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Sample records for test pattern generator

  1. Test pattern generation for ILA sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, YU; Frenzel, James F.; Maki, Gary K.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method of generating test patterns for sequential machines implemented using one-dimensional, unilateral, iterative logic arrays (ILA's) of BTS pass transistor networks is presented. Based on a transistor level fault model, the method affords a unique opportunity for real-time fault detection with improved fault coverage. The resulting test sets are shown to be equivalent to those obtained using conventional gate level models, thus eliminating the need for additional test patterns. The proposed method advances the simplicity and ease of the test pattern generation for a special class of sequential circuitry.

  2. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  3. Remote-sensing satellite ground station evaluation using QPSK emulator with test pattern and PRBS generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, R.; Nithyanandan, L.; Umadevi, G.; Padmavathi, C. S.; Nayani, Radha

    2015-12-01

    In order to validate the performance of X-band (8000-8400 MHz) remote-sensing satellite receive chain, when the satellite is not in the vicinity of ground station, local loop end-end evaluation tests are mandatory to certify the RF downlink and base band receive chain performance. A customised test patterns compatible to IRS satellite series and PRBS sequence are generated, which are modulated using QPSK emulator to check and verify the satellite downlink chain performance. The design and implementation are done using novel digital techniques, and QPSK modulator is integrated with Test pattern and PRBS generator using state-of-art FPGAs. The QPSK emulator output is connected to high-speed fibre optic link which transfers the signal to near field bore-site antenna system. The test signal is thus up converted from 2557.5 MHz (S-band) frequency to required satellite carrier frequency of 8212.5 MHz; the emulated test signal is radiated from bore-site antenna, which simulates real-time satellite data transmission from space. Thus, the signal received by the parabolic dish antenna is down converted to 720 MHz, demodulated, bit synchronized, clock recovered, and frame synchronized. The evaluation of frame sync errors is done for good video data quality check. Also in the QPSK emulator, there is option of PRBS mode. Hence, using this option, the RF downlink and receive chain are evaluated for good Bit error rate (BER). The BER requirement is 1 error (tolerable) in 106 Million bits. The QPSK emulator has the provision to support different frequencies and data rates corresponding to all IRS satellite missions.

  4. [The central pattern generators].

    PubMed

    Balaban, P M; Vorontsov, D D; Dyakonova, V E; Dyakonova, T L; Zakharov, I S; Korshunova, T A; Orlov, O Yu; Pavlova, G A; Panchin, Yi V; Sakharov, D A; Falikman, M V

    2013-01-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) is defined as a set of neurons involved in joint production of patterned motor output. The roundtable discussion on the CPG was a part of the 5th All-Russian Conference on Animal Behavior (Moscow, Nov. 21, 2012). The discussion centred on three core themes: 1) the mechanisms of the organization and reconfiguration of pattern generating neuronal ensembles, 2) extrapolations that extend the CPG concept beyond the motor systems, and 3) evolutionary and developmental aspects of CPG.

  5. CMOS standard cells characterization for open defects for test pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Andrzej; Pleskacz, Witold

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an extended method of CMOS standard cells characterization for defect based voltage testing. It allows to estimate the probabilities of physical open defects occurrences in a cell, describes its faulty behavior caused by the defects and finds the test sequences that detect those faults. Finally, the minimal set of test sequences is selected to cover all detectable faults and the optimal complex test sequence is constructed. Experimental results for cells from industrial standard cell library are presented as well.

  6. Test Response Patterning,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), PATTERN RECOGNITION), (*PERFORMANCE TESTS , STATISTICAL ANALYSIS), PSYCHOMETRICS, NUMERICAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES, ERRORS, TEST CONSTRUCTION(PSYCHOLOGY), MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION, PERSONALITY, BEHAVIOR

  7. Parallel streams versus integrated timing in multilimb pattern generation: A test of Korte's Third Law.

    PubMed

    Jagacinski, Richard J; Rizzi, Emanuele; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lavender, Steven A; Speller, Lassiter F; Klapp, Stuart T

    2016-11-01

    Skilled drummers performed a 4:3:2 polyrhythm with 2 hands and 1 foot. For each pair of limbs patterns of temporal covariation were used to infer relatively independent parallel streams versus integrated timing relationships. Parallel timing was more prevalent between hand and foot than between the 2 hands, and parallel timing generally increased with tapping rate. Different combinations of integrated and parallel timing were found among the 3 limbs. A second experiment used a wider range of tapping rates and explored 3:2 tapping with 2 hands, 2 feet, or hand and foot. The latter 2 limb pairs resulted in greater prevalence of parallel timing. These results can be interpreted in terms of a Gestalt principle of grouping known as Korte's Third Law, which can be extended from the perceptual domain to the perceptual-motor domain. This principle indicates that perceived velocity is a key factor in determining whether a sequence of events is represented as a single integrated pattern or as multiple parallel patterns. The present results put disparate previous findings on bimanual polyrhythmic tapping and rhythmic aspects of the golf swing under a common theoretical perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Automatic Test Program Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    presents a test description language, NOPAL , in which a user may describe diagnostic tests, and a software system which automatically generates test...programs for an automatic test equipment based on the descriptions of tests. The software system accepts as input the tests specified in NOPAL , performs

  9. Starter/generator testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon

    1994-10-01

    Sundstrand Aerospace and GE Aircraft Engines have studied the switched reluctance machine for use as an integral starter/generator for future aircraft engines. They have conducted an initial, low-power testing of the starter/generator, which is based on power inverters using IGBT-technology semiconductors, to verify its feasibility in the externally mounted version of the integral starter/generator. This preliminary testing of the 250-kW starter/generator reveals favorable results.

  10. Walmsley CVC Patterns Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Sean A.

    Designed to provide a criterion referenced measurement of CVC (consonant vowel consonant) word patterns, this test consists of six subtests of 152 items prepared as slides for projection. Items are to be presented to the subjects on two separate occasions. (This document is one of those reviewed in The Research Instruments Project (TRIP) monograph…

  11. Multifunctional pattern-generating circuits.

    PubMed

    Briggman, K L; Kristan, W B

    2008-01-01

    The ability of distinct anatomical circuits to generate multiple behavioral patterns is widespread among vertebrate and invertebrate species. These multifunctional neuronal circuits are the result of multistable neural dynamics and modular organization. The evidence suggests multifunctional circuits can be classified by distinct architectures, yet the activity patterns of individual neurons involved in more than one behavior can vary dramatically. Several mechanisms, including sensory input, the parallel activity of projection neurons, neuromodulation, and biomechanics, are responsible for the switching between patterns. Recent advances in both analytical and experimental tools have aided the study of these complex circuits.

  12. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    2001-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator is intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter. Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic mode were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations resulted in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included a turbine inlet manifold, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  13. A comparison between 8-bit and 10-bit luminance resolution when generating low-contrast sinusoidal test pattern on an LCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, Patrik; Båth, Magnus; Ungsten, Linda; Månsson, Lars Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Radiological images are today mostly displayed on monitors, but much is still unknown regarding the interaction between monitor and viewer. Issues like monitor luminance range, calibration, contrast resolution and luminance distribution need to be addressed further. To perform vision research of high validity to the radiologists, test images should be presented on medical displays. One of the problems has been how to display low contrast patterns in a strictly controlled way. This paper demonstrates how to generate test patterns close to the detection limit on a medical grade display using subpixel modulation. Patterns are generated with both 8-bit and 10-bit monitor input. With this technique, up to 7162 luminance levels can be displayed and the average separation is approximately 0.08 of a JND (Just Noticeable Difference) on a display with a luminance range between 1 and 400 cd/m2. These patterns were used in a 2AFC detection task and the detection threshold was found to be 0.75 +/- 0.02 of a JND when the adaptation level was the same as the target luminance (20 cd/m2). This is a reasonable result considering that the magnitude of a JND is based on the method of adjustment rather than on a detection task. When test patterns with a different luminance than the adaptation level (20 cd/m2) were displayed, the detection thresholds were 1.11 and 1.06 of a JND for target luminance values 1.8 and 350 cd/m2, respectively.

  14. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  15. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Also, apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  16. Automated Test Case Generator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    which will fulfill the requirement. Included is a sample soft- are program which Is manually carried through the various steps of the DD I ’ R , 1473...path- condition of that test case. 1-6 , / 4 -- 1 Si E T11 -I r I I 1I T2 A S4 I2 S5 L -II r C T5 Level i blocks: I I S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7 S8...asT followed by the test number. The two possible resolutions of that test, true and false, will be refered to as ’ R ’ and ’P’ followed by the 2-3

  17. Test chip assembler and test program generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    One of the major problems in working at the geometry level for the generation of either test structure or functional circuit designs is the amount of labor involved in the design phase. To reduce the amount of labor involved in both the design and test of the structures used, JPL has developed a design and test program consisting of a Test Chip Assembler (TCA) and a Test Program Generator (TPG), which creates the geometrical description of the structures and generates the necessary test information using a high-level language. This system reduces the design time for a test chip by a factor of 30. To analyze the data obtained from wafer probing, a statistical package called STMJPL was developed. Some of the capabilities of the JPL software (STMJPL) are described.

  18. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  19. Central pattern generators and interphyletic awareness.

    PubMed

    Stein, P S

    1999-01-01

    Our understandings of how neuronal networks organized as central pattern generators generate motor behavior have greatly increased in the last 40 years. In the 60s, many investigators studying invertebrate motor behaviors were not aware of the work of those studying vertebrate motor behaviors, and vice versa. In the 70s, key conferences provided venues for important interactions among investigators working on preparations in different species. These interactions, termed interphyletic awareness, continued in the 80s and 90s at major conferences and played important roles in the development of our understandings of central pattern generators for motor behavior in these decades.

  20. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin–Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  1. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease.

  2. Central pattern generators and the control of rhythmic movements.

    PubMed

    Marder, E; Bucher, D

    2001-11-27

    Central pattern generators are neuronal circuits that when activated can produce rhythmic motor patterns such as walking, breathing, flying, and swimming in the absence of sensory or descending inputs that carry specific timing information. General principles of the organization of these circuits and their control by higher brain centers have come from the study of smaller circuits found in invertebrates. Recent work on vertebrates highlights the importance of neuro-modulatory control pathways in enabling spinal cord and brain stem circuits to generate meaningful motor patterns. Because rhythmic motor patterns are easily quantified and studied, central pattern generators will provide important testing grounds for understanding the effects of numerous genetic mutations on behavior. Moreover, further understanding of the modulation of spinal cord circuitry used in rhythmic behaviors should facilitate the development of new treatments to enhance recovery after spinal cord damage.

  3. Test Generator for MATLAB Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joel

    2011-01-01

    MATLAB Automated Test Tool, version 3.0 (MATT 3.0) is a software package that provides automated tools that reduce the time needed for extensive testing of simulation models that have been constructed in the MATLAB programming language by use of the Simulink and Real-Time Workshop programs. MATT 3.0 runs on top of the MATLAB engine application-program interface to communicate with the Simulink engine. MATT 3.0 automatically generates source code from the models, generates custom input data for testing both the models and the source code, and generates graphs and other presentations that facilitate comparison of the outputs of the models and the source code for the same input data. Context-sensitive and fully searchable help is provided in HyperText Markup Language (HTML) format.

  4. Intersecting circuits generate precisely patterned retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2013-07-24

    The developing retina generates spontaneous glutamatergic (stage III) waves of activity that sequentially recruit neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON and OFF RGCs). This activity pattern is thought to help establish parallel ON and OFF pathways in downstream visual areas. The circuits that produce stage III waves and desynchronize ON and OFF RGC firing remain obscure. Using dual patch-clamp recordings, we find that ON and OFF RGCs receive sequential excitatory input from ON and OFF cone bipolar cells (CBCs), respectively. This input sequence is generated by crossover circuits, in which ON CBCs control glutamate release from OFF CBCs via diffusely stratified inhibitory amacrine cells. In addition, neighboring ON CBCs communicate directly and indirectly through lateral glutamatergic transmission and gap junctions, both of which are required for wave initiation and propagation. Thus, intersecting lateral excitatory and vertical inhibitory circuits give rise to precisely patterned stage III retinal waves.

  5. Central pattern generators deciphered by molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Ole; Kullander, Klas

    2004-02-05

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are localized neuronal networks that have the ability to produce rhythmic movements even in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. They are found in all animals, including man, and serve as informative model systems for understanding how neuronal networks produce behavior. Traditionally, CPGs have been investigated with electrophysiological techniques. Here we review recent molecular and genetic approaches for dissecting the organization and development of CPGs.

  6. The Human Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Dzeladini, Florin; Guertin, Pierre A; Ijspeert, Auke

    2017-03-01

    The ability of dedicated spinal circuits, referred to as central pattern generators (CPGs), to produce the basic rhythm and neural activation patterns underlying locomotion can be demonstrated under specific experimental conditions in reduced animal preparations. The existence of CPGs in humans is a matter of debate. Equally elusive is the contribution of CPGs to normal bipedal locomotion. To address these points, we focus on human studies that utilized spinal cord stimulation or pharmacological neuromodulation to generate rhythmic activity in individuals with spinal cord injury, and on neuromechanical modeling of human locomotion. In the absence of volitional motor control and step-specific sensory feedback, the human lumbar spinal cord can produce rhythmic muscle activation patterns that closely resemble CPG-induced neural activity of the isolated animal spinal cord. In this sense, CPGs in humans can be defined by the activity they produce. During normal locomotion, CPGs could contribute to the activation patterns during specific phases of the step cycle and simplify supraspinal control of step cycle frequency as a feedforward component to achieve a targeted speed. Determining how the human CPGs operate will be essential to advance the theory of neural control of locomotion and develop new locomotor neurorehabilitation paradigms.

  7. Temperature distortion generator for turboshaft engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, G. A.; Barth, R. L.; Biesiadny, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures and unique hardware used to conduct an experimental investigation into the response of a small-turboshaft-engine compression system to various hot gas ingestion patterns are presented. The temperature distortion generator described herein uses gaseous hydrogen to create both steady-state and time-variant, or transient, temperature distortion at the engine inlet. The range of transient temperature ramps produced by the distortion generator during the engine tests was from less than 111 deg K/sec (200 deg R/sec) to above 611 deg K/sec (1100 deg R/sec); instantaneous temperatures to 422 deg K (760 deg R) above ambient were generated. The distortion generator was used to document the maximum inlet temperatures and temperature rise rates that the compression system could tolerate before the onset of stall for various circumferential distortions as well as the compressor system response during stall.

  8. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  9. Multivariable Harmonic Balance for Central Pattern Generators.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2008-12-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) is a nonlinear oscillator formed by a group of neurons, providing a fundamental control mechanism underlying rhythmic movements in animal locomotion. We consider a class of CPGs modeled by a set of interconnected identical neurons. Based on the idea of multivariable harmonic balance, we show how the oscillation profile is related to the connectivity matrix that specifies the architecture and strengths of the interconnections. Specifically, the frequency, amplitudes, and phases are essentially encoded in terms of a pair of eigenvalue and eigenvector. This basic principle is used to estimate the oscillation profile of a given CPG model. Moreover, a systematic method is proposed for designing a CPG-based nonlinear oscillator that achieves a prescribed oscillation profile.

  10. Spinal cord pattern generators for locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V

    2003-08-01

    It is generally accepted that locomotion in mammals, including humans, is based on the activity of neuronal circuits within the spinal cord (the central pattern generator, CPG). Afferent information from the periphery (i.e. the limbs) influences the central pattern and, conversely, the CPG selects appropriate afferent information according to the external requirement. Both the CPG and the reflexes that mediate afferent input to the spinal cord are under the control of the brainstem. There is increasing evidence that in central motor diseases, a defective utilization of afferent input, in combination with secondary compensatory processes, is involved in typical movement disorders, such as spasticity and Parkinson's disease. Recent studies indicate a plastic behavior of the spinal neuronal circuits following a central motor lesion. This has implications for any rehabilitative therapy that should be directed to take advantage of the plasticity of the central nervous system. The significance of this research is in a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying movement disorders and the consequences for an appropriate treatment.

  11. Central pattern generators for bipedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carla M A; Golubitsky, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins proposed two models for the achitecture of central pattern generators (CPGs): one for bipeds (which we call leg) and one for quadrupeds (which we call quad). In this paper we use symmetry techniques to classify the possible spatiotemporal symmetries of periodic solutions that can exist in leg (there are 10 nontrivial types) and we explore the possibility that coordinated arm/leg rhythms can be understood, on the CPG level, by a small breaking of the symmetry in quad, which leads to a third CPG architecture arm. Rhythms produced by leg correspond to the bipedal gaits of walk, run, two-legged hop, two-legged jump, skip, gallop, asymmetric hop, and one-legged hop. We show that breaking the symmetry between fore and hind limbs in quad, which yields the CPG arm, leads to periodic solution types whose associated leg rhythms correspond to seven of the eight leg gaits found in leg; the missing biped gait is the asymmetric hop. However, when arm/leg coordination rhythms are considered, we find the correct rhythms only for the biped gaits of two-legged hop, run, and gallop. In particular, the biped gait walk, along with its arm rhythms, cannot be obtained by a small breaking of symmetry of any quadruped gait supported by quad.

