Science.gov

Sample records for temperature gas nitriding

  1. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-02-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  2. Foreign Object Damage Behavior of Two Gas-turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2002-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through strength testing of flexure test specimens impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 220 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub IC)). Additionally, the FOD response of an equiaxed, fine-grained silicon nitride (NC132) was also investigated to provide further insight. The NC132 silicon nitride exhibited the lowest fracture toughness of the three materials tested, providing further evidence that K(sub IC) is a key material parameter affecting FOD resistance. The observed damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the forms of well- or ill-developed ring or cone cracks with little presence of radial cracks.

  3. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  4. Foreign Object Damage in Disks of Two Gas-turbine-grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine-grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through postimpact strength testing of disks impacted by steel ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 115 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (k(sub Ic)). The critical impact velocity V(sub c) for which the corresponding postimpact strength was the lowest was V(sub c) approximately equal to 440 and 300 m/s AS800 and SN282, respectively. A unique lower strength regime was typified for both silicon nitrides depending on impact velocity and was attributed to significant radial cracking. The damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the form of ring, radial, and cone cracks with their severity and combination being dependent on impact velocity. Unlike the thick (4 millimeters) flexure bar specimens used in our previous studies, the thin (2 millimeter) disk target specimen exhibited a unique back-side radial cracking on the reverse side just beneath the impact sites at and above impact velocities of 160 meters per second for SN282 and 220 meters per second AS800.

  5. Low temperature synthesis of silicon nitride thin films deposited by VHF/RF PECVD for gas barrier application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun S.; Shin, Kyung S.; Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates as barrier layers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Utilizing a combination of very high-frequency (VHF 40.68 MHz) and radio-frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasmas it was possible to adopt PECVD deposition at low-temperature using the precursors: Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) and nitrogen. To investigate relationship between film properties and plasma properties, plasma diagnostic using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was performed along with the film analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). OES measurements show that there is dominance of the excited N2 and N2+ emissions with increase in N2 dilution, which has a significant impact on the film properties. It was seen that all the deposited films contains mainly silicon nitride with a small content of carbon and no signature of oxygen. Interestingly, upon air exposure, films have shown the formation of Si-O bonds in addition to the Si-N bonds. Measurements and analysis reveals that SiNx films deposited with high content of nitrogen with HMDSN plasma can have lower gas barrier properties as low as 7 . 3 ×10-3 g/m2/day. Also at Chiang Mai University.

  6. High temperature gas nitriding and tempering in 17Cr-1Ni-0.5C-0.4V steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, J. H.; Lee, D. J.; On, H. Y.; Park, S. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kang, C. Y.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, H. W.

    2010-12-01

    High temperature gas nitriding (HTGN) at 1050 °C and tempering of a 17Cr-1Ni-0.5C-0.4V (CNV) steel were experimentally investigated. The phases appearing in the surface layer of the HTGN-treated steel were martensite and austenite with mostly Cr2N precipitates that were formed by permeated nitrogen, and a small amount of Cr23C6 and VN precipitates. The reverse migration of carbon hindered the diffusion of nitrogen when nitrogen permeated from the surface to the interior, which resulted in the accumulation of nitrogen on the outermost surface. The strong affinity between nitrogen and chromium atoms induced the diffusion of chromium from the interior to the surface, leading to the substitution of Cr23C6 for Cr2N. After tempering the HTGN-treated steel at 500 °C, the dense precipitates of Cr2N and the increased martensite phase in the surface layer led to secondary hardening, which increased the hardness value up to 901 Hv.

  7. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashovets, N. S.; Pastukh, I. M.; Voloshko, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples' argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm2. The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. In addition, changing the technological mode allows you to manage a wide range of modified phase composition of the surface layer and as a result - to form the surface of titanium parts, taking into account the conditions of the subsequent operation.

  8. Modeling the Gas Nitriding Process of Low Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Zimmerman, C.; Donahue, D.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    The effort to simulate the nitriding process has been ongoing for the last 20 years. Most of the work has been done to simulate the nitriding process of pure iron. In the present work a series of experiments have been done to understand the effects of the nitriding process parameters such as the nitriding potential, temperature, and time as well as surface condition on the gas nitriding process for the steels. The compound layer growth model has been developed to simulate the nitriding process of AISI 4140 steel. In this paper the fundamentals of the model are presented and discussed including the kinetics of compound layer growth and the determination of the nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone. The excellent agreements have been achieved for both as-washed and pre-oxided nitrided AISI 4140 between the experimental data and simulation results. The nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone is determined to be constant and only depends on the nitriding temperature, which is ~5 × 10-9 cm2/s at 548 °C. It proves the concept of utilizing the compound layer growth model in other steels. The nitriding process of various steels can thus be modeled and predicted in the future.

  9. The characteristics of high temperature Gas Nitriding heat treatment and tempering in 0.8Mo added 17Cr-1Ni-0.5C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, J. H.; Lee, D. J.; On, H. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, H. W.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of the High Temperature Gas Nitriding (HTGN) and tempering treatment of 17Cr-1Ni-0.5C-0.8Mo (CNMo) steel was experimentally investigated. The HTGN was carried out at 1050 °C for 1 h in a gaseous atmosphere containing 98.07 kPa of nitrogen. Chromium nitrides in the austenite and martensite phase appeared at the nitrogen-permeated surface layer after the HTGN treatment. The hardness of the outmost surface of the HTGN treated specimen measured 708 Hv. When it was tempered at 500 °C for 1 h, the hardness of the outmost surface was 763 Hv as a result of the precipitation of mostly micro Cr2N, which was densely packed with a small amount of Cr23C6 and the secondary hardening effect. In addition, an improvement in the corrosion resistance was observed in the tempered specimen.

  10. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  11. Uranium nitride behavior at thermionic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using uranium nitride for in-core thermionic applications was evaluated in electrically heated thermal gradient tests and in flat plate thermionic converters. These tests indicated that grain boundary penetration of uranium nitride into both tungsten and rhenium will occur under thermal gradient conditions. In the case of the tungsten thermionic converter, this led to grain boundary rupture of the emitter and almost total loss of electrical output from the converter. It appears that uranium nitride is unsuitable for thermionic applications at the 2000 K temperatures used in these tests.

  12. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  13. Investigation of isochronal annealing on the optical properties of HWCVD amorphous silicon nitride deposited at low temperatures and low gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T. F. G.; Jacobs, S.; Cummings, F. R.; Oliphant, C. J.; Malgas, G. F.; Arendse, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) is used as anti-reflection coatings in commercial solar cells. A final firing step in the production of micro-crystalline silicon solar cells allows hydrogen effusion from the a-SiNx:H into the solar cell, and contributes to bulk passivation of the grain boundaries. In this study a-SiNx:H deposited in a hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) chamber with reduced gas flow rates and filament temperature compared to traditional deposition regimes, were annealed isochronally. The UV-visible reflection spectra of the annealed material were subjected to the Bruggeman Effective Medium Approximation (BEMA) treatment, in which a theoretical amorphous semiconductor was combined with particle inclusions due to the structural complexities of the material. The extraction of the optical functions and ensuing Wemple-DeDomenici analysis of the wavelength-dependent refractive index allowed for the correlation of the macroscopic optical properties with the changes in the local atomic bonding configuration, involving silicon, nitrogen and hydrogen.

  14. Inverse magnetostrictive characteristics of Fe-Co composite materials using gas-nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenya; Yang, Zhenjun; Narita, Fumio

    2018-03-01

    The inverse magnetostrictive response, known as the Villari effect, of magnetostrictive materials is a change in magnetization due to an applied stress. It is commonly used for sensor applications. This work deals with the inverse magnetostrictive characteristics of Fe-Co bimetal plates that were subjected gas-nitriding process. Gas-nitriding was performed on bimetal plates for 30 min at 853 K as a surface heat treatment process. The specimens were cooled to room temperature after completing the nitriding treatment. Three-point bending tests were performed on the plates under a magnetic field. The changes on the magnetic induction of the plates due to the applied load are discussed. The effect of the nitriding treatment on the inverse magnetostrictive characteristics, magnetostrictive susceptibility, and magnetic hysteresis loop was examined. Our work represents an important step forward in the development of magnetostrictive sensor materials.

  15. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Pure Titanium by using Hollow Cathode RF-DC Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windajanti, J. M.; S, D. J. Djoko H.; Abdurrouf

    2017-05-01

    Pure titanium is widely used for the structures and mechanical parts due to its high strength, low density, and high corrosion resistance. Unfortunately, titanium products suffer from low hardness and low wear resistance. Titanium’s surface can be modified by nitriding process to overcome such problems, which is commonly conducted at high temperature. Here, we report the low-temperature plasma nitriding process, where pure titanium was utilized by high-density RF-DC plasma combined with hollow cathode device. To this end, a pure titanium plate was set inside a hollow tube placed on the cathode plate. After heating to 450 °C, a pre-sputtering process was conducted for 1 hour to remove the oxide layer and activate the surface for nitriding. Plasma nitriding using N2/H2 gasses was performed in 4 and 8 hours with the RF voltage of 250 V, DC bias of -500 to -600 V, and gas pressure of 75 to 30 Pa. To study the nitriding mechanism as well as the role of hollow cathode, the nitrided specimen was characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, and micro-hardness equipment. The TiN compound was obtained with the diffusion zone of nitrogen until 5 μm thickness for 4 hours nitriding process, and 8 μm for 8 hours process. The average hardness also increased from 300 HV in the untreated specimen to 624 HV and 792 HV for 4 and 8 hours nitriding, respectively.

  16. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  18. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. PMID:27991593

  19. The elevated temperature mechanical properties of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trice, Rodney Wayne

    A unique, all-ceramic material capable of non-brittle fracture via crack deflection has been characterized from 25sp°C through 1400sp°C. This material, called fibrous monoliths (FMs), was comprised of unidirectionally aligned 250 mum diameter cells of silicon nitride surrounded by 10 mum thick cell boundaries of boron nitride. Six weight percent yttria and two weight percent alumina were added to the silicon nitride to aid in densification. TEM experiments revealed that the sintering aids used to densify the silicon nitride cells were migrating into the boron nitride cell boundary during hot-pressing and that a fine network of micro-cracks existed between basal planes of boron nitride. Elevated temperature four point bending tests were performed on fibrous monolith ceramics from room temperature through 1400sp°C. Peak strengths of FMs averaged 510 MPa for specimens tested at room temperature through 176 MPa at 1400sp°C. Work of fractures ranged from 7300 J/msp2 to 3200 J/msp2 under the same temperature conditions. The interfacial fracture energy of boron nitride, GammasbBN, as a function of temperature has been determined using the Charalambides method. The fracture energy of boron nitride is approximately 40 J/msp2 and remained constant from 25sp°C through 950sp°C. A sharp increase in GammasbBN, to about 60 J/msp2, was observed at 1000sp°C-1050sp°C. This increase in GammasbBN was attributed to interactions of the crack tip with the cell boundary glassy phase. Subsequent measurements at 1075sp°C indicated a marked decrease in GammasbBN to near 40 J/msp2 before plateauing at 17-20 J/msp2 in the 1200sp°C-1300sp°C regime. The Mode I fracture toughness of silicon nitride was also determined using the single edge precracked beam method as a function of temperature. The He and Hutchinson model relating crack deflection at an interface to the Dundurs' parameter was applied to the current data set using the temperature dependent fracture energies of the boron

  20. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  1. Nitrogen-related effects on low-temperature electronic properties of two-dimensional electron gas in very dilute nitride GaNxAs1-x/AlGaAs (x = 0 and 0.08%) modulation-doped heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mootabian, Mahnaz; Eshghi, Hosein

    2013-07-01

    The low-temperature (4 K) two-dimensional (2D) electron gas mobility data versus carrier concentration in the modulation-doped dilute nitride GaAs1-xNx/Al0.3Ga0.7As (x = 0 and 0.08%) heterostructures are analyzed. Theoretical analysis is based on Fermi-Dirac statistics for the occupation of the quantum confined electronic states in the triangular quantum wells and the width of the quantum well versus 2D concentration. In addition, the mobility analysis is based on Matthiessen's rule for various scattering mechanisms. We found that the N-related neutral cluster alloy scattering together with crystal dislocations created at the interface strongly affects the electrons' mobility in the N-contained channel sample. We also found that as the electron concentration in the well increases from ˜1 × 1011 to 3.5 × 1011 cm-2 the carriers mainly occupy the first subband, tending to remain closer and closer to the hetero-interface.

  2. High Temperature Oxidation of Boron Nitride. Part 1; Monolithic Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Farmer, Serene; Moore, Arthur; Sayir, Haluk

    1997-01-01

    High temperature oxidation of monolithic boron nitride (BN) is examined. Hot pressed BN and both low and high density CVD BN were studied. It is shown that oxidation rates are quite sensitive to microstructural factors such as orientation, porosity, and degree of crystallinity. In addition small amounts of water vapor lead to volatilization of the B2O3 oxide as H(x)B(y)O(z). For these reasons, very different oxidation kinetics were observed for each type of BN.

  3. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/Vmore » up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.« less

  4. Dry Lubrication of High Temperature Silicon Nitride Rolling Contacts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    comparable to M50 bearing steel [2]. Quality control measures were implemented in the areas of raw material inspection as well as non-destructive evaluation...to oil lubricated bearing steels . Due to the apparent success of graphite at high tem- perature, three vendors were selected that manufacture graph...hybrid bearings ( steel rings and silicon nitride balls) to establish solid lubricant/cage design practices. High temperature bearing tests with silicon

  5. Discontinuous Inter-Granular Separations (DIGS) in the Gas Nitride Layer of ISS Race Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figert, John; Dasgupta, Rajib; Martinez, James

    2010-01-01

    The starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ) race ring on the International space station (ISS) failed due to severe spalling of the outer diameter, 45 degree (outer canted) nitrided surface. Subsequent analysis at NASA-KSC revealed that almost all of the debris generated due to the failure was nitrided 15-5 stainless steel. Subsequent analysis of the nitride control coupons (NCC) at NASA-JSC revealed the presence of discontinuous inter-granular separations (DIGS) in the gas nitride layer. These DIGS were present in the inter-granular networking located in the top 2 mils of the nitride layer. The manufacturer's specification requires the maximum white structure to be 0.0003 inches and intergranular networking below the allowable white structure depth to be cause for rejection; a requirement that the NCCs did not meet. Subsequent testing and analysis revealed that lower DIGS content significantly lowered the probability of nitride spalling in simulated, dry condition runs. One batch of nitride samples with DIGS content similar to the port SARJ (did not fail on orbit) which exhibited almost no nitride spalling after being run on one test rig. Another batch of nitride samples with DIGS content levels similar to the starboard SARJ exhibited significant nitride spalling on the same test rig with the same load under dry conditions. Although DIGS were not the root cause of starboard race ring failure, testing indicates that increased DIGS reduced the robustness of the gas nitride layer under dry operating conditions.

  6. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  7. Low Working-Temperature Acetone Vapor Sensor Based on Zinc Nitride and Oxide Hybrid Composites.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fengdong; Yuan, Yao; Guarecuco, Rohiverth; Yang, Minghui

    2016-06-01

    Transition-metal nitride and oxide composites are a significant class of emerging materials that have attracted great interest for their potential in combining the advantages of nitrides and oxides. Here, a novel class of gas sensing materials based on hybrid Zn3 N2 and ZnO composites is presented. The Zn3 N2 /ZnO (ZnNO) composites-based sensor exhibits selectivity and high sensitivity toward acetone vapor, and the sensitivity is dependent on the nitrogen content of the composites. The ZnNO-11.7 described herein possesses a low working temperature of 200 °C. The detection limit (0.07 ppm) is below the diabetes diagnosis threshold (1.8 ppm). In addition, the sensor shows high reproducibility and long-term stability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Investigation of electrical and optical properties of low temperature titanium nitride grown by rf-magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, D.; Kudryashov, D.; Mozharov, A.

    2017-11-01

    Titanium nitride is a promising material due to its low resistivity, high hardness and chemical inertness. Titanium nitride (TiN) can be applied as an ohmic contact for n-GaN and rectifying contact for p-GaN and also as a part of perovskite solar cell. A technology of TiN low temperature reactive rf-magnetron sputtering has been developed. Electrical and optical properties of titanium nitride were studied as a function of the rf-power and gas mixture composition. Reflectance and transmittance spectra were measured. Cross-section and surface SEM image were obtained. 250 nm thin films of TiN with a resistivity of 23.6 μOm cm were obtained by rf-magnetron sputtering at low temperature.

  9. Foreign Object Damage of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides in a Thin Disk Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through post-impact strength testing for thin disks impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 115 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub IC)). The critical impact velocity in which the corresponding post-impact strength yielded the lowest value was V(sub c) approx. 440 and 300 m/s for AS800 and SN282, respectively. A unique lower-strength regime was typified for both silicon nitrides depending on impact velocity, attributed to significant radial cracking. The damages generated by projectile impact were typically in the forms of ring, radial, and cone cracks with their severity and combination being dependent on impact velocity. Unlike thick (3 mm) flexure bar specimens used in the previous studies, thin (2 mm) disk target specimens exhibited a unique backside radial cracking occurring on the reverse side just beneath the impact sites at and above impact velocity of 160 and 220 m/s for SN282 and AS800, respectively.

  10. Low-temperature nitridation of manganese and iron oxides using NaNH2 molten salt.

    PubMed

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro

    2013-10-21

    Manganese and iron nitrides are important functional materials, but their synthesis processes from oxides often require high temperatures. Herein, we show a novel meta-synthesis method for manganese and iron nitrides by low-temperature nitridation of their oxides using NaNH2 molten salt as the nitrogen source in an autoclave at 240 °C. With this method, nitridation of micrometer-sized oxide particles kept their initial morphologies, but the size of the primary particles decreased. The thermodynamic driving force is considered to be the conversion of oxides to sodium hydroxide, and the kinetic of nitridation is improved by the decrease of particle size and the low melting point of NaNH2. This technique as developed here has the advantages of low reaction temperature, reduced consumption of ammonia, employing nonspecialized equipment, and providing facile control of the reactions for producing nitrides from oxides.

  11. Room-temperature ballistic transport in III-nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Matioli, Elison; Palacios, Tomás

    2015-02-11

    Room-temperature (RT) ballistic transport of electrons is experimentally observed and theoretically investigated in III-nitrides. This has been largely investigated at low temperatures in low band gap III-V materials due to their high electron mobilities. However, their application to RT ballistic devices is limited by their low optical phonon energies, close to KT at 300 K. In addition, the short electron mean-free-path at RT requires nanoscale devices for which surface effects are a limitation in these materials. We explore the unique properties of wide band-gap III-nitride semiconductors to demonstrate RT ballistic devices. A theoretical model is proposed to corroborate experimentally their optical phonon energy of 92 meV, which is ∼4× larger than in other III-V semiconductors. This allows RT ballistic devices operating at larger voltages and currents. An additional model is described to determine experimentally a characteristic dimension for ballistic transport of 188 nm. Another remarkable property is their short carrier depletion at device sidewalls, down to 13 nm, which allows top-down nanofabrication of very narrow ballistic devices. These results open a wealth of new systems and basic transport studies possible at RT.

  12. Improved performance of silicon nitride-based high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Recent progress in the production of Si3N4 based ceramics is reviewed: (1) high temperature strength and toughness of hot pressed Si3N4 were improved by using high purity powder and a stabilized ZrO2 additive, (2) impact resistance of hot pressed Si3N4 was increased by the use of a crushable energy absorbing layer, (3) the oxidation resistance and strength of reaction sintered Si3N4 were increased by impregnating reaction sintered silicon nitride with solutions that oxidize to Al2O3 or ZrO2, (4) beta prime SiA1ON compositions and sintering aids were developed for improved oxidation resistance or improved high temperature strength.

  13. Fission-gas-release rates from irradiated uranium nitride specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Fission-gas-release rates from two 93 percent dense UN specimens were measured using a sweep gas facility. Specimen burnup rates averaged .0045 and .0032 percent/hr, and the specimen temperatures ranged from 425 to 1323 K and from 552 to 1502 K, respectively. Burnups up to 7.8 percent were achieved. Fission-gas-release rates first decreased then increased with burnup. Extensive interconnected intergranular porosity formed in the specimen operated at over 1500 K. Release rate variation with both burnup and temperature agreed with previous irradiation test results.

  14. A fission gas release correlation for uranium nitride fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A model was developed to predict fission gas releases from UN fuel pins clad with various materials. The model was correlated with total release data obtained by different experimentors, over a range of fuel temperatures primarily between 1250 and 1660 K, and fuel burnups up to 4.6 percent. In the model, fission gas is transported by diffusion mechanisms to the grain boundaries where the volume grows and eventually interconnects with the outside surface of the fuel. The within grain diffusion coefficients are found from fission gas release rate data obtained using a sweep gas facility.

  15. Impact of annealing temperature on the mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered aluminum nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gillinger, M.; Schneider, M.; Bittner, A.

    2015-02-14

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a promising material for challenging sensor applications such as process monitoring in harsh environments (e.g., turbine exhaust), due to its piezoelectric properties, its high temperature stability and good thermal match to silicon. Basically, the operational temperature of piezoelectric materials is limited by the increase of the leakage current as well as by enhanced diffusion effects in the material at elevated temperatures. This work focuses on the characterization of aluminum nitride thin films after post deposition annealings up to temperatures of 1000 °C in harsh environments. For this purpose, thin film samples were temperature loaded for 2 hmore » in pure nitrogen and oxygen gas atmospheres and characterized with respect to the film stress and the leakage current behaviour. The X-ray diffraction results show that AlN thin films are chemically stable in oxygen atmospheres for 2 h at annealing temperatures of up to 900 °C. At 1000 °C, a 100 nm thick AlN layer oxidizes completely. For nitrogen, the layer is stable up to 1000 °C. The activation energy of the samples was determined from leakage current measurements at different sample temperatures, in the range between 25 and 300 °C. Up to an annealing temperature of 700 °C, the leakage current in the thin film is dominated by Poole-Frenkel behavior, while at higher annealing temperatures, a mixture of different leakage current mechanisms is observed.« less

  16. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-04-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  17. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  18. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  19. High temperature thermal management with boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Xu, Lisha; Yang, Zhi; Xie, Hua; Jiang, Puqing; Dai, Jiaqi; Luo, Wei; Yao, Yonggang; Hitz, Emily; Yang, Ronggui; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-12-21

    The rapid development of high power density devices requires more efficient heat dissipation. Recently, two-dimensional layered materials have attracted significant interest due to their superior thermal conductivity, ease of production and chemical stability. Among them, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is electrically insulating, making it a promising thermal management material for next-generation electronics. In this work, we demonstrated that an h-BN thin film composed of layer-by-layer laminated h-BN nanosheets can effectively enhance the lateral heat dissipation on the substrate. We found that by using the BN-coated glass instead of bare glass as the substrate, the highest operating temperature of a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based device could increase from 700 °C to 1000 °C, and at the same input power, the operating temperature of the RGO device is effectively decreased. The remarkable performance improvement using the BN coating originates from its anisotropic thermal conductivity: a high in-plane thermal conductivity of 14 W m -1 K -1 for spreading and a low cross-plane thermal conductivity of 0.4 W m -1 K -1 to avoid a hot spot right underneath the device. Our results provide an effective approach to improve the heat dissipation in integrated circuits and high power devices.

  20. Homogeneous and heterogeneous micro-structuring of austenitic stainless steels by the low temperature plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, T.; Yoshihara, S.-I.

    2018-06-01

    The austenitic stainless steels have been widely utilized as a structural component and member as well as a die and mold substrate for stamping. AISI316 dies and molds require for the surface treatment to accommodate the sufficient hardness and wear resistance to them. In addition, the candidate treatment methods must be free from toxicity, energy consumption and inefficiency. The low temperature plasma nitriding process has become one of the most promising methods to make solid-solution hardening by the nitrogen super-saturation. In the present paper, the high density RF/DC plasma nitriding process was applied to form the uniform nitrided layer in the AISI316 matrix and to describe the essential mechanism of inner nitriding in this low temperature nitriding process. In case of the nitrided AISI316 at 673 K for 14.4ks, the nitrided layer thickness became 60 μm with the surface hardness of 1700 HV and the surface nitrogen content of 7 mass %. This inner nitriding process is governed by the synergetic interrelation among the nitrogen super-saturation, the lattice expansion, the phase transformation, the plastic straining, the microstructure refinement and the acceleration of nitrogen diffusion. As far as this interrelation is sustained during the nitriding process, the original austenitic microstructure is homogeneously nitrided to have fine grains with the average size of 0.1 μm and the high crystallographic misorientation angles and to have two phase (γ + α’) structures with the plateau of nitrogen content by 5 mass%. Once this interrelation does not work anymore, the homogeneous microstructure changed itself to the heterogeneous one. The plastic straining took place in the selected coarse grains; they were partially refined into subgrains. This plastic localization accompanied the localized phase transformation.

  1. High Temperature Oxidation and Mechanical properties of Silicon Nitride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    The results of thermogravimentric studies on the rate of oxidation of chemically vapor-deposited Si3 N, at various temperatures are reported. Up to...only be such ceramics as Si3N4 -. In addition to the potential for increased engine efficiency through higher gas-inlet temperatures, the use of Si3 N...to replace cur- rently used Ni -or Co-based superalloys offers a significant weight reduction that can increase the performance of the propulsion system

  2. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.

    1994-04-05

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

  3. Elevated temperature mechanical behavior of monolithic and SiC whisker-reinforced silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Choi, Sung R.; Sanders, William A.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a 30 volume percent SiC whisker reinforced silicon nitride and a similar monolithic silicon nitride were measured at several temperatures. Measurements included strength, fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, dynamic fatigue susceptibility, post oxidation strength, and creep rate. Strength controlling defects were determined with fractographic analysis. The addition of SiC whiskers to silicon nitride did not substantially improve the strength, fracture toughness, or crack growth resistance. However, the fatigue resistance, post oxidation strength, and creep resistance were diminished by the whisker addition.

  4. Syntheses, Characterization and Kinetics of Nickel-Tungsten Nitride Catalysts for Hydrotreating of Gas Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botchwey, Christian

    This thesis summarizes the methods and major findings of Ni-W(P)/gamma-Al 2O3 nitride catalyst synthesis, characterization, hydrotreating activity, kinetic analysis and correlation of the catalysts' activities to their synthesis parameters and properties. The range of parameters for catalyst synthesis were W (15-40 wt%), Ni (0-8 wt%), P (0-5 wt%) and nitriding temperature (TN) (500-900 °C). Characterization techniques used included: N2 sorption studies, chemisorption, elemental analysis, temperature programmed studies, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) were performed at: temperature (340-380 °C), pressure (6.2-9.0 MPa), liquid hourly space velocity (1-3 h-1) and hydrogen to oil ratio (600 ml/ml, STP). The predominant species on the catalyst surface were Ni3N, W2N and bimetallic Ni2W3N. The bimetallic Ni-W nitride species was more active than the individual activities of the Ni3N and W2N. P increased weak acid sites while nitriding temperature decreased amount of strong acid sites. Low nitriding temperature enhanced dispersion of metal particles. P interacted with Al 2O3 which increased the dispersion of metal nitrides on the catalyst surface. HDN activity increased with Ni and P loading but decreased with increase in nitriding temperature (optimum conversion; 60 wt%). HDS and HDA activities went through a maximum with increase in the synthesis parameters (optimum conversions; 88. wt% for HDS and 47 wt% for HDA). Increase in W loading led to increase in catalyst activity. The catalysts were stable to deactivation and had the nitride structure conserved during hydrotreating in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. The results showed good correlation between hydrotreating activities (HDS and HDN) and the catalyst nitrogen content, number of exposed

  5. Synthesis of Aluminum-Aluminum Nitride Nanocomposites by a Gas-Liquid Reaction II. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovo, Cecilia; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2016-04-01

    In situ fabrication of the reinforcing particles in the metal matrix is an answer to many of the challenges encountered in manufacturing aluminum matrix nanocomposites. In this method, the nanoparticles are formed directly within the melt by means of a chemical reaction between a specially designed aluminum alloy and a gas. In this publication, we describe a process for synthesizing aluminum-aluminum nitride nanocomposites by reacting a nitrogen-containing gas with a molten aluminum-lithium alloy. We quantify the effect of the process parameters on the average particle size and particle distribution, as well as on the tendency of the particles to cluster in the alloy matrix, is quantified. Also in this publication, we present the measured room temperature and elevated temperature tensile properties of the nanocomposite material as well as its measured room temperature impact toughness.

  6. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  7. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  8. Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOEpatents

    Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

    2014-03-18

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  9. Reduction of Defects on Microstructure Aluminium Nitride Using High Temperature Annealing Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasta, Z.; Muhamad, P.; Kuwano, N.; Norfazrina, H. M. Y.; Unuh, M. H.

    2018-03-01

    Aluminium Nitride (AlN) is a ceramic 111-nitride material that is used widely as components in functional devices. Besides good thermal conductivity, it also has a high band gap in emitting light which is 6 eV. AlN thin film is grown on the sapphire substrate (0001). However, lattice mismatch between both materials has caused defects to exist along the microstructure of AlN thin films. The defects have affected the properties of Aluminium Nitride. Annealing heat treatment has been proved by the previous researcher to be the best method to improve the microstructure of Aluminium Nitride thin films. Hence, this method is applied at four different temperatures for two hour. The changes of Aluminium Nitride microstructures before and after annealing is observed using Transmission Electron Microscope. It is observed that inversion domains start to occur at temperature of 1500 °C. Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction pattern simulation has confirmed the defects as inversion domain. Therefore, this paper is about to extract the matters occurred during the process of producing high quality Aluminium Nitride thin films and the ways to overcome this problem.

  10. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  11. Platinum Nanoparticle Loading of Boron Nitride Aerogel and Its Use as a Novel Material for Low-Power Catalytic Gas Sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Harley-Trochimczyk, Anna; Pham, Thang; Chang, Jiyoung; ...

    2015-12-09

    We report that a high-surface-area, highly crystalline boron nitride aerogel synthesized with nonhazardous reactants has been loaded with crystalline platinum nanoparticles to form a novel nanomaterial that exhibits many advantages for use in a catalytic gas sensing application. The platinum nanoparticle-loaded boron nitride aerogel integrated onto a microheater platform allows for calorimetric propane detection. The boron nitride aerogel exhibits thermal stability up to 900 °C and supports disperse platinum nanoparticles, with no sintering observed after 24 h of high-temperature testing. The high thermal conductivity and low density of the boron nitride aerogel result in an order of magnitude faster responsemore » and recovery times (<2 s) than reported on alumina support and allow for 10% duty cycling of the microheater with no loss in sensitivity. Lastly, the resulting 1.5 mW sensor power consumption is two orders of magnitude less than commercially available catalytic gas sensors and unlocks the potential for wireless, battery-powered catalytic gas sensing.« less

  12. Controlled Gas Exfoliation of Boron Nitride into Few-Layered Nanosheets

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Wenshuai; Gao, Xiang; Li, Qian; ...

    2016-07-22

    The controlled exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into single- or few-layered nanosheets remains a grand challenge and becomes the bottleneck to essential studies and applications of h-BN. Here, we present an efficient strategy for the scalable synthesis of few-layered h-BN nanosheets (BNNS) via a novel gas exfoliation of bulk h-BN in liquid N 2 (L-N 2). The essence of this strategy lies in the combination of a high temperature triggered expansion of bulk h-BN and the cryogenic L-N 2 gasification to exfoliate the h-BN. The produced BNNS after ten cycles (BNNS-10) consisted primarily of fewer than five atomic layersmore » with high a mass yield of 16~20%. N 2 sorption and desorption isotherms show that the BNNS-10 exhibited a much higher specific surface area of 278 m 2/g –1 than that of bulk BN (10 m 2/g –1). Through the investigation of the exfoliated intermediates combined with a theoretical calculation, we found that the huge temperature variation initiates the expansion and curling of the bulk h-BN. Subseqently, the L-N 2 penetrates into the interlayers of h-BN along the curling edge, followed by an immediate drastic gasification of L-N 2, further peeling off h-BN. In conclusion, this novel gas exfoliation of high surface area BNNS not only opens up potential opportunities for wide applications, but also can be extended to produce other layered materials with high yeilds.« less

  13. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  14. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  15. Effects of Temperature on Microstructure and Wear of Salt Bath Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Peng, Qian; Shen, Baoluo

    2012-08-01

    Salt bath nitriding of 17-4 PH martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels was conducted at 610, 630, and 650 °C for 2 h using a complex salt bath heat-treatment, and the properties of the nitrided surface were systematically evaluated. Experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite (α'), expanded austenite (γN), CrN, Fe4N, and (Fe,Cr) x O y . In the sample nitrided above 610 °C, the expanded martensite transformed into expanded austenite. But in the sample nitrided at 650 °C, the expanded austenite decomposed into αN and CrN. The decomposed αN then disassembled into CrN and alpha again. The nitrided layer depth thickened intensively with the increasing nitriding temperature. The activation energy of nitriding in this salt bath was 125 ± 5 kJ/mol.

  16. Bright Room-Temperature Single-Photon Emission from Defects in Gallium Nitride.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Amanuel M; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Bodrog, Zoltán; Fiedler, Saskia; Schröder, Tim; Triviño, Noelia Vico; Palacios, Tomás; Gali, Adam; Toth, Milos; Englund, Dirk; Aharonovich, Igor

    2017-03-01

    Room-temperature quantum emitters in gallium nitride (GaN) are reported. The emitters originate from cubic inclusions in hexagonal lattice and exhibit narrowband luminescence in the red spectral range. The sources are found in different GaN substrates, and therefore are promising for scalable quantum technologies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Erosion-corrosion resistance properties of 316L austenitic stainless steels after low-temperature liquid nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Pan, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The low-temperature liquid nitriding of stainless steels can result in the formation of a surface zone of so-called expanded austenite (S-phase) by the dissolution of large amounts of nitrogen in the solid solution and formation of a precipitate-free layer supersaturated with high hardness. Erosion-corrosion measurements were performed on low-temperature nitrided and non-nitrided 316L stainless steels. The total erosion-corrosion, erosion-only, and corrosion-only wastages were measured directly. As expected, it was shown that low-temperature nitriding dramatically reduces the degree of erosion-corrosion in stainless steels, caused by the impingement of particles in a corrosive medium. The nitrided 316L stainless steels exhibited an improvement of almost 84% in the erosion-corrosion resistance compared to their non-nitrided counterparts. The erosion-only rates and synergistic levels showed a general decline after low-temperature nitriding. Low-temperature liquid nitriding can not only reduce the weight loss due to erosion but also significantly reduce the weight loss rate of interactions, so that the total loss of material decreased evidently. Therefore, 316L stainless steels displayed excellent erosion-corrosion behaviors as a consequence of their highly favorable corrosion resistances and superior wear properties.

  18. Chemical synthesis of hexagonal indium nitride nanocrystallines at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangbiao; Shen, Qianli; Zhao, Dejian; Lu, Juanjuan; Liu, Weiqiao; Zhang, Junhao; Bao, Keyan; Zhou, Quanfa

    2017-08-01

    In this study, hexagonal indium nitride nanocystallines with high crystallinity have been prepared by the reaction of InCl3·4H2O, sulfur and NaNH2 in an autoclave at 160 °C. The crystal structures and morphologies of the obtained InN sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. As InCl3·4H2O is substituted by In(NO3)3·4.5H2O, InN nanocrystallines could also be obtained by using the similar method. The photoluminescence spectrum shows that the InN emits a broad peak positioned at 2.3 eV.

  19. Low temperature binary gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Glen E.; Leonard, Kenneth R.

    2017-12-01

    Application of partial pressure technology to combinations of one gas above its critical temperature (helium) mixed with a two-phase liquid (nitrogen) can result in liquid temperatures down to and below the nitrogen triple point. The thermodynamics of this process is developed and an experimental apparatus is described which was used to produce a helium/nitrogen bath temperature of 59.17 K, 4 K lower than the 63.2 K nitrogen triple point and lower than any liquid nitrogen temperature reported in the literature.

  20. Low-temperature direct synthesis of mesoporous vanadium nitrides for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Min; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2017-04-01

    Mesoporous vanadium nitrides are directly synthesized by a one-step chemical precipitation method at a low temperature (70 °C). Structural and morphological analyses reveal that vanadium nitride consist of long and slender nanowhiskers, and mesopores with diameters of 2-5 nm. Compositional analysis confirms the presence of vanadium in the VN structure, along with oxidized vanadium. The cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge tests indicate that the obtained material stores charges via a combination of electric double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance mechanisms. The vanadium nitride electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 598 F/g at a current density of 4 A/g. After 5000 charge-discharge cycles, the electrode has an equivalent series resistance of 1.42 Ω and retains 83% of its initial specific capacitance. This direct low-temperature synthesis of mesoporous vanadium nitrides is a simple and promising method to achieve high specific capacitance and low equivalent series resistance for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  1. Temperature and the Ideal Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daisley, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Presents some organized ideas in thermodynamics which are suitable for use with high school (GCE A level or ONC) students. Emphases are placed upon macroscopic observations and intimate connection of the modern definition of temperature with the concept of ideal gas. (CC)

  2. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    A gas temperature measurement system with compensated frequency response of 1 KHz and capability to operate in the exhaust of a gas turbine combustor was developed. Environmental guidelines for this measurement are presented, followed by a preliminary design of the selected measurement method. Transient thermal conduction effects were identified as important; a preliminary finite-element conduction model quantified the errors expected by neglecting conduction. A compensation method was developed to account for effects of conduction and convection. This method was verified in analog electrical simulations, and used to compensate dynamic temperature data from a laboratory combustor and a gas turbine engine. Detailed data compensations are presented. Analysis of error sources in the method were done to derive confidence levels for the compensated data.

  3. Foreign Object Damage in a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride by Spherical Projectiles of Various Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Assessments of foreign object damage (FOD) of a commercial, gas-turbine grade, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramic (AS800, Honeywell Ceramics Components) were made using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. AS800 flexure target specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers in a velocity range from 50 to 450 m/s by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different projectile materials were used including hardened steel, annealed steel, silicon nitride ceramic, and brass. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to appraise the severity of local impact damage. For a given impact velocity, the degree of strength degradation was greatest for ceramic balls, least for brass balls, and intermediate for annealed and hardened steel balls. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles. Impact load as a function of impact velocity was quasi-statically estimated based on both impact and static indentation associated data.

  4. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  5. The Influence of Hot-Rolled Temperature on Plasma Nitriding Behavior of Iron-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hossary, F. M.; Khalil, S. M.; Lotfy, Kh.; Kassem, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Experiments were performed with an aim of studying the effect of hot-rolled temperature (600 and 900°C) on radio frequency (rf) plasma nitriding of Fe93Ni4Zr3 alloy. Nitriding was carried out for 10 min in a nitrogen atmosphere at a base pressure of 10-2 mbarr. Different continuous plasma processing powers of 300-550 W in steps 50 W or less were applied. Nitrided hot-rolled specimens were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness measurements. The results reveal that the surface of hot-rolled rf plasma nitrided specimens at 600°C is characterized with a fine microstructure as a result of the high nitrogen solubility and diffusivity. Moreover, the hot-rolled treated samples at 600°C exhibit higher microhardness value than the associated values of hot-rolled treated samples at 900°C. The enhancement of microhardness is due to precipitation and predominance of new phases ( γ and ɛ phases). Mainly, this conclusion has been attributed to the high defect densities and small grain sizes of the samples hot-rolled at 600°C. Generally, the refinement of grain size plays a dramatic role in improvement of mechanical properties of tested samples.

  6. Correction: Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-28

    Correction for 'Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control' by Sujoy Sarkar et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6407-6410.

  7. Soliton microdynamics and thermal conductivity of uranium nitride at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, O. A.; Orlov, A. V.; Semenov, V. A.

    2011-09-01

    The microdynamics of soliton waves and localized modes of nonlinear vibrations of the acoustic and optical types in uranium nitride has been investigated. It has been shown that, with an increase in the excitation energy in the spectral gap between the bands of optical and acoustic phonons, the energies of solitons increase, whereas the energies of local modes decrease. The previously experimentally observed unidentified quasi-resonant features, which shift in the gap with variations in the temperature, can represent the revealed soliton waves and local modes. The microdynamics of heat conduction of uranium nitride has been studied for the stochastic generation of soliton waves and local modes in the case of spatially distant energy absorption. The thermal conductivity coefficient determined from the temperature gradient and the absorbed energy flux insignificantly exceeds the experimentally observed values, which are decreased because of the presence of structural defects of different types in the material.

  8. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  9. Method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, John A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride is disclosed. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article is packed in a packing mixture consisting of silicon nitride powder and a densification aid. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are sujected to a positive, low pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause any open porosity originally found in the reaction bonded silicon nitride article to be substantially closed. Thereafter, the reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are subjected to a positive high pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause a sintering of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article whereby the strength of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article is increased.

  10. High Temperature Gas Energy Transfer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-15

    will be made. A theoretical model has been applied to the calculation of energy transfer amounts between molecules as a function of molecular size... theoretical analysis was given of shock tube data for high temperature gas reactions. The data were analyzed to show that colli- sional energy transfer...Systems by I. Oref and B. S. Rabiovitch. In this report a simple theoretical model describing energy transfer probabilities is given. Conservation of

  11. Hot-Electron Gallium Nitride Two Dimensional Electron Gas Nano-bolometers For Advanced THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Rahul

    Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in semiconductor heterostructures was identified as a promising medium for hot-electron bolometers (HEB) in the early 90s. Up until now all research based on 2DEG HEBs is done using high mobility AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. These systems have demonstrated very good performance, but only in the sub terahertz (THz) range. However, above ˜0.5 THz the performance of AlGaAs/GaAs detectors drastically deteriorates. It is currently understood, that detectors fabricated from standard AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures do not allow for reasonable coupling to THz radiation while maintaining high conversion efficiency. In this work we have developed 2DEG HEBs based on disordered Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductor, that operate at frequencies beyond 1THz at room temperature. We observe strong free carrier absorption at THz frequencies in our disordered 2DEG film due to Drude absorption. We show the design and fabrication procedures of novel micro-bolometers having ultra-low heat capacities. In this work the mechanism of 2DEG response to THz radiation is clearly identified as bolometric effect through our direct detection measurements. With optimal doping and detector geometry, impedances of 10--100 O have been achieved, which allow integration of these devices with standard THz antennas. We also demonstrate performance of the antennas used in this work in effectively coupling THz radiation to the micro-bolometers through polarization dependence and far field measurements. Finally heterodyne mixing due to hot electrons in the 2DEG micro-bolometer has been performed at sub terahertz frequencies and a mixing bandwidth greater than 3GHz has been achieved. This indicates that the characteristic cooling time in our detectors is fast, less than 50ps. Due to the ultra-low heat capacity; these detectors can be used in a heterodyne system with a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as a local oscillator (LO) which typically provides output powers in the micro

  12. Room-temperature low-voltage electroluminescence in amorphous carbon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, R.; Legnani, C.; Ribeiro Pinto, P. M.; Cremona, M.; de Araújo, P. J. G.; Achete, C. A.

    2003-06-01

    White-blue electroluminescent emission with a voltage bias less than 10 V was achieved in rf sputter-deposited amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN) and amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiCN) thin-film-based devices. The heterojunction structures of these devices consist of: Indium tin oxide (ITO), used as a transparent anode; amorphous carbon film as an emission layer, and aluminum as a cathode. The thickness of the carbon films was about 250 Å. In all of the produced diodes, a stable visible emission peaked around 475 nm is observed at room temperature and the emission intensity increases with the current density. For an applied voltage of 14 V, the luminance was about 3 mCd/m2. The electroluminescent properties of the two devices are discussed and compared.

  13. Strategies to indium nitride and gallium nitride nanoparticles: Low-temperature, solution-phase and precursor routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingman, Sean Douglas

    I present new strategies to low-temperature solution-phase synthesis of indium and gallium nitride (InN and GaN) ceramic materials. The strategies include: direct conversion of precursor molecules to InN by pyrolysis, solution-phase synthesis of nanostructured InN fibers via molecular precursors and co-reactants, and synthesis of powders through reactions derived from molten-salt chemistry. Indium nitride powders are prepared by pyrolysis of the precursors R 2InN3 (R = t-Bu (1), i-Amyl(2), Et(3), i-Pr( 4)). The precursors are synthesized via azide-alkoxide exchange of R2InOMe with Me3SiN3. The precursors are coordination polymers containing five-coordinate indium centers. Pyrolysis of 1 and 2 under N2 at 400°C yields powders consisting primarily of InN with average crystal sizes of 15--35 nm. 1 yields nanocrystalline InN with average particle sizes of 7 nm at 250°C. 3 and 4 yield primarily In metal from pyrolysis. Refluxing 1 in diisopropylbenzene (203°C) in the presence of primary amines yields InN nanofibers 10--100 nm in length. InN nanofibers of up to 1 mum can be synthesized by treating 1 with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) The DMHy appears to control the fiber length by acting as a secondary source of active nitrogen in order to sustain fiber growth. The resulting fibers are attached to droplets of indium metal implying a solution-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Precursor 4 yields crystalline InN whiskers when reacted with DMHy. Reactions of 4 with reducing agents such as HSnBu3, yield InN nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 16 nm. Gallium precursors R2GaN3 (R = t-Bu( 5), Me3SiCH2(6) and i-Pr( 7)), synthesized by azide-alkoxide exchange, are found to be inert toward solution decomposition and do not yield GaN. These compounds are molecular dimers and trimers unlike the indium analogs. Compound 6 displays a monomer-dimer equilibrium in benzene solution, but exists as a solid-state trimer. InN powders are also synthesized by reactions of InCl3 and

  14. Titanium Nitride: An Oxidizable Coating for the High-Temperature Protection of Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1961-01-01

    A titanium nitride coating for graphite, prepared by deposition process, protected test specimens for 60 seconds the vapors in a supersonic ceramic-heated air jet with a stagnation temperature of approximately 2,250 K. For the same test conditions, coated specimens showed no damage to the graphite body for the 60-second test, whereas uncoated specimens were very severely damaged after 20 seconds and were destroyed toward the end of the test. A discussion of the coating of these graphite specimens and of some of the conditions necessary for the utilization of oxidizable substances as oxidation-protective coatings for bodies facing high convective heat transfer in the atmosphere is presented.

  15. Hall effects on peristalsis of boron nitride-ethylene glycol nanofluid with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, F. M.; Gul, Maimoona; Shehzad, S. A.

    2018-05-01

    Current study provides a comprehensive numerical investigation of the peristaltic transport of boron nitride-ethylene glycol nanofluid through a symmetric channel in presence of magnetic field. Significant effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis have been included in the energy equation. Hall and Ohmic heating effects are also taken into consideration. Resulting system of non-linear equations is solved numerically using NDSolve in Mathematica. Expressions for velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are derived and plotted under the assumption of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. Influence of various parameters on heat and mass transfer rates have been discussed with the help of bar charts.

  16. Gas-exfoliated porous monolayer boron nitride for enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingcheng; Wu, Peiwen; Chao, Yanhong; He, Jing; Li, Hongping; Lu, Linjie; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Huaming; Zhu, Wenshuai

    2018-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride has been regarded to be an efficient catalyst in aerobic oxidation fields, but limited by the less-exposed active sites. In this contribution, we proposed a simple green liquid nitrogen gas exfoliation strategy for preparation of porous monolayer nanosheets (BN-1). Owing to the reduced layer numbers, decreased lateral sizes and artificially-constructed pores, increased exposure of active sites was expected, further contributed to an enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) performance up to ˜98% of sulfur removal, achieving ultra-deep desulfurization. This work not only introduced an excellent catalyst for aerobic ODS, but also provided a strategy for construction of some other highly-efficient monolayer two-dimensional materials for enhanced catalytic performance.

  17. Gas-exfoliated porous monolayer boron nitride for enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcheng; Wu, Peiwen; Chao, Yanhong; He, Jing; Li, Hongping; Lu, Linjie; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Huaming; Zhu, Wenshuai

    2018-01-12

    Hexagonal boron nitride has been regarded to be an efficient catalyst in aerobic oxidation fields, but limited by the less-exposed active sites. In this contribution, we proposed a simple green liquid nitrogen gas exfoliation strategy for preparation of porous monolayer nanosheets (BN-1). Owing to the reduced layer numbers, decreased lateral sizes and artificially-constructed pores, increased exposure of active sites was expected, further contributed to an enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) performance up to ∼98% of sulfur removal, achieving ultra-deep desulfurization. This work not only introduced an excellent catalyst for aerobic ODS, but also provided a strategy for construction of some other highly-efficient monolayer two-dimensional materials for enhanced catalytic performance.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of several nondestructive-evaluation techniques for silicon nitride gas-turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D. S.; Sciammarella, C.; Lapinski, N. P.

    1978-01-01

    Several nondestructive-evaluation (NDE) techniques have been examined to establish their effectiveness for detecting critically sized flaws in silicon nitride gas-turbine rotors. Preliminary results have been obtained for holographic interferometry, acoustic microscopy, dye-enhanced radiography, acoustic emission, and acoustic-impact testing techniques. This report discusses the relative effectiveness of these techniques in terms of their applicability to the rotor geometry and ability to detect critically sized flaws. Where feasible, flaw indications were verified by alternative NDE techniques or destructive examination. This study has indicated that, since the various techniques have different advantages, ultimately a reliable interrogation of ceramic rotors may require the applicationmore » of several NDE methods.« less

  19. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxidemore » and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.« less

  20. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    iii iv v xii 1. Introduction 1 2. Introduction and Summary-Vehicular Turbine Project 3 2.1 Vehicular Turbine Project Plan 5 2.2 Progress and...64.4% SiaNi» - 35.6% AI2O3 + 16.1% Y-O3 Sialon Figure 4.33 Longitudinal ( V ^ and Transverse (Vt) Sonic Velocity vs Density of Silicon Nitride...Peak Load Temperature) Page No. 99 101 102 104 106 109 110 111 118 119 120 120 121 122 122 123 V ? xl R*»" - ■■ ■— ^ .w<ui>wMu

  1. Effect of substrate nitridation temperature on the persistent photoconductivity of unintentionally-doped GaN layer grown by PAMBE

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Nisha, E-mail: prakasnisha@gmail.com; Barvat, Arun; Anand, Kritika

    2016-05-23

    The surface roughness and defect density of GaN epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire substrate are investigated and found to be dependent on nitridation temperature. GaN epitaxial layers grown after nitridation of sapphire at 200°C have a higher defect density and higher surface roughness compared to the GaN layers grown at 646°C nitridation as confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The persistent photoconductivity (PPC) was observed in both samples and it was found to be decreasing with decreasing temperature in the range 150-300°C due to long carrier lifetime and high electron mobility at low temperature. The photoresponse of the GaNmore » films grown in this study exhibit improved PPC due to their better surface morphology at 646°C nitrided sample. The point defects or extended microstructure defects limits the photocarrier lifetime and electron mobility at 200°C nitrided sample.« less

  2. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  3. Investigation of Influence of Gas Ratio on the Electron Temperature in TiN Magnetron Sputtering Deposition System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada , Spain Investigation of Influence of Gas Ratio on the Electron Temperature in TiN Magnetron Sputtering...ICPIG) Held in Granada , Spain on 14-19 July 2013 14. ABSTRACT In this work, a nanolayer of titanium nitride which produced by the magnetron

  4. Analysis of Aluminum-Nitride SOI for High-Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Osman, Mohamed A.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We use numerical simulation to investigate the high-temperature (up to 500K) operation of SOI MOSFETs with Aluminum-Nitride (AIN) buried insulators, rather than the conventional silicon-dioxide (SiO2). Because the thermal conductivity of AIN is about 100 times that of SiO2, AIN SOI should greatly reduce the often severe self-heating problem of conventional SOI, making SOI potentially suitable for high-temperature applications. A detailed electrothermal transport model is used in the simulations, and solved with a PDE solver called PROPHET In this work, we compare the performance of AIN-based SOI with that of SiO2-based SOI and conventional MOSFETs. We find that AIN SOI does indeed remove the self-heating penalty of SOL However, several device design trade-offs remain, which our simulations highlight.

  5. Engineering of III-Nitride Semiconductors on Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Mánuel, J M; Jiménez, J J; Morales, F M; Lacroix, B; Santos, A J; García, R; Blanco, E; Domínguez, M; Ramírez, M; Beltrán, A M; Alexandrov, D; Tot, J; Dubreuil, R; Videkov, V; Andreev, S; Tzaneva, B; Bartsch, H; Breiling, J; Pezoldt, J; Fischer, M; Müller, J

    2018-05-02

    This work presents results in the field of advanced substrate solutions in order to achieve high crystalline quality group-III nitrides based heterostructures for high frequency and power devices or for sensor applications. With that objective, Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics has been used, as a non-crystalline substrate. Structures like these have never been developed before, and for economic reasons will represent a groundbreaking material in these fields of Electronic. In this sense, the report presents the characterization through various techniques of three series of specimens where GaN was deposited on this ceramic composite, using different buffer layers, and a singular metal-organic chemical vapor deposition related technique for low temperature deposition. Other single crystalline ceramic-based templates were also utilized as substrate materials, for comparison purposes.

  6. Deposition of silicon oxynitride films by low energy ion beam assisted nitridation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youroukov, S.; Kitova, S.; Danev, G.

    2008-05-01

    The possibility is studied of growing thin silicon oxynitride films by e-gun evaporation of SiO and SiO2 together with concurrent bombardment with low energy N2+ ions from a cyclotron resonance (ECR) source at room temperature of substrates. The degree of nitridation and oxidation of the films is investigated by means of X-ray spectroscopy. The optical characteristics of the films, their environmental stability and adhesion to different substrates are examined. The results obtained show than the films deposited are transparent. It is found that in the case of SiO evaporation with concurrent N2+ ion bombardment, reactive implantation of nitrogen within the films takes place at room temperature of the substrate with the formation of a new silicon oxynitride compound even at low ion energy (150-200 eV).

  7. A Two-Dimensional Manganese Gallium Nitride Surface Structure Showing Ferromagnetism at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingqiao; Chinchore, Abhijit V; Smith, Arthur R; Barral, María Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2018-01-10

    Practical applications of semiconductor spintronic devices necessitate ferromagnetic behavior at or above room temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate a two-dimensional manganese gallium nitride surface structure (MnGaN-2D) which is atomically thin and shows ferromagnetic domain structure at room temperature as measured by spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Application of small magnetic fields proves that the observed magnetic domains follow a hysteretic behavior. Two initially oppositely oriented MnGaN-2D domains are rotated into alignment with only 120 mT and remain mostly in alignment at remanence. The measurements are further supported by first-principles theoretical calculations which reveal highly spin-polarized and spin-split surface states with spin polarization of up to 95% for manganese local density of states.

  8. Synthesis micro-scale boron nitride nanotubes at low substrate temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Muhammad, E-mail: msajjadd@gmail.com; Makarov, Vladimir; Morell, Gerardo

    2016-07-15

    High temperature synthesis methods produce defects in 1D nanomaterials, which ultimately limit their applications. We report here the synthesis of micro-scale boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) at low substrate temperature (300 {sup o}C) using a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser deposition technique in the presence of catalyst. The electron microscopic analyses have shown the nanotubes distributed randomly on the surface of the substrate. The average diameter (∼0.25 μm) of a nanotube, which is the highest reported value to date, is estimated by SEM data and confirmed by TEM measurements. These nanotubes are promising for high response deep-UV photo-luminescent devices. A detailed synthesismore » mechanism is presented and correlated with the experimental results.« less

  9. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxynitride Fiber Reinforced Boron Nitride Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunrong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Xie, Zhengfang; Shao, Changwei

    2016-02-01

    The structural evolution of a silicon oxynitride fiber reinforced boron nitride matrix (Si-N-Of/BN) wave-transparent composite at high temperatures was investigated. When heat treated at 1600 °C, the composite retained a favorable bending strength of 55.3 MPa while partially crystallizing to Si2N2O and h-BN from the as-received amorphous structure. The Si-N-O fibers still performed as effective reinforcements despite the presence of small pores due to fiber decomposition. Upon heat treatment at 1800 °C, the Si-N-O fibers already lost their reinforcing function and rough hollow microstructure formed within the fibers because of the accelerated decomposition. Further heating to 2000 °C led to the complete decomposition of the reinforcing fibers and only h-BN particles survived. The crystallization and decomposition behaviors of the composite at high temperatures are discussed.

  10. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range. PMID:26370999

  11. Temperature Controller System for Gas Gun Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholtz, S. M.; Gehr, R. J.; Rupp, T. D.; Sheffield, S. A.; Robbins, D. L.

    2006-07-01

    A temperature controller system capable of heating and cooling gas gun targets over the range -75°C to +120°C was designed and tested. The system uses cold nitrogen gas from a liquid nitrogen Dewar for cooling and compressed air for heating. Two gas flow heaters control the gas temperature for both heating and cooling. One heater controls the temperature of the target mounting plate and the other the temperature of a copper tubing coil surrounding the target. Each heater is separately adjustable, so the target material will achieve a uniform temperature throughout its volume. A magnetic gauge membrane with integrated thermocouples was developed to measure the internal temperature of the target. Using this system, multiple magnetic gauge shock experiments, including equation-of-state measurements and shock initiation of high explosives, can be performed over a range of initial temperatures. Successful heating and cooling tests were completed on Teflon samples.

  12. Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films at temperatures to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Pantic, D. M.; Johnson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of silicon nitride films deposited by low- and high-frequency plasmas (30 kHz and 13.56 MHz) at various temperatures to 700 C in vacuum were examined. The results of the investigation indicated that the Si/N ratios were much greater for the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than for those deposited at 30 kHz. Amorphous silicon was present in both low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited silicon nitride films. However, more amorphous silicon occurred in the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than in those deposited at 30 kHz. Temperature significantly influenced adhesion, friction, and wear of the silicon nitride films. Wear occurred in the contact area at high temperature. The wear correlated with the increase in adhesion and friction for the low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited films above 600 and 500 C, respectively. The low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films exhibited a capability for lubrication (low adhesion and friction) in vacuum at temperatures to 500 and 400 C, respectively.

  13. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  14. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

    1994-03-15

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  15. Methods of forming boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boronmore » nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.« less

  16. Temperature sensitivity of silicon nitride nanocoated long-period gratings working in various surrounding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietana, M.; Bock, W. J.; Mikulic, P.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the temperature sensing properties of a silicon nitride (SiNx) nanocoated long-period grating (LPG). A high-temperature, radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited SiNx nanocoating was applied to tune the external refractive index (RI) sensitivity of LPGs written with UV and electric arc techniques in boron co-doped and standard germanium doped fibers, respectively. The technique allows for deposition of good quality, hard and wear-resistant nanofilms as are required for optical sensors. Thanks to the high-RI SiNx nanocoating, which is less than 90 nm thick, it is possible to reduce RI sensitivity over a wide range (from nD = 1.333 to 1.479), simultaneously decreasing its cross-sensitivity to temperature. For the presented nanocoated LPGs, the temperature effect on resonance wavelength is linear and slightly dependent on the thermo-optic coefficient of the surrounding liquid. The other advantage of the nanocoating is that it makes the resonance clearly visible in the whole investigated external RI range. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents for the first time a nanocoating able to simultaneously tune the RI sensitivity and enable temperature measurements in high-RI liquids applied to LPGs.

  17. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for themore » DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.« less

  18. First-principles investigation of armchair boron nitride nanoribbons for sensing PH3 gas molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Varun

    2014-09-01

    The present work exhibits density functional theory (DFT) based first-principles calculations to explore the sensing properties of bare armchair boron nitride nanoribbons (ABNNR) for PH3 gas molecules. Edges of the ribbon were considered as the sites of possible adsorption with two different configurations i.e. adsorption at one edge and adsorption at both edges of the ribbon. It is revealed that B atoms of the ribbons are more energetically favorable sites for the adsorption of PH3 molecules as compared with N atoms. The adsorption of PH3 affects the electronic properties of nanoribbons. One edge PH3 adsorbed ribbons are metallic whereas in both edges PH3 adsorption, the band gap is decreased than that of bare ribbon. The changes in electronic properties caused by PH3 adsorption are further supported by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the considered configurations. The results show that ABNNR can serve as a potential candidate for PH3 sensing applications.

  19. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    A gas temperature measurement system with compensated frequency response of 1 kHz and capability to operate in the exhaust of a gas turbine engine combustor was developed. A review of available technologies which could attain this objective was done. The most promising method was identified as a two wire thermocouple, with a compensation method based on the responses of the two different diameter thermocouples to the fluctuating gas temperature field. In a detailed design of the probe, transient conduction effects were identified as significant. A compensation scheme was derived to include the effects of gas convection and wire conduction. The two wire thermocouple concept was tested in a laboratory burner exhaust to temperatures of about 3000 F and in a gas turbine engine to combustor exhaust temperatures of about 2400 F. Uncompensated and compensated waveforms and compensation spectra are presented.

  20. Temperature dependent structural properties and bending rigidity of pristine and defective hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Siby; Ajith, K. M.; Chandra, Sharat; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2015-08-01

    Structural and thermodynamical properties of monolayer pristine and defective boron nitride sheets (h-BN) have been investigated in a wide temperature range by carrying out atomistic simulations using a tuned Tersoff-type inter-atomic empirical potential. The temperature dependence of lattice parameter, radial distribution function, specific heat at constant volume, linear thermal expansion coefficient and the height correlation function of the thermally excited ripples on pristine as well as defective h-BN sheet have been investigated. Specific heat shows considerable increase beyond the Dulong-Petit limit at high temperatures, which is interpreted as a signature of strong anharmonicity present in h-BN. Analysis of the height fluctuations, < {{h}2}> , shows that the bending rigidity and variance of height fluctuations are strongly temperature dependent and this is explained using the continuum theory of membranes. A detailed study of the height-height correlation function shows deviation from the prediction of harmonic theory of membranes as a consequence of the strong anharmonicity in h-BN. It is also seen that the variance of the height fluctuations increases with defect concentration.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Wavelength Selectable Zero-Phonon Emission from Single Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Nicholas R; Calderon, Brian; Ji, Yanxin; Spencer, Michael G; Flatté, Michael E; Fuchs, Gregory D

    2016-10-12

    We investigate the distribution and temperature-dependent optical properties of sharp, zero-phonon emission from defect-based single photon sources in multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) flakes. We observe sharp emission lines from optically active defects distributed across an energy range that exceeds 500 meV. Spectrally resolved photon-correlation measurements verify single photon emission, even when multiple emission lines are simultaneously excited within the same h-BN flake. We also present a detailed study of the temperature-dependent line width, spectral energy shift, and intensity for two different zero-phonon lines centered at 575 and 682 nm, which reveals a nearly identical temperature dependence despite a large difference in transition energy. Our temperature-dependent results are well described by a lattice vibration model that considers piezoelectric coupling to in-plane phonons. Finally, polarization spectroscopy measurements suggest that whereas the 575 nm emission line is directly excited by 532 nm excitation, the 682 nm line is excited indirectly.

  2. Molecular Simulation Study of Gas Solubility and Diffusion in a Polymer-Boron Nitride Nanotube Composite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyue; Jagirdar, Preeti; Naserifar, Saber; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-02-25

    We study the possibility of using polymer composites made of a polymer and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) as a new type of membranes for gas separation. The polymer used is amorphous poly(ether imide) (PEI), and zigzag BNNTs are used to generate the composites with the PEI. The solubilities and self-diffusivities of CO2 and CH4 in the PEI and its composites with the BNNTs are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular models of the PEI and its composites with the BNNTs are generated using energy minimization and MD simulation, and the Universal Force Field is used to represent the interactions between all the atoms. The morhology of the composites are characterized and are compared with that of PEI. The accuracy of the computations is tested by calculating the gases' solubilities and self-diffsivities in the pure PEI and comparing them with the experimental data. Good agreement is obtained with the data. The computed diffusivities and solubilities in the polymer-BNNTs composites are much larger than those in the pure polymer, which are attributed to the changes that the BNNTs induce in the polymer composite's free-volume distribution. As the mechanical properties of the polymer-BNNTs composites are superior over those of the pure PEI, their use as a membrane for gas separation offers distinct advantages over the pure polymer. We also demonstrate that, calculating the diffusion coefficients with MD simulations in the NPT ensemble, as opposed to the common practice of utilizing the NVT ensemble, leads to much more accurate results.

  3. Temperature of gas delivered from ventilators.

    PubMed

    Chikata, Yusuke; Onodera, Mutsuo; Imanaka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Although heated humidifiers (HHs) are the most efficient humidifying device for mechanical ventilation, some HHs do not provide sufficient humidification when the inlet temperature to the water chamber is high. Because portable and home-care ventilators use turbines, blowers, pistons, or compressors to inhale in ambient air, they may have higher gas temperature than ventilators with piping systems. We carried out a bench study to investigate the temperature of gas delivered from portable and home-care ventilators, including the effects of distance from ventilator outlet, fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FIO2), and minute volume (MV). We evaluated five ventilators equipped with turbine, blower, piston, or compressor system. Ambient air temperature was adjusted to 24°C ± 0.5°C, and ventilation was set at FIO2 0.21, 0.6, and 1.0, at MV 5 and 10 L/min. We analyzed gas temperature at 0, 40, 80, and 120 cm from ventilator outlet and altered ventilator settings. While temperature varied according to ventilators, the outlet gas temperature of ventilators became stable after, at the most, 5 h. Gas temperature was 34.3°C ± 3.9°C at the ventilator outlet, 29.5°C ± 2.2°C after 40 cm, 25.4°C ± 1.2°C after 80 cm and 25.1°C ± 1.2°C after 120 cm (P < 0.01). FIO2 and MV did not affect gas temperature. Gas delivered from portable and home-care ventilator was not too hot to induce heated humidifier malfunctioning. Gas soon declined when passing through the limb.

  4. High Operating Temperature and Low Power Consumption Boron Nitride Nanosheets Based Broadband UV Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Manuel; Velázquez, Rafael; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Andrew F.; Feng, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We extend our work on the use of digitally controlled pulsed laser plasma deposition (PLPD) technique to synthesize high quality, 2-dimensional single crystalline boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) at a low substrate temperature for applications in high-performance deep UV photodetectors. The obtained sample consists of a large amount of BNNSs partially overlapping one another with random orientations. Each sheet is composed of a few (from 2 to 10) stacked atomic layers exhibiting high transparency due to its highly ordered hBN crystallinity. Deep UV detectors based on the obtained BNNSs were designed, fabricated, and tested. The bias and temperature effects on the photocurrent strength and the signal-to-noise ratio have been carefully characterized and discussed. A significant shift in the cut off wavelength of the BNNSs based photodetectors was observed suggesting a band gap reduction as a result of the BNNSs’ collective structure. The newly designed photodetector presented exceptional properties: a high sensitivity to weak intensities of radiation in both UVC and UVB range while remaining visible-blind, and a high signal-to-noise ratio operation even at temperatures as high as 400 °C. In addition, the BNNSs based photodetector exhibited potential for self-powered operation. PMID:28256507

  5. Ultrahigh performance heat spreader based on gas-liquid exfoliation boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiheng; Zhao, Hongran; Wang, Qiaolei; Peng, Wanjun; Yu, Haibin

    2017-11-24

    Due to their high thermal conductivity and insulation performance, boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) have great promise to fabricate thermal management equipment for application in power electronics. The liquid-phase exfoliation route has been regarded as the most commonly used approach to produce single and few-layered BNNS for many research fields. However, this process takes a long time, and the production yield is extremely low. In this work, an efficient technique to obtain few-layered (mostly < 5 layers), high-yield (∼33%), and plane-defect-free BNNS by the combination of liquid N 2 (L-N 2 ) gasification and liquid exfoliation was developed. The as-obtained BNNS suspensions could be vacuum filtered to make a thermal conductive film named a BNNS heat spreader which possessed a superior thermal conductivity of 61.2 W m -1 K -1 at room temperature. In addition, we also proved that the thermal conductivity of the BNNS heat spreader increased with the increase of density, creating an approach for fine tuning the thermal property of this heat spreader.

  6. Ultrahigh performance heat spreader based on gas-liquid exfoliation boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jiheng; Zhao, Hongran; Wang, Qiaolei; Peng, Wanjun; Yu, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    Due to their high thermal conductivity and insulation performance, boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) have great promise to fabricate thermal management equipment for application in power electronics. The liquid-phase exfoliation route has been regarded as the most commonly used approach to produce single and few-layered BNNS for many research fields. However, this process takes a long time, and the production yield is extremely low. In this work, an efficient technique to obtain few-layered (mostly < 5 layers), high-yield (˜33%), and plane-defect-free BNNS by the combination of liquid N2 (L-N2) gasification and liquid exfoliation was developed. The as-obtained BNNS suspensions could be vacuum filtered to make a thermal conductive film named a BNNS heat spreader which possessed a superior thermal conductivity of 61.2 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature. In addition, we also proved that the thermal conductivity of the BNNS heat spreader increased with the increase of density, creating an approach for fine tuning the thermal property of this heat spreader.

  7. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  8. Preparation of Boron Nitride Nanoparticles with Oxygen Doping and a Study of Their Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Zhao, Qi; Yang, Tianye; Zhai, Chengbo; Wang, Dongxue; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2018-04-18

    In this work, oxygen-doped boron nitride nanoparticles with room-temperature ferromagnetism have been synthesized by a new, facile, and efficient method. There are no metal magnetic impurities in the nanoparticles analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The boron nitride nanoparticles exhibit a parabolic shape with increase in the reaction time. The saturation magnetization value reaches a maximum of 0.2975 emu g -1 at 300 K when the reaction time is 12 h, indicating that the Curie temperature ( T C ) is higher than 300 K. Combined with first-principles calculation, the coupling between B 2p orbital, N 2p orbital, and O 2p orbital in the conduction bands is the main origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism and also proves that the magnetic moment changes according the oxygen-doping content change. Compared with other room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors, boron nitride nanoparticles have widely potential applications in spintronic devices because of high temperature oxidation resistance and excellent chemical stability.

  9. Low Temperature Reactive Sputtering of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films on Metallic Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Khaled Sayed Elbadawi; Evoy, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric aluminum nitride thin films were deposited on aluminum-molybdenum (AlMo) metallic nanocomposites using reactive DC sputtering at room temperature. The effect of sputtering parameters on film properties was assessed. A comparative study between AlN grown on AlMo and pure aluminum showed an equivalent (002) crystallographic texture. The piezoelectric coefficients were measured to be 0.5±0.1 C m-2 and 0.9±0.1 C m-2, for AlN deposited on Al/0.32Mo and pure Al, respectively. Films grown onto Al/0.32Mo however featured improved surface roughness. Roughness values were measured to be 1.3nm and 5.4 nm for AlN films grown on AlMo and on Al, respectively. In turn, the dielectric constant was measured to be 8.9±0.7 for AlN deposited on Al/0.32Mo seed layer, and 8.7±0.7 for AlN deposited on aluminum; thus, equivalent within experimental error. Compatibility of this room temperature process with the lift-off patterning of the deposited AlN is also reported. PMID:26193701

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis for growth interface of cubic boron nitride single crystals synthesized under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Meizhe; Xu, Bin; Cai, Lichao; Guo, Xiaofei; Yuan, Xingdong

    2018-05-01

    After rapid cooling, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) single crystals synthesized under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) are wrapped in the white film powders which are defined as growth interface. In order to make clear that the transition mechanism of c-BN single crystals, the variation of B and N atomic hybrid states in the growth interface is analyzed with the help of auger electron spectroscopy in the Li-based system. It is found that the sp2 fractions of B and N atoms decreases, and their sp3 fractions increases from the outer to the inner in the growth interface. In addition, Lithium nitride (Li3N) are not found in the growth interface by X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment. It is suggested that lithium boron nitride (Li3BN2) is produced by the reaction of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and Li3N at the first step, and then B and N atoms transform from sp2 into sp3 state with the catalysis of Li3BN2 in c-BN single crystals synthesis process.

  11. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  12. First-principles study of fission gas incorporation and migration in zirconium nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Linyun; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-03-24

    To evaluate the effectiveness of ZrN as a diffusion barrier against fission gases, we investigate in this paper the incorporation and migration of fission gas atoms, with a focus on Xe, in ZrN by first-principles calculations. The formations of point defects in ZrN, including vacancies, interstitials, divacancies, Frenkel pairs, and Schottky defects, are first studied. Among all the defects, the Schottky defect with two vacancies as first nearest neighbor is predicted to be the most favorable incorporation site for fission gas Xe in ZrN. The migration of Xe gas atom in ZrN is investigated through two diffusion mechanisms, i.e., interstitialmore » and vacancy-assisted diffusions. The migration barrier of Xe gas atom through the intrinsic interstitials in ZrN is considerably lower than that through vacancies. Finally, therefore, at low temperatures fission gas Xe atoms diffuse mainly through interstitials in single crystal ZrN, whereas at high temperatures Xe may diffuse in ZrN assisted by vacancies.« less

  13. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  14. Blueish green photoluminescence from nitrided GaAs(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Goro; Udagawa, Takashi

    1999-04-01

    Optical and structural studies were made on the Si-doped (100)GaAs surfaces nitrided at a temperature between 650° and 750°C for 15 min in the flowing NH 3 gas. The wavelength of photoluminescence (PL) spectra were observed to be shortened from 820 nm of the GaAs nitrided at 650°C with increasing nitridation temperature. Blueish green PL with wavelengths of approx. 490 nm and 470 nm were emitted from the nitrided surfaces at 700° and 750°C, respectively. Results of AES and SIMS indicated that the surfaces are nitrided as GaAs 1- xN x, (0< x≤1) alloy layer, and the nitrided region also tended to increase as the temperature raised. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM), transmission electron diffraction (TED) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) results showed that films peeled off from the nitrided surfaces consisted mainly of hexagonal, wurtzite-type gallium nitride (GaN) with stacking faults and microtwins.

  15. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  16. Temperature Controller System for Gas Gun Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholtz, Scott; Sheffield, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    A temperature controller system capable of heating and cooling gas gun targets over the range -75 C to +200 C was designed and tested. The system uses cold nitrogen gas from a liquid nitrogen Dewar for cooling and compressed air for heating. Two gas flow heaters control the gas temperature for both heating and cooling. One heater controls the temperature of the target mounting plate and the other the temperature of a copper tubing coil surrounding the target. Each heater is separately adjustable, so the target material will achieve a uniform temperature throughout its volume. A magnetic gauge with integrated thermocouples was developed to measure the internal temperature of the target. Using this system shock experiments, including equation-of-state measurements and shock initiation of high explosives, can be performed over a range of initial temperatures. Successful tests were completed on Teflon samples. This work was supported by the NNSA Enhanced Surveillance Campaign through contract DE-ACO4-01AL66850.

  17. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  18. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  19. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Vladescu, Alina; Stan, George E

    2017-11-17

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c -axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  20. Mobility enhancement in graphene transistors on low temperature pulsed laser deposited boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Md Ahsan, E-mail: uddin2@email.sc.edu, E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu; Koley, Goutam, E-mail: uddin2@email.sc.edu, E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208

    2015-11-16

    Low temperature pulsed laser deposited (PLD) ultrathin boron nitride (BN) on SiO{sub 2} was investigated as a dielectric for graphene electronics, and a significant enhancement in electrical transport properties of graphene/PLD BN compared to graphene/SiO{sub 2} has been observed. Graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and transferred on PLD deposited and annealed BN exhibited up to three times higher field effect mobility compared to graphene on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. Graphene field effect transistor devices fabricated on 5 nm BN/SiO{sub 2} (300 nm) yielded maximum hole and electron mobility of 4980 and 4200 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. In addition, significant improvement in carriermore » homogeneity and reduction in extrinsic doping in graphene on BN has been observed. An average Dirac point of 3.5 V and residual carrier concentration of 7.65 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} was observed for graphene transferred on 5 nm BN at ambient condition. The overall performance improvement on PLD BN can be attributed to dielectric screening of charged impurities, similar crystal structure and phonon modes, and reduced substrate induced doping.« less

  1. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Stan, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c-axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials. PMID:29149061

  2. Thin-walled boron nitride microtubes exhibiting intense band-edge UV emission at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi; Terao, Takeshi; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-02-25

    Boron nitride (BN) microtubes were synthesized in a vertical induction furnace using Li(2)CO(3) and B reactants. Their structures and morphologies were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The microtubes have diameters of 1-3 microm, lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers, and well-structured ultrathin walls only approximately 50 nm thick. A mechanism combining the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and template self-sacrificing processes is proposed to explain the formation of these novel one-dimensional microstructures, in which the Li(2)O-B(2)O(3) eutectic reaction plays an important role. Cathodoluminescence studies show that even at room temperature the thin-walled BN microtubes can possess an intense band-edge emission at approximately 216.5 nm, which is distinct compared with other BN nanostructures. The study suggests that the thin-walled BN microtubes should be promising for constructing compact deep UV devices and find potential applications in microreactors and microfluidic and drug delivery systems.

  3. Room temperature single photon source using fiber-integrated hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Tobias; Lu, Yuerui; Lam, Ping Koy

    2017-07-01

    Single photons are a key resource for quantum optics and optical quantum information processing. The integration of scalable room temperature quantum emitters into photonic circuits remains to be a technical challenge. Here we utilize a defect center in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) attached by Van der Waals force onto a multimode fiber as a single photon source. We perform an optical characterization of the source in terms of spectrum, state lifetime, power saturation and photostability. A special feature of our source is that it allows for easy switching between fiber-coupled and free space single photon generation modes. In order to prove the quantum nature of the emission we measure the second-order correlation function {{g}(2)}≤ft(τ \\right) . For both fiber-coupled and free space emission, the {{g}(2)}≤ft(τ \\right) dips below 0.5 indicating operation in the single photon regime. The results so far demonstrate the feasibility of 2D material single photon sources for scalable photonic quantum information processing.

  4. Superconducting transition temperature of a boron nitride layer with a high niobium coverage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo; Magana, Fernando

    We explore the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a Boron Nitride (BN) sheet, by doping its surface with Nb atoms sitting on the center of the hexagons. We used first-principles density functional theory in the general gradient approximation. The Quantum-Espresso package was used with norm conserving pseudo potentials. The structure considered was relaxed to their minimum energy configuration. Phonon frequencies were calculated using the linear-response technique on several phonon wave-vector meshes. The electron-phonon coupling parameter was calculated for a number of k meshes. The superconducting critical temperature was estimated using the Allen-Dynes formula with μ* = 0.1 - 0.15. We note that Nb is a good candidate material to show a superconductor transition for the BN-metal system. We thank Dirección General de Asuntos del Personal Académico de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, partial financial support by Grant IN-106514 and we also thank Miztli Super-Computing center the technical assistance.

  5. High temperature desulfurization of synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Robin, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    The hot process gas stream from the partial oxidation of sulfur-containing heavy liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel and/or sulfur-containing solid carbonaceous fuel comprising gaseous mixtures of H.sub.2 +CO, sulfur-containing gases, entrained particulate carbon, and molten slag is passed through the unobstructed central passage of a radiant cooler where the temperature is reduced to a temperature in the range of about 1800.degree. F. to 1200.degree. F. From about 0 to 95 wt. % of the molten slag and/or entrained material may be removed from the hot process gas stream prior to the radiant cooler with substantially no reduction in temperature of the process gas stream. In the radiant cooler, after substantially all of the molten slag has solidified, the sulfur-containing gases are contacted with a calcium-containing material to produce calcium sulfide. A partially cooled stream of synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas containing entrained calcium sulfide particulate matter, particulate carbon, and solidified slag leaves the radiant cooler containing a greatly reduced amount of sulfur-containing gases.

  6. Consolidation of silicon nitride without additives. [for gas turbine engine efficiency increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.; Yeh, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ceramics for gas turbine engine construction might make it possible to increase engine efficiency by raising operational temperatures to values beyond those which can be tolerated by metallic alloys. The most promising ceramics being investigated in this connection are Si3N4 and SiC. A description is presented of a study which had the objective to produce dense Si3N4. The two most common methods of consolidating Si3N4 currently being used include hot pressing and reaction sintering. The feasibility was explored of producing a sound, dense Si3N4 body without additives by means of conventional gas hot isostatic pressing techniques and an uncommon hydraulic hot isostatic pressing technique. It was found that Si3N4 can be densified without additions to a density which exceeds 95% of the theoretical value

  7. Effects of deposition temperature and ammonia flow on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Beechem, Thomas; Ohta, Taisuke; Spataru, Catalin; Figiel, Jeffrey; Smith, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The use of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition at high temperature is investigated as a means to produce epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at the wafer scale. Several categories of hBN films were found to exist based upon precursor flows and deposition temperature. Low, intermediate, and high NH3 flow regimes were found to lead to fundamentally different deposition behaviors. The low NH3 flow regimes yielded discolored films of boron sub-nitride. The intermediate NH3 flow regime yielded stoichiometric films that could be deposited as thick films. The high NH3 flow regime yielded self-limited deposition with thicknesses limited to a few mono-layers. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism is proposed to explain the onset of self-limited behavior for the high NH3 flow regime. Photoluminescence characterization determined that the intermediate and high NH3 flow regimes could be further divided into low and high temperature behaviors with a boundary at 1500 °C. Films deposited with both high NH3 flow and high temperature exhibited room temperature free exciton emission at 210 nm and 215.9 nm.

  8. Fission-gas release from uranium nitride at high fission rate density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    A sweep gas facility has been used to measure the release rates of radioactive fission gases from small UN specimens irradiated to 8-percent burnup at high fission-rate densities. The measured release rates have been correlated with an equation whose terms correspond to direct recoil release, fission-enhanced diffusion, and atomic diffusion (a function of temperature). Release rates were found to increase linearly with burnups between 1.5 and 8 percent. Pore migration was observed after operation at 1550 K to over 6 percent burnup.

  9. Measurement and thermal modeling of sapphire substrate temperature at III-Nitride MOVPE conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Here, growth rates and alloy composition of AlGaN grown by MOVPE is often very temperature dependent due to the presence of gas-phase parasitic chemical processes. These processes make wafer temperature measurement highly important, but in fact such measurements are very difficult because of substrate transparency in the near- IR (~900 nm) where conventional pyrometers detect radiation. The transparency problem can be solved by using a mid-IR pyrometer operating at a wavelength (~7500 nm) where sapphire is opaque. We employ a mid- IR pyrometer to measure the sapphire wafer temperature and simultaneously a near-IR pyrometer to measure wafer pocket temperature, whilemore » varying reactor pressure in both a N 2 and H 2 ambient. Near 1300 °C, as the reactor pressure is lowered from 300 Torr to 10 Torr the wafer temperature drops dramatically, and the ΔT between the pocket and wafer increases from ~20 °C to ~250 °C. Without the mid-IR pyrometer the large wafer temperature change with pressure would not have been noted. In order to explain this behavior we have developed a quasi-2D thermal model that includes a proper accounting of the pressure-dependent thermal contact resistance, and also accounts for sapphire optical transmission. The model and experimental results demonstrate that at most growth conditions the majority of the heat is transported from the wafer pocket to the wafer via gas conduction, in the free molecular flow limit. In this limit gas conductivity is independent of gap size but first order in pressure, and can quantitatively explain results from 20 to 300 Torr. Further analysis yields a measure of the thermal accommodation coefficients; α(H 2) =0.23, α(N 2) =0.50, which are in the range typically measured.« less

  10. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  11. Development of a Nitride Dispersion Strengthened (NDS) Metallic Alloy for High-Temperature Recuperators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    Alloy 2- 40 2-17 Summary of Tensile and Creep/Rupture Results on 0.010-in.-Thick NDS 200 Material 2-41 2-18 Brazing Alloy Screening Tests on NOS 300 2-44...Nitride Strengthening Process 100 - - 90 - __ __ __ __ - 80 __ AFTER NITRIDE AND DENITRIDE CYCLE S 60 - - -- C,50- _ - 40 . 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200...commercially with development of the 200-series stainless steels and the Nitronic alloys (Armco Steel designation). Manganese also is known to

  12. Study of SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface nitridation by post-oxidation annealing in pure nitrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chanthaphan, Atthawut, E-mail: chanthaphan@asf.mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi

    An alternative and effective method to perform interface nitridation for 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices was developed. We found that the high-temperature post-oxidation annealing (POA) in N{sub 2} ambient was beneficial to incorporate a sufficient amount of nitrogen atoms directly into thermal SiO{sub 2}/SiC interfaces. Although N{sub 2}-POA was ineffective for samples with thick thermal oxide layers, interface nitridation using N{sub 2}-POA was achieved under certain conditions, i.e., thin SiO{sub 2} layers (< 15 nm) and high annealing temperatures (>1350°C). Electrical characterizations of SiC-MOS capacitors treated with high-temperature N{sub 2}-POA revealed the same evidence of slow trap passivation and fast trapmore » generation that occurred in NO-treated devices fabricated with the optimized nitridation conditions.« less

  13. Advanced processing of gallium nitride and gallium nitride-based devices: Ultra-high temperature annealing and implantation incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijiang

    This dissertation is focused on three fields: ultra-high temperature annealing of GaN, activation of implanted GaN and the implantation incorporation into AlGaN/GaN HEMT processing, with an aim to increase the performance, manufacturability and reliability of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. First, the ultra high temperature (around 1500°C) annealing of MOCVD grown GaN on sapphire has been studied, and a thermally induced threading dislocation (TD) motion and reaction are reported. Using a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) approach capable of heating 2 inch wafers to around 1500°C with 100 bar N2 over-pressure, evidence of dislocation motion was first observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs of both planar and patterned GaN films protected by an AIN capping layer. An associated decrease in x-ray rocking curve (XRC) full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) was also observed for both the symmetric and asymmetric scans. After annealing, the AIN capping layer remained intact, and optical measurements showed no degradation of the opto-electronic properties of the films. Then activation annealing of Si implants in MOCVD grown GaN has been studied for use in ohmic contacts. Si was implanted in semi-insulating GaN at 100 keV with doses from 5 x 1014 cm-2 to 1.5 x 1016 cm-2. Rapid thermal annealing at 1500°C with 100 bar N2 over-pressure was used for dopant activation, resulting in a minimum sheet resistance of 13.9 O/square for a dose of 7 x 1015 cm-2. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements showed a post-activation broadening of the dopant concentration peak by 20 nm (at half the maximum), while X-Ray triple axis o-2theta scans indicated nearly complete implant damage recovery. Transfer length method measurements of the resistance of Ti/Al/Ni/Au contacts to activated GaN:Si (5 x 1015 cm-2 at 100 keV) indicated lowest contact resistances of 0.07 Omm and 0.02 Omm for as-deposited and subsequently annealed contacts, respectively. Finally, the incorporation of Si implantation

  14. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-11-09

    Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100 degrees C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1) to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5), the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins.

  15. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    White Army Material and Mechanics Research Center E. M. Lenoe, R. N. Katz, D. R. Messier, H. Priest m ’■ V ..W.*.il.’■.■,:;.-M V -^.’ -i.-■..::.■ f.:irjU...Stator Vane Development 6.1.1 Design and Analysis v 6.1.2 Static Rig Testing 6.1.3 Vane Fabrication 6.1.4 Heat Transfer Tests Progress on Materials...Oxidation on the Strengths of Hot- Pressed Silicon Nitride and Silicon Carbide Properties of Yttria Hot-Pressed Silicon Nitride i ii iii iv v x 1

  16. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    f7<psBCsqRf°?^PM^ppRi^Sq^PMip««niS! V Modulus of Rupture tests were conducted on 274 specimens of hot pressed silicon nitride to investigate the...Reaction Sintered 813^ 4. 3 Nitriding Developments 4.4 Sialon Materials 4. 5 Silicon Milling Studies 5. References v Page No. 1 ii...iv v vi ix 1 3 5 7 7 14 17 19 19 21 38 48 65 66 73 75 87 89 97 101 103 .:,:.o:^ -.. ...•• ._ . .- —~ «-«aa. m

  17. The Evolution of High Temperature Gas Sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F. H.; Brosha, E. L.; Mukundan, R.

    2001-01-01

    Gas sensor technology based on high temperature solid electrolytes is maturing rapidly. Recent advances in metal oxide catalysis and thin film materials science has enabled the design of new electrochemical sensors. We have demonstrated prototype amperometric oxygen sensors, nernstian potentiometric oxygen sensors that operate in high sulfur environments, and hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide sensing mixed potentials sensors. Many of these devices exhibit part per million sensitivities, response times on the order of seconds and excellent long-term stability.

  18. Effects of radiation and temperature on gallium nitride (GaN) metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiamori, Heather C.; Angadi, Chetan; Suria, Ateeq; Shankar, Ashwin; Hou, Minmin; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    The development of radiation-hardened, temperature-tolerant materials, sensors and electronics will enable lightweight space sub-systems (reduced packaging requirements) with increased operation lifetimes in extreme harsh environments such as those encountered during space exploration. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a ceramic, semiconductor material stable within high-radiation, high-temperature and chemically corrosive environments due to its wide bandgap (3.4 eV). These material properties can be leveraged for ultraviolet (UV) wavelength photodetection. In this paper, current results of GaN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) UV photodetectors behavior after irradiation up to 50 krad and temperatures of 15°C to 150°C is presented. These initial results indicate that GaN-based sensors can provide robust operation within extreme harsh environments. Future directions for GaN-based photodetector technology for down-hole, automotive and space exploration applications are also discussed.

  19. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    There are several ceramic materials which are currently being considered for use as structural elements in coal combustion and coal conversion systems because of their thermal and mechanical properties. These include alumina (refractories, membranes, heat engines); silicon carbide and silicon nitride (turbine engines, internal combustion engines, heat exchangers, particulate filters); zirconia (internal combustion engines, turbine engines, refractories); and mullite and cordierite (particulate filters, refractories, heat exchangers). High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and highmore » efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, and zirconia. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products and determination of the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time. 145 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.« less

  20. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  1. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  2. High temperature surface protection. [10 gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Alloys of the MCrAlX type are the basis for high temperature surface protection systems in gas turbines. M can be one or more of Ni, Co, or Fe and X denotes a reactive metal added to enhance oxide scale adherence. The selection and formation as well as the oxidation, hot corrosion and thermal fatigue performance of MCrAlX coatings are discussed. Coatings covered range from simple aluminides formed by pack cementation to the more advanced physical vapor deposition overlay coatings and developmental plasma spray deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  3. THz detectors based on heating of two-dimensional electron gas in disordered nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, V.; Ramaswamy, R.; Wang, K.; Choi, J. K.; Pakmehr, M.; Muraviev, A.; Shur, M.; Gaska, R.; Pogrebnyak, V.; Sergeev, A.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of design, fabrication, and characterization of the room-temperature, low electron heat capacity hot-electron THz microbolometers based on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The 2DEG sensor is integrated with a broadband THz antenna and a coplanar waveguide. Devices with various patterning of 2DEG have been fabricated and tested. Optimizing the material properties, geometrical parameters of the 2DEG, and antenna design, we match the impedances of the sensor and antenna to reach strong coupling of THz radiation to 2DEG via the Drude absorption. Testing the detectors, we found that the THz-induced photocurrent, ΔI, is proportional to the bias current, I, and the temperature derivative of the resistance and inversely proportional to the area of 2DEG sensor, S. The analysis allowed us to identify the mechanism of the 2DEG response to THz radiation as electron heating. The responsivity of our sensors, normalized to the bias current and to unit area of 2DEG, R*= ΔI•S/ (I•P), is ~ 103 W-1 μm2. So, for our typical sensor with an area of 1000 μm2 and bias currents of ~ 10 mA, the responsivity is ~ 0.01 A/W. The measurements of mixing at sub-terahertz frequencies showed that the mixing bandwidth is above 2 GHz, which corresponds to a characteristic electron relaxation time to be shorter than 0.7 ps. Further decrease of the size of 2DEG sensors will increase the responsivity as well as allows for decreasing the local oscillator power in heterodyne applications.

  4. High-Performance Polymers Sandwiched with Chemical Vapor Deposited Hexagonal Boron Nitrides as Scalable High-Temperature Dielectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Amin; Gadinski, Matthew R; Li, Qi; AlSaud, Mohammed Abu; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Bo; Liu, Feihua; Chen, Long-Qing; Alem, Nasim; Wang, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Polymer dielectrics are the preferred materials of choice for power electronics and pulsed power applications. However, their relatively low operating temperatures significantly limit their uses in harsh-environment energy storage devices, e.g., automobile and aerospace power systems. Herein, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films are prepared from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and readily transferred onto polyetherimide (PEI) films. Greatly improved performance in terms of discharged energy density and charge-discharge efficiency is achieved in the PEI sandwiched with CVD-grown h-BN films at elevated temperatures when compared to neat PEI films and other high-temperature polymer and nanocomposite dielectrics. Notably, the h-BN-coated PEI films are capable of operating with >90% charge-discharge efficiencies and delivering high energy densities, i.e., 1.2 J cm -3 , even at a temperature close to the glass transition temperature of polymer (i.e., 217 °C) where pristine PEI almost fails. Outstanding cyclability and dielectric stability over a straight 55 000 charge-discharge cycles are demonstrated in the h-BN-coated PEI at high temperatures. The work demonstrates a general and scalable pathway to enable the high-temperature capacitive energy applications of a wide range of engineering polymers and also offers an efficient method for the synthesis and transfer of 2D nanomaterials at the scale demanded for applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effect of ripples on the finite temperature elastic properties of hexagonal boron nitride using strain-fluctuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Siby; Ajith, K. M.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2017-11-01

    This work intents to put forth the results of a classical molecular dynamics study to investigate the temperature dependent elastic constants of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) between 100 and 1000 K for the first time using strain fluctuation method. The temperature dependence of out-of-plane fluctuations (ripples) is quantified and is explained using continuum theory of membranes. At low temperatures, negative in-plane thermal expansion is observed and at high temperatures, a transition to positive thermal expansion has been observed due to the presence of thermally excited ripples. The decrease of Young's modulus, bulk modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio with increase in temperature has been analyzed. The thermal rippling in h-BN leads to strong anharmonic behaviour that causes large deviation from the isotropic elasticity. A detailed study shows that the strong thermal rippling in large systems is also responsible for the softening of elastic constants in h-BN. From the determined values of elastic constants and elastic moduli, it has been elucidated that 2D h-BN sheets meet the Born's mechanical stability criterion in the investigated temperature range. The variation of longitudinal and shear velocities with temperature is also calculated from the computed values of elastic constants and elastic moduli.

  6. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  7. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  8. Electrochemical high-temperature gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saruhan, B.; Stranzenbach, M.; Yüce, A.; Gönüllü, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Combustion produced common air pollutant, NOx associates with greenhouse effects. Its high temperature detection is essential for protection of nature. Component-integration capable high-temperature sensors enable the control of combustion products. The requirements are quantitative detection of total NOx and high selectivity at temperatures above 500°C. This study reports various approaches to detect NO and NO2 selectively under lean and humid conditions at temperatures from 300°C to 800°C. All tested electrochemical sensors were fabricated in planar design to enable componentintegration. We suggest first an impedance-metric gas sensor for total NOx-detection consisting of NiO- or NiCr2O4-SE and PYSZ-electrolyte. The electrolyte-layer is about 200μm thickness and constructed of quasi-single crystalline columns. The sensing-electrode (SE) is magnetron sputtered thin-layers of NiO or NiCr2O4. Sensor sensitivity for detection of total NOx has been measured by applying impedance analysis. The cross-sensitivity to other emission gases such as CO, CO2, CH4 and oxygen (5 vol.%) has been determined under 0-1000ppm NO. Sensor maintains its high sensitivity at temperatures up to 550°C and 600°C, depending on the sensing-electrode. NiO-SE yields better selectivity to NO in the presence of oxygen and have shorter response times comparing to NiCr2O4-SE. For higher temperature NO2-sensing capability, a resistive DC-sensor having Al-doped TiO2-sensing layers has been employed. Sensor-sensitivity towards NO2 and cross-sensitivity to CO has been determined in the presence of H2O at temperatures 600°C and 800°C. NO2 concentrations varying from 25 to 100ppm and CO concentrations from 25 to 75ppm can be detected. By nano-tubular structuring of TiO2, NO2 sensitivity of the sensor was increased.

  9. High-temperature performance of gallium-nitride-based pin alpha-particle detectors grown on sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiu; Liang, Hongwei; Tang, Bin; Peng, Xincun; Liu, Jianxun; Yang, Chao; Xia, Xiaochuan; Tao, Pengcheng; Shen, Rensheng; Zou, Jijun; Du, Guotong

    2018-06-01

    The temperature-dependent radiation-detection performance of an alpha-particle detector that was based on a gallium-nitride (GaN)-based pin structure was studied from 290 K to 450 K. Current-voltage-temperature measurements (I-V-T) of the reverse bias show the exponential dependence of leakage currents on the voltage and temperature. The current transport mechanism of the GaN-based pin diode from the reverse bias I-V fitting was analyzed. The temperature-dependent pulse-height spectra of the detectors were studied using an 241 Am alpha-particle source at a reverse bias of 10 V, and the peak positions shifted from 534 keV at 290 K to 490 keV at 450 K. The variation of full width at half maximum (FWHM) from 282 keV at 290 K to 292 keV at 450 K is almost negligible. The GaN-based pin detectors are highly promising for high-temperature environments up to 450 K.

  10. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  11. The thermal power of aluminum nitride at temperatures between 1350 and 1650 deg C in argon and nitrogen atmospheres. Ph.D. Thesis - Rhine-Westphalia High School at Aachen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, W. A.; Schuh, B.

    1978-01-01

    The test apparatus for measuring the thermal voltage of aluminum nitride for temperature differences of up to + or - 60 C between 1350 and 1650 C is described. The thermal power and its homogeneous proportion are determined and the heat transfer of the migration ions resulting from the homogeneous thermal power is calculated. The conduction mechanism in aluminum nitride is discussed.

  12. Micromechanical and Electrical Properties of Monolithic Aluminum Nitride at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2000-01-01

    Micromechanical spectroscopy of aluminum nitride reveals it to possess extremely low background internal friction at less than 1x10(exp-4) logarithmic decrement (log dec) from 20 to 1200 T. Two mechanical loss peaks were observed, the first at 350 C approximating a single Debye peak with a peak height of 60x10(exp-4) log dec. The second peak was seen at 950 'C with a peak height of 20x 10' log dec and extended from 200 to over 1200 C. These micromechanical observations manifested themselves in the electrical behavior of these materials. Electrical conduction processes were predominately intrinsic. Both mechanical and electrical relaxations appear to be thermally activated processes, with activation energies of 0.78 and 1.32 eV respectively.

  13. Micromechanical and Electrical Properties of Monolithic Aluminum Nitride at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    Micromechanical spectroscopy of aluminum nitride reveals it to possess extremely low background internal friction at less than 1 x 10 (exp -4) logarithmic decrement (log dec.) from 20 to 1200 C. Two mechanical loss peaks were observed, the first at 350 C approximating a single Debye peak with a peak height of 60 x 10 (exp -4) log dec. The second peak was seen at 950 C with a peak height of 20 x 10 (exp -4) log dec. and extended from 200 to over 1200 C. These micromechanical observations manifested themselves in the electrical behavior of these materials. Electrical conduction processes were predominately intrinsic. Both mechanical and electrical relaxations appear to be thermally activated processes, with activation energies of 0.78 and 1.32 eV respectively.

  14. Laser gas assisted texturing and formation of nitride and oxynitride compounds on alumina surface: Surface response to environmental dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Al-Sharafi, A.; Al-Aqeeli, N.

    2018-03-01

    Laser gas assisted texturing of alumina surface is carried out, and formation of nitride and oxynitride compounds in the surface vicinity is examined. The laser parameters are selected to create the surface topology consisting of micro/nano pillars with minimum defect sites including micro-cracks, voids and large size cavities. Morphological and hydrophobic characteristics of the textured surface are examined using the analytical tools. The characteristics of the environmental dust and its influence on the laser textured surface are studied while mimicking the local humid air ambient. Adhesion of the dry mud on the laser textured surface is assessed through the measurement of the tangential force, which is required to remove the dry mud from the surface. It is found that laser texturing gives rise to micro/nano pillars topology and the formation of AlN and AlON compounds in the surface vicinity. This, in turn, lowers the free energy of the textured surface and enhances the hydrophobicity of the surface. The liquid solution resulted from the dissolution of alkaline and alkaline earth metals of the dust particles in water condensate forms locally scattered liquid islands at the interface of mud and textured surface. The dried liquid solution at the interface increases the dry mud adhesion on the textured surface. Some dry mud residues remain on the textured surface after the dry mud is removed by a pressurized desalinated water jet.

  15. High-temperature ceramics for automobile gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walzer, P.

    1978-01-01

    The employment of the high operational temperatures makes it necessary to use, for the construction of the turbines, ceramic materials such as silicon nitride or silicon carbide. Investigations concerning the development of turbine components made of such materials are conducted by a German automobile manufacturer and the ceramics industry. The current status of these investigations is reviewed. Flame tubes and guide-vane rings have successfully passed tests lasting 20 hours. Prototype turbine wheels have withstood the effects of peripheral speeds of 450 m/s. They also showed resistance to thermal shocks which were as high as 6-0 K/s.

  16. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP; Peuter, K. de

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takesmore » place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.« less

  17. Morphology and band structure regulation of graphitic carbon nitride microspheres by solvothermal temperature to boost photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuaijun; Yan, Qingyun; Dong, Pei; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Yongqiang; Liu, Fang; Li, Lin

    2018-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) microspheres (CNMS) were fabricated via a solvothermal method by using supramolecular complexes of dicyandiamide and cyanuric chloride as precursors. The effect of solvothermal temperature on the morphology, band structure, and activity was systematically investigated. Structural characterization results indicate that the samples prepared at 180 °C (CNMS-180) and 200 °C (CNMS-200) possess spherical morphology, while irregular bulk particles were obtained at 160 °C (CN-160). In addition, the band gap increased as the solvothermal temperature decreased from 200 to 160 °C. In comparison with CN-160 and CNMS-200, the valence band of CNMS-180 was more positive and thus gives higher photo-oxidation capability. Accordingly, CNMS-180 exhibits higher photocatalytic degradation efficiency on Rhodamine B, stronger photocurrent response, and lower charge transfer resistance. Additionally, CNMS-180 exhibits excellent stability after four runs. This work might provide a guidance for the regulation of morphology and band structure of g-C3N4-based materials prepared at low temperatures.

  18. Development of high temperature stable Ohmic and Schottky contacts on n-gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Rohit

    compounds. The barrier height obtained on n GaN was ˜0-5-0.6 eV which was low compared to those obtained by Pt or Ni. This barrier height is too low for use as a gate contact and they can only have limited use, perhaps, in gas sensors where large leakage current can be tolerated in exchange for better thermal reliability. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) were fabricated with Ti/Al/TiB2/Ti/Au source/drain ohmic contacts and a variety of gate metal schemes (Pt/Au, Ni/Au, Pt/TiB2/Au or Ni/TiB 2/Au) and were subjected to long-term annealing at 350°C. By comparison with companion devices with conventional Ti/Al/Pt/Au ohmic contacts and Pt/Au gate contacts, the HEMTs with boride-based ohmic metal and either Pt/Au, Ni/Au or Ni/TiB2/Au gate metal showed superior stability of both source-drain current and transconductance after 25 days aging at 350°C. The need for sputter deposition of the borides causes' problem in achieving significantly lower specific contact resistance than with conventional schemes deposited using e-beam evaporation. The borides also seem to be, in general, good getters for oxygen leading to sheet resistivity issues. Ir/Au Schottky contacts and Ti/Al/Ir/Au ohmic contacts on n-type GaN were investigated as a function of annealing temperature and compared to their more common Ni-based counterparts. The Ir/Au ohmic contacts on n-type GaN with n˜1017 cm-3 exhibited barrier heights of 0.55 eV after annealing at 700°C and displayed less intermixing of the contact metals compared to Ni/Au. A minimum specific contact resistance of 1.6 x 10-6 O.cm2 was obtained for the ohmic contacts on n-type GaN with n˜1018 cm-3 after annealing at 900°C. The measurement temperature dependence of contact resistance was similar for both Ti/Al/Ir/Au and Ti/Al/Ni/Au, suggesting the same transport mechanism was present in both types of contacts. The Ir-based ohmic contacts displayed superior thermal aging characteristics at 350°C. Auger Electron Spectroscopy

  19. Local Dynamics of Chemical Kinetics at Different Phases of Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat

    2015-08-01

    The local dynamics of chemical kinetics at different phases of the nitriding process have been studied. The calculations are performed under the conditions where the temperature and composition data are provided experimentally from an in-service furnace. Results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It is shown that if it is available in the furnace, the adsorption of the N2 gas can seemingly start at temperatures as low as 200 °C. However, at such low temperatures, as the diffusion into the material is very unlikely, this results in the surface poisoning. It becomes clear that, contrary to common knowledge, the nitriding heat treatment with ammonia as a nitrogen-providing medium is possible at temperatures like 400 °C. Under these conditions, however, the presence of excess amounts of product gas N2 in the furnace atmosphere suppresses the forward kinetics in the nitriding process. It seems that the best operating point in the nitriding heat treatment is achieved with a mixture of 6% N2. When the major nitriding species NH3 is substituted by N2 and the N2 fraction increases above 30%, the rate of the forward reaction decreases drastically, so that there is no point to continue the furnace operation any further. Hence, during the initial heating phase, the N2 gas must be purged from the furnace to keep its fraction less than 30% before the furnace reaches the temperature where the reaction starts.

  20. Surface passivation of p-type Ge substrate with high-quality GeNx layer formed by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takuro; Otani, Yohei; Ono, Toshiro

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of the formation temperature and postmetallization annealing (PMA) on the interface properties of GeNx/p-Ge fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The nitridation temperature is found to be a critical parameter in improving the finally obtained GeNx/Ge interface properties. The GeNx/Ge formed at room temperature and treated by PMA at 400 °C exhibits the best interface properties with an interface trap density of 1 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. The GeNx/Ge interface is unpinned and the Fermi level at the Ge surface can move from the valence band edge to the conduction band edge.

  1. Atypically small temperature-dependence of the direct band gap in the metastable semiconductor copper nitride Cu 3 N

    SciTech Connect

    Birkett, Max; Savory, Christopher N.; Fioretti, Angela N.

    The temperature-dependence of the direct band gap and thermal expansion in the metastable anti-ReO 3 semiconductor Cu 3N are investigated between 4.2 and 300 K by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Complementary refractive index spectra are determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry at 300K. A direct gap of 1.68eV is associated with the absorption onset at 300K, which strengthens continuously and reaches a magnitude of 3.5 x 10 5cm -1 at 2.7eV, suggesting potential for photovoltaic applications. Notably, the direct gap redshifts by just 24meV between 4.2 and 300K, giving an atypically small band-gap temperature coefficient dE g/dT of -0.082meV/K. Additionally,more » the band structure, dielectric function, phonon dispersion, linear expansion, and heat capacity are calculated using density functional theory; remarkable similarities between the experimental and calculated refractive index spectra support the accuracy of these calculations, which indicate beneficially low hole effective masses and potential negative thermal expansion below 50K. To assess the lattice expansion contribution to the band-gap temperature-dependence, a quasiharmonic model fit to the observed lattice contraction finds a monotonically decreasing linear expansion (descending past 10 -6K -1 below 80K), while estimating the Debye temperature, lattice heat capacity, and Gruneisen parameter. Accounting for lattice and electron-phonon contributions to the observed band-gap evolution suggests average phonon energies that are qualitatively consistent with predicted maxima in the phonon density of states. Furthermore, as band-edge temperature-dependence has significant consequences for device performance, copper nitride should be well suited for applications that require a largely temperature-invariant band gap.« less

  2. Atypically small temperature-dependence of the direct band gap in the metastable semiconductor copper nitride Cu 3 N

    DOE PAGES

    Birkett, Max; Savory, Christopher N.; Fioretti, Angela N.; ...

    2017-03-06

    The temperature-dependence of the direct band gap and thermal expansion in the metastable anti-ReO 3 semiconductor Cu 3N are investigated between 4.2 and 300 K by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Complementary refractive index spectra are determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry at 300K. A direct gap of 1.68eV is associated with the absorption onset at 300K, which strengthens continuously and reaches a magnitude of 3.5 x 10 5cm -1 at 2.7eV, suggesting potential for photovoltaic applications. Notably, the direct gap redshifts by just 24meV between 4.2 and 300K, giving an atypically small band-gap temperature coefficient dE g/dT of -0.082meV/K. Additionally,more » the band structure, dielectric function, phonon dispersion, linear expansion, and heat capacity are calculated using density functional theory; remarkable similarities between the experimental and calculated refractive index spectra support the accuracy of these calculations, which indicate beneficially low hole effective masses and potential negative thermal expansion below 50K. To assess the lattice expansion contribution to the band-gap temperature-dependence, a quasiharmonic model fit to the observed lattice contraction finds a monotonically decreasing linear expansion (descending past 10 -6K -1 below 80K), while estimating the Debye temperature, lattice heat capacity, and Gruneisen parameter. Accounting for lattice and electron-phonon contributions to the observed band-gap evolution suggests average phonon energies that are qualitatively consistent with predicted maxima in the phonon density of states. Furthermore, as band-edge temperature-dependence has significant consequences for device performance, copper nitride should be well suited for applications that require a largely temperature-invariant band gap.« less

  3. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control.

  4. High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Sajad

    2011-05-01

    General Atomics (GA) has over 35 years experience in prismatic block High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology design. During this period, the design has recently involved into a modular have been performed to demonstrate its versatility. This versatility is directly related to refractory TRISO coated - particle fuel that can contain any type of fuel. This paper summarized GA's fuel cycle studies individually and compares each based upon its cycle sustainability, proliferation-resistance capabilities, and other performance data against pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle data. Fuel cycle studies LEU-NV;commercial HEU-Th;commercial LEU-Th;weapons-grade plutonium consumption; and burning of LWR waste including plutonium and minor actinides in the MHR. results show that all commercial MHR options, with the exception of HEU-TH, are more sustainable than a PWR fuel cycle. With LEU-NV being the most sustainable commercial options. In addition, all commercial MHR options out perform the PWR with regards to its proliferation-resistance, with thorium fuel cycle having the best proliferation-resistance characteristics.

  5. Temperature measurement in a gas turbine engine combustor

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, Upul

    A method and system for determining a temperature of a working gas passing through a passage to a turbine section of a gas turbine engine. The method includes identifying an acoustic frequency at a first location in the engine upstream from the turbine section, and using the acoustic frequency for determining a first temperature value at the first location that is directly proportional to the acoustic frequency and a calculated constant value. A second temperature of the working gas is determined at a second location in the engine and, using the second temperature, a back calculation is performed to determinemore » a temperature value for the working gas at the first location. The first temperature value is compared to the back calculated temperature value to change the calculated constant value to a recalculated constant value. Subsequent first temperature values at the first location may be determined based on the recalculated constant value.« less

  6. X3 expansion tube driver gas spectroscopy and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, V.; Gildfind, D.; Lewis, S.; James, C.

    2018-07-01

    The University of Queensland's X3 facility is a large, free-piston driven expansion tube used for super-orbital and high Mach number scramjet aerothermodynamic studies. During recent development of new scramjet test flow conditions, experimentally measured shock speeds were found to be significantly lower than that predicted by initial driver performance calculations. These calculations were based on ideal, isentropic compression of the driver gas and indicated that loss mechanisms, not accounted for in the preliminary analysis, were significant. The critical determinant of shock speed is peak driver gas sound speed, which for a given gas composition depends on the peak driver gas temperature. This temperature may be inaccurately estimated if an incorrect fill temperature is assumed, or if heat losses during driver gas compression are significant but not accounted for. For this study, the ideal predicted peak temperature was 3750 K, without accounting for losses. However, a much lower driver temperature of 2400 K is suggested based on measured experimental shock speeds. This study aimed to measure initial and peak driver gas temperatures for a representative X3 operating condition. Examination of the transient temperatures of the driver gas and compression tube steel wall during the initial fill process showed that once the filling process was complete, the steady-state driver gas temperature closely matched the tube wall temperature. Therefore, while assuming the gas is initially at the ambient laboratory temperature is not a significant source of error, it can be entirely mitigated by simply monitoring tube wall temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to determine the driver gas spectra after diaphragm rupture; the driver gas emission spectrum exhibited a significant continuum radiation component, with prominent spectral lines attributed to contamination of the gas. A graybody approximation of the continuum suggested a peak driver gas temperature of

  7. X3 expansion tube driver gas spectroscopy and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, V.; Gildfind, D.; Lewis, S.; James, C.

    2017-11-01

    The University of Queensland's X3 facility is a large, free-piston driven expansion tube used for super-orbital and high Mach number scramjet aerothermodynamic studies. During recent development of new scramjet test flow conditions, experimentally measured shock speeds were found to be significantly lower than that predicted by initial driver performance calculations. These calculations were based on ideal, isentropic compression of the driver gas and indicated that loss mechanisms, not accounted for in the preliminary analysis, were significant. The critical determinant of shock speed is peak driver gas sound speed, which for a given gas composition depends on the peak driver gas temperature. This temperature may be inaccurately estimated if an incorrect fill temperature is assumed, or if heat losses during driver gas compression are significant but not accounted for. For this study, the ideal predicted peak temperature was 3750 K, without accounting for losses. However, a much lower driver temperature of 2400 K is suggested based on measured experimental shock speeds. This study aimed to measure initial and peak driver gas temperatures for a representative X3 operating condition. Examination of the transient temperatures of the driver gas and compression tube steel wall during the initial fill process showed that once the filling process was complete, the steady-state driver gas temperature closely matched the tube wall temperature. Therefore, while assuming the gas is initially at the ambient laboratory temperature is not a significant source of error, it can be entirely mitigated by simply monitoring tube wall temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to determine the driver gas spectra after diaphragm rupture; the driver gas emission spectrum exhibited a significant continuum radiation component, with prominent spectral lines attributed to contamination of the gas. A graybody approximation of the continuum suggested a peak driver gas temperature of

  8. Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-25

    identify by block number) FIELW GROUP SUB-GROUP 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and Identify by block number) Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN...AND TASK OBJECTIVES Aluminum gallium nitride (AIGaN) has long been recognized as a promising radiation hard optoelectronic material. AIGaN has a wide...Efficient, pure, low temperature sources for the gas source molecular beam epitaxial (GSMBE) growth of aluminum gallium nitride will essentially

  9. Template-Free Synthesis of Highly Porous Boron Nitride: Insights into Pore Network Design and Impact on Gas Sorption.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Sofia; McGilvery, Catriona M; Bailey, Josh; Petit, Camille

    2017-10-24

    Production of biocompatible and stable porous materials, e.g., boron nitride, exhibiting tunable and enhanced porosity is a prerequisite if they are to be employed to address challenges such as drug delivery, molecular separations, or catalysis. However, there is currently very limited understanding of the formation mechanisms of porous boron nitride and the parameters controlling its porosity, which ultimately prevents exploiting the material's full potential. Herein, we produce boron nitride with high and tunable surface area and micro/mesoporosity via a facile template-free method using multiple readily available N-containing precursors with different thermal decomposition patterns. The gases are gradually released, creating hierarchical pores, high surface areas (>1900 m 2 /g), and micropore volumes. We use 3D tomography techniques to reconstruct the pore structure, allowing direct visualization of the mesopore network. Additional imaging and analytical tools are employed to characterize the materials from the micro- down to the nanoscale. The CO 2 uptake of the materials rivals or surpasses those of commercial benchmarks or other boron nitride materials reported to date (up to 4 times higher), even after pelletizing. Overall, the approach provides a scalable route to porous boron nitride production as well as fundamental insights into the material's formation, which can be used to design a variety of boron nitride structures.

  10. Hardness, microstructure and surface characterization of laser gas nitrided commercially pure titanium using high power CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Selvan, J.S.; Subramanian, K.; Nath, A.K.

    Surface nitriding of commercially pure (CP) titanium was carried out using high power CO{sub 2} laser at pure nitrogen and dilute nitrogen (N{sub 2} + Ar) environment. The hardness, microstructure, and melt pool configuration of the laser melted titanium in helium and argon atmosphere was compared with laser melting at pure and dilute nitrogen environment. The hardness of the nitrided layer was of the order of 1000 to 1600 HV. The hardness of the laser melted titanium in the argon and helium atmosphere was 500 to 1000 HV. Using x-ray analysis of the formation of TiN and Ti{sub 2}N phasemore » was identified in the laser nitrided titanium. The presence of nitrogen in the nitrided zone was confirmed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. The microstructures revealed densely populated dendrites in the sample nitrided at 100% N{sub 2} environment and thinly populated dendrites in dilute environment. The crack intensity was large in the nitrided sample at pure nitrogen, and few cracks were observed in the 50% N{sub 2} + 50% Ar environment.« less

  11. Empirical potential influence and effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of pristine and defective hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Siby; Ajith, K. M.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2017-06-01

    The major objective of this work is to present results of a classical molecular dynamics study to investigate the effect of changing the cut-off distance in the empirical potential on the stress-strain relation and also the temperature dependent Young’s modulus of pristine and defective hexagonal boron nitride. As the temperature increases, the computed Young’s modulus shows a significant decrease along both the armchair and zigzag directions. The computed Young’s modulus shows a trend in keeping with the structural anisotropy of h-BN. The variation of Young’s modulus with system size is elucidated. The observed mechanical strength of h-BN is significantly affected by the vacancy and Stone-Wales type defects. The computed room temperature Young’s modulus of pristine h-BN is 755 GPa and 769 GPa respectively along the armchair and zigzag directions. The decrease of Young’s modulus with increase in temperature has been analyzed and the results show that the system with zigzag edge shows a higher value of Young’s modulus in comparison to that with armchair edge. As the temperature increases, the computed stiffness decreases and the system with zigzag edge possesses a higher value of stiffness as compared to the armchair counterpart and this behaviour is consistent with the variation of Young’s modulus. The defect analysis shows that presence of vacancy type defects leads to a higher Young’s modulus, in the studied range with different percentage of defect concentration, in comparison with Stone-Wales defect. The variations in the peak position of the computed radial distribution function reveals the changes in the structural features of systems with zigzag and armchair edges in the presence of applied stress.

  12. Spherical boron nitride particles and method for preparing them

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2003-11-25

    Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride and method of preparing them. Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride are produced from precursor particles of hexagonal phase boron nitride suspended in an aerosol gas. The aerosol is directed to a microwave plasma torch. The torch generates plasma at atmospheric pressure that includes nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen atoms is critical in allowing boron nitride to melt at atmospheric pressure while avoiding or at least minimizing decomposition. The plasma includes a plasma hot zone, which is a portion of the plasma that has a temperature sufficiently high to melt hexagonal phase boron nitride. In the hot zone, the precursor particles melt to form molten particles that acquire spherical and polyhedral shapes. These molten particles exit the hot zone, cool, and solidify to form solid particles of boron nitride with spherical and polyhedral shapes. The molten particles can also collide and join to form larger molten particles that lead to larger spherical and polyhedral particles.

  13. Large Reduction of Hot Spot Temperature in Graphene Electronic Devices with Heat-Spreading Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Choi, David; Poudel, Nirakar; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji; Cronin, Stephen B; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2018-04-04

    Scanning thermal microscopy measurements reveal a significant thermal benefit of including a high thermal conductivity hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heat-spreading layer between graphene and either a SiO 2 /Si substrate or a 100 μm thick Corning flexible Willow glass (WG) substrate. At the same power density, an 80 nm thick h-BN layer on the silicon substrate can yield a factor of 2.2 reduction of the hot spot temperature, whereas a 35 nm thick h-BN layer on the WG substrate is sufficient to obtain a factor of 4.1 reduction. The larger effect of the h-BN heat spreader on WG than on SiO 2 /Si is attributed to a smaller effective heat transfer coefficient per unit area for three-dimensional heat conduction into the thick, low-thermal conductivity WG substrate than for one-dimensional heat conduction through the thin oxide layer on silicon. Consequently, the h-BN lateral heat-spreading length is much larger on WG than on SiO 2 /Si, resulting in a larger degree of temperature reduction.

  14. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  15. Fuel Fraction Analysis of 500 MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Nitride (UN-PuN) Fuel without Refueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Su'ud, Zaki; Basar, Khairul; Irwanto, Dwi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is one of candidates which can support electricity demand in the world. The Generation IV NPP has fourth main objective, i.e. sustainability, economics competitiveness, safety and reliability, and proliferation and physical protection. One of Gen-IV reactor type is Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). In this study, the analysis of fuel fraction in small GFR with nitride fuel has been done. The calculation was performed by SRAC code, both Pij and CITATION calculation. SRAC2002 system is a code system applicable to analyze the neutronics of variety reactor type. And for the data library used JENDL-3.2. The step of SRAC calculation is fuel pin calculated by Pij calculation until the data homogenized, after it homogenized we calculate core reactor. The variation of fuel fraction is 40% up to 65%. The optimum design of 500MWth GFR without refueling with 10 years burn up time reach when radius F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:30cm:30cm and height F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:40cm:30cm, variation percentage Plutonium in F1:F2:F3 = 7%:10%:13%. The optimum fuel fraction is 41% with addition 2% Plutonium weapon grade mix in the fuel. The excess reactivity value in this case 1.848% and the k-eff value is 1.01883. The high burn up reached when the fuel fraction is low. In this study 41% fuel fraction produce faster fissile fuel, so it has highest burn-up level than the other fuel fraction.

  16. Low-temperature formation of c-axis-oriented aluminum nitride thin films by plasma-assisted reactive pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Satake, Yoshikatsu; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2018-01-01

    The low-temperature formation of c-axis-oriented aluminum nitride thin films was demonstrated by plasma-assisted reactive pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering. The effects of the duty cycle at the pulsed-DC voltage applied to the Al target on the properties of AlN films formed via inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-enhanced pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering deposition were investigated. With decreasing duty cycle at the target voltage, the peak intensity of AlN(0002) increased linearly. The surface roughness of AlN films decreased since there was an increase in film density owing to the impact of energetic ions on the films together with the enhancement of nitriding associated with the relative increase in N radical flux. The improvement of both the crystallinity and surface morphology of AlN films at low temperatures is considered to be caused by the difference between the relative flux values of ions and sputtered atoms.

  17. Simulations of the synthesis of boron-nitride nanostructures in a hot, high pressure gas volume† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c8sc00667a

    PubMed Central

    Han, Longtao; Irle, Stephan; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-01-01

    We performed nanosecond timescale computer simulations of clusterization and agglomeration processes of boron nitride (BN) nanostructures in hot, high pressure gas, starting from eleven different atomic and molecular precursor systems containing boron, nitrogen and hydrogen at various temperatures from 1500 to 6000 K. The synthesized BN nanostructures self-assemble in the form of cages, flakes, and tubes as well as amorphous structures. The simulations facilitate the analysis of chemical dynamics and we are able to predict the optimal conditions concerning temperature and chemical precursor composition for controlling the synthesis process in a high temperature gas volume, at high pressure. We identify the optimal precursor/temperature choices that lead to the nanostructures of highest quality with the highest rate of synthesis, using a novel parameter of the quality of the synthesis (PQS). Two distinct mechanisms of BN nanotube growth were found, neither of them based on the root-growth process. The simulations were performed using quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) based on the density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) quantum mechanics in conjunction with a divide-and-conquer (DC) linear scaling algorithm, as implemented in the DC-DFTB-K code, enabling the study of systems as large as 1300 atoms in canonical NVT ensembles for 1 ns time. PMID:29780513

  18. Effects of Nano-Aluminum Nitride on the Performance of an Ultrahigh-Temperature Inorganic Phosphate Adhesive Cured at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengkun; Chen, Hailong; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jifeng; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Limin

    2017-01-01

    Based on the optimal proportion of resin and curing agent, an ultrahigh-temperature inorganic phosphate adhesive was prepared with aluminum dihydric phosphate, aluminium oxide (α-Al2O3), etc. and cured at room temperature (RT). Then, nano-aluminum nitride (nano-AlN), nano-Cupric oxide (nano-CuO), and nano-titanium oxide (nano-TiO2) were added into the adhesive. Differential scanning calorimetry was conducted using the inorganic phosphate adhesive to analyze the phosphate reactions during heat treatment, and it was found that 15 wt % nano-AlN could clearly decrease the curing temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the microphenomenon of the modified adhesive at ultrahigh-temperature. The differential thermal analysis of the inorganic phosphate adhesive showed that the weight loss was approximately 6.5 wt % when the mass ratio of resin to curing agent was 1:1.5. An X-ray diffraction analysis of the adhesive with 10% nano-AlN showed that the phase structure changed from AlPO4(11-0500) to the more stable AlPO4(10-0423) structure after heat treatment. The shear strength of the adhesive containing 10% nano-AlN reached 7.3 MPa at RT due to the addition of nano-AlN, which promoted the formation of phosphate and increased the Al3+. PMID:29099812

  19. Synthesis of boron nitride powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissig, Dirk Horst

    2002-09-01

    In the materials science community there is much interest in the development of new, efficient approaches for preparing ceramic powders having properties or performance characteristics not found with powders produced by traditional metallurgical synthesis methods. In this regard, aerosol-based syntheses are finding general acceptance for the preparation of non-metal and metal oxide powders. In contrast, much less effort has been given to aerosol-type syntheses for non-oxide powders despite potentially useful benefits. This dissertation describes the application of two chemical systems in aerosol assisted vapor phase synthesis (AAVS) for the preparation of spherical morphology boron oxynitride, BNxOy, powders that are subsequently converted to spherical morphology boron nitride in a second nitridation step. Chapter 1 describes the AAVS synthesis of BNxOy powders using a reaction of an aqueous boric acid containing aerosol with ammonia at 1000°C. The effect of reactor tube material, total gas flow rate, ammonia concentration, boric acid concentration, and urea addition to the boric acid aerosol on the percent oxygen composition is described. The resulting BNxOy powders contain significant amounts of oxygen that require replacement in a second stage nitridation reaction at elevated temperature under ammonia. The influences of the reaction temperature profile, crucible geometry and transformation additive on final oxygen composition and powder crystallinity are described. Chapter 2 outlines the formation of BNxOy powders from an AAVS reaction between the boron precursor (MeO)3B and ammonia. The formation of the powders is studied as a function of total gas flow rate and ammonia concentration. In all cases the resulting powders contain lower levels of oxygen compared to powders produced from aqueous boric acid aerosols. The conversion of the BNxOy powders in the second stage nitridation reaction with ammonia is examined as a function of crucible geometry, temperature

  20. Temperature effects on metal-alumina-nitride-oxide-silicon memory operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Heh, Dawei; Bersuker, Gennadi; Della Marca, Vincenzo; Pavan, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    We present a detailed investigation of temperature effects on the operation of TaN/Al2O3/Si3N4/SiO2/Si (TANOS) memory devices. We show that not only retention but also program and erase operations are affected significantly by temperature. Using a large set of experimental data and simulations on a variety of TANOS stacks, we show that the temperature dependence of TANOS program and erase operations can be explained by accounting for that the alumina dielectric constant increases by 20%-25% over a 125 K temperature range.

  1. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  2. Tunable and high-purity room temperature single-photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. Here, we demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters over 6 meV, and material processing sharply improves the single photon purity. We observe high single photon count rates exceeding 7 × 10 6 counts per second at saturation, after correcting for uncorrelated photonmore » background. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.« less

  3. Temperature-triggered chemical switching growth of in-plane and vertically stacked graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Teng; Song, Xiuju; Du, Huiwen; Nie, Yufeng; Chen, Yubin; Ji, Qingqing; Sun, Jingyu; Yang, Yanlian; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-01-01

    In-plane and vertically stacked heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN-G and G/h-BN, respectively) are both recent focuses of graphene research. However, targeted synthesis of either heterostructure remains a challenge. Here, via chemical vapour deposition and using benzoic acid precursor, we have achieved the selective growth of h-BN-G and G/h-BN through a temperature-triggered switching reaction. The perfect in-plane h-BN-G is characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), showing atomically patched graphene and h-BN with typical zigzag edges. In contrast, the vertical alignment of G/h-BN is confirmed by unique lattice-mismatch-induced moiré patterns in high-resolution STM images, and two sets of aligned selected area electron diffraction spots, both suggesting a van der Waals epitaxial mechanism. The present work demonstrates the chemical designability of growth process for controlled synthesis of graphene and h-BN heterostructures. With practical scalability, high uniformity and quality, our approach will promote the development of graphene-based electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:25869236

  4. Tunable and high-purity room temperature single-photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; ...

    2017-09-26

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. Here, we demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters over 6 meV, and material processing sharply improves the single photon purity. We observe high single photon count rates exceeding 7 × 10 6 counts per second at saturation, after correcting for uncorrelated photonmore » background. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.« less

  5. Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Tiegs, Terry N.

    1992-01-01

    A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  6. Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1992-10-13

    A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  7. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  8. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  9. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  10. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  11. Deterministic optical polarisation in nitride quantum dots at thermoelectrically cooled temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J; Patra, Saroj K; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C; Oliver, Rachel A; Schulz, Stefan; Taylor, Robert A

    2017-09-21

    We report the successful realisation of intrinsic optical polarisation control by growth, in solid-state quantum dots in the thermoelectrically cooled temperature regime (≥200 K), using a non-polar InGaN system. With statistically significant experimental data from cryogenic to high temperatures, we show that the average polarisation degree of such a system remains constant at around 0.90, below 100 K, and decreases very slowly at higher temperatures until reaching 0.77 at 200 K, with an unchanged polarisation axis determined by the material crystallography. A combination of Fermi-Dirac statistics and k·p theory with consideration of quantum dot anisotropy allows us to elucidate the origin of the robust, almost temperature-insensitive polarisation properties of this system from a fundamental perspective, producing results in very good agreement with the experimental findings. This work demonstrates that optical polarisation control can be achieved in solid-state quantum dots at thermoelectrically cooled temperatures, thereby opening the possibility of polarisation-based quantum dot applications in on-chip conditions.

  12. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for silicon nitride-scandium(III) oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at tripple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  13. Influence of gas temperature on ignition, burning and extinction of carbon particles-gas suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskaya, S. G.; Zuy, O. N.; Liseanskaia, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    The ignition and burning of monodisperse and two-fraction suspensions of carbon particles at gas temperature in the range 1100 ÷ 1500 K are modeled. The critical gas temperature of the suspension ignition, the particles ignition delay and burning time, the burning temperature, and the extinction parameters are determined. The data obtained are compared with burning characteristics of single particle of equal size. The ignition temperatures of the fine fraction (the particle diameter 60 μm) and the coarse one (120 μm) are practically the same. The ignition temperatures of the equivalent single particles are much higher and they differ by 100 K and more. The gas temperature is found below which the ignition delay of the fine fraction exceeds the one of the coarse fraction. It is found that, at critical ignition temperatures the burning temperature of the fine fraction is lower than that of the coarse fraction. At gas temperatures above 1250 K, the burning temperature of the fine fraction is higher. It is established that, in contrast to single particles, the temperature difference between the particles and the gas is small during gas-suspension extinction. Further oxidation of the particles occurs in the kinetic regime, so it is possible to estimate the time of their complete conversion.

  14. Hall effect of copper nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, G. H.; Liu, J. Z.; Li, M.; Yuan, X. M.; Yan, P. X.; Liu, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    The Hall effect of copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films was investigated in our work. Cu3N films were deposited on glass substrates by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering at different temperatures using pure copper as the sputtering target. The Hall coefficients of the films are demonstrated to be dependent on the deposition gas flow rate and the measuring temperature. Both the Hall coefficient and resistance of the Cu3N films increase with the nitrogen gas flow rate at room temperature, while the Hall mobility and the carrier density of the films decrease. As the temperature changed from 100 K to 300 K, the Hall coefficient and the resistivity of the films decreased, while the carrier density increased and Hall mobility shows no great change. The energy band gap of the Cu3N films deduced from the curve of the common logarithm of the Hall coefficient against 1/T is 1.17-1.31 eV.

  15. The steady-state and transient electron transport within bulk zinc-blende indium nitride: The impact of crystal temperature and doping concentration variations

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqua, Poppy; O'Leary, Stephen K., E-mail: stephen.oleary@ubc.ca

    2016-03-07

    Within the framework of a semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo electron transport simulation approach, we analyze the steady-state and transient aspects of the electron transport within bulk zinc-blende indium nitride, with a focus on the response to variations in the crystal temperature and the doping concentration. We find that while the electron transport associated with zinc-blende InN is highly sensitive to the crystal temperature, it is not very sensitive to the doping concentration selection. The device consequences of these results are then explored.

  16. Effects of gaseous nitriding AISI4140 alloy steel on corrosion and hardness properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamil Moli, L.; Wahab, N.; Gopinathan, M.; Karmegam, K.; Maniyarasi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in the industry especially on machinery since it weakens the structure of the machinery part and causes the mechanical failure. This will stop the production and increase the maintenance cost. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of gas nitriding on a screw press machine shaft made from AISI 4140 steel was investigated. Pitting corrosion was identified as a major cause of the shaft failure and this study was conducted to improve the corrosion resistance on the AISI 4140 alloy steel shaft by gas nitriding as a surface hardening treatment. Gas nitriding was performed with composition of 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen at temperatures of 525 °C, 550 °C and 575 °C and with the soaking time of 30, 45 and 60 minutes, respectively. The samples were prepared as rectangular sized of 30mm x 12mm x 3mm for immersion testing. The results showed that corrosion rate of untreated samples was 77% higher compared to the nitrided samples. It was also found that hardness of the nitrided samples was higher than untreated sample. All in all, it can be concluded that gaseous nitriding can significantly improve the surface hardness and the corrosion resistance of the shaft made of AISI 4140 alloy steel, hence reduces the pitting that is the root cause of failure.

  17. Heat pipe temperature control utilizing a soluble gas absorption reservior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A new gas-controlled heat pipe design is described which uses a liquid matrix reservior, or sponge, to replace the standard gas reservior. Reservior volume may be reduced by a factor of five to ten for certain gas-liquid combinations, while retaining the same level of temperature control. Experiments with ammonia, butane, and carbon dioxide control gases with methanol working fluid are discussed.

  18. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  19. Gas temperature measurements in deuterium hollow cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Majstorović, Gordana, E-mail: gordana.majstorovic@va.mod.gov.rs; Šišović, Nikola, E-mail: nikolas@ff.bg.ac.rs

    2016-03-25

    We report results of optical emission spectroscopy measurements of rotational T{sub rot} and translational (gas) temperature of deuterium molecules in a hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge. The rotational temperature of excited electronic state of D{sub 2} was determined from the intensity distribution in the rotational structure of Q branch of the two Fulcher-α diagonal bands: (ν’=ν”=2) and (ν’=ν”=3). The population of excited energy levels, determined from relative line intensities, was used to derive radial rotational temperature distributions as well as gas temperature distribution of deuterium molecule.

  20. Temperatures and Stresses on Hollow Blades For Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollmann, Erich

    1947-01-01

    The present treatise reports on theoretical investigations and test-stand measurements which were carried out in the BMW Flugmotoren GMbH in developing the hollow blade for exhaust gas turbines. As an introduction the temperature variation and the stress on a turbine blade for a gas temperature of 900 degrees and circumferential velocities of 600 meters per second are discussed. The assumptions onthe heat transfer coefficients at the blade profile are supported by tests on an electrically heated blade model. The temperature distribution in the cross section of a blade Is thoroughly investigated and the temperature field determined for a special case. A method for calculation of the thermal stresses in turbine blades for a given temperature distribution is indicated. The effect of the heat radiation on the blade temperature also is dealt with. Test-stand experiments on turbine blades are evaluated, particularly with respect to temperature distribution in the cross section; maximum and minimum temperature in the cross section are ascertained. Finally, the application of the hollow blade for a stationary gas turbine is investigated. Starting from a setup for 550 C gas temperature the improvement of the thermal efficiency and the fuel consumption are considered as well as the increase of the useful power by use of high temperatures. The power required for blade cooling is taken into account.

  1. Isolating Gas Sensor From Pressure And Temperature Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chen, Tony T. D.; Chaturvedi, Sushi K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-stage flow system enables oxygen sensor in system to measure oxygen content of low-pressure, possibly-high-temperature atmosphere in test environment while protecting sensor against possibly high temperature and fluctuations in pressure of atmosphere. Sensor for which flow system designed is zirconium oxide oxygen sensor sampling atmospheres in high-temperature wind tunnels. Also adapted to other gas-analysis instruments that must be isolated from pressure and temperature effects of test environments.

  2. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  3. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  4. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-05

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α'-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α' → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α'N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  5. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α′-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α′ → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α′N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance. PMID:27492862

  6. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    Fabrication 4.2 Rotor Blade Development 4.2.1 WISEC Rotor Blade Analysis Page No. i 11 ill i v v xiii 1 11 11 13 14 15 15 17 32 42 55...in Examples of commonly observed flaws *" ™tor t^ade g ^ ■7 ~,n „„i i ?i Rnth entrapped gas voids and siiii-iiNis^ v ^x rr...aluminas C11-’ has indicated that 40 or more samples are necessary to determine the Weibull material constants m and a . V Future spin testing

  7. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  8. Effects of oxide additions and temperature on sinterability of milled silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of milled alpha-Si3N4 with 0 to 5.07 equivalent percent of oxide additions were pressureless sintered at 1650 to 1820 C for 4 hours in nitrogen while covered with powdered Si3N4 + SiO2. Densities of less than or equal to 97.5 percent resulted with approximately 2.5 equivalent percent of MgO, CeO2, Y2O3, and three mixtures involving these oxides. Densities of greater than or equal to 94 percent were obtained with approximately 0.62 equivalent percent of the same additives. At most temperatures, best sinterability (density maxima) was obtained with 1.2 to 2.5 equivalent percent additive.

  9. Testing of uranium nitride fuel in T-111 cladding at 1200 K cladding temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.; Smith, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of six fuel pins each were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a tantalum alloy clad. The first group of fuel pins was irradiated for 1500 hours to a maximum burnup of 0.7-atom-percent uranium. The second group of fuel pins was irradiated for about 3000 hours to a maximum burnup of 1.0-atom-percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation of both groups of fuel pins was approximately 1200 K. The postirradiation examination revealed the following: no clad failures or fuel swelling occurred; less than 1 percent of the fission gases escaped from the fuel; and the clad of the first group of fuel pins experienced clad embrittlement whereas the second group, which had modified assembly and fabrication procedures to minimize contamination, had a ductile clad after irradiation.

  10. Gas analysis system for the Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Davis, Patricia P.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Puster, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a gas collection and analysis system that is to be installed in the Eight-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8' HTT) at NASA's Langley Research Center. This system will be used to analyze the test gas medium that results after burning a methane-air mixture to achieve the proper tunnel test parameters. The system consists of a sampling rake, a gas sample storage array, and a gas chromatographic system. Gas samples will be analyzed after each run to assure that proper combustion takes place in the tunnel resulting in a correctly balanced composition of the test gas medium. The proper ratio of gas species is critically necessary in order for the proper operation and testing of scramjet engines in the tunnel. After a variety of methane-air burn conditions have been analyzed, additional oxygen will be introduced into the combusted gas and the enriched test gas medium analyzed. The pre/post enrichment sets of data will be compared to verify that the gas species of the test gas medium is correctly balanced for testing of air-breathing engines.

  11. High-temperature fracture mechanism of low-Ca-doped silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Isao; Igashira, Kenichiro; Okamoto, Taira

    1995-03-01

    High-purity Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (with 2.5 wt% glassy SiO{sub 2}) doped with 0 to 450 at.ppm of Ca was prepared as a model system to investigate the effects of grain-boundary segregants on fracture phenomenology at 1,400 C. Subcritical crack-growth (SCG) resistance as well as creep resistance was degraded significantly by the presence of a small amount of Ca. The internal friction of the doped materials exhibited the superposition of a grain-boundary relaxation peak and a high-temperature background, and the apparent viscosity of the grain-boundary film was determined from the peak. Based on these experimental data, the fracture mechanism at 1,400more » C was divided into three regions: ``brittle``, SCG, and creep failure as a function of both external strain rate and Ca concentration, C{sub ca}. From the investigation of the C{sub Ca} dependence of the critical strain rate for the transition from ``brittle`` to SCG fractures, the SCG phenomenon is suggested to be triggered by small-scale, grain-boundary sliding. The C{sub Ca} dependence of ``steady-state`` creep rate was far from the theoretical dependence of diffusional creep via a solution-precipitation mechanism. The discrepancy was interpreted to be due to the presence of an impurity-insensitive creep component. This component may correspond to the lowest limit of the tensile creep rate in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} polycrystalline materials containing intergranular glassy-SiO{sub 2} film.« less

  12. Temperature dependence of copper diffusion in different thickness amorphous tungsten/tungsten nitride layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgary, Somayeh; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2017-11-01

    The amorphous W/WN films with various thickness (10, 30 and 40 nm) and excellent thermal stability were successfully prepared on SiO2/Si substrate with evaporation and reactive evaporation method. The W/WN bilayer has technological importance because of its low resistivity, high melting point, and good diffusion barrier properties between Cu and Si. The thermal stability was evaluated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In annealing process, the amorphous W/WN barrier crystallized and this phenomenon is supposed to be the start of Cu atoms diffusion through W/WN barrier into Si. With occurrence of the high-resistive Cu3Si phase, the W/WN loses its function as a diffusion barrier. The primary mode of Cu diffusion is the diffusion through grain boundaries that form during heat treatments. The amorphous structure with optimum thickness is the key factor to achieve a superior diffusion barrier characteristic. The results show that the failure temperature increased by increasing the W/WN film thickness from 10 to 30 nm but it did not change by increasing the W/WN film thickness from 30 to 40 nm. It is found that the 10 and 40 nm W/WN films are good diffusion barriers at least up to 800°C while the 30 nm W/WN film shows superior properties as a diffusion barrier, but loses its function as a diffusion barrier at about 900°C (that is 100°C higher than for 10 and 40 nm W/WN films).

  13. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  14. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  15. Examination of T-111 clad uranium nitride fuel pins irradiated up to 13,000 hours at a clad temperature of 990 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.; Siegel, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    The examination of 27 fuel pins irradiated for up to 13,000 hours at 990 C is described. The fuel pin clad was a tantalum alloy with uranium nitride as the nuclear fuel. Two nominal fuel pin diameters were tested with a maximum burnup of 2.34 atom percent. Twenty-two fuel pins were tested for fission gas leaks; thirteen pins leaked. Clad ductility tests indicated clad embrittlement. The embrittlement is attributed to hydrogen from an n,p reaction in the fuel. Fuel swelling was burnup dependent, and the amount of fission gas release was low, generally less than 0.5 percent. No incompatibilities between fuel, liner, and clad were in evidence.

  16. Pleistocene tropical Pacific temperature sensitivity to radiative greenhouse gas forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, K. A.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    How high will Earth's global average surface temperature ultimately rise as greenhouse gas concentrations increase in the future? One way to tackle this question is to compare contemporaneous temperature and greenhouse gas concentration data from paleoclimate records, while considering that other radiative forcing mechanisms (e.g. changes in the amount and distribution of incoming solar radiation associated with changes in the Earth's orbital configuration) also contribute to surface temperature change. Since the sensitivity of surface temperature varies with location and latitude, here we choose a central location representative of the west Pacific warm pool, far from upwelling regions or surface temperature gradients in order to minimize climate feedbacks associated with high-latitude regions or oceanic dynamics. The 'steady-state' or long-term temperature change associated with greenhouse gas radiative forcing is often labeled as equilibrium (or 'Earth system') climate sensitivity to the doubling of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration. Climate models suggest that Earth system sensitivity does not change dramatically over times when CO2 was lower or higher than the modern atmospheric value. Thus, in our investigation of the changes in tropical SST, from the glacial to interglacial states when greenhouse gas forcing nearly doubled, we use Late Pleistocene paleoclimate records to constrain earth system sensitivity for the tropics. Here we use Mg/Ca-paleothermometry using the foraminifera G. ruber from ODP Site 871 from the past 500 kyr in the western Pacific warm pool to estimate tropical Pacific equilibrium climate sensitivity to a doubling of greenhouse gas concentrations to be ~4°C. This tropical SST sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing is ~1-2°C higher than that predicted by climate models of past glacial periods or future warming for the tropical Pacific. Equatorial Pacific SST sensitivity may be higher than predicted by models for a number of reasons

  17. Multi-spectral temperature measurement method for gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Feng, Chi; Wang, Lixin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    One of the basic methods to improve both the thermal efficiency and power output of a gas turbine is to increase the firing temperature. However, gas turbine blades are easily damaged in harsh high-temperature and high-pressure environments. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. There are unsolved problems in blade temperature measurement, relating to the emissivity of the blade surface, influences of the combustion gases, and reflections of radiant energy from the surroundings. In this study, the emissivity of blade surfaces has been measured, with errors reduced by a fitting method, influences of the combustion gases have been calculated for different operational conditions, and a reflection model has been built. An iterative computing method is proposed for calculating blade temperatures, and the experimental results show that this method has high precision.

  18. Method for producing refractory nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1989-01-24

    A process for making fine, uniform metal nitride powders that can be hot pressed or sintered. A metal salt is placed in a solvent with Melamine and warmed until a metal-Melamine compound forms. The solution is cooled and the metal-Melamine precipitate is calcined at a temperature below 700.degree. C. to form the metal nitrides and to avoid formation of the metal oxide.

  19. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  20. Atomizing-gas temperature effect on cryogenic spray dropsize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Correlating expressions for two-phase flow breakup of liquid nitrogen, LN2, jets in sonic velocity nitrogen gasflows were obtained for an atomizing-gas temperature range of 111 to 442 K. The correlations were based on characteristic dropsize measurements obtained with a scattered-light scanner. The effect of droplet vaporization on the measurements of the volume-median dropsize was calculated by using previously determined heat and momentum transfer expressions for droplets evaporating in high-velocity gasflow. Finally, the dropsize of the originally unvaporized spray was calculated, normalized with respect to jet diameter and correlated with atomizing-gas flowrate and temperature.

  1. Pt-decorated zinc oxide nanorod arrays with graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets for highly efficient dual-functional gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailin; Fan, Huiqing; Ma, Jiangwei; Liu, Zhiyong; Ma, Longtao; Lei, Shenhui; Fang, Jiawen; Long, Changbai

    2018-01-05

    In this work, well-aligned ZnO nanorods were grown on the substrate of exfoliated g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis, and then Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures were obtained after the deposition of Pt nanoparticles. The growth of vertically ordered ZnO nanorods was occurred on g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets through the bonding interaction between Zn and N atoms, which was confirmed by XPS, FT-IR data and molecular orbital theory. The Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures sensor exhibited the remarkable sensitivity, selectivity, and fast response/recovery time for air pollutants of ethanol and NO 2 . The application of Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures could be used as a dual-functional gas sensor through the controlled working temperature. Besides, the Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures sensor could be applied to the repeating detection of ethanol and NO 2 in the natural environment. The synergistic effect and improved the separation of electron-hole pairs in Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures had been verified for the gas sensing mechanism. Additionally, Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures revealed the excellent charge carriers transport properties in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), such as the longer electron lifetime (τ n ), higher electron diffusion coefficient (D n ) and bigger effective diffusion length (L n ), which also played an important role for Pt/ZnO/g-C 3 N 4 nanostructures with striking gas sensing activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  3. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  4. Effect of substrate temperature and gas flow ratio on the nanocomposite TiAlBN coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Z. M.; Kwan, W. L.; Juoi, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Nanocomposite TiAlBN (nc-TiAlBN) coatings were successfully deposited via RF magnetron sputtering by varying the nitrogen-to-total gas flow ratio (RN), and substrate temperature (TS). All coatings were deposited on AISI 316 substrates using single Ti-Al-BN hot-pressed disc as a target. The grain size, phases, and chemical composition of the coatings were evaluated using glancing angle X-ray diffraction analysis (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that the grains size of the deposited nc-TiAlBN coatings were in the range of 3.5 to 5.7 nm and reached a nitride saturation state as early as 15 % RN. As the nitrogen concentration decreases, boron concentration increased from 9 at.% to 16.17 at.%. and thus, increase the TiB2 phase within the coatings. The TS, however, showed no significant effect either on the crystallographic structure, grain size, or in the chemical composition of the deposited nc-TiAlBN coating.

  5. Temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves in air. [radiometric measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, J. B.; Nerem, R. M.; Dann, J. B.; Culp, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometric method for the measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gases has been applied in the study of shock tube generated flows. This method involves making two absolute intensity measurements at identical wavelengths, but for two different pathlengths in the same gas sample. Experimental results are presented for reflected shock waves in air at conditions corresponding to incident shock velocities from 7 to 10 km/s and an initial driven tube pressure of 1 torr. These results indicate that, with this technique, temperature measurements with an accuracy of + or - 5 percent can be carried out. The results also suggest certain facility related problems.

  6. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphologymore » of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).« less

  7. Preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Ronnie A.; Sease, John D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel elements wherein uncarbonized fuel rods are inserted in appropriate channels of an HTGR fuel element block and the entire block is inserted in an autoclave for in situ carbonization under high pressure. The method is particularly applicable to remote handling techniques.

  8. Temperatures of dust and gas in S 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumpia, E.; Harvey, P. M.; Ossenkopf, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Mookerjea, B.; Fuente, A.; Kramer, C.

    2015-08-01

    Context. In dense parts of interstellar clouds (≥105 cm-3), dust and gas are expected to be in thermal equilibrium, being coupled via collisions. However, previous studies have shown that in the presence of intense radiation fields, the temperatures of the dust and gas may remain decoupled even at higher densities. Aims: The objective of this work is to study in detail the temperatures of dust and gas in the photon-dominated region S 140, especially around the deeply embedded infrared sources IRS 1-3 and at the ionization front. Methods: We derive the dust temperature and column density by combining Herschel-PACS continuum observations with SOFIA observations at 37 μm and SCUBA data at 450 μm. We model these observations using simple greybody fits and the DUSTY radiative transfer code. For the gas analysis we use RADEX to model the CO 1-0, CO 2-1, 13CO 1-0 and C18O 1-0 emission lines mapped with the IRAM-30 m telescope over a 4' field. Around IRS 1-3, we use HIFI observations of single-points and cuts in CO 9-8, 13CO 10-9 and C18O 9-8 to constrain the amount of warm gas, using the best fitting dust model derived with DUSTY as input to the non-local radiative transfer model RATRAN. The velocity information in the lines allows us to separate the quiescent component from outflows when deriving the gas temperature and column density. Results: We find that the gas temperature around the infrared sources varies between ~35 and ~55 K. In contrast to expectation, the gas is systematically warmer than the dust by ~5-15 K despite the high gas density. In addition we observe an increase of the gas temperature from 30-35 K in the surrounding up to 40-45 K towards the ionization front, most likely due to the UV radiation from the external star. Furthermore, detailed models of the temperature structure close to IRS 1 which take the known density gradient into account show that the gas is warmer and/or denser than what we model. Finally, modelling of the dust emission from

  9. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (of varying Al composition “x”) via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where E{sub g}(AlGaN) > E{sub g}(Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ∼1 eV in comparison to that atmore » free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si{sup 0/−1}) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/n-GaN to the valence band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.« less

  10. Miniaturized Planar Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Electrochemical Gas Sensor for Rapid Multiple Gas Pollutants Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hao; Yin, Heyu; Lin, Lu; Zeng, Xiangqun; Mason, Andrew J

    2018-02-01

    The growing impact of airborne pollutants and explosive gases on human health and occupational safety has escalated the demand of sensors to monitor hazardous gases. This paper presents a new miniaturized planar electrochemical gas sensor for rapid measurement of multiple gaseous hazards. The gas sensor features a porous polytetrafluoroethylene substrate that enables fast gas diffusion and room temperature ionic liquid as the electrolyte. Metal sputtering was utilized for platinum electrodes fabrication to enhance adhesion between the electrodes and the substrate. Together with carefully selected electrochemical methods, the miniaturized gas sensor is capable of measuring multiple gases including oxygen, methane, ozone and sulfur dioxide that are important to human health and safety. Compared to its manually-assembled Clark-cell predecessor, this sensor provides better sensitivity, linearity and repeatability, as validated for oxygen monitoring. With solid performance, fast response and miniaturized size, this sensor is promising for deployment in wearable devices for real-time point-of-exposure gas pollutant monitoring.

  11. Method to synthesize bulk iron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Todd; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Zheng, Baolong

    Bulk iron nitride can be synthesized from iron nitride powder by spark plasma sintering. The iron nitride can be spark plasma sintered at a temperature of less than 600°C. and a pressure of less than 600 MPa, with 400 MPa or less most often being sufficient. High pressure SPS can consolidate dense iron nitrides at a lower temperature to avoid decomposition. The higher pressure and lower temperature of spark discharge sintering avoids decomposition and limits grain growth, enabling enhanced magnetic properties. The method can further comprise synthesis of nanocrystalline iron nitride powders using two-step reactive milling prior to high-pressure sparkmore » discharge sintering.« less

  12. Feasibility study of silicon nitride regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rao, V. D. N.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride as a regenerator matrix material for applications requiring inlet temperatures above 1000 C is examined. The present generation oxide ceramics are used as a reference to examine silicon nitride from a material characteristics, manufacturing, thermal stress and aerothermodynamic viewpoint.

  13. Diffusive Gas Loss from Silica Glass Ampoules at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the pressure of hydrogen, helium and neon due to diffusion through the wall of silica crystal growth ampoules at elevated temperatures were determined experimentally. We show that, while both He- and Ne-losses closely follow conventional model of diffusive gas permeation through the wall, hydrogen losses, in particular at low fill pressures, can be much larger. This is interpreted in terms of the high solubility of hydrogen in silica glasses.

  14. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James William; Bayless, Paul David; Nelson, Lee Orville

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  15. Non-intrusive measurement of hot gas temperature in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    DeSilva, Upul P.; Claussen, Heiko; Yan, Michelle Xiaohong; Rosca, Justinian; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-09-27

    A method and apparatus for operating a gas turbine engine including determining a temperature of a working gas at a predetermined axial location within the engine. An acoustic signal is encoded with a distinct signature defined by a set of predetermined frequencies transmitted as a non-broadband signal. Acoustic signals are transmitted from an acoustic transmitter located at a predetermined axial location along the flow path of the gas turbine engine. A received signal is compared to one or more transmitted signals to identify a similarity of the received signal to a transmitted signal to identify a transmission time for the received signal. A time-of-flight is determined for the signal and the time-of-flight for the signal is processed to determine a temperature in a region of the predetermined axial location.

  16. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  17. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  18. The effect of surface nanocrystallization on plasma nitriding behaviour of AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Lie

    2010-11-01

    A plastic deformation surface layer with nanocrystalline grains was produced on AISI 4140 steel by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). Plasma nitriding of SMAT and un-SMAT AISI 4140 steel was carried out by a low-frequency pulse excited plasma unit. A series of nitriding experiments has been conducted at temperatures ranging from 380 to 500 °C for 8 h in an NH 3 gas. The samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The results showed that a much thicker compound layer with higher hardness was obtained for the SMAT samples when compared with un-SMAT samples after nitriding at the low temperature. In particular, plasma nitriding SMAT AISI 4140 steel at 380 °C for 8 h can produced a compound layer of 2.5 μm thickness with very high hardness on the surface, which is similar to un-SMAT samples were plasma nitrided at approximately 430 °C within the same time.

  19. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  20. Startup analysis for a high temperature gas loaded heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the rapid startup of a high-temperature gas-loaded heat pipe is presented. A two-dimensional diffusion analysis is used to determine the rate of energy transport by the vapor between the hot and cold zones of the pipe. The vapor transport rate is then incorporated in a simple thermal model of the startup of a radiation-cooled heat pipe. Numerical results for an argon-lithium system show that radial diffusion to the cold wall can produce large vapor flow rates during a rapid startup. The results also show that startup is not initiated until the vapor pressure p sub v in the hot zone reaches a precise value proportional to the initial gas pressure p sub i. Through proper choice of p sub i, startup can be delayed until p sub v is large enough to support a heat-transfer rate sufficient to overcome a thermal load on the heat pipe.

  1. High-performance gas sensors with temperature measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Shengtao; Zhang, Jingyuan; Pan, Zhigang; Min, Daomin; Li, Xin; Song, Xiaoping; Liu, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes as cathode or anode. Unfortunately, their applications are greatly limited by their multi-valued sensitivity, one output value corresponding to several measured concentration values. Here we describe a triple-electrode structure featuring two electric fields with opposite directions, which enable us to overcome the multi-valued sensitivity problem at 1 atm in a wide range of gas concentrations. We used a carbon nanotube array as the first electrode, and the two electric fields between the upper and the lower interelectrode gaps were designed to extract positive ions generated in the upper gap, hence significantly reduced positive ion bombardment on the nanotube electrode, which allowed us to maintain a high electric field near the nanotube tips, leading to a single-valued sensitivity and a long nanotube life. We have demonstrated detection of various gases and simultaneously monitoring temperature, and a potential for applications. PMID:23405281

  2. High-temperature protection of steel goods from gas corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V.V.; Porfir`eva, R.T.; Peskov, A.V.

    The feasibility of using phosphorus-containing compounds to activate the thermal diffusion impregnation of steels with aluminum was explored and substantiated by experiment. Volatile phosphorus formed from the thermal destruction of the phosphorus-containing substances and the resulting Al/P-type complexes, which provide a gas-transportation medium to take the aluminum to the article surface, were instrumental in the mechanism. The resultant thermal diffusion coatings enabled steel to be safely protected from gas corrosion at a temperature of 950{degrees}C. As a result of research on the structure of the protective layer using electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis, coatings formed using a mixture containingmore » 1 wt.% iron glycerophosphate exhibited the optimum operating characteristics.« less

  3. M.H.D. Diagnostics - Gas Temperature and Emittance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-04-06

    AD-A280 700 DTIC $ELECTE M.H.D. DIAGNOSTICS - GAS TEMPERATURE AND EMITTANCE by W. E. HILL REPORT NO. 60GL63 APRIL 6, 1960t i T i n n e iii, ic ie. n ...Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB Una;Olow;ced Justification Distribution y Availability C,.. Avail ard C.A Dist Special GENERAL* ELECTRIC _ l I SCHOWCTADY...from the Instrumen- tation viewpoint. Some of the instrumentation techniques developed $ n the allied field of combustion instrumentation can be expected

  4. High-temperature optical fiber instrumentation for gas flow monitoring in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Adrian; May, Russell G.; Pickrell, Gary R.; Wang, Anbo

    2002-02-01

    In the design and testing of gas turbine engines, real-time data about such physical variables as temperature, pressure and acoustics are of critical importance. The high temperature environment experienced in the engines makes conventional electronic sensors devices difficult to apply. Therefore, there is a need for innovative sensors that can reliably operate under the high temperature conditions and with the desirable resolution and frequency response. A fiber optic high temperature sensor system for dynamic pressure measurement is presented in this paper. This sensor is based on a new sensor technology - the self-calibrated interferometric/intensity-based (SCIIB) sensor, recently developed at Virginia Tech. State-of-the-art digital signal processing (DSP) methods are applied to process the signal from the sensor to acquire high-speed frequency response.

  5. Surface passivation of p-type Ge substrate with high-quality GeN{sub x} layer formed by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Yukio; Otani, Yohei; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2011-09-26

    We have investigated the effects of the formation temperature and postmetallization annealing (PMA) on the interface properties of GeN{sub x}/p-Ge fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The nitridation temperature is found to be a critical parameter in improving the finally obtained GeN{sub x}/Ge interface properties. The GeN{sub x}/Ge formed at room temperature and treated by PMA at 400 deg. C exhibits the best interface properties with an interface trap density of 1 x 10{sup 11 }cm{sup -2 }eV{sup -1}. The GeN{sub x}/Ge interface is unpinned and the Fermi level at the Ge surfacemore » can move from the valence band edge to the conduction band edge.« less

  6. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  7. Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa

    2002-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Majormore » features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)« less

  8. Low temperature RF plasma nitriding of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes for effective bandgap reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Thiago Scremin; Pereyra, Inés

    2018-06-01

    Titanium dioxide is a widely studied semiconductor material found in many nanostructured forms, presenting very interesting properties for several applications, particularly photocatalysis. TiO2 nanotubes have a high surface-to-volume ratio and functional electronic properties for light harvesting. Despite these manifold advantages, TiO2 photocatalytic activity is limited to UV radiation due to its large band gap. In this work, TiO2 nanotubes produced by electrochemical anodization were submitted to plasma nitriding processes in a PECVD reactor. The plasma parameters were evaluated to find the best conditions for gap reduction, in order to increase their photocatalytic activity. The pressure and RF power density were varied from 0.66 to 2.66 mbar and 0.22 to 3.51 W/cm2 respectively. The best gap reduction, to 2.80 eV, was achieved using a pressure of 1.33 mbar and 1.75 W/cm2 RF power at 320 °C, during a 2-h process. This leads to a 14% reduction in the band gap value and an increase of 25.3% in methylene blue reduction, doubling the range of solar photons absorption from 5 to 10% of the solar spectrum.

  9. Optimized Spiral Metal-Gallium-Nitride Nanowire Cavity for Ultra-High Circular Dichroism Ultraviolet Lasing at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Chun; Liao, Shu-Wei; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Hao; Chang, Shu-Wei; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Shih, Min-Hsiung

    2016-05-25

    Circularly polarized laser sources with small footprints and high efficiencies can possess advanced functionalities in optical communication and biophotonic integrated systems. However, the conventional lasers with additional circular-polarization converters are bulky and hardly compatible with nanophotonic circuits, and most active chiral plasmonic nanostructures nowadays exhibit broadband emission and low circular dichroism. In this work, with spirals of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWRs) covered by a metal layer, we demonstrated an ultrasmall semiconductor laser capable of emitting circularly-polarized photons. The left- and right-hand spiral metal nanowire cavities with varied periods were designed at ultraviolet wavelengths to achieve the high quality factor circular dichroism metastructures. The dissymmetry factors characterizing the degrees of circular polarizations of the left- and right-hand chiral lasers were 1.4 and -1.6 (±2 if perfectly circular polarized), respectively. The results show that the chiral cavities with only 5 spiral periods can achieve lasing signals with the high degrees of circular polarizations.

  10. The role of plasma chemistry on functional silicon nitride film properties deposited at low-temperature by mixing two frequency powers using PECVD.

    PubMed

    Sahu, B B; Yin, Y Y; Tsutsumi, T; Hori, M; Han, Jeon G

    2016-05-14

    Control of the plasma densities and energies of the principal plasma species is crucial to induce modification of the plasma reactivity, chemistry, and film properties. This work presents a systematic and integrated approach to the low-temperature deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films looking into optimization and control of the plasma processes. Radiofrequency (RF) and ultrahigh frequency (UHF) power are combined to enhance significantly the nitrogen plasma and atomic-radical density to enforce their effect on film properties. This study presents an extensive investigation of the influence of combining radiofrequency (RF) and ultrahigh frequency (UHF) power as a power ratio (PR = RF : UHF), ranging from 4 : 0 to 0 : 4, on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the synthesized films. The data reveal that DF power with a characteristic bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is effectively useful for enhancing the ionization and dissociation of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high rate deposition with better film properties than that of SF operations. Utilizing DF PECVD, a wide-bandgap of ∼3.5 eV with strong photoluminescence features can be achieved only by using a high-density plasma and high nitrogen atom density at room temperature. The present work also proposes the suitability of the DF PECVD approach for industrial applications.

  11. Small-scale fracture toughness of ceramic thin films: the effects of specimen geometry, ion beam notching and high temperature on chromium nitride toughness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, James P.; Zechner, Johannes; Wheeler, Jeffrey M.; Schoeppner, Rachel; Morstein, Marcus; Michler, Johann

    2016-12-01

    For the implementation of thin ceramic hard coatings into intensive application environments, the fracture toughness is a particularly important material design parameter. Characterisation of the fracture toughness of small-scale specimens has been a topic of great debate, due to size effects, plasticity, residual stress effects and the influence of ion penetration from the sample fabrication process. In this work, several different small-scale fracture toughness geometries (single-beam cantilever, double-beam cantilever and micro-pillar splitting) were compared, fabricated from a thin physical vapour-deposited ceramic film using a focused ion beam source, and then the effect of the gallium-milled notch on mode I toughness quantification investigated. It was found that notching using a focused gallium source influences small-scale toughness measurements and can lead to an overestimation of the fracture toughness values for chromium nitride (CrN) thin films. The effects of gallium ion irradiation were further studied by performing the first small-scale high-temperature toughness measurements within the scanning electron microscope, with the consequence that annealing at high temperatures allows for diffusion of the gallium to grain boundaries promoting embrittlement in small-scale CrN samples. This work highlights the sensitivity of some materials to gallium ion penetration effects, and the profound effect that it can have on fracture toughness evaluation.

  12. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S

    2016-08-08

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g(-1)) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g(-1)). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  13. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g-1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g-1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  14. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g−1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g−1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  15. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  16. Tribological and corrosion properties of plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized 42CrMo4 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmic, D.; Van Thanh, D.

    2017-02-01

    This article deals with tribological and corrosion resistance comparison of plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized 42CrMo4 steel used for breech mechanism in the armament production. Increasing of materials demands (like wear resistance, surface hardness, running-in properties and corrosion resistance) used for armament production and in other industrial application leads in the field of surface treatment. Experimental steel samples were plasma nitrided under different nitriding gas ratio at 500 °C for 15h and nitrocarburized for 45 min at temperature 590°C and consequently post-oxidized for 10 min at 430°C. Individual 42CrMo4 steel samples were subsequently metallographically evaluated and characterized by hardness and microhardness measuring. The wear test “ball on disc” was realized for measuring of adhesive wear and coefficient of friction during unlubricated sliding. NSS corrosion tests were realized for corrosion resistance evaluation and expressed by corroded area and calculated corrosion rate. The corrosion resistance evaluation is by the surface corrosion-free surfaces evaluation supplemented using the laser confocal microscopy. Due to different surface treatment and plasma nitriding conditions, there are wear resistance and corrosion resistance differences evident between the plasma nitrided steel samples as well.

  17. A charge-density-wave oscillator based on an integrated tantalum disulfide-boron nitride-graphene device operating at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanxiong; Debnath, Bishwajit; Pope, Timothy R; Salguero, Tina T; Lake, Roger K; Balandin, Alexander A

    2016-10-01

    The charge-density-wave (CDW) phase is a macroscopic quantum state consisting of a periodic modulation of the electronic charge density accompanied by a periodic distortion of the atomic lattice in quasi-1D or layered 2D metallic crystals. Several layered transition metal dichalcogenides, including 1T-TaSe 2 , 1T-TaS 2 and 1T-TiSe 2 exhibit unusually high transition temperatures to different CDW symmetry-reducing phases. These transitions can be affected by the environmental conditions, film thickness and applied electric bias. However, device applications of these intriguing systems at room temperature or their integration with other 2D materials have not been explored. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature current switching driven by a voltage-controlled phase transition between CDW states in films of 1T-TaS 2 less than 10 nm thick. We exploit the transition between the nearly commensurate and the incommensurate CDW phases, which has a transition temperature of 350 K and gives an abrupt change in current accompanied by hysteresis. An integrated graphene transistor provides a voltage-tunable, matched, low-resistance load enabling precise voltage control of the circuit. The 1T-TaS 2 film is capped with hexagonal boron nitride to provide protection from oxidation. The integration of these three disparate 2D materials in a way that exploits the unique properties of each yields a simple, miniaturized, voltage-controlled oscillator suitable for a variety of practical applications.

  18. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated natural gas fuel to determine the effect of increasing fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperatures ranged from ambient to 800 K (980 F). Combustor pressure was 6 atmospheres and the inlet air temperature ranged from 589 to 894 K (600 to 1150 F). The NOx emission index increased with fuel temperature at a rate of 4 to 9 percent per 100 K (180 F), depending on the inlet air temperature. The rate of increase in NOx was lowest at the highest inlet air temperature tested.

  19. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  20. Feasibility study of silicon nitride protection of plastic encapsulated semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, J. W.; Hall, T. C.; Erickson, J. J.; Gebhart, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of low temperature silicon nitride protective layers on wire bonded integrated circuits mounted on lead frame assemblies is reported. An evaluation of the mechanical and electrical compatibility of both plasma nitride and photochemical silicon nitride (photonitride) passivations (parallel evaluations) of integrated circuits which were then encapsulated in plastic is described. Photonitride passivation is compatible with all wire bonded lead frame assemblies, with or without initial chip passivation. Plasma nitride passivation of lead frame assemblies is possible only if the chip is passivated before lead frame assembly. The survival rate after the environmental test sequence of devices with a coating of plasma nitride on the chip and a coating of either plasma nitride or photonitride over the assembled device is significantly greater than that of devices assembled with no nitride protective coating over either chip or lead frame.

  1. Sorption J-T refrigeration utilizing manganese nitride chemisorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Lund, Alan

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium pressures and compositions have been measured for a system of finely powdered manganese nitride and nitrogen gas at 650, 700, 800, and 850 C for various nitrogen loadings. Pressures ranged from less than 0.02 MPa at 650 C to 6.38 MPa at 850 C. Analysis of the test results has shown that under certain conditions Mn(x)N(y) could potentially be used in a triple regenerative sorption compressor refrigeration system, but the potential power savings are small compared to the increased complexity and reliability problems associated with very high temperature (above 950 C) pressurized systems.

  2. Study of Solid Particle Behavior in High Temperature Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, A.; Bauder, U.; Stindl, T.; Fertig, M.; Herdrich, G.; Röser, H.-P.

    2009-01-01

    The Euler-Lagrangian approach is used for the simulation of solid particles in hypersonic entry flows. For flow field simulation, the program SINA (Sequential Iterative Non-equilibrium Algorithm) developed at the Institut für Raumfahrtsysteme is used. The model for the effect of the carrier gas on a particle includes drag force and particle heating only. Other parameters like lift Magnus force or damping torque are not taken into account so far. The reverse effect of the particle phase on the gaseous phase is currently neglected. Parametric analysis is done regarding the impact of variation in the physical input conditions like position, velocity, size and material of the particle. Convective heat fluxes onto the surface of the particle and its radiative cooling are discussed. The variation of particle temperature under different conditions is presented. The influence of various input conditions on the trajectory is explained. A semi empirical model for the particle wall interaction is also discussed and the influence of the wall on the particle trajectory with different particle conditions is presented. The heat fluxes onto the wall due to impingement of particles are also computed and compared with the heat fluxes from the gas.

  3. Chemically Adjusting Plasma Temperature, Energy and Reactivity (CAPTEAR) Method Using NOx and Combustion for Selective Synthesis of Sc3N@C80 Metallic Nitride Fullerenes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Steven; Thompson, M. Corey; Coumbe, H. Louie; Mackey, Mary A.; Coumbe, Curtis E.; Phillips, J. Paige

    2008-01-01

    Goals are (1) to selectively synthesize MNFs in lieu of empty-cage fullerenes (e.g., C60, C70) without compromising MNF yield and (2) to test our hypothesis that MNFs possess a different set of optimal formation parameters than empty-cage fullerenes. In this work, we introduce a novel approach for the selective synthesis of metallic nitride fullerenes (MNFs). This new method is “Chemically Adjusting Plasma Temperature, Energy and Reactivity” (CAPTEAR). The CAPTEAR approach with copper nitrate hydrate uses NOx vapor from NOx generating solid reagents, air and combustion to “tune” the temperature, energy and reactivity of the plasma environment. The extent of temperature, energy and reactive environment is stoichiometrically varied until optimal conditions for selective MNF synthesis are achieved. Analysis of soot extracts indicate that percentages of C60 and Sc3N@C80 are inversely related, whereas the percentages of C70 and higher empty-cage C2n fullerenes are largely unaffected. Hence, there may be a “competitive link” in the formation and mechanism of C60 and Sc3N@C80. Using this CAPTEAR method, purified MNFs (96% Sc3N@C80, 12 mg) have been obtained in soot extracts without a significant penalty in milligram yield when compared to control soot extracts (4% Sc3N@C80, 13 mg Sc3N@C80). The CAPTEAR process with Cu(NO3)2·2.5 H2O uses an exothermic nitrate moiety to suppress empty-cage fullerene formation, whereas Cu functions as a catalyst additive to offset the reactive plasma environment and boost the Sc3N@C80 MNF production. PMID:18052069

  4. Recent developments in high temperature coatings for gas turbine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of coatings for hot section airfoils has increased with the drive for more cost-effective use of fuel in a wide variety of gas turbine engines. Minor additions of silicon have been found to appreciably increase the oxidation resistance of plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings on a single crystal nickel-base superalloy. Increasing the chromium content of MCrAlY coatings substantially increases the resistance to acidic (Na2SO4-SO3) hot corrosion at temperatures of about 1300 F (704 C) but gives no significant improvement beyond contemporary coatings in the range of 1600 F (871 C). Surface enrichment of MCrAlY coatings with silicon also gives large increases in resistance to acidic hot corrosion in the 1300 F region. The resistance to the thermal stress-induced spalling of zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings has been improved by lowering coating stresses with segmented structures and by controlling the substrate temperature during coating fabrication.

  5. Multifunctional potentiometric gas sensor array with an integrated temperature control and temperature sensors

    DOEpatents

    Blackburn, Bryan M; Wachsman, Eric D

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the subject invention relate to a gas sensor and method for sensing one or more gases. An embodiment incorporates an array of sensing electrodes maintained at similar or different temperatures, such that the sensitivity and species selectivity of the device can be fine tuned between different pairs of sensing electrodes. A specific embodiment pertains to a gas sensor array for monitoring combustion exhausts and/or chemical reaction byproducts. An embodiment of the subject device related to this invention operates at high temperatures and can withstand harsh chemical environments. Embodiments of the device are made on a single substrate. The devices can also be made on individual substrates and monitored individually as if they were part of an array on a single substrate. The device can incorporate sensing electrodes in the same environment, which allows the electrodes to be coplanar and, thus, keep manufacturing costs low. Embodiments of the device can provide improvements to sensitivity, selectivity, and signal interference via surface temperature control.

  6. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' containing residual {alpha}-Fe prepared by low-temperature ammonia nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, S.; Masubuchi, Y.; Nakazawa, Y.

    2012-10-15

    Slight enhancement of saturation magnetization to 219 A m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} was observed from 199 A m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} for the original {alpha}-Fe on the intermediate nitrided mixture of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' with residual {alpha}-Fe among the low temperature ammonia nitridation products under 5 T magnetic field at room temperature. The value changed not linearly against the yield as had been expected. Crystal structure refinement indicated that the phase similar to {alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} had deviations on its lattice constants and positional parameters, compared to previously reported values for {alpha} Prime Primemore » -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}. Spin-polarized total energy calculations were performed using the projector-augmented wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) to calculate magnetic moment on the refined crystal structure of the intermediate '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}'. The calculations supported the observed magnetization enhancement in the intermediate nitridation product. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structural parameters slightly change in the intermediate nitrided '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' from those in {alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} to show the magnetization maxima in the mixture of '{alpha} Prime Prime -Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}' and the residual {alpha}-F. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Larger magnetization was observed than the value of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} on its intermediate nitrided mixture with residual {alpha}-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement was related to the crystal structural deviation from Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} on the intermediate nitride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was supported by spin-polarized total energy calculation using the deviated structure.« less

  7. Extraction of titanium from low-iron nitrided Malaysian ilmenite by chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Najwa; Ahmadi, Eltefat; Rahman, Shaik Abdul; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Rezan, Sheikh Abdul

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, production of TiCl4 from low-iron nitrided ilmenite samples at relatively low temperature using chlorine gas generated from the reaction between KMnO4 and HCl has been investigated. The effects of chlorination soaking time, potassium permanganate (KMnO4) to hydrochloric acid (HCl) molar ratio and aluminium powder catalyst in chlorine gas generation on titanium extraction from nitrided Malaysian ilmenite were examined. The low-iron nitrided Malaysian ilmenite contained titanium oxycarbonitride (TiOxCyNz) after carbothermal reduction and nitridation with subsequent leaching. Chlorination process was performed at 500°C for 30 - 60 minutes. Statistical analysis of the data was done by Design of Experiment (DOE) to identify the significant variables and their interactions. The results achieved in this study showed that the highest extent of chlorination was about 98.34% at 500°C for 60 minutes. The lowest extent of chlorination was about 68.51% obtained in KMnO4 to HCl molar ratio of 2.0 and 0.35 g of aluminium powder. The chlorinated titanium oxycarbonitride powders and TiCl4 solutions were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), respectively. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the processing parameters on extracting titanium via pyrometallurgical technique.

  8. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  9. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Transition-metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock-salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10-20 GPa. Here, we report high-pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN through an ion-exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 - 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ-MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ-MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo-N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  10. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  11. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  12. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; ...

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  13. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  14. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; Mcdaniel, Amos D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  15. Unrestrained swelling of uranium-nitride fuel irradiated at temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1400 K (1980 to 2520 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Six fuel pins were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a stainless steel (type 304L) clad. The pins were irradiated for approximately 4000 hours to burnups of about 2.0 atom percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation was about 1100 K (1980 deg R). Since stainless steel has a very low creep strength relative to that of UN at this temperature, these tests simulated unrestrained swelling of UN. The tests indicated that at 1 percent uranium atom burnup the unrestrained diametrical swelling of UN is about 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 percent at 1223, 1264, and 1306 K (2200, deg 2273 deg, and 2350 deg R), respectively. The tests also indicated that the irradiation induced swelling of unrestrained UN fuel pellets appears to be isotropic.

  16. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of gallium-nitride bulk single crystals doped with Mg and their evolution with annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Suski, T.; Piotrzkowski, R.

    Comprehensive studies of the electrical properties of Mg-doped bulk GaN crystals, grown by high-pressure synthesis, were performed as a function of temperature up to 750{degree}C. Annealing of the samples in nitrogen ambient modifies qualitatively their resistivity values {rho} and the {rho}(T) variation. It was found that our material is characterized by a high concentration of oxygen-related donors and that the charge transport in the studied samples is determined by two types of states, one of shallow character (Mg-related state, E{sub A}{approximately}0.15eV), and the second one much more deep, E{sub 2}{approximately}0.95eV (above the valence band). Depending on the effective concentration ofmore » either states, different resistivities {rho} can be observed: lower resistivity ({rho}{lt}10{sup 4}{Omega}cm at ambient temperature) in samples with dominant E{sub A} states and very high resistivity ({rho}{gt}10{sup 6}{Omega}cm at ambient temperature) in samples with dominant E{sub 2} states. For the first type of samples, annealing at T{sub ann}{lt}500{degree}C leads to a decrease of their resistivity and is associated with an increase of the effective concentration of the shallow Mg acceptors. Annealing of both types of samples at temperatures between 600 and 750{degree}C leads to an increase of the deep state concentration. The presence of hydrogen ambient during annealing of the low-resistivity samples strongly influences their properties. The increase of the sample resistivity and an appearance of a local vibrational mode of hydrogen at 3125 cm{minus}1 were observed. These effects can be removed by annealing in hydrogen-free ambient. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.« less

  17. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  18. Xenon migration behaviour in titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavarini, S.; Toulhoat, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Martin, P.; Mende, J.; Pipon, Y.; Jaffrezic, H.

    2007-05-01

    Titanium nitride is one of the inert matrixes proposed to surround the fuel in gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems. These reactors operate at high temperature and necessitate refractory materials presenting a high chemical stability and good mechanical properties. A total retention of the most volatile fission products, such as Xe, I or Cs, by the inert matrix is needed during the in pile process. The thermal migration of xenon in TiN was studied by implanting 800 keV Xe++ ions in sintered samples at an ion fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2. Annealing was performed at temperatures ranging from 1673 to 1923 K for 1 and 3 h. Xenon concentration profiles were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) using 2.5 MeV α-particles. The migration behaviour of xenon corresponds to a gas migration model. It is dominated by a surface directed transport with a slight diffusion component. The mean activation energy corresponding to the diffusion component was found to be 2.2 ± 0.3 eV and corresponds to the Brownian motion of xenon bubbles. The directed Xe migration can be interpreted in term of bubble transport using Evans model. This last process is mostly responsible for xenon release from TiN.

  19. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  20. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  1. Studies of long chain lipids in insects by high temperature gas chromatography and high temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Paul A; Wilde, Michael J; Martin, Stephen J; Cvačka, Josef; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Rowland, Steven J

    2013-07-05

    The organic compounds occurring naturally on the cuticles (surfaces) of insects are important for insect communication, help to act as protective water barriers and are useful in chemical taxonomy. Typically the cuticular lipids are only studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of hexane or pentane extracts, so the normal limitations of GC-MS makes it perhaps unsurprising that compounds with more than about 35 carbon atoms have only rarely been reported. Here we show by high temperature (HT) GC and HTGC-MS of extracts of eleven species of insects from nine genera, that longer chain compounds are actually common. Wax esters and triacylglycerides are virtually ubiquitous in such extracts, but long chain (>C35) hydrocarbons also sometimes occur. Whilst the latter have occasionally been reported previously from mass spectrometry studies, the use of the HTGC combination with MS allowed even some isobaric isomers to be separated and thus more complete lipid distributions to be monitored. Since the physical properties of cuticular compounds depend on this composition of the mixtures, such differences may influence the water loss rates of the insects, amongst other effects. In addition, the high molecular weight compound profiles may allow species to be more easily differentiated, one from another. It would be interesting to apply these methods to examination of the cuticular lipids of insects on a more routine basis, ideally in combination with MALDI-TOF-MS and imaging methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chlorination Kinetics of Titanium Nitride for Production of Titanium Tetrachloride from Nitrided Ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Rezan, Sheikh Abdul; Baharun, Norlia; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Fauzi, Ahmad; Zhang, Guangqing

    2017-10-01

    The kinetics of chlorination of titanium nitride (TiN) was investigated in the temperature range of 523 K to 673 K (250 °C to 400 °C). The results showed that the extent of chlorination slightly increased with increasing temperature and decreasing particle size of titanium nitride at constant flow rate of N2-Cl2 gas mixture. At 523 K (250 °C), the extent of chlorination was 85.6 pct in 60 minutes whereas at 673 K (400 °C), it was 97.7 pct investigated by weight loss measurement and confirmed by ICP analyses. The experimental results indicated that a shrinking unreacted core model with mixed-control mechanism governed the chlorination rate. It was observed that the surface chemical reaction of chlorine gas on the surface of TiN particles was rate controlling in the initial stage and, during later stage, internal (pore) diffusion through the intermediate product layer was rate controlling step. Overall the process follows the mixed-control model incorporating both chemical reaction and internal diffusion control. The activation energy for the chlorination of TiN was found to be about 10.97 kJ mol-1. In processing TiCl4 from TiN and TiO0.02C0.13N0.85, the solids involved in the chlorination process were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). The SEM/EDX results demonstrated the consumption of TiN particles with extent of chlorination that showed shrinking core behavior.

  3. High temperature heat exchanger studies for applications to gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, June Kee; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Kui Soon

    2009-12-01

    Growing demand for environmentally friendly aero gas-turbine engines with lower emissions and improved specific fuel consumption can be met by incorporating heat exchangers into gas turbines. Relevant researches in such areas as the design of a heat exchanger matrix, materials selection, manufacturing technology, and optimization by a variety of researchers have been reviewed in this paper. Based on results reported in previous studies, potential heat exchanger designs for an aero gas turbine recuperator, intercooler, and cooling-air cooler are suggested.

  4. Gas absorption/desorption temperature-differential engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    Continuously operating compressor system converts 90 percent of gas-turbine plant energy to electricity. Conventional plants work in batch mode, operating at 40 percent efficiency. Compressor uses metal hydride matrix on outside of rotating drum to generate working gas, hydrogen. Rolling valve seals allow continuous work. During operation, gas is absorbed, releasing heat, and desorbed with heat gain. System conserves nuclear and fossil fuels, reducing powerplant capital and operating costs.

  5. Use of a microwave diagnostics technique to measure the temperature of an axisymmetric ionized gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsel'Sov, Iu. G.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.

    1990-12-01

    A method is developed for determining the temperature of an ionized gas on the basis of electron-density sounding. This technique is used to measure the cross-sectional temperature distribution of an axisymmetric ionized gas flow using microwave diagnostics.

  6. Experimental and numerical study on plasma nitriding of AISI P20 mold steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebpashaee, N.; Vafaeenezhad, H.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding was used to fabricate a hard protective layer on AISI P20 steel, at three process temperatures (450°C, 500°C, and 550°C) and over a range of time periods (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 h), and at a fixed gas N2:H2 ratio of 75vol%:25vol%. The morphology of samples was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and the formed phase of each sample was determined by X-ray diffraction. The elemental depth profile was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and glow dispersive spectroscopy. The hardness profile of the samples was identified, and the microhardness profile from the surface to the sample center was recorded. The results show that ɛ-nitride is the dominant species after carrying out plasma nitriding in all strategies and that the plasma nitriding process improves the hardness up to more than three times. It is found that as the time and temperature of the process increase, the hardness and hardness depth of the diffusion zone considerably increase. Furthermore, artificial neural networks were used to predict the effects of operational parameters on the mechanical properties of plastic mold steel. The plasma temperature, running time of imposition, and target distance to the sample surface were all used as network inputs; Vickers hardness measurements were given as the output of the model. The model accurately reproduced the experimental outcomes under different operational conditions; therefore, it can be used in the effective simulation of the plasma nitriding process in AISI P20 steel.

  7. Plasma Assisted Ignition and Combustion at Low Initial Gas Temperatures: Development of Kinetic Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-05

    the complexity of the air flow, plasma and combustion interaction can be obtained from papers where the ignition of supersonic and fast subsonic gas ...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0083 Plasma Assisted Ignition and Combustion at Low Initial Gas Temperatures: Development of Kinetic Mechanism Svetlana...Combustion at Low Initial Gas Temperatures: Development of Kinetic Mechanism 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-13-1-4064 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT

  8. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 3; Analysis of Rotor and Blade Temperatures in Liquid-Cooled Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. Byron; Livingood, John N. B.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the radial temperature distribution through the rotor and constant cross sectional area blades near the coolant passages of liquid cooled gas turbines was made. The analysis was applied to obtain the rotor and blade temperatures of a specific turbine using a gas flow of 55 pounds per second, a coolant flow of 6.42 pounds per second, and an average coolant temperature of 200 degrees F. The effect of using kerosene, water, and ethylene glycol was determined. The effect of varying blade length and coolant passage lengths with water as the coolant was also determined. The effective gas temperature was varied from 2000 degrees to 5000 degrees F in each investigation.

  9. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  10. A low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor prepared on plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hsueh, Ting-Jen

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was prepared on plastic substrate. The operating temperature of the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was reduced to room temperature using ultraviolet illumination. The experimental results indicate a favorable sensor response at low temperature, with the best response at 60 °C. The results also reveal that the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor can be easily integrated into portable products, whose waste heat can improve sensor response and achieve energy savings, while energy consumption can be further reduced by solar irradiation.

  11. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-02-06

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  12. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  13. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  14. The effect of surfactants on epitaxial growth of gallium nitride from gas phase in the Ga-HCl-NH3-H2-Ar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilyaev, Yu. V.; Zelenin, V. V.; Orlova, T. A.; Panteleev, V. N.; Poletaev, N. K.; Rodin, S. N.; Snytkina, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied epitaxial layers of gallium nitride (GaN) in a template composition grown by surfactant-mediated hydride-chloride vapor phase epitaxy. The surfactant component was provided by 5 mass % additives of antimony and indium to the source of gallium. Comparative analysis of the obtained results shows evidence of the positive influence of surfactants on the morphology of epitaxial GaN layers.

  15. Temperature dependence of gas sensing behaviour of TiO2 doped PANI composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, S. S.; Sharma, Preetam; Sharma, Vinay; Rajura, Rajveer Singh; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    In the present work we have reported the effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of TiO2 doped PANI composite thin film based chemiresistor type gas sensors for hydrogen gas sensing application. PANI and TiO2 doped PANI composite were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline at low temperature. The electrical properties of these composite thin films were characterized by I-V measurements as function of temperature. The I-V measurement revealed that conductivity of composite thin films increased as the temperature increased. The changes in resistance of the composite thin film sensor were utilized for detection of hydrogen gas. It was observed that at room temperature TiO2 doped PANI composite sensor shows higher response value and showed unstable behavior as the temperature increased. The surface morphology of these composite thin films has also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement.

  16. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-10-09

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  17. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  18. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  19. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  20. The sensitivity of the electron transport within bulk zinc-blende gallium nitride to variations in the crystal temperature, the doping concentration, and the non-parabolicity coefficient associated with the lowest energy conduction band valley

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqua, Poppy; O'Leary, Stephen K., E-mail: stephen.oleary@ubc.ca

    2016-09-07

    Within the framework of a semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo simulation approach, we analyze the steady-state and transient electron transport that occurs within bulk zinc-blende gallium nitride. In particular, we examine how the steady-state and transient electron transport that occurs within this material changes in response to variations in the crystal temperature, the doping concentration, and the non-parabolicity coefficient associated with the lowest energy conduction band valley. These results are then contrasted with those corresponding to a number of other compound semiconductors of interest.

  1. Computed Temperature Distribution and Cooling of Solid Gas-Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, J. George; Gazley, Carl, Jr.

    1947-01-01

    Computations were made to determine the temperature distribution and cooling of solid gas-turbine blades.A range of temperatures was used from 1500 degrees to 2500 degrees F, blade-root temperatures from 100 degrees to 1000 degrees F, blade thermal conductivity from 8 to 220 BTU/(hr)(sq ft)(degrees F/ft), and net gas to metal heat transfer coefficients from 75 to 250 BTU/(hr)(sq ft)(degrees F).

  2. Crystal growth in supercritical ammonia using high surface area silicon nitride feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskel, Stefan; Khanna, Meikh; Zibrowius, Bodo; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Ullner, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The use of amorphous high surface area silicon nitride is proposed as a raw material for crystallization experiments in supercritical ammonia. Compared with earlier studies, the use of highly dispersed solids results in the crystallization of inorganic nitrides under relatively mild conditions (673 K). Mineralizers such as amides (LiNH 2, NaNH 2, KNH 2) are found to be effective crystallization aids. The crystalline products, detected using powder X-ray diffraction, are either MSi 2N 3 (M=Li, Na) or Si 2N 2NH. Si 2N 2NH is also characterized using 29Si MAS NMR. The spectrum shows a narrow line located at -44.7 ppm, whereas for amorphous silicon nitride-based materials the line is broad. The ammonothermal reaction of NaAl(NH 2) 4 and high surface area silicon nitride at 673 K affords a new orthorhombic phase, isostructural with NaSi 2N 3, but with extended lattice constants ( a=9.634, b=5.643, c=5.011 Å). Effective crystallization is also achieved using fluoride mineralizers (KF, CsF) at 673 K. A new small scale autoclave, suitable for laboratory syntheses at temperatures up to 873 K, is presented that can be loaded under inert gas.

  3. Cellulose nanobiocomposites with reinforcement of boron nitride: study of thermal, oxygen barrier and chemical resistant properties.

    PubMed

    Swain, Sarat K; Dash, Satyabrata; Behera, Chandini; Kisku, Sudhir K; Behera, Lingaraj

    2013-06-20

    A series of cellulose based nanobiocomposites (cellulose/BN) were prepared with incorporation of various percentage of nano boron nitride (BN). The interaction between cellulose and boron nitride was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of cellulose/BN nanobiocomposites was investigated by XRD, FESEM, and HRTEM. It was observed that the boron nitride nanoparticles were dispersed within cellulose matrix due to intercalation and partial exfoliation. The quantitative identification of nanobiocomposites was investigated by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Thermal stabilities of the prepared nanobiocomposites were measured by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and it was found that thermal stability of the nanobiocomposites was higher than the virgin cellulose. The oxygen barrier property of cellulose/BN nanobiocomposites was measured using a gas permeameter and a substantial reduction in oxygen permeability due to increase in boron nitride loading was observed. Further it was noticed that the chemical resistance of the nanobiocomposites was more than the virgin cellulose. Hence, the prepared nanobiocomposite may be widely used for insulating and temperature resistant packaging materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Device For Determining Therophysical Properties Of A Multi-Component Gas At Arbitrary Temperature And Pressure

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2005-02-01

    A computer product for determining thermodynamic properties of a natural gas hydrocarbon, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. Thus, the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for mass flow calculations, to determine the speed of sound at standard pressure and temperature, and to determine various thermophysical characteristics of the gas.

  5. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  6. 2D molybdenum and vanadium nitrides synthesized by ammoniation of 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    DOE PAGES

    Urbankowski, Patrick; Anasori, Babak; Hantanasirisakul, Kanit; ...

    2017-11-08

    MXenes are a rapidly growing class of 2D transition metal carbides and nitrides, finding applications in fields ranging from energy storage to electromagnetic interference shielding and transparent conductive coatings. However, while more than 20 carbide MXenes have already been synthesized, Ti 4N 3 and Ti 2N are the only nitride MXenes reported so far. Here by ammoniation of Mo 2CT x and V 2CT x MXenes at 600 °C, we report on their transformation to 2D metal nitrides. Carbon atoms in the precursor MXenes are replaced with N atoms, resulting from the decomposition of ammonia molecules. The crystal structures ofmore » the resulting Mo 2N and V 2N were determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. Our results indicate that Mo 2N retains the MXene structure and V 2C transforms to a mixed layered structure of trigonal V 2N and cubic VN. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements of the nitrides reveal that they exhibit metallic conductivity, as opposed to semiconductor-like behavior of their parent carbides. As important, room-temperature electrical conductivity values of Mo2N and V2N are three and one order of magnitude larger than those of the Mo 2CT x and V 2CT x precursors, respectively. In conclusion, this study shows how gas treatment synthesis such as ammoniation can transform carbide MXenes into 2D nitrides with higher electrical conductivities and metallic behavior, opening a new avenue in 2D materials synthesis.« less

  7. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, James M.; Lepetre, Yves J.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  8. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  9. Microstructure and antibacterial properties of microwave plasma nitrided layers on biomedical stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Chung; Wu, Ching-Zong; Hung, Jing-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-06-01

    Nitriding of AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave plasma system at various temperatures was conducted in the present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The antibacterial properties of this nitrided layer were evaluated. During nitriding treatment between 350 °C and 550 °C, the phase transformation sequence on the nitrided layers of the alloys was found to be γ → (γ + γ N) → (γ + α + CrN). The analytical results revealed that the surface hardness of AISI 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with the formation of γ N phase in nitriding process. Antibacterial test also demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent antibacterial properties. The enhanced surface hardness and antibacterial properties make the nitrided AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel to be one of the essential materials in the biomedical applications.

  10. Multi-spectral pyrometer for gas turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi

    2014-09-01

    To achieve the highest possible turbine inlet temperature requires to accurately measuring the turbine blade temperature. If the temperature of blade frequent beyond the design limits, it will seriously reduce the service life. The problem for the accuracy of the temperature measurement includes the value of the target surface emissivity is unknown and the emissivity model is variability and the thermal radiation of the high temperature environment. In this paper, the multi-spectral pyrometer is designed provided mainly for range 500-1000°, and present a model corrected in terms of the error due to the reflected radiation only base on the turbine geometry and the physical properties of the material. Under different working conditions, the method can reduce the measurement error from the reflect radiation of vanes, make measurement closer to the actual temperature of the blade and calculating the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment shows that this method has higher accuracy measurements.

  11. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  12. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  13. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso

    2016-02-01

    Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si3N4 layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si3N4 layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  14. Thermal Improvement and Stability of Si3N4/GeNx/p- and n-Ge Structures Prepared by Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma Nitridation and Sputtering at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takuro; Izumi, Kohei; Otani, Yohei; Ishizaki, Hiroki; Ono, Toshiro

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on the thermal improvement of Si3N4/GeNx/Ge structures. After the Si3N4 (5 nm)/GeNx (2 nm) stacks were prepared on Ge substrates by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation and sputtering at room temperature, they were thermally annealed in atmospheric N2 + 10% H2 ambient at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. It was demonstrated that the electronic properties of the GeNx/Ge interfaces were thermally improved at temperatures of up to 500 °C with a minimum interface trap density (Dit) of ˜1×1011 cm-2 eV-1 near the Ge midgap, whereas the interface properties were slightly degraded after annealing at 600 °C with a minimum Dit value of ˜4×1011 cm-2 eV-1.

  15. Thermal conversion of an iron nitride-silicon nitride precursor into a ferromagnetic nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, L.; Thompson, J. R.; Song, K. J.; Warmack, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Iron nitride films, FeN, in a pure form and in the form of a nanocomposite in silicon nitride were prepared by reactive sputtering using iron or iron disilicide, respectively, as targets in a nitrogen plasma. Iron nitride decomposes into the elements by heating in vacuum to 800 °C. Intermediate phases such as Fe2N or Fe4N form at lower temperatures. The nanocomposites contain the iron phases as particles with an average size of ˜5 nm dispersed in the amorphous silicon nitride matrix. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposites were established. The precursor FeN-Si3N4 film is paramagnetic, while the Fe-Si3N4, obtained by heating in vacuum, is ferromagnetic and shows typical superparamagnetic behavior. These films are of interest as recording media with superior chemical and mechanical stability and may be encoded by localized heating.

  16. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  17. High temperature, low expansion, corrosion resistant ceramic and gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Rauch, Sr., Harry W.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to ZrO.sub.2 -MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 ceramic materials having improved thermal stability and corrosion resistant properties. The utilization of these ceramic materials as heat exchangers for gas turbine engines is also disclosed.

  18. Efficient removal of UDMH from dilute nitride MOCVD exhaust streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahle, Jörg; Czerniak, Mike; Seeley, Andy; Baker, Derek

    2004-12-01

    Unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH) (CH 3) 2N 2H 2 is often used in the deposition of dilute nitride semiconductors because it provides a source of nitrogen with a low thermal decomposition temperature (Temperature-dependent carrier lifetime in GaNAs using resonant-coupled photoconductive decay, NCPV Program Review Meeting, Lakewood, Colorado, 14-17 October, 2001). The problems with using this material, however, are its significant toxicity (0.01 ppm compared to ammonia's 25 ppm) and also the fact that it blocks the action of conventional dosed wet scrubbers sometimes used on nitride applications, resulting in diminished efficiency in removing arsine (the source of arsenic), and arsine being similarly toxic (TLV of 0.05 ppm). Efficient removal of UDMH, AsH 3 and hydrogen (which, though not toxic poses a potential safety hazard) by means of a combined thermal oxidation reaction and wet scrubber in series is described at input gas flow rates exceeding those typically encountered in practice. The detection technique employed was Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), and the calibration and resolution techniques will be described. For input UDMH flows of up to 445 sccm (i.e. 1.85×10 -2 mol/min), destructive reaction efficiencies (DREs) of >99.9% were demonstrated, corresponding to the background detection resolution of 0.4 ppm.

  19. Crack healing behavior of hot pressed silicon nitride due to oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Tikare, V.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that limited oxidation of an MgO-containing, hot-pressed silicon nitride ceramic at 800 deg C and above results in increased strength due to crack healing. Slight oxidation of the surface produces enstatite and cristobalite which fills in cracks. More extensive oxidation leads to strength degradation due to the formation of new flaws by the evolution of N2 gas at the surface. The apparent fracture toughness also increased at 800 deg C and above due to oxidation. Bonds formed between the two surfaces of the crack during oxidation leads to a reduction in stress intensity at the crack tip, suggesting that valid high-temperature toughness values cannot be obtained in an air environment. The increase in strength due to crack healing by oxidation can be achieved without compromising the fatigue properties of the silicon nitride ceramic.

  20. Development of a coolant channel helium and nitrogen gas ratio sensor for a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cadell, S. R.; Woods, B. G.

    2012-07-01

    To measure the changing gas composition of the coolant during a postulated High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) accident, an instrument is needed. This instrument must be compact enough to measure the ratio of the coolant versus the break gas in an individual coolant channel. This instrument must minimally impact the fluid flow and provide for non-direct signal routing to allow minimal disturbance to adjacent channels. The instrument must have a flexible geometry to allow for the measurement of larger volumes such as in the upper or lower plenum of a HTGR. The instrument must be capable of accurately functioning throughmore » the full operating temperature and pressure of a HTGR. This instrument is not commercially available, but a literature survey has shown that building off of the present work on Capacitance Sensors and Cross-Capacitors will provide a basis for the development of the desired instrument. One difficulty in developing and instrument to operate at HTGR temperatures is acquiring an electrical conductor that will not melt at 1600 deg. C. This requirement limits the material selection to high temperature ceramics, graphite, and exotic metals. An additional concern for the instrument is properly accounting for the thermal expansion of both the sensing components and the gas being measured. This work covers the basic instrument overview with a thorough discussion of the associated uncertainty in making these measurements. (authors)« less

  1. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  2. Effect of pairwise additivity on finite-temperature behavior of classical ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekaari, Ashkan; Jafari, Mahmoud

    2018-05-01

    Finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to inquire into the effect of pairwise additivity on the behavior of classical ideal gas within the temperature range of T = 250-4000 K via applying a variety of pair potentials and then examining the temperature dependence of a number of thermodynamical properties. Examining the compressibility factor reveals the most deviation from ideal-gas behavior for the Lennard-Jones system mainly due to the presence of both the attractive and repulsive terms. The systems with either attractive or repulsive intermolecular potentials are found to present no resemblance to real gases, but the most similarity to the ideal one as temperature rises.

  3. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  4. Effect of Temperature Shock and Inventory Surprises on Natural Gas and Heating Oil Futures Returns

    PubMed Central

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station. PMID:25133233

  5. Effect of temperature shock and inventory surprises on natural gas and heating oil futures returns.

    PubMed

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Hu, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station.

  6. Plasma Assisted Ignition and Combustion at Low Initial Gas Temperatures: Development of Kinetic Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-05

    describes physics of a nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) at ambient gas temperature and high pressures (1-6 bar) in air. Details about...the ignition by a nanosecond discharge. Chapter 7 presents the high pressure high temperature reactor built recently at Laboratory for Plasma Physics ...livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll Laboratory for Physics of Plasma, Ecole Polytechnique Plasma Assisted Ignition and Combustion at Low Initial Gas

  7. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Abraini, Jacques H; David, Hélène N; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances - gases, metals, rubbers, etc . - is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  8. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat

    PubMed Central

    Abraini, Jacques H.; David, Hélène N.; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances – gases, metals, rubbers, etc. – is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature. PMID:29152210

  9. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  10. Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures in a research engine for gas stream temperatures cycling between 1067 and 1567 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled blades in a research turbojet engine, cycling between cruise and idle conditions. Transient data were recorded by a high speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 3.9 K (7 F). Turbine inlet pressures were repeatable between cycles to within 0.32 N/sq cm (0.47 psia). The tests were conducted at a gas stream temperature of 1567 K (2360 F) at cruise, and 1067 K (1460 F) at idle conditions. The corresponding gas stream pressures were about 26.2 and 22.4 N/sq cm (38 and 32.5 psia) respectively. The nominal coolant inlet temperature was about 811 K (1000 F).

  11. Effect of processing parameters on reaction bonding of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, M. H.; Gregory, O. J.; Magida, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reaction bonded silicon nitride was developed. The relationship between the various processing parameters and the resulting microstructures was to design and synthesize reaction bonded materials with improved room temperature mechanical properties.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Cermet Turbine Stator Blades for Use at Elevated Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiarito, Patrick T.; Johnston, James R.

    1959-01-01

    The suitability of cermets for turbine stator blades of a modified turbojet engine was determined at an average turbine-inlet-gas temperature of 2000 F. Such an increase in temperature would yield a premium in thrust from a service engine. Because the cermet blades require no cooling, all the available compressor bleed air could be used to cool a turbine made from conventional ductile alloys. Cermet blades were first run in 100-hour endurance tests at normal gas temperatures in order to evaluate two methods for mounting them. The elevated gas-temperature test was then run using the method of support considered best for high-temperature operation. After 52 hours at 2000 F, one of the group of four cermet blades fractured probably because of end loads resulting from thermal distortion of the spacer band of the nozzle diaphragm. Improved design of a service engine would preclude this cause of premature failure.

  13. Selective Sensing of Gas Mixture via a Temperature Modulation Approach: New Strategy for Potentiometric Gas Sensor Obtaining Satisfactory Discriminating Features.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-An; Jin, Han; Wang, Jinxia; Zou, Jie; Jian, Jiawen

    2017-03-12

    A new strategy to discriminate four types of hazardous gases is proposed in this research. Through modulating the operating temperature and the processing response signal with a pattern recognition algorithm, a gas sensor consisting of a single sensing electrode, i.e., ZnO/In₂O₃ composite, is designed to differentiate NO₂, NH₃, C₃H₆, CO within the level of 50-400 ppm. Results indicate that with adding 15 wt.% ZnO to In₂O₃, the sensor fabricated at 900 °C shows optimal sensing characteristics in detecting all the studied gases. Moreover, with the aid of the principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm, the sensor operating in the temperature modulation mode demonstrates acceptable discrimination features. The satisfactory discrimination features disclose the future that it is possible to differentiate gas mixture efficiently through operating a single electrode sensor at temperature modulation mode.

  14. Selective Sensing of Gas Mixture via a Temperature Modulation Approach: New Strategy for Potentiometric Gas Sensor Obtaining Satisfactory Discriminating Features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fu-an; Jin, Han; Wang, Jinxia; Zou, Jie; Jian, Jiawen

    2017-01-01

    A new strategy to discriminate four types of hazardous gases is proposed in this research. Through modulating the operating temperature and the processing response signal with a pattern recognition algorithm, a gas sensor consisting of a single sensing electrode, i.e., ZnO/In2O3 composite, is designed to differentiate NO2, NH3, C3H6, CO within the level of 50–400 ppm. Results indicate that with adding 15 wt.% ZnO to In2O3, the sensor fabricated at 900 °C shows optimal sensing characteristics in detecting all the studied gases. Moreover, with the aid of the principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm, the sensor operating in the temperature modulation mode demonstrates acceptable discrimination features. The satisfactory discrimination features disclose the future that it is possible to differentiate gas mixture efficiently through operating a single electrode sensor at temperature modulation mode. PMID:28287492

  15. Kinetic Energy of a Trapped Fermi Gas at Finite Temperature.

    PubMed

    Grela, Jacek; Majumdar, Satya N; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-09-29

    We study the statistics of the kinetic (or, equivalently, potential) energy for N noninteracting fermions in a 1d harmonic trap of frequency ω at finite temperature T. Remarkably, we find an exact solution for the full distribution of the kinetic energy, at any temperature T and for any N, using a nontrivial mapping to an integrable Calogero-Moser-Sutherland model. As a function of temperature T and for large N, we identify (i) a quantum regime, for T∼ℏω, where quantum fluctuations dominate and (ii) a thermal regime, for T∼Nℏω, governed by thermal fluctuations. We show how the mean and the variance as well as the large deviation function associated with the distribution of the kinetic energy cross over from the quantum to the thermal regime as T increases.

  16. Kinetic Energy of a Trapped Fermi Gas at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grela, Jacek; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-09-01

    We study the statistics of the kinetic (or, equivalently, potential) energy for N noninteracting fermions in a 1 d harmonic trap of frequency ω at finite temperature T . Remarkably, we find an exact solution for the full distribution of the kinetic energy, at any temperature T and for any N , using a nontrivial mapping to an integrable Calogero-Moser-Sutherland model. As a function of temperature T and for large N , we identify (i) a quantum regime, for T ˜ℏω , where quantum fluctuations dominate and (ii) a thermal regime, for T ˜N ℏω , governed by thermal fluctuations. We show how the mean and the variance as well as the large deviation function associated with the distribution of the kinetic energy cross over from the quantum to the thermal regime as T increases.

  17. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Huffsmith, Sarah A.

    1981-01-01

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi.sub.2 indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi.sub.2 with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400.degree. C.; and, simultaneously with the heating, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  18. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Huffsmith, S.A.

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite are described. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi/sub 2/ indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi/sub 2/ with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400/sup 0/C; and, simultaneously, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  19. Passive Gas-Gap Heat Switches for Use in Low-Temperature Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, M. O.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; Tuttle, J. G.; Jahromi, A. E.; Dipirro, M. J.; James, B. L.; Sampson, M. A.; Letmate, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the current state of development in passive gas-gap heat switches. This type of switch does not require a separate heater to activate heat transfer but, instead, relies upon the warming of one end due to an intrinsic step in a thermodynamic cycle to raise a getter above a threshold temperature. Above this temperature sequestered gas is released to couple both sides of the switch. This enhances the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and reduces the complexity of the control system. Various gas mixtures and getter configurations will be presented.

  20. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-02-24

    The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100[degrees]C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5] times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

  1. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Elliott, Amy M.

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to anmore » azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.« less

  3. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  4. Interface trap and oxide charge generation under negative bias temperature instability of p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with ultrathin plasma-nitrided SiON gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shiyang; Nakajima, Anri; Ohashi, Takuo

    2005-12-01

    The interface trap generation ({delta}N{sub it}) and fixed oxide charge buildup ({delta}N{sub ot}) under negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) of p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (pMOSFETs) with ultrathin (2 nm) plasma-nitrided SiON gate dielectrics were studied using a modified direct-current-current-voltage method and a conventional subthreshold characteristic measurement. Different stress time dependences were shown for {delta}N{sub it} and {delta}N{sub ot}. At the earlier stress times, {delta}N{sub it} dominates the threshold voltage shift ({delta}V{sub th}) and {delta}N{sub ot} is negligible. With increasing stress time, the rate of increase of {delta}N{sub it} decreases continuously, showing a saturating trend for longer stress times, while {delta}N{submore » ot} still has a power-law dependence on stress time so that the relative contribution of {delta}N{sub ot} increases. The thermal activation energy of {delta}N{sub it} and the NBTI lifetime of pMOSFETs, compared at a given stress voltage, are independent of the peak nitrogen concentration of the SiON film. This indicates that plasma nitridation is a more reliable method for incorporating nitrogen in the gate oxide.« less

  5. Variable-temperature cryogenic trap for the separation of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a continuous variable-temperature U-shaped cold trap which can both purify vacuum-line combustion products for subsequent stable isotopic analysis and isolate the methane and ethane constituents of natural gases. The canister containing the trap is submerged in liquid nitrogen, and, as the gas cools, the gas mixture components condense sequentially according to their relative vapor pressures. After the about 12 min required for the bottom of the trap to reach the liquid-nitrogen temperature, passage of electric current through the resistance wire wrapped around the tubing covering the U-trap permits distillation of successive gas components at optimal temperatures. Data on the separation achieved for two mixtures, the first being typical vacuum-line combustion products of geochemical samples such as rocks and the second being natural gas, are presented, and the thermal behavior and power consumption are reported.

  6. Calculation of the critical temperature of a dilute Bose gas in the Bogoliubov approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiórkowski, M.; Reuvers, R.; Solovej, J. P.

    2018-01-01

    Following an earlier calculation in 3D, we calculate the 2D critical temperature of a dilute, translation-invariant Bose gas using a variational formulation of the Bogoliubov approximation introduced by Critchley and Solomon in 1976. This provides the first analytical calculation of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature that includes the constant in the logarithm.

  7. Effects of Outside Air Temperature on Movement of Phosphine Gas in Concrete Elevator Bins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies that measured the movement and concentration of phosphine gas in upright concrete bins over time indicated that fumigant movement was dictated by air currents, which in turn, were a function of the difference between the average grain temperature and the average outside air temperature durin...

  8. Development of a tunable diode laser sensor for measurements of gas turbine exhaust temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.; Hinckley, K. M.; Woodmansee, M. A.

    2006-03-01

    A tunable diode laser (TDL) temperature sensor is designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated in the exhaust of an industrial gas turbine. Temperature is determined from the ratio of the measured absorbance of two water vapor overtone transitions in the near infrared where telecommunication diode lasers are available. Design rules are developed to select the optimal pair of transitions for direct absorption measurements using spectral simulations by systematically examining the absorption strength, spectral isolation, and temperature sensitivity to maximize temperature accuracy in the core flow and minimize sensitivity to water vapor in the cold boundary layer. The contribution to temperature uncertainty from the spectroscopic database is evaluated and precise line-strength data are measured for the selected transitions. Gas-temperature measurements in a heated cell are used to verify the sensor accuracy (over the temperature range of 350 to 1000 K, ΔT˜2 K for the optimal line pair and ΔT˜5 K for an alternative line pair). Field measurements of exhaust-gas temperature in an industrial gas turbine demonstrate the practical utility of TDL sensing in harsh industrial environments.

  9. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  10. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A., E-mail: amelia.greig@anu.edu.au; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are highermore » than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.« less

  11. Structure refinement for tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lianyun; School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shang Yuan Cun, Haidian District, Beijing 100044; Huang, Kai

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various phases and morphologies for the first time have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. Highlights: ► The spherical TaN, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. ► The crystal structures of different tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement on the X-ray diffraction data and the examinations of electron microcopies. ► The specific surface area of the tantalum nitrides powders was around 10 m{supmore » 2} g{sup −1}. ► Tantalum nitrides powders could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitrides (TaN{sub x}) nanocrystals with different phase and morphology have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. The crystal structures of tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement based on the X-ray diffraction data. The morphologies of various tantalum nitrides nanocrystals in high quality were analyzed through the electron microcopies examinations. The spherical TaN nanoparticles, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been selectively prepared at different annealing temperatures. In addition, the specific surface areas of the tantalum nitrides nanocrystals measured by BET method were around 9.87–11.64 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, indicating that such nano-sized tantalum nitrides could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance.« less

  12. Activation energy for diamond growth from the carbon-hydrogen gas system at low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiegler, J.; Lang, T.; von Kaenel, Y.; Michler, J.; Blank, E.

    1997-01-01

    The growth kinetics of diamond films deposited at low substrate temperatures (600-400 °C) from the carbon-hydrogen gas system have been studied. When the substrate temperature alone was varied, independently of all other process parameters in the microwave plasma reactor, an activation energy in the order of 7 kcal/mol was observed. This value did not change with different carbon concentrations in hydrogen. It is supposed that growth kinetics in this temperature range are controlled by a single chemical reaction, probably the abstraction of surface bonded hydrogen by gas phase atomic hydrogen.

  13. Thermal barrier coating on high temperature industrial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N.; Stoner, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal barrier coating used was a yttria stabilized zirconia material with a NiCrAlY undercoat, and the base engine used to establish improvements was the P&WA FT50A-4 industrial gas turbine engine. The design benefits of thermal barrier coatings include simplified cooling schemes and the use of conventional alloys in the engine hot section. Cooling flow reductions and improved heating rates achieved with thermal barrier coating result in improved performance. Economic benefits include reduced power production costs and reduced fuel consumption. Over the 30,000 hour life of the thermal barrier coated parts, fuel savings equivalent to $5 million are projected and specific power (megawatts/mass of engine airflow) improvements on the order of 13% are estimated.

  14. In-situ study of the gas-phase composition and temperature of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode surface fed by reformate natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.; Silva Mosqueda, D. M.; Pumiglia, D.; Viceconti, E.; Conti, B.; Boigues Muñoz, C.; Bosio, B.; Ulgiati, S.; McPhail, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    An innovative experimental setup is used for in-depth and in-operando characterization of solid oxide fuel cell anodic processes. This work focuses on the heterogeneous reactions taking place on a 121 cm2 anode-supported cell (ASC) running with a H2, CH4, CO2, CO and steam gas mixture as a fuel, using an operating temperature of 923 K. The results have been obtained by analyzing the gas composition and temperature profiles along the anode surface in different conditions: open circuit voltage (OCV) and under two different current densities, 165 mA cm-2 and 330 mA cm-2, corresponding to 27% and 54% of fuel utilization, respectively. The gas composition and temperature analysis results are consistent, allowing to monitor the evolution of the principal chemical and electrochemical reactions along the anode surface. A possible competition between CO2 and H2O in methane internal reforming is shown under OCV condition and low current density values, leading to two different types of methane reforming: Steam Reforming and Dry Reforming. Under a current load of 40 A, the dominance of exothermic reactions leads to a more marked increase of temperature in the portion of the cell close to the inlet revealing that current density is not uniform along the anode surface.

  15. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  16. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  17. Iodine isothermal migration behaviour in titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavarini, S.; Jaffrezic, H.; Martin, P.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Cardinal, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Pichon, C.; Tribet, M.

    2008-02-01

    Titanium nitride is one of the inert matrixes proposed to surround the fuel in gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems. These reactors will operate at high temperature and refractory materials with a high chemical stability and good mechanical properties are required. Furthermore, a total retention of the most volatile fission products, such as I, Xe or Cs, by the inert matrix is needed during the in-pile process. The isothermal migration of iodine in TiN was studied by implanting 800 keV I ++ ions in sintered samples at an ion fluence of 5 × 10 15 cm -2. Thermal treatments were performed under secondary vacuum at temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1700 °C. Iodine concentration profiles were determined by 2.5 MeV α-particle elastic backscattering. The migration of iodine seems to be correlated with point defects created by implanted ions near the surface. The Arrhenius plot corresponding to iodine detrapping is curved with possibly two straight-line regions which could indicate either the presence of two types of traps, or a strong dependence of trap's concentration on temperature above 1500 °C. The activation energies associated with each linear region of the Arrhenius plot were found to be: Ea = 2.4 ± 0.2 eV below 1500 °C and E=11.4±0.2 eV above 1500 °C. Nitrogen evaporation from TiN surface under secondary vacuum was proposed as a contributing factor to the enhanced mobility of iodine at high temperature.

  18. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstratemore » such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.« less

  19. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  20. Development of micro-heaters with optimized temperature compensation design for gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woo-Jin; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Roh, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Dae-Sung; Choa, Sung-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    One of the key components of a chemical gas sensor is a MEMS micro-heater. Micro-heaters are used in both semiconductor gas sensors and NDIR gas sensors; however they each require different heat dissipation characteristics. For the semiconductor gas sensors, a uniform temperature is required over a wide area of the heater. On the other hand, for the NDIR gas sensor, the micro-heater needs high levels of infrared radiation in order to increase sensitivity. In this study, a novel design of a poly-Si micro-heater is proposed to improve the uniformity of heat dissipation on the heating plate. Temperature uniformity of the micro-heater is achieved by compensating for the variation in power consumption around the perimeter of the heater. With the power compensated design, the uniform heating area is increased by 2.5 times and the average temperature goes up by 40 °C. Therefore, this power compensated micro-heater design is suitable for a semiconductor gas sensor. Meanwhile, the poly-Si micro-heater without compensation shows a higher level of infrared radiation under equal power consumption conditions. This indicates that the micro-heater without compensation is more suitable for a NDIR gas sensor. Furthermore, the micro-heater shows a short response time of less than 20 ms, indicating a very high efficiency of pulse driving.

  1. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (< 10 mTorr) radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (< 1 kW), the molecular hydrogen temperature was observed to be linearly proportional to the pressure while the atomic hydrogen temperature was inversely proportional. Both temperatures were observed to rise linearly with input power. For high power operation (5-20 kW), the molecular temperature was found to rise with both power and pressure up to a maximum of approximately 1200 K. Spatially resolved measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  2. Temperature distributions and thermal stresses in a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.; Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed for improved engine performance was studied. Transient temperature and stress profiles in a test seal geometry were determined by numerical analysis. During a simulated engine deceleration cycle from sea-level takeoff to idle conditions, the maximum seal temperature occurred below the seal surface, therefore the top layer of the seal was probably subjected to tensile stresses exceeding the modulus of rupture. In the stress analysis both two- and three-dimensional finite element computer programs were used. Predicted trends of the simpler and more easily usable two-dimensional element programs were borne out by the three-dimensional finite element program results.

  3. Estimates of in situ gas hydrate concentration from resistivity monitoring of gas hydrate bearing sediments during temperature equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, M.; Long, P.E.; Collett, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 at southern Hydrate Ridge off Oregon we have monitored changes in sediment electrical resistivity during controlled gas hydrate dissociation experiments. Two cores were used, each filled with gas hydrate bearing sediments (predominantly mud/silty mud). One core was from Site 1249 (1249F-9H3), 42.1 m below seafloor (mbsf) and the other from Site 1248 (1248C-4X1), 28.8 mbsf. At Site 1247, a third experiment was conducted on a core without gas hydrate (1247B-2H1, 3.6 mbsf). First, the cores were imaged using an infra-red (IR) camera upon recovery to map the gas hydrate occurrence through dissociation cooling. Over a period of several hours, successive runs on the multi-sensor track (includes sensors for P-wave velocity, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and gamma-ray density) were carried out complemented by X-ray imaging on core 1249F-9H3. After complete equilibration to room temperature (17-18??C) and complete gas hydrate dissociation, the final measurement of electrical resistivity was used to calculate pore-water resistivity and salinities. The calculated pore-water freshening after dissociation is equivalent to a gas hydrate concentration in situ of 35-70% along core 1249F-9H3 and 20-35% for core 1248C-4X1 assuming seawater salinity of in situ pore fluid. Detailed analysis of the IR scan, X-ray images and split-core photographs showed the hydrate mainly occurred disseminated throughout the core. Additionally, in core 1249F-9H3, a single hydrate filled vein, approximately 10 cm long and dipping at about 65??, was identified. Analyses of the logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity data revealed a structural dip of 40-80?? in the interval between 40 and 44 mbsf. We further analyzed all resistivity data measured on the recovered core during Leg 204. Generally poor data quality due to gas cracks allowed analyses to be carried out only at selected intervals at Sites 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, and 1252. With a few

  4. Gas-liquid interface of room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cherry S; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-06-01

    The organization of ions at the interface of ionic liquids and the vacuum is an ideal system to test new ideas and concepts on the interfacial chemistry of electrolyte systems in the limit of no solvent medium. Whilst electrolyte systems have numerous theoretical and experimental methods used to investigate their properties, the ionic liquids are relatively new and our understanding of the interfacial properties is just beginning to be explored. In this critical review, the gas-liquid interface is reviewed, as this interface does not depend on the preparation of another medium and thus produces a natural interface. The interface has been investigated by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ultra-high vacuum techniques. The results provide a detailed molecular-level view of the surface composition and structure. These have been complemented by theoretical studies. The combinations of treatments on this interface are starting to provide a somewhat convergent description of how the ions are organized at this neat interface (108 references).

  5. Acoustic and microwave tests in a cylindrical cavity for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Feng, X.J.; Gillis, K.; Moldover, M.; Zhang, J.T.; Lin, H.; Qu, J.F.; Duan, Y.N.

    2016-01-01

    Relative primary acoustic gas thermometry determines the ratios of thermodynamic temperatures from measured ratios of acoustic and microwave resonance frequencies in a gas-filled metal cavity on isotherms of interest. When measured in a cavity with known dimensions, the frequencies of acoustic resonances in a gas determine the speed of sound, which is a known function of the thermodynamic temperature T. Changes in the dimensions of the cavity are measured using the frequencies of the cavity's microwave resonances. We explored techniques and materials for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperatures using a cylindrical cavity with remote acoustic transducers. We used gas-filled ducts as acoustic waveguides to transmit sound between the cavity at high temperatures and the acoustic transducers at room temperature. We measured non-degenerate acoustic modes in a cylindrical cavity in the range 295 K < T < 797 K. The fractional uncertainty of the measured acoustic frequencies increased from 2×10−6 at 295 K to 5×10−6 at 797 K. In addition, we measured the frequencies of several transverse magnetic (TM) microwave resonances up to 1000 K in order to track changes in the cavity's length L and radius R. The fractional standard deviation of the values of L deduced from three TM modes increased from 3×10−6 for T < 600 K to 57×10−6 at 1000 K. We observed similar inconsistencies in a previous study. PMID:26903106

  6. Effect of cathode cooling efficiency and oxygen plasma gas pressure on the hafnium cathode wall temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Koustubh; Diehl, Gregory; Hamer, John

    2012-10-01

    The hafnium cathode is widely used in DC plasma arc cutting (PAC) under an oxygen gas environment to cut iron and iron alloys. The hafnium erosion is always a concern which is controlled by the surface temperature. In this study, the effect of cathode cooling efficiency and oxygen gas pressure on the hafnium surface temperature are quantified. The two layer cathode sheath model is applied on the refractive hafnium surface while oxygen species (O2, O, O+, O++, e-) are considered within the thermal dis-equilibrium regime. The system of non-linear equations comprising of current density balance, heat flux balance at both the cathode surface and the sheath-ionization layer is coupled with the plasma gas composition solver. Using cooling heat flux, gas pressure and current density as inputs; the cathode wall temperature, electron temperature, and sheath voltage drop are calculated. Additionally, contribution of emitted electron current (Je) and ions current (Ji) to the total current flux are estimated. Higher gas pressure usually reduces Ji and increases Je that reduces the surface temperature by thermionic cooling.

  7. The Validity of 21 cm Spin Temperature as a Kinetic Temperature Indicator in Atomic and Molecular Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Gargi; Ferland, G. J.; Hubeny, I., E-mail: gargishaw@gmail.com, E-mail: gary@uky.edu, E-mail: hubeny@as.arizona.edu

    The gas kinetic temperature ( T {sub K} ) of various interstellar environments is often inferred from observations that can deduce level populations of atoms, ions, or molecules using spectral line observations; H i 21 cm is perhaps the most widely used, and has a long history. Usually the H i 21 cm line is assumed to be in thermal equilibrium and the populations are given by the Boltzmann distribution. A variety of processes, many involving Ly α , can affect the 21 cm line. Here we show how this is treated in the spectral simulation code Cloudy, and presentmore » numerical simulations of environments where this temperature indicator is used, with a detailed treatment of the physical processes that determine level populations within H{sup 0}. We discuss situations where this temperature indicator traces T {sub K}, cases where it fails, as well as the effects of Ly α pumping on the 21 cm spin temperature. We also show that the Ly α excitation temperature rarely traces the gas kinetic temperature.« less

  8. Adiabatic temperature changes of magma-gas mixtures during ascent and eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Ghiorso, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Most quantitative studies of flow dynamics in eruptive conduits during volcanic eruptions use a simplified energy equation that ignores either temperature changes, or the thermal effects of gas exsolution. In this paper we assess the effects of those simplifications by analyzing the influence of equilibrium gas exsolution and expansion on final temperatures, velocities, and liquid viscosities of magma-gas mixtures during adiabatic decompression. For a given initial pressure (p1), temperature (T1) and melt composition, the final temperature (Tf) and velocity (Umax) will vary depending on the degree to which friction and other irreversible processes reduce mechanical energy within the conduit. The final conditions range between two thermodynamic end members: (1) Constant enthalpy (dh=0), in which Tf is maximal and no energy goes into lifting or acceleration; and (2) constant entropy (ds=0), in which Tf is minimal and maximum energy goes into lifting and acceleration. For ds=0, T1=900 ??C and p1=200 MPa, a water-saturated albitic melt cools by ???200 ??C during decompression, but only about 250 ??C of this temperature decrease can be attributed to the energy of gas exsolution per se: The remainder results from expansion of gas that has already exsolved. For the same T1 and p1, and dh=0, Tf is 10-15 ??C hotter than T1 but is about 10-25 ??C cooler than Tf in similar calculations that ignore the energy of gas exsolution. For ds=0, p1=200 MPa and T1= 9,000 ??C, assuming that all the enthalpy change of decompression goes into kinetic energy, a water-saturated albitic mixture can theoretically accelerate to ???800 m/s. Similar calculations that ignore gas exsolution (but take into account gas expansion) give velocities about 10-15% higher. For the same T1, p1 = 200 MPa, and ds = 0, the cooling associated with gas expansion and exsolution increases final melt viscosity more than 2.5 orders of magnitude. For dh = 0, isenthalpic heating decreases final melt viscosity by about

  9. Boron nitride housing cools transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron nitride ceramic heat sink cools transistors in r-f transmitter and receiver circuits. Heat dissipated by the transistor is conducted by the boron nitride housing to the metal chassis on which it is mounted.

  10. Method for determining waveguide temperature for acoustic transceiver used in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, Upul P.; Claussen, Heiko; Ragunathan, Karthik

    A method for determining waveguide temperature for at least one waveguide of a transceiver utilized for generating a temperature map. The transceiver generates an acoustic signal that travels through a measurement space in a hot gas flow path defined by a wall such as in a combustor. The method includes calculating a total time of flight for the acoustic signal and subtracting a waveguide travel time from the total time of flight to obtain a measurement space travel time. A temperature map is calculated based on the measurement space travel time. An estimated wall temperature is obtained from the temperaturemore » map. An estimated waveguide temperature is then calculated based on the estimated wall temperature wherein the estimated waveguide temperature is determined without the use of a temperature sensing device.« less

  11. Collective modes of a two-dimensional Fermi gas at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkerin, Brendan C.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2018-05-01

    We examine the breathing mode of a strongly interacting two-dimensional Fermi gas and the role of temperature on the anomalous breaking of scale invariance. By calculating the equation of state with different many-body T -matrix theories and the virial expansion, we obtain a hydrodynamic equation of the harmonically trapped Fermi gas (with trapping frequency ω0) through the local density approximation. By solving the hydrodynamic equations, we determine the breathing mode frequencies as a function of interaction strength and temperature. We find that the breathing mode anomaly depends sensitively on both interaction strength and temperature. In particular, in the strongly interacting regime, we predict a significant downshift of the breathing mode frequency, below the scale invariant value of 2 ω0 , for temperatures of the order of the Fermi temperature.

  12. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 1: Technical efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A compensated dynamic gas temperature thermocouple measurement method was experimentally verified. Dynamic gas temperature signals from a flow passing through a chopped-wheel signal generator and an atmospheric pressure laboratory burner were measured by the dynamic temperature sensor and other fast-response sensors. Compensated data from dynamic temperature sensor thermoelements were compared with fast-response sensors. Results from the two experiments are presented as time-dependent waveforms and spectral plots. Comparisons between compensated dynamic temperature sensor spectra and a commercially available optical fiber thermometer compensated spectra were made for the atmospheric burner experiment. Increases in precision of the measurement method require optimization of several factors, and directions for further work are identified.

  13. Temperature dependence of surface tension of molten iron under reducing gas atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, S.; Takahashi, S.; Fukuyama, H.; Watanabe, M.

    2011-12-01

    Surface tension of molten iron was measured under Ar-He-5vol.%H2 gas by oscillating droplet method using electromagnetic levitation furnace in consideration of the temperature dependence of oxygen partial pressure, Po2, of the gas. For comparison, the measurement was carried under Ar-He atmosphere to fix the Po2 of the inlet gas at 10-2Pa. The surface tension was successfully measured over a wide temperature range of about 780K including undercooling condition. When Po2 is fixed at 10-2 Pa, the surface tension increased and then decreased with increasing temperature like a boomerang shape. When the measurement was carried out under the H2-containing gas atmosphere, the temperature dependence of the surface tension shows unique kink at around 1810K instead of liner relationship due to competition between the temperature dependence of the Po2 and that of the equilibrium constant of oxygen adsorption reaction. The relationship between the calculated lnKad with respect to inverse temperature using Szyszkowski model was different between the atmospheric gases.

  14. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model and a solution algorithm is developed to study the physics of high temperature heat transfer and material ablation and identify the problems associated with the flow of hydrogen gas at very high temperatures and velocities through pipes and various components of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motors. Ablation and melting can be experienced when the inner solid surface of the cooling channels and the diverging-converging nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motor is exposed to hydrogen gas flow at temperatures around 2500 degrees Kelvin and pressures around 3.4 MPa. In the experiments conducted on typical NTR motors developed in 1960s, degradation of the cooling channel material (cracking in the nuclear fuel element cladding) and in some instances melting of the core was observed. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study based on two types of physics based mathematical models that were developed to simulate the thermal-hydrodynamic conditions that lead to ablation of the solid surface of a stainless steel pipe exposed to high temperature hydrogen gas near sonic velocities. One of the proposed models is one-dimensional and assumes the gas flow to be unsteady, compressible and viscous. An in-house computer code was developed to solve the conservations equations of this model using a second-order accurate finite-difference technique. The second model assumes the flow to be three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible and viscous. A commercial CFD code (Fluent) was used to solve the later model equations. Both models assume the thermodynamic and transport properties of the hydrogen gas to be temperature dependent. In the solution algorithm developed for this study, the unsteady temperature of the pipe is determined from the heat equation for the solid. The solid-gas interface temperature is determined from an energy balance at the interface which includes heat transfer from or to the interface by conduction, convection, radiation, and

  15. Magnetoresistance measurements of superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Arasu, A. V. Thanikai; Amaladass, E. P.

    2016-05-23

    Molybdenum nitride thin films have been deposited on aluminum nitride buffered glass substrates by reactive DC sputtering. GIXRD measurements indicate formation of nano-crystalline molybdenum nitride thin films. The transition temperature of MoN thin film is 7.52 K. The transition width is less than 0.1 K. The upper critical field Bc{sub 2}(0), calculated using GLAG theory is 12.52 T. The transition width for 400 µA current increased initially upto 3 T and then decreased, while that for 100 µA current transition width did not decrease.

  16. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, Ankur

    1986-01-01

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750.degree. C. but less than 1150.degree. C. for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25-100 micrometers thickness. These barrier nitrides appear to shield the available oxidizing metallic species of the alloy for up to a sixfold improved resistance against oxidation and also appear to impede egress of surface dislocations for increased fatigue and creep strengths.

  17. Relationship between the humidity and temperature of inspired gas and the function of the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Williams, R; Rankin, N; Smith, T; Galler, D; Seakins, P

    1996-11-01

    To review the available literature on the relationship between the humidity and temperature of inspired gas and airway mucosal function. International computerized databases and published indices, experts in the field, conference proceedings, bibliographies. Two hundred articles/texts on respiratory tract physiology and humidification were reviewed. Seventeen articles were selected from 40 articles for inclusion in the published data verification of the model. Selection was by independent reviewers. Extraction was by consensus, and was based on finding sufficient data. A relationship exists between inspired gas humidity and temperature, exposure time to a given humidity level, and mucosal function. This relationship can be modeled and represented as an inspired humidity magnitude vs. exposure time map. The model is predictive of mucosal function and can be partially verified by the available literature. It predicts that if inspired humidity deviates from an optimal level, a progressive mucosal dysfunction begins. The greater the humidity deviation, the faster the mucosal dysfunction progresses. A model for the relationship between airway mucosal dysfunction and the combination of the humidity of inspired gas and the duration over which the airway mucosa is exposed to that humidity is proposed. This model suggests that there is an optimal temperature and humidity above which, and below which, there is impaired mucosal function. This optimal level of temperature and humidity is core temperature and 100% relative humidity. However, existing data are only sufficient to test this model for gas conditions below core temperature and 100% relative humidity. These data concur with the model in that region. No studies have yet looked at this relationship beyond 24 hrs. Longer exposure times to any given level of inspired humidity and inspired gas temperatures and humidities above core temperature and 100% relative humidity need to be studied to fully verify the proposed

  18. Development of an Acoustic Sensor for On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

    2006-01-15

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2-Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1989 the U.S. Department of Energy has supported development of advanced coal gasification technology. The Wabash River and TECO IGCC demonstration projects supported by the DOE have demonstrated the ability of these plantsmore » to achieve high levels of energy efficiency and extremely low emissions of hazardous pollutants. However, a continuing challenge for this technology is the tradeoff between high carbon conversion which requires operation with high internal gas temperatures, and limited refractory life which is exacerbated by those high operating temperatures. Attempts to control internal gas temperature so as to operate these gasifiers at the optimum temperature have been hampered by the lack of a reliable technology for measuring internal gas temperatures. Thermocouples have serious survival problems and provide useful temperature information for only a few days or weeks after startup before burning out. For this reason, the Department of Energy has funded several research projects to develop more robust and reliable temperature measurement approaches for use in coal gasifiers. Enertechnix has developed a line of acoustic gas temperature sensors for use in coal-fired electric utility boilers, kraft recovery boilers, cement kilns and petrochemical process heaters. Acoustic pyrometry provides several significant advantages for gas temperature measurement in hostile process environments. First, it is non-intrusive so survival of the measurement components

  19. Tuning operating temperature of BaSnO3 gas sensor for reducing and oxidizing gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Pugh, David; Dasgupta, Daipayan; Sarin, Neha; Parkin, Ivan; Luthra, Vandna

    2018-05-01

    Barium stannate (BaSnO3) was prepared by solid state ceramic route. The crystalline phase of the prepared sample was confirmed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern. Gas sensing behaviour of barium stannate was investigated for reducing and oxidizing gases; such as butane, ethanol, CO and NO2; from 5 ppm to 50 ppm levels of concentration. Barium stannate sensors were optimized for highest responsiveness by varying operating temperature between 270 °C to 550 °C. Its highest response was observed for ethanol at 300°C. The gas sensing response of ethanol was better than other gases at all the operating temperatures. Such studies in conjunction with gas sensing tests can be used for setting the optimum operating temperatures and can be used for low concentration ethanol sensing applications.

  20. Thermal Stress FE Analysis of Large-scale Gas Holder Under Sunshine Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyu; Yang, Ranxia; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The temperature field and thermal stress of Man type gas holder is simulated by using the theory of sunshine temperature field based on ASHRAE clear-sky model and the finite element method. The distribution of surface temperature and thermal stress of gas holder under the given sunshine condition is obtained. The results show that the thermal stress caused by sunshine can be identified as one of the important factors for the failure of local cracked oil leakage which happens on the sunny side before on the shady side. Therefore, it is of great importance to consider the sunshine thermal load in the stress analysis, design and operation of large-scale steel structures such as the gas holder.

  1. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  2. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  3. Room temperature synthesis of heptazine-based microporous polymer networks as photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Schmidt, Johannes; Bildirir, Hakan; Zhang, Guigang; Blechert, Siegfried; Wang, Xinchen; Thomas, Arne

    2013-06-25

    Two emerging material classes are combined in this work, namely polymeric carbon nitrides and microporous polymer networks. The former, polymeric carbon nitrides, are composed of amine-bridged heptazine moieties and showed interesting performance as a metal-free photocatalyst. These materials have, however, to be prepared at high temperatures, making control of their chemical structure difficult. The latter, microporous polymer networks have received increasing interest due to their high surface area, giving rise to interesting applications in gas storage or catalysis. Here, the central building block of carbon nitrides, a functionalized heptazine as monomer, and tecton are used to create microporous polymer networks. The resulting heptazine-based microporous polymers show high porosity, while their chemical structure resembles the ones of carbon nitrides. The polymers show activity for the photocatalytic production of hydrogen from water, even under visible light illumination. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Understanding the low temperature electrical properties of nanocrystalline tin oxide for gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Christina Hartsell

    Nanocrystalline metal/metal oxide is an important class of transparent and electronic materials due to its potential use in many applications, including gas sensors. At the nanoscale, many of the phenomena observed that give nanocrystalline semiconducting oxide enhanced performance as a gas sensor material over other conventional engineering materials is still poorly understood. This study is aimed at understanding the low temperature electrical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline SnO2 that makes it suitable for room temperature gas detectors. Studies were carried out in order to understand how various synthesis methods affect the surfaces on the nano-oxides, interactions of a target gas (in this study hydrogen) with different surface species, and changes in the electrical properties as a function of dopants and grain size. A correlation between the surface reactions and the electrical response of doped nanocrystalline metal-oxide-semiconductors exposed to a reducing gas is established using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy attached to a specially built custom designed catalytic cell. First principle calculations of oxygen vacancy concentrations from absorbance spectra are presented. FTIR is used for effectively screening of these nanostructures for gas sensing applications. The effect of processing temperature on the microstructural evolution and on the electronic properties of nanocrystalline trivalent doped-SnO 2 is also presented. This study includes the effect of dopants (In and Ce) on the growth of nano-SnO2, as well as their effects on the electronic properties and gas sensor behavior of the nanomaterial at room temperature. Band bending affects are also investigated for this system and are related to enhanced low temperature gas sensing. The role and importance of oxygen vacancies in the electronic and chemical behavior of surface modified nanocrystalline SnO2 are explored in this study. A generalized explanation for the low temperature

  5. Inspired gas humidity and temperature during mechanical ventilation with the Stephanie ventilator.

    PubMed

    Preo, Bianca L; Shadbolt, Bruce; Todd, David A

    2013-11-01

    To measure inspired gas humidity and temperature delivered by a Stephanie neonatal ventilator with variations in (i) circuit length; (ii) circuit insulation; (iii) proximal airway temperature probe (pATP) position; (iv) inspiratory temperature (offset); and (v) incubator temperatures. Using the Stephanie neonatal ventilator, inspired gas humidity and temperature were measured during mechanical ventilation at the distal inspiratory limb and 3 cm down the endotracheal tube. Measurements were made with a long or short circuit; with or without insulation of the inspiratory limb; proximal ATP (pATP) either within or external to the incubator; at two different inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5) and 39(-2.0)°C; and at three different incubator temperatures of 32, 34.5, and 37°C. Long circuits produced significantly higher inspired humidity than short circuits at all incubator settings, while only at 32°C was the inspired temperature higher. In the long circuits, insulation further improved the inspired humidity especially at 39(-2.0)°C, while only at incubator temperatures of 32 and 37°C did insulation significantly improve inspired temperature. Positioning the pATP outside the incubator did not result in higher inspired humidity but did significantly improve inspired temperature. An inspiratory temperature (offset) of 39(-2.0)°C delivered significantly higher inspired humidity and temperature than the 37(-0.5)°C especially when insulated. Long insulated Stephanie circuits should be used for neonatal ventilation when the infant is nursed in an incubator. The recommended inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5)°C produced inspired humidity and temperature below international standards, and we suggest an increase to 39(-2.0)°C. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Swelling and gas release in oxide fuels during fast temperature transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollins, C. C.; Jursich, M.

    1982-05-01

    A previously reported intergranular swelling and gas release model for oxide fuels has been modified to predict fission gas behavior during fast temperature transients. Under steady state or slowly varying conditions it has been assumed in the previous model that the pressure caused by the fission gas within the gas bubbles is in equilibrium with the surface tension of the bubbles. During a fast transient, however, net vacancy migration to the bubbles may be insufficient to maintain this equilibrium. In order to ascertain the net vacancy flow, it is necessary to model the point defect behavior in the fuel. Knowing the net flow of vacancies to the bubble and the bubble size, the bubble diffusivity can be determined and the long range migration of the gas out of the fuel can be calculated. The model has also been modified to allow release of all the gas on the grain boundaries during a fast temperature transient. The gas release predicted by the revised model shows good agreement to fast transient gas release data from an EBR-II TREAT H-3 (Transient Reactor Test Facility) test. Agreement has also been obtained between predictions using the model and gas release data obtained by Argonne National Laboratory from out-of-reactor transient heating experiments on irradiated UO 2. It was found necessary to increase the gas bubble diffusivity used in the model by a factor of thirty during the transient to provide agreement between calculations and measurements. Other workers have also found that such an increase is necessary for agreement and attribute the increased diffusivity to yielding at the bubble surface due to the increased pressure.

  7. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications. PMID:26393596

  8. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-09-18

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  9. Determination of chlorine concentration using single temperature modulated semiconductor gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, Ł.; Kalinowski, P.; Jasiński, G.; Jasiński, P.

    2016-11-01

    A periodic temperature modulation using sinusoidal heater voltage was applied to a commercial SnO2 semiconductor gas sensor. Resulting resistance response of the sensor was analyzed using a feature extraction method based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). The amplitudes of the higher harmonics of the FFT from the dynamic nonlinear responses of measured gas were further utilized as an input for Artificial Neuron Network (ANN). Determination of the concentration of chlorine was performed. Moreover, this work evaluates the sensor performance upon sinusoidal temperature modulation.

  10. Cooling of Gas Turbines, IV - Calculated Temperature Distribution in the Trailing Part of a Turbine Blade Using Direct Liquid Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. Byron; Monroe, William R.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the temperature distribution through the trailing portion of a blade near the coolant passages of liquid cooled gas turbines was made. The analysis was applied to obtain the hot spot temperatures at the trailing edge and influence of design variables. The effective gas temperature was varied from 2000 degrees to 5000 degrees F in each investigation.

  11. High Temperature Gas Reactors: Assessment of Applicable Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Bruce K.; Nickolaus, James R.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2011-10-31

    Current interest expressed by industry in HTGR plants, particularly modular plants with power up to about 600 MW(e) per unit, has prompted NRC to task PNNL with assessing the currently available literature related to codes and standards applicable to HTGR plants, the operating history of past and present HTGR plants, and with evaluating the proposed designs of RPV and associated piping for future plants. Considering these topics in the order they are arranged in the text, first the operational histories of five shut-down and two currently operating HTGR plants are reviewed, leading the authors to conclude that while small, simplemore » prototype HTGR plants operated reliably, some of the larger plants, particularly Fort St. Vrain, had poor availability. Safety and radiological performance of these plants has been considerably better than LWR plants. Petroleum processing plants provide some applicable experience with materials similar to those proposed for HTGR piping and vessels. At least one currently operating plant - HTR-10 - has performed and documented a leak before break analysis that appears to be applicable to proposed future US HTGR designs. Current codes and standards cover some HTGR materials, but not all materials are covered to the high temperatures envisioned for HTGR use. Codes and standards, particularly ASME Codes, are under development for proposed future US HTGR designs. A 'roadmap' document has been prepared for ASME Code development; a new subsection to section III of the ASME Code, ASME BPVC III-5, is scheduled to be published in October 2011. The question of terminology for the cross-duct structure between the RPV and power conversion vessel is discussed, considering the differences in regulatory requirements that apply depending on whether this structure is designated as a 'vessel' or as a 'pipe'. We conclude that designing this component as a 'pipe' is the more appropriate choice, but that the ASME BPVC allows the owner of the facility to

  12. Effect of temperature on the permeability of gas adsorbed coal under triaxial stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangchen; Yan, Xiaopeng; Kang, Yili

    2018-04-01

    The combined effects of gas sorption, stress and temperature play a significant role in the changing behavior of gas permeability in coal seams. The effect of temperature on nitrogen and methane permeability of naturally fractured coal is investigated. Coal permeability, P-wave velocity and axial strain were simultaneously measured under two effective stresses and six different temperatures. The results showed that the behavior of nitrogen and methane permeability presented nonmonotonic changes with increasing temperature. The variation in the P-wave velocity and axial strain showed a good correspondence with coal permeability. A higher effective stress limited the bigger deformation and caused the small change in permeability. Methane adsorption and desorption significantly influence the mechanical properties of coal and play an important role in the variations in coal permeability. The result of coal permeability during a complete stress-strain process showed that the variation in permeability is determined by the evolution of the internal structure. The increase in the temperature of the gas saturated coal causes the complex interaction between matrix swelling, matrix shrinkage and micro-fracture generation, which leads to the complex changes in coal structure and permeability. These results are helpful to understand the gas transport mechanism for exploiting coal methane by heat injection.

  13. Tar-free fuel gas production from high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leguan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • High temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge was efficient for producing tar-free fuel gas. • Complete tar removal and volatile matter release were at elevated temperature of 1300 °C. • Sewage sludge was converted to residual solid with high ash content. • 72.60% of energy conversion efficiency for gas production in high temperature pyrolysis. • Investment and costing for tar cleaning were reduced. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was studied in a free-fall reactor at 1000–1400 °C. The results showed that the volatile matter in the sludge could be completely released to gaseous product at 1300 °C. Themore » high temperature was in favor of H{sub 2} and CO in the produced gas. However, the low heating value (LHV) of the gas decreased from 15.68 MJ/N m{sup 3} to 9.10 MJ/N m{sup 3} with temperature increasing from 1000 °C to 1400 °C. The obtained residual solid was characterized by high ash content. The energy balance indicated that the most heating value in the sludge was in the gaseous product.« less

  14. Temperature Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of a Trapped Dipolar Bose-Condensed Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, H.

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of a trapped dipolar Bose condensed gas is calculated as a function of temperature in the framework of linear response theory. The contributions of the interactions between condensed and noncondensed atoms and between noncondensed atoms in the presence of both contact and dipole-dipole interactions are taken into account to the thermal relaxation time, by evaluating the self-energies of the system in the Beliaev approximation. We will show that above the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature ( T > T BEC ) in the absence of dipole-dipole interaction, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity reduces to that of an ideal Bose gas. In a trapped Bose-condensed gas for temperature interval k B T << n 0 g B , E p << k B T ( n 0 is the condensed density and g B is the strength of the contact interaction), the relaxation rates due to dipolar and contact interactions between condensed and noncondensed atoms change as {τ}_{dd12}^{-1}∝ {e}^{-E/{k}_BT} and τ c12 ∝ T -5, respectively, and the contact interaction plays the dominant role in the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity, which leads to the T -3 behavior of the thermal conductivity. In the low-temperature limit, k B T << n 0 g B , E p >> k B T, since the relaxation rate {τ}_{c12}^{-1} is independent of temperature and the relaxation rate due to dipolar interaction goes to zero exponentially, the T 2 temperature behavior for the thermal conductivity comes from the thermal mean velocity of the particles. We will also show that in the high-temperature limit ( k B T > n 0 g B ) and low momenta, the relaxation rates {τ}_{c12}^{-1} and {τ}_{dd12}^{-1} change linearly with temperature for both dipolar and contact interactions and the thermal conductivity scales linearly with temperature.

  15. The Relationship Between Temperature and Gas Concentration Fluctuation Rates at an Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, W. E.; Jessup, A. T.; Liang, H.; Zappa, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    The air-sea flux, F, of a sparingly soluble nonreactive gas can be expressed as F = kG(CS-CW), where kG is the gas transfer velocity, CS is the concentration of gas that would be expected in the water if the system were in Henry's Gas Law equilibrium, and CW is the gas concentration in the bulk water. An analogous relationship for the net heat flux can also be written using the heat transfer velocity, kH, and the bulk-skin temperature difference in the aqueous phase. Surface divergence theory for the air-water transfer of gas and heat predicts that kG and kH will scale as the square root of the surface divergence rate, r. However, because of the interaction between diffusivity and the scale depth of the surface divergences, the scale factor for heat is likely to be different from the scale factor for gases. Infrared imagery was used to measure the timescales of variations in temperature at a water surface and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure temporal fluctuations in aqueous-phase concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) at a water surface. The rate at which these temperature and concentration fluctuations occur is then assumed to be related to r. The divergence rates derived for temperature from the IR images can be compared to the rates for gas derived from the LIF measurements to understand how r estimated from the two measurements differ. The square root of r is compared to concurrently measured kG for helium and sulfur hexafluoride to test the assumption that r1/2 scales with kG. Additionally, we measured kH using the active controlled flux technique, and those heat transfer velocities can also be used to test for a r1/2 dependence. All measurements reported here were made in the APL-UW synthetic jet array facility.

  16. Fabrication of turbine components and properties of sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, J. T.; French, K. W.; Quackenbush, C. L.; Smith, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a status report on the injection molding of sinterable silicon nitride at GTE Laboratories. The effort involves fabrication of single axial turbine blades and monolithic radial turbine rotors. The injection molding process is reviewed and the fabrication of the turbine components discussed. Oxidation resistance and strength results of current injection molded sintered silicon nitride as well as dimensional checks on sintered turbine blades demonstrate that this material is a viable candidate for high temperature structural applications.

  17. Synthesis of Continuous Boron Nitride Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Wen, G.; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Long; Zhong, Bo; Fan, Shaoyu

    Continuous boron nitride nanofibers (BNNFs) have been gotten by electrospinning. The appropriate precursor of BNNFs was electrospinned to green born nitride nanofibers (GBNNFs) with temperatures from 80°C to 100°C in the protection of N2. By successive heat treatments in N2, the organics in GBNNFs disappeared and BN ceramics nanofibers came into being. The average diameters of BNNFs by electrospinning are less than 10 μm

  18. Nitriding of Polymer by Low Energy Nitrogen Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Keigo; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    Nitriding of polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) has been carried out at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam with kinetic energy of less than 100 eV. The surface hardness of nitrided samples increased to two times that of the untreated sample, when the acceleration voltage was between 30 and 50 V. The thickness of the hardened polymer layer was estimated to be 1 µm. It was concluded that the hardness enhancement was caused by the diffusion of nitrogen atoms into the polymer.

  19. Analysis of waterborne paints by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a temperature-programmable pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Takino, M; Daishima, S

    2001-04-06

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a temperature-programmable pyrolyzer was used for the analysis of waterborne paints. Evolved gas analysis (EGA) profiles of the waterborne paints were obtained by this temperature-programmed pyrolysis directly coupled with MS via a deactivated metal capillary tube. The EGA profile suggested the optimal thermal desorption conditions for solvents and additives and the subsequent optimal pyrolysis temperature for the remaining polymeric material. Polymers were identified from pyrograms with the assistance of a new polymer library. The solvents were identified from the electron ionization mass spectra with the corresponding chemical ionization mass spectra. The additive was identified as zinc pyrithione by comparison with authentic standard. Zinc pyrithione cannot be analyzed by GC-MS as it is. However, the thermal decomposition products of zinc pyrithione could be detected. The information on the decomposition temperature and products was useful for the identification of the original compound.

  20. Analysis of a Pneumatic Probe for Measuring Exhaust-Gas Temperatures with Some Preliminary Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scadron, Marvin D.

    1952-01-01

    A pneumatic probe based on continuity of mass flow through two restrictions separated by a cooling chamber was constructed to measure gas temperature at and beyond the limit of thermocouples. This probe consisted of a subsonic flat-plate orifice for the first restriction and a sonic-flow converging-diverging nozzle for the second restriction. The effect of variation in gas constants on the calibration is examined for common engine-exhaust gases. A high-temperature wind tunnel that allowed calibration of the probe at temperatures up to 2000 deg R and. Mach numbers up to 0.8 is described. Agreement to better than 30 deg R between pneumatic probe indication and the indication of a rake of radiation shielded thermocouples indicates that extrapolation of the calibration to higher temperatures is possible with fair accuracy

  1. Experimental study on the impact of temperature on the dissipation process of supersaturated total dissolved gas.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xia; Liu, Shengyun; Li, Ran; Ou, Yangming

    2014-09-01

    Water temperature not only affects the solubility of gas in water but can also be an important factor in the dissipation process of supersaturated total dissolved gas (TDG). The quantitative relationship between the dissipation process and temperature has not been previously described. This relationship affects the accurate evaluation of the dissipation process and the subsequent biological effects. This article experimentally investigates the impact of temperature on supersaturated TDG dissipation in static and turbulent conditions. The results show that the supersaturated TDG dissipation coefficient increases with the temperature and turbulence intensity. The quantitative relationship was verified by straight flume experiments. This study enhances our understanding of the dissipation of supersaturated TDG. Furthermore, it provides a scientific foundation for the accurate prediction of the dissipation process of supersaturated TDG in the downstream area and the negative impacts of high dam projects on aquatic ecosystems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nitride coating enhances endothelialization on biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Ion, Raluca; Luculescu, Catalin; Cimpean, Anisoara; Marx, Philippe; Gordin, Doina-Margareta; Gloriant, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Surface nitriding was demonstrated to be an effective process for improving the biocompatibility of implantable devices. In this study, we investigated the benefits of nitriding the NiTi shape memory alloy for vascular stent applications. Results from cell experiments indicated that, compared to untreated NiTi, a superficial gas nitriding treatment enhanced the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cell spreading and proliferation. This investigation provides data to demonstrate the possibility of improving the rate of endothelialization on NiTi by means of nitride coating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  4. A high-temperature gas-and-steam turbine plant operating on combined fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Milman, O. O.; Shifrin, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    A high-temperature gas-steam turbine plant (GSTP) for ultrasupercritical steam conditions is proposed based on an analysis of prospects for the development of power engineering around the world and in Russia up to 2040. The performance indicators of a GSTP using steam from a coal-fired boiler with a temperature of 560-620°C with its superheating to 1000-1500°C by firing natural gas with oxygen in a mixingtype steam superheater are analyzed. The thermal process circuit and design of a GSTP for a capacity of 25 MW with the high- and intermediate-pressure high-temperature parts with the total efficiency equal to 51.7% and the natural gas utilization efficiency equal to 64-68% are developed. The principles of designing and the design arrangement of a 300 MW GSTP are developed. The effect of economic parameters (the level and ratio of prices for solid fuel and gas, and capital investments) on the net cost of electric energy is determined. The net cost of electric energy produced by the GSTP is lower than that produced by modern combined-cycle power plants in a wide variation range of these parameters. The components of a high-temperature GSTP the development of which determines the main features of such installations are pointed out: a chamber for combusting natural gas and oxygen in a mixture with steam, a vacuum device for condensing steam with a high content of nondensables, and a control system. The possibility of using domestically available gas turbine technologies for developing the GSTP's intermediate-pressure high-temperature part is pointed out. In regard of its environmental characteristics, the GSTP is more advantageous as compared with modern condensing power plants: it allows a flow of concentrated carbon dioxide to be obtained at its outlet, which can be reclaimed; in addition, this plant requires half as much consumption of fresh water.

  5. A comparative study of ethylene oxide gas, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, and low-temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Imasaka, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Shiho; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ueno, Kumi; Takemura, Hiromu; Hirayama, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacies of ethylene oxide gas (EOG), hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (PLASMA), and low-temperature steam formaldehyde (LTSF) sterilization methods. The efficacies of EOG, PLASMA, and LTSF sterilization were tested using metal and plastic plates, common medical instruments, and three process challenge devices with narrow lumens. All items were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus spores or used a standard biological indicator. EOG and LTSF demonstrated effective killing of B. stearothermophilus spores, with or without serum, on plates, on instruments, and in process challenge devices. PLASMA failed to adequately sterilize materials on multiple trials in several experiments, including two of three plates, two of three instruments, and all process challenge devices. Our results suggest that PLASMA sterilization may be unsuccessful under certain conditions, particularly when used for items with complex shapes and narrow lumens. Alternatively, LTSF sterilization demonstrates excellent efficacy and is comparable to EOG sterilization. LTSF could potentially act as a substitute if EOG becomes unavailable due to environmental concerns.

  6. Acoustic transducer in system for gas temperature measurement in gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, Upul P.; Claussen, Heiko

    An apparatus for controlling operation of a gas turbine engine including at least one acoustic transmitter/receiver device located on a flow path boundary structure. The acoustic transmitter/receiver device includes an elongated sound passage defined by a surface of revolution having opposing first and second ends and a central axis extending between the first and second ends, an acoustic sound source located at the first end, and an acoustic receiver located within the sound passage between the first and second ends. The boundary structure includes an opening extending from outside the boundary structure to the flow path, and the second endmore » of the surface of revolution is affixed to the boundary structure at the opening for passage of acoustic signals between the sound passage and the flow path.« less

  7. An "Inefficient Fin" Non-Dimensional Parameter to Measure Gas Temperatures Efficiently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemieux, Patrick; Murray, William; Cooke, Terry; Gerhardt, James

    2012-01-01

    A gas containment vessel that is not in thermal equilibrium with the bulk gas can affect its temperature measurement. The physical nature of many gas dynamics experiments often makes the accurate measurement of temperature a challenge. The environment itself typically requires that the thermocouple be sheathed, both to protect the wires and hot junction of the instrument from their environment, and to provide a smooth, rigid surface for pressure sealing of the enclosure. However, that enclosure may also be much colder than the gas to be sensed, or vice-versa. Either way, the effect of such gradients is to potentially skew the temperature measurements themselves, since heat may then be conducted by the instrument. Thermocouple designers traditionally address this problem by insulating the sheath from the thermocouple leads and hot junction as much as possible. The thermocouple leads are typically packed in a ceramic powder inside the sheath, protecting them somewhat from temperature gradients along the sheath, but there is no effective mechanism to shield the sheath from the enclosure body itself. Standard practice dictates that thermocouples be used in installations that do not present large thermal gradients along the probe. If this conduction dominates heat transfer near the tip of the probe, then temperature measurements may be expected to be skewed. While the same problem may be experienced in the measurement of temperature at various points within a solid in a gradient, it tends to be aggravated in the measurements of gas temperature, since heat transfer dependent on convection is often less efficient than conduction along the thermocouple. The proposed solution is an inefficient fin thermocouple probe. Conventional wisdom suggests that in many experiments where gas flows through an enclosure (e.g., flow in pipe, manifold, nozzle, etc.), the thermocouple be introduced flush to the surface, so as not to interfere with the flow. In practice, however, many such

  8. On the X-ray temperature of hot gas in diffuse nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Arthur, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray emitting diffuse nebulae around hot stars are observed to have soft-band temperatures in the narrow range [1-3]× 106 K, independent of the stellar wind parameters and the evolutionary stage of the central star. We discuss the origin of this X-ray temperature for planetary nebulae (PNe), Wolf-Rayet nebulae (WR) and interstellar wind bubbles around hot young stars in our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. We calculate the differential emission measure (DEM) distributions as a function of temperature from previously published simulations and combine these with the X-ray emission coefficient for the 0.3-2.0 keV band to estimate the X-ray temperatures. We find that all simulated nebulae have DEM distributions with steep negative slopes, which is due to turbulent mixing at the interface between the hot shocked stellar wind and the warm photoionized gas. Sharply peaked emission coefficients act as temperature filters and emphasize the contribution of gas with temperatures close to the peak position, which coincides with the observed X-ray temperatures for the chemical abundance sets we consider. Higher metallicity nebulae have lower temperature and higher luminosity X-ray emission. We show that the second temperature component found from spectral fitting to X-ray observations of WR nebulae is due to a significant contribution from the hot shocked stellar wind, while the lower temperature principal component is dominated by nebular gas. We suggest that turbulent mixing layers are the origin of the soft X-ray emission in the majority of diffuse nebulae.

  9. On the X-ray temperature of hot gas in diffuse nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Arthur, S. J.

    2018-07-01

    X-ray-emitting diffuse nebulae around hot stars are observed to have soft-band temperatures in the narrow range [1-3] × 106K, independent of the stellar wind parameters and the evolutionary stage of the central star. We discuss the origin of this X-ray temperature for planetary nebulae, Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae, and interstellar wind bubbles around hot young stars in our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. We calculate the differential emission measure (DEM) distributions as a function of temperature from previously published simulations and combine these with the X-ray emission coefficient for the 0.3-2.0 keV band to estimate the X-ray temperatures. We find that all simulated nebulae have DEM distributions with steep negative slopes, which is due to turbulent mixing at the interface between the hot shocked stellar wind and the warm photoionized gas. Sharply peaked emission coefficients act as temperature filters and emphasize the contribution of gas with temperatures close to the peak position, which coincides with the observed X-ray temperatures for the chemical abundance sets we consider. Higher metallicity nebulae have lower temperature and higher luminosity X-ray emission. We show that the second temperature component found from spectral fitting to X-ray observations of WR nebulae is due to a significant contribution from the hot shocked stellar wind, while the lower temperature principal component is dominated by nebular gas. We suggest that turbulent mixing layers are the origin of the soft X-ray emission in the majority of diffuse nebulae.

  10. High speed 2-dimensional temperature measurements of nanothermite composites: Probing thermal vs. Gas generation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rohit J.; Kline, Dylan J.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the reaction dynamics of metastable intermolecular composites through high speed spectrometry, pressure measurements, and high-speed color camera pyrometry. Eight mixtures including Al/CuO and Al/Fe2O3/xWO3 (x being the oxidizer mol. %) were reacted in a constant volume pressure cell as a means of tuning gas release and adiabatic temperature. A direct correlation between gas release, peak pressure, and pressurization rate was observed, but it did not correlate with temperature. When WO3 was varied as part of the stoichiometric oxidizer content, it was found that Al/Fe2O3/70% WO3 achieved the highest pressures and shortest burn time despite a fairly constant temperature between mixtures, suggesting an interplay between the endothermic Fe2O3 decomposition and the higher adiabatic flame temperature sustained by the Al/WO3 reaction in the composite. It is proposed that the lower ignition temperature of Al/WO3 leads to the initiation of the composite and its higher flame temperature enhances the gasification of Fe2O3, thus improving advection and propagation as part of a feedback loop that drives the reaction. Direct evidence of such gas release promoting reactivity was obtained through high speed pyrometry videos of the reaction. These results set the stage for nanoenergetic materials that can be tuned for specific applications through carefully chosen oxidizer mixtures.

  11. An Annular Mechanical Temperature Compensation Structure for Gas-Sealed Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiuchun; Jiang, Yonggang; Takao, Hidekuni; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2012-01-01

    A novel gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor with a temperature compensation structure is reported. The pressure sensor is sealed by Au-Au diffusion bonding under a nitrogen ambient with a pressure of 100 kPa and integrated with a platinum resistor-based temperature sensor for human activity monitoring applications. The capacitance-pressure and capacitance-temperature characteristics of the gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor without temperature compensation structure are calculated. It is found by simulation that a ring-shaped structure on the diaphragm of the pressure sensor can mechanically suppress the thermal expansion effect of the sealed gas in the cavity. Pressure sensors without/with temperature compensation structures are fabricated and measured. Through measured results, it is verified that the calculation model is accurate. Using the compensation structures with a 900 μm inner radius, the measured temperature coefficient is much reduced as compared to that of the pressure sensor without compensation. The sensitivities of the pressure sensor before and after compensation are almost the same in the pressure range from 80 kPa to 100 kPa. PMID:22969385

  12. Relaxation of heavy species and gas temperature in the afterglow of a N2 microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent kinetic model to study the temporal variation of the gas temperature in the afterglow of a 440 Pa microwave nitrogen discharge operating at 433 MHz in a 3.8 cm diameter tube. The initial conditions in the afterglow are determined by a kinetic model that solves the electron Boltzmann equation coupled to the gas thermal balance equation and a system of rate-balance equations for N2(X 1∑g+, v) molecules, electronically excited states of N2, ground and excited states of atomic nitrogen and the main positive ions. Once the initial concentrations of the heavy species and gas temperature are known, their relaxation in the afterglow is obtained from the solutions to the corresponding time-dependent equations. Modelling predictions are found to be in good agreement with previously measured values for the concentrations of N(4S) atoms and N2(A 3∑u+) molecules, and the radially averaged gas temperature Tg along the afterglow of a microwave discharge in N2 under the same working conditions. It is shown that gas heating in the afterglow comes essentially from the energy transfer involving non-resonant vibration-vibration (V-V) collisions between vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, as well as from energy exchanges in vibration-translation (V-T) on N2-N collisions. Contribution to the topical issue "Plasma Sources and Plasma Processes (PSPP)", edited by Luis Lemos Alves, Thierry Belmonte and Tiberiu Minea

  13. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  14. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment — the formation of uranium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Geoffrey C.; Holmes, Nigel R.

    1988-05-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air.

  15. Erbium doped aluminum nitride nanoparticles for nano-thermometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2015-06-01

    We have synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) of aluminum nitride (AlN) doped in situ with erbium (Er) using the inert gas condensation technique. These NPs have optical properties that make them good candidates for nanoscale temperature sensors. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of Er3+ in these NPs shows two emission peaks in the green region at around 540 and 560 nm. The ratio of the intensities of these luminescence peaks is related to temperature. Using Boltzmann’s distribution, the temperature of the NP and its surrounding can be calculated. The NPs were directly deposited on (111) p-type silicon wafers, transmission electron microscope grids and glass cover slips. XRD and HRTEM study indicates that most of the NPs have crystalline hexagonal AlN structure. An enhancement of the luminescence from these NPs was observed after heating in-air at 770 K for 3 h. The sample was then heated in air using a scanning optical microscope laser. The corresponding change in PL peak intensities of the NPs was recorded for laser powers ranging from 0.2 to 15.1 mW. Temperature calculated using the Boltzmann’s distribution was in the range of 300-470 K. This temperature range is of interest for semiconductor device heating and for thermal treatment of cancerous cells, for example.

  16. Chemistry and mineralogy of high-temperature gas discharges from Colima volcano, Mexico. Implications for magmatic gas atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y. A.; Bernard, A.; Gavilanes, J.-C.; Lunezheva, E.; Cortés, A.; Armienta, M. A.

    2001-08-01

    Gases, condensates and silica tube precipitates were collected from 400°C (Z2) and 800°C (Z3) fumaroles at Colima volcano, Mexico, in 1996-1998. Volcanic gases at Colima were very oxidized and contain up to 98% air due to mixing with air inside the dome interior, close to the hot magmatic body. An alkaline trap method was used to collect gas samples, therefore only acidic species were analysed. Colima volcanic gases are water-rich (95-98 mol%) and have typical S/C/Cl/F ratios for a subduction type volcano. δD-values for the high-temperature Z3 fumarolic vapour vary from -26 to -57‰. A negative δD-Cl correlation for the Z3 high-temperature fumarole may result from magma degassing: enrichment in D and decrease in the Cl concentration in condensates are likely a consequence of input of ;fresh; batches of magma and an increasing of volcanic activity, respectively. The trace element composition of Colima condensates generally does not differ from that of other volcanoes (e.g. Merapi, Kudryavy) except for some enrichment in V, Cu and Zn. Variations in chemical composition of precipitates along the silica tube from the high-temperature fumarole (Colima 1, fumarole Z3), in contrast to other volcanoes, are characterized by high concentrations of Ca and V, low concentration of Mo and a lack of Cd. Mineralogy of precipitates differs significantly from that described for silica tube experiments at other volcanoes with reduced volcanic gas. Thermochemical modelling was used to explain why very oxidized gas at Colima does not precipitate halite, sylvite, and Mo- and Cd-minerals, but does precipitate V-minerals and native gold, which have not been observed before in mineral precipitates from reduced volcanic gases.

  17. Exhaust-Gas Pressure and Temperature Survey of F404-GE-400 Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An exhaust-gas pressure and temperature survey of the General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofan engine was conducted in the altitude test facility of the NASA Lewis Propulsion System Laboratory. Traversals by a survey rake were made across the exhaust-nozzle exit to measure the pitot pressure and total temperature. Tests were performed at Mach 0.87 and a 24,000-ft altitude and at Mach 0.30 and a 30,000-ft altitude with various power settings from intermediate to maximum afterburning. Data yielded smooth pressure and temperature profiles with maximum jet temperatures approximately 1.4 in. inside the nozzle edge and maximum jet temperatures from 1 to 3 in. inside the edge. A low-pressure region located exactly at engine center was noted. The maximum temperature encountered was 3800 R.

  18. Long wavelength infrared radiation thermometry for non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, J.; Zipf, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini, M.; Ebert, H.-P.; Tutschke, A.; Hallam, A.; Hanspal, J.; Langley, M.; Hodge, D.; Hartmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the EU project "Sensors Towards Advanced Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Engines (acronym STARGATE)" is the development of a suite of advanced sensors, instrumentation and related systems in order to contribute to the developing of the next generation of green and efficient gas turbine engines. One work package of the project deals with the design and development of a long wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation thermometer for the non-contact measurement of the surface temperature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during the operation of gas turbine engines. For opaque surfaces (e.g. metals or superalloys) radiation thermometers which are sensitive in the near or short wavelength infrared are used as state-of-the-art method for non-contact temperature measurements. But this is not suitable for oxide ceramic based TBCs (e.g. partially yttria stabilized zirconia) as oxide ceramics are semi-transparent in the near and short wavelength infrared spectral region. Fortunately the applied ceramic materials are non-transparent in the long wavelength infrared and additionally exhibit a high emittance in this wavelength region. Therefore, a LWIR pyrometer can be used for non-contact temperature measurements of the surfaces of TBCs as such pyrometers overcome the described limitation of existing techniques. For performing non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines one has to know the infrared-optical properties of the applied TBCs as well as of the hot combustion gas in order to properly analyse the measurement data. For reaching a low uncertainty on the one hand the emittance of the TBC should be high (>0.9) in order to reduce reflections from the hot surrounding and on the other hand the absorbance of the hot combustion gas should be low (<0.1) in order to decrease the influence of the gas on the measured signal. This paper presents the results of the work performed by the authors with focus on the implementation of the LWIR pyrometer and the

  19. An Application of Trimethylsilyl Derivatives with Temperature Programmed Gas Chromatography to the Senior Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to teach temperature programed gas chromatography (TPGC) techniques and importance of derivatizing many classes of substrated to be separated. Includes equipment needed, procedures for making trimethylsilyl derivatives, applications, sample calculations, and typical results. Procedure required one, three-hour…

  20. Temperature Evolution of a 1 MA Triple-Nozzle Gas-Puff Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grouchy, Philip; Banasek, Jacob; Engelbrecht, Joey; Qi, Niansheng; Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Cahill, Adam; Moore, Hannah; Potter, William; Ransohoff, Lauren; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce; Laboratory of Plasma Studies Team

    2015-11-01

    Mitigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays a critical role in optimizing x-ray output at high-energy ~ 13 keV using the triple-nozzle Krypton gas-puff at Sandia National Laboratory. RTI mitigation by gas-puff density profiling using a triple-nozzle gas-puff valve has recently been recently demonstrated on the COBRA 1MA z-pinch at Cornell University. In support of this work we investigate the role of shell cooling in the growth of RTI during gas-puff implosions. Temperature measurements within the imploding plasma shell are recorded using a 527 nm, 10 GW Thomson scattering diagnostic for Neon, Argon and Krypton puffs. The mass-density profile is held constant at 22 microgram per centimeter for all three puffs and the temperature evolution of the imploding material is recorded. In the case of Argon puffs we find that the shell ion and electron effective temperatures remain in equilibrium at around 1keV for the majority of the implosion phase. In contrast scattered spectra from Krypton are dominated by of order 10 keV effective ion temperatures. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs.

  1. Megawatt low-temperature DC plasma generator with divergent channels of gas-discharge tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Yusupov, D. I.; Sargsyan, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and studied a new effective megawatt double-unit generator of low-temperature argon plasma, which belongs to the class of dc plasmatrons and comprises the cathode and anode units with divergent gas-discharge channels. The generator has an efficiency of about 80-85% and ensures a long working life at operating currents up to 4000 A.

  2. Effects of gas temperature on nozzle damping experiments on cold-flow rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bing-bing; Li, Shi-peng; Su, Wan-xing; Li, Jun-wei; Wang, Ning-fei

    2016-09-01

    In order to explore the impact of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics of solid rocket motor, numerical simulations were carried out by an experimental motor in Naval Ordnance Test Station of China Lake in California. Using the pulse decay method, different cases were numerically studied via Fluent along with UDF (User Defined Functions). Firstly, mesh sensitivity analysis and monitor position-independent analysis were carried out for the computer code validation. Then, the numerical method was further validated by comparing the calculated results and experimental data. Finally, the effects of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics were studied in this paper. The results indicated that the gas temperature had cooperative effects on the nozzle damping and there had great differences between cold flow and hot fire test. By discussion and analysis, it was found that the changing of mainstream velocity and the natural acoustic frequency resulted from gas temperature were the key factors that affected the nozzle damping, while the alteration of the mean pressure had little effect. Thus, the high pressure condition could be replaced by low pressure to reduce the difficulty of the test. Finally, the relation of the coefficients "alpha" between the cold flow and hot fire was got.

  3. Greenhouse gas emissions from beef feedlot surface materials as affected by diet, moisture, temperature, and time

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A laboratory study was conducted to measure the effects of diet, moisture, temperature, and time on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from feedlot surface materials (FSM). The FSM were collected from open-lot pens where beef cattle were fed either a dry-rolled corn (DRC) diet containing no wet distille...

  4. Temperature and Driving Cycle Significantly Affect Carbonaceous Gas and Particle Matter Emissions from Diesel Trucks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examines the effects of fuel (an ultra-low sulfur diesel [ULSD] versus a 20% v/v soy-based biodiesel—80% v/v petroleum blend [B20]), temperature, load, vehicle, driving cycle, and active regeneration technology on gas- and particle-phase carbon emissions from li...

  5. Combination probes for stagnation pressure and temperature measurements in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonham, C.; Thorpe, S. J.; Erlund, M. N.; Stevenson, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    During gas turbine engine testing, steady-state gas-path stagnation pressures and temperatures are measured in order to calculate the efficiencies of the main components of turbomachinery. These measurements are acquired using fixed intrusive probes, which are installed at the inlet and outlet of each component at discrete point locations across the gas-path. The overall uncertainty in calculated component efficiency is sensitive to the accuracy of discrete point pressures and temperatures, as well as the spatial sampling across the gas-path. Both of these aspects of the measurement system must be considered if more accurate component efficiencies are to be determined. High accuracy has become increasingly important as engine manufacturers have begun to pursue small gains in component performance, which require efficiencies to be resolved to within less than  ± 1% . This article reports on three new probe designs that have been developed in a response to this demand. The probes adopt a compact combination arrangement that facilitates up to twice the spatial coverage compared to individual stagnation pressure and temperature probes. The probes also utilise novel temperature sensors and high recovery factor shield designs that facilitate improvements in point measurement accuracy compared to standard Kiel probes used in engine testing. These changes allow efficiencies to be resolved within  ± 1% over a wider range of conditions than is currently achievable with Kiel probes.

  6. Interstellar Gas Flow Vector and Temperature Determination over 5 Years of IBEX Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Sokół, J. M.; Wurz, P.

    2015-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes the interstellar neutral gas flow trajectories at their perihelion in Earth's orbit every year from December through early April, when the Earth's orbital motion is into the oncoming flow. These observations have defined a narrow region of possible, but very tightly coupled interstellar neutral flow parameters, with inflow speed, latitude, and temperature as well-defined functions of inflow longitude. The best- fit flow vector is different by ≈ 3° and lower by ≈ 3 km/s than obtained previously with Ulysses GAS, but the temperature is comparable. The possible coupled parameter space reaches to the previous flow vector, but only for a substantially higher temperature (by ≈ 2000 K). Along with recent pickup ion observations and including historical observations of the interstellar gas, these findings have led to a discussion, whether the interstellar gas flow into the solar system has been stable or variable over time. These intriguing possibilities call for more detailed analysis and a longer database. IBEX has accumulated observations over six interstellar flow seasons. We review key observations and refinements in the analysis, in particular, towards narrowing the uncertainties in the temperature determination. We also address ongoing attempts to optimize the flow vector determination through varying the IBEX spacecraft pointing and discuss related implications for the local interstellar cloud and its interaction with the heliosphere.

  7. Robust control of speed and temperature in a power plant gas turbine.

    PubMed

    Najimi, Ebrahim; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an H(∞) robust controller has been designed for an identified model of MONTAZER GHAEM power plant gas turbine (GE9001E). In design phase, a linear model (ARX model) which is obtained using real data has been applied. Since the turbine has been used in a combined cycle power plant, its speed and also the exhaust gas temperature should be adjusted simultaneously by controlling fuel signals and compressor inlet guide vane (IGV) position. Considering the limitations on the system inputs, the aim of the control is to maintain the turbine speed and the exhaust gas temperature within desired interval under uncertainties and load demand disturbances. Simulation results of applying the proposed robust controller on the nonlinear model of the system (NARX model), fairly fulfilled the predefined aims. Simulations also show the improvement in the performance compared to MPC and PID controllers for the same conditions. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Room Temperature Halogenation of Polyimide Film Surface using Chlorine Trifluoride Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Kosuga, Takahiro; Koike, Kunihiko; Aida, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Takashi; Aihara, Masahiko

    2004-02-01

    In order to develop a new application of chlorine trifluoride gas, the halogenation of a polyimide film surface at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure is studied for the first time. The polyimide film surface after exposure to the chlorine trifluoride gas shows a decreased water contact angle with increasing chlorine trifluoride gas concentration and exposure period. Since both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy simultaneously showed the formation of a carbon-chlorine bond and carbon-fluorine bond, it is concluded that the chlorine trifluoride gas can easily and safely perform the halogenation of the polyimide film surface under the stated conditions using a low-cost process and equipment.

  9. Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Larry D.; Johnson, Jr., William R.

    1985-01-01

    A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

  10. Transport properties of N2 gas at cryogenic temperatures. [computation of viscosity and thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The viscosity and thermal conductivity of nitrogen gas for the temperature range 5 K - 135 K have been computed from the second Chapman-Enskog approximation. Quantum effects, which become appreciable at the lower temperatures, are included by utilizing collision integrals based on quantum theory. A Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential was assumed. The computations yield viscosities about 20 percent lower than those predicted for the high end of this temperature range by the method of corresponding states, but the agreement is excellent when the computed values are compared with existing experimental data.

  11. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  12. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  13. Highly selective room temperature NO2 gas sensor based on rGO-ZnO composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti, Kanaujiya, Neha; Varma, G. D.

    2018-05-01

    Blending metal oxide nanoparticles with graphene or its derivatives can greatly enhance gas sensing characteristics. In the present work, ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized via reflux method. Thin films of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and composite of rGO-ZnO have been fabricated by drop casting method for gas sensing application. The samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) for the structural and morphological studies respectively. Sensing measurements have been carried out for the composite film of rGO-ZnO for different concentrations of NO2 ranging from 4 to 100 ppm. Effect of increasing temperature on the sensing performance has also been studied and the rGO-ZnO composite sensor shows maximum percentage response at room temperature. The limit of detection (LOD) for rGO-ZnO composite sensor is 4ppm and it exhibits a high response of 48.4% for 40 ppm NO2 at room temperature. To check the selectivity of the composite sensor, sensor film has been exposed to 40 ppm different gases like CO, NH3, H2S and Cl2 at room temperature and the sensor respond negligibly to these gases. The present work suggests that rGO-ZnO composite material can be a better candidate for fabrication of highly selective room temperature NO2 gas sensor.

  14. Measurements of gas temperature in a radiatively heated particle laden turbulent duct flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Banko, Andrew; Villafane, Laura; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2017-11-01

    Predicting the absorption of radiation through a turbulent, particle laden flow is relevant in atmospheric sciences, turbulent combustion, and in the design of a particle solar receivers. In order to better understand the coupling between the particle phase, the turbulent fluid phase, and the incident radiation, the effects of radiation absorption by disperse inertial particles in a turbulent duct flow was studied experimentally. A fully-developed turbulent duct flow at Reynolds numbers of O(104) , laden with particles at mass loading ratios of 0.1-0.8, was subject to infrared radiation at varying incident powers. The particle Stokes number based on the Kolmogorov length scale was approximately 12, resulting in a preferentially concentrated particle phase. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating components of the gas phase temperature were made along the wall bisector. Results from mean temperature traverses of the gas phase show that a one-dimensional model can account for much of the mean gas temperature rise. Temperature fluctuations due to preferential concentration are significant and can reach approximately 50% of the mean temperature rise. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-NA0002373-1.

  15. Linearized-moment analysis of the temperature jump and temperature defect in the Knudsen layer of a rarefied gas.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Jun; Emerson, David R

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the thermal behavior of a rarefied gas remains a fundamental problem. In the present study, we investigate the predictive capabilities of the regularized 13 and 26 moment equations. In this paper, we consider low-speed problems with small gradients, and to simplify the analysis, a linearized set of moment equations is derived to explore a classic temperature problem. Analytical solutions obtained for the linearized 26 moment equations are compared with available kinetic models and can reliably capture all qualitative trends for the temperature-jump coefficient and the associated temperature defect in the thermal Knudsen layer. In contrast, the linearized 13 moment equations lack the necessary physics to capture these effects and consistently underpredict kinetic theory. The deviation from kinetic theory for the 13 moment equations increases significantly for specular reflection of gas molecules, whereas the 26 moment equations compare well with results from kinetic theory. To improve engineering analyses, expressions for the effective thermal conductivity and Prandtl number in the Knudsen layer are derived with the linearized 26 moment equations.

  16. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  17. A diode laser sensor for rapid, sensitive measurements of gas temperature and water vapour concentration at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, G. B.; Li, H.; Liu, X.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.; Allen, M. G.; Wehe, S. D.; Mulhall, P. A.; Kindle, H. S.

    2007-05-01

    A near-infrared diode laser sensor is presented that is capable of measuring time-varying gas temperature and water vapour concentration at temperatures up to 1050 K and pressures up to 25 atm with a bandwidth of 7.5 kHz. Measurements with noise-equivalent-absorbances of the order of 10-3 (10-5 Hz-1/2) are made possible in dynamic environments through the use of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection (2f) on two water vapour spectral features near 7203.9 and 7435.6 cm-1. Laser performance characteristics that become important at the large modulation depths needed at high pressures are accounted for in the WMS-2f signal analysis, and the utility of normalization by the 1f signal to correct for variations in laser intensity, transmission and detector gain is presented. Laboratory measurements with the sensor system in a static cell with known temperature and pressure agree to 3% RMS in temperature and 4% RMS in H2O mole fraction for 500 < T < 900 K and 1 < P < 25 atm. The sensor time response is demonstrated in a high-pressure shock tube where shock wave transients are successfully captured, the average measured post-shock temperature agrees within 1% of the expected value, and H2O mole fraction agrees within 8%.

  18. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  19. In Situ Temperature Measurements at the Svalbard Continental Margin: Implications for Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Wallmann, K.; Berndt, C.; Pape, T.; Freudenthal, T.; Bergenthal, M.; Bünz, S.; Bohrmann, G.

    2018-04-01

    During expedition MARIA S. MERIAN MSM57/2 to the Svalbard margin offshore Prins Karls Forland, the seafloor drill rig MARUM-MeBo70 was used to assess the landward termination of the gas hydrate system in water depths between 340 and 446 m. The study region shows abundant seafloor gas vents, clustered at a water depth of ˜400 m. The sedimentary environment within the upper 100 m below seafloor (mbsf) is dominated by ice-berg scours and glacial unconformities. Sediments cored included glacial diamictons and sheet-sands interbedded with mud. Seismic data show a bottom simulating reflector terminating ˜30 km seaward in ˜760 m water depth before it reaches the theoretical limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) at the drilling transect. We present results of the first in situ temperature measurements conducted with MeBo70 down to 28 mbsf. The data yield temperature gradients between ˜38°C km-1 at the deepest site (446 m) and ˜41°C km-1 at a shallower drill site (390 m). These data constrain combined with in situ pore-fluid data, sediment porosities, and thermal conductivities the dynamic evolution of the GHSZ during the past 70 years for which bottom water temperature records exist. Gas hydrate is not stable in the sediments at sites shallower than 390 m water depth at the time of acquisition (August 2016). Only at the drill site in 446 m water depth, favorable gas hydrate stability conditions are met (maximum vertical extent of ˜60 mbsf); however, coring did not encounter any gas hydrates.

  20. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  1. Optical Measurement and Visualization in High-Pressure, High-Temperature, Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Locke, Randy J.

    2000-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), planar Mie scattering (PMie), and linear (1-D) spontaneous Raman scattering are applied to flame tube and sector combustors that burn Jet-A fuel at a range of inlet temperatures and pressures that simulate conditions expected in future high-performance civilian gas turbine engines. Chemiluminescence arising from C2 in the flame was also imaged. Flame spectral emissions measurements were obtained using a scanning spectrometer. Several different advanced concept fuel injectors were examined. First-ever PLIF and chemiluminescence data are presented from the 60-atm Gas turbine combustor facility.

  2. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  3. Examination of charge transfer in Au/YSZ for high-temperature optical gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Au-nanoparticle incorporated oxide thin film materials demonstrate significant promise as functionalsensor materials for high temperature optical gas sensing in severe environments relevant for fossil andnuclear based power generation. The Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system has been extensivelystudied in the literature and serves as a model system for fundamental investigations that seek to betterunderstand the mechanistic origin of the plasmonic gas sensing response. In this work, X-ray photoelec-tron spectroscopy techniques are applied to Au/YSZ films in an attempt to provide further experimentalevidence for a proposed sensing mechanism involving a change in free carrier density of Au nanoparticles due to charge transfer.

  4. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  5. Ideal Gas with a Varying (Negative Absolute) Temperature: an Alternative to Dark Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subhajit; Mondal, Anindita; Corda, Christian

    2018-02-01

    The present work is an attempt to investigate whether the evolutionary history of the Universe from the offset of inflation can be described by assuming the cosmic fluid to be an ideal gas with a specific gas constant but a varying negative absolute temperature (NAT). The motivation of this work is to search for an alternative to the "exotic" and "supernatural" dark energy (DE). In fact, the NAT works as an "effective quintessence" and there is need to deal neither with exotic matter like DE nor with modified gravity theories. For the sake of completeness, we release some clarifications on NATs in Section 3 of the paper.

  6. Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition in High-Temperature Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Ronald; Whitty, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) when combined with carbon capture and storage can be one of the cleanest methods of extracting energy from coal. Control of coal and biomass gasification processes to accommodate the changing character of input-fuel streams is required for practical implementation of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies. Therefore a fast time-response sensor is needed for real-time monitoring of the composition and ideally the heating value of the synthesis gas (here called syngas) as it exits the gasifier. The goal of this project was the design, construction, and demonstration an in situ laserabsorption sensor to monitor multiplemore » species in the syngas output from practical-scale coal gasifiers. This project investigated the hypothesis of using laser absorption sensing in particulateladen syngas. Absorption transitions were selected with design rules to optimize signal strength while minimizing interference from other species. Successful in situ measurements in the dusty, high-pressure syngas flow were enabled by Stanford’s normalized and scanned wavelength modulation strategy. A prototype sensor for CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O was refined with experiments conducted in the laboratory at Stanford University, a pilot-scale at the University of Utah, and an engineering-scale gasifier at DoE’s National Center for Carbon Capture with the demonstration of a prototype sensor with technical readiness level 6 in the 2014 measurement campaign.« less

  7. THETRIS: A MICRO-SCALE TEMPERATURE AND GAS RELEASE MODEL FOR TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ortensi; A.M. Ougouag

    2011-12-01

    The dominating mechanism in the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the Doppler feedback effect. These reactor designs are fueled with sub-millimeter sized kernels formed into TRISO particles that are imbedded in a graphite matrix. The best spatial and temporal representation of the feedback effect is obtained from an accurate approximation of the fuel temperature. Most accident scenarios in HTRs are characterized by large time constants and slow changes in the fuel and moderator temperature fields. In these situations a meso-scale, pebble and compact scale, solution provides a good approximation of the fuel temperature. Micro-scale models aremore » necessary in order to obtain accurate predictions in faster transients or when parameters internal to the TRISO are needed. Since these coated particles constitute one of the fundamental design barriers for the release of fission products, it becomes important to understand the transient behavior inside this containment system. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed and incorporated into the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The code includes gas release models that provide a simple predictive capability of the internal pressure during transients. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with other micro-scale fuel models, but with the added capability to analyze gas release, internal pressure buildup, and effects of a gap in the TRISO. The analyses show the instances when the micro-scale models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature and Doppler feedback. In addition, a sensitivity study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap is included. Although the formation of a gap occurs under special conditions, its consequences on the dynamic behavior of the reactor can cause unexpected responses during fast transients. Nevertheless, the

  8. Rapid Measurement of Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Electrochemical Gas Sensor using Transient Double Potential Amperometry

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hao; Yin, Heyu; Mason, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Intense study on gas sensors has been conducted to implement fast gas sensing with high sensitivity, reliability and long lifetime. This paper presents a rapid amperometric method for gas sensing based on a room temperature ionic liquid electrochemical gas sensor. To implement a miniaturized sensor with a fast response time, a three electrode system with gold interdigitated electrodes was fabricated by photolithography on a porous polytetrafluoroethylene substrate that greatly enhances gas diffusion. Furthermore, based on the reversible reaction of oxygen, a new transient double potential amperometry (DPA) was explored for electrochemical analysis to decrease the measurement time and reverse reaction by-products that could cause current drift. Parameters in transient DPA including oxidation potential, oxidation period, reduction period and sample point were investigated to study their influence on the performance of the sensor. Oxygen measurement could be accomplished in 4 s, and the sensor presented a sensitivity of 0.2863 μA/[%O2] and a linearity of 0.9943 when tested in air samples with different oxygen concentrations. Repeatability and long-term stability were also investigated, and the sensor was shown to exhibit good reliability. In comparison to conventional constant potential amperometry, transient DPA was shown to reduce relative standard deviation by 63.2%. With transient DPA, the sensitivity, linearity, repeatability, measurement time and current drift characteristics demonstrated by the presented gas sensor are promising for acute exposure applications. PMID:28603384

  9. Rapid Measurement of Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Electrochemical Gas Sensor using Transient Double Potential Amperometry.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hao; Yin, Heyu; Mason, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    Intense study on gas sensors has been conducted to implement fast gas sensing with high sensitivity, reliability and long lifetime. This paper presents a rapid amperometric method for gas sensing based on a room temperature ionic liquid electrochemical gas sensor. To implement a miniaturized sensor with a fast response time, a three electrode system with gold interdigitated electrodes was fabricated by photolithography on a porous polytetrafluoroethylene substrate that greatly enhances gas diffusion. Furthermore, based on the reversible reaction of oxygen, a new transient double potential amperometry (DPA) was explored for electrochemical analysis to decrease the measurement time and reverse reaction by-products that could cause current drift. Parameters in transient DPA including oxidation potential, oxidation period, reduction period and sample point were investigated to study their influence on the performance of the sensor. Oxygen measurement could be accomplished in 4 s, and the sensor presented a sensitivity of 0.2863 μA/[%O 2 ] and a linearity of 0.9943 when tested in air samples with different oxygen concentrations. Repeatability and long-term stability were also investigated, and the sensor was shown to exhibit good reliability. In comparison to conventional constant potential amperometry, transient DPA was shown to reduce relative standard deviation by 63.2%. With transient DPA, the sensitivity, linearity, repeatability, measurement time and current drift characteristics demonstrated by the presented gas sensor are promising for acute exposure applications.

  10. Rapid nondestructive spectrometric measurement of temperature-dependent gas-liquid solubility equilibria.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Yang, Bingcheng

    2011-02-01

    Gas-liquid solubility equilibria (Henry's Law behavior) are of basic interest to many different areas. Temperature-dependent aqueous solubilities of various organic compounds are of fundamental importance in many branches of environmental science. In a number of situations, the gas/dissolved solute of interest has characteristic spectroscopic absorption that is distinct from that of the solvent. For such cases, we report facile nondestructive rapid measurement of the temperature-dependent Henry's law constant (K(H)) in a static sealed spectrometric cell. Combined with a special cell design, multiwavelength measurement permits a large range of K(H) to be spanned. It is possible to derive the K(H) values from the absorbance measured in the gas phase only, the liquid phase only (preferred), and both phases. Underlying principles are developed, and all three approaches are illustrated for a solute like acetone in water. A thermostatic spectrophotometer cell compartment, widely used and available, facilitates rapid temperature changes and allows rapid temperature-dependent equilibrium measurements. Applicability is shown for both acetone and methyl isobutyl ketone. Very little sample is required for the measurement; the K(H) for 4-hydroxynonenal, a marker for oxidative stress, is measured to be 56.9 ± 2.6 M/atm (n = 3) at 37.4 °C with 1 mg of the material available.

  11. Durable fiber optic sensor for gas temperature measurement in the hot section of turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregay, George W.; Calabrese, Paul R.; Finney, Mark J.; Stukey, K. B.

    1994-10-01

    An optical sensor system extends gas temperature measurement capability in turbine engines beyond the present generation of thermocouple technology. The sensing element which consists of a thermally emissive insert embedded inside a sapphire lightguide is capable of operating above the melting point of nickel-based super alloys. The emissive insert generates an optical signal as a function of temperature. Continued development has led to an optically averaged system by combining the optical signals from four individual sensing elements at a single detector assembly. The size of the signal processor module has been reduced to overall dimensions of 2 X 4 X 0.7 inches. The durability of the optical probe design has been evaluated in an electric-utility operated gas turbine under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute. The temperature probe was installed between the first stage rotor and second stage nozzle on a General Electric MS7001B turbine. The combined length of the ceramic support tube and sensing element reached 1.5 inches into the hot gas stream. A total of over 2000 hours has been accumulated at probe operation temperatures near 1600 degree(s)F. An optically averaged sensor system was designed to replace the existing four thermocouple probes on the upper half of a GE F404 aircraft turbine engine. The system was ground tested for 250 hours as part of GE Aircraft Engines IR&D Optical Engine Program. Subsequently, two flight sensor systems were shipped for use on the FOCSI (Fiber Optic Control System Integration) Program. The optical harnesses, each with four optical probes, measure the exhaust gas temperature in a GE F404 engine.

  12. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  13. Wettability of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride by Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    1991-01-01

    The wetting of pyrolytic boron nitride by molten 99.9999 percent pure aluminum was investigated by using the sessile drop method in a vacuum operating at approximately 660 micro-Pa at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 C. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with an increase in temperature. For temperatures at 900 C or less, the equilibrium contact angle was greater than 90 deg. At 1000 C a nonwetting-to-wetting transition occurred and the contact angle stabilized at 49 deg.

  14. Growth of single-layer boron nitride dome-shaped nanostructures catalysed by iron clusters.

    PubMed

    Torre, A La; Åhlgren, E H; Fay, M W; Ben Romdhane, F; Skowron, S T; Parmenter, C; Davies, A J; Jouhannaud, J; Pourroy, G; Khlobystov, A N; Brown, P D; Besley, E; Banhart, F

    2016-08-11

    We report on the growth and formation of single-layer boron nitride dome-shaped nanostructures mediated by small iron clusters located on flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. The nanostructures were synthesized in situ at high temperature inside a transmission electron microscope while the e-beam was blanked. The formation process, typically originating at defective step-edges on the boron nitride support, was investigated using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and computational modelling. Computational modelling showed that the domes exhibit a nanotube-like structure with flat circular caps and that their stability was comparable to that of a single boron nitride layer.

  15. Effects of the Process Parameters on the Microstructure and Properties of Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Zeng, Dezhi; Yan, Jing; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-04-01

    The effects of process parameters on the microstructure, microhardness, and dry-sliding wear behavior of plasma nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and wear testing. The results show that a wear-resistant nitrided layer was formed on the surface of direct current plasma nitrided 17-4PH martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure and thickness of the nitrided layer is dependent on the treatment temperature rather than process pressure. XRD indicated that a single α N phase was formed during nitriding at 623 K (350 °C). When the temperature increased, the α N phase disappeared and CrN transformed in the nitrided layer. The hardness measurement demonstrated that the hardness of the stainless substrate steel increased from 320 HV0.1 in the untreated condition increasing to about 1275HV0.1 after nitriding 623 K (350 °C)/600 pa/4 hours. The extremely high values of the microhardness achieved by the great misfit-induced stress fields associated with the plenty of dislocation group and stacking fault. Dry-sliding wear resistance was improved by DC plasma nitriding. The best wear-resistance performance of a nitrided sample was obtained after nitriding at 673 K (350 °C), when the single α N-phase was produced and there were no CrN precipitates in the nitrided layer.

  16. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appearsmore » to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a

  17. Altitude Investigation of Gas Temperature Distribution at Turbine of Three Similar Axial-Flow Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, W.R.; Schulze, F.W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of inlet pressure, corrected engine speed, and turbine temperature level on turbine-inlet gas temperature distributions was conducted on a J40-WE-6, interim J40-WE-6, and prototype J40-WE-8 turbojet engine in the altitude wind tunnel at the NAC.4 Lewis laboratory. The engines were investigated over a range of simulated pressure altitudes from 15,000 to 55,000 feet, flight Mach numbers from 0.12 to 0.64, and corrected engine speeds from 7198 to 8026 rpm, The gas temperature distribution at the turbine of the three engines over the range of operating conditions investigated was considered satisfactory from the standpoint of desired temperature distribution with one exception - the distribution for the J40-WE-6 engine indicated a trend with decreasing engine-inlet pressure for the temperature to exceed the desired in the region of the blade hub. Installation of a compressor-outlet mixer vane assembly remedied this undesirable temperature distribution, The experimental data have shown that turbine-inlet temperature distributions are influenced in the expected manner by changes in compressor-outlet pressure or mass-flow distribution and by changes in combustor hole-area distribution. The similarity between turbine-inlet and turbine-outlet temperature distribution indicated only a small shift in temperature distribution imposed by the turbine rotors. The attainable jet thrusts of the three engines were influenced in different degrees and directions by changes in temperature distributions with change in engine-inlet pressure. Inability to match the desired temperature distribution resulted, for the J40-WE-6 engine, in an 11-percent thrust loss based on an average turbine-inlet temperature of 1500 F at an engine-inlet pressure of 500 pounds per square foot absolute. Departure from the desired temperature distribution in the Slade tip region results, for the prototype J40-WE-8 engine, in an attainable thrust increase of 3 to 4 percent as

  18. High resolution temperature mapping of gas turbine combustor simulator exhaust with femtosecond laser induced fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robert B.; Yun, Sangsig; Ding, Huimin; Charbonneau, Michel; Coulas, David; Lu, Ping; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Ramachandran, Nanthan

    2017-04-01

    Femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) laser written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), have demonstrated great potential for extreme sensing. Such conditions are inherent in advanced gas turbine engines under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and the ability to measure temperature gradients in these harsh environments is currently limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding the high temperature, pressure and corrosive conditions present. This paper discusses fabrication and deployment of several fs-IR written FBG arrays, for monitoring exhaust temperature gradients of a gas turbine combustor simulator. Results include: contour plots of measured temperature gradients, contrast with thermocouple data.

  19. Identifying Liquid-Gas System Misconceptions and Addressing Them Using a Laboratory Exercise on Pressure-Temperature Diagrams of a Mixed Gas Involving Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on students' understandings of a liquid-gas system with liquid-vapor equilibrium in a closed system using a pressure-temperature ("P-T") diagram. By administrating three assessment questions concerning the "P-T" diagrams of liquid-gas systems to students at the beginning of undergraduate general chemistry…

  20. Room-Temperature Determination of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Concentration and Mobility in Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, S. E.; Mena, R. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for determination of room-temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration and mobility in heterostructures is presented. Using simultaneous fits of the longitudinal and transverse voltages as a function of applied magnetic field, we were able to separate the parameters associated with the 2DEG from those of the parallel layer. Comparison with the Shubnikov-de Haas data derived from measurements at liquid helium temperatures proves that the analysis of the room-temperature data provides an excellent estimate of the 2DEG concentration. In addition we were able to obtain for the first time the room-temperature mobility of the 2DEG, an important parameter to device application. Both results are significantly different from those derived from conventional Hall analysis.

  1. ASCA Temperature Maps for Merging and Relaxed Clusters and Physics of the Cluster Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, M.; Sarazin, C.; Nevalainen, J.; Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.

    1999-01-01

    ASCA temperature maps for several galaxy clusters undergoing strong mergers will be presented. From these maps, it is possible to estimate velocities of the colliding subclusters. I will discuss several interesting implications of these estimates for the physics of the cluster gas and the shape of the gravitational potential. I will also present temperature maps and profiles for several relaxed clusters selected for X-ray mass determination, and present the mass values derived without the assumption of isothermality. The accurate mass-temperature and luminosity-temperature relations will be discussed. This talk will review how AXAF will revolutionize X-ray astronomy through its radically better imaging and spectroscopic resolution. Examples from many fields of astrophysics will be given.

  2. Effects of temperature distribution and elastic properties of materials on gas-turbine-disk stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, Arthur G; Faldetta, Richard D

    1947-01-01

    Calculations were made to determine the influence of changes in temperature distribution and in elastic material properties on calculated elastic stresses for a typical gas-turbine disk. Severe temperature gradients caused thermal stresses of sufficient magnitude to reduce the operating safety of the disk. Small temperature gradients were found to be desirable because they produced thermal stresses that subtracted from the centrifugal stresses in the region of the rim. The thermal gradients produced a tendency for a severe stress condition to exist near the rim but this stress condition could be shifted away from the region of blade attachment by altering the temperature distribution. The investigation of elastic material properties showed that centrifugal stresses are slightly affected by changes in modulus of elasticity, but that thermal stresses are approximately proportional to modulus of elasticity and to coefficient of thermal expansion.

  3. Gas temperature and density measurements based on spectrally resolved Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Lock, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of molecular Rayleigh scattering for measurements of gas density and temperature is evaluated. The technique used is based on the measurement of the spectrum of the scattered light, where both temperature and density are determined from the spectral shape. Planar imaging of Rayleigh scattering from air using a laser light sheet is evaluated for ambient conditions. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for the shot-noise limited density and temperature measurement uncertainties are calculated for an ideal optical spectrum analyzer and for a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static, imaging mode. With this technique, a single image of the Rayleigh scattered light can be analyzed to obtain density (or pressure) and temperature. Experimental results are presented for planar measurements taken in a heated air stream.

  4. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  5. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pocoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  6. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  7. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  8. THERMTRAJ: A FORTRAN program to compute the trajectory and gas film temperatures of zero pressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J.; Carlson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called THERMTRAJ is presented which can be used to compute the trajectory of high altitude scientific zero pressure balloons from launch through all subsequent phases of the balloon flight. In addition, balloon gas and film temperatures can be computed at every point of the flight. The program has the ability to account for ballasting, changes in cloud cover, variable atmospheric temperature profiles, and both unconditional valving and scheduled valving of the balloon gas. The program was verified for an extensive range of balloon sizes (from 0.5 to 41.47 million cubic feet). Instructions on program usage, listing of the program source deck, input data and printed and plotted output for a verification case are included.

  9. Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alptekin, G.O.; Copeland, R.; Dubovik, M.

    2002-09-20

    Gasification technologies convert coal and other heavy feedstocks into synthesis gas feed streams that can be used in the production of a wide variety of chemicals, ranging from hydrogen through methanol, ammonia, acetic anhydride, dimethyl ether (DME), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), high molecular weight liquid hydrocarbons and waxes. Syngas can also be burned directly as a fuel in advanced power cycles to generate electricity with very high efficiency. However, the coal-derived synthesis gas contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the catalysts that are used in the downstream manufacturing processes and may also be regulated in powermore » plant emissions. Particularly, the catalysts used in the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol and other liquid fuels (Fischer-Tropsch liquids) have been found to be very sensitive to the low levels of poisons, especially arsenic, that are present in the synthesis gas from coal. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing an expendable high capacity, low-cost chemical absorbent to remove arsenic from coal-derived syngas. Unlike most of the commercially available sorbents that physically adsorb arsenic, TDA's sorbent operates at elevated temperatures and removes the arsenic through chemical reaction. The arsenic content in the coal gas stream is reduced to ppb levels with the sorbent by capturing and stabilizing the arsenic gas (As4) and arsenic hydrides (referred to as arsine, AsH3) in the solid state. To demonstrate the concept of high temperature arsenic removal from coal-derived syngas, we carried out bench-scale experiments to test the absorption capacity of a variety of sorbent formulations under representative conditions. Using on-line analysis techniques, we monitored the pre- and post-breakthrough arsine concentrations over different sorbent samples. Some of these samples exhibited pre-breakthrough arsine absorption capacity over 40% wt. (capacity is defined as lb of arsenic absorbed/lb of sorbent

  10. Temporally and Spatially Resolved Plasma Spectroscopy in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ultra-Thin Boron Nitride Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0196 TEMPORALLY AND SPATIALLY RESOLVED PLASMA SPECTROSCOPY IN PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ULTRA-THIN BORON NITRIDE...AND SPATIALLY RESOLVED PLASMA SPECTROSCOPY IN PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ULTRA-THIN BORON NITRIDE FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650...distributions within a PVD plasma plume ablated from a boron nitride (BN) target by a KrF laser at different pressures of nitrogen gas were investigated

  11. Dynamic gas temperature measurements using a personal computer for data acquisition and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a dynamic gas temperature measurement system. It has frequency response to 1000 Hz, and can be used to measure temperatures in hot, high pressure, high velocity flows. A personal computer is used for collecting and processing data, which results in a much shorter wait for results than previously. The data collection process and the user interface are described in detail. The changes made in transporting the software from a mainframe to a personal computer are described in appendices, as is the overall theory of operation.

  12. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  13. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 2: Operation and program manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purpura, P. T.

    1983-01-01

    The hot section technology (HOST) dynamic gas temperature measurement system computer program acquires data from two type B thermocouples of different diameters. The analysis method determines the in situ value of an aerodynamic parameter T, containing the heat transfer coefficient from the transfer function of the two thermocouples. This aerodynamic parameter is used to compute a fequency response spectrum and compensate the dynamic portion of the signal of the smaller thermocouple. The calculations for the aerodynamic parameter and the data compensation technique are discussed. Compensated data are presented in either the time or frequency domain, time domain data as dynamic temperature vs time, or frequency domain data.

  14. Study of flue-gas temperature difference in supercritical once-through boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yanchang; Li, Bing; Song, Ang

    2018-02-01

    The 600 MW coal-fired once-through Boilers with opposed firing at a power plant are found to experience marked temperature variation and even overtemperature on the wall of the heating surface as a result of flue-gas temperature (FGT) variation in the boiler. In this study, operational adjustments were made to the pulverizing, combustion, and secondary air box systems in these boilers, in order to solve problems in internal combustion. The adjustments were found to reduce FGT difference and optimize the boiler’ combustion conditions. The results of this study can provide a reference for optimization of coal-fired boiler of the same type in similar conditions.

  15. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 2: Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Dana R.

    1986-01-01

    The Dynamic Gas Temperature Measurement System compensation software accepts digitized data from two different diameter thermocouples and computes a compensated frequency response spectrum for one of the thermocouples. Detailed discussions of the physical system, analytical model, and computer software are presented in this volume and in Volume 1 of this report under Task 3. Computer program software restrictions and test cases are also presented. Compensated and uncompensated data may be presented in either the time or frequency domain. Time domain data are presented as instantaneous temperature vs time. Frequency domain data may be presented in several forms such as power spectral density vs frequency.

  16. γ-irradiation induced zinc ferrites and their enhanced room-temperature ammonia gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, S. D.; Awasarmol, V. V.; Ghule, B. G.; Shaikh, S. F.; Gore, S. K.; Sharma, R. P.; Pawar, P. P.; Mane, R. S.

    2018-03-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs), synthesized using a facile and cost-effective sol-gel auto-combustion method, were irradiated with 2 and 5 kGy γ-doses using 60Co as a radioactive source. Effect of γ-irradiation on the structure, morphology, pore-size and pore-volume and room-temperature (300 K) gas sensor performance has been measured and reported. Both as-synthesized and γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs reveal remarkable gas sensor activity to ammonia in contrast to methanol, ethanol, acetone and toluene volatile organic gases. The responses of pristine, 2 and 5 kGy γ-irradiated ZnFe2O4 NPs are respectively 55%, 66% and 81% @100 ppm concentration of ammonia, signifying an importance of γ-irradiation for enhancing the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of ZnFe2O4 NPs as ammonia gas sensors. Thereby, due to increase in surface area and crystallinity on γ-doses, the γ-irradiation improves the room-temperature ammonia gas sensing performance of ZnFe2O4.

  17. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  18. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James William; Bayless, Paul David; Nelson, Lee Orville

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James William; Bayless, Paul David; Nelson, Lee Orville

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  20. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  1. An Annotated Bibliography on Silicon Nitride for Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    a sea of interconnected flakes. Nitriding at temp- eratures above the melting point of Si leads to the growth of largely /3-Si3N4 with only small...partly to oxidation and partly to microplasticity at the crack tip. High temperature modulus of elasticity decreased with increasing temperature but the

  2. Porous Si nanowires for highly selective room-temperature NO2 gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yong Jung; Mirzaei, Ali; Gil Na, Han; Kang, Sung Yong; Choi, Myung Sik; Bang, Jae Hoon; Oum, Wansik; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-07-01

    We report the room-temperature sensing characteristics of Si nanowires (NWs) fabricated from p-Si wafers by a metal-assisted chemical etching method, which is a facile and low-cost method. X-ray diffraction was used to the the study crystallinity and phase formation of Si NWs, and product morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After confirmation of Si NW formation via the SEM and TEM micrographs, sensing tests were carried out at room temperature, and it was found that the Si NW sensor prepared from Si wafers with a resistivity of 0.001–0.003 Ω.cm had the highest response to NO2 gas (Rg/Ra = 1.86 for 50 ppm NO2), with a fast response (15 s) and recovery (30 s) time. Furthermore, the sensor responses to SO2, toluene, benzene, H2, and ethanol were nearly negligible, demonstrating the excellent selectivity to NO2 gas. The gas-sensing mechanism is discussed in detail. The present sensor can operate at room temperature, and is compatible with the microelectronic fabrication process, demonstrating its promise for next-generation Si-based electronics fused with functional chemical sensors.

  3. Porous Si nanowires for highly selective room-temperature NO2 gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Jung; Mirzaei, Ali; Na, Han Gil; Kang, Sung Yong; Choi, Myung Sik; Bang, Jae Hoon; Oum, Wansik; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-07-20

    We report the room-temperature sensing characteristics of Si nanowires (NWs) fabricated from p-Si wafers by a metal-assisted chemical etching method, which is a facile and low-cost method. X-ray diffraction was used to the the study crystallinity and phase formation of Si NWs, and product morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After confirmation of Si NW formation via the SEM and TEM micrographs, sensing tests were carried out at room temperature, and it was found that the Si NW sensor prepared from Si wafers with a resistivity of 0.001-0.003 Ω.cm had the highest response to NO 2 gas (R g /R a  = 1.86 for 50 ppm NO 2 ), with a fast response (15 s) and recovery (30 s) time. Furthermore, the sensor responses to SO 2 , toluene, benzene, H 2 , and ethanol were nearly negligible, demonstrating the excellent selectivity to NO 2 gas. The gas-sensing mechanism is discussed in detail. The present sensor can operate at room temperature, and is compatible with the microelectronic fabrication process, demonstrating its promise for next-generation Si-based electronics fused with functional chemical sensors.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEMPERATURE IN THE ASH-GAS FLOW DURING KORYAKSKY VOLCANO ERUPTION IN 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E.; Droznin, V.

    2009-12-01

    The observations of the ash-gas plumes during the Koryaksky eruption in March 2009 by the high resolution thermovision camera allowed obtaining thermal distributions inside the ash-gas flows. The plume structure is formed by single emissions. They rise at the rate of 5.5-7 m/s. The plume structure in general is represented as 3 zones: 1. a zone of high heat exchange; 2. a zone of floating up; 3. a zone of lateral movement. The plume temperature within the zone of lateral movement exceeds the atmospheric temperature by 3-5 oC, within the zone of floating up it exceeds by 20 oC. Its rate within the zone of floating up comprises 5-7 m/s. At the boundary between the zones of high heat exchange and floating up where we know the plume section, from heat balance equation we can estimate steam rate and heat power of the fluid thermal flow. Power of the overheated steam was estimated as Q=35 kg/s. It forms the ash-gas plume from the eruption and has temperature equal to 450 oC. The total volume of water steam produced during 100 days of eruption was estimated 3*105 t, its energy - 109 MJ.

  5. Wafer-Scale and Wrinkle-Free Epitaxial Growth of Single-Orientated Multilayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride on Sapphire.

    PubMed

    Jang, A-Rang; Hong, Seokmo; Hyun, Chohee; Yoon, Seong In; Kim, Gwangwoo; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Park, Sung O; Wong, Kester; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Noejung; Yu, Kwangnam; Choi, Eunjip; Mishchenko, Artem; Withers, Freddie; Novoselov, Kostya S; Lim, Hyunseob; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2016-05-11

    Large-scale growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride has been a challenge in two-dimensional-material-based electronics. Herein, we present wafer-scale and wrinkle-free epitaxial growth of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride on a sapphire substrate by using high-temperature and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations and theoretical calculations reveal that synthesized hexagonal boron nitride has a single rotational orientation with AA' stacking order. A facile method for transferring hexagonal boron nitride onto other target substrates was developed, which provides the opportunity for using hexagonal boron nitride as a substrate in practical electronic circuits. A graphene field effect transistor fabricated on our hexagonal boron nitride sheets shows clear quantum oscillation and highly improved carrier mobility because the ultraflatness of the hexagonal boron nitride surface can reduce the substrate-induced degradation of the carrier mobility of two-dimensional materials.

  6. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  7. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devicesmore » and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.« less

  8. A System And Method To Determine Thermophysical Properties Of A Multi-Component Gas At Arbitrary Temperature And Pressure

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas E.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2004-03-09

    A method to determine thermodynamic properties of a natural gas hydrocarbon, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. Thus, the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for mass flow calculations, to determine the speed of sound at standard pressure and temperature, and to determine various thermophysical characteristics of the gas.

  9. Role of temperature on static correlational properties in a spin-polarized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Priya; Moudgil, R. K., E-mail: rkmoudgil@kuk.ac.in; Kumar, Krishan

    We have studied the effect of temperature on the static correlational properties of a spin-polarized three-dimensional electron gas (3DEG) over a wide coupling and temperature regime. This problem has been very recently studied by Brown et al. using the restricted path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) technique in the warm-dense regime. To this endeavor, we have used the finite temperature version of the dynamical mean-field theory of Singwi et al, the so-called quantum STLS (qSTLS) approach. The static density structure factor and the static pair-correlation function are calculated, and compared with the RPIMC simulation data. We find an excellent agreement with themore » simulation at high temperature over a wide coupling range. However, the agreement is seen to somewhat deteriorate with decreasing temperature. The pair-correlation function is found to become small negative for small electron separation. This may be attributed to the inadequacy of the mean-field theory in dealing with the like spin electron correlations in the strong-coupling domain. A nice agreement with RPIMC data at high temperature seems to arise due to weakening of both the exchange and coulomb correlations with rising temperature.« less

  10. Diode-Laser Absorption Sensor for Line-of-Sight Gas Temperature Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Scott T.; Wang, Jian; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2001-08-01

    Line-of-sight diode-laser absorption techniques have been extended to enable temperature measurements in nonuniform-property flows. The sensing strategy for such flows exploits the broad wavelength-scanning abilities ( >1.7 nm ~ 30 cm-1 ) of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to interrogate multiple absorption transitions along a single line of sight. To demonstrate the strategy, a VCSEL-based sensor for oxygen gas temperature distributions was developed. A VCSEL beam was directed through paths containing atmospheric-pressure air with known (and relatively simple) temperature distributions in the 200 -700 K range. The VCSEL was scanned over ten transitions in the R branch of the oxygen A band near 760 nm and optionally over six transitions in the P branch. Temperature distribution information can be inferred from these scans because the line strength of each probed transition has a unique temperature dependence; the measurement accuracy and resolution depend on the details of this temperature dependence and on the total number of lines scanned. The performance of the sensing strategy can be optimized and predicted theoretically. Because the sensor exhibits a fast time response ( ~30 ms) and can be adapted to probe a variety of species over a range of temperatures and pressures, it shows promise for industrial application.

  11. Low-temperature amorphous boron nitride on Si0.7Ge0.3(001), Cu, and HOPG from sequential exposures of N2H4 and BCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steven; Edmonds, Mary; Sardashti, Kasra; Clemons, Max; Park, Jun Hong; Yoshida, Naomi; Dong, Lin; Nemani, Srinivas; Yieh, Ellie; Holmes, Russell; Alvarez, Daniel; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2018-05-01

    Low-temperature sequential exposures of N2H4 and BCl3 have been performed on Si0.3Ge0.7(001), Cu, and HOPG surfaces at 350 °C. A novel BN ALD process has been achieved on Si0.3Ge0.7(001) with 60 cycles of BN ALD producing a uniform, pinhole-free thin film with low contamination, as characterized with XPS and AFM. On Cu and Si0.3Ge0.7(001), XPS spectra indicated a near stoichiometric BN film. While AFM imaging indicated the deposition on Cu yielded nanometer-scale etching, conformal deposition was observed on Si0.3Ge0.7(001). The BN ALD also nucleated on inert HOPG via step edges. In situ STM imaging showed that cyclic exposures at 350 °C were able to decorate step edges with features ∼2 nm tall and ∼200 nm wide, indicating the propensity for BN to grow in the planar direction. The N2H4 and BCl3 ALD allows for the deposition of low oxygen, low carbon films, but to avoid etching, the growth should be nucleated by N2H4, since exposure to BCl3 can result in the formation of volatile Cl-containing surface species on many substrates. Therefore, the formation of a stable surface nitride prior to BCl3 exposure is necessary to prevent formation and desorption of volatile species from the substrate.

  12. Testing marine shales' ability to generate catalytic gas at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Sauer, P. E.; Mastalerz, M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases are generally thought to originatevia low-temperature microbial or high-temperature thermogenicpathways (Whiticar, 1996) that can be distinguished by compound-specific hydrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios. An alternative low-temperature catalytic pathway for hydrocarbon generation from sedimentary organic matter has been proposed to be active at temperatures as low as 50oC (e.g.,Mango and Jarvie,2009,2010; Mango et al., 2010; Bartholomew et al., 1999). This hypothesis, however, still requires rigoroustesting by independent laboratory experiments.The possibility of catalytic generation of hydrocarbons in some source rocks (most likely in relatively impermeable and organic-rich shales where reduced catalytic centers can be best preserved) would offer an explanation for the finding of gas of non-microbial origin in formations that lack the thermal maturity for generating thermogenic gas.It is unknown whether catalytically generated methane would be isotopically different from thermogenicmethane (δ13CCH4>-50‰, δ2HCH4from -275‰ to -100‰) ormicrobially generated methane (δ13CCH4from -40‰ to -110‰, δ2HCH4from -400‰to -150‰) (Whiticar, 1998). In order to test for catalytic gas generationin water-wet shales and coals, we are conductinglaboratory experiments at three temperatures (60°C, 100°C, 200°C)and three pressures (ambient pressure, 107 Pa, 3x107 Pa)over periods of six months to several years. So far, our longest running experiments have reached one year. We sealed different types of thermally immature, pre-evacuatedshales (Mowry, New Albany, and Mahoganyshales) and coals (SpringfieldCoal and Wilcoxlignite)with isotopically defined waters in gold cells in the absence of elemental oxygen.Preliminary results show that these samples, depending on conditions, can generate light hydrocarbon gases (methane, ethane and propane) and CO2. Methane, CO2, and traces of H2havebeen generated at 60°C, whereas experiments at 100°C and 200

  13. Development of silicon nitride of improved toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of reaction sintered Si2N4 energy absorbing surface layers to hot-pressed Si3N4 was investigated. The surface layer was formed by in-place nitridation of silicon powder. It was found that reaction sintered Si3N4 layers of 1 mm thickness, fabricated from either -100, +200, -200, or -325 mesh Si powder and nitrided in 96% N2/4% H2 so that approximately 20-25 vol % unnitrided Si remained in the layer, resulted in a sevenfold increase in ballistic impact resistance of a 0.64 cm thick hot-pressed SI3N4 substrate from RT 1370 C. Both NC-132 SI3N4, with MgO additive, and NCX-34 Si3N4, with Y2O3 additive, were evaluated as substrate material. The finer grain size -200 and -325 mesh nitrided Si layers were for their smoothness and relatively high density. It was found that nitriding in N2/H2 mixtures, rather than pure N2, resulted in a microstructure that did not substantially degrade the strength of the hot-pressed Si3N4 substrate. Thermal cycling tests on the RSSN/HPSN combinations from 200 C to 1370 C for 75 cycles in air did not degrade the impact resistance nor the interfacial bonding, although a large amount of internal silica formation occurred within the RSSN layer. Mach 0.8, 5 hr, hot gas erosion tests showed no surface recession of RSSN layers at 1200 C and slight surface recession at 1370 C.

  14. A Passive Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Gas Sensor With Self-Correction Against Fluctuations of Ambient Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Surman, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled fluctuations of ambient temperature in the field typically greatly reduce accuracy of gas sensors. In this study, we developed an approach for the self-correction against fluctuations of ambient temperature of individual gas and vapor sensors. The main innovation of our work is in the temperature correction which is accomplished without the need for a separate uncoated reference sensor or a separate temperature sensor. Our sensors are resonant inductor-capacitor-resistor (LCR) transducers coated with sensing materials and operated as multivariable passive (battery-free) radio-frequency identification (RFID) sensors. Using our developed approach, we performed quantitation of an exemplary vapor over the temperature range from 25 to 40 °C. This technical solution will be attractive in numerous applications where temperature stabilization of a gas sensor or addition of auxiliary temperature or uncoated reference sensors is prohibitive. PMID:23956496

  15. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, P. C.; Panousis, E.; Carstensen, J.; Doiron, C. B.; Färber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone-Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions.

  16. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  17. Rotational relaxation of fluoromethane molecules in low-temperature collisions with buffer-gas helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingjia; Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to study the rotational relaxation of polar molecules [here taking fluoromethane (CH3F ) as an example] in collisions with 3.5 K buffer-gas helium (He) atoms by using an electrostatic guiding technique. The dependence of the guiding signal of CH3F on the injected He flux and the dependence of the guiding efficiency of CH3F on its rotational temperature are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing the experimental and simulated results, we find that the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled CH3F molecules can reach to about 5.48 and 0.60 K, respectively, and the ratio between the translational and average rotational collisional cross sections of CH3F -He is γ =σt/σr=36.49 ±6.15 . In addition, the slowing, cooling, and boosting effects of the molecular beam with different injected He fluxes are also observed and their forming conditions are investigated in some detail. Our study shows that our proposed method can not only be used to measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled molecules, but also to measure the ratio of the translational collisional cross section to the average rotational collisional cross section, and even to measure the average rotational collisional cross section when the translational collisional cross section is measured by fitting the lifetime of molecule signal to get a numerical solution from the diffusion equation of buffer-gas He atoms in the cell.

  18. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  19. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  20. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Iron Nitrides on Zinc-Blende Gallium Nitride(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Jeongihm; Lin, Wenzhi; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R.

    2008-03-01

    Iron nitrides are attractive materials for their high magnetic moments, corrosion, and oxidation resistance. We present the successful epitaxial growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride (c-GaN) in order to develop a novel magnetic transition metal nitride/semiconductor system. First, GaN is grown on magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates having (001) orientation using rf N2-plasma molecular beam epitaxy. Then we grow FeN at substrate temperature of ˜ 210 ^oC up to a thickness of ˜ 10.5 nm. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to monitor the surface during growth. Initial results suggest that the epitaxial relationship is FeN[001] || GaN[001] and FeN[100] || GaN[100]. Work in progress is to investigate the surface using in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to reveal the surface structure at atomic scale, as well as to explore more Fe-rich magnetic phases.