work has also confirmed the suitability of the candidate turbine for a range of low temperature ORC applications.

  11. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor: The Nuclear Light Bulb concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntt, R. O.; Slutz, S. A.; Harms, G. A.; Latham, T. S.; Roman, W. C.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (greater than 1800 s) and thrust (greater than 445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (greater than 4000 K). Analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept are described. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRE. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRE for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept.

  12. FREEZE-THAW CYCLING AND COLD TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON GEOMEMBRANE SHEETS AND SEAMS. Project summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of freeze-thaw cycling on the tensile strength of 19 geomembranes and 31 different seam types were investigated. The study was performed in three parts using different test conditions. Part I involved incubating unconfined specimens in freeze-thaw cycles and then per...

  13. Estrous cycle fluctuations in sex and ingestive behavior are accentuated by exercise or cold ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abdulhay, Amir; Benton, Noah A; Klingerman, Candice M; Krishnamoorthy, Kaila; Brozek, Jeremy M; Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". In female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), low circulating levels of ovarian steroids are associated with increased food hoarding and decreased sexual motivation, but these effects are exaggerated in food-restricted females. To determine whether cold ambient temperature has the same effects as food restriction, groups of hamsters were fed ad libitum while they were housed at either 5 °C or 22 °C, and then tested for behavior for 90 min on each day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 22 °C, high levels of sexual motivation and low levels of food hoarding were seen every day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 5 °C, high levels of sexual motivation were restricted to the periovulatory day. On the three nonestrous days, these females showed high levels of food hoarding, but not food intake. A separate cohort of females were provided with access to running wheels and housed at 22 °C. They showed high levels of sexual motivation restricted to the periovulatory day, similar to the pattern of sexual motivation seen in cold-housed females. Unlike cold-housed females, those with running wheels showed low levels of food hoarding and high levels of food intake. Food restriction, cold housing, and access to wheels had no significant effect on plasma estradiol or progesterone concentrations, but significantly decreased plasma leptin concentrations. All three energetic challenges unmask estrous cycle fluctuations in sexual motivation that are obscured in laboratory conditions, i.e., isolation in a small cage with an overabundance of food.

  14. Development and testing of a high cycle life 30 A-h sealed AgO-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A two-phase program was initiated to investigate design parameters and technology to develop an improved AgO-Zn battery. The basic performance goal was 100 charge/discharge cycles (22 h/2 h) at 50 percent depth of discharge following a six-month period of charged stand at room temperature. Phase 1, cell evaluation, involved testing 70 cells in five-cell groups. The major design variables were active material ratios, electrolyte concentrations, separator systems, and negative plate shape. Phase 1 testing showed that cycle life could be improved 10 percent to 20 percent by using greater ratios of zinc to silver oxide and higher electrolyte concentrations. Wedge-shaped negatives increased cycle life by nearly 100 percent. Phase 2 battery evaluation, which was initiated before the Phase 1 results were known completely, involved evaluation of six designs as 19-cell batteries. Only one battery exceeded 100 cycles following nine months charged stand.

  15. Diurnal evolution of cycling biomechanical parameters during a 60-s Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Lericollais, R; Gauthier, A; Bessot, N; Davenne, D

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of pedaling kinetics and kinematics during a short-term fatigue cycling exercise at two times of day. Twenty active male subjects were asked to perform a 60-s Wingate test against a constant braking resistance during two experimental sessions at 06:00 and 18:00 hours, i.e., very close to the hours of core temperature values, which are, respectively, the lowest and the highest. The results showed that the fatigue index was higher (P<0.05) at 18:00 hours (71.4%) than at 06:00 hours (69.2%) and power output was higher (P<0.05) in the evening than in the morning during the first 20 s of the test, after which no difference was observed. Taken together, these results showed a greater progression of fatigue in the evening than in the morning. The diurnal variations in performance and fatigue were associated (P<0.001) with diurnal changes in cycling kinematic parameters, characterized by a reduction in the range of motion of the ankle angle in the evening. These findings show that a time-of-day effect on movement patterns occurs during an anaerobic cycling exercise and that this phenomenon has a direct influence on performance and fatigue.

  16. Entrainment of the circadian clock by daily ambient temperature cycles in the camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    El Allali, Khalid; Achaâban, Mohamed R; Bothorel, Béatrice; Piro, Mohamed; Bouâouda, Hanan; El Allouchi, Morad; Ouassat, Mohammed; Malan, André; Pévet, Paul

    2013-06-01

    In mammals the light-dark (LD) cycle is known to be the major cue to synchronize the circadian clock. In arid and desert areas, the camel (Camelus dromedarius) is exposed to extreme environmental conditions. Since wide oscillations of ambient temperature (Ta) are a major factor in this environment, we wondered whether cyclic Ta fluctuations might contribute to synchronization of circadian rhythms. The rhythm of body temperature (Tb) was selected as output of the circadian clock. After having verified that Tb is synchronized by the LD and free runs in continuous darkness (DD), we submitted the animals to daily cycles of Ta in LL and in DD. In both cases, the Tb rhythm was entrained to the cycle of Ta. On a 12-h phase shift of the Ta cycle, the mean phase shift of the Tb cycle ranged from a few hours in LD (1 h by cosinor, 4 h from curve peaks) to 7-8 h in LL and 12 h in DD. These results may reflect either true synchronization of the central clock by Ta daily cycles or possibly a passive effect of Ta on Tb. To resolve the ambiguity, melatonin rhythmicity was used as another output of the clock. In DD melatonin rhythms were also entrained by the Ta cycle, proving that the daily Ta cycle is able to entrain the circadian clock of the camel similar to photoperiod. By contrast, in the presence of a LD cycle the rhythm of melatonin was modified by the Ta cycle in only 2 (or 3) of 7 camels: in these specific conditions a systematic effect of Ta on the clock could not be evidenced. In conclusion, depending on the experimental conditions (DD vs. LD), the daily Ta cycle can either act as a zeitgeber or not.

  17. The onion fly modulates the adult eclosion time in response to amplitude of temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Watari, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    To confirm whether the amplitude of diel temperature cycles causes a phase shift of adult eclosion rhythm of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, the peak time ( Ø E) of adult eclosion was determined under various thermoperiods with a fixed temperature either in the warm or cool phase and temperature differences ranging from 1°C to 4°C between the two phases. Irrespective of the temperature level during the warm or cool phase, Ø E occurred earlier with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. The results strongly support the previous conclusion of Tanaka and Watari (Naturwissenschaften 90:76-79, 2003) that D. antiqua responds to the amplitude of temperature cycle as a cue for the circadian adult eclosion timing. The phase advance was larger in thermoperiods with a fixed warm-phase temperature than in those with a fixed cool-phase temperature. This might be ascribed to the interaction between the amplitude and level of temperature in the thermoperiodic regimes.

  18. A two-fold increase of carbon cycle sensitivity to tropical temperature variations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuhui; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Myneni, Ranga B; Cox, Peter; Heimann, Martin; Miller, John; Peng, Shushi; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hui; Chen, Anping

    2014-02-13

    Earth system models project that the tropical land carbon sink will decrease in size in response to an increase in warming and drought during this century, probably causing a positive climate feedback. But available data are too limited at present to test the predicted changes in the tropical carbon balance in response to climate change. Long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide data provide a global record that integrates the interannual variability of the global carbon balance. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that most of this variability originates in the terrestrial biosphere. In particular, the year-to-year variations in the atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate (CGR) are thought to be the result of fluctuations in the carbon fluxes of tropical land areas. Recently, the response of CGR to tropical climate interannual variability was used to put a constraint on the sensitivity of tropical land carbon to climate change. Here we use the long-term CGR record from Mauna Loa and the South Pole to show that the sensitivity of CGR to tropical temperature interannual variability has increased by a factor of 1.9 ± 0.3 in the past five decades. We find that this sensitivity was greater when tropical land regions experienced drier conditions. This suggests that the sensitivity of CGR to interannual temperature variations is regulated by moisture conditions, even though the direct correlation between CGR and tropical precipitation is weak. We also find that present terrestrial carbon cycle models do not capture the observed enhancement in CGR sensitivity in the past five decades. More realistic model predictions of future carbon cycle and climate feedbacks require a better understanding of the processes driving the response of tropical ecosystems to drought and warming.

  19. Atmospheric temperature: successful test of remote probing.

    PubMed

    Wark, D Q; Hilleary, D T

    1969-09-19

    The Nimbus III satellite carries the satellite infrared spectrometer (SIRS). It measures the radiance of the earth and the atmosphere in seven narrow spectral intervals in the 15-micrometer carbon dioxide band and in one interval of minimum absorption at 11.1 micrometers. Seven simultaneous equations are solved to obtain the vertical temperature profile; the eighth measurement is used to determine the boundary condition (cloud or surface temperature). Results agree with those obtained from conventional radiosondes.

  20. Temperature fine-tunes Mediterranean Arabidopsis thaliana life-cycle phenology geographically.

    PubMed

    Marcer, A; Vidigal, D S; James, P M A; Fortin, M-J; Méndez-Vigo, B; Hilhorst, H W M; Bentsink, L; Alonso-Blanco, C; Picó, F X

    2017-02-27

    To understand how adaptive evolution in life-cycle phenology operates in plants, we need to unravel the effects of geographic variation in putative agents of natural selection on life-cycle phenology by considering all key developmental transitions and their co-variation patterns. We address this goal by quantifying the temperature-driven and geographically varying relationship between seed dormancy and flowering time in the annual Arabidopsis thaliana across the Iberian Peninsula. We used data on genetic variation in two major life-cycle traits, seed dormancy (DSDS50) and flowering time (FT), in a collection of 300 A. thaliana accessions from the Iberian Peninsula. The geographically varying relationship between life-cycle traits and minimum temperature, a major driver of variation in DSDS50 and FT, was explored with geographically weighted regressions (GWR). The environmentally varying correlation between DSDS50 and FT was analysed by means of sliding window analysis across a minimum temperature gradient. Maximum local adjustments between minimum temperature and life-cycle traits were obtained in the southwest Iberian Peninsula, an area with the highest minimum temperatures. In contrast, in off-southwest locations, the effects of minimum temperature on DSDS50 were rather constant across the region, whereas those of minimum temperature on FT were more variable, with peaks of strong local adjustments of GWR models in central and northwest Spain. Sliding window analysis identified a minimum temperature turning point in the relationship between DSDS50 and FT around a minimum temperature of 7.2 °C. Above this minimum temperature turning point, the variation in the FT/DSDS50 ratio became rapidly constrained and the negative correlation between FT and DSDS50 did not increase any further with increasing minimum temperatures. The southwest Iberian Peninsula emerges as an area where variation in life-cycle phenology appears to be restricted by the duration and severity

  1. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  2. Testing the effects of temperature and humidity on printed passive UHF RFID tags on paper substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnea Merilampi, Sari; Virkki, Johanna; Ukkonen, Leena; Sydänheimo, Lauri

    2014-05-01

    This article is an interesting substrate material for environmental-friendly printable electronics. In this study, screen-printed RFID tags on paper substrate are examined. Their reliability was tested with low temperature, high temperature, slow temperature cycling, high temperature and high humidity and water dipping test. Environmental stresses affect the tag antenna impedance, losses and radiation characteristics due to their impact on the ink film and paper substrate. Low temperature, temperature cycling and high humidity did not have a radical effect on the measured parameters: threshold power, backscattered signal power or read range of the tags. However, the frequency response and the losses of the tags were slightly affected. Exposure to high temperature was found to even improve the tag performance due to the positive effect of high temperature on the ink film. The combined high humidity and high temperature had the most severe effect on the tag performance. The threshold power increased, backscattered power decreased and the read range was shortened. On the whole, the results showed that field use of these tags in high, low and changing temperature conditions and high humidity conditions is possible. Use of these tags in combined high-humidity and high-temperature conditions should be carefully considered.

  3. Body temperature and physical activity correlates of the menstrual cycle in Chacma Baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus).

    PubMed

    Nyakudya, Trevor T; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the temporal relationship between abdominal temperature, physical activity, perineal swelling, and urinary progesterone and estradiol concentrations over the menstrual cycle in unrestrained captive baboons. Using a miniature temperature-sensitive data logger surgically implanted in the abdominal cavity and an activity data logger implanted subcutaneously on the trunk, we measured, continuously over 6 months at 10-min intervals, abdominal temperature and physical activity patterns in four female adult baboons Papio hamadryas ursinus (12.9-19.9 kg), in cages in an indoor animal facility (22-25°C). We monitored menstrual bleeding and perineal swelling changes, and measured urinary progesterone and estradiol concentrations, daily for up to 6 months, to ascertain the stage and length of the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle was 36 ± 2 days (mean ± SD) long and the baboons exhibited cyclic changes in perineal swellings, abdominal temperature, physical activity, urinary progesterone, and estradiol concentrations over the cycle. Mean 24-hr abdominal temperature during the luteal phase was significantly higher than during the periovulatory phase (ANOVA, F((2, 9)) = 4.7; P = 0.04), but not different to that during the proliferative phase. Physical activity followed a similar pattern, with mean 24-hr physical activity almost twice as high in the luteal than in the periovulatory phase (ANOVA, P = 0.58; F((2, 12)) = 5.8). We have characterized correlates of the menstrual cycle in baboons and shown, for the first time, a rhythm of physical activity and abdominal temperature over the menstrual cycle, with a nadir of temperature and activity at ovulation.

  4. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  5. A New High-Speed, High-Cycle, Gear-Tooth Bending Fatigue Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, David B.; Dykas, Brian D.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-speed test capability for determining the high cycle bending-fatigue characteristics of gear teeth has been developed. Experiments were performed in the test facility using a standard spur gear test specimens designed for use in NASA Glenn s drive system test facilities. These tests varied in load condition and cycle-rate. The cycle-rate varied from 50 to 1000 Hz. The loads varied from high-stress, low-cycle loads to near infinite life conditions. Over 100 tests were conducted using AISI 9310 steel spur gear specimen. These results were then compared to previous data in the literature for correlation. Additionally, a cycle-rate sensitivity analysis was conducted by grouping the results according to cycle-rate and comparing the data sets. Methods used to study and verify load-path and facility dynamics are also discussed.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  11. Cycle life testing of lithium-ion batteries for small satellite LEO space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1993-08-16

    In 1990, Sony corporation announced their intention to manufacture a rechargeable lithium ion battery, based on the intercalation of lithium ions into a carbonaceous anode. The cells were first introduced for portable telephone use in June, 1991. (1) A 3.6V average cell voltage (4.1-2.75V range); (2) Excellent cycle life (1200 @ 100% DOD); (3) Good capacity retention (70% after 6 months); (4) Wide temperature range performance ({minus}20 to +60{degrees}C); (5) Excellent Discharge rate (82% capacity at 30 min. discharge rate); (6) Excellent Charge rate (100% Charge in <3 hrs); and (7) High energy density (264 W*hr/1 and 120 Whr/kg for ``D`` size cell. These specifications show significant promise for application of these batteries in low earth orbit (LEO) small satellites, particularly when compared to existing NiH{sub 2} and NiCd technology. The very high energy density and specific energy will reduce power system volume and weight. The wide temperature range enables simpler thermal design, particularly for new, small, high power satellites. The materials used in the lithium ion batteries are relatively inexpensive and benign, so that we expect costs to come down substantially in the future. The specified cycle life at 100% DOD is also 50% longer than most NiCds, so low DOD (depth of discharge) performance could be substantial. This study was undertaken to: (a) assess the feasibility for using lithium ion cells on small satellite LEO missions and (b) verify the claims of the manufacturer. This was accomplished by performing a detailed autopsy and various depth of discharge and rate tests on the cells. Of special interest was the cycle life performance of these cell at various depths of discharge DOD`s, to get an initial measure of the reduction in capacity fade with cycle conditions. Low DOD`s are used to extend the life of all batteries used in a space application.

  12. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  13. Field testing of a high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, R.L.; Hoyer, M.C.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) System has been operated as a field test facility for the past six years. Four short-term and two long-term cycles have been completed to data providing a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. A third long-term cycle is currently being planned to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact on the aquifer from heated waste storage cycles. The most critical activities in the preparation for the next cycle have proved to be the applications for the various permits and variances necessary to conduct the third cycle and the matching of the characteristics of the ATES system during heat recovery with a suitable adjacent building thermal load.

  14. High-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Notched Specimens for Ti-6Al-4V ELI Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-31

    The notch effects on the high-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy have been investigated at cryogenic temperatures. Smooth and notched specimens with the Kt=1.5, Kt=2 and Kt=3 were prepared. High-cycle fatigue tests were carried out at 4, 77 and 293 K. One million cycles fatigue strength (FS) of smooth specimen was increased with a decrease of the test temperature. Although the FS of each notched specimen at 4 K were lower than those of 77 K. Fatigue crack initiation sites of the smooth, the Kt=1.5 and the Kt=2 notched specimens at 4 K were facets in the specimen interior (internal type fracture) and those of the Kt=3 notched specimens were at the notch root (surface type fracture). The size of individual facets comprising the internal fatigue crack initiation sites correspond to almost the {alpha}-grain size. Therefore, improvement of the fatigue strength of the notched specimens for Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy which show internal type fracture at cryogenic temperatures requires attaining a smaller area size by grain refining.

  15. High-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Notched Specimens for Ti-6Al-4V ELI Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-01

    The notch effects on the high-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy have been investigated at cryogenic temperatures. Smooth and notched specimens with the Kt=1.5, Kt=2 and Kt=3 were prepared. High-cycle fatigue tests were carried out at 4, 77 and 293 K. One million cycles fatigue strength (FS) of smooth specimen was increased with a decrease of the test temperature. Although the FS of each notched specimen at 4 K were lower than those of 77 K. Fatigue crack initiation sites of the smooth, the Kt=1.5 and the Kt=2 notched specimens at 4 K were facets in the specimen interior (internal type fracture) and those of the Kt=3 notched specimens were at the notch root (surface type fracture). The size of individual facets comprising the internal fatigue crack initiation sites correspond to almost the α-grain size. Therefore, improvement of the fatigue strength of the notched specimens for Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy which show internal type fracture at cryogenic temperatures requires attaining a smaller area size by grain refining.

  16. Improving the long-term cycling performance of lithium-ion batteries at elevated temperature with electrolyte additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian; Ma, Lin; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of vinylene carbonate-based and prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone-based electrolyte additives on the cycling behavior of Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2/graphite pouch type cells at elevated temperature have been systematically studied. Capacity fade during cycling, charge-transfer resistance before and after cycling as well as gas evolution during formation and also during cycling were examined and compared. For vinylene carbonate-based additive blends, only 3% vinylene carbonate, 2% vinylene carbonate + 1% 1,3,2-dioxathiolane-2,2-dioxide + 1% tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite or 2% vinylene carbonate + 1% methylene methyl disulfonate + 1% tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite showed less capacity fade than 2% vinylene carbonate alone. Cells with all of these vinylene carbonate-based electrolyte additive blends lost more than 20% of their initial capacity after ∼1000 cycles at 55 °C and all the vinylene carbonate-based cells swelled more than 10% of their initial volume during this test. Cells containing all prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone-based additive blends generally produced much less gas than the vinylene carbonate-based blends. Many cells containing prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone-based additive blends lost less than 20% of their initial capacity after 1000 cycles. Moreover, the impedance of these prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone-based electrolytes decreased after long-term cycling. These results suggest that prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone-based electrolytes are more useful than vinylene carbonate-based electrolytes at high temperatures in Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2/graphite cells.

  17. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK TEST CYCLES: COMBINING DRIVEABILITY WITH REALISTIC ENGINE EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy-duty engine certification testing uses a cycle that is scaled to the capabilities of each engine. As such, every engine should be equally challenged by the cycle's power demands. It would seem that a chassis cycle, similarly scaled to the capabilities of each vehicle, could...

  18. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 1: Narloy Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for Narloy Z, a centrifugally cast, copper-base alloy. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature in air and in argon at 482, 538 and 593 C using an axial strain rate of .002/sec to the -1 power. In addition tensile tests were performed at 538 C in an evaluation of tensile properties at strain rates of .004 and .01/sec to the -1 power. Ultimate and yield strength values of about 315 and 200 MN/sq m respectively were recorded at room temperature and these decreased to about 120 and 105 respectively as the temperature was increased to 593 C. Reduction in area values were recorded in the range from 40 to 50% with some indication of a minimum ductility point at 538 C.

  19. A Statistical Test of Uniformity in Solar Cycle Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway David H.

    2012-01-01

    Several indices are used to characterize the solar activity cycle. Key among these are: the International Sunspot Number, the Group Sunspot Number, Sunspot Area, and 10.7 cm Radio Flux. A valuable aspect of these indices is the length of the record -- many decades and many (different) 11-year cycles. However, this valuable length-of-record attribute has an inherent problem in that it requires many different observers and observing systems. This can lead to non-uniformity in the datasets and subsequent erroneous conclusions about solar cycle behavior. The sunspot numbers are obtained by counting sunspot groups and individual sunspots on a daily basis. This suggests that the day-to-day and month-to-month variations in these numbers should follow Poisson Statistics and be proportional to the square-root of the sunspot numbers themselves. Examining the historical records of these indices indicates that this is indeed the case - even with Sunspot Area and 10.7 cm Radio Flux. The ratios of the RMS variations to the square-root of the indices themselves are relatively constant with little variation over the phase of each solar cycle or from small to large solar cycles. There are, however, important step-like changes in these ratios associated with changes in observer and/or observer system. Here we show how these variations can be used to construct more uniform datasets.

  20. The effect of temperature cycling typical of low earth orbit satellites on thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogro-Campero, A.; Turner, L. G.; Bogorad, A.; Herschitz, R.

    1990-01-01

    The refrigeration of superconductors in space poses a challenging problem. The problem could be less severe if superconducting materials would not have to be cooled when not in use. Thin films of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) superconductor were subjected to thermal cycling, which was carried out to simulate a large number of eclipses of a low earth orbit satellite. Electrical measurements were performed to find the effect of the temperature cycling. Thin films of YBCO were formed by coevaporation of Y, BaF2, and Cu and postannealing in wet oxygen at 850 C for 3.5 h. The substrates used were (100) SrTiO3, polycrystalline alumina, and oxidized silicon; the last two have an evaporated zirconia layer. Processing and microstructure studies of these types of films have been published. THe zero resistance transition temperatures of the samples used in this study were 91, 82, and 86 K, respectively. The samples were characterized by four point probe electrical measurements as a function of temperature. The parameters measured were: the zero resistance transition temperature, the 10 to 90 percent transition width, and the room temperature resistance, normalized to that measured before temperature cycling. The results for two samples are presented. Each sample had a cumulative exposure. Cycling in atmospheric pressure nitrogen was performed at a rate of about 60 cycles per day, whereas in vacuum the rate was only about 10 cycles per day. The results indicate only little or no changes in the parameters measured. Degradation of superconducting thin films of YBCO has been reported due to storage in nitrogen. It is believed that the relatively good performance of films after temperature cycling is related to the fact that BaF2 was used as an evaporation source. The latest result on extended temperature cycling indicates significant degradation. Further tests of extended cycling will be carried out to provide additional data and to clarify this preliminary finding.

  1. Life Cycle Testing of Viscoelastic Material for Hubble Space Telescope Solar Array 3 Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Reed, Benjamin B.; Viens, Michael J.; Parker, Bradford H.; Pendleton, Scott C.

    2003-01-01

    During the March 2002 Servicing Mission by Space Shuttle (STS 109), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was refurbished with two new solar arrays that now provide all of its power. These arrays were built with viscoelastic/titanium dampers, integral to the supporting masts, which reduce the interaction of the wing bending modes with the Telescope. Damping of over 3% of critical was achieved. To assess the damper s ability to maintain nominal performance over the 10-year on-orbit design goal, material specimens were subjected to an accelerated life test. The test matrix consisted of scheduled events to expose the specimens to pre-determined combinations of temperatures, frequencies, displacement levels, and numbers of cycles. These exposure events were designed to replicate the life environment of the damper from fabrication through testing to launch and life on-orbit. To determine whether material degradation occurred during the exposure sequence, material performance was evaluated before and after the accelerated aging with complex stiffness measurements. Based on comparison of pre- and post-life-cycle measurements, the material is expected to maintain nominal performance through end of life on-orbit. Recent telemetry from the Telescope indicates that the dampers are performing nominally.

  2. Elevated temperature fatigue testing of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    The major technology areas needed to perform a life prediction of an aircraft turbine engine hot section component are discussed and the steps required for life prediction are outlined. These include the determination of the operating environment, the calculation of the thermal and mechanical loading of the component, the cyclic stress-strain and creep behavior of the material required for structural analysis, and the structural analysis to determine the local stress-strain-temperature-time response of the material at the critical location in the components. From a knowledge of the fatigue, creep, and failure resistance of the material, a prediction of the life of the component is made. Material characterization and evaluation conducted for the purpose of calculating fatigue crack initiation lives of components operating at elevated temperatures are emphasized.

  3. Estimates of the emission rates of nitrous oxide from light-duty vehicles using different chassis dynamometer test cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, Tao; Durbin, Thomas D.; Wayne Miller, J.; Norbeck, Joseph M.

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) that can be formed over a catalyst in the vehicle exhaust. In this study, a total of 60 vehicles ranging from non-catalyst to super ultra low-emission vehicles (SULEV) technologies were tested over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), with a subset of vehicles also tested over the cold start ST01, the hot running ST01, and more aggressive cycles, such as the US06 and Modal Emissions Cycle (MEC01v7). The N 2O emission rate was highest for the earliest catalyst technologies and declined for more advanced technology vehicles. Of the 60 test vehicles, nearly half (25) of the vehicles had FTP N 2O emission rates below 10 mg mile -1, while the emission rate of the remaining vehicles varied significantly depending on the specific vehicle control technology, operating, cycle and sulfur content of the gasoline. Real-time data showed that N 2O emissions are primarily formed during the early period of catalyst light-off, and decline significantly as the catalyst reaches its equilibrium temperature. Only cycles with a cold start component, such as the cold start ST01 and FTP, showed any substantial N 2O emissions. N 2O emissions for aggressive cycles, such as the US06 or MEC01v7, or cycles where the catalyst was always at operating temperature, were near detection limits. Increases in fuel sulfur from 30 to 330 ppmw were found to increase N 2O emissions by almost 4 times over the FTP and US06, while increases from 5 to 150 ppmw in fuel sulfur increased N 2O by between 3 and 8 times depending on the cycle. It is concluded that gasoline sulfur, control technology and start conditions must all be considered in estimating N 2O emissions inventories.

  4. Development of a variational data assimilation system for the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While, J.; Martin, M.

    2013-06-01

    A variational data assimilation system based on an incremental 4D-Var approach is proposed for use with a zero-dimensional model of the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST). Traditional 4D-Var, which seeks to find the initial state of a system, is not appropriate for diurnal SST which is a wind and heat flux driven system that has only a limited memory of its prior state. Instead the proposed assimilation system corrects both the initial SST and the heat and wind fluxes applied throughout the day. The assimilation system is tested using ensembles in a set of idealized twin experiments. In these tests controlling parameters are varied around reasonable "default" values with the quality of the analyses assessed against a known "truth". Within our tests data assimilation is shown to improve diurnal SST under most circumstances. Analyzed heat fluxes are also sometimes improved, although the improvement is much less than that observed for diurnal SST. The system was not found to improve the wind stress. The only circumstances where diurnal SST was not found to be improved by the assimilation were where either observational errors were large (greater than 0.5 K in our tests), or biases in the observations were too big (less than -0.3 K or greater than 0.2 K). The non-Gaussian behavior of the wind stress was found to have an impact on the assimilation in low-wind conditions and under these conditions the best analyses were obtained by artificially inflating the observation error.

  5. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... between the feedback and reference cycle values, the entire engine speed and torque feedback signal... feedback signals are shifted, both speed and torque must be shifted the same amount in the same direction... engine feedback speed and torque values recorded. Also calculate the reference brake horsepower-hour...

  6. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  7. Effects of Elevated Temperatures and Thermal Cycling on Ceramic Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    the facilities of the materials laboratory at will. Larry Zawada provided the plates for me to use and gave me much information on the processing and...Fabrication All plates were manufactured at the Air Force Materials Laboratory under the supervision of Mr. Larry Zawada . The following processing...the room temperature, elevated temperature, and thermal cycling I portions of this study were conducted. Specimen Preparation. Mr. Larry Zawada

  8. Application of high temperature air heaters to advanced power generation cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T R; Boss, W H; Chapman, J N

    1992-03-01

    Recent developments in ceramic composite materials open up the possibility of recuperative air heaters heating air to temperatures well above the feasible with metal tubes. A high temperature air heater (HTAH) has long been recognized as a requirement for the most efficient MHD plants in order to reach high combustor flame temperatures. The application of gas turbines in coal-fired plants of all types has been impeded because of the problems in cleaning exhaust gas sufficiently to avoid damage to the turbine. With a possibility of a HTAH, such plants may become feasible on the basis of air turbine cycles, in which air is compressed and heated in the HTAH before being applied to turbine. The heat exchanger eliminates the need for the hot gas cleanup system. The performance improvement potential of advanced cycles with HTAH application including the air turbine cycle in several variations such as the DOE program on ``Coal-Fired Air Furnace Combined Cycle...,`` variations originated by the authors, and the MHD combined cycle are presented. The status of development of ceramic air heater technology is included.

  9. Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Simić, Nataša; Ravlić, Arijana

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown cyclic changes in the activation levels and performance of different tasks throughout the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to examine if changes in the reaction time to both light and sound stimuli may be associated with basal body temperature changes and subjective assessments of General and High Activation during the different phases of a menstrual cycle characterized by high (preovulatory and midluteal phase) and low (menstrual and early follicular phase) levels of oestrogen and progesterone. The study included measurements of basal body temperature, simple reaction times to light and sound and self-assessment of General and High Activation during the menstrual, early follicular, late follicular and luteal phase. The sample consisted of 19 female subjects with regular menstrual cycles. The results obtained in this study indicate lower basal body temperature values during phases with low sex hormone levels, while the activation assessments suggest stable levels of both General and High Activation throughout the menstrual cycle. Similar patterns of change have been shown for reaction times in visual and auditory sensory modalities. Reaction times were shorter during phases characterized by high sex hormone levels, while phases with low hormone levels were associated with longer reaction times. From the modified text on correlations in the data analysis section, it is evident that they were calculated from averaged data from all phases of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, they do not reflect intraindividual but rather interindividual variations between the observed variables, and are not related to the hypotheses of this paper.

  10. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  11. A Physics-Based Temperature Stabilization Criterion for Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft testing specifications differ greatly in the criteria they specify for stability in thermal balance tests. Some specify a required temperature stabilization rate (the change in temperature per unit time, dT/dt), some specify that the final steady-state temperature be approached to within a specified difference, delta T , and some specify a combination of the two. The particular values for temperature stabilization rate and final temperature difference also vary greatly between specification documents. A one-size-fits-all temperature stabilization rate requirement does not yield consistent results for all test configurations because of differences in thermal mass and heat transfer to the environment. Applying a steady-state temperature difference requirement is problematic because the final test temperature is not accurately known a priori, especially for powered configurations. In the present work, a simplified, lumped-mass analysis has been used to explore the applicability of these criteria. A new, user-friendly, physics-based approach is developed that allows the thermal engineer to determine when an acceptable level of temperature stabilization has been achieved. The stabilization criterion can be predicted pre-test but must be refined during test to allow verification that the defined level of temperature stabilization has been achieved.

  12. Estimation of the biphasic property in a female's menstrual cycle from cutaneous temperature measured during sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxi; Kitazawa, Masumi; Togawa, Tatsuo

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes a method to estimate a woman's menstrual cycle based on the hidden Markov model (HMM). A tiny device was developed that attaches around the abdominal region to measure cutaneous temperature at 10-min intervals during sleep. The measured temperature data were encoded as a two-dimensional image (QR code, i.e., quick response code) and displayed in the LCD window of the device. A mobile phone captured the QR code image, decoded the information and transmitted the data to a database server. The collected data were analyzed by three steps to estimate the biphasic temperature property in a menstrual cycle. The key step was an HMM-based step between preprocessing and postprocessing. A discrete Markov model, with two hidden phases, was assumed to represent higher- and lower-temperature phases during a menstrual cycle. The proposed method was verified by the data collected from 30 female participants, aged from 14 to 46, over six consecutive months. By comparing the estimated results with individual records from the participants, 71.6% of 190 menstrual cycles were correctly estimated. The sensitivity and positive predictability were 91.8 and 96.6%, respectively. This objective evaluation provides a promising approach for managing premenstrual syndrome and birth control.

  13. Timing of the diurmal temperature cycle in remote sensing and model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from variations in measuring devise or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of lo...

  14. 40 CFR 86.884-7 - Dynamometer operation cycle for smoke emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer operation cycle for smoke... Dynamometer operation cycle for smoke emission tests. (a) The following sequence of operations shall be performed during engine dynamometer testing of smoke emissions, starting with the dynamometer...

  15. Distribution of radiocarbon as a test of global carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Kheshgi, H.S.

    1995-03-01

    Accurate global carbon cycle models are needed to estimate the future change of atmospheric CO{sub 2} for specified scenarios of CO{sub 2} emissions. Model accuracy cannot be tested directly because of the difficulty in estimating the carbon flux to the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere. However, one test of model consistency is the requirement that the model reproduce past changes and spatial distributions of {sup 14}C. A model for carbon exchange within and among the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial biosphere is found to satisfy this test. The ocean is modeled as an upwelling-diffusion column capped by a mixed layer with recirculation of the polar bottom water to complete the thermohaline circulation. This ocean advection scheme contains only two key dynamic parameters, the vertical eddy diffusivity {kappa} and the upwelling velocity w, which are calibrated to match the vertical distribution of preanthropogenic {sup 14}C. The thermocline depth scale {kappa}/w = 1343 m found by calibration is considerably deeper than that required to match the steady vertical temperature profile (500 m). This is consistent with the hypothesis that isopyncal mixing, which is much more rapid than diapyncal mixing, has a stronger effect on {sup 14}C than on temperature since isopyncals are nearly isothermal. This model is found to match measured values, within measurement error, of the prebomb decrease in {sup 14}C in the atmosphere and the mixed layer due to the Suess effect, the bomb {sup 14}C in the mixed layer, the bomb {sup 14}C penetration depth, the bomb {sup 14}C ocean inventory, and the vertical distribution of total carbon. Results are compared to those of other schematic carbon cycle models as well as those of ocean general circulation models. 95 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must be met for both cold and hot cycles individually. Point deletions from the regression analyses are... to 1.030 0.83-1.03 (hot), 0.77-1.03 (cold) 0.89-1.03 (hot), 0.87-1.03 (cold). Coefficient of determination, r 2 1 0.9700 1 0.8800 (hot), 1 0.8500 (cold) 1 0.9100. Y intercept of the regression line, b...

  18. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P < 0.01) and CONTROL (-1.8 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.05), and a greater increase in mean skin temperature during the heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.01), no differences in power output were found between HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P < 0.05). Additionally, no differences were observed in core temperature measures, HR, and RPE. Skin temperature does not affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

  19. Initial Test Results of a Dual Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Mason, Lee S.

    2007-01-01

    The dual Brayton power conversion system constructed for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was acceptance tested April 2007 at Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, Colorado. This uniquely configured conversion system is built around two modified commercial Capstone C30 microturbines and employs two closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) converters sharing a common gas inventory and common heat source. Because both CBCs share the gas inventory, behavior of one CBC has an impact on the performance of the other CBC, especially when one CBC is standby or running at a different shaft speed. Testing performed to date includes the CBCs operating at equal and unequal shaft speeds. A test was also conducted where one CBC was capped off and the other was operated as a single CBC converter. The dual Brayton configuration generated 10.6 kWe at 75 krpm and a turbine inlet temperature of 817 K. Single Brayton operation generated 14.8 kWe at 90 krpm and a turbine inlet temperature of 925 K.

  20. Temperature and the sulfur cycle control monomethylmercury cycling in high Arctic coastal marine sediments from Allen Bay, Nunavut, Canada.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, K A; Chétélat, J; Yumvihoze, E; Poulain, A J

    2014-01-01

    Monomethylmercury (MMHg) is a neurotoxin of concern in the Canadian Arctic due to its tendency to bioaccumulate and the importance of fish and wildlife in the Inuit diet. In lakes and wetlands, microbial sediment communities are integral to the cycling of MMHg; however, the role of Arctic marine sediments is poorly understood. With projected warming, the effect of temperature on the production and degradation of MMHg in Arctic environments also remains unclear. We examined MMHg dynamics across a temperature gradient (4, 12, 24 °C) in marine sediments collected in Allen Bay, Nunavut. Slurries were spiked with stable mercury isotopes and amended with specific microbial stimulants and inhibitors, and subsampled over 12 days. Maximal methylation and demethylation potentials were low, ranging from below detection to 1.13 pmol g(-1) h(-1) and 0.02 pmol g(-1) h(-1), respectively, suggesting that sediments are likely not an important source of MMHg to overlying water. Our results suggest that warming may result in an increase in Hg methylation - controlled by temperature-dependent sulfate reduction, without a compensatory increase in demethylation. This study highlights the need for further research into the role of high Arctic marine sediments and climate on the Arctic marine MMHg budget.

  1. Preliminary low temperature tests of a digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Daud, Taher; Sekanina, Lukas

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an initial experiment performed to assess the electrical behavior of the Innovative Integration board containing a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) with its JTAG (Blackhawk) connector at low temperatures. The objective of the experiment is to determine the lowest temperature at which the DSP can operate. The DSP was tested at various low-temperatures and a Genetic Algorithm was used as the DSP test program.

  2. ON THE CONSTANCY OF THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE IN THE EXPANDING CORONA THROUGHOUT SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2010-03-10

    A recent analysis of Fe emission lines observed during the total solar eclipses of 2006 March 29 and 2008 August 1 established the first empirical link between the electron temperature in the expanding corona and Fe charge states measured in interplanetary space. In this Letter, we use this link to infer this temperature throughout solar cycle 23 from in situ charge state measurements from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and on Ulysses. The distribution of the SWICS/ACE Fe charge states, which span cycle 23 from 1998 to 2009, is skewed with a peak centered on Fe{sup 8+}, Fe{sup 9+}, and Fe{sup 10+} and a tail spanning Fe{sup 12+} to Fe{sup 20+}. An iterative process based on this distribution and on the Fe ion fraction as a function of electron temperature yields a narrow peak at 1.1 x 10{sup 6} K. The tail in the measured charge state distribution is attributed to the sporadic release of material hotter than 2 x 10{sup 6} K from closed magnetic structures within the bulges of streamers. The Fe Ulysses charge state measurements between 1992 and 1997 from cycle 22 peaked at Fe{sup 11+}, indicative of a slightly higher temperature of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} K. The relative constancy of the electron temperature in the expanding corona throughout solar cycle 23 points to the presence of an unknown mechanism regulating the energy input to electrons in the acceleration region of the solar wind at all latitudes during this cycle.

  3. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  4. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and

  5. Environmental degradation of 316 stainless steel in high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Manson, S. Stanford; Halford, Gary R.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures based on modification of the conventional Strainrange Partitioning method are proposed to characterize the time-dependent degradation of engineering alloys in high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue. Creep-fatigue experiments were conducted in air using different waveforms of loading on 316 stainless steel at 816 C (1500 F) to determine the effect of exposure time on cyclic life. Reductions in the partitioned cyclic lives were observed with an increase in the time of exposure (or with the corresponding decrease in the steady-state creep rate) for all the waveforms involving creep strain. Excellent correlations of the experimental data were obtained by modifying the Conventional Strainrange Partitioning life relationships involving creep strain using a power-law term of either: (1) time of exposure, or (2) steady-state creep rate of the creep-fatigue test. Environmental degradation due to oxidation, material degradation due to the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries and detrimental deformation modes associated with the prolonged periods of creep were observed to be the main mechanisms responsible for life reductions at long exposure times.

  6. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  7. Effect of programmed diurnal temperature cycles on plasma thyroxine level, body temperature, and feed intake of holstein dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, I. M.; Johnson, H. D.; Hahn, G. L.

    1983-03-01

    Holstein cows exposed to simulated summer diurnal ambient temperature cycles of Phoenix, Arizona and Atlanta, Georgia and diurnal modifications of these climates displayed daily cycles fluctuations in plasma thyroxine (T4) and rectal temperatures (Tre). There were daily diurnal changes in T4 and Tre under all simulated climate conditions. Maximal values generally occurred in the evening hours and minimum values in the morning. Although the diurnal rhythm was influenced by the various simulated climates (diurnal modifications) a diurnal rhythm was very evident even under constant conditions at thermoneutral (Tnc) and at cyclic thermoneutral conditions (TN). The major significance of the study is that the initiation of night cooling of the animals at a time when their Tre was highest was most beneficial to maintenance of a TN plasma T4 level. There was a highly significant negative relationship of average T4 and average Tre. There was also a significant negative relationship of feed consumption and average temperature-humidity index (THI). These data suggest that night cooling may be a most effective method to alleviate thermoregulatory limitations of a hot climate on optimal animal performance. Decreasing the night time air temperature (Ta) or THI or increasing the diurnal range allows the cows to more easily dissipate excess body heat accumulated during the day and minimize the thermal inhibition on feed intake, and alterations in plasma T4 and Tre.

  8. Residual thermal effects in macro fiber composite actuators exposed to persistent temperature cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobeck, J. D.; Owen, R. B.; Inman, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the authors present results of an experimental investigation demonstrating how extreme persistent thermal cycling influences the performance of piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. More specifically, this research shows how repeated temperature cycling ranging from -60 °C to 90 °C and from -50 °C to 150 °C affects an MFCs ability to actuate while being driven at frequencies of 60 Hz to 90 Hz with a voltage of 20 Vpp. Experimental results show that thermal cycling causes MFC actuation characteristics to drift and eventually stabilize after approximately 20 cycles. In two cases presented here, thermal cycling alone caused a residual increase in actuation amplitude that exceeded the initial amplitude by 70%. This apparent thermal memory effect of MFCs may significantly impact the design and analysis of active structures where MFCs are used for vibration or displacement control in transient extreme temperature environments such as those encountered by aerospace structures, industrial equipment, automobiles, and civil infrastructure.

  9. Inhomogeneous degradation of graphite anodes in automotive lithium ion batteries under low-temperature pulse cycling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, Daniel; Sergeeva, Kseniya; Calles, Simon; Schorb, Klaus; Börger, Alexander; Roth, Christina; Heitjans, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The aging of graphite anodes in prismatic lithium ion cells during a low temperature pulse charging regime was studied by electrical tests and post-mortem analysis. The capacity decrease and impedance increase mainly occurs in the beginning of cycling and lithium plating was identified as the major aging mechanism. The degradation and the local states of charge show an inhomogeneous distribution over the anode, which is confirmed from spatially resolved XRD studies and SEM combined with EDX performed on electrode cross sections. Comparing a charged cell with a discharged cell reveals that ca. 1/3 of the lithium is plated reversibly at the given SOH of 60%. It is proposed that high charge rates at low temperatures induce inhomogeneities of temperature and anode utilization resulting in inhomogeneous aging effects that accumulate over lifetime.

  10. High temperature, low cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 3: Zirconium-copper; thermal-mechanical strain cycling, hold-time and notch fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue characteristics of smooth bar and notched bar specimens (hourglass shape) of zirconium-copper, 1/2 Hard, material (R-2 Series) were evaluated at room temperature in axial strain control. Over the fatigue life range from about 300 to 3000 cycles the ratio of fatigue life for smooth bar to fatigue life for notched bar remained constant at a value of about 6.0. Some additional hold-time data for the R-2 alloy tested in argon at 538 C are reported. An analysis of the relaxation data obtained in these hold-time tests is also reported and it is shown that these data yield a fairly consistent correlation in terms of instantaneous stress rate divided by instantaneous stress. Two thermal-mechanical strain cycling tests were also performed using a cyclic frequency of 4.5 cycles per hour and a temperature cycling interval from 260 to 538 C. The fatigue life values in these tests were noticeably lower than that observed in isothermal tests at 538 C.

  11. Mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high temperature low cycle fatigue of Rene 80 and IN 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoski, G. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens tested for the AGARD strain range partitioning program were investigated. Rene 80 and IN 100 were tested in air and in vacuum; at 871 C, 925 C, and 1000 C; and in the coated and uncoated condition. The specimens exhibited a multiplicity of high-temperature low-cycle fatigue damage. Observations of the various forms of damage were consistent with material and testing conditions and were generally in agreement with previous studies. In every case observations support a contention that failure occurs at a particular combination of crack length and maximum stress. A failure criterion which is applicable in the regime of testing studied is presented. The predictive capabilities of this criterion are straight forward.

  12. The application of probabilistic design theory to high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirsching, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Metal fatigue under stress and thermal cycling is a principal mode of failure in gas turbine engine hot section components such as turbine blades and disks and combustor liners. Designing for fatigue is subject to considerable uncertainty, e.g., scatter in cycles to failure, available fatigue test data and operating environment data, uncertainties in the models used to predict stresses, etc. Methods of analyzing fatigue test data for probabilistic design purposes are summarized. The general strain life as well as homo- and hetero-scedastic models are considered. Modern probabilistic design theory is reviewed and examples are presented which illustrate application to reliability analysis of gas turbine engine components.

  13. Calibration and testing or models of the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, W.R.; Killough, G.G.; Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A ten-compartment model of the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon is presented. The two less-abundant isotopes of carbon, /sup 13/C and /sup 14/C, as well as total carbon, are considered. The cycling of carbon in the ocean is represented by two well-mixed compartments and in the world's terrestrial ecosystems by seven compartments, five which are dynamic and two with instantaneous transfer. An internally consistent procedure for calibrating this model against an assumed initial steady state is discussed. In particular, the constraint that the average /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio in the total flux from the terrestrial component of the model to the atmosphere be equal to that of the steady-state atmosphere is investigated. With this additional constraint, the model provides a more accurate representation of the influence of the terrestrial system on the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio of the atmosphere and provides an improved basis for interpreting records, such as tree rings, reflecting historical changes in this ratio.

  14. Testing the Goodwin growth-cycle macroeconomic dynamics in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, N. J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the empirical validity of Goodwin’s (1967) macroeconomic model of growth with cycles by assuming that the individual income distribution of the Brazilian society is described by the Gompertz-Pareto distribution (GPD). This is formed by the combination of the Gompertz curve, representing the overwhelming majority of the population (˜99%), with the Pareto power law, representing the tiny richest part (˜1%). In line with Goodwin’s original model, we identify the Gompertzian part with the workers and the Paretian component with the class of capitalists. Since the GPD parameters are obtained for each year and the Goodwin macroeconomics is a time evolving model, we use previously determined, and further extended here, Brazilian GPD parameters, as well as unemployment data, to study the time evolution of these quantities in Brazil from 1981 to 2009 by means of the Goodwin dynamics. This is done in the original Goodwin model and an extension advanced by Desai et al. (2006). As far as Brazilian data is concerned, our results show partial qualitative and quantitative agreement with both models in the studied time period, although the original one provides better data fit. Nevertheless, both models fall short of a good empirical agreement as they predict single center cycles which were not found in the data. We discuss the specific points where the Goodwin dynamics must be improved in order to provide a more realistic representation of the dynamics of economic systems.

  15. Insect seasonality: circle map analysis of temperature-driven life cycles.

    PubMed

    Powell, James A; Logan, Jesse A

    2005-05-01

    Maintaining an adaptive seasonality, with life cycle events occurring at appropriate times of year and in synchrony with cohorts and ephemeral resources, is a basic ecological requisite for many cold-blooded organisms. There are many mechanisms for synchronizing developmental milestones, such as egg laying (oviposition), egg hatching, cocoon opening, and the emergence of adults. These are often irreversible, specific to particular life stages, and include diapause, an altered physiological state which can be reversed by some synchronizing environmental cue (e.g. photoperiod). However, many successful organisms display none of these mechanisms for maintaining adaptive seasonality. In this paper, we briefly review the mathematical relationship between environmental temperatures and developmental timing and discuss the consequences of viewing these models as circle maps from the cycle of yearly oviposition dates and temperatures to oviposition dates for subsequent generations. Of particular interest biologically are life cycles which are timed to complete in exactly 1 year, or univoltine cycles. Univoltinism, associated with reproductive success for many temperate species, is related to stable fixed points of the developmental circle map. Univoltine fixed points are stable and robust in broad temperature bands, but lose stability suddenly to maladaptive cycles at the edges of these bands. Adaptive seasonality may therefore break down with little warning with constantly increasing or decreasing temperature change, as in scenarios for global warming. These ideas are illustrated and explored in the context of Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) occurring in the marginal thermal habitat of central Idaho's Rocky Mountains. Applications of these techniques have not been widely explored by the applied math community, but are likely to provide great insight into the response of biological systems to climate change.

  16. Ultrahigh vacuum, high temperature, low cycle fatigue of coated and uncoated Rene 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted on the ultrahigh vacuum strain controlled by low cycle fatigue behavior of uncoated and CODEP B-1 aluminide coated Rene' 80 nickel-base superalloy at 1000 C (1832 F) and 871 C (1600 F). The results indicated little effect of coating or temperature on the fatigue properties. There was, however, a significant effect on fatigue life when creep was introduced into the strain cycles. The effect of this creep component was analyzed in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning.

  17. Fast freeze-drying cycle design and optimization using a PAT based on the measurement of product temperature.

    PubMed

    Bosca, Serena; Barresi, Antonello A; Fissore, Davide

    2013-10-01

    This paper is focused on the use of an innovative Process Analytical Technology for the fast design and optimization of freeze-drying cycles for pharmaceuticals. The tool is based on a soft-sensor, a device that uses the experimental measure of product temperature during freeze-drying, a mathematical model of the process, and the Extended Kalman Filter algorithm to estimate the sublimation flux, the residual amount of ice in the vial, and some model parameters (heat and mass transfer coefficients). The accuracy of the estimations provided by the soft-sensor has been shown using as test case aqueous solutions containing different excipients (sucrose, polyvinylpyrrolidone), processed at various operating conditions, pointing out that the soft-sensor allows a fast estimation of model parameters and product dynamics without involving expensive hardware or time consuming analysis. The possibility of using the soft-sensor to calculate in-line (or off-line) the design space of the primary drying phase is here presented and discussed. Results evidences that by this way, it is possible to identify the values of the heating fluid temperature that maintain product temperature below the limit value, as well as the operating conditions that maximize the sublimation flux. Various experiments have been carried out to test the effectiveness of the proposed approach for a fast design of the cycle, evidencing that drying time can be significantly reduced, without impairing product quality.

  18. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  19. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  20. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  1. [Effect of water temperature, stocking density and feeding cycle on growth of juvenile Poecilobdella manillensis].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo-xing; Liu, Fei; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Shi, Hong-zhuan; Li, Meng-meng; Lu, Yu-xi

    2015-03-01

    The effect of water temperature, stocking density and feeding cycle on the growth of Poecilobdella manillensis juvenile was conducted P. manillensis was conducted respectively under different conditions: water temperatures(18, 22, 26, 30,34, 38 degrees C and CT), stocking density (75, 125, 200, 275, 350 individual/L) and feeding cycle(2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 d). After 30 days, survival rate, weight gain rate, specific growth rate were measured. There was a significant correlation between water temperature and specific growth rate (γ = -0.066x2 + 3.543 1x -38.09, R2 = 0.837 9). Based on the regression equation, the specific growth rate of P. manillensis achieved the maximum (9.461 4) at 26.84 degrees C. And the most optimal water temperature was 26-30 degrees C. Meanwhile, the survival rates of P. manillensis was 0 at 38 degrees C in 3 d. There was significant negative correlation between density and specific growth rate (γ = -0.005 7x + 9.197 3, R2 = 0.998 3) and between feeding cycle and specific growth rate (γ = -0.468 2x + 10.574, R2 = 0.998 8).

  2. Development of a low cost, low temperature cryocooler using the Gifford McMahon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanayaka, A.; Mani, R.

    2008-03-01

    Although Helium is the second most abundant element, its concentration in the earth's atmosphere is fairly low and constant, as the portion that escapes from the atmosphere is replace by new emission. Historically, Helium was extracted as a byproduct of natural gas production, and stored in gas fields in a National Helium Reserve, in an attempt to conserve this interesting element. National policy has changed and the cost of liquid Helium has increased rapidly in the recent past. These new circumstances have created new interest in alternative eco-friendly methods to realizing and maintaining low temperatures in the laboratory. There have been number of successful attempts at making low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerators by modifying an existing closed cycle system, and usually the regenerator has been replaced in order to achieve the desired results. Here, we discus our attempt to fabricate a low cost, low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerator starting from a 15K Gifford McMahon system. We reexamine the barriers to realizing lower temperature here and our attempts at overcoming them.

  3. The Language Testing Cycle: From Inception to Washback. Series S, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, Ed.; Elder, Catherine, Ed.

    A selection of essays on language testing includes: "Perspectives on the Testing Cycle: Setting the Scene" (Catherine Elder, Gillian Wigglesworth); "The Politicisation of English: The Case of the STEP Test and the Chinese Students" (Lesleyanne Hawthorne); "Developing Language Tests for Specific Populations" (Rosemary…

  4. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  5. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  6. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

  7. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a SiCp reinforced aluminum matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han, N.L.; Wang, Z.G.; Sun, L.Z.

    1995-06-01

    Based on an investigation of low cycle fatigue life and cyclic stress response characteristics of SiC particulates reinforced pure aluminum and unreinforced matrix aluminum at 298 K and 441 K, the following observations were made. (1) Cyclic stress response of the unreinforced matrix aluminum, in the as-extruded condition, revealed initial cyclic hardening, cyclic stability and second hardening at ambient temperature. With a contrast, the unreinforced aluminum at elevated temperature showed progressively cyclic softening behavior without initial hardening. (2) The cyclic stress response characteristics of the composite were different from that of its unreinforced matrix at room temperature. In spite of the initial hardening, the composite showed progressive softening in most of the fatigue life. At elevated temperature the composite also displayed continuous cyclic softening behavior. The reason for the softening behavior probably was that the dislocation tangles in the composite specimen with a likely work-hardened status was not stable and could be changed under a cyclic loading. (3) The SiCp/Al composite and the unreinforced matrix followed the Coffin-Manson law. The low cycle fatigue resistance of the composite at room temperature was lower than that of the unreinforced matrix. A decrease in the fatigue endurance due to a rise in test temperature was observed for the composite and the unreinforced matrix especially at low cyclic plastic strain ranges. The induction of fatigue life of the unreinforced aluminum was faster than that of the composite, so the fatigue resistance of the composite was stronger than that of the unreinforced aluminum under lower cyclic strain ranges at elevated temperature.

  8. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and, in some cases, return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential.

  9. Test summary for advanced H2 cycle NI-CD cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee

    1987-01-01

    To improve operational tolerances and mass, the H2 gas recombination design provisions of the Ni-H2 system were incorporated into the sealed Ni-Cd system. Produced is a cell design capable of operating on the H2 cycle versus the normal O2 cycle. Three test cells have now completed approximately 4,330 LEO (90 minute) cycles at 20 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Performance remains stable although one cell exhibited a temporary pressure anomaly.

  10. Study on the High Cycle Fatigue Property of Ti-600 Alloy at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liying; Yang, Guanjun; Hong, Quan; Zhao, Yongqing

    2011-06-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) property of one kind of near alpha titanium alloy named after Ti-600 was investigated at a frequency of 120~130Hz and with a load ratio R of 0.1. The HCF strength for the alloy at ambient temperature was found to be 475MPa. The observed high HCF strength was attributed to its overlapping plate like α+β phase microstructure. At the same stress of 600MPa, the distance between two fatigue stripes for the sample fractured at 8.61×105 cycles was wider than that of the sample failured at 1.78×106 cycles, which indicated that their propagation resistance for fatigue cracks was smaller.

  11. Notch effects on high-cycle fatigue properties of Ti 6Al 4V ELI alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.; Ogata, T.

    2006-01-01

    Notch effects on the high-cycle fatigue properties of the forged Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy at cryogenic temperatures were investigated. Also, the high-cycle fatigue data were compared with the rolled Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy. The one million cycles fatigue strength (FS) of the smooth specimen for the forged Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy increased with a decrease of test temperature. However, the FS of each notched specimen at 4 K were lower than those at 77 K. On the other hand, the FS of the smooth and the notched specimens for the forged Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy at 4 K were lower than those for the rolled Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy. This is considered to be the early initiation of the fatigue crack in the forged Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy compares with the forged Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI.

  12. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, the cycle life of nickel electrodes was tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45 minute low Earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. It is shown that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength does not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. It is found that the best plaque is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has median pore size of 13 micron.

  13. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part II. Capacity fade analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. The major causes of capacity loss were identified and a complete capacity fade balance was carried out to account for the total capacity loss of Li-ion battery as a function of cycle number and temperature. The three most significant parameters that cause capacity loss were loss of secondary active material (LiCoO 2/carbon) and primary active material (Li +) and the rate capability losses. Intrinsic capacity measurements for both positive and negative electrode has been used to estimate the capacity loss due to secondary active material and a charge balance gives the capacity lost due to primary active material (Li +). Capacity fade has been quantified with secondary active material loss dominating the other losses.

  14. Organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plant utilizing low temperature heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maizza, V.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing and converting of existing low temperature and waste heat sources by the use of a high efficiency bottoming cycle is attractive and should be possible for many locations. This paper presents a theoretical study on possible combination of an organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plate with the heat pump supplied by waste energy sources. Energy requirements and system performances are analyzed using realistic design operating condition for a middle town. Some conversion systems employing working fluids other than water are being studied for the purpose of proposed application. Thermodynamic efficiencies, with respect to available resource, have been calculated by varying some system operating parameters at various reference temperature. With reference to proposed application equations and graphs are presented which interrelate the turbine operational parameters for some possible working fluids with computation results.

  15. The influence of photoperiod and temperature on the Neosho Madtom (norturus placidus) reproductive cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, J.L.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Noltie, Douglas B.

    2001-01-01

    The key to successful fish culture is to understand the environmental cues that trigger spawning. In temperate fishes, photoperiod and temperature are important in many species including the family Ictaluridae. The object of this study was to examine whether natural photo-thermal conditions in the laboratory could stimulate the reproductive cycle of Neosho madtoms (Noturus placidus). For three years a small population of Neosho madtoms were maintained under natural conditions and continually sampled using ultrasound to examine interior gonad state and exterior body measurements. The purpose was to examine the secondary sexual characteristics that normally occur during the spawning period. Every year the fish cycled in and out of spawning condition, including production and reabsorbtion of eggs. The best external measurement found to distinguish between sexes was the ratio of head length to total length. Internal measurements found the average number of eggs per female increased as the fish length increased and over time but the average sizes of the eggs were constant. After years in the simulated environment 13 different fish were involved in ten spawns. The use of ultrasound to examine gonad in madtoms is promising, especially the lack of injury associated with the procedure. Overall laboratory conditions that simulated the natural photo-thermal environment, especially daily temperature fluctuations, were successful at stimulating the reproductive cycle of Neosho madtoms including egg cycling and spawning. These results show promise towards culture of madtoms especially for those species that are rare and endangered.

  16. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  17. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  18. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2013-09-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart S of... - Transient Test Driving Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... E to Subpart S of Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.../Maintenance Program Requirements Pt. 51, Subpt. S, App. E Appendix E to Subpart S of Part 51—Transient Test Driving Cycle (I) Driver's trace. All excursions in the transient driving cycle shall be evaluated by...

  20. Impacts of the Last Glacial Cycle on ground surface temperature reconstructions over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Illanes, Lizett; Tarasov, Lev

    2017-01-01

    Borehole temperature profiles provide robust estimates of past ground surface temperature changes, in agreement with meteorological data. Nevertheless, past climatic changes such as the Last Glacial Cycle (LGC) generated thermal effects in the subsurface that affect estimates of recent climatic change from geothermal data. We use an ensemble of ice sheet simulations spanning the last 120 ka to assess the impact of the Laurentide Ice Sheet on recent ground surface temperature histories reconstructed from borehole temperature profiles over North America. When the thermal remnants of the LGC are removed, we find larger amounts of subsurface heat storage (2.8 times) and an increased warming of the ground surface over North America by 0.75 K, both relative to uncorrected borehole estimates.

  1. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  2. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175°C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  3. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200 °C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175 °C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β″-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175 °C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  4. High Temperature Evaluation of Tantalum Capacitors - Test 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-09-28

    Tantalum capacitors can provide much higher capacitance at high-temperatures than the ceramic capacitors. This study evaluates selected tantalum capacitors at high temperatures to determine their suitability for you in geothermal field. This data set contains results of the first test where three different types of capacitors were evaluated at 260C.

  5. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test. The torque and rpm feedback signals may be filtered. (d) Idle Speed Enhancement Devices (e.g... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... longer, the average feedback torque must be within ±10 ft-lbs of zero. To allow for transition, up to...

  6. Effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue properties of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Zhi-yang; Wan, Ao-shuang; Xiong, Jun-jiang; Li, Kuang; Liu, Jian-zhong

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent high-cycle fatigue (HCF) properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo, which suffer from substantial vibrational loading at small stress amplitude, high stress ratio, and high frequency in the high-temperature environments in which they function as blade and rotor spindle materials in advanced gas or steam turbine engines. Fatigue tests were performed on alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo subjected to constant-amplitude loading at four stress ratios and at four and three temperatures, respectively, to determine their temperature-dependent HCF properties. The interaction mechanisms between high temperature and stress ratio were deduced and compared with each other on the basis of the results of fractographic analysis. A phenomenological model was developed to evaluate the effects of stress ratio on the temperature-dependent HCF properties of alloy steels 2CrMo and 9CrCo. Good correlation was achieved between the predictions and actual experiments, demonstrating the practical and effective use of the proposed method.

  7. Buckling tests of aluminium columns at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Langhelle, N.K.; Amdahl, J.; Eberg, E.; Lundberg, S.

    1996-12-31

    Accidental fires are events with severe catastrophe potential for all offshore structures, and in particular for aluminium structures. Due to aluminium`s rapid strength degradation at elevated temperatures, this is particular true for aluminium structures. Accurate prediction of fire resistance is therefore essential. Experimental tests are needed to evaluate current design rules and state-of-the-art material models for aluminium under elevated temperatures. An experimental investigation was undertaken in order to study the behavior of AA 6082 alloy aluminium columns at elevated temperatures. Some of the tests were carried out at constant load with increasing temperature. Other tests experienced constant temperature and increasing load. Buckling tests at ambient temperature were also conducted. Particular emphasis was put on high temperature creep effects. The purpose of the tests was to provide data for verification of the material model implemented in the computer program USFOS, for analysis of progressive collapse analyses of space frame structures. The performance of the tempers T4 and T6 as well as columns with transversal welds are compared internally as well as to column buckling curves given in current design codes.

  8. Effect of stress ratio on high-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy forging at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Matsuoka, Saburo; Sunakawa, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the stress ratio R (the ratio of minimum stress to maximum stress) on the high-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (ELI) alloy forging was investigated at 293 and 77 K. At 293 K, the fatigue strength at 107 cycles exhibited deviations below the modified Goodman line in the R=0.01 and 0.5 tests. Moreover, at 77 K, larger deviations of the fatigue strength at 107 cycles below the modified Goodman line were confirmed in the same stress ratio conditions. The high-cycle fatigue strength of the present alloy forging exhibit an anomalous mean stress dependency at both temperatures and this dependency becomes remarkable at low temperature.

  9. Influence of temperature difference calculation method on the evaluation of Rankine cycle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisaki, Takafumi.; Ikegami, Yasuyuki.

    2014-02-01

    In the new century, energy and environmental problems are becoming more critical, and the development of natural energy is desired. Low-grade Thermal Energy Conversion (LTEC) is refocused as one of the renewable energy methods. The usefulness of LTEC is expected using hot springs and waste heat. In the case of the Rankine cycle using ammonia as the working fluid, the thermal properties of the working fluid changes in the evaporator. The traditional evaluation method of heat exchanger performance is the LMTD (Logarithmic Mean Temperature Difference) method. On the other hand, the GMTD (Generalized Mean Temperature Difference) method allows the variation of thermal properties in the heat exchanger. The aim of this study is to compare the two methods for the calculation of temperature differences and the corresponding influence on the total performance of the Rankine cycle that is operated using ammonia as a working fluid. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle is greater than that of the LMTD method. Moreover, the computable range of the GMTD calculation method is less than that of the LMTD calculation method.

  10. Solar Cycle Variability in Mean Thermospheric Composition and Temperature Induced by Atmospheric Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M., Jr.; Forbes, J. M.; Hagan, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Vertically-propagating atmospheric thermal tides whose origins lie in Earth's lower atmosphere are now widely recognized as one of the dominant "meteorological" drivers of space weather. Many prior research efforts have focused on documenting and understanding the role that dissipating tides play in determining the longitudinal and seasonal variability associated with lower thermospheric winds, temperature, and constituent densities. However, considerably less attention has focused on understanding the potential solar cycle variability in the mean thermospheric state induced by the tides. In this paper we utilize the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM), forced with observationally-based tides at the model lower boundary from the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT, from Oberheide et al. [2011]), to elucidate how the dissipating tides induce variations of up to 30 K in the zonal-mean thermosphere temperature between solar minimum and maximum. Numerical experiments are performed for the month of September and for solar minimum, medium, and maximum conditions in order to quantify the solar cycle variability associated with the different terms in the thermodynamic energy, major and minor neutral constituent continuity equations. Our analysis indicates that solar cycle variability in neutral temperatures results from a combination of net eddy heat transport effects and tidal modulation of net nitric oxide (NO) cooling. The chemical and dynamical pathways through which dissipating tides affect mean NO cooling differently at solar minimum and maximum are diagnosed.

  11. Diurnal and menstrual cycles in body temperature are regulated differently: a 28-day ambulatory study in healthy women with thermal discomfort of cold extremities and controls.

    PubMed

    Kräuchi, Kurt; Konieczka, Katarzyna; Roescheisen-Weich, Corina; Gompper, Britta; Hauenstein, Daniela; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fraenkl, Stephan; Flammer, Josef

    2014-02-01

    Diurnal cycle variations in body-heat loss and heat production, and their resulting core body temperature (CBT), are relatively well investigated; however, little is known about their variations across the menstrual cycle under ambulatory conditions. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether menstrual cycle variations in distal and proximal skin temperatures exhibit similar patterns to those of diurnal variations, with lower internal heat conductance when CBT is high, i.e. during the luteal phase. Furthermore, we tested these relationships in two groups of women, with and without thermal discomfort of cold extremities (TDCE). In total, 19 healthy eumenorrheic women with regular menstrual cycles (28-32 days), 9 with habitual TDCE (ages 29 ± 1.5 year; BMI 20.1 ± 0.4) and 10 controls without these symptoms (CON: aged 27 ± 0.8 year; BMI 22.7 ± 0.6; p < 0.004 different to TDCE) took part in the study. Twenty-eight days continuous ambulatory skin temperature measurements of distal (mean of hands and feet) and proximal (mean of sternum and infraclavicular regions) skin regions, thighs, and calves were carried out under real-life, ambulatory conditions (i-Buttons® skin probes, sampling rate: 2.5 min). The distal minus proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG) provided a valuable measure for heat redistribution from the core to the shell, and, hence, for internal heat conduction. Additionally, basal body temperature was measured sublingually directly after waking up in bed. Mean diurnal amplitudes in skin temperatures increased from proximal to distal skin regions and the 24-h mean values were inversely related. TDCE compared to CON showed significantly lower hand skin temperatures and DPG during daytime. However, menstrual cycle phase did not modify these diurnal patterns, indicating that menstrual and diurnal cycle variations in skin temperatures reveal additive effects. Most striking was the finding that all measured skin

  12. A simple-harmonic model for depicting the annual cycle of seasonal temperatures of streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Timothy Doak

    1978-01-01

    Due to economic or operational constraints, stream-temperature records cannot always be collected at all sites where information is desired or at frequencies dictated by continuous or near-continuous surveillance requirements. For streams where only periodic measurements are made during the year, and that are not appreciably affected by regulation or by thermal loading , a simple harmonic function may adequately depict the annual seasonal cycle of stream temperature at any given site. Resultant harmonic coefficients obtained from available stream-temperature records may be used in the following ways: (1) To interpolate between discrete measurements by solving the harmonic function at specified times, thereby filling in estimates of stream-temperature values; (2) to characterize areal or regional patterns of natural stream-temperature values; (2) to characterize areal or regional patterns of natural stream-temperature conditions; and (3) to detect and to assess any significant at a site brought about by streamflow regulation or basin development. Moreover, less-than-daily or sampling frequencies at a given site may give estimates of annual variation of stream temperatures that are statistically comparable to estimates obtained from a daily or continuous sampling scheme. The latter procedure may result in potential savings of resources in network operations, with negligible loss in information on annual stream-temperature variations. (Woodard -USGS)

  13. Estimates of the emission rates of ammonia from light-duty vehicles using standard chassis dynamometer test cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Thomas D.; Wilson, Ryan D.; Norbeck, Joseph M.; Miller, J. Wayne; Huai, Tao; Rhee, Sam H.

    Emissions rates of ammonia (NH 3) are reported for a fleet of 39 in-use light-duty gasoline-fueled vehicles. The fleet consisted of both light-duty passenger vehicles and light-duty trucks with various levels of emission control technologies, ranging from non-catalyst vehicles to those that were certified at the ULEV standard for California. NH 3 measurements were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the federal test procedure (FTP) driving cycle. The FTP NH 3 emission rate for this fleet of vehicles averaged 54 mg mi -1 with a range from <4 to 177 mg mi -1. For this fleet of vehicles, NH 3 emissions did not decline as significantly as the regulated pollutants with improvements in emission control technology. A subset of 5 vehicles was tested over the US06, the New York City Cycle (NYCC), and a high-speed freeway cycle for comparison with the FTP cycle. NH 3 emissions showed a strong cycle dependence, with increased emissions under more aggressive driving conditions. These results show that NH 3 emissions formed during more aggressive driving conditions should be considered in the development of NH 3 emission factors. The onset of NH 3 emissions typically occurred after catalyst light-off, near when the catalyst reached its equilibrium temperature. Initial studies showed that NH 3 emissions increased as the sulfur content in the fuel was decreased.

  14. High-temperature low-cycle fatigue of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-46Al-2Nb-2Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Malakondaiah, G.; Nicholas, T.

    1996-08-01

    The low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-46Al-2Nb-2Cr in fully lamellar (FL) and nearly lamellar (NL) microstructural conditions is studied at 650 C and 800 C, with and without hold times. At 650 C and 800 C, the alloy in either condition exhibits cyclic stability at all strain levels studied, excepting the NL structure which shows slight cyclic hardening at higher strain levels at 650 C. Fracture in the FL condition occurs by a mixed mode comprising delamination, translamellar fracture, and stepwise fracture. On the other hand, fracture occurs mostly by translamellar mode in the NL condition. At both test temperatures, the alloy in the FL condition obeys the well-known Manson-Coffin behavior. The fatigue resistance of the alloy at 650 C in the FL condition is very much comparable to, while in the NL condition it is superior to, that of Ti-24Al-11Nb alloy. At 650 C, a 100-second peak tensile strain hold doubles the fatigue life of the alloy in the FL condition, while a 100-second hold at compressive peak strain or at both tensile and compressive peak strain degrades fatigue life. The observed hold time effects can primarily be attributed to mean stress. Irrespective of the nature of the test, the hysteretic energy (total as well as tensile) per cycle remains nearly constant during the majority of its life. The total and tensile hysteretic energy to fracture, at both test temperatures, increase with cycles to failure, and the variation follows a power-law relationship.

  15. High-temperature low-cycle fatigue of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-46Al-2Nb-2Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakondaiah, G.; Nicholas, T.

    1996-08-01

    The low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-46Al-2Nb-2Cr in fully lamellar (FL) and nearly lamellar (NL) microstructural conditions is studied at 650 °C and 800 °C, with and without hold times. At 650 °C and 800 °C, the alloy in either condition exhibits cyclic stability at all strain levels studied, excepting the NL structure which shows slight cyclic hardening at higher strain levels at 650 °C. Fracture in the FL condition occurs by a mixed mode comprising delamination, translamellar fracture, and stepwise fracture. On the other hand, fracture occurs mostly by translamellar mode in the NL condition. At both test temperatures, the alloy in the FL condition obeys the well-known Manson-Coffin behavior. The fatigue resistance of the alloy at 650 °C in the FL condition is very much comparable to, while in the NL condition it is superior to, that of Ti-24Al-llNb alloy. At 650 °C, a 100-second peak tensile strain hold doubles the fatigue life of the alloy in the FL condition, while a 100-second hold at compressive peak strain or at both tensile and compressive peak strain degrades fatigue life. The observed hold time effects can primarily be attributed to mean stress. Irrespective of the nature of the test, the hysteretic energy (total as well as tensile) per cycle remains nearly constant during the majority of its life. The total and tensile hysteretic energy to fracture, at both test temperatures, increase with cycles to failure, and the variation follows a power-law relationship.

  16. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  17. Design, fabrication and testing of an optical temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Decker, R. O.; Mcclurg, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The laboratory breadboard optical temperature sensor based on the temperature dependent absorptive characteristics of a rare earth (europium) doped optical fiber. The principles of operation, materials characterization, fiber and optical component design, design and fabrication of an electrooptic interface unit, signal processing, and initial test results are discussed. Initial tests indicated that, after a brief warmup period, the output of the sensor was stable to approximately 1 C at room temperature or approximately + or - 0.3 percent of point (K). This exceeds the goal of 1 percent of point. Recommendations are presented for further performance improvement.

  18. High temperature high cycle fatigue behavior of new aluminum alloy strengthened by (Co, Ni)3Al4 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sung, Si-Young; Han, Bum-Suck; Jung, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2014-03-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of a new heat-resistant aluminum alloy at elevated temperature was investigated. This alloy consists of an α-Al matrix, a small amount of precipitated Mg2Si, and distributed (Co, Ni)3Al4 strengthening particles. HCF tests were conducted with a stress ratio of (R)=0 and a frequency of (F)=30 Hz at 130 °C. The fatigue limit (maximum stress) of this alloy was 120 MPa at 107 cycles. This is a value superior to that of conventional heat-resistant aluminum alloys such as the A319 alloy. Furthermore, regardless of the stress conditions, the new heat-resistant Al alloy has an outstanding fatigue life at high temperatures. The results of fractography observation showed that second phases, especially (Co, Ni)3Al4 particles, were effective to the resistance of fatigue crack initiation and propagation. On the other hand, Mg2Si particles were more easily fractured by the fatigue crack. This study also clarifies the micromechanism of fatigue deformation behavior at elevated temperature related to its microstructure.

  19. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure.

  20. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25038

  1. ARMCOM Red Team Role in The Single Integrated Development Test Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    USADACS Tdv*c* Ubrtry RIA-76-U146 5 0712 01001238 0 AOA0ivi& ARMCOM RED TEAM ROLE IN THE SINGLE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT TEST CYCLE THOMAS N...TITLE (and Subtitle) ARMCOM Red Team Role in The Single Integrated Development Test Cycle. 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Note...per year. In addition to the Red Team function, the Systems Analysis Directorate will also function in the Blue Team role to support the developer

  2. Thermocouples For High Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding and structural materials. Data are needed to characeterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed htat can survive proposed test conditions. Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project was intiated to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications (see Rempe and Wilkins, 2005). This paper summarizes efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate these specialized thermocouples.

  3. Effects of temperature on in situ toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, C.D.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    With increasing concern over the impacts and perturbations to receiving waters as a result of storm water runoff and contaminated sediments, many investigators have turned towards in situ testing for direct response data. In situ testing has been shown to be an effective assessment tool. In order to further evaluate the limitations of this method, temperature effects were evaluated. There is concern that laboratory to stream transfer of test organisms may induce significant stress if water temperatures are too cool. This study was designed to specifically address the issue of temperature tolerance and attenuation of Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in in situ conditions. Temperature tolerance is of importance in areas where receiving waters are subject to low or fluctuating temperatures as well as areas of more temperate climates. In this study, the organisms where exposed to temperatures as low as 2 C for variable lengths of time, removed and allowed to come to ambient laboratory temperatures then monitored for acute or chronic responses. No effects on survival were observed after 48 h. at 5 C; however lower temperatures increased mortality.

  4. The 18.6-year lunar nodal cycle and surface temperature variability in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnell, Stewart M.; Crawford, William R.

    2007-02-01

    The 18.6-year lunar nodal cycle (LNC) is a significant feature of winter (January) air and sea temperatures along the North American west coast over a 400-year period. Yet much of the recent temperature variation can also be explained by wind patterns associated with the PNA teleconnection. At Sitka, Alaska, (57°N) and nearby stations in northern British Columbia, the January PNA index accounts for over 70% of average January air temperatures in lengthy meteorological records. It appears that the LNC signal in January air temperatures in this region is not independent of the PNA, but is a component of it. The Sitka air temperature record, along with SSTs along the British Columbia coast and the PNA index have significant cross-correlations with the LNC that appear at a 2-year lag, LNC leading. The influence of the PNA pattern declines in winter with decreasing latitude but the LNC component does not. It appears as a significant feature of long-term SST variation at Scripps Pier and the California Current System. The LNC also appears over centennial-scales in proxy temperatures along western North America. The linkage of LNC-moderated surface temperatures to processes involving basin-scale teleconnections expands the possibility that the proximate mechanism may be located remotely from its expression in the northeast Pacific. Some of the largest potential sources of a diurnal tidal signal in the atmosphere are located in the western Pacific; the Sea of Okhotsk and the Indonesian archipelago.

  5. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  6. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  7. Further demonstration of the ambient temperature dependence of the annual biological cycles in the edible dormouse, Glis glis.

    PubMed

    Jallageas, M; Mas, N; Assenmacher, I

    1989-01-01

    In the male edible dormouse, it has been proposed that the annual temperature cycle is the major external factor triggering annual biological rhythms in this hibernating species. The present study was designed to explore (i) the effects of suppression of the annual thermoperiodic cycle under natural photoperiodic conditions, and (ii) the effects of acute exposure to a warm environment on basal plasma T4 levels observed during hibernation. The results of the first experiment demonstrate an absence of circannual cycles of hibernation, body weight, and endocrine thyroid and gonadal functions in the absence of annual fluctuations of temperature (constant warm environment at 24 degrees C) despite the maintenance of a normal photoperiodic cycle. On the other hand, acute exposure to 24 degrees C during the late stage of hibernation stimulated thyroid function as expressed by a consistent transitory rise in plasma T4 concentrations, which was maximal within 7 days and restored to basal levels after 14 days. These findings are in close agreement with the concept that in the edible dormouse, the annual thyroid cycle is synchronized with the annual temperature cycle. Moreover, the present study, combined with prior data indicating that the thyroid cycle induces the testis cycle, suggests that the ambient temperature cycle may be intricately involved in the control of neuroendocrine cycles in dormice, although the mechanism is still unknown.

  8. Analysis of anaerobic capacity in rowers using Wingate test on cycle and rowing ergometer.

    PubMed

    Klasnja, Aleksandar; Barak, Otto; Popadić-Gaćesa, Jelena; Drapsin, Miodrag; Knezević, Aleksandar; Grujić, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    The 30-s all-out Wingate test has been used in athletes of all sport specialties to measure the capacity for short duration, high power output while cycling. The aim of this study was to establish differences in measuring anaerobic capacity between the classic Wingate test on a cycling ergometer and the modified Wingate test on a rowing ergometer in rowers. A group of20 rowers was tested by both the cycle and rowing ergometers during 30s of maximum power to test anaerobic capacity and to make correlation between these tests. The parameters measured were the peak power and mean power. The peak power on the cycling ergometer was 475 +/- 75.1W and 522.4 +/- 81W (p < 0.05) on the rowing ergometer. The mean power on the cycling ergometer and the rowing ergometer was 344.4 +/- 51.1W and 473.7W +/- 67.2, (p < 0.05) respectively. The maximum values were achieved at the same time on both ergometers, but remained on the higher level till the end of the test on the rowing ergometer. By correlating the anaerobic parameters of the classic Wingate test and a modified Wingate test on the rowing ergometer a significant positive correlation was detected in the peak power (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) as well as in the mean power (r = 0.65, p < 0.05). The results show that the rowers achieved better results of the anaerobic parameters on the rowing ergometer compared to the cycling ergometer due to a better mechanical efficiency. It is concluded that the modified Wingate test on the rowing ergometer can be used in rowers for testing their anaerobic capacity as a sport specific test ergometer since it provides more precise results.

  9. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  10. An extension of the VIRA electron temperature and density models to include solar cycle variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.

    The original VIRA ionosphere model was based primarily on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data obtained at solar maximum (F10.7~200) in 1979 and 1980 when periapsis was being maintained deep in the Venusian ionosphere. In situ measurements provided data on temperature, composition, density, and drift velocity, while the radio occultation method provided height profiles of electron density, N_e. The solar cycle variation was deduced by comparison with the Venera 9 and 10 occultation data from the previous solar minimum. No data were available on the solar cycle variations of other ionospheric parameters, because periapsis had already risen out of the ionosphere by the time solar activity began to decline early in 1983. During the Entry period in the Fall of 1992, however, PVO got a brief glimpse of the nightside ionosphere at lower solar activity (F10.7~120). During the intervening decade important in situ data were obtained on the upper nightside ionosphere that extends far down stream from the planet. This region was found to be highly sensitive to solar wind interactions and solar activity. In this paper, we discuss ways in which the later PVO data can be used to extend the VIRA model to higher altitudes and to include the solar cycle variations. As an example, we present some pre-entry Orbiter Electron Temperature Probe measurements that provide new clues as to the dayside T_e behavior at low solar activity.

  11. The temperature of quiescent streamers during solar cycles 23 and 24

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Testa, P.

    2014-05-20

    Recent in-situ determinations of the temporal evolution of the charge state distribution in the fast and slow solar wind have shown a general decrease in the degree of ionization of all the elements in the solar wind along solar cycles 23 and 24. Such a decrease has been interpreted as a cooling of the solar corona which occurred during the decline and minimum phase of solar cycle 23 from 2000 to 2010. In the present work, we investigate whether spectroscopic determinations of the temperature of the quiescent streamers show signatures of coronal plasma cooling during cycles 23 and 24. We measure the coronal electron density and thermal structure at the base of 60 quiescent streamers observed from 1996 to 2013 by SOHO/SUMER and Hinode/EIS and find that both quantities do now show any significant dependence on the solar cycle. We argue that if the slow solar wind is accelerated from the solar photosphere or chromosphere, the measured decrease in the in-situ wind charge state distribution might be due to an increased efficiency in the wind acceleration mechanism at low altitudes. If the slow wind originates from the corona, a combination of density and wind acceleration changes may be responsible for the in-situ results.

  12. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, F. W.; Palmer, A. J.; Stites, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) for fusion materials irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. The ITV is capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and individual temperature control for up to 15 experiment capsules simultaneously. The test vehicle consists of three In-Pile Tubes (IPTs) running the length of the reactor vessel. These IPTs are kept dry and test trains with integral instrumentation are inserted and removed through a transfer shield plate above the reactor vessel head. The test vehicle is designed to irradiate specimens as large as 2.2 cm in diameter, at temperatures of 250-800°C, achieving neutron damage rates as high as 10 displacements per atom per year. The high fast to thermal neutron flux ratio required for fusion materials testing is accomplished by using an aluminum filler to displace as much water as possible from the flux trap and surrounding the filler piece with a ring of replaceable neutron absorbing material. The gas blend temperature control system remains in place from test to test, thus hardware costs for new tests are limited to the experiment capsule train and integral instrumentation.

  13. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-06-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min-1 can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant.

  14. Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, O.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better blade cooling technology in topping cycle and enhanced heat recovery in bottoming cycle. The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperatures (TITs) of both gas turbine and steam turbine. Literature review shows that a combined cycle with transpiration cooled gas turbine has not been analyzed with varying gas/steam TITs. In view of above the present study has been undertaken for thermodynamic study of gas/steam combined cycle with respect to variation in TIT in both topping and bottoming cycles, for air transpiration cooled gas turbine. The performance of combined cycle with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator has been evaluated for different cycle pressure ratios (CPRs) varying from 11 to 23 and the selection diagrams presented for TIT varying from 1,600 to 1,900 K. Both the cycle efficiency and specific work increase with TIT for each pressure ratio. For each TIT there exists an optimum pressure ratio for cycle efficiency and specific work. For the CPR of 23 the best cycle performance is seen at a TIT of 1,900 K for maximum steam temperature of 570 °C, which gives the cycle efficiency of 60.9 % with net specific work of 909 kJ/kg.

  15. High temperature low-cycle fatigue mechanisms in single crystals of nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W.; Jayaraman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty three high temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200. Tests were conducted at 760 and 870 C. SEM fractography and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine mechanisms responsible for the observed orientation dependent fatigue behavior. It has been concluded that the plastic characteristics of the alloy lead to orientation-dependent strain hardening and fatigue lives at 760 C. At 870 C, the elastic characteristics of the alloy dominated the behavior, even though the plastic strain ranges were about the same as they were at 760 C. This led to orientation-dependent fatigue lives, but the trends were not the same as they were at 760 C.

  16. Control of continuous irradiation injury on potatoes with daily temperature cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Bennett, S. M.; Cao, W.

    1990-01-01

    Two controlled-environment experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature fluctuations under continuous irradiation on growth and tuberization of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Kennebec and Superior. These cultivars had exhibited chlorotic and stunted growth under continuous irradiation and constant temperatures. The plants were grown for 4 weeks in the first experiment and for 6 weeks in the second experiment. Each experiment was conducted under continuous irradiation of 400 micromoles per square meter per second of photosynthetic photon flux and included two temperature treatments: constant 18 degrees C and fluctuating 22 degrees C/14 degrees C on a 12-hour cycle. A common vapor pressure deficit of 0.62 kilopascal was maintained at all temperatures. Plants under constant 18 degrees C were stunted and had chlorotic and abscised leaves and essentially no tuber formation. Plants grown under the fluctuating temperature treatment developed normally, were developing tubers, and had a fivefold or greater total dry weight as compared with those under the constant temperature. These results suggest that a thermoperiod can allow normal plant growth and tuberization in potato cultivars that are unable to develop effectively under continuous irradiation.

  17. Control of continuous irradiation injury on potatoes with daily temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T W; Bennett, S M; Cao, W

    1990-01-01

    Two controlled-environment experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature fluctuations under continuous irradiation on growth and tuberization of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Kennebec and Superior. These cultivars had exhibited chlorotic and stunted growth under continuous irradiation and constant temperatures. The plants were grown for 4 weeks in the first experiment and for 6 weeks in the second experiment. Each experiment was conducted under continuous irradiation of 400 micromoles per square meter per second of photosynthetic photon flux and included two temperature treatments: constant 18 degrees C and fluctuating 22 degrees C/14 degrees C on a 12-hour cycle. A common vapor pressure deficit of 0.62 kilopascal was maintained at all temperatures. Plants under constant 18 degrees C were stunted and had chlorotic and abscised leaves and essentially no tuber formation. Plants grown under the fluctuating temperature treatment developed normally, were developing tubers, and had a fivefold or greater total dry weight as compared with those under the constant temperature. These results suggest that a thermoperiod can allow normal plant growth and tuberization in potato cultivars that are unable to develop effectively under continuous irradiation.

  18. The Feasibility of Applying AC Driven Low-Temperature Plasma for Multi-Cycle Detonation Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dianfeng

    2016-11-01

    Ignition is a key system in pulse detonation engines (PDE). As advanced ignition methods, nanosecond pulse discharge low-temperature plasma ignition is used in some combustion systems, and continuous alternating current (AC) driven low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used for the combustion assistant. However, continuous AC driven plasmas cannot be used for ignition in pulse detonation engines. In this paper, experimental and numerical studies of pneumatic valve PDE using an AC driven low-temperature plasma igniter were described. The pneumatic valve was jointly designed with the low-temperature plasma igniter, and the numerical simulation of the cold-state flow field in the pneumatic valve showed that a complex flow in the discharge area, along with low speed, was beneficial for successful ignition. In the experiments ethylene was used as the fuel and air as oxidizing agent, ignition by an AC driven low-temperature plasma achieved multi-cycle intermittent detonation combustion on a PDE, the working frequency of the PDE reached 15 Hz and the peak pressure of the detonation wave was approximately 2.0 MPa. The experimental verifications of the feasibility in PDE ignition expanded the application field of AC driven low-temperature plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176001)

  19. Control of Continuous Irradiation Injury on Potatoes with Daily Temperature Cycling 1

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Bennett, Susan M.; Cao, Weixing

    1990-01-01

    Two controlled-environment experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature fluctuations under continuous irradiation on growth and tuberization of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Kennebec and Superior. These cultivars had exhibited chlorotic and stunted growth under continuous irradiation and constant temperatures. The plants were grown for 4 weeks in the first experiment and for 6 weeks in the second experiment. Each experiment was conducted under continuous irradiation of 400 micromoles per square meter per second of photosynthetic photon flux and included two temperature treatments: constant 18°C and fluctuating 22°C/14°C on a 12-hour cycle. A common vapor pressure deficit of 0.62 kilopascal was maintained at all temperatures. Plants under constant 18°C were stunted and had chlorotic and abscised leaves and essentially no tuber formation. Plants grown under the fluctuating temperature treatment developed normally, were developing tubers, and had a fivefold or greater total dry weight as compared with those under the constant temperature. These results suggest that a thermoperiod can allow normal plant growth and tuberization in potato cultivars that are unable to develop effectively under continuous irradiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:11537703

  20. Cycle life test. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells. [performance tests on silver zinc batteries, silver cadmium batteries, and nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable research is being done to find more efficient and reliable means of starting electrical energy for orbiting satellites. Rechargeable cells offer one such means. A test program is described which has been established in order to further the evaluation of certain types of cells and to obtain performance and failure data as an aid to their continued improvement. The purpose of the program is to determine the cycling performance capabilities of packs of cells under different load and temperature conditions. The various kinds of cells tested were nickel-cadmium, silver-cadmium, and silver-zinc sealed cells. A summary of the results of the life cycling program is given in this report.

  1. Validity of cycling peak power as measured by a short-sprint test versus the Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Coso, Juan Del; Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo

    2006-06-01

    To validate the measurement of peak power output (PPO) using a short cycling sprint test (inertial load (IL) test), we compare it to the widely accepted Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT). Fifteen healthy, young, active subjects performed 2 experimental trials. In each trial, subjects warmed up and sprinted 4 times for the IL test. After recovery, they cycled for 30 s at maximum capacity for the WAnT. The experimental trial was replicated 3 d later to test for reliability. Inter- and intra-day PPO measured with the IL test was very reliable (R(1) = 0.99 and R(1) = 0.94, respectively). The correlation between the IL and WAnT was highly significant (r = 0.82; P < 0.001), although the absolute PPO values were markedly higher for the IL test (1268 +/- 41 W vs. 786 +/- 27 W; P < 0.001). In conclusion, cycling PPO can be validly assessed with the IL test. The higher PPO attained with an IL test could be related to better identification of peak power, since both velocity and resistance are free to vary during the sprint in comparison with the WAnT, where resistance is fixed. Owing to the short duration of the sprint (4 s) and high intra-day reliability despite a short recovery time (180 s), the IL test is optimal for repeated measurements of anaerobic performance.

  2. Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving VHTR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh

    2006-06-01

    Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase plant net efficiency.

  3. Temperature-based rapid toxicity test using Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Jun, B H; Lee, S I; Ryu, H D; Kim, Y J

    2006-01-01

    Toxicants, which may cause the inhibition to the biological process in sewage/wastewater treatment plant, need to be monitored within short time to prevent from serious damage. A new method, Temperature-based rapid toxicity test (TempTox test) using Ceriodaphnia dubia, was developed and compared with the standard 48 hr acute bioassay (Std. 48-hr test). Inorganic toxicants of cadmium, zinc, copper, cyanide, chromium (III), chromium (VI) and organic toxicants of phenol, PCP and pesticides of BPMC, Diazinon, Fenitrothion were tested for TempTox test and Std. 48-hr test. Because the TempTox test is based on just temperature control, C. dubia neonates were exposed to toxicants under high temperature (35.5 degrees C) condition without any complicated pretreatment. After given exposure time of 1, 1.25, 1.5 hours, the number of the live (no toxic effect) or the dead (toxic effect) was counted with eye without the aid of any microscope and median effective concentrations (EC50 values) were determined. From the results for all toxicants, the TempTox test was proved to be as sensitive as the Std. 48-hr test with shorter-time of just 1.25-1.5 hours. Moreover, the TempTox test was further much more sensitive than alternative bioassays such as the 1-hour l.Q. test and 30-minute Microtox. The TempTox test showed a high applicability of toxicity bioassay for real sewage/wastewater treatment plant by its easiness, rapidity and sensitivity. Finally, the prototype for short-term TempTox test was introduced.

  4. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1039.505 Section 1039.505 Protection of Environment... duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for...

  5. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1039.505 Section 1039.505 Protection of Environment... duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for...

  6. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1039.505 Section 1039.505 Protection of Environment... duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for...

  7. The sleep-wake cycle and motor activity, but not temperature, are disrupted over the light-dark cycle in mice genetically depleted of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Solarewicz, Julia Z; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role that serotonin has in the modulation of sleep and wakefulness across a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle and determined whether temperature and motor activity are directly responsible for potential disruptions to arousal state. Telemetry transmitters were implanted in 24 wild-type mice (Tph2(+/+)) and 24 mice with a null mutation for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2(-/-)). After surgery, electroencephalography, core body temperature, and motor activity were recorded for 24 h. Temperature for a given arousal state (quiet and active wake, non-rapid eye movement, and paradoxical sleep) was similar in the Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice across the light-dark cycle. The percentage of time spent in active wakefulness, along with motor activity, was decreased in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice at the start and end of the dark cycle. This difference persisted into the light cycle. In contrast, the time spent in a given arousal state was similar at the remaining time points. Despite this similarity, periods of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and wakefulness were less consolidated in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice throughout the light-dark cycle. We conclude that the depletion of serotonin does not disrupt the diurnal variation in the sleep-wake cycle, motor activity, and temperature. However, serotonin may suppress photic and nonphotic inputs that manifest at light-dark transitions and serve to shorten the ultraradian duration of wakefulness and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Finally, alterations in the sleep-wake cycle following depletion of serotonin are unrelated to disruptions in the modulation of temperature.

  8. A note on the annual cycles of surface heat balance and temperature over a continent. [North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Crane, G.

    1974-01-01

    A surface heating function, defined as the ratio of the time derivative of the mean annual temperature curve to the surface heat balance, is computed from the annual temperature range and heat balance data for the North American continent. An annual cycle of the surface heat balance is then reconstructed from the surface heating function and the annual temperature curve, and an annual cycle of evaporative plus turbulent heat loss is recomputed from the annual cycles of radiation balance and surface heat balance for the continent. The implications of these results for long range weather forecasting are discussed.

  9. Temperature cycling periods affect growth and tuberization in potatoes under continuous irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Plants of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars Denali, Norland, Haig and Kennebec were grown for 42 days under three temperature cycling periods (thermoperiods) with continuous irradiation in two repeated experiments to help determine if temperature cycling might be varied to optimize tuber development of potatoes in controlled environments. Thermoperiods of 6/6 hours, 12/12 hours and 24/24 hours were established with the same temperature change of 22/14C and same controlled vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa. The thermoperiod of 24/24 hours significantly promoted tuber initiation but slowed tuber enlargement in all four cultivars, compared to the thermoperiods of 6/6 hours and 12/12 hours. Denali' produced the highest tuber and total dry weights under the 6/6 hours thermoperiod. Kennebec' produced the highest tuber dry weight under the 12/12 hours thermoperiod. Thermoperiods had no significant effect on shoot and root dry weights of any cultivars. The major effect of thermoperiods was on initiation and enlargement of tubers.

  10. Solar Array at Very High Temperatures: Ground Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Solar array design for any spacecraft is determined by the orbit parameters. For example, operational voltage for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is limited by significant differential charging due to interactions with low temperature plasma. In order to avoid arcing in LEO, solar array is designed to generate electrical power at comparatively low voltages (below 100 volts) or to operate at higher voltages with encapsulation of all suspected discharge locations. In Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) differential charging is caused by energetic electrons that produce differential potential between the coverglass and the conductive spacecraft body in a kilovolt range. In such a case, the weakly conductive layer over coverglass, indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the possible measures to eliminate dangerous discharges on array surface. Temperature variations for solar arrays in both orbits are measured and documented within the range of minus150 degrees Centigrade to plus 1100 degrees Centigrade. This wide interval of operational temperatures is regularly reproduced in ground tests with radiative heating and cooling inside a shroud with flowing liquid nitrogen. The requirements to solar array design and tests turn out to be more complicated when planned trajectory crosses these two orbits and goes closer to the Sun. The conductive layer over coverglass causes a sharp increase in parasitic current collected from LEO plasma, high temperature may cause cracks in encapsulating (Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) material; radiative heating of a coupon in vacuum chamber becomes practically impossible above 1500 degrees Centigrade; conductivities of glass and adhesive go up with temperature that decrease array efficiency; and mechanical stresses grow up to critical magnitudes. A few test arrangements and respective results are presented in current paper. Coupons were tested against arcing in simulated LEO and GEO environments under elevated temperatures up to 2000 degrees

  11. Preliminary tests of an advanced high-temperature combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Trout, A. M.; Smith, J. M.; Jacobs, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion system has been developed to operate efficiently and with good durability at inlet pressures to 4.05 MPa (40 atm), inlet air temperatures to 900 K, and exhaust gas temperatures to 2480 K. A preliminary investigation of this system was conducted at inlet pressures to 0.94 MPa (9 atm), a nominal inlet air temperature of 560 K, and exhaust gas temperatures to 2135 K. A maximum combustion efficiency of 98.5 percent was attained at a fuel-air ratio of 0.033; the combustion efficiency decreased to about 90 percent as the fuel-air ratio was increased to 0.058. An average liner metal temperature of 915 K, 355 kelvins greater than the nominal inlet air temperature, was reached with an average exhaust gas temperature of 2090 K. The maximum local metal temperature at this condition was about 565 kelvins above the nominal inlet air temperature and decreased to 505 kelvins above with increasing combustor pressure. Tests to determine the isothermal total pressure loss of the combustor showed a liner loss of 1.1 percent and a system loss of 6.5 percent.

  12. Temperature-dependent dispersal strategies of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (Nostocales, Cyanobacteria): implications for the annual life cycle.

    PubMed

    Cirés, Samuel; Wörmer, Lars; Wiedner, Claudia; Quesada, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aphanizomenon ovalisporum is a planktonic nostocalean cyanobacterium with increasing research interest due to its ability to produce the potent cytotoxin cylindrospermopsin and its potential invasiveness under the global warming scenario. The present study provides novel data on the potential dispersal strategies of A. ovalisporum by analyzing the influence of temperature (10-40 °C) on akinete differentiation and cell morphometry in cultures of A. ovalisporum UAM 290 isolated from a Spanish pond. Our results confirmed a temperature-dependent akinete differentiation, with the maximum akinete production reached at 20 °C (15 % of the cells), a low basal production at 25-30 °C (<0.4 % of the cells) and no detectable production at 35 °C. Furthermore, we reported the fragmentation of A. ovalisporum filaments at temperatures of 25 °C and above. Additionally, we observed that the morphology of vegetative cells varied under different temperature scenarios. Indeed, a strong negative correlation was found between temperature and the width, length and biovolume of vegetative cells, whereas akinete dimensions remained stable along the temperature gradient. Therefore, linear regressions between temperature and the cell size parameters are herein presented aiming to facilitate the identification of A. ovalisporum in the field throughout the course of the year. This is the first study evidencing that akinete production is triggered by temperatures between 20 and 25 °C in A. ovalisporum and reporting the existence of filament fragmentation as a potential dispersal strategy of this species. The importance of these findings for understanding the annual life cycle and invasive potential of A. ovalisporum is further discussed herein.

  13. The role of low temperature alteration of the oceanic crust in global carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, L. A.; Gillis, K. M.; Parrish, R. R.; Austin-Giddings, W.; Dosso, S. E.; Moore, A.

    2013-12-01

    The role of low-temperature (10's of degrees Celsius) seafloor alteration in the long-term carbon cycle has received far less attention than the parallel process on the continents of 'chemical weathering'. This difference in the amount of study of these two sinks for CO2 degassed from the solid Earth does not appear to be based on their relative importance to global C-cycling. A large amount of CO2 is precipitated as carbonate minerals in the upper oceanic crust and this appears to be largely due to in situ alkalinity generation due to reactions within the oceanic crust [1,2]. Better understanding of the role of this CO2 sink in the global carbon cycle requires better constraints on: (i) the controls on alkalinity production during low-temperature alteration of the upper oceanic crust; and (ii) when in the life cycle of a piece of crust most low-temperature reaction occurs. Alkalinity production due to low-temperature alteration of the oceanic crust appears to have varied over the last 160 Myr [3], but whether this reflects differences in ocean composition or ocean bottom temperature is unclear. New data, largely from the Troodos ophiolite, are being collected to determine the reactions involved in alkalinity generation and how these vary as a function of the environmental conditions. To this end, a new suite of volcanic glass major and trace element data have been collected to determine the protolith composition; this is required in computing alkalinity generation from the altered rock compositions. Overall the data collection (bulk-rock compositions, carbonate O-isotopes) is designed to allow us to determine the roles of protolith composition and fluid temperature in alkalinity generation. Sample processing is underway and these new data will be presented. Understanding the timing of low-T alteration of the oceanic crust is important in understanding the impacts of this process on global geochemical cycling. We are applying novel dating approaches to this problem

  14. Hypothesis driven drug design: improving quality and effectiveness of the design-make-test-analyse cycle.

    PubMed

    Plowright, Alleyn T; Johnstone, Craig; Kihlberg, Jan; Pettersson, Jonas; Robb, Graeme; Thompson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    In drug discovery, the central process of constructing and testing hypotheses, carefully conducting experiments and analysing the associated data for new findings and information is known as the design-make-test-analyse cycle. Each step relies heavily on the inputs and outputs of the other three components. In this article we report our efforts to improve and integrate all parts to enable smooth and rapid flow of high quality ideas. Key improvements include enhancing multi-disciplinary input into 'Design', increasing the use of knowledge and reducing cycle times in 'Make', providing parallel sets of relevant data within ten working days in 'Test' and maximising the learning in 'Analyse'.

  15. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  16. Description of a system for interlocking elevated temperature mechanical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Poulter, G.A.

    1995-07-01

    Long term mechanical creep and fatigue testing at elevated temperatures requires reliable systems with safeguards to prevent destruction of equipment, loss of data and negative environmental impacts. Toward this goal, a computer controlled system has been developed and built for interlocking tests run on elevated temperature mechanical test facilities. Sensors for water flow, water pressure, water leakage, temperature, power and hydraulic status are monitored to control specimen heating equipment through solid state relays and water solenoid valves. The system is designed to work with the default interlocks present in the RF generators and mechanical tests systems. Digital hardware consists of two National Instruments 1/0 boards mounted in a Macintosh IIci computer. Software is written in National Instruments LabVIEW. Systems interlocked include two MTS closed loop servo controlled hydraulic test frames, one with an RF generator and one with both an RF generator and a quartz lamp furnace. Control for individual test systems is modularized making the addition of more systems simple. If any of the supporting utilities fail during tests, heating systems, chill water and hydraulics are powered down, minimizing specimen damage and eliminating equipment damage. The interlock control is powered by an uninterruptible power supply. Upon failure the cause is documented in an ASCII file.

  17. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day–night cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8–13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day–night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance. PMID:27959339

  18. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  19. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-13

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  20. Study of a Liquid Plug-Flow Thermal Cycling Technique Using a Temperature Gradient-Based Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-use thermal cycling for performing rapid and small-volume DNA amplification on a single chip has attracted great interest in the area of rapid field detection of biological agents. For this purpose, as a more practical alternative to conventional continuous flow thermal cycling, liquid plug-flow thermal cycling utilizes a thermal gradient generated in a serpentine rectangular flow microchannel as an actuator. The transit time and flow speed of the plug flow varied drastically in each temperature zone due to the difference in the tension at the interface between temperature gradients. According to thermal distribution analyses in microfluidics, the plug flow allowed for a slow heating process, but a fast cooling process. The thermal cycle of the microfluid was consistent with the recommended temperature gradient for PCR. Indeed, amplification efficiency of the plug flow was superior to continuous flow PCR, and provided an impressive improvement over previously-reported flow microchannel thermal cycling techniques. PMID:25350508

  1. Study of a liquid plug-flow thermal cycling technique using a temperature gradient-based actuator.

    PubMed

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori

    2014-10-27

    Easy-to-use thermal cycling for performing rapid and small-volume DNA amplification on a single chip has attracted great interest in the area of rapid field detection of biological agents. For this purpose, as a more practical alternative to conventional continuous flow thermal cycling, liquid plug-flow thermal cycling utilizes a thermal gradient generated in a serpentine rectangular flow microchannel as an actuator. The transit time and flow speed of the plug flow varied drastically in each temperature zone due to the difference in the tension at the interface between temperature gradients. According to thermal distribution analyses in microfluidics, the plug flow allowed for a slow heating process, but a fast cooling process. The thermal cycle of the microfluid was consistent with the recommended temperature gradient for PCR. Indeed, amplification efficiency of the plug flow was superior to continuous flow PCR, and provided an impressive improvement over previously-reported flow microchannel thermal cycling techniques.

  2. Solar Array at Very High Temperatures: Ground Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Solar array design for any spacecraft is determined by the orbit parameters. For example, operational voltage for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is limited by significant differential charging due to interactions with low temperature plasma. In order to avoid arcing in LEO, solar array is designed to generate electrical power at comparatively low voltages (below 100 V) or to operate at higher voltages with encapsulated of all suspected discharge locations. In Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) differential charging is caused by energetic electrons that produce differential potential between coverglass and conductive spacecraft body in a kilovolt range. In such a case, weakly conductive layer over coverglass (ITO) is one of possible measures to eliminate dangerous discharges on array surface. Temperature variations for solar arrays in both orbits are measured and documented within the range of -150 C +110 C. This wide interval of operational temperatures is regularly reproduced in ground tests with radiative heating and cooling inside shroud with flowing liquid nitrogen. The requirements to solar array design and tests turn out to be more complicated when planned trajectory crosses these two orbits and goes closer to Sun. Conductive layer over coverglass causes sharp increase in parasitic current collected from LEO plasma, high temperature may cause cracks in encapsulating material (RTV), radiative heating of coupon in vacuum chamber becomes practically impossible above 150 C, conductivities of glass and adhesive go up with temperature that decrease array efficiency, and mechanical stresses grow up to critical magnitudes. A few test arrangements and respective results are presented in current paper. Coupons were tested against arcing in simulated LEO and GEO environments under elevated temperatures up to 200 C. The dependence of leakage current on temperature was measured, and electrostatic cleanness was verified for coupons with antireflection (AR) coating over ITO

  3. Brayton cycle heat exchanger and duct assembly (HXDA, preliminary design and technology tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, M. G.; Morse, C. J.; Graves, R. F.; Gibson, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary design of the heat exchanger and duct assembly (HXDA) for a 60 kwe, closed loop, Brayton cycle space power system is presented. This system is weight optimized within the constraints imposed by the defined structural and operational requirements. Also presented are the results of several small scale tests, directed to obtaining specific design data and/or the resolution of a design approach for long life Brayton cycle heat exchanger systems.

  4. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  5. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  6. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  7. Aquarius Reflector Surface Temperature Monitoring Test and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Jamie; Lee, Siu-Chun; Becker, Ray

    2008-01-01

    The presentation addresses how to infer the front side temperatures for the Aquarius L-band reflector based upon backside measurement sites. Slides discussing the mission objectives and design details are at the same level found on typical project outreach websites and in conference papers respectively. The test discussion provides modest detail of an ordinary thermal balance test using mockup hardware. The photographs show an off-Lab vacuum chamber facility with no compromising details.

  8. Removing Diurnal Cycle Contamination in Satellite-Derived Tropospheric Temperatures: Understanding Tropical Tropospheric Trend Discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po-Chedley, S.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical mid-tropospheric temperature (TMT) time series have been constructed by several independent research teams using satellite microwave sounding unit (MSU) measurements beginning in 1978 and advanced MSU (AMSU) measurements since 1998. Despite careful efforts to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements, tropical TMT trends disagree by a factor of three even though each analysis uses the same basic data. Previous studies suggest that the discrepancy in tropical TMT temperature trends is largely caused by differences in both the NOAA-9 warm target factor and diurnal drift corrections used by various teams to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements. This work introduces a new observationally-based method for removing biases related to satellite diurnal drift. The method relies on minimizing inter-satellite and inter-node drifts by subtracting out a common diurnal cycle determined via linear regression. It is demonstrated that this method is effective at removing intersatellite biases and biases between the ascending (PM) and descending (AM) node of individual satellites in the TMT time series. After TMT bias correction, the ratio of tropical tropospheric temperature trends relative to surface temperature trends is in accord with the ratio from global climate models. It is shown that bias corrections for diurnal drift based on a climate model produce tropical trends very similar to those from the observationally-based correction, with a trend differences smaller than 0.02 K decade-1. Differences among various TMT datasets are explored further. Tropical trends from this work are comparable to those from the Remote Sensing System (RSS) and NOAA datasets despite small differences. Larger differences between this work and UAH are attributed to differences in the treatment of the NOAA-9 target factor and the UAH diurnal cycle correction.

  9. The annual cycle of satellite-derived sea surface temperature in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, Guillermo P.; Brown, Otis B.; Evans, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    The annual cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean was estimated using four years (July 1984-July 1988) of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer observations. High resolution satellite observations at 1-km space and daily time resolution were grided at 100-km space and 5-day time intervals to develop an analysis dataset for determination of low frequency SST variability. The integral time scale, a measure of serial correlation, was found to vary from 40 to 60 days in the domain of interest. The existence of superannual trends in the SST data was investigated, but conclusive results could not be obtained. The annual cycle (and, in particular, the annual harmonic) explains a large proportion of the SST variability. The estimated amplitude of the cycle ranges between 5 deg and 13 deg C throughout the study area, with minima in August-September and maxima in February. The resultant climatology is compared with an arbitrary 5-day satellite SST field, and with the COADS/ICE SST climatology. It was found that the higher resolution satellite-based SST climatology resolves boundary current structure and has significantly better structural agreement with the observed field.

  10. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  11. Does sunspot numbers cause global temperatures? A reconsideration using non-parametric causality tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Hossein; Huang, Xu; Gupta, Rangan; Ghodsi, Mansi

    2016-10-01

    In a recent paper, Gupta et al., (2015), analyzed whether sunspot numbers cause global temperatures based on monthly data covering the period 1880:1-2013:9. The authors find that standard time domain Granger causality test fails to reject the null hypothesis that sunspot numbers do not cause global temperatures for both full and sub-samples, namely 1880:1-1936:2, ​1936:3-1986:11 and 1986:12-2013:9 (identified based on tests of structural breaks). However, frequency domain causality test detects predictability for the full-sample at short (2-2.6 months) cycle lengths, but not the sub-samples. But since, full-sample causality cannot be relied upon due to structural breaks, Gupta et al., (2015) conclude that the evidence of causality running from sunspot numbers to global temperatures is weak and inconclusive. Given the importance of the issue of global warming, our current paper aims to revisit this issue of whether sunspot numbers cause global temperatures, using the same data set and sub-samples used by Gupta et al., (2015), based on an nonparametric Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA)-based causality test. Based on this test, we however, show that sunspot numbers have predictive ability for global temperatures for the three sub-samples, over and above the full-sample. Thus, generally speaking, our non-parametric SSA-based causality test outperformed both time domain and frequency domain causality tests and highlighted that sunspot numbers have always been important in predicting global temperatures.

  12. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  13. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  14. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-07-10

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  15. A Sugar-Derived Room-Temperature Sodium Sulfur Battery with Long Term Cycling Stability.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Cohn, Adam P; Pint, Cary L

    2017-03-08

    We demonstrate a room-temperature sodium sulfur battery based on a confining microporous carbon template derived from sucrose that delivers a reversible capacity over 700 mAh/gS at 0.1C rates, maintaining 370 mAh/gS at 10 times higher rates of 1C. Cycling at 1C rates reveals retention of over 300 mAh/gS capacity across 1500 cycles with Coulombic efficiency >98% due to microporous sulfur confinement and stability of the sodium metal anode in a glyme-based electrolyte. We show sucrose to be an ideal platform to develop microporous carbon capable of mitigating electrode-electrolyte reactivity and loss of soluble intermediate discharge products. In a manner parallel to the low-cost materials of the traditional sodium beta battery, our work demonstrates the combination of table sugar, sulfur, and sodium, all of which are cheap and earth abundant, for a high-performance stable room-temperature sodium sulfur battery.

  16. Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle Zero Power Physics Tests Analysis with VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Francheschini, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, including a core simulation capability called VERA-CS. A key milestone for this endeavor is to validate VERA against measurements from operating nuclear power reactors. The first step in validation against plant data is to determine the ability of VERA to accurately simulate the initial startup physics tests for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (WBN1) cycle 1. VERA-CS calculations were performed with the Insilico code developed at ORNL using cross section processing from the SCALE system and the transport capabilities within the Denovo transport code using the SPN method. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections in 252 groups (collapsed to 23 groups for the 3D transport solution). The key results of the comparison of calculations with measurements include initial criticality, control rod worth critical configurations, control rod worth, differential boron worth, and isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITC). The VERA results for these parameters show good agreement with measurements, with the exception of the ITC, which requires additional investigation. Results are also compared to those obtained with Monte Carlo methods and a current industry core simulator.

  17. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%–0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: • The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. • TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. • The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. • The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  18. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  19. Capture and release of carbon dioxide by carbon nanotubes via temperature cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rende{2}, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) received remarkable attention since they were shown to possess many unique properties as well as being effective and stable adsorbent materials that make them potentially useful for gas storage and separation of various gas mixtures. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on carbon dioxide (CO2) capture via single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs of type (10,10), (15,15), and (20,20) and MWNTs formed from the combination of these were simulated. The temperature was varied between 300 and 360 K. The results suggest that absorption of CO2 into the CNTs were directly related to the internal volume of the nanotube, but the cross-sectional area of the tube entrance had a significant effect on the number of CO2 molecules retained. The number of CO2 molecules collected in CNTs gradually decreases with increasing temperature. Separate simulations were performed to understand the potential use of CNTs as thermal pumps to collect/discharge CO2 molecules via temperature cycling. Supported by the NSF (CMMI-0500324 and DMR-0117792).

  20. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  1. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  2. Solar Cycle and Anthropogenic Forcing of Surface-Air Temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 10-yr moving average (yma) values of Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) surface-air temperatures with selected solar cycle indices (sunspot number (SSN) and the Aa geomagnetic index (Aa)), sea-surface temperatures in the Nino 3.4 region, and Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) atmospheric concentration measurements reveals a strong correlation (r = 0.686) between the Armagh temperatures and Aa, especially, prior to about 1980 (r = 0.762 over the interval of 1873-1980). For the more recent interval 1963-2003, the strongest correlation (r = 0.877) is between Armagh temperatures and MLCO2 measurements. A bivariate fit using both Aa and Mauna Loa values results in a very strong fit (r = 0.948) for the interval 1963-2003, and a trivariate fit using Aa, SSN, and Mauna Loa values results in a slightly stronger fit (r = 0.952). Atmospheric CO2 concentration now appears to be the stronger driver of Armagh surface-air temperatures. An increase of 2 C above the long-term mean (9.2 C) at Armagh seems inevitable unless unabated increases in anthropogenic atmospheric gases can be curtailed. The present growth in 10-yma Armagh temperatures is about 0.05 C per yr since 1982. The present growth in MLCO2 is about 0.002 ppmv, based on an exponential fit using 10-yma values, although the growth appears to be steepening, thus, increasing the likelihood of deleterious effects attributed to global warming.

  3. Testing of molded high temperature plastic actuator road seals for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, A. W.; Huxford, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Molded high temperature plastic first and second stage rod seal elements were evaluated in seal assemblies to determine performance characteristics. These characteristics were compared with the performance of machined seal elements. The 6.35 cm second stage Chevron seal assembly was tested using molded Chevrons fabricated from five molding materials. Impulse screening tests conducted over a range of 311 K to 478 K revealed thermal setting deficiencies in the aromatic polyimide molding materials. Seal elements fabricated from aromatic copolyester materials structurally failed during impulse cycle calibration. Endurance testing of 3.85 million cycles at 450 K using MIL-H-83283 fluid showed poorer seal performance with the unfilled aromatic polyimide material than had been attained with seals machined from Vespel SP-21 material. The 6.35 cm first stage step-cut compression loaded seal ring fabricated from copolyester injection molding material failed structurally during impulse cycle calibration. Molding of complex shape rod seals was shown to be a potentially controllable technique, but additional molding material property testing is recommended.

  4. The 5200 cycle test of an 8-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    An accelerated cycle test was conducted in which an 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster (EMT) prototype successfully completed 5200 on-off cycles and a total of more than 1300hours of thruster operation at a 4.5 mN thrust level. Cathode tip heater powers required for starting and keeper voltages remained well within acceptable limits. The discharge chamber utilization and electrical efficiency were nearly constant over the duration of the test. It was concluded that on-off cyclic operation by itself does not appreciably degrade starting capability or performance of the 8-cm EMT.

  5. Effects of Hot Rolling on Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Zn-22 wt.% Al Alloy at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. H.; Cao, Q. D.; Ma, S. J.; Han, S. H.; Tang, W.; Zhang, X. P.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the reduction ratio (RR) on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of the Zn-22 wt.% Al (Zn-22Al) alloy were investigated. Various grain sizes from 0.68 to 1.13 μm were obtained by controlled RRs. Tensile and LCF tests were carried out at room temperature. Superplasticity and cyclic softening were observed. Strength and ductility of the rolled Zn-22Al alloy increased with the RR, owing to the decrease in its grain size. The RR did not affect the cyclic softening behavior of the alloy. The fatigue life of the alloy decreased with increasing strain amplitude, while the fatigue life first decreased and then increased with increasing RR. The longest fatigue life was observed for the alloy rolled at a RR of 60%. A bilinear Coffin-Manson relationship was observed to hold true for this alloy.

  6. Investigation of speciated VOC in gasoline vehicular exhaust under ECE and EUDC test cycles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jin, Liangmao; Gao, Junhua; Shi, Jianwu; Zhao, Yanlin; Liu, Shuangxi; Jin, Taosheng; Bai, Zhipeng; Wu, Chang-Yu

    2013-02-15

    The emission factors and compositions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in exhaust gas from in-use gasoline passenger cars were characterized using a chassis dynamometer. Three passenger cars were tested at the ECE and the EUDC drive cycles to represent both urban and suburban driving scenarios. Exhaust gas was collected in Summa canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Common gaseous emissions (CH(4), NOx, CO, and CO(2)) were measured by an on-board monitoring system. The VOC emission factors of different cars ranged from 0.10 to 0.25 g km(-1) at the ECE cycle, and 0.01-0.02 g km(-1) at the EUDC cycle. A total of 57 individual VOC were detected in the exhaust gas, and the weight percentages were very consistent among the three cars. Ethylene (11.80 wt.%), toluene (11.27 wt.%), and benzene (8.83 wt.%) were the most abundant VOC in exhaust gas. Aromatics (38.32%) dominated the low speed conditions (ECE), while alkanes (37.34%) were the major compounds at the high speed condition (EUDC). The total amount of alkenes did not change much between those two cycles, while ethylene is abundant in the ECE and EUDC cycles. Ozone formation potential (OFP) was calculated to estimate the ozone yield from VOC emissions by gasoline cars and the results showed that OFP of VOC emission at the ECE cycle was about ten times higher than that at the EUDC cycle.

  7. Low temperature optical testing of CFRP telescope panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, William F.; Woida, Patrick; Tysenn, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, low temperature optical tests were made of very lightweight mirror panels for use in balloon and space infrared and submillimeter telescopes. In order to accomplish this testing, an ambient pressure 0.5 meter test chamber operating from 20 to -80 C, developed techniques for measuring non-optical quality mirrors with phase modulation 10.6 micron interferometry, and created the interferogram reduction program. During the course of the program, nineteen mirrors from four manufactures were tested: carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel mirrors, a CFRP sandwich panel with an added glass facesheet, and carbon fiber reinforced glass panels. The results of the panel development and test program are summarized.

  8. Effect of temperature-cycled retrogradation on in vitro digestibility and structural characteristics of waxy potato starch.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yao-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Pei; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Xu, Xue-Ming; Chen, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    The effects of temperature-cycled retrogradation treatment on the structural characteristics and in vitro digestibility of waxy potato starch were investigated in this study. The results showed that the maximum yield of slowly digestible starch (SDS) in waxy potato starch reached 38.63% by retrogradation treatment under temperature cycles of 4/25°C for 3 days with an interval of 24h. The starch products prepared under the temperature cycles of 4/25°C exhibited a narrower melting temperature range (Tc-To), a higher melting enthalpy (ΔH) and a higher IR absorbance ratio (1047cm(-1)/1022cm(-1)) than that prepared at a constant temperature of 25°C. Compared to native starch, X-ray diffraction pattern of treated starch was altered from B-type to C-type. Furthermore, the relative crystallinity of the starch products prepared under temperature-cycled retrogradation was the highest. This study suggests that more imperfect crystallites are formed in the crystalline matrix under temperature-cycled retrogradation, resulting in a high yield of SDS.

  9. Comparison Testings between Two High-temperature Strain Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, J.-F.; Castelli, M. G.; Androjna, D.; Blue, C.; Blue, R.; Lin, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of a newly developed resistance strain gage, the PdCr temperature-compensated wire strain gage, to that of a conventional high-temperature extensometry. The evaluation of the two strain measurement systems was conducted through the application of various thermal and mechanical loading spectra using a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system equipped with quartz lamp heating. The purpose of the testing was not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the testing environment typically employed when characterizing the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials. Strain measurement capabilities to 8OO C were investigated with a nickel base superalloy IN100 substrate material, and application to titanium matrix composite (TMC) materials was examined with the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 08 system. PdCr strain gages installed by three attachment techniques, namely, flame spraying, spot welding and rapid infrared joining were investigated.

  10. Raytheon RSP2 Cryocooler Low Temperature Testing and Design Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, R. C.; Kirkconnell, C. S.; Shrago, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    The High Capacity Raytheon Stirling/Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage cryocooler (HC-RSP2) was originally developed to provide simultaneous cooling at temperatures of 85 K and 35 K. During testing performed in 2008 it was demonstrated that this stock-configuration cryocooler is capable of providing significant amounts of heat lift at 2nd stage temperatures as low as 12 K, and modeling indicated that minor changes to the 2nd stage inertance tube/surge volume setup could yield improved performance. These changes were implemented and the cooler was successfully retested, producing >350 mW of heat lift at 12 K. A comprehensive redesign of the system has been performed, the result of which is a robust 2-stage cryocooler system that is intended to efficiently produce relatively large amounts of cooling at 2nd stage temperatures <12 K. This cryocooler, called the Low Temperature RSP2 (LT-RSP2) will be fabricated and tested over the next 12 months. This paper reports on the recently-completed test activities, as well as details relating to the system redesign. Expected performance, mass and packaging volume are addressed.

  11. The Late Ordovician crisis: the Large Igneous Province hypothesis tested by global carbon cycle modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Vincent; Servais, Thomas; François, Louis; Averbuch, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    The causes of the well-known Late Ordovician-Hirnantian glaciation remain largely debated. This global cooling event is generally attributed to a severe decrease of atmospheric pCO2 during a time of general greenhouse climate but its duration is not fully determined. The climate perturbation is synchronous with one of the biggest biotic crisis of the Earth history. Some authors have shown that, considering the Ashgillian paleogeography, a drop in pCO2 below a threshold of 8x to 10x PAL (Present Atmospheric Level) may induce a decrease in temperature in high latitudes so that the installation of an ice-sheet on Gondwana could be possible. Such a process requires an intensification of silicate weathering and/or organic carbon burial that are the two major processes potentially driving a decrease in atmospheric pCO2 at the geologic time scale. The Late Ordovician is known to be a period of high mantellic activity marked by a lack of reversal magnetic field and high volcanic activity. Barnes (2004) and Courtillot and Olson (2007) link this process to a superplume event that may give rise to continental basalt flooding. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis with a global carbon cycle numerical box-model coupled with an Energy Balance Climate Model. The Model is an upgrade of that used by Grard et al. (2005) to simulate the environmental impact of the Siberian traps at the P/T boundary. The configuration of the box-model has been set using the Late Ordovician paleogeography. In each oceanic box, the model calculates the evolution of carbon, phosphorus and oxygen concentrations and alkalinity. It also calculates atmospheric pCO2, atmospheric and oceanic δ13C. We tested different scenarios of Large Igneous Province (LIP) emplacements and organic carbon cycle interactions simulating atmospheric pCO2 drops of amplitude large enough to produce the Hirnantian glaciation. We show that the hypothesis of low latitude LIP well accounts for the Late Ordovician climate

  12. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE AND THE 22-YEAR QUASICYCLE IN THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Weizheng; Zhao Jinping; Huang Fei; Deng Shenggui

    2012-07-15

    According to the variation pattern of the solar magnetic field polarity and its relation to the relative sunspot number, we established the time series of the sunspot magnetic field polarity index and analyzed the strength and polarity cycle characteristics of the solar magnetic field. The analysis showed the existence of a cycle with about a 22-year periodicity in the strength and polarity of the solar magnetic field, which proved the Hale proposition that the 11-year sunspot cycle is one-half of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. By analyzing the atmospheric temperature field, we found that the troposphere and the stratosphere in the middle latitude of both the northern and southern hemispheres exhibited a common 22-year quasicycle in the atmospheric temperature, which is believed to be attributable to the 22-year solar magnetic cycle.

  13. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  14. A Preliminary Study on Designing and Testing of an Absorption Refrigeration Cycle Powered by Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitupulu, F. H.; Daulay, F. A.; Dedy, P. M.; Denis; Jecson

    2017-03-01

    In order to recover the waste heat from the exhaust gas of a combustion engine, an adsorption refrigeration cycle is proposed. This is a preliminary study on design and testing of a prototype of absorption refrigeration cycle powered by an internal combustion engine. The heat source of the cycle is a compression ignition engine which generates 122.36 W of heat in generator of the cycle. The pairs of absorbent and refrigerant are water and ammonia. Here the generator is made of a shell and tube heat exchanger with number of tube and its length are 20 and 0.69 m, respectively. In the experiments the exhaust gas, with a mass flow rate of 0.00016 kg/s, enters the generator at 110°C and leaves it at 72°C. Here, the solution is heated from 30°C to 90°C. In the evaporator, the lowest temperature can be reached is 17.9°C and COP of the system is 0.45. The main conclusion can be drawn here is that the proposed system can be used to recycle the waste heat and produced cooling. However, the COP is still low.

  15. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for a Nickel-hydrogen Cell: Cycle Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, cycle life tests of nickel electrodes were carried out in Hi/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45-minute low earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. The results show that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength did not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. The best plaque type appears to be one which is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has a median pore size of 13 micron.

  16. Evaluation of Electromyographic Frequency Domain Changes during a Three-Minute Maximal Effort Cycling Test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Robinson, Edward H; Miramonti, Amelia A; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the time course of EMG frequency changes during a three-minute maximal effort cycling test (3MT) session and to examine which parameter between mean (MNF) and median (MDF) frequency is more suitable for evaluation of changes in neuromuscular function throughout a 3MT. Eighteen recreationally-active men volunteered to participate in this study. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured using a dynamometer to determine maximal EMG frequency of the vastus lateralis (VL) of the kicking leg during isometric knee extension. A maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) on a cycle ergometer was performed to establish the appropriate load profile for the 3MT which was completed after a period of at least 48 hours. MNF, MDF and power output (PO) values were measured at 10-second epochs throughout the duration of the 3MT. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the changes in EMG frequency, relative to maximal values from the MVC, and change in PO during the testing procedure. MNF, Root Mean Square (RMS), and PO significantly decreased during the 3MT, while MDF did not change significantly. Statistically, EMG frequency and PO decreased at first and remained constant in response to the 3MT, which may be reflective of differing patterns of muscle fiber type fatigue throughout the testing session. Due to decreased variability, changes in neuromuscular function during this protocol may be better evaluated using MNF than MDF. Key pointsEMG frequency decreased initially and remained constant in response to all-out cycling test.The change in EMG frequency and power output were similar during all-out cycling test.MNF may be better than MDF for neuromuscular function evaluation during all-out cycling test due to decreased variability.

  17. EFFECTS OF TEST TEMPERATURE ON FLOW OF METALLIC GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. NOURI; Y. LIU; P. WESSELING; J. LEWANDOWSKI

    2006-04-12

    Micro-hardness experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures using a Nikon QM micro-hardness machine on a number of metallic glass (e.g. Zr-, Fe-, Al-) systems. Although high micro-hardness was exhibited at room temperature, significant hardness reductions were exhibited near the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. The effects of changes in test temperature on the micro-hardness will be reported. The effects of exposure time on the hardness evolution at a given temperature will also be summarized to illustrate some of the differences in behavior of the systems shown. The extreme softening near T{sub g}, characteristic of bulk metallic glass systems, enables the exploration of novel deformation processing. In order to develop deformation processing windows, the evaluation of bulk metallic glass mechanical properties under quasi-static conditions and the determination of flow properties at different temperatures and strain rates are reported. The use of such information to create layered/composite bulk metallic glasses will be summarized.

  18. Results of deep DoD life cycle tests at high rates on 12Ah NiCd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panneton, Paul E.; Meyer, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A 12 Ah Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) life cycle test that induced 47 percent more deep Depth Of Discharge cycles by mixing them with shallow DOD cycles is discussed. The test showed how aggressive recharging to a C/D ratio of 1.15 nearly doubled performance over cycling below a C/D of 1.11.

  19. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, D.B.; Moore-ede, M.C.

    1986-12-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function. 13 references.

  20. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wexler, D. B.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function.

  1. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  2. Ice surface temperatures: seasonal cycle and daily variability from in-situ and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristine S.; Dybkjær, Gorm; Høyer, Jacob L.; Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Rasmussen, Till A. S.; Tonboe, Rasmus T.

    2016-04-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter for understanding the climate system, including the Polar Regions. Yet, in-situ temperature measurements over ice- and snow covered regions are sparse and unevenly distributed, and atmospheric circulation models estimating surface temperature may have large biases. To change this picture, we will analyse the seasonal cycle and daily variability of in-situ and satellite observations, and give an example of how to utilize the data in a sea ice model. We have compiled a data set of in-situ surface and 2 m air temperature observations over land ice, snow, sea ice, and from the marginal ice zone. 2523 time series of varying length from 14 data providers, with a total of more than 13 million observations, have been quality controlled and gathered in a uniform format. An overview of this data set will be presented. In addition, IST satellite observations have been processed from the Metop/AVHRR sensor and a merged analysis product has been constructed based upon the Metop/AVHRR, IASI and Modis IST observations. The satellite and in-situ observations of IST are analysed in parallel, to characterize the IST variability on diurnal and seasonal scales and its spatial patterns. The in-situ data are used to estimate sampling effects within the satellite observations and the good coverage of the satellite observations are used to complete the geographical variability. As an example of the application of satellite IST data, results will be shown from a coupled HYCOM-CICE ocean and sea ice model run, where the IST products have been ingested. The impact of using IST in models will be assessed. This work is a part of the EUSTACE project under Horizon 2020, where the ice surface temperatures form an important piece of the puzzle of creating an observationally based record of surface temperatures for all corners of the Earth, and of the ESA GlobTemperature project which aims at applying surface temperatures in models in order to

  3. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  4. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  5. Weekly cycles in peak time temperatures and urban heat island intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Nick; Simmonds, Ian; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-07-01

    Regular diurnal and weekly cycles (WCs) in temperature provide valuable insights into the consequences of anthropogenic activity on the urban environment. Different locations experience a range of identified WCs and have very different structures. Two important sources of urban heat are those associated with the effect of large urban structures on the radiation budget and energy storage and those from the heat generated as a consequence of anthropogenic activity. The former forcing will remain relatively constant, but a WC will appear in the latter. WCs for specific times of day and the urban heat island (UHI) have not been analysed heretofore. We use three-hourly surface (2 m) temperature data to analyse the WCs of seven major Australian cities at different times of day and to determine to what extent one of our major city’s (Melbourne) UHI exhibits a WC. We show that the WC of temperature in major cities differs according to the time of day and that the UHI intensity of Melbourne is affected on a WC. This provides crucial information that can contribute toward the push for healthier urban environments in the face of a more extreme climate.

  6. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor—the nuclear light bulb concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Harms, Gary A.; Latham, Thomas S.; Roman, Ward C.; Rodgers, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (≳1800 s) and thrust (≳445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (˜4000 K). The following paper describes analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented here include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRR. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRR for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept.

  7. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, H.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA subassembly was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort is operations and testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon s EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of this testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. The lunar testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This had not been achieved in any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  8. Establishing isothermal contact at a known temperature under thermal equilibrium in elevated temperature instrumented indentation testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, X. D.; Alvarez, C. L. M.; Jennett, N. M.

    2017-02-01

    Instrumented indentation testing (IIT) at elevated temperatures has proved to be a useful tool to study plastic and elastic deformation and understand the performance of material components at (or nearer to) the actual temperatures experienced in-service. The value of elevated temperature IIT data, however, depends on the ability not only to achieve a stable, isothermal indentation contact at thermal equilibrium when taking data, but to be able to assign a valid temperature to that contact (and so to the data). The most common method found in the current literature is to use the calculated thermal drift rate as an indicator, but this approach has never been properly validated. This study proves that using the thermal drift rate to determine isothermal contact may lead to large errors in the determination of the real contact temperature. Instead, a more sensitive and validated method is demonstrated, based upon using the indenter tip and the tip heater control thermocouple as a reproducible and calibrated contact temperature sensor. A simple calibration procedure is described, along with step by step guidance to establish an isothermal contact at a known temperature under thermal equilibrium when conducting elevated temperature IIT experiments.

  9. Synergistic effect of daily temperature fluctuations and matching light-dark cycle enhances population growth and synchronizes oviposition behavior in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    Liefting, Maartje; Cosijn, Jarno; Ellers, Jacintha

    2017-01-01

    Some major aspects of insect life, like development time and reproduction, can benefit from fluctuating temperatures rather than a constant temperature regime. The benefit of fluctuating temperature has generally been attributed to the non-linear properties of the relationship of many life history traits with temperature. Daily temperature rise, however, usually coincide with the light phase of the photoperiodic cycle and there could be a benefit in linking daily temperature fluctuations with light and dark phases e.g. to anticipate the change in temperature. Such synergistic effects have primarily been studied in the light of activity patterns and gene expression, but have not yet been shown to extend to population dynamics and aspects of individual fitness like oviposition behavior. We therefore explored possible synergistic effects on life history traits of the springtail Orchesella cincta. We first test the primary effect of ecologically relevant temperature fluctuations of different amplitudes on population growth and total population mass. The slowest population growth was observed in the constant temperature regime treatment and the highest population growth in the regime with high amplitude fluctuations. In a second experiment, population growth and oviposition rhythm were measured under four different regimes; a constant light and temperature regime, thermoperiod only, photoperiod only and thermoperiod and photoperiod aligned as under natural conditions. The regime in which thermoperiod was aligned with photoperiod resulted in a higher population growth than could be realized by either factor alone. Also, significantly fewer eggs were laid in the constant temperature/light regime than in the other three regimes, strongly suggesting that this regime is stressful to O. cincta. Additionally, the fraction of eggs laid at night was highest in the regime with the combined temperature and light cycle. In conclusion, our results show that under these experimental

  10. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  11. Wide temperature range testing with ROTEM coagulation analyses.

    PubMed

    Kander, Thomas; Brokopp, Jens; Friberg, Hans; Schött, Ulf

    2014-09-01

    Mild induced hypothermia is used for neuroprotection in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Temperature-dependent effects on rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®)) assays with EXTEM(®), FIBTEM(®), or APTEM(®) in cardiac arrest patients have not previously been studied. Ten patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who underwent induced hypothermia were studied during stable hypothermia at 33°C. ROTEM temperature effects on EXTEM, FIBTEM, and APTEM assays were studied at temperatures set between 30°C and 42°C. Citrated whole blood test tubes were incubated in temperature-adjusted heating blocks and then investigated at respective temperature in the temperature-adjusted ROTEM. The following variables were determined: clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α-angle, and maximum clot firmness (MCF). The results from hypo- and hyperthermia samples were compared with the samples incubated at 37°C using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. CT-EXTEM(®) and CT-APTEM(®) were prolonged by hypothermia at 30°C (p<0.01 for both) and 33°C (p<0.05 for both). Hyperthermia at 42°C shortened CT-EXTEM (p<0.05) and CT-APTEM (p<0.01). CFT-EXTEM(®) and CFT-APTEM(®) were markedly prolonged by hypothermia at 30°C, 33°C, and 35°C (p<0.01 for all except CFT-EXTEM, 35°C [p<0.05]). The α-angle-EXTEM was markedly decreased at 30°C, 33°C, and 35°C (p<0.01) but increased at 40°C (p<0.05) and 42°C (p<0.01); α-angle-APTEM showed similar results. MCF was unchanged at different temperatures for all tests. ROTEM (EXTEM, FIBTEM, and APTEM assays) revealed a hypocoagulative response to in vitro-applied hypothermia in the blood of cardiac arrest patients reflected in the prolonged clot initiation and decreased clot propagation. Hyperthermia showed the opposite effects. Clot firmness was not affected by temperature.

  12. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  13. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  14. Problem-Based Test: Replication of Mitochondrial DNA during the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setalo, Gyorgy, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cell cycle, generation time, S-phase, cell culture synchronization, isotopic pulse-chase labeling, density labeling, equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation, buoyant density, rate-zonal centrifugation, nucleoside, nucleotide, kinase enzymes, polymerization of nucleic acids,…

  15. Testing of high temperature coal slurry pump packings

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, B.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents the results of a test program of packing designs and materials for high temperature coal slurry plunger pump services. The work was conducted to support the investigations and development of reliable and cost-effective reciprocating coal slurry pumps for future coal liquefaction process application. The short-term objectives were to screen, test and evaluate the state-of-the-art, commercially available packing designs and materials for the coal slurry feed pumps at the coal liquefaction pilot plants. Four major tasks were completed: failure analysis of slurry feed pumps packing components; selection of commercial packing designs and materials for testing; laboratory testing of high temperature coal slurry pump packings; and field testing of selected coalslurry pump packings. The results are presented. The primary root causes of the packing failures experienced at the pilot plants were identified as: insufficient packing lubrication, ineffective plunger flushing, unstable plunger alignment conditions of the pump, packing material incompatible to slurry and solvent, and undesirable packing installation, start-up, standby, and maintenance.

  16. High temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell power cycle: Preliminary design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of a high temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell, hydrogen/oxygen, thermally regenerative power cycle is developed and used to simulate system performance for varying system parameters. Initial estimates of system efficiency, weight, and volume are provided for a one KWe module assuming specific electrolyzer and fuel cell characteristics, both current and future. Specific interest is placed on examining the system responses to changes in device voltage versus current density operating curves, and the associated optimum operating ranges. The performance of a solar-powered, space based system in low earth orbit is examined in terms of the light-dark periods requiring storage. The storage design tradeoffs between thermal energy, electrical energy, and hydrogen/oxygen mass storage are examined. The current technology module is based on the 1000 C solid oxide electrolyzer cell and the alkaline fuel cell. The Future Technology system examines benefits involved with developing a 1800K electrolyzer operating with an advanced fuel cell.

  17. Performance predictions for a room temperature, Ericsson cycle, magnetic heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnell, J. G.

    1982-05-01

    The performance potential of a room temperature magnetic heat pump utilizing Gadolinium and operating on an Ericsson Cycle was investigated at magnetic flux densities of 2 and 7-Tesla which represent the upper limits of conventional and superconducting electromagnetics, respectively. At a coefficient of performance of 5, a 7-Tesla system would provide a cooling capacity of at best 1200 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium while a 2-Tesla system would operate at approximately 130 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium. Magnetic circuit efficiency was not determined but must be high (95-percent or better) in order for the magnetic heat pump performance to compete with conventional cooling systems. It is unlikely the magnetic heat pump investigated could approach the performance and compactness of the conventional cooling systems unless field strengths much greater than 7-Tesla are possible.

  18. High temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell power cycle: Preliminary design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1987-06-01

    A model of a high temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell, hydrogen/oxygen, thermally regenerative power cycle is developed and used to simulate system performance for varying system parameters. Initial estimates of system efficiency, weight, and volume are provided for a one KWe module assuming specific electrolyzer and fuel cell characteristics, both current and future. Specific interest is placed on examining the system responses to changes in device voltage versus current density operating curves, and the associated optimum operating ranges. The performance of a solar-powered, space based system in low earth orbit is examined in terms of the light-dark periods requiring storage. The storage design tradeoffs between thermal energy, electrical energy, and hydrogen/oxygen mass storage are examined. The current technology module is based on the 1000 C solid oxide electrolyzer cell and the alkaline fuel cell. The Future Technology system examines benefits involved with developing a 1800K electrolyzer operating with an advanced fuel cell.

  19. High-temperature nuclear closed Brayton cycle power conversion system for the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, D.J. )

    1991-01-05

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has stated goals of colonizing the moon and conducting manned exploration of the planet Mars. Unlike previous ventures into space, both manned and unmanned, large quantities of electrical power will be required to provide the energy for lunar base sustenance and for highly efficient propulsion systems for the long trip to mars and return. Further, the requirement for electrical power of several megawatts will necessitate the use of nuclear reactor driven power conversion systems. This paper discusses a particle bed reactor closed Brayton cycle space power system that uses advanced materials technology to achieve a high-temperature, low-specific-weight modular system capable of providing the requisite electrical power for both a lunar base and a Mars flight vehicle propulsion system.

  20. High-temperature nuclear closed Brayton cycle power conversion system for the Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Donald J.

    The Space Exploration Initiative has stated goals of colonizing the moon and conducting manned exploration of the planet Mars. Unlike previous ventures into space, both manned and unmanned, large quantities of electrical power will be required to provide the energy for lunar base sustenance and for highly efficient propulsion systems for the long trip to Mars and return. Further, the requirement for electrical power of several megawatts will necessitate the use of nuclear reactor driven power conversion systems. This paper discusses a particle bed reactor closed Brayton cycle space power system that uses advanced materials technology to achieve a high-temperature, low-specific-weight modular system capable of providing the requisite electrical power for both a lunar base and a Mars flight vehicle propulsion system.

  1. High-temperature nuclear closed Brayton cycle power conversion system for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has stated goals of colonizing the moon and conducting manned exploration of the planet Mars. Unlike previous ventures into space, both manned and unmanned, large quantities of electrical power will be required to provide the energy for lunar base sustenance and for highly efficient propulsion systems for the long trip to mars and return. Further, the requirement for electrical power of several megawatts will necessitate the use of nuclear reactor driven power conversion systems. This paper discusses a particle bed reactor closed Brayton cycle space power system that uses advanced materials technology to achieve a high-temperature, low-specific-weight modular system capable of providing the requisite electrical power for both a lunar base and a Mars flight vehicle propulsion system.

  2. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James William; Bayless, Paul David; Nelson, Lee Orville; Gougar, Hans David; Kinsey, James Carl; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  3. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  4. High-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy forging at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Demura, Masahiko; Matsuoka, Saburo; Sunakawa, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn Extra Low Interstitial (ELI) alloy forging were investigated at low temperatures. The high-cycle fatigue strength at low temperatures of this alloy was relatively low compared with that at ambient temperature. The crystallographic orientation of a facet formed at a fatigue crack initiation site was determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method in scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fatigue crack initiation mechanism and discuss on the low fatigue strength at low temperature. Furthermore, in terms of the practical use of this alloy, the effect of the stress ratio (or mean stress) on the high-cycle fatigue properties was evaluated using the modified Goodman diagram.

  5. A Finite Element Model Of Self-Resonating Bimorph Microcantilever For Fast Temperature Cycling In A Pyroelectric Energy Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, Salwa; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Bannuru, Thirumalesh; Rajic, Slobodan; Islam, Syed K; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2011-01-01

    A self resonating bimorph cantilever structure for fast temperature cycling in a pyroelectric energy harvester has been modeled using a finite element method. The effect of constituting material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure has been investigated. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature play a key role in dominating the cycling frequency and efficiency of energy recycling. An optimal solution for the most efficient energy scavenging process has been sought by studying the performance trend with different variable parameters such as thermal contact conductance, heat source temperature, device aspect ratio and constituent materials of varying thermal conductivity and expansion coefficients.

  6. High-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy forging at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Demura, Masahiko; Matsuoka, Saburo; Sunakawa, Hideo

    2014-01-27

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn Extra Low Interstitial (ELI) alloy forging were investigated at low temperatures. The high-cycle fatigue strength at low temperatures of this alloy was relatively low compared with that at ambient temperature. The crystallographic orientation of a facet formed at a fatigue crack initiation site was determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method in scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fatigue crack initiation mechanism and discuss on the low fatigue strength at low temperature. Furthermore, in terms of the practical use of this alloy, the effect of the stress ratio (or mean stress) on the high-cycle fatigue properties was evaluated using the modified Goodman diagram.

  7. Disparate effects of constant and annually-cycling daylength and water temperature on reproductive maturation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.W.; Henderson-Arzapalo, A.; Sullivan, C.V.

    2005-01-01

    Adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) were exposed to various combinations of constant or anually-cycling daylength and water temperature. Constant conditions (15 h days, 18??C) were those normally experienced at spawning and cycling conditions simulated natural changes at Chesapeake Bay latitude. Females exposed to constant long (15 h) days and cycling water temperature (TEMPERATURE group) had blood plasma levels of sex steroids (testosterone [T] and estradiol-17?? [E2]) and vitellogenin (Vg), and profiles of oocyte growth, that were nearly identical to those of females held under a natural photothermal cycle (CONTROL group). Several fish from these two groups were induced to spawn fertile eggs. Females constantly exposed to warm water (18??C), with or without a natural photoperiod cycle (PHOTOPERIOD and STATIC groups, respectively), had diminished circulating levels of gonadal steroid hormones and Vg, impaired deposition of yolk granules in their ooplasm, and decreased oocyte growth, and they underwent premature ovarian atresia. Males exposed to cycling water temperature (CONTROL and TEMPERATURE groups) spermiated synchronously during the natural breeding season, at which time they also had had high plasma androgen (T and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]) levels. The timing of spermiation was highly asynchronous among males in groups of fish held constantly at 18??C (STATIC and PHOTOPERIOD groups) and this asynchrony was associated with diminished plasma androgen levels. Termination of spermiation by males exposed to cycling water temperature coincided with a sharp decline in levels of plasma androgens about a month after water temperature rose above 18??C. In contrast, most males held constantly at 18??C sustained intermediate levels of plasma androgens and spermiated until the end of the study in late July. The annual cycle of water temperature clearly plays a prominent role in the initiation, maintenance, and termination of the striped bass reproductive cycle. In

  8. High Temperature Environmental Test Facility for Uniaxial Testing under Cyclic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY ( Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED March 23, 1998 Final Report (1 Aug 95 to 31 Jul 97) 4 . TITLE...AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS High Temperature Environmental Test Facility For Uniaxial F49620-95- 1-04 70 Testing Under Cyclic Loading 6 . AUTHOR(S...extensometer is rated for 1200 ’C. The system is capable of fatigue testing conventional aluminum and titanium materials and high temperature or single crystal

  9. CARS temperature measurements in a hypersonic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Smith, M. W.; Antcliff, R. R.; Northam, G. B.; Cutler, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Static-temperature measurements performed in a reacting vitiated air-hydrogen Mach-2 flow in a duct in Test Cell 2 at NASA LaRC by using a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system are discussed. The hypersonic propulsion Test Cell 2 hardware is outlined with emphasis on optical access ports and safety features in the design of the Test Cell. Such design considerations as vibration, noise, contamination from flow field or atmospheric-borne dust, unwanted laser- and electrically-induced combustion, and movement of the sampling volume in the flow are presented. The CARS system is described, and focus is placed on the principle and components of system-to-monochromator signal coupling. Contour plots of scramjet combustor static temperature in a reacting-flow region are presented for three stations, and it is noted that the measurements reveal such features in the flow as maximum temperature near the model wall in the region of the injector footprint.

  10. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  11. The effect of aging and cold working on the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue behavior of alloy 800h: part ii: continuous cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagrana, R. E.; Kaae, J. L.; Ellis, J. R.

    1981-11-01

    The individual and combined effects of cold working (5 and 10 pct) and aging (4000 and 8000 h in the temperature range 538 to 760 °C) on the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue behavior of alloy 800H have been investigated. The specimens were tested at the aging temperatures. Both the saturation stress range and the fatigue life were found to be history dependent. A history-independent hardening mechanism, dynamic strain aging, was found to operate over the temperature range ~450 to 650°C and to be maximized at ~55O °C. It is speculated that carbon is responsible for this dynamic strain aging. Finally, at temperatures above 538 °C the Coffin-Manson plots show a history-independent deviation from linearity.

  12. Closed Cycle Engine Program Used in Solar Dynamic Power Testing Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clint B., III; McKissock, David B.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is testing the world's first integrated solar dynamic power system in a simulated space environment. This system converts solar thermal energy into electrical energy by using a closed-cycle gas turbine and alternator. A NASA-developed analysis code called the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) has been used for both pretest predictions and post-test analysis of system performance. The solar dynamic power system has a reflective concentrator that focuses solar thermal energy into a cavity receiver. The receiver is a heat exchanger that transfers the thermal power to a working fluid, an inert gas mixture of helium and xenon. The receiver also uses a phase-change material to store the thermal energy so that the system can continue producing power when there is no solar input power, such as when an Earth-orbiting satellite is in eclipse. The system uses a recuperated closed Brayton cycle to convert thermal power to mechanical power. Heated gas from the receiver expands through a turbine that turns an alternator and a compressor. The system also includes a gas cooler and a radiator, which reject waste cycle heat, and a recuperator, a gas-to-gas heat exchanger that improves cycle efficiency by recovering thermal energy.

  13. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  14. Effects of temperature and humidity cycling on the strengths of textile reinforced carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Furrow, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of the combined effects of temperature and humidity cycling on AS4/3501-6 composites (unstitched, Kevlar 29 stitched, and S-2 glass stitched uniweave fabric) and AS4/E905L composites (2-D, S-2 glass stitched 2-D, and 3-D braided fabric). The AS4/3501-6 uniweave material had a quasi-isotropic layup, whereas the AS4/E905L materials were braided in a (+/-30 deg/0 deg)(sub s) orientation. Data presented include compression strengths and compression-compression fatigue results for uncycled composites and cycled composites (160, 480, 720, and 1280 cycles from 140 deg F at 95 percent relative humidity to -67 deg F). To observe the presence of microcracking within the laminates, photomicrographs were taken of each material type at the end of each cycling period. Microcracks were found to be more prevalent within stitched laminates, predominantly around individual stitches. The glass stitched laminates showed significant microcracking even before cycling. Less microcracking was evident in the Kevlar stitched materials, whereas the unstitched uniweave material developed microcracks only after cycling. The 3-D braid did not develop microcracks. The static compression strengths of the unstitched and Kevlar stitched uniweave materials were degraded by about 10 percent after 1280 temperature/humidity cycles, whereas the reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched uniweave was less than 3 percent. The reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched 2-D braid was less than 8 percent. The unstitched 2-D and 3-D braids did not lose strength from temperature/humidity cycling. The compression-compression fatigue properties of all six material types were not affected by temperature/humidity cycling.

  15. Miniature environmental chambers for temperature humidity bias testing of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Hook, Michael David; Mayer, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Environmental chambers are commonly used for reliability testing of microelectronics and other products and materials. These chambers are large, expensive, and limit electrical connectivity to devices under test. In this paper, we present a collection of ten small, low-cost environmental chambers, with humidity control based on mixtures of water and glycerol placed inside the chambers. We demonstrate relative humidities from 44% to 90%, at temperatures from 30 to 85 °C, enabling industry-standard testing at 85% humidity and 85 °C. The division of samples between ten separate chambers allows different conditions to be applied to each sample, in order to quickly characterize the effects of the environment on device reliability, enabling extrapolation to estimate lifetimes in working conditions.

  16. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  17. Testing rig for low cycle fatigue tests in combined bending and torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caligiana, Gianni; Curioni, Sergio

    1992-07-01

    In order to simulate, on samples, the fatigue behavior of notched or grooved shafts used in industrial plants, a biaxal testing equipment, to transform the alternate motion of a conventional testing machine into combined torsion and bending cyclic loadings, was devised and realized. Several different amplitude ratios between torsion and bending can be obtained beyond pure torsion and pure bending. Design choices, modeling, numerical simulations and experimental verifications performed for the testing apparatus are reported. Influence of misalignment and manufacturing imperfections on the behavior of the equipment are considered.

  18. Impact of the Last Glacial Cycle on Common-Era temperature and energy reconstructions from terrestrial borehole temperatures in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; Matharoo, G. S.; Tarasov, L.; Rath, V.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstructions of past climatic changes from borehole temperature profiles areimportant independent estimates of temperature histories over the lastmillennium. There remain, however, multiple uncertainties in theinterpretation of these data as climatic indicators and as estimates of thechanges in heat content of the continental subsurface due to long-termclimatic change. One of these uncertainties is associated with the oftenignored impact of the last glacial cycle on the subsurface energy content, andthe estimate of the background quasi steady-state signal associated withthe diffusion of accretionary energy from the Earth's interior. Here we providethe first quantification of the impact of the Laurentide ice sheeton energy and surface temperature reconstructions during the Common Era from measurements ofterrestrial borehole temperatures in North America. We use basal temperaturevalues from the data-calibrated Memorial University of Newfoundland GlacialSystems Model to quantify the extent of the perturbation tosteady-state temperature profiles and to derive spatial maps of the expectedimpacts on measured profiles over North America. Furthermore, we presentquantitative estimates of the potential effects of temperature changes duringthe last glacial cycle on Common-Era surface temperature reconstructions for North America. The range of these possible impacts areestimated using synthetic basal temperatures for a period covering 120 ka tothe present day that include the basal temperature history uncertainties froman ensemble of results from the calibrated numerical model. For all thelocations, we find that within the depth ranges that are typical for availableboreholes used to estimate surface temperature changes during the Common era (~600 m), the induced perturbations to the steady-state temperature profile are on the order of 10 mW/m2, decreasingwith greater depths. Results indicate that site-specific heat content estimatesover North America can differ by as much

  19. The Cross-Validation of the United States Air Force Submaximal Cycle Ergometer Test to Estimate Aerobic Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    and Febiger, 199’. 2. Arts, F.JP., H. Kuipers , A.E. Jeukendrup, et al. A short cycle ergometry test to predict workload and maximal oxygen uptake. Int...133Description of Monark Cycle Ergometer Calibration Monark Cycle Ergometer calibration is achieved by first turning the resistance belt to zero on the free

  20. Flight Tests on a Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Sawatari, Takeo; Lin, Yuping; Elam, Kristie A.

    1998-01-01

    For aircraft engine control, one key parameter to detect on an airplane is the exhaust gas temperature (EGT). Presently, thermocouples are used to perform this measurement. These electrical sensors perform adequately; however, fully utilizing the benefits of optical sensors requires replacing electrical architectures with optical architectures. Part of this requires replacing electrical sensors with optical sensors, such as the EGT sensor chosen for these tests. The objective of the development and testing of this prototype sensor system was to determine the feasibility of operating an optical sensor in a hostile aircraft environment. The fiber optic sensor system was developed to measure temperatures from 20C to 600C in an aircraft environment and was utilized to monitor the EGT of an OV-10D aircraft engine. The sensor has successfully flown over 50 hours and proven to be immune to surface deterioration of the optical element (located inside the sensor head) and able to withstand and operate in normal and sustained severe flight conditions where forces on the airplane exceeded 4 g's. Potential commercial uses for this sensor include monitoring temperature for aeropropulsion system control, military vehicle and naval engine control, conventional and nuclear power plant monitoring and industrial plan monitoring where EMI issues are critical.

  1. Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

  2. Atmospheric leakage and condensate production in NASA's biomass production chamber. Effect of diurnal temperature cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Drese, John H.; Sager, John C.

    1991-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to monitor atmospheric leakage rate and condensate production in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Water was circulated through the 64 plant culture trays inside the chamber during the tests but no plants were present. Environmental conditions were set to a 12-hr photoperiod with either a matching 26 C (light)/20 C (dark) thermoperiod, or a constant 23 C temperature. Leakage, as determined by carbon dioxide decay rates, averaged about 9.8 percent for the 26 C/20 C regime and 7.3 percent for the constant 23 C regime. Increasing the temperature from 20 C to 26 C caused a temporary increase in pressure (up to 0.5 kPa) relative to ambient, while decreasing the temperature caused a temporary decrease in pressure of similar magnitude. Little pressure change was observed during transition between 23 C (light) and 23 C (dark). The lack of large pressure events under isothermal conditions may explain the lower leakage rate observed. When only the plant support inserts were placed in the culture trays, condensate production averaged about 37 liters per day. Placing acrylic germination covers over the tops of culture trays reduced condensate production to about 7 liters per day. During both tests, condensate production from the lower air handling system was 60 to 70 percent greater than from the upper system, suggesting imbalances exist in chilled and hot water flows for the two air handling systems. Results indicate that atmospheric leakage rates are sufficiently low to measure CO2 exchange rates by plants and the accumulation of certain volatile contaminants (e.g., ethylene). Control system changes are recommended in order to balance operational differences (e.g., humidity and temperature) between the two halves of the chamber.

  3. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 2: Zirconium-copper at 482, 538 and 593 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Zirconium-copper (1/2 hard) was tested in argon over the temperature range from 482 to 593 C in an evaluation of short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties was evaluated at 538 C and in general it was found that the yield and ultimate strengths increased as the strain rate was increased from 0.0004 to 0.01/sec. Ductility was essentially insensitive to strain rate in the case of the zirconium-copper alloy. Strain-rate and hold-time effects on the low cycle fatigue behavior of zirconium-copper were evaluated in argon at 538 C. These effects were as expected in that decreased fatigue life was noted as the strain rate decreased and when hold times were introduced into the tension portion of the strain-cycle. Hold times in compression were much less detrimental than hold times in tension.

  4. Reproducibility of a life-cycle toxicity test with Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, B.R.; Forte, J.L.; Wright, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    Standardized chronic life-cycle toxicity testing procedures for aquatic species are described. The reproducibility of chronic toxicity and points using the static-renewal method with Daphnia magna are investigated. The objectives were to determine if the lowest rejected concentrations tested (LRCTs) obtained for six different toxicity criteria in static-renewal tests with acridine were reproducible over time and to determine the relative sensitivity and variability of the toxicity criteria. Two of the six toxicity criteria, numbers of young per brood and the young produced per female, were found to be reliable and sensitive for estimating the LRCT for acridine to D. magna. (RJC)

  5. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  6. Effect of temperature, microstructure, and stress state on the low cycle fatigue behavior of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, D. R.; Antolovich, S. D.; Mirdamadi, M.; Zamrik, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Specimens of Waspaloy of two different microstructures were tested in uniaxial and torsional low-cycle fatigue at 24 and 649 C. For all specimens, deformation and failure mechanisms are found to be independent of stress state at 24 C; in both microstructures, failure is associated with the formation of shear cracks. At 649 C, deformation and failure mechanisms for the fine-grain large gamma-prime specimens are independent of stress state, and the mechanisms are similar to those observed at 24 C. For the coarse-grain small gamma-prime specimens, however, failure occurs on principal planes in torsion and on shear plane in uniaxial tension. The results are interpreted in terms of deformation mode and microstructural instability.

  7. Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of P92 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Hu, ZhengFei; Schmauder, Siegfried; Mlikota, Marijo; Fan, KangLe

    2016-04-01

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of P92 ferritic-martensitic steel and the corresponding microstructure evolution at 873 K has been extensively studied. The test results of fatigue lifetime are consistent with the Coffin-Manson relationship over a range of controlled total strain amplitudes from 0.15 to 0.6%. The influence of strain amplitude on the fatigue crack initiation and growth has been observed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of secondary cracks is established according to the observation of fracture after fatigue process and there is an intrinsic relationship between striation spacing, current crack length, and strain amplitude. Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to investigate the microstructure evolution after fatigue process. It indicates the interaction between carbides and dislocations together with the formation of cell structure inhibits the cyclic softening. The low-angle sub-boundary elimination in the martensite is mainly caused by the cyclic stress.

  8. Very high temperature measurements: Application to nuclear reactor safety tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parga, Clemente Jose

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100ºC to 2480ºC), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: -The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (+/-0.001ºC) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (+/-3-5ºC). -The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300ºC) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000ºC).

  9. Thermocline temperature variability in the Timor Strait over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, E.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2012-12-01

    *Lo Giudice Cappelli, E elgc@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Holbourn, A ah@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Kuhnt, W wk@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Regenberg, M regenberg@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Garbe- Schönberg, D dgs@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Seafloor temperature variations within the path of the Indonesian Throughflow are mainly influenced by the intensity of the cool throughflow and by glacial-interglacial sea-level changes. We present a study based on core 18471 (9°21.987' S, 129°58.983' E, 485m water depth, 13.5m long) and 30 core tops retrieved in the Timor Sea during the R/V Sonne Cruise 185 ("VITAL"). Multicorer core tops were retrieved along two transects between 130 and 2400m water depths, representing a range of present day bottom water temperatures between 2 and 21°C. For the downcore study, we measured Mg/Ca-ratios in ~10 tests of the benthic foraminifera Hoeglundina elegans, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Hyalinea balthica in 10cm intervals (1-2kyr time resolution). The preservation of tests was checked with a scanning electron microscope. Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and H. balthica were used in one interval, where H. elegans was rare. Duplicate samples were analyzed to inter-calibrate the three species. Mg/Ca ratios were converted into temperature using published calibrations and our regional calibration based on Timor Sea core tops. Preliminary results show that Mg/Ca ratios in H. elegans vary between 0.8 and 2.2mmol mol-1 corresponding to a temperature range between 4 and 10.5°C, in contrast to a modern annual average temperature of 7.9°C at 400m. 22-paired analyses in H. elegans give a reproducibility of 0.16mmol mol-1 (standard deviation

  10. Actinide ion extraction using room temperature ionic liquids: opportunities and challenges for nuclear fuel cycle applications.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Studies on the extraction of actinide ions from radioactive feeds have great relevance in nuclear fuel cycle activities, mainly in the back end processes focused on reprocessing and waste management. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction vis-à-vis molecular diluents, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By the suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids, their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered key parameters in metal ion extraction. Aqueous solubility of the RTILs, which can lead to significant loss in the solvent inventory, can be avoided by appending the extractant moieties onto the ionic liquid. While the low vapour pressure and non-flammability of the ionic liquids make them appear as 'green' diluents, their aqueous solubility raises concerns of environmental hazards. The present article gives a summary of studies carried out on actinide ion extraction and presents perspectives of its applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. The article discusses various extractants used for actinide ion extraction and at many places, comparison is made vis-à-vis molecular diluents which includes the nature of the extracted species and the mechanism of extraction. Results of studies on rare earth elements are also included in view of their similarities with the trivalent minor actinides.

  11. Evaluation of Specialized Thermocouples for High-Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; S. C. Wilkins

    2006-06-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding, and structural materials. Data are needed to characterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing, and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed that can survive proposed test conditions. Standard thermocuoples for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 ºC. Hence, INL initiated a project to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate, and evaluate specialized high-temperature thermocouples for in-pile applications suggest that several material combinations are viable. Tests show that several low neutron cross-section candidate materials are resistant to material interactions and remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, results indicate that the thermoelectric response is singlevalued and repeatable with acceptable resolution for the candidate thermoelements considered. The final selection of the thermocouple materials will depend on the desired peak temperature and accuracy requirements. If thermocouples are needed that measure temperatures at 1600 ºC or higher, the doped Mo / Nb-1%Zr and Mo-1.6% Nb / Nb-1%Zr thermoelement wire combinations are recommended with HfO2 insulation, and a Nb-1%Zr sheath. Additional evaluations are underway to characterize the performance of this proposed thermocouple design. INL has worked to optimize this thermocouple’s stability. With appropriate heat treatment and fabrication approaches, results indicate that the effects of thermal cycling on the calibration of the proposed thermocouple design can be minimized. INL has initiated a series of high temperature (from 1200 to 1800 ºC) long duration (up to six months) tests. Initial results indicate the INL-developed thermocouple’s termoelectric response is stable with less than 15 ºC drift observed in over 3500 hours of the planned 4000 hours

  12. Probabilistic material strength degradation model for Inconel 718 components subjected to high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of both the fifth and sixth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for five variables, namely, high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using an updated version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of high-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue was performed. Then using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS94, a second sensitivity study including the effect of low-cycle mechanical fatigue, as well as, the three previous effects was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of high-cycle mechanical

  13. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution.

  14. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  15. Temperature effects on Ca2+ cycling in scombrid cardiomyocytes: a phylogenetic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Gina L. J.; Lipnick, Michael S.; Shiels, Holly A.; Block, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Specialisations in excitation–contraction coupling may have played an important role in the evolution of endothermy and high cardiac performance in scombrid fishes. We examined aspects of Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes from Pacific bonito (Sarda chiliensis), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis). The whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to measure the temperature sensitivity of the L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa), density, and steady-state and maximal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content (ssSRload and maxSRload). Current–voltage relations, peak ICa density and charge density of ICa were greatest in mackerel and yellowfin at all temperatures tested. ICa density and kinetics were temperature sensitive in all species studied, and the magnitude of this response was not related to the thermal preference of the species. SRload was greater in atrial than in ventricular myocytes in the Pacific bluefin tuna, and in species that are more cold tolerant (bluefin tuna and mackerel). ICa and SRload were particularly small in bonito, suggesting the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger plays a more pivotal role in Ca2+ entry into cardiomyocytes of this species. Our comparative approach reveals that the SR of cold-tolerant scombrid fishes has a greater capacity for Ca2+ storage. This specialisation may contribute to the temperature tolerance and thermal niche expansion of the bluefin tuna and mackerel. PMID:21389190

  16. Microstructural Features Controlling the Variability in Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy Inconel 718DA at Intermediate Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Damien; Gómez, Ana Casanova; Pierret, Stéphane; Franchet, Jean-Michel; Pollock, Tresa M.; Villechaise, Patrick; Cormier, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of two direct-aged versions of the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718DA) was examined in the low-strain amplitude regime at intermediate temperature. High variability in fatigue life was observed, and abnormally short lifetimes were systematically observed to be due to crack initiation at (sub)-surface non-metallic inclusions. However, crack initiation within (sub)-surface non-metallic inclusions did not necessarily lead to short fatigue life. The macro- to micro-mechanical mechanisms of deformation and damage have been examined by means of detailed microstructural characterization, tensile and fatigue mechanical tests, and in situ tensile testing. The initial stages of crack micro-propagation from cracked non-metallic particles into the surrounding metallic matrix occupies a large fraction of the fatigue life and requires extensive local plastic straining in the matrix adjacent to the cracked inclusions. Differences in microstructure that influence local plastic straining, i.e., the δ-phase content and the grain size, coupled with the presence of non-metallic inclusions at the high end of the size distribution contribute strongly to the fatigue life variability.

  17. Fabrication of Titanium Bonded Joint Specimens for High Temperature Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Kovach, Michael P.; Hudson, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    Four sets of adhesively bonded, titanium lap-shear coupon specimens were fabricated for ultimate strength testing according to the ASTM D1002 and D3165 standards. Important features of the fabrication methods, processing details, and lap-shear test results are presented for specimens fabricated using a modified bismaleimide adhesive, EA 9673, on titanium. Surface treatment of the titanium was performed using surface abrasion followed by one of two separate chemical etching processes. Although cure cycle requirements are different among most adhesives, a single surface preparation method was sought as the preferred method for conditioning the titanium specimens prior to bonding and curing. A fabrication process using a combination of low-pressure grit-blasting of the titanium surface followed by anodization with a sodium hydroxide solution applied to the D1002 specimen geometry provided the highest lapshear strengths in the study. Additionally, difficulties documented during the fabrication process of the D3165 specimens along with features of the D3165 geometry were identified as factors that contributed to lower lap-shear strength results for the D3165 specimens as compared to the results for the D1002 specimens.

  18. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  19. Solar cycle variation of Mars exospheric temperatures: Critical review of available dayside measurements and recent model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, Stephen; Huestis, David

    The responses of the Martian dayside thermosphere to solar flux variations (on both solar rotation and solar cycle timescales) have been the subject of considerable debate and study for many years. Available datasets include: Mariner 6,7,9 (UVS dayglow), Viking Lander 1-2 (UAMS densities upon descent), several aerobraking campaigns (MGS, Odyssey, MRO densities), and Mars Express (SPICAM dayglow). Radio Science derived plasma scale heights near the ionospheric peak can be used to derive neutral temperatures in this region (only); such values are not applicable to exobase heights (e.g. Forbes et al. 2008; Bougher et al. 2009). Recently, densities and temperatures derived from precise orbit determination of the MGS spacecraft (1999-2005) have been used to establish the responses of Mars' exosphere to long-term solar flux variations (Forbes et al., 2008). From this multi-year dataset, dayside exospheric temperatures weighted toward moderate southern latitudes are found to change by about 120 K over the solar cycle. However, the applicability of these drag derived exospheric temperatures to near solar minimum conditions is suspect (e.g Bruinsma and Lemoine, 2002). Finally, re-evaluation of production mechanisms for UV dayglow emissions implies revised values for exospheric temperatures (e.g. Simon et al., 2009; Huestis et al. 2010). Several processes are known to influence Mars' exospheric temperatures and their variability (Bougher et al., 1999; 2000; 2009). Solar EUV heating and its variations with solar fluxes received at Mars, CO2 15-micron cooling, molecular thermal conduction, and hydrodynamic heating/cooling associated with global dynamics all contribute to regulate dayside thermo-spheric temperatures. Poorly measured dayside atomic oxygen abundances render CO2 cooling rates uncertain at the present time. However, global thermospheric circulation models can be exercised for conditions spanning the solar cycle and Mars seasons to address the relative roles of

  20. Effect of incubation temperature and wet-dry cycle on the availabilities of Cd, Pb and Zn in soil.

    PubMed

    Si, Ji-tao; Tian, Bao-guo; Wang, Hong-tao

    2006-01-01

    The effect of incubation temperature and wet-dry cycle on the availabilities of Cd, Pb and Zn was studied. Three soils with pH ranging from 3.8 to 7.3, organic carbon (OC) from 0.7% to 2.4%, and clay from 12.3% to 35.6% were selected. Soils were spiked with reagent grade Cd(NO3)2, Pb(NO3)2, and Zn(NO3)2 at concentrations of 30 mg Cd/kg soil, 300 mg Zn/kg soil and 2000 mg Pb/kg soil. The soils were incubated at 35, 60, 105 degrees C, respectively and went through four wet-dry cycles. Metal availability in soils was estimated by soil extraction with 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3)2. According to this study, the effect of the spiking temperature on the metal availabilities was different among the metals, soils and wet-dry cycles. Mostly, 35 degrees C was the first recommended spiking temperature for Cd and Pb while no spiking temperature was obviously better than others for Zn. Three wet-dry cycles was recommended regardless of the type of metals and incubation temperature.