  12. Test Writing Made Simple: Generate Tests and Worksheets Electronically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodish, Erica

    1986-01-01

    Describes capabilities of test and worksheet generator software; discusses features to consider when evaluating the software for purchase; and presents reviews of eight test and worksheet generators: P.D.Q., Testmaster, Easy Quiz Maker, EA Mathematics Worksheet Generator, Mathematics Worksheet Generator, Earth Science Test Maker, Individualized…

  13. Automatic optometer operates with infrared test pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornsweet, T. N.; Crane, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Refractive strength of human eye is monitored by optometer that automatically and continuously images infrared test pattern onto the retina. Condition of focus of the eye at any instant is determined from optometer settings needed to maintain focus of the pattern on the retina.

  14. Generation 1.5 Written Error Patterns: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Stephen M.; Miller, Donald

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to contribute to existing research on Generation 1.5 students, the current study uses quantitative and qualitative methods to compare error patterns in a corpus of Generation 1.5, L1, and L2 community college student writing. This error analysis provides one important way to determine if error patterns in Generation 1.5 student…

  15. Altering cAMP levels within a central pattern generator modifies or disrupts rhythmic motor output.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Stefan; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2007-12-01

    Cyclic AMP is a second messenger that has been implicated in the neuromodulation of rhythmically active motor patterns. Here, we tested whether manipulating cAMP affects swim motor pattern generation in the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea. Inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC) with 9-cyclopentyladenine (9-CPA) slowed or stopped the swim motor pattern. Inhibiting phosphodiesterase with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) or applying dibutyryl-cAMP (dB-cAMP) disrupted the swim motor pattern, as did iontophoresing cAMP into the central pattern generator neuron C2. Additionally, during wash-in, IBMX sometimes temporarily produced extended or spontaneous swim motor patterns. Photolysis of caged cAMP in C2 after initiation of the swim motor pattern inhibited subsequent bursting. These results suggest that cAMP levels can dynamically modulate swim motor pattern generation, possibly shaping the output of the central pattern generator on a cycle-by-cycle basis.

  16. Vapor-Generator Wand Helps To Reveal Airflow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In vapor-generator wand, liquid propylene glycol flows into electrically heated stainless-steel tube. Liquid boils in heated tube, and emerging vapor forms dense, smoke-like fog used to make airflow patterns visible. Built in variety of sizes, suitable for uses ranging from tabletop demonstrations to research in wind tunnels. For best viewing, plume illuminated by bright, focused incandescent spotlight at right angle to viewing direction. Viewing further enhanced by coating walls of test chamber with flat, dark color to minimize reflections and increase contrast.

  17. Hospital generator sizing, testing, and exercising.

    PubMed

    Nash, H O

    1994-02-01

    With the NFPA 99 and JCAHO requirements for minimum loads on generators during testing, hospital engineers are finding that oversized standby generators can mean operational problems. This document explains the oversized generator problem, including the code changes that gave birth to the problem. Some practical suggestions for sizing generators are then provided.

  18. Neuromodulation of central pattern generators in invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Patsy S

    2006-12-01

    Central pattern generators are subject to extensive modulation that generates flexibility in the rhythmic outputs of these neural networks. The effects of neuromodulators interact with one another, and modulatory neurons are themselves often subject to modulation, enabling both higher order control and indirect interactions among central pattern generators. In addition, modulators often directly mediate the interactions between functionally related central pattern generators. In systems such as the vertebrate respiratory central pattern generator, multiple pacemaker types interact to produce rhythmic output. Modulators can then alter the relative contributions of the different pacemakers, leading to substantial changes in motor output and hence to different behaviors. Surprisingly, substantial changes in some aspects of the circuitry of a central pattern generator, such as a several-fold increase in synaptic strength, can sometimes have little effect on the output of the CPG, whereas other changes have profound effects.

  19. Automated Test Requirement Document Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    DIAGNOSTICS BASED ON THE PRINCIPLES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELIGENCE ", 1984 International Test Conference, 01Oct84, (A3, 3, Cs D3, E2, G2, H2, 13, J6, K) 425...j0O GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS 0 ABBREVIATION DEFINITION AFSATCOM Air Force Satellite Communication Al Artificial Intelligence ASIC Application Specific...In-Test Equipment (BITE) and AI ( Artificial Intelligence) - Expert Systems - need to be fully applied before a completely automated process can be

  20. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  1. Sentences Generation by Frequent Parsing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Miura, Takao; Shioya, Isamu

    We propose a sophisticated approach to generate sentences from syntax trees. Users are assumed to give their intent in text or equivalent ones (such as syntax trees). Here we generate standard sentences by examining how the syntax structure consist of frequent structures and how they are constructed. We examine corpus in some domains to extract elementary syntax structures appeared in the corpus as well as standard sentences using the trees.

  2. Challenging giga-feature pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odselius, Leif; Ivansen, Lars; Thuren, Anders; Savitsky, Mikhail; Larsson, Jan-Erik

    2002-03-01

    Moore's law implies linear growth of integrated circuit density, but the micro-lithographic pattern density grows significantly faster than linear due to OPC embellishments. The progress of technology supporting this growth goes in small steps interleaved by substantial leaps. The leaps occur when the progress in the computing architecture falls behind the requirements from pattern complexity. An established technology can be optimized to a many times surprisingly large extent, but increasing demands eventually crosses the border that makes a given technological architecture inadequate and obsolete. Three major issues with micro-lithographic data processing demand new solutions. One is the need for raw computing power. The second is the data transport mechanisms, which must be designed to prevent bottlenecks. A third issue is the basic data structuring, i.e. the efficiency of the pattern data formats. Exploding reticle pattern complexity requires that backward compatibility with legacy formats is abandoned and that the efficiency of the data format is placed in focus. Micronic Laser Systems maintains a technological roadmap for modular and expandable parallel computing architectures, from data input and pre-processing, through fracturing to rasterizing.

  3. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  4. Automated Camouflage Pattern Generation Technology Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    world. Typical applications include: a. Medical Imaging: Digital radiography, x-ray averaging and recording, ultrasonic analysis, NMR, CAT, etc. Ill-i...Multiple Colors The three color pattern in use in this application adds another constraint. If the robot cannot be equipped with multiple nozzles , the... nozzle would require changing while painting each vehicle. This would add significant time and cost to the painting process. 5. General In addition to

  5. Nonlinear ring resonator: spatial pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir Y.; Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Irochnikov, Nikita G.

    2000-03-01

    We consider theoretically spatial pattern formation processes in a unidirectional ring cavity with thin layer of Kerr-type nonlinear medium. Our method is based on studying of two coupled equations. The first is a partial differential equation for temporal dynamics of phase modulation of light wave in the medium. It describes nonlinear interaction in the Kerr-type lice. The second is a free propagation equation for the intracavity field complex amplitude. It involves diffraction effects of light wave in the cavity.

  6. Revised evaluation of steam generator testing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A scoping evaluation was made of various facility alternatives for test of LMFBR prototype steam generators and models. Recommendations are given for modifications to EBR-II and SCTI (Sodium Components Test Installation) for prototype SG testing, and for few-tube model testing. (DLC)

  7. Design flow automation for variable-shaped beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, Martin; Ballhorn, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    Raster scan pattern generators have been used in the photomask industry for many years. Methods and software tools for data preparation for these pattern generators are well established and have been integrated into design flows with a high degree of automation. But the growing requirements for pattern fidelity have lead to the introduction of 50 kV variable shaped beam pattern generators. Due to their different writing strategy these tools use proprietary data formats and in turn require an optimized data preparation. As a result the existing design flow has to be adopted to account for these requirements. Due to the fact that cycle times have grown severely over the last years the automation of this adopted design flow will not only enhance the design flow quality by avoiding errors during manual operations but will also help to reduce turn-around times. We developed and implemented an automated design flow for a variable shaped beam pattern generator which had to fulfill two conflicting requirements: Well established automated tools originally developed for raster scan pattern generators had to be retained with only slight modifications to avoid the (re)implementation and the concurrent usage of two systems while on the other hand data generation especially during fracturing had to be optimized for a variable shaped beam pattern generator.

  8. Error-budget paradigms and laser mask pattern generator evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaker, H. Christopher; Jolley, Matthew J.; Berwick, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the ALTA(R) series of laser mask pattern generators has increased the relative contribution of intensity errors on critical-dimension (CD) control to those from placement errors. This paradigm shift has driven a change in rasterization strategy wherein aerial image sharpness is improved at the cost of a slight decrease in the averaging of column-to-column placement errors. Print performance evaluation using small-area CD test patterns show improvements in stripe-axis local CD uniformity (CDU) 3σ values of 15-25% using the new strategy, and systematic brush-error contributions were reduced by 50%. The increased importance of intensity errors, coupled with the improvement of ALTA system performance, has also made the mask-blank and process-induced errors a more significant part of the overall error budget. A simple model based on two components, a pattern-invariant footprint and one related to the exposure density ρ(x, y), is shown to describe adequately the errors induced by these sources. The first component is modeled by a fourth-order, two-dimensional polynomial, whereas the second is modeled as a convolution of ρ(x, y) with one or more Gaussian kernels. Implementation of this model on the ALTA 4700 system shows improvements in global CDU of 50%.

  9. Generating Test Templates via Automated Theorem Proving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kancherla, Mani Prasad

    1997-01-01

    Testing can be used during the software development process to maintain fidelity between evolving specifications, program designs, and code implementations. We use a form of specification-based testing that employs the use of an automated theorem prover to generate test templates. A similar approach was developed using a model checker on state-intensive systems. This method applies to systems with functional rather than state-based behaviors. This approach allows for the use of incomplete specifications to aid in generation of tests for potential failure cases. We illustrate the technique on the cannonical triangle testing problem and discuss its use on analysis of a spacecraft scheduling system.

  10. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  11. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  12. Self-Testing Quantum Random Number Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, Tommaso; Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Lavigne, Quentin; Bowles, Joseph; Martin, Anthony; Zbinden, Hugo; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The generation of random numbers is a task of paramount importance in modern science. A central problem for both classical and quantum randomness generation is to estimate the entropy of the data generated by a given device. Here we present a protocol for self-testing quantum random number generation, in which the user can monitor the entropy in real time. Based on a few general assumptions, our protocol guarantees continuous generation of high quality randomness, without the need for a detailed characterization of the devices. Using a fully optical setup, we implement our protocol and illustrate its self-testing capacity. Our work thus provides a practical approach to quantum randomness generation in a scenario of trusted but error-prone devices.

  13. Generator Set Environmental and Stability Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    be seen in Figure 1. Table 1. Generator Equipment Details Model Serial Numbers of Units Tested Output [kW] MFR Engine Model Weight [lbs...Scientific model CR3000. Thirty two thermocouples were used on each generator , along with five pressure transducers. Voltage, current, and frequency...cleaned and adjusted to meet the spec. After reinstallation, both generators ran smooth at no load conditions. Model : Serial: Cylinder # Old

  14. The thermoelectric generator test program at JPL.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Rouklove, P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the test results and analysis performed on data obtained from eight thermoelectric generators exhibiting a total combined operating time of about 21 years. Three (3) SNAP-19 type generators are discussed. Generator SN-20, the engineering model of the units presently operating on the Nimbus S/C, has been in operation for over 4 years and has shown drastic degradation after losing the internal cover gas. Generator SN-21, with more than four years of operating time, is operated in an air environment. The performance of this generator appears predictable and stable. For the last 2 years of operation generator degradation has been negligible. Generator SN-31, which utilizes the TAGS material for the P thermoelectric leg, is similar in design to the units to be used on the Pioneer S/C and has operated for over two years in an all-argon atmosphere.

  15. The pharmacology of vertebrate spinal central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Alford, Simon; Schwartz, Eric; Viana di Prisco, Gonzalo

    2003-06-01

    Central pattern generators are networks of neurons capable of generating an output pattern of spike activity in a relatively stereotyped, rhythmic pattern that has been found to underlie vital functions like respiration and locomotion. The central pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrates seems to share some basic building blocks. Activation and excitation of activity is driven by descending, sensory, and intraspinal glutamatergic neurons. NMDA receptor activation may also lead to the activation of oscillatory properties in individual neurons that depend on an array of ion channels situated in those neurons. Coordination across joints or the midline of the animal is driven primarily by glycinergic inhibition. In addition to these processes, numerous modulatory mechanisms alter the function of the central pattern generator. These include metabotropic amino acid receptors activated by rhythmic release of glutamate and GABA as well as monoamines, ACh, and peptides. Function and stability of the central pattern generator is also critically dependent on the array of ion channels found in neurons that compose these oscillators, including Ca2+ and voltage-gated K+ channels and Ca2+ channels.

  16. Contextual modulation of a multifunctional central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Arnett, Bridgette; Murphy, A Don

    2014-11-01

    The multifunctional buccal central pattern generator in snails, which controls different oral behaviors, has been well characterized. In this work we propose a role for the group of about 40 electrotonically coupled buccal A cluster cells as a context-dependant switch for the buccal central pattern generator, modulating motor patterns that elicit different oral behaviors. We characterize these cells based on location and morphology, and provide evidence for their selective activation under two different stimuli - Listerine perfusion and intestinal nerve stimulation - triggering buccal motor patterns putatively underlying egestion and substrate cleaning. A new role for these electrotonically coupled buccal A cluster neurons is shown. They serve as a context-dependant switch that alters buccal motor patterns depending on input stimuli, thereby eliciting the appropriate behavioral response.

  17. MYSID TWO-GENERATION TEST GUIDELINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    McKenney, Charles L., Jr. In press. Mysid Two-Generation Test Guideline. OECD Expert Group on Invertebrate Testing for Endocrine Disruptors, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris, France. 17 p. (ERL,GB 1215).

    This guideline describes a two-generati...

  18. A simple approach for stochastic generation of spatial rainfall patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, Angelica; Franchini, Marco; Camici, Stefania; Brocca, Luca; Melone, Florisa; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2010-05-01

    between data, keeping its simplicity in the application. Moreover the method can be used for all types of input probability distribution and it allows the marginal distributions to remain intact. The IC method was applied to hourly and daily rainfall time series. In the second case, a temporal disaggregation technique has been carried out to obtain the hourly data. To test the proposed methodology, rainfall data from one catchment located in the Upper Tiber River Basin was considered. At first, long stochastic rainfall time series were generated through the NSRP model for several sites, then the IC method was applied to generate spatially correlated rainfall time series. The main statistics of these time series were compared both with the observed data and with ones generated by using the more complex STNSRP model. In particular, results were expressed in terms of depth-duration-frequency (DDF) curves obtained for the areal mean rainfall that are of upmost importance for the design flood estimation. The high performance shown by the IC approach in reproducing the observed data along with its simplicity of application make it a valuable tool for the estimation of spatial rainfall patterns.

  19. Formal methods for test case generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John (Inventor); De Moura, Leonardo Mendonga (Inventor); Hamon, Gregoire (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of model checkers to generate efficient test sets for hardware and software systems. The method provides for extending existing tests to reach new coverage targets; searching *to* some or all of the uncovered targets in parallel; searching in parallel *from* some or all of the states reached in previous tests; and slicing the model relative to the current set of coverage targets. The invention provides efficient test case generation and test set formation. Deep regions of the state space can be reached within allotted time and memory. The approach has been applied to use of the model checkers of SRI's SAL system and to model-based designs developed in Stateflow. Stateflow models achieving complete state and transition coverage in a single test case are reported.

  20. Nanoscale patterning of colloidal quantum dots for surface plasmon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonsang; Roh, Young-Geun; Kim, Un Jeong; Chung, Dae-Young; Suh, Hwansoo; Kim, Jineun; Cheon, Sangmo; Lee, Jaesoong; Kim, Tae-Ho; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-03-01

    The patterning of colloidal quantum dots with nanometer resolution is essential for their application in photonics and plasmonics. Several patterning approaches, such as the use of polymer composites, molecular lock-and-key methods, inkjet printing, and microcontact printing of quantum dots, have limits in fabrication resolution, positioning and the variation of structural shapes. Herein, we present an adaptation of a conventional liftoff method for patterning colloidal quantum dots. This simple method is easy and requires no complicated processes. Using this method, we formed straight lines, rings, and dot patterns of colloidal quantum dots on metallic substrates. Notably, patterned lines approximately 10 nm wide were fabricated. The patterned structures display high resolution, accurate positioning, and well-defined sidewall profiles. To demonstrate the applicability of our method, we present a surface plasmon generator elaborated from quantum dots.

  1. Computer Generated Holography with Intensity-Graded Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Rossella; Assayag, Osnath; de Sars, Vincent; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Computer Generated Holography achieves patterned illumination at the sample plane through phase modulation of the laser beam at the objective back aperture. This is obtained by using liquid crystal-based spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs), which modulate the spatial phase of the incident laser beam. A variety of algorithms is employed to calculate the phase modulation masks addressed to the LC-SLM. These algorithms range from simple gratings-and-lenses to generate multiple diffraction-limited spots, to iterative Fourier-transform algorithms capable of generating arbitrary illumination shapes perfectly tailored on the base of the target contour. Applications for holographic light patterning include multi-trap optical tweezers, patterned voltage imaging and optical control of neuronal excitation using uncaging or optogenetics. These past implementations of computer generated holography used binary input profile to generate binary light distribution at the sample plane. Here we demonstrate that using graded input sources, enables generating intensity graded light patterns and extend the range of application of holographic light illumination. At first, we use intensity-graded holograms to compensate for LC-SLM position dependent diffraction efficiency or sample fluorescence inhomogeneity. Finally we show that intensity-graded holography can be used to equalize photo evoked currents from cells expressing different levels of chanelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), one of the most commonly used optogenetics light gated channels, taking into account the non-linear dependence of channel opening on incident light. PMID:27799896

  2. Mechanochemical models for generating biological pattern and form in development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. D.; Maini, P. K.; Tranquillo, R. T.

    1988-12-01

    The central issue in development is the formation of spatial patterns of cells in the early embryo. The mechanisms which generate these patterns are unknown. Here we describe the new Oster-Murray mechanochemical approach to the problem, the elements of which are experimentally well documented. By way of illustration we derive one of the basic models from first principles and apply it to a variety of problems of current interest and research. We specifically discuss the formation of skin organ patterns, such as feather and scale germs, cartilage condensations in the developing vertebrate limb and finally wound healing.

  3. Model-based pattern dummy generation for logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jongwon; Kim, Cheolkyun; Ko, Sungwoo; Byun, Seokyoung; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu

    2014-03-01

    The insertion of SRAF(Sub-Resolution Assist Feature) is one of the most frequently used method to enlarge the process window area. In most cases, the size of SRAF is proportional to the focus margin of drawn patterns. However, there is a trade-off between the SRAF size and SRAF printing, because SRAF is not supposed to be patterned on a wafer. For this reason, a lot of OPC engineers have been tried to put bigger and more SRAFs within the limits of the possible. The fact that many papers about predicting SRAF printability have been published recent years reflects this circumstance. Pattern dummy is inserted to enhance the lithographic process margin and CD uniformity unlike CMP dummy for uniform metal line height. It is ordinary to put pattern dummy at the designated location under consideration of the pitch of real patterns at design step. However, it is not always desirable to generate pattern dummies based on rules at the lithographic point of view. In this paper, we introduce the model based pattern dummy insertion method, which is putting pattern dummies at the location that model based SRAF is located. We applied the model based pattern dummy to the layers in logic devices, and studied which layer is more efficient for the insertion of dummies.

  4. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  5. Computer-Based Arithmetic Test Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trocchi, Robert F.

    1973-01-01

    The computer can be a welcome partner in the instructional process, but only if there is man-machine interaction. Man should not compromise system design because of available hardware; the computer must fit the system design for the result to represent an acceptable solution to instructional technology. The Arithmetic Test Generator system fits…

  6. Improved methodology for generating controlled test atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Miller, R R; Letts, R L; Potts, W J; McKenna, M J

    1980-11-01

    Improved methodology has been developed for generating controlled test atmospheres. Vaporization of volatile liquids is accomplished in a 28 mm (O.D.) glass J-tube in conjunction with a compressed air flameless heat torch, a pressure-sensitive switch, and a positive displacement piston pump. The vaporization system has been very reliable with a variety of test materials in studies ranging from a few days to several months. The J-tube vaporization assembly minimizes the possibility of thermal decomposition of the test material and affords a better margin of safety when vaporizing potentially explosive materials.

  7. Action Generation Model Based on Changes in State Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouko, Manabu; Tomi, Naoki; Nagano, Tomoaki; Ito, Koji

    In this paper, we propose a self-organized learning model that can generate behaviors for successfully performing various tasks. The model memorizes various relationships between changes in a state pattern and a motor command through learning. After the learning, the model can perform various tasks by generating the various behaviors automatically. We confirmed the performance of the model by applying it to a mobile robot simulation. The results indicate that suitable behaviors for all the tasks generated spontaneously. Additionally, we propose a sequential learning method which modifies the memorized various relationships while the model executes the task. And we confirmed the effectiveness of the sequential learning by the simulation.

  8. Central pattern generator for vocalization: Is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one’s own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems. PMID:25050813

  9. Central pattern generator for vocalization: is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed

    Bass, Andrew H

    2014-10-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one's own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems.

  10. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  11. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  12. Modeling Scalable Pattern Generation in DNA Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter B.; Chen, Xi; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical framework for developing patterns in multiple dimensions using controllable diffusion and designed reactions implemented in DNA. This includes so-called strand displacement reactions in which one single-stranded DNA hybridizes to a hemi-duplex DNA and displaces another single-stranded DNA, reversibly or irreversibly. These reactions can be designed to proceed with designed rate and molecular specificity. By also controlling diffusion by partial complementarity to a stationary, cross-linked DNA, we can generate predictable patterns. We demonstrate this with several simulations showing deterministic, predictable shapes in space. PMID:25506295

  13. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  14. Key central pattern generators of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Pierre A; Steuer, Inge

    2009-08-15

    In the central nervous system (CNS), central pattern generators (CPGs) are generally considered as specialized networks that can produce oscillatory motor output in the absence of any oscillatory input. For instance, respiration and mastication are among the critical biological functions well known to be controlled by such specialized networks. Several other CPGs have also been found specifically in the spinal cord. Among them, the CPG for locomotion is probably the most extensively studied rhythm- and pattern-generating network of the CNS. Other, less completely understood CPGs have also been associated with the control of scratching, micturition, and ejaculation. This review provides a brief update on CPG organization and function in the spinal cord and focuses on similarities and differences between these networks and their pharmacological modulation.

  15. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  16. Towards multifocal ultrasonic neural stimulation: pattern generation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Yoni; Naor, Omer; Volovick, Alexander; Shoham, Shy

    2010-10-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) waves directed onto neural structures have been shown to dynamically modulate neural activity and excitability, opening up a range of possible systems and applications where the non-invasiveness, safety, mm-range resolution and other characteristics of FUS are advantageous. As in other neuro-stimulation and modulation modalities, the highly distributed and parallel nature of neural systems and neural information processing call for the development of appropriately patterned stimulation strategies which could simultaneously address multiple sites in flexible patterns. Here, we study the generation of sparse multi-focal ultrasonic distributions using phase-only modulation in ultrasonic phased arrays. We analyse the relative performance of an existing algorithm for generating multifocal ultrasonic distributions and new algorithms that we adapt from the field of optical digital holography, and find that generally the weighted Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm leads to overall superior efficiency and uniformity in the focal spots, without significantly increasing the computational burden. By combining phased-array FUS and magnetic-resonance thermometry we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous generation of tightly focused multifocal distributions in a tissue phantom, a first step towards patterned FUS neuro-modulation systems and devices.

  17. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam generator inspections and tests. 229.114... Generators § 229.114 Steam generator inspections and tests. (a) Periodic steam generator inspection. Except as provided in § 229.33, each steam generator shall be inspected and tested in accordance...

  18. THE IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING OF INTERACTION PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a method for identifying and assessing the significance of interaction patterns among various chemicals and chemical classes of importance to regulatory toxicologists. To this end, efforts were made to assemble and evaluate experimental data on toxicologically...

  19. Modular neuromuscular control of human locomotion by central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Seyyed Arash; Farahmand, Farzam; Zohoor, Hassan

    2017-02-28

    The central pattern generators (CPG) in the spinal cord are thought to be responsible for producing the rhythmic motor patterns during rhythmic activities. For locomotor tasks, this involves much complexity, due to a redundant system of muscle actuators with a large number of highly nonlinear muscles. This study proposes a reduced neural control strategy for the CPG, based on modular organization of the co-active muscles, i.e., muscle synergies. Four synergies were extracted from the EMG data of the major leg muscles of two subjects, during two gait trials each, using non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. A Matsuoka׳s four-neuron CPG model with mutual inhibition, was utilized to generate the rhythmic activation patterns of the muscle synergies, using the hip flexion angle and foot contact force information from the sensory afferents as inputs. The model parameters were tuned using the experimental data of one gait trial, which resulted in a good fitting accuracy (RMSEs between 0.0491 and 0.1399) between the simulation and experimental synergy activations. The model׳s performance was then assessed by comparing its predictions for the activation patterns of the individual leg muscles during locomotion with the relevant EMG data. Results indicated that the characteristic features of the complex activation patterns of the muscles were well reproduced by the model for different gait trials and subjects. In general, the CPG- and muscle synergy-based model was promising in view of its simple architecture, yet extensive potentials for neuromuscular control, e.g., resolving redundancies, distributed and fast control, and modulation of locomotion by simple control signals.

  20. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  1. Organization of mammalian locomotor rhythm and pattern generation

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, David A.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2008-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) located in the spinal cord produce the coordinated activation of flexor and extensor motoneurons during locomotion. Previously proposed architectures for the spinal locomotor CPG have included the classical half-center oscillator and the unit burst generator (UBG) comprised of multiple coupled oscillators. We have recently proposed another organization in which a two-level CPG has a common rhythm generator (RG) that controls the operation of the pattern formation (PF) circuitry responsible for motoneuron activation. These architectures are discussed in relation to recent data obtained during fictive locomotion in the decerebrate cat. The data show that the CPG can maintain the period and phase of locomotor oscillations both during spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and during sensory stimulation affecting motoneuron activity throughout the limb. The proposed two-level CPG organization has been investigated with a computational model which incorporates interactions between the CPG, spinal circuits and afferent inputs. The model includes interacting populations of spinal interneurons and motoneurons modeled in the Hodgkin-Huxley style. Our simulations demonstrate that a relatively simple CPG with separate RG and PF networks can realistically reproduce many experimental phenomena including spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and a variety of effects of afferent stimulation. The model suggests plausible explanations for a number of features of real CPG operation that would be difficult to explain in the framework of the classical single-level CPG organization. Some modeling predictions and directions for further studies of locomotor CPG organization are discussed. PMID:17936363

  2. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. PMID:26598733

  3. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-05

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization.

  4. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms.

  5. Phylogenetic and individual variation in gastropod central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2015-09-01

    Gastropod molluscs provide a unique opportunity to explore the neural basis of rhythmic behaviors because of the accessibility of their nervous systems and the number of species that have been examined. Detailed comparisons of the central pattern generators (CPGs) underlying rhythmic feeding and swimming behaviors highlight the presence and effects of variation in neural circuits both across and within species. The feeding motor pattern of the snail, Lymnaea, is stereotyped, whereas the feeding motor pattern in the sea hare, Aplysia, is variable. However, the Aplysia motor pattern is regularized with operant conditioning or by mimicking learning using the dynamic clamp to change properties of CPG neurons. Swimming evolved repeatedly in marine gastropods. Distinct neural mechanisms underlie dissimilar forms of swimming, with homologous neurons playing different roles. However, even similar swimming behaviors in different species can be produced by distinct neural mechanisms, resulting from different synaptic connectivity of homologous neurons. Within a species, there can be variation in the strength and even valence of synapses, which does not have functional relevance under normal conditions, but can cause some individuals to be more susceptible to lesion of the circuit. This inter- and intra-species variation provides novel insights into CPG function and plasticity.

  6. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  7. Torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic walking with central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Vanderborght, Bram; Van Ham, Ronald; Wang, Qining

    2014-12-01

    Walking behavior is modulated by controlling joint torques in most existing passivity-based bipeds. Controlled Passive Walking with adaptable stiffness exhibits controllable natural motions and energy efficient gaits. In this paper, we propose torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic bipedal walking, which extends the concept of Controlled Passive Walking by introducing structured control parameters and a bio-inspired control method with central pattern generators. The proposed walking paradigm is beneficial in clarifying the respective effects of the external actuation and the internal natural dynamics. We present a seven-link biped model to validate the presented walking. Effects of joint torque and joint stiffness on gait selection, walking performance and walking pattern transitions are studied in simulations. The work in this paper develops a new solution of motion control of bipedal robots with adaptable stiffness and provides insights of efficient and sophisticated walking gaits of humans.

  8. The generation of vertebral segmental patterning in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Senthinathan, Biruntha; Sousa, Cátia; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2012-06-01

    We have carried out a series of experimental manipulations in the chick embryo to assess whether the notochord, neural tube and spinal nerves influence segmental patterning of the vertebral column. Using Pax1 expression in the somite-derived sclerotomes as a marker for segmentation of the developing intervertebral disc, our results exclude such an influence. In contrast to certain teleost species, where the notochord has been shown to generate segmentation of the vertebral bodies (chordacentra), these experiments indicate that segmental patterning of the avian vertebral column arises autonomously in the somite mesoderm. We suggest that in amniotes, the subdivision of each sclerotome into non-miscible anterior and posterior halves plays a critical role in establishing vertebral segmentation, and in maintaining left/right alignment of the developing vertebral elements at the body midline.

  9. Optimal Test Design with Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal test-design methods are applied to rule-based item generation. Three different cases of automated test design are presented: (a) test assembly from a pool of pregenerated, calibrated items; (b) test generation on the fly from a pool of calibrated item families; and (c) test generation on the fly directly from calibrated features defining…

  10. Excitable Oscillators as Models for Central Pattern Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David; Holmes, Philip; Cohen, Avis H.

    Chains of coupled oscillators have been used to model the central pattern generator for locomotion in lamprey1,2,3, as well as electrical waves in the mammalian small intestine4. In this paper we examine a variation on the equations for the coupled oscillators used in a number of these papers. In particular, we investigate the effect of modeling the uncoupled oscillators as excitable. The motivation behind this is that it may provide some insight into the electrical activity of the lamprey spinal cord with brainstem attached5

  11. Sensory feedback in CNN-based central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Patane, Luca

    2003-12-01

    Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) are a suitable paradigm to solve the problem of locomotion control in walking robots. CPGs are able to generate feed-forward signals to achieve a proper coordination among the robot legs. In literature they are often modelled as networks of coupled nonlinear systems. However the topic of feedback in these systems is rarely addressed. On the other hand feedback is essential for locomotion. In this paper the CPG for a hexapod robot is implemented through Cellular Neural Networks (CNNs). Feedback is included in the CPG controller by exploiting the dynamic properties of the CPG motor-neurons, such as synchronization issue and local bifurcations. These universal paradigms provide the essential issues to include sensory feedback in CPG architectures based on coupled nonlinear systems. Experiments on a dynamic model of a hexapod robot are presented to validate the approach introduced.

  12. Validation Testing of Hydrogen Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Barton; Toops, Todd J

    2007-12-01

    This report describes the results of testing performed by ORNL for Photech Energies, Inc. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the efficacy of Photech's hydrogen generation reactor technology, which produces gaseous hydrogen through electrolysis. Photech provided several prototypes of their proprietary reactor for testing and the ancillary equipment, such as power supplies and electrolyte solutions, required for proper operation of the reactors. ORNL measured the production of hydrogen gas (volumetric flow of hydrogen at atmospheric pressure) as a function of input power and analyzed the composition of the output stream to determine the purity of the hydrogen content. ORNL attempted measurements on two basic versions of the prototype reactors-one version had a clear plastic outer cylinder, while another version had a stainless steel outer cylinder-but was only able to complete measurements on reactors in the plastic version. The problem observed in the stainless steel reactors was that in these reactors most of the hydrogen was produced near the anodes along with oxygen and the mixed gases made it impossible to determine the amount of hydrogen produced. In the plastic reactors the production of hydrogen gas increased monotonically with input power, and the flow rates increased faster at low input powers than they did at higher input powers. The maximum flow rate from the cathode port measured during the tests was 0.85 LPM at an input power of about 1100 W, an electrolyte concentration of 20%. The composition of the flow from the cathode port was primarily hydrogen and water vapor, with some oxygen and trace amounts of carbon dioxide. An operational mode that occurs briefly during certain operating conditions, and is characterized by flashes of light and violent bubbling near the cathode, might be attributable to the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in the electrolyte solution.

  13. A rule-based software test data generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deason, William H.; Brown, David B.; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Cross, James H., II

    1991-01-01

    Rule-based software test data generation is proposed as an alternative to either path/predicate analysis or random data generation. A prototype rule-based test data generator for Ada programs is constructed and compared to a random test data generator. Four Ada procedures are used in the comparison. Approximately 2000 rule-based test cases and 100,000 randomly generated test cases are automatically generated and executed. The success of the two methods is compared using standard coverage metrics. Simple statistical tests showing that even the primitive rule-based test data generation prototype is significantly better than random data generation are performed. This result demonstrates that rule-based test data generation is feasible and shows great promise in assisting test engineers, especially when the rule base is developed further.

  14. Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion: Anatomical, Physiological, and Pathophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome. PMID:23403923

  15. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  20. Bases of motifs for generating repeated patterns with wild cards.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Nadia; Crochemore, Maxime; Grossi, Roberto; Sagot, Marie-France

    2005-01-01

    Motif inference represents one of the most important areas of research in computational biology, and one of its oldest ones. Despite this, the problem remains very much open in the sense that no existing definition is fully satisfying, either in formal terms, or in relation to the biological questions that involve finding such motifs. Two main types of motifs have been considered in the literature: matrices (of letter frequency per position in the motif) and patterns. There is no conclusive evidence in favor of either, and recent work has attempted to integrate the two types into a single model. In this paper, we address the formal issue in relation to motifs as patterns. This is essential to get at a better understanding of motifs in general. In particular, we consider a promising idea that was recently proposed, which attempted to avoid the combinatorial explosion in the number of motifs by means of a generator set for the motifs. Instead of exhibiting a complete list of motifs satisfying some input constraints, what is produced is a basis of such motifs from which all the other ones can be generated. We study the computational cost of determining such a basis of repeated motifs with wild cards in a sequence. We give new upper and lower bounds on such a cost, introducing a notion of basis that is provably contained in (and, thus, smaller) than previously defined ones. Our basis can be computed in less time and space, and is still able to generate the same set of motifs. We also prove that the number of motifs in all bases defined so far grows exponentially with the quorum, that is, with the minimal number of times a motif must appear in a sequence, something unnoticed in previous work. We show that there is no hope to efficiently compute such bases unless the quorum is fixed.

  1. Disparate SPF testing methodologies generate similar SPFs.

    PubMed

    Garzarella, Katherine; Caswell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory agencies throughout the world have developed exclusive methodologies for assessing and classifying sunscreen product efficacy in their respective markets. Three prevalent methods, the Food and Drug Administration-Final Monograph (FDA-FM) method, the Australia/New Zealand (Aus/NZ) method, and the COLIPA International (International) method, contain procedural and statistical dissimilarities with undefined significance. The objective of our clinical trials was to evaluate the influence of these disparities on sun protection factor (SPF) values. Our clinical trials evaluated the SPF of 59 test materials, using two or all three of the aforementioned methods in simultaneous trials, providing two or three SPF values for each formulation. A total of 135 trials were conducted. The consequent mean SPF values generated per trial were used to compare methods in a correlation and variance analysis. The correlation coefficients for each method pair, International vs. FDA-FM, Aus/NZ vs. FDA-FM, and International vs. Aus/NZ, were each ≥0.94. The difference in least square mean SPF for each method pair was 0.12, 0.62, and 0.81, respectively. Our juxtaposition of the mean SPFs produced by these methods clearly illustrate that any disparities between average SPF values produced by these methods are not clinically or statistically significant and that using one method should be sufficient for SPF labeling in all three respective markets.

  2. General principles of rhythmogenesis in central pattern generator networks.

    PubMed

    Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    The cellular and ionic mechanisms that generate the rhythm in central pattern generator (CPG) networks for simple movements are not well understood. Using vertebrate locomotion, respiration and mastication as exemplars, I describe four main principles of rhythmogenesis: (1) rhythmogenic ionic currents underlie all CPG networks, regardless of whether they are driven by a network pacemaker or an endogenous pacemaker neuron kernel; (2) fast synaptic transmission often evokes slow currents that can affect cycle frequency; (3) there are likely to be multiple and redundant mechanisms for rhythmogenesis in any essential CPG network; and (4) glial cells may participate in CPG network function. The neural basis for rhythmogenesis in simple behaviors has been studied for almost 100 years, yet we cannot identify with certainty the detailed mechanisms by which rhythmic behaviors are generated in any vertebrate system. Early studies focused on whether locomotor rhythms were generated by a chain of coupled reflexes that require sensory feedback, or by a central neural network. By now there is general agreement that for the major rhythmic behaviors (including locomotion, respiration, and mastication, the subjects of this book), there exist CPG networks within the central nervous system that are able to drive the basic rhythmic behavior in the complete absence of sensory feedback. This of course does not eliminate an important role for sensory feedback, which certainly affects cycle frequency and for some behaviors determines the timing of one phase of the behavior (Borgmann et al., 2009; Pearson, 2008). Given the existence of CPGs, the question of rhythmogenesis can be rephrased to ask how these networks determine the timing of the rhythmic behavior. In this chapter, I focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms that could underlie rhythmogenesis in CPG networks, especially those that drive locomotion, respiration, and mastication.

  3. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-06-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits.

  4. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits. PMID:18471902

  5. Exploring Lab Tests Over Utilization Patterns Using Health Analytics Methods.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Zabani, Ibrahim; Khalid, Parwaiz

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare resources are over utilized contributing more to the growing costs of care. Although laboratory testing is essential, yet it can be expensive and excessive. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia studied lab tests utilization patterns using health analytics methods. The objective was to identify patterns of utilizing lab tests and to develop recommendations to control over utilization. Three over utilization patterns were identified; using expensive tests for many patients as routine, unnecessarily repeating lab test and a combined one. Two recommendations were suggested; a user approach, modifying user behavior through orientation about the impact of over utilization on the cost effectiveness of healthcare, and a system approach, implementing system alerts to help physicians check the results and identify the date of the last lab tests done with information about appropriate frequency of ordering such lab test and medically significant intervals at which such test should be repeated.

  6. The New Generation of Standardized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynd, Christine

    High-stakes testing is one of the hottest topics in education today. Although most states use some form of testing, fewer than half administer tests linked to state education standards and goals, often called criterion referenced tests. Fewer still use statewide tests with high stakes for both the students enrolled in the public schools and the…

  7. Generation of Earth's First-Order Biodiversity Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Andrew Z.; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W.; Roy, Kaustuv

    2009-02-01

    The first-order biodiversity pattern on Earth today and at least as far back as the Paleozoic is the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), a decrease in richness of species and higher taxa from the equator to the poles. LDGs are produced by geographic trends in origination, extinction, and dispersal over evolutionary timescales, so that analyses of static patterns will be insufficient to reveal underlying processes. The fossil record of marine bivalve genera, a model system for the analysis of biodiversity dynamics over large temporal and spatial scales, shows that an origination and range-expansion gradient plays a major role in generating the LDG. Peak origination rates and peak diversities fall within the tropics, with range expansion out of the tropics the predominant spatial dynamic thereafter. The origination-diversity link occurs even in a "contrarian" group whose diversity peaks at midlatitudes, an exception proving the rule that spatial variations in origination are key to latitudinal diversity patterns. Extinction rates are lower in polar latitudes (≥60°) than in temperate zones and thus cannot create the observed gradient alone. They may, however, help to explain why origination and immigration are evidently damped in higher latitudes. We suggest that species require more resources in higher latitudes, for the seasonality of primary productivity increases by more than an order of magnitude from equatorial to polar regions. Higher-latitude species are generalists that, unlike potential immigrants, are adapted to garner the large share of resources required for incumbency in those regions. When resources are opened up by extinctions, lineages spread chiefly poleward and chiefly through speciation.

  8. Generation of Earth's first-order biodiversity pattern.

    PubMed

    Krug, Andrew Z; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W; Roy, Kaustuv

    2009-01-01

    The first-order biodiversity pattern on Earth today and at least as far back as the Paleozoic is the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), a decrease in richness of species and higher taxa from the equator to the poles. LDGs are produced by geographic trends in origination, extinction, and dispersal over evolutionary timescales, so that analyses of static patterns will be insufficient to reveal underlying processes. The fossil record of marine bivalve genera, a model system for the analysis of biodiversity dynamics over large temporal and spatial scales, shows that an origination and range-expansion gradient plays a major role in generating the LDG. Peak origination rates and peak diversities fall within the tropics, with range expansion out of the tropics the predominant spatial dynamic thereafter. The origination-diversity link occurs even in a "contrarian" group whose diversity peaks at midlatitudes, an exception proving the rule that spatial variations in origination are key to latitudinal diversity patterns. Extinction rates are lower in polar latitudes (> or =60 degrees ) than in temperate zones and thus cannot create the observed gradient alone. They may, however, help to explain why origination and immigration are evidently damped in higher latitudes. We suggest that species require more resources in higher latitudes, for the seasonality of primary productivity increases by more than an order of magnitude from equatorial to polar regions. Higher-latitude species are generalists that, unlike potential immigrants, are adapted to garner the large share of resources required for incumbency in those regions. When resources are opened up by extinctions, lineages spread chiefly poleward and chiefly through speciation.

  9. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres. 53.22... Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 § 53.22 Generation of test atmospheres. (a) Table B-2 to subpart B of part 53 specifies preferred methods for generating test atmospheres and...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Thromboplastin generation test. (a) Identification. A thromboplastin generation test is a device used to...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  16. Two-stage Turing model for generating pigment patterns on the leopard and the jaguar.

    PubMed

    Liu, R T; Liaw, S S; Maini, P K

    2006-07-01

    Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, which showed that flecks are the primitive pattern of the felid family and all other patterns including rosettes and blotches develop from it, we construct a Turing reaction-diffusion model which generates spot patterns initially. Starting from this spotted pattern, we successfully generate patterns of adult leopards and jaguars by tuning parameters of the model in the subsequent phase of patterning.

  17. Two-stage Turing model for generating pigment patterns on the leopard and the jaguar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. T.; Liaw, S. S.; Maini, P. K.

    2006-07-01

    Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, which showed that flecks are the primitive pattern of the felid family and all other patterns including rosettes and blotches develop from it, we construct a Turing reaction-diffusion model which generates spot patterns initially. Starting from this spotted pattern, we successfully generate patterns of adult leopards and jaguars by tuning parameters of the model in the subsequent phase of patterning.

  18. "MSTGen": Simulated Data Generator for Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    Multistage testing, or MST, was developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for applications in which it is preferable to administer a test at the level of item sets (i.e., modules). As with CAT, the simulation technique in MST plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of tests. "MSTGen," a new MST…

  19. Associative neural network model for the generation of temporal patterns. Theory and application to central pattern generators.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfeld, D; Sompolinsky, H

    1988-01-01

    Cyclic patterns of motor neuron activity are involved in the production of many rhythmic movements, such as walking, swimming, and scratching. These movements are controlled by neural circuits referred to as central pattern generators (CPGs). Some of these circuits function in the absence of both internal pacemakers and external feedback. We describe an associative neural network model whose dynamic behavior is similar to that of CPGs. The theory predicts the strength of all possible connections between pairs of neurons on the basis of the outputs of the CPG. It also allows the mean operating levels of the neurons to be deduced from the measured synaptic strengths between the pairs of neurons. We apply our theory to the CPG controlling escape swimming in the mollusk Tritonia diomedea. The basic rhythmic behavior is shown to be consistent with a simplified model that approximates neurons as threshold units and slow synaptic responses as elementary time delays. The model we describe may have relevance to other fixed action behaviors, as well as to the learning, recall, and recognition of temporally ordered information. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:3233265

  20. Neural Patterns of the Implicit Association Test

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Graham F.; Boran, Lorraine; Smeaton, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a reaction time based categorization task that measures the differential associative strength between bipolar targets and evaluative attribute concepts as an approach to indexing implicit beliefs or biases. An open question exists as to what exactly the IAT measures, and here EEG (Electroencephalography) has been used to investigate the time course of ERPs (Event-related Potential) indices and implicated brain regions in the IAT. IAT-EEG research identifies a number of early (250–450 ms) negative ERPs indexing early-(pre-response) processing stages of the IAT. ERP activity in this time range is known to index processes related to cognitive control and semantic processing. A central focus of these efforts has been to use IAT-ERPs to delineate the implicit and explicit factors contributing to measured IAT effects. Increasing evidence indicates that cognitive control (and related top-down modulation of attention/perceptual processing) may be components in the effective measurement of IAT effects, as factors such as physical setting or task instruction can change an IAT measurement. In this study we further implicate the role of proactive cognitive control and top-down modulation of attention/perceptual processing in the IAT-EEG. We find statistically significant relationships between D-score (a reaction-time based measure of the IAT-effect) and early ERP-time windows, indicating where more rapid word categorizations driving the IAT effect are present, they are at least partly explainable by neural activity not significantly correlated with the IAT measurement itself. Using LORETA, we identify a number of brain regions driving these ERP-IAT relationships notably involving left-temporal, insular, cingulate, medial frontal and parietal cortex in time regions corresponding to the N2- and P3-related activity. The identified brain regions involved with reduced reaction times on congruent blocks coincide with those of previous studies

  1. The generation of antiphase oscillations and synchrony by a rebound-based vertebrate central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chang; Merrison-Hort, Robert; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Borisyuk, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Many neural circuits are capable of generating multiple stereotyped outputs after different sensory inputs or neuromodulation. We have previously identified the central pattern generator (CPG) for Xenopus tadpole swimming that involves antiphase oscillations of activity between the left and right sides. Here we analyze the cellular basis for spontaneous left-right motor synchrony characterized by simultaneous bursting on both sides at twice the swimming frequency. Spontaneous synchrony bouts are rare in most tadpoles, and they instantly emerge from and switch back to swimming, most frequently within the first second after skin stimulation. Analyses show that only neurons that are active during swimming fire action potentials in synchrony, suggesting both output patterns derive from the same neural circuit. The firing of excitatory descending interneurons (dINs) leads that of other types of neurons in synchrony as it does in swimming. During synchrony, the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition is 7.9 ± 1 ms, shorter than that in swimming (41 ± 2.3 ms). The occasional, extra midcycle firing of dINs during swimming may initiate synchrony, and mismatches of timing in the left and right activity can switch synchrony back to swimming. Computer modeling supports these findings by showing that the same neural network, in which reciprocal inhibition mediates rebound firing, can generate both swimming and synchrony without circuit reconfiguration. Modeling also shows that lengthening the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition by increasing dIN synaptic/conduction delay can improve the stability of synchrony.

  2. The Network Spinal Wave as a Central Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Donald M.; Lemberger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This article explains the research on a unique spinal wave visibly observed in association with network spinal analysis care. Since 1997, the network wave has been studied using surface electromyography (sEMG), characterized mathematically, and determined to be a unique and repeatable phenomenon. Methods: The authors provide a narrative review of the research and a context for the network wave's development. Results: The sEMG research demonstrates that the movement of the musculature of the spine during the wave phenomenon is electromagnetic and mechanical. The changes running along the spine were characterized mathematically at three distinct levels of care. Additionally, the wave has the mathematical properties of a central pattern generator (CPG). Conclusions: The network wave may be the first CPG discovered in the spine unrelated to locomotion. The mathematical characterization of the signal also demonstrates coherence at a distance between the sacral to cervical spine. According to mathematical engineers, based on studies conducted a decade apart, the wave itself is a robust phenomenon and the detection methods for this coherence may represent a new measure for central nervous system health. This phenomenon has implications for recovery from spinal cord injury and for reorganizational healing development. PMID:27243963

  3. Mutual synchronization between structure and central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, Junichi; Iba, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    This paper shows an evaluating method of synchronization between a structure and Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), which are embedded in a controller designed for an active mass damper. A neural oscillator composing the CPGs has nonlinear and entrainment properties. Therefore, the proposed controller has possibility to exhibit the characteristic of robustness, when the structural parameters, i.e. stiffness or damping, are changed by earthquakes and the like. Our earlier studies have proposed the new controller and ascertained the efficacy of vibration suppression. However, there has been no study to evaluate the controller's above-mentioned properties. For tuning into practical application, the reliability and robustness along with the controller's vibration mitigation performance must be analyzed. In this paper, phase reduction theory is tried to appraise the synchronization between a structure and the CPGs. In this case, the synchronization between the target structure and a single neural oscillator constituting the CPGs is required to be investigated. Therefore, the single neural oscillator's the harmonization characteristic with sinusoidal input is firstly examined, and the synchronization region is expressed using phase response curves. In addition, the mutual synchronization between the structure and the single neural oscillator is studied under sinusoidal input using the result of the harmonization characteristic.

  4. The Full Function Test Explosive Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Griffith, L V; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-12-13

    We have conducted three tests of a new pulsed power device called the Full Function Test (FFT). These tests represented the culmination of an effort to establish a high energy pulsed power capability based on high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) technology. This involved an extensive computational modeling, engineering, fabrication, and fielding effort. The experiments were highly successful and a new US record for magnetic energy was obtained.

  5. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  6. Adding Test Generation to the Teaching Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce-Lockhart, Michael; Norvell, Theodore; Crescenzi, Pierluigi

    2009-01-01

    We propose an extension of the Teaching Machine project, called Quiz Generator, that allows instructors to produce assessment quizzes in the field of algorithm and data structures quite easily. This extension makes use of visualization techniques and is based on new features of the Teaching Machine that allow third-party visualizers to be added as…

  7. Cellular basis for singing motor pattern generation in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer)

    PubMed Central

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The singing behavior of male crickets allows analyzing a central pattern generator (CPG) that was shaped by sexual selection for reliable production of species-specific communication signals. After localizing the essential ganglia for singing in Gryllus bimaculatus, we now studied the calling song CPG at the cellular level. Fictive singing was initiated by pharmacological brain stimulation. The motor pattern underlying syllables and chirps was recorded as alternating spike bursts of wing-opener and wing-closer motoneurons in a truncated wing nerve; it precisely reflected the natural calling song. During fictive singing, we intracellularly recorded and stained interneurons in thoracic and abdominal ganglia and tested their impact on the song pattern by intracellular current injections. We identified three interneurons of the metathoracic and first unfused abdominal ganglion that rhythmically de- and hyperpolarized in phase with the syllable pattern and spiked strictly before the wing-opener motoneurons. Depolarizing current injection in two of these opener interneurons caused additional rhythmic singing activity, which reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. The closely intermeshing arborizations of the singing interneurons revealed the dorsal midline neuropiles of the metathoracic and three most anterior abdominal neuromeres as the anatomical location of singing pattern generation. In the same neuropiles, we also recorded several closer interneurons that rhythmically hyper- and depolarized in the syllable rhythm and spiked strictly before the wing-closer motoneurons. Some of them received pronounced inhibition at the beginning of each chirp. Hyperpolarizing current injection in the dendrite revealed postinhibitory rebound depolarization as one functional mechanism of central pattern generation in singing crickets. PMID:23170234

  8. Neural basis of singing in crickets: central pattern generation in abdominal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2011-12-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cricket singing behavior have been the focus of several studies, but the central pattern generator (CPG) for singing has not been localized conclusively. To test if the abdominal ganglia contribute to the singing motor pattern and to analyze if parts of the singing CPG are located in these ganglia, we systematically truncated the abdominal nerve cord of fictively singing crickets while recording the singing motor pattern from a front-wing nerve. Severing the connectives anywhere between terminal ganglion and abdominal ganglion A3 did not preclude singing, although the motor pattern became more variable and failure-prone as more ganglia were disconnected. Singing terminated immediately and permanently after transecting the connectives between the metathoracic ganglion complex and the first unfused abdominal ganglion A3. The contribution of abdominal ganglia for singing pattern generation was confirmed by intracellular interneuron recordings and current injections. During fictive singing, an ascending interneuron with its soma and dendrite in A3 depolarized rhythmically. It spiked 10 ms before the wing-opener activity and hyperpolarized in phase with the wing-closer activity. Depolarizing current injection elicited rhythmic membrane potential oscillations and spike bursts that elicited additional syllables and reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. Our results disclose that the abdominal ganglion A3 is directly involved in generating the singing motor pattern, whereas the more posterior ganglia seem to provide only stabilizing feedback to the CPG circuit. Localizing the singing CPG in the anterior abdominal neuromeres now allows analyzing its circuitry at the level of identified interneurons in subsequent studies.

  9. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  10. HIV Testing Patterns among Urban YMSM of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Rajan, Sonali; Gwadz, Marya V.; Aregbesola, Temi

    2014-01-01

    The heightened level of risk for HIV infection among Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is driven by multilevel influences. Using cross-sectional data, we examined HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color in a high-HIV seroprevalence area (ages 16 to 21 years). Self-reported frequency of testing was high, with 42% of…

  11. Techniques for testing the quality of parallel pseudorandom number generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cuccaro, S.A.; Mascagni, M.; Pryor, D.V.

    1995-12-01

    Ensuring that pseudorandom number generators have good randomness properties is more complicated in a multiprocessor implementation than in the uniprocessor case. We discuss simple extensions of uniprocessor testing for SIMD parallel streams, and develop in detail a repeatability test for the SPMD paradigm. Examples of the application of these tests to an additive tagged-Fibonacci generator are also given.

  12. NEXT GENERATION LEACHING TESTS FOR EVALUATING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the U.S. as in other countries, there is increased interest in using industrial by-products as alternative or secondary materials, helping to conserve virgin or raw materials. The LEAF and associated test methods are being used to develop the source term for leaching or any inorganic constituents of potential concern (COPC) in determining what is environmentally acceptable. The leaching test methods include batch equilibrium, percolation column and semi-dynamic mass transport tests for monolithic and compacted granular materials. By testing over a range of values for pH, liquid/solid ratio, and physical form of the material, this approach allows one data set to be used to evaluate a range of management scenarios for a material, representing different environmental conditions (e.g., disposal or beneficial use). The results from these tests may be interpreted individually or integrated to identify a solid material’s characteristic leaching behavior. Furthermore the LEAF approach provides the ability to make meaningful comparisons of leaching between similar and dissimilar materials from national and worldwide origins. To present EPA's research under SHC to implement validated leaching tests referred to as the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF). The primary focus will be on the guidance for implementation of LEAF describing three case studies for developing source terms for evaluating inorganic constituents.

  13. Dynamic Test Generation for Large Binary Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-12

    Dalal and Mallows framed this question as a size-dependent sequential search problem, in which each bug has a different probability of being found, or...observed size for each bug. We could then derive for each test run the cutoff according to the Dalal and Mallows rule, then run for, say, twice that number...Software En- gineering). ACM, May 2005. [27] S. R. Dalal and C. L. Mallows . When should one stop testing software. j-J-AM-STAT- ASSOC, 83(403):872–879

  14. Pre-cataract surgery test using speckle pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutamulia, Suganda; Wihardjo, Erning; Widjaja, Joewono

    2016-11-01

    A laser diode device for pre cataract surgery test is proposed. The operation is based on the speckle generated on the retina by the cataract lens, when the cataract lens is illuminated with a coherent laser light.

  15. Generating Circuit Tests by Exploiting Designed Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    determine whether the circuit is in test-mode and control /AR shifting. We modified the circuit model accordingly. Figure 6.16 shows the consequences for...productive. Yehudah Freundlich opened my mind to the history and philosophy of science. He knows lots of pretty good jokes too. Glenn Kramer, Narinder...39 2.2 Modeling Circuits and Faults ...... ...................... 44 2.2.1 Circuit Models

  16. Function generator for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Hagood, G. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A simple highly flexible device for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns is described. These mode patterns can be used to identify vibration mode data. This device sums selected sine and cosine functions and then plots the sum against a linear function.

  17. Generation of pattern and form in the developing limb.

    PubMed

    Towers, Matthew; Tickle, Cheryll

    2009-01-01

    The developing limb is a major model for pattern formation in vertebrate embryos. Many of the seminal discoveries of the mechanisms involved in patterning have been made using chick embryos because of the ease of manipulating their developing limbs. More recently, the molecular basis of limb pattern formation has been increasingly uncovered and now, with the availability of genomic resources, the genetic approaches available are even more powerful. Nevertheless, since the limb is ultimately built of cells, gene action must ultimately be translated into cell behaviour and a major challenge will be to integrate genetics with molecular and cellular biology. In this review, we will first outline the stages in limb development, the major interacting signalling pathways that pattern the limb and the molecules involved. We will describe fate maps of the developing limb, and discuss what is known about cellular activities including proliferation, death, adhesiveness, communication and migration during the patterning process. Finally we will explore how these cell activities produce form.

  18. Generation of 1D interference patterns of Bloch surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomina, E. A.; Bezus, E. A.; Doskolovich, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns of Bloch surface waves with a period that is significantly less than the wavelength of incident radiation are formed using dielectric diffraction gratings located on the surface of photonic crystal. The simulation based on electromagnetic diffraction theory is used to demonstrate the possibility of high-quality interference patterns due to resonant enhancement of higher evanescent diffraction orders related to the excitation of the Bloch surface waves. The contrast of the interference patterns is close to unity, and the period is less than the period of the diffraction structure by an order of magnitude.

  19. Model Based Analysis and Test Generation for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Schumann, Johann M.; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Lowry, Mike R.; Karsai, Gabor; Nine, Harmon; Neema, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We describe a framework for model-based analysis and test case generation in the context of a heterogeneous model-based development paradigm that uses and combines Math- Works and UML 2.0 models and the associated code generation tools. This paradigm poses novel challenges to analysis and test case generation that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been addressed before. The framework is based on a common intermediate representation for different modeling formalisms and leverages and extends model checking and symbolic execution tools for model analysis and test case generation, respectively. We discuss the application of our framework to software models for a NASA flight mission.

  20. Testing polycyclicity of finitely generated rational matrix groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, Bjoern; Eick, Bettina

    2007-09-01

    We describe algorithms for testing polycyclicity and nilpotency for finitely generated subgroups of mathrm{GL}(d,mathbb{Q}) and thus we show that these properties are decidable. Variations of our algorithm can be used for testing virtual polycyclicity and virtual nilpotency for finitely generated subgroups of mathrm{GL}(d,mathbb{Q}) .

  1. Testing to Characterize the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward; Schreiber, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a high efficiency generator, is being considered for space missions. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated an engineering unit (EU), the ASRG EU, under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently undergoing extended operation testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. It has also undergone performance tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs. This paper summarizes and explains test results in the context of designing operating strategies for the generator during a space mission and notes expected differences between the EU performance and future generators.

  2. Central pattern generators of the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal networks within the spinal cord of mammals are responsible for generating various rhythmic movements, such as walking, running, swimming, and scratching. The ability to generate multiple rhythmic movements highlights the complexity and flexibility of the mammalian spinal circuitry. The present review describes features of some rhythmic motor behaviors generated by the mammalian spinal cord and discusses how the spinal circuitry is able to produce different rhythmic movements with their own sets of goals and demands.

  3. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Tulsky, David S.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test–retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3–85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5–85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  4. Generation of Crystal-Structure Transverse Patterns via a Self-Frequency-Doubling Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang; Petrov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) visible crystal-structure patterns analogous to the quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) have been experimentally observed in the near- and far-fields of a self-frequency-doubling (SFD) microchip laser. Different with the fundamental modes, the localization of the SFD light is changed with the propagation. Calculation based on Hermite-Gaussian (HG) functions and second harmonic generation theory reproduces well the patterns both in the near- and far-field which correspond to the intensity distribution in coordinate and momentum spaces, respectively. Considering the analogy of wave functions of the transverse HG mode and 2D harmonic oscillator, we propose that the simple monolithic SFD lasers can be used for developing of new materials and devices and testing 2D quantum mechanical theories.

  5. [Genetic determinants of generating the motor pattern of rhythmic movements in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, S A; Bragina, Iu V; Besedina, N G; Danilenkova, L V; Kamysheva, E A; Kamyshev, N G

    2013-01-01

    To investigate molecular and cellular mechanisms of central pattern generators (CPG) functioning, we previously selected candidate genes mutations of which are accompanied with deviations in Drosophila melanogaster motor activity. In this research we tested locomotor parameters in lines with post transcriptional silencing of 12 candidate gene in Drosophila central nervous system. Silencing was provided by synthesis of interfering RNA by means of GAL4/UAS system under control of CNS-specific gene promoters (elav, nrv2, appl, tsh). It was found that RNA interference of most genes are accompanied with changes in one or several locomotor parameters. Pattern of revealed deviations under control of different promotors makes it possible to determine the genes that activity in nervous system is necessary for proper functioning of locomotor CPG.

  6. Generation of crystal-structure transverse patterns via a self-frequency-doubling laser.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang; Petrov, V

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) visible crystal-structure patterns analogous to the quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) have been experimentally observed in the near- and far-fields of a self-frequency-doubling (SFD) microchip laser. Different with the fundamental modes, the localization of the SFD light is changed with the propagation. Calculation based on Hermite-Gaussian (HG) functions and second harmonic generation theory reproduces well the patterns both in the near- and far-field which correspond to the intensity distribution in coordinate and momentum spaces, respectively. Considering the analogy of wave functions of the transverse HG mode and 2D harmonic oscillator, we propose that the simple monolithic SFD lasers can be used for developing of new materials and devices and testing 2D quantum mechanical theories.

  7. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  8. LAPACK Working Note 9: A test matrix generation suite

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, J.; McKenney, A. . Courant Institute)

    1989-02-28

    We discuss the design and implementation of a suite of test matrix generators for testing linear algebra software. These routines generate random matrices with certain properties which are useful for testing linear equation solving, least squares, and eigendecomposition software. These properites include the spectrum, symmetry, bandwidth, norm, sparsity, conditioning (with respect to inversion or for the eigenproblem), type (real or complex), and storage scheme (dense, packed or banded).

  9. Random number generators tested on quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Miura, Kenichi

    2010-08-01

    We have tested and compared several (pseudo) random number generators (RNGs) applied to a practical application, ground state energy calculations of molecules using variational and diffusion Monte Carlo metheds. A new multiple recursive generator with 8th-order recursion (MRG8) and the Mersenne twister generator (MT19937) are tested and compared with the RANLUX generator with five luxury levels (RANLUX-[0-4]). Both MRG8 and MT19937 are proven to give the same total energy as that evaluated with RANLUX-4 (highest luxury level) within the statistical error bars with less computational cost to generate the sequence. We also tested the notorious implementation of linear congruential generator (LCG), RANDU, for comparison.

  10. Octopamine-containing (OC) interneurons enhance central pattern generator activity in sucrose-induced feeding in the snail Lymnaea.

    PubMed

    Vehovszky, Agnes; Szabó, Henriette; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2004-10-01

    In the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis octopamine-containing (OC) interneurons trigger and reconfigure the feeding pattern in isolated CNS by excitation of the central pattern generator. In semi-intact (lip-mouth-CNS) preparations, this central pattern generator is activated by chemosensory inputs. We now test if sucrose application to the lips activates the OC neurons independently of the rest of the feeding central pattern generator, or if the OC interneuron is activated by inputs from the feeding network. In 66% of experiments, sucrose stimulated feeding rhythms and OC interneurons received regular synaptic inputs. Only rarely (14%) did the OC interneuron fire action potentials, proving that firing of OC interneurons is not necessary for the sucrose-induced feeding. Prestimulation of OC neurons increased the intensity and duration of the feeding rhythm evoked by subsequent sucrose presentations. One micromolar octopamine in the CNS bath mimicked the effect of OC interneuron stimulation, enhancing the feeding response when sucrose is applied to the lips. We conclude that the modulatory OC neurons are not independently excited by chemosensory inputs to the lips, but rather from the buccal central pattern generator network. However, when OC neurons fire, they release modulatory octopamine, which provides a positive feedback to the network to enhance the sucrose-activated central pattern generator rhythm.

  11. Cytoskeletal stability and heat shock-mediated thermoprotection of central pattern generation in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Garlick, Kristopher M; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2007-06-01

    Prior exposure to extreme temperatures can induce thermoprotection in migratory locusts, which is important for survival in their natural environment. An important motor activity that needs to be protected is ventilation. The mechanism underlying heat shock is not fully understood, and our goal was to test the idea that cytoskeletal stability is critical for such thermoprotection. Cytoskeletal stabilizers (concanavalin A) and destabilizers (colchicine) were bath-applied in semi-intact locust preparations in both control (C) and pre-treated heat-shocked (3 h, 45 degrees C) animals. We measured parameters of the ventilatory motor pattern during maintained high temperature (43 degrees C) and recorded the times taken for motor pattern generation to fail and then recover on returning to room temperature. We found that concanavalin A mimicked the effects of a prior heat stress in control animals by increasing time to failure and decreasing time to recovery of motor pattern generation. However, colchicine destroyed protection in heat-shocked animals by decreasing time to failure and increasing time to recovery. Our findings confirm that the cytoskeleton has a mechanistic role in preserving neural function at high temperatures, possibly through stabilizing ion channels and other integral membrane proteins (e.g. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase) and their interactions with heat shock proteins.

  12. Testing of a direct drive generator for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sondergaard, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    The normal drive train of a wind turbine consists a gearbox and a 4 to 8 poles asynchronous generator. The gearbox is an expensive and unreliable components and this paper deals with testing of a direct drive synchronous generator for a gearless wind turbine. The Danish company Belt Electric has constructed and manufactured a 27 kW prototype radial flux PM-generator (DD600). They have used cheap hard ferrite magnets in the rotor of this PM-generator. This generator has been tested at Riso and the test results are investigated and analyzed in this paper. The tests have been done with three different load types (1: resistance; 2: diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance; 3: AC-capacitor, diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance). 1 ref., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Study on Noncontact Pulmonary Function Test Using Pattern Light Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Koshiji, Kohji

    The pulmonary function test by spirometer is generally conducted. The test subjects, especially children, women and older people, feel uncomfortable as the mouthpiece and nasal plug must be attached to the face of them. We have studied the nonrestraint pulmonary function test using the dot matrix pattern projection in order to decrease the burden to the examinee. In our proposed system, the pattern light projector illuminates the thorax with the dot matrix pattern light. And the CCD camera takes a series of images of the dot matrix pattern. The three dimensional shape of the thorax surface can be calculated by the distribution of light dots. And the respiratory waveform is calculated by the time-series change of the three dimensional shape. The respiratory waveform of our system was similar to one of spirometer. Therefore, we clarified that our proposed system can equivalently measure the respiration with spirometer. And we compared the volume change of the three dimensional shape calculated by our system with the expired tidal volume measured by the expiration gas analyzer. And we examined the relationship between the expired tidal volume and the volume change of the thorax surface.

  14. The neural basis of perceptual hypothesis generation and testing.

    PubMed

    Weidner, R; Shah, N J; Fink, G R

    2006-02-01

    Four-dot masking is a new form of visual masking that does not involve local contour interactions or spatial superimposition of the target stimulus and the mask (as, e.g., in pattern or metacontrast masking). Rather, the effective masking mechanism is based on object substitution. Object substitution masking occurs when low-level visual information representations are altered before target identification through iterative interaction with high-level visual processing stages has been completed. Interestingly, object substitution interacts with attention processes: Strong masking effects are observed when attentional orientation toward the target location is delayed. In contrast, no masking occurs when attention can be rapidly shifted to and engaged onto the target location. We investigated the neural basis of object substitution masking by studying the interaction of spatial attention and masking processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Behavioral data indicated a two-way interaction between the factors Spatial Attention (valid vs. invalid cueing) and Masking (four-dot vs. pattern masking). As expected, spatial attention improved performance more strongly during object substitution masking. Functional correlates of this interaction were found in the primary visual cortex, higher visual areas, and left intraparietal sulcus. A region-of-interest analysis in these areas revealed that the largest blood oxygenation level-dependent signal changes occurred during effective four-dot masking. In contrast, the weakest signal changes in these areas were observed when target visibility was highest. The data suggest that these areas represent an object substitution network dedicated to the generation and testing of a perceptual hypotheses as described by the object substitution theory of masking of Di-Lollo et al. [Competition for consciousness among visual events: The psychophysics of reentrant visual processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 129

  15. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning.

  16. A random approach of test macro generation for early detection of hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-hyun; Kim, Chin; Kang, Minsoo; Hwang, Sungwook; Yang, Jae-seok; Harb, Mohammed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe

    2016-03-01

    Multiple-Patterning Technology (MPT) is still the preferred choice over EUV for the advanced technology nodes, starting the 20nm node. Down the way to 7nm and 5nm nodes, Self-Aligned Multiple Patterning (SAMP) appears to be one of the effective multiple patterning techniques in terms of achieving small pitch of printed lines on wafer, yet its yield is in question. Predicting and enhancing the yield in the early stages of technology development are some of the main objectives for creating test macros on test masks. While conventional yield ramp techniques for a new technology node have relied on using designs from previous technology nodes as a starting point to identify patterns for Design of Experiment (DoE) creation, these techniques are challenging to apply in the case of introducing an MPT technique like SAMP that did not exist in previous nodes. This paper presents a new strategy for generating test structures based on random placement of unit patterns that can construct more meaningful bigger patterns. Specifications governing the relationships between those unit patterns can be adjusted to generate layout clips that look like realistic SAMP designs. A via chain can be constructed to connect the random DoE of SAMP structures through a routing layer to external pads for electrical measurement. These clips are decomposed according to the decomposition rules of the technology into the appropriate mandrel and cut masks. The decomposed clips can be tested through simulations, or electrically on silicon to discover hotspots. The hotspots can be used in optimizing the fabrication process and models to fix them. They can also be used as learning patterns for DFM deck development. By expanding the size of the randomly generated test structures, more hotspots can be detected. This should provide a faster way to enhance the yield of a new technology node.

  17. Bio-inspired design strategies for central pattern generator control in modular robotics.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Carrón, F; Rodríguez, F B; Varona, P

    2011-03-01

    New findings in the nervous system of invertebrates have shown how a number of features of central pattern generator (CPG) circuits contribute to the generation of robust flexible rhythms. In this paper we consider recently revealed strategies that living CPGs follow to design CPG control paradigms for modular robots. To illustrate them, we divide the task of designing an example CPG for a modular robot into independent problems. We formulate each problem in a general way and provide a bio-inspired solution for each of them: locomotion information coding, individual module control and inter-module coordination. We analyse the stability of the CPG numerically, and then test it on a real robot. We analyse steady state locomotion and recovery after perturbations. In both cases, the robot is able to autonomously find a stable effective locomotion state. Finally, we discuss how these strategies can result in a more general design approach for CPG-based locomotion.

  18. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  19. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  20. Implementation of Imitation Learning using Natural Learner Central Pattern Generator Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Hamed; Parandeh, Reyhaneh; Jamshidi, Kamal

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a new design of neural networks is introduced, which is able to generate oscillatory patterns. The fundamental building block of the neural network is O-neurons that can generate an oscillation in its transfer functions. Since the natural policy gradient learning has been used in training a central pattern generator paradigm, it is called Natural Learner CPG Neural Networks (NLCPGNN). O-neurons are connected and coupled to each other in order to shape a network and their unknown parameters are found by a natural policy gradient learning algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is design of this learning algorithm which is able to simultaneously search for the weights and topology of the network. This system is capable to obtain any complex motion and rhythmic trajectory via first layer and learn rhythmic trajectories in the second layer and converge towards all these movements. Moreover this two layers system is able to provide various features of a learner model for instance resistance against perturbations, modulation of trajectories amplitude and frequency. Simulation of the learning system in the robot simulator (WEBOTS) that is linked with MATLAB software has been done. Implementation on a real NAO robot demonstrates that the robot has learned desired motion with high accuracy. These results show proposed system produces high convergence rate and low test errors.

  1. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  2. The Oncoprotein BRD4-NUT Generates Aberrant Histone Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zee, Barry M; Dibona, Amy B; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; French, Christopher A; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2016-01-01

    Defects in chromatin proteins frequently manifest in diseases. A striking case of a chromatin-centric disease is NUT-midline carcinoma (NMC), which is characterized by expression of NUT as a fusion partner most frequently with BRD4. ChIP-sequencing studies from NMC patients revealed that BRD4-NUT (B4N) covers large genomic regions and elevates transcription within these domains. To investigate how B4N modulates chromatin, we performed affinity purification of B4N when ectopically expressed in 293-TREx cells and quantified the associated histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) using proteomics. We observed significant enrichment of acetylation particularly on H3 K18 and of combinatorial patterns such as H3 K27 acetylation paired with K36 methylation. We postulate that B4N complexes override the preexisting histone code with new PTM patterns that reflect aberrant transcription and that epigenetically modulate the nucleosome environment toward the NMC state.

  3. The Oncoprotein BRD4-NUT Generates Aberrant Histone Modification Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M.; Dibona, Amy B.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; French, Christopher A.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in chromatin proteins frequently manifest in diseases. A striking case of a chromatin-centric disease is NUT-midline carcinoma (NMC), which is characterized by expression of NUT as a fusion partner most frequently with BRD4. ChIP-sequencing studies from NMC patients revealed that BRD4-NUT (B4N) covers large genomic regions and elevates transcription within these domains. To investigate how B4N modulates chromatin, we performed affinity purification of B4N when ectopically expressed in 293-TREx cells and quantified the associated histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) using proteomics. We observed significant enrichment of acetylation particularly on H3 K18 and of combinatorial patterns such as H3 K27 acetylation paired with K36 methylation. We postulate that B4N complexes override the preexisting histone code with new PTM patterns that reflect aberrant transcription and that epigenetically modulate the nucleosome environment toward the NMC state. PMID:27698495

  4. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  5. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure. PMID:26594264

  6. Test Input Generation for Red-Black Trees using Abstraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, Willem; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Pelanek, Radek

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of test input generation for code that manipulates complex data structures. Test inputs are sequences of method calls from the data structure interface. We describe test input generation techniques that rely on state matching to avoid generation of redundant tests. Exhaustive techniques use explicit state model checking to explore all the possible test sequences up to predefined input sizes. Lossy techniques rely on abstraction mappings to compute and store abstract versions of the concrete states; they explore under-approximations of all the possible test sequences. We have implemented the techniques on top of the Java PathFinder model checker and we evaluate them using a Java implementation of red-black trees.

  7. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  8. Reflective electron beam lithography: lithography results using CMOS controlled digital pattern generator chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubiotti, Thomas; Sun, Jeff Fuge; Freed, Regina; Kidwingira, Francoise; Yang, Jason; Bevis, Chris; Carroll, Allen; Brodie, Alan; Tong, William M.; Lin, Shy-Jay; Wang, Wen-Chuan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Vereecke, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Maskless electron beam lithography can potentially extend semiconductor manufacturing to the 10 nm logic (16 nm half pitch) technology node and beyond. KLA-Tencor is developing Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) technology targeting high-volume 10 nm logic node performance. REBL uses a novel multi-column wafer writing system combined with an advanced stage architecture to enable the throughput and resolution required for a NGL system. Using a CMOS Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) chip with over one million microlenses, the system is capable of maskless printing of arbitrary patterns with pixel redundancy and pixel-by-pixel grayscaling at the wafer. Electrons are generated in a flood beam via a thermionic cathode at 50-100 keV and decelerated to illuminate the DPG chip. The DPG-modulated electron beam is then reaccelerated and demagnified 80-100x onto the wafer to be printed. Previously, KLA-Tencor reported on the development progress of the REBL tool for maskless lithography at and below the 10 nm logic technology node. Since that time, the REBL team has made good progress towards developing the REBL system and DPG for direct write lithography. REBL has been successful in manufacturing a CMOS controlled DPG chip with a stable charge drain coating and with all segments functioning. This DPG chip consists of an array of over one million electrostatic lenslets that can be switched on or off via CMOS voltages to pattern the flood electron beam. Testing has proven the validity of the design with regards to lenslet performance, contrast, lifetime, and pattern scrolling. This chip has been used in the REBL demonstration platform system for lithography on a moving stage in both PMMA and chemically amplified resist. Direct imaging of the aerial image has also been performed by magnifying the pattern at the wafer plane via a mag stack onto a YAG imaging screen. This paper will discuss the chip design improvements and new charge drain coating that have resulted in a

  9. More about hospital generator sizing, testing and exercising.

    PubMed

    Nash, H O

    1996-08-01

    The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements for testing and exercising on-site standby generators are intended to prevent testing with insufficient load. However, engineers grapple with local and state enforcement agencies who require needlessly oversized standby generators, putting the engineer in the difficult position of using supplementary load banks because of insufficient building load for testing. This document examines the latest changes in NFPA codes and the JCAHO policy that aim to resolve testing issues.

  10. Generator Set Durability Testing Using 25% ATJ Fuel Blend

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    FMTV – Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles GEP – General Engine Products HC – hydrocarbon HEUI – hydraulically actuated, electronically controlled...loggers: Campbell Scientific model CR3000. Thirty thermocouples were used on each generator , along with five pressure transducers. Voltage, current...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED GENERATOR SET DURABILITY TESTING USING 25% ATJ FUEL BLEND INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 476 by Gregory A. T

  11. SSME seal test program: Test results for hole-pattern damper seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The results consisting of direct and transverse force coefficients are presented for thirteen, hole-pattern, damper-seal configurations. The designation damper seal refers to a seal which uses a deliberately roughened stator nd smooth rotor, to increase the net damping force developed by a seal. The designation hole-pattern refers to a stator roughness pattern which is developed by a pattern of round holes while are milled into the stator. All seals tested use the same smooth rotor and have the same constant minimum clearance. The seal tests examined the following major design options: (1) hole-area density, i.e., the proportion of stator surface area consumed by holes; and (2) hole depth, particularly the ratio of hole depth to minimum clearance. In addition, limited data were taken to examine the influence of in-line versus staggered hole patterns and flat-bottomed versus spherical-bottomed holes.

  12. A simple approach for stochastic generation of spatial rainfall patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, A.; Franchini, M.; Brocca, L.; Camici, S.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryRainfall scenarios are of considerable interest for design flood and flood risk analysis. To this end, the stochastic generation of continuous rainfall sequences is often coupled with the continuous hydrological modelling. In this context, the spatial and the temporal rainfall variability represents a significant issue, especially for basins in which the rainfall field cannot be approximated through the use of a single station. Therefore, methodologies for the spatially and temporally correlated rainfall generation are welcome. An example of such a methodology is the well-established Spatial-Temporal Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulse (STNSRP), a modification of the single-site Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulse (NSRP) approach, designed to incorporate specific features to reproduce the rainfall spatial cross-correlation. In order to provide a simple alternative to the STNSRP, a new method of generating synthetic rainfall time series with pre-set spatial-temporal correlation is proposed herein. This approach relies on the single-site NSRP model, which is used to generate synthetic hourly independent rainfall time series at each rain gauge station with the required temporal autocorrelation (and several other appropriately selected statistics). The rank correlation method of Iman and Conover (IC) is then applied to these synthetic rainfall time series in order to introduce the same spatial cross-correlation that exists between the observed time series. This combination of the NSRP model with the IC method consents the reproduction of the observed spatial-temporal variability of a rainfall field. In order to verify the proposed procedure, four sub-basins of the Upper Tiber River basin are investigated whose basin areas range from 165 km2 to 2040 km2. Results show that the procedure is able to preserve both the rainfall temporal autocorrelation at single site and the rainfall spatial cross-correlation at basin scale, and its performance is comparable with that of the

  13. Chemicals and heat generate different protein patterns in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1997-01-01

    The effect of exposing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V to DNP-stress and heat shock was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, which were detected either by autoradiography or by silver staining. Both DNP stress and heat shock led to altered patterns of protein synthesis or concentration. About 10% of the proteins which were synthesized newly or at an increased rate and about 25% of those which were found newly or with an increased concentration after DNP treatment were identified after heat shock, too.

  14. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  15. Improving physician practice efficiency by learning lab test ordering pattern.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Cao, Feng; Ni, Yuan; Shen, Weijia; Zheng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The system of electronic medical records (EMR) has been widely used in physician practice. In China, physicians have the time pressure to provide care to many patients in a short period. Improving practice efficiency is a promising direction to mitigate this predicament. During the encounter, ordering lab test is one of the most frequent actions in EMR system. In this paper, our motivation is to save physician's time by providing lab test ordering list to facilitate physician practice. To this end, we developed weight based multi-label classification framework to learn to order lab test for the current encounter according to the historical EMR. Particularly, we propose to learn the physician-specific lab test ordering pattern as different physicians may have different practice behavior on the same population. Experimental results on the real data set demonstrate that physician-specific models can outperform the baseline.

  16. Developmental approaches to the analysis of vertebrate central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J

    1987-10-01

    The isolated spinal cord of the chick embryo is a new preparation for analyzing the neural mechanisms and development of vertebrate motor activity. The embryonic cord can be isolated in vitro during the period of development when antagonist alternation of hindlimb motoneurons matures. The preparation is spontaneously active in vitro generating episodes of motor activity that can be recorded from muscle nerves and the ventral roots. The neural mechanisms responsible for the development and genesis of motor activity are being investigated using intra- and extracellular recording from motoneurons and electrotonic recordings of motoneuron synaptic activity from muscle nerves. The results suggest that alternating motor activity in the isolated chick cord may be generated by a mechanism in which a synaptically induced motoneuronal shunt conductance regulates the time of discharge of flexor and extensor motoneurons.

  17. SSME seal test program: Test results for smooth, hole-pattern and helically-grooved stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1987-01-01

    All of the listed seals were tested in a liquid Halon test facility at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, a helically-grooved-stator seal was tested in an air seal facility. An analysis of the test results with comparisons to theoretical predictions supports the following conclusions: (1) For small seals, the Hirs' friction-factor model is more restricted than had been thought; (2) For smooth seals, predictions of stiffness and damping improve markedly as the radical clearance is reduced; (3) Friction-factor data for hole-pattern-seal stators frequently deviates from the Hirs model; (4) Predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients for hole-pattern-stator seals is generally reasonable; (5) Tests for the hole-pattern stators at reduced clearances show no clear optimum for hole-pattern seals with respect to either hole-area ratio or hole depth to minimum clearance ratios; (6) Tests of these hole-pattern stators show no significant advantage in net damping over smooth seals; (7) Tests of helically-grooved seal stators in Halon show reasonable agreement between theory and prediction for leakage and direct stiffness but poor agreement for the net damping coefficient.

  18. Morphodynamics and anabranching patterns generated in the Madeira River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Bonthius, C.; Abad, J. D.; Stevaux, J.; Filizola, N.; Frias, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Madeira River is the largest tributary in water discharge and sediment transport of the Amazon River. At present, this river is at the center of a controversial political discussion because the Brazilian government is building two hydroelectric plants on the Bolivia-Brazil border, flooding a long reach from near Cachuela Esperanza in the tributary Beni River, close to the Brazil-Bolivia border, up to Porto Velho. We present results from three field expeditions carried out in July-August 2011, December 2012 and March 2013. The main scope of this article is to disseminate the environmental threat suffered by the Madeira from regulation/disruption, and to present preliminary results on the geomorphologic characteristics of the Madeira channel and floodplain. Using historical radar and satellite imagery, the floodplain morpho-sedimentary units and morphology of the channel were assessed and quantified. Sediment bed and bank sampling, bathymetric surveys and velocity measurements were recorded using a single beam echo sounder and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), respectively. Velocity data were analyzed using TRDI's WinRiverII and a MATLAB-based software package Velocity Mapping Tool. We consider that the Madeira River offers some ideal conditions to provide information on critical conditions and geomorphologic thresholds in mega-rivers. The Madeira River has been classified as a simple to moderate anabranching low-sinuosity river. The Madeira flows through a relatively simple pattern, alternating straight reaches with others that exhibit an incipient tendency to anabranch. Single beam and ADCP data yields insight into the bathymetry and flow characteristics in the channel through straight, pseudo-meandering, and anabranching stretches. We studied in detail three selected three reaches zones where three primary mechanisms for anabranching were identified: a) branches upstream and downstream in box shape pseudo-meanders; b) simple branch patterns

  19. A Pulse-Type Hardware CPG Model for Generation and Transition of Quadruped Locomotion Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Keiko; Sekine, Yoshifumi; Nakabora, Yoshifumi; Saeki, Katsutoshi

    The purpose of our research is to clarify information processing functions of living organisms by neural networks using pulse-type hardware neuron models and applying pulse-type hardware neural networks to engineered models. It is known that locomotion such as walking by a living organism is generated and transited by CPG (Central Pattern Generator) in the central nervous system. We investigate a pulse-type hardware CPG model using coupled oscillator composed of pulse-type hardware neuron models. A CPG model is need to generate and control quadruped locomotion. In this paper, we describe generation and transition of oscillation patterns, corresponding to quadruped locomotion patterns. As a result, it is shown that generation and transition of oscillation patterns are possible by giving external inputs of one pulse to the CPG model.

  20. Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

    2007-05-25

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: • Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. • Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. • Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE’s proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. • Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

  1. A versatile waveform generator for testing neuroelectric signal processors.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A F

    1989-08-01

    A multi-channel waveform generator was designed for testing neuroelectric signal processors. Smooth transient signals that resemble action potentials or evoked potentials are generated by a second order switched capacitor filter excited by brief rectangular pulses. The choice of an integrated circuit switched capacitor filter simplified the design by circumventing some of the disadvantages of conventional active filters. The waveform generator is versatile, with several signal parameters being independently adjustable from front panel controls: duration, waveshape, latency, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio. The generator has been used for testing evoked potential acquisition and processing systems, for evaluating the effects of analog filters on evoked potentials and for testing systems designed to detect and classify trains of multi-unit action potentials.

  2. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  3. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  4. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGES

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; ...

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  5. A three-phase sag generator for testing industrial equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.R. Jr.; Morgan, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    A diesel powered three-phase standby 480V, 15kW, 60Hz synchronous generator has been modified to give controlled three-phase voltage sags. These sags can be controlled in both depth and duration. A 486-based computer with a data acquisition system controls the generator and monitors the system under test. The custom software interface allows the user to select the depth and duration of the each sag. Typically, the user will select a series of sags in selectable increments down to a certain depth. The data acquisition system has both digital and analog inputs, so that data lines, ac and dc voltages and currents, contactors and relays, etc. can be monitored during the tests. The software interface enables the user to select allowable tolerance bands for the monitored signals. If one or more of the signals falls outside the allowable range, the test is suspended. The sag depth and duration that caused the equipment to fail the test is then recorded. After testing over a range of sag durations, a CBEMA-type curve is available for the system under test. The sag generator enables the user to systematically determine the sensitivity of the components of an installed process line. This will enable the user to determine cost-effective ride-through enhancement strategies or to test the effectiveness of currently installed equipment. Although this test generator is small, the basic concept can be scaled up to the 2MVA range.

  6. Once-through testing of the CRBRP prototype steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Gabler, M.J.; Carlson, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The prototype steam generator for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) was designed, built, and tested by Rockwell International. A portion of these tests, performed by the Energy Technology Engineering Center during early 1983, had the specific objective of supporting the design of a hockey-stick-type steam generator for use in the once-through cycle mode, including demonstration of steady-state operation, startup and shutdown in a once-through mode, and stable operation at low power. Eighteen steady-state performance tests were performed at power levels from 33 to 70 MWt, which represented 20 to 42 percent full power per tube of a commercial design. Pretest predictions are compared with test results. Startup and shutdown operations under a full-liquid condition in the steam generator are described. Steam generator tube inlet orifices, removed during the CRBRP test program, were not replaced for these tests. Therefore, dynamic instability was encountered during certain tests, and the results are compared with the DYNAM code for predicting flow instability conditions. Sodium and steam temperature maldistributions cause by testing at off-design conditions for this unit are also discussed.

  7. Testing random number generators for Monte Carlo applications.

    PubMed

    Sim, L H; Nitschke, K N

    1993-03-01

    Central to any system for modelling radiation transport phenomena using Monte Carlo techniques is the method by which pseudo random numbers are generated. This method is commonly referred to as the Random Number Generator (RNG). It is usually a computer implemented mathematical algorithm which produces a series of numbers uniformly distributed on the interval [0,1). If this series satisfies certain statistical tests for randomness, then for practical purposes the pseudo random numbers in the series can be considered to be random. Tests of this nature are important not only for new RNGs but also to test the implementation of known RNG algorithms in different computer environments. Six RNGs have been tested using six statistical tests and one visual test. The statistical tests are the moments, frequency (digit and number), serial, gap, and poker tests. The visual test is a simple two dimensional ordered pair display. In addition the RNGs have been tested in a specific Monte Carlo application. This type of test is often overlooked, however it is important that in addition to satisfactory performance in statistical tests, the RNG be able to perform effectively in the applications of interest. The RNGs tested here are based on a variety of algorithms, including multiplicative and linear congruential, lagged Fibonacci, and combination arithmetic and lagged Fibonacci. The effect of the Bays-Durham shuffling algorithm on the output of a known "bad" RNG has also been investigated.

  8. Computer-Assisted Generation of Patterns and Virtual Reality Techniques for Fashion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Mickael; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2009-03-01

    We present a methodology for the design of aesthetic patterns and their visualization on virtual clothes. Generated patterns are directly mapped on the dress of a virtual mannequin. Furthermore, patterns sets may be interactively mapped on the virtual dress using a specific 3D interaction technique called Back-and-Forth. Pattern generation involves different mathematical approaches such as iterated function systems (IFS) and nonlinear trajectory models. Both model parameters and color space exploration is performed through a simple user interface. This work contributes to promote both computer assistance in the context of mass customization for fashion design.

  9. A Test Generation Framework for Distributed Fault-Tolerant Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, Alwyn; Bushnell, David; Miner, Paul; Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2009-01-01

    Heavyweight formal methods such as theorem proving have been successfully applied to the analysis of safety critical fault-tolerant systems. Typically, the models and proofs performed during such analysis do not inform the testing process of actual implementations. We propose a framework for generating test vectors from specifications written in the Prototype Verification System (PVS). The methodology uses a translator to produce a Java prototype from a PVS specification. Symbolic (Java) PathFinder is then employed to generate a collection of test cases. A small example is employed to illustrate how the framework can be used in practice.

  10. Dynamic test input generation for multiple-fault isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Phil

    1990-01-01

    Recent work is Causal Reasoning has provided practical techniques for multiple fault diagnosis. These techniques provide a hypothesis/measurement diagnosis cycle. Using probabilistic methods, they choose the best measurements to make, then update fault hypotheses in response. For many applications such as computers and spacecraft, few measurement points may be accessible, or values may change quickly as the system under diagnosis operates. In these cases, a hypothesis/measurement cycle is insufficient. A technique is presented for a hypothesis/test-input/measurement diagnosis cycle. In contrast to generating tests a priori for determining device functionality, it dynamically generates tests in response to current knowledge about fault probabilities. It is shown how the mathematics previously used for measurement specification can be applied to the test input generation process. An example from an efficient implementation called Multi-Purpose Causal (MPC) is presented.

  11. Eggs illusion: Local shape deformation generated by a grid pattern.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Mitsudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we report a new visual shape illusion, the eggs illusion, in which circular disks located at the midpoints between adjacent grid intersections are perceived as being deformed to ellipses. In Experiment 1, we examined the eggs illusion by using a matching method and found that grid luminance and patch size play a critical role in producing the illusory deformation. In Experiment 2, we employed several types of elliptic or circular patches to examine the conditions in which the illusory deformation was cancelled or weakened. We observed that the illusory deformation was dependent on local grid orientation. Based on these results, we found several common features between the eggs illusion and the scintillating grid illusion. This resemblance suggests a possibility that similar mechanisms underlie the two phenomena. In addition to the scintillating grid illusion, we also considered several known perceptual phenomena that might be related to the eggs illusion, i.e., the apparent size illusion, the shape-contrast effect, and the Orbison illusion. Finally, we discuss the role of orientation processing in generating the eggs illusion.

  12. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  13. Automated Generation and Assessment of Autonomous Systems Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Horvath, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning verification and validation testing of autonomous spacecraft routinely culminates in the exploration of anomalous or faulted mission-like scenarios using the work involved during the Dawn mission's tests as examples. Prioritizing which scenarios to develop usually comes down to focusing on the most vulnerable areas and ensuring the best return on investment of test time. Rules-of-thumb strategies often come into play, such as injecting applicable anomalies prior to, during, and after system state changes; or, creating cases that ensure good safety-net algorithm coverage. Although experience and judgment in test selection can lead to high levels of confidence about the majority of a system's autonomy, it's likely that important test cases are overlooked. One method to fill in potential test coverage gaps is to automatically generate and execute test cases using algorithms that ensure desirable properties about the coverage. For example, generate cases for all possible fault monitors, and across all state change boundaries. Of course, the scope of coverage is determined by the test environment capabilities, where a faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity, software-only simulation would allow the broadest coverage. Even real-time systems that can be replicated and run in parallel, and that have reliable set-up and operations features provide an excellent resource for automated testing. Making detailed predictions for the outcome of such tests can be difficult, and when algorithmic means are employed to produce hundreds or even thousands of cases, generating predicts individually is impractical, and generating predicts with tools requires executable models of the design and environment that themselves require a complete test program. Therefore, evaluating the results of large number of mission scenario tests poses special challenges. A good approach to address this problem is to automatically score the results

  14. Islanding tests near a mini hydro generating plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jutras, R.; Lafond, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Plamondon, M.; Proulx, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the authors present the measurements taken while a mini hydro power plant and the adjoining load were islanded on a 25 kV distribution feeder. This was as a part of the acceptance tests before commissioning. The frequency was allowed to vary from 56.3 to 64.5 Hz before the generation was tripped off. They also present the estimation of the moment of inertia of the generating system from these measurements.

  15. Thrombin generation testing for monitoring hemophilia treatment: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Gian Luca; Berntorp, Erik

    2010-10-01

    Thrombin generation is a key process that determines the extent of a hemostatic plug or a thrombotic process. The ensuing thrombin burst is crucial for the formation of a stable fibrin clot. During its active life, thrombin exerts a multitude of highly regulated actions on the blood and the vessel wall, among which is the clotting of fibrinogen. The inappropriate generation of thrombin may lead to pathological processes, foremost of which are hemorrhagic or thrombotic diseases. The coagulation system is usually investigated by means of two in vitro classical clotting tests, the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. These assays assess only the time taken to form a clot and do not entirely reflect global hemostatic balance. They permit identification of connectivity between the component activities identified as required for plasma coagulation and define the concept of intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways, which converge at the step of formation of the prothrombinase complex. However, the mechanisms established by in vitro tests are not always mirrored in the human pathologies associated with bleeding or thrombosis. The recent development of newer tests based on the continuous registration of thrombin generation (TG) under in vitro conditions that mimic more closely what occurs in vivo prompted us to reinvestigate the balance between procoagulants and anticoagulants in patients. Thrombin generation assays (TGA) not only provide an overall assessment of hemostasis, but they also target potential extrahemostatic effects of the generated thrombin, a potent agonist of a multitude of cellular activation pathways. Moreover, estimation of an individual's thrombin generation potential may correlate more closely with a hyper- or hypocoagulable phenotype, compared with traditional coagulation tests. In this review, we discuss to what extent TG can be expected to reflect the clotting function of blood, the development and use of different TGA

  16. Mechanisms of Left-Right Coordination in Mammalian Locomotor Pattern Generation Circuits: A Mathematical Modeling View

    PubMed Central

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized “hopping” pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left–right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  17. Mechanisms of left-right coordination in mammalian locomotor pattern generation circuits: a mathematical modeling view.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Bacak, Bartholomew J; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized "hopping" pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left-right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  18. Historical Identity Development Patterns and Contemporary Multicultural Identity in First, Second and Third Generation Counseling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Nola Butler

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the historical and contemporary identity development patterns of first, second, and third generation students to determine the attributes students bring with them and how they develop through their experiences in a multicultural counselor training program. The paper examines patterns between groups, followed by a discussion of…

  19. Central Pattern Generation and the Motor Infrastructure for Suck, Respiration, and Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Steven M.; Estep, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current report is to review experimental findings on centrally patterned movements and sensory and descending modulation of central pattern generators (CPGs) in a variety of animal and human models. Special emphasis is directed toward speech production muscle systems, including the chest wall and orofacial complex during…

  20. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    PubMed Central

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment. PMID:26902520

  1. Making a Swim Central Pattern Generator Out of Latent Parabolic Bursters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaçam, Deniz; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2015-06-01

    We study the rhythmogenesis of oscillatory patterns emerging in network motifs composed of inhibitory coupled tonic spiking neurons represented by the Plant model of R15 nerve cells. Such motifs are argued to be used as building blocks for a larger central pattern generator network controlling swim locomotion of sea slug Melibe leonina.

  2. From Central Pattern Generator to Sensory Template in the Evolution of Birdsong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and…

  3. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment.

  4. Integrated circuit test-port architecture and method and apparatus of test-port generation

    DOEpatents

    Teifel, John

    2016-04-12

    A method and apparatus are provided for generating RTL code for a test-port interface of an integrated circuit. In an embodiment, a test-port table is provided as input data. A computer automatically parses the test-port table into data structures and analyzes it to determine input, output, local, and output-enable port names. The computer generates address-detect and test-enable logic constructed from combinational functions. The computer generates one-hot multiplexer logic for at least some of the output ports. The one-hot multiplexer logic for each port is generated so as to enable the port to toggle between data signals and test signals. The computer then completes the generation of the RTL code.

  5. Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor Development and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Lee, Jimmy; Robertson, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) was the primary docking sensor for the Orbital Express mission. The sensor performed extremely well during the mission, and the technology has been proven on orbit in other flights too. Parts obsolescence issues prevented the construction of more AVGS units, so the next generation of sensor was designed with current parts and updated to support future programs. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been tested as a breadboard, two different brassboard units, and a prototype. The testing revealed further improvements that could be made and demonstrated capability beyond that ever demonstrated by the sensor on orbit. This paper presents some of the sensor history, parts obsolescence issues, radiation concerns, and software improvements to the NGAVGS. In addition, some of the testing and test results are presented. The NGAVGS has shown that it will meet the general requirements for any space proximity operations or docking need.

  6. Experiments with Test Case Generation and Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Drusinsky, Doron; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Rosu, Grigore; Visser, Willem; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Software testing is typically an ad hoc process where human testers manually write many test inputs and expected test results, perhaps automating their execution in a regression suite. This process is cumbersome and costly. This paper reports preliminary results on an approach to further automate this process. The approach consists of combining automated test case generation based on systematically exploring the program's input domain, with runtime analysis, where execution traces are monitored and verified against temporal logic specifications, or analyzed using advanced algorithms for detecting concurrency errors such as data races and deadlocks. The approach suggests to generate specifications dynamically per input instance rather than statically once-and-for-all. The paper describes experiments with variants of this approach in the context of two examples, a planetary rover controller and a space craft fault protection system.

  7. State-of-the-Art Assessment of Testing and Testability of Custom LSI/VLSI Circuits. Volume IV. Test Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    containing 240 gates and 36 flip-flops [Hill & Huey 1977]. It 13 S tart aults Fault (1)-AgorithmI (2) Sensitization Searchj o. , ye F nauls no -- - Delet...Conf., Cherry Hill, NJ, pp. 37-41, October 1979. [Lesser & Shedletsky 1980] J.D. Lesser & J.J. Shedletsky: "An experimental delay test generator for...patterns within a structured sequential logic network," Digest Semiconductor Test Symp., Cherry Hill, NJ, pp. 19-27, October 1977. [Yamada et al. 1977

  8. Benzene Generation Testing for Tank 48H Waste Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-05-13

    In support for the Aggregation option1, researchers performed a series of tests using actual Tank 48H slurries. The tests were designed to examine potential benzene generation issues if the Tank 48H slurry is disposed to Saltstone. Personnel used the archived Tank 48H sample (HTF-E-03-127, collected September 17, 2003) for the experiments. The tests included a series of three experiments (Tests A, B, and F) performed in duplicate, giving a total of six experiments. Test A used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}20:1 with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H. Test B used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}2.7:1 with DWPF Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H, while Test F used Tank 48H slurry as-is. Tests A and B occurred at 45 C, while Test F occurred at 55 C. Over a period of 8 weeks, personnel collected samples for analysis, once per week. Each sample was tested with the in-cell gamma counter. The researchers noted a decline in the cesium activity in solution which is attributed to temperature dependence of the complex slurry equilibrium. Selected samples were sent to ADS for potassium, boron, and cesium analysis. The benzene generation rate was inferred from the TPB destruction which is indirectly measured by the in-growth of cesium, potassium or boron. The results of all the analyses reveal no discernible in-growth of radiocesium, potassium or boron, indicating no significant tetraphenylborate (TPB) decomposition in any of the experiments. From boron measurements, the inferred rate of TPB destruction remained less than 0.332 mg/(L-h) implying a maximum benzene generation rate of <0.325 mg/(L-h).

  9. In Silico Proficiency Testing for Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Duncavage, Eric J; Abel, Haley J; Pfeifer, John D

    2017-01-01

    Quality assurance for clinical next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based assays is difficult given the complex methods and the range of sequence variants such assays can detect. As the number and range of mutations detected by clinical NGS assays has increased, it is difficult to apply standard analyte-specific proficiency testing (PT). Most current proficiency testing challenges for NGS are methods-based PT surveys that use DNA from reference samples engineered to harbor specific mutations that test both sequence generation and bioinformatics analysis. These methods-based PTs are limited by the number and types of mutations that can be physically introduced into a single DNA sample. In silico proficiency testing, which evaluates only the bioinformatics component of NGS assays, is a recently introduced PT method that allows for evaluation of numerous mutations spanning a range of variant classes. In silico PT data sets can be generated from simulated or actual sequencing data and are used to test alignment through variant detection and annotation steps. In silico PT has several advantages over the use of physical samples, including greater flexibility in tested variants, the ability to design laboratory-specific challenges, and lower costs. Herein, we review the use of in silico PT as an alternative to traditional methods-based PT as it is evolving in oncology applications and discuss how the approach is applicable more broadly.

  10. Effects of Differences in Working Memory Capacity on Patterns of Word Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Mimpei; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Morioka, Shu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that WM (working memory) is concerned with word generation, but many points regarding the relationship between the individual differences of WM capacity and the patterns of word generation remain unclear. This study is to investigate these unclear points by using three types of word fluency task with different…

  11. Testing and Functions of the J2X Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I, NASA s new solid rocket based crew launch vehicle, is a two stage in line rocket that has made its waytothe forefront of NASA s endeavors. The Ares I s Upper Stage (US) will be propelled by a J-2X engine which is fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The J-2X is a variation based on two of its predecessor s, the J-2 and J-2S engines. ET50 is providing the design support for hardware required to run tests on the J-2X Gas Generator (GG) that increases the delivery pressure of the supplied combustion fuels that the engine burns. The test area will be running a series of tests using different lengths and curved segments of pipe and different sized nozzles to determine the configuration that best satisfies the thrust, heat, and stability requirements for the engine. I have had to research the configurations that are being tested and gain an understanding of the purpose of the tests. I then had to research the parts that would be used in the test configurations. I was taken to see parts similar to the ones used in the test configurations and was allowed to review drawings and dimensions used for those parts. My job over this summer has been to use the knowledge I have gained to design, model, and create drawings for the un-fabricated parts that are necessary for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator Phase IIcTest.

  12. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  16. Automatic Generation of Tests from Domain and Multimedia Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papasalouros, Andreas; Kotis, Konstantinos; Kanaris, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an approach for generating tests in an automatic way. Although other methods have been already reported in the literature, the proposed approach is based on ontologies, representing both domain and multimedia knowledge. The article also reports on a prototype implementation of this approach, which…

  17. Assessing Threat Detection Scenarios through Hypothesis Generation and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    e.g., Cohen et al., 1996; Klein, Moon , & Hoffman, 2006; Osman, 2010). Unlike hypothesis generation, however, researchers often consider testing to be...Massachusetts: MIT Press. Klein, G., Moon , B. M., & Hoffman, R. R. (Sep-Oct 2006). Making sense of sensemaking 2: A macro-cognitive model. IEEE

  18. Testing a Student Generated Hypothesis Using Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Herle M.; Vaughan, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that allows students to experience the full process of a statistical investigation, from generating the research question, to collecting data and testing a hypothesis. Implementation of the activity is described both with and without use of clickers, handheld remotes that allow instant data collection.

  19. Development and Testing of Next Generation AWACS SF Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    dimensional assignment problems could be generalized to n- dimensions, then it would solve the tracking sensor fusion problem. Although the true n...Dates Covered (from... to) ("DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle Development and Testing of Next Generation AWACS SF Processing Contract or Grant

  20. The Effects of Student-Generated Questions on Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves-Kazelskis, Carolyn; Kazelskis, Richard

    A total of 50 college students enrolled in different sections of a language arts methodology course served as treatment and control groups to investigate the effects of student-generated questions on test performance. Periodically throughout the course, students in the treatment group received instruction in effective questioning techniques by…

  1. Quantum random number generation for loophole-free Bell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Morgan; Abellan, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar

    2015-05-01

    We describe the generation of quantum random numbers at multi-Gbps rates, combined with real-time randomness extraction, to give very high purity random numbers based on quantum events at most tens of ns in the past. The system satisfies the stringent requirements of quantum non-locality tests that aim to close the timing loophole. We describe the generation mechanism using spontaneous-emission-driven phase diffusion in a semiconductor laser, digitization, and extraction by parity calculation using multi-GHz logic chips. We pay special attention to experimental proof of the quality of the random numbers and analysis of the randomness extraction. In contrast to widely-used models of randomness generators in the computer science literature, we argue that randomness generation by spontaneous emission can be extracted from a single source.

  2. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Automated Test Case Generation for an Autopilot Requirement Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Rungta, Neha; Feary, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Designing safety-critical automation with robust human interaction is a difficult task that is susceptible to a number of known Human-Automation Interaction (HAI) vulnerabilities. It is therefore essential to develop automated tools that provide support both in the design and rapid evaluation of such automation. The Automation Design and Evaluation Prototyping Toolset (ADEPT) enables the rapid development of an executable specification for automation behavior and user interaction. ADEPT supports a number of analysis capabilities, thus enabling the detection of HAI vulnerabilities early in the design process, when modifications are less costly. In this paper, we advocate the introduction of a new capability to model-based prototyping tools such as ADEPT. The new capability is based on symbolic execution that allows us to automatically generate quality test suites based on the system design. Symbolic execution is used to generate both user input and test oracles user input drives the testing of the system implementation, and test oracles ensure that the system behaves as designed. We present early results in the context of a component in the Autopilot system modeled in ADEPT, and discuss the challenges of test case generation in the HAI domain.

  4. Improved Ant Algorithms for Software Testing Cases Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shunkun; Xu, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    Existing ant colony optimization (ACO) for software testing cases generation is a very popular domain in software testing engineering. However, the traditional ACO has flaws, as early search pheromone is relatively scarce, search efficiency is low, search model is too simple, positive feedback mechanism is easy to porduce the phenomenon of stagnation and precocity. This paper introduces improved ACO for software testing cases generation: improved local pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization, improved pheromone volatilization coefficient for ant colony optimization (IPVACO), and improved the global path pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization (IGPACO). At last, we put forward a comprehensive improved ant colony optimization (ACIACO), which is based on all the above three methods. The proposed technique will be compared with random algorithm (RND) and genetic algorithm (GA) in terms of both efficiency and coverage. The results indicate that the improved method can effectively improve the search efficiency, restrain precocity, promote case coverage, and reduce the number of iterations. PMID:24883391

  5. Thermal Analysis and Testing of Fastrac Gas Generator Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine is being developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help meet the goal of substantially reducing the cost of access to space. This engine relies on a simple gas-generator cycle, which burns a small amount of RP-1 and oxygen to provide gas to drive the turbine and then exhausts the spent fuel. The Fastrac program envisions a combination of analysis, design and hot-fire evaluation testing. This paper provides the supporting thermal analysis of the gas generator design. In order to ensure that the design objectives were met, the evaluation tests have started on a component level and a total of 15 tests of different durations were completed to date at MSFC. The correlated thermal model results will also be compared against hot-fire thermocouple data gathered.

  6. Improved ant algorithms for software testing cases generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shunkun; Man, Tianlong; Xu, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    Existing ant colony optimization (ACO) for software testing cases generation is a very popular domain in software testing engineering. However, the traditional ACO has flaws, as early search pheromone is relatively scarce, search efficiency is low, search model is too simple, positive feedback mechanism is easy to produce the phenomenon of stagnation and precocity. This paper introduces improved ACO for software testing cases generation: improved local pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization, improved pheromone volatilization coefficient for ant colony optimization (IPVACO), and improved the global path pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization (IGPACO). At last, we put forward a comprehensive improved ant colony optimization (ACIACO), which is based on all the above three methods. The proposed technique will be compared with random algorithm (RND) and genetic algorithm (GA) in terms of both efficiency and coverage. The results indicate that the improved method can effectively improve the search efficiency, restrain precocity, promote case coverage, and reduce the number of iterations.

  7. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  8. One-eighth look-up table method for effectively generating computer-generated hologram patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungjin; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Young; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-05-01

    To generate ideal digital holograms, a computer-generated hologram (CGH) has been regarded as a solution. However, it has an unavoidable problem in that the computational burden for generating CGH is very large. Recently, many studies have been conducted to investigate different solutions in order to reduce the computational complexity of CGH by using particular methods such as look-up tables (LUTs) and parallel processing. Each method has a positive effectiveness about reducing computational time for generating CGH. However, it appears to be difficult to apply both methods simultaneously because of heavy memory consumption of the LUT technique. Therefore, we proposed a one-eighth LUT method where the memory usage of the LUT is reduced, making it possible to simultaneously apply both of the fast computing methods for the computation of CGH. With the one-eighth LUT method, only one-eighth of the zone plates were stored in the LUT. All of the zone plates were accessed by indexing method. Through this method, we significantly reduced memory usage of LUT. Also, we confirmed the feasibility of reducing the computational time of the CGH by using general-purpose graphic processing units while reducing the memory usage.

  9. Exploring a type of central pattern generator based on Hindmarsh-Rose model: from theory to application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingguo; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes the idea that Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuronal model can be used to develop a new type of central pattern generator (CPG). Some key properties of HR model are studied and proved to meet the requirements of CPG. Pros and cons of HR model are provided. A CPG network based on HR model is developed and the related properties are investigated. We explore the bipedal primary gaits generated by the CPG network. The preliminary applications of HR model are tested on humanoid locomotion model and functional electrical stimulation (FES) walking system. The positive results of stimulation and experiment show the feasibility of HR model as a valid CPG.

  10. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    PubMed Central

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  11. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullara, D.; de Decker, Y.

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction-diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction-diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns.

  12. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  13. Generative Models of Segregation: Investigating Model-Generated Patterns of Residential Segregation by Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Fossett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the potential for using agent models to explore theories of residential segregation in urban areas. Results of generative experiments conducted using an agent-based simulation of segregation dynamics document that varying a small number of model parameters representing constructs from urban-ecological theories of segregation can generate a wide range of qualitatively distinct and substantively interesting segregation patterns. The results suggest how complex, macro-level patterns of residential segregation can arise from a small set of simple micro-level social dynamics operating within particular urban-demographic contexts. The promise and current limitations of agent simulation studies are noted and optimism is expressed regarding the potential for such studies to engage and contribute to the broader research literature on residential segregation. PMID:21379372

  14. Experimental verification of multilevel spatial pattern generation from binary data page with four-step phase pattern (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barada, Daisuke; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Holographic memory is expected for cold storage because of the features of huge data capacity, high data transfer rate, and long life time. In holographic memory, a signal beam is modulated by a spatial light modulator according to data pages. The recording density is dependent on information amount per pixel in a data page. However, a binary spatial light modulator is used to realize high data transfer rate in general. In our previous study, an optical conversion method from binary data to multilevel data has been proposed. In this paper, the principle of the method is experimentally verified. In the proposed method, a data page consists of symbols with 2x2 pixels and a four-step phase mask is used. Then, the complex amplitudes of four pixels in a symbol become positive real, positive imaginary, negative real, and negative imaginary values, respectively. A square pixel pattern is spread by spatial frequency filtering with a square aperture in a Fourier plane. When the aperture size is too small, the complex amplitude of four pixels in a symbol is superposed and a symbol is regarded as a pixel with a complex number. In this work, a data page pattern with a four-step phase pattern was generated by using a computer-generated circular polarization hologram (CGCPH). The CGCPH was prepared by electron beam lithography. The page data pattern is Fourier transformed by a lens and spatially filtered by a variable rectangular aperture. The complex amplitude of the spatial filtered data page pattern was measured by digital holography and the principle was experimentally verified.

  15. A test vector generator for a radar signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, C. B.

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the test vector generator (TVG) system developed for the purpose of testing a radar signal processor. This system simulates an eight channel radar receiver by providing input data for testing the signal processor test bed. The TVG system outputs 128-bit wide data samples at variable rates up to and including 10 million samples per second. The VTG memory array is one million samples deep. Variably sized output vectors can be addressed within the memory array and the vectors can be concatenated, repeated, and reshuffled in real time under the control of a single board computer. The TVG is seen having applications on a variety of programs. Discussions of adapting and scaling the system to these other applications are presented.

  16. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  17. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yong; Noh, Junghyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.

  18. Generation of Simulated Tracking Data for LADEE Operational Readiness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodburn, James; Policastri, Lisa; Owens, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Operational Readiness Tests were an important part of the pre-launch preparation for the LADEE mission. The generation of simulated tracking data to stress the Flight Dynamics System and the Flight Dynamics Team was important for satisfying the testing goal of demonstrating that the software and the team were ready to fly the operational mission. The simulated tracking was generated in a manner to incorporate the effects of errors in the baseline dynamical model, errors in maneuver execution and phenomenology associated with various tracking system based components. The ability of the mission team to overcome these challenges in a realistic flight dynamics scenario indicated that the team and flight dynamics system were ready to fly the LADEE mission. Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment.

  19. Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

    1990-01-01

    An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

  20. Development of Intake Swirl Generators for Turbo Jet Engine Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    As a test object a Larxac 04 turbofan engine was chosen which is used as propulsion in the Alpha Jet aircraft . This twospool engine features a two...a__ OPI: !’fIC-TID N .18.1 DEVELOPMENT OF NAR 8WZRL GENERATORS FOR TURBO JET ENGINE TU TING by H.P. Gensmlor*, W. Meyer**, L. Fottner*** Dipl.-Ing...at the Universitit der Bundeswehr MUnchen. The test facility is designed for turbo jet engines up to an maximum thrust of 30kN and a maximum mass

  1. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  2. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system.

  3. NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Halse, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

  4. Unbalanced rock mass vibration generator and its bench testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalkin, LA; Azarov, AV; Serdyukov, AS

    2017-02-01

    This work presents an unbalanced borehole vibration source with the pneumatic actuator to affect the rock mass bottomhole zone in the seismic frequency range. The modulus-type source consists of the vibration generator with automatic step regulation of static moment, clamping node and built-in pneumatic device to transfer equipment in uncased boreholes. There are test results on the source prototype, amplitude and frequency characteristics and spectral content of the source signal.

  5. Design and Test of a Continuous Duty Pulsed AC Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    DESIGN AND TEST OF A CONTINUOUS DUTY PULSED AC GENERATOR* R. M. Calfo, D. J . Scott , and D. W. Scherbarth Westinghouse Electric Corporation...Proceedings of the 19th Power Modulator Symposium, June 26-28, 1990, San Diego, CA. Dennis J . Scott and Raymond M. Calfo, •Synchronous Machines for...Pulsed Power Applications,• Seventh IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, June 11-14, 1989, Monterey, CA. D. J . Scott , R. M. Calfo, H. R. Schwenk

  6. Intelligent fuzzy-neural pattern generation and control of a quadrupedal bionic inspection robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfeddine, D.; Bulgakov, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents a case study on ‘single leg single step’ pattern generation and control of quadrupedal bionic robot movement using intelligent fuzzy-neural approaches. The aim is to set up a flip-flop mechanical configuration allowing the robot to move one step forward. The same algorithm can be integrated to develop a full trajectory pattern as an interconnected task of global path planning for autonomous quadrupedal robots.

  7. Second harmonic generation in a low-loss orientation-patterned GaAs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, K A; McRobbie, A D; Sokolovskii, G S; Schunemann, P G; Rafailov, E U

    2013-07-15

    The technology of low-loss orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) waveguided crystals was developed and realized by reduction of diffraction scattering on the waveguide pattern. The propagation losses in the OP-GaAs waveguide were estimated to be as low as 2.1 dB/cm, thus demonstrating the efficient second harmonic generation at 1621 nm under an external pumping.

  8. Submodular Memetic Approximation for Multiobjective Parallel Test Paper Generation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Luan; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, Alvis C M

    2016-06-23

    Parallel test paper generation is a biobjective distributed resource optimization problem, which aims to generate multiple similarly optimal test papers automatically according to multiple user-specified assessment criteria. Generating high-quality parallel test papers is challenging due to its NP-hardness in both of the collective objective functions. In this paper, we propose a submodular memetic approximation algorithm for solving this problem. The proposed algorithm is an adaptive memetic algorithm (MA), which exploits the submodular property of the collective objective functions to design greedy-based approximation algorithms for enhancing steps of the multiobjective MA. Synergizing the intensification of submodular local search mechanism with the diversification of the population-based submodular crossover operator, our algorithm can jointly optimize the total quality maximization objective and the fairness quality maximization objective. Our MA can achieve provable near-optimal solutions in a huge search space of large datasets in efficient polynomial runtime. Performance results on various datasets have shown that our algorithm has drastically outperformed the current techniques in terms of paper quality and runtime efficiency.

  9. When does colonisation of a semi-arid hillslope generate vegetation patterns?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    Patterned vegetation occurs in many semi-arid regions of the world. Most previous studies have assumed that patterns form from a starting point of uniform vegetation, for example as a response to a decrease in mean annual rainfall. However an alternative possibility is that patterns are generated when bare ground is colonised. This paper investigates the conditions under which colonisation leads to patterning on sloping ground. The slope gradient plays an important role because of the downhill flow of rainwater. One long-established consequence of this is that patterns are organised into stripes running parallel to the contours; such patterns are known as banded vegetation or tiger bush. This paper shows that the slope also has an important effect on colonisation, since the uphill and downhill edges of an isolated vegetation patch have different dynamics. For the much-used Klausmeier model for semi-arid vegetation, the author shows that without a term representing water diffusion, colonisation always generates uniform vegetation rather than a pattern. However the combination of a sufficiently large water diffusion term and a sufficiently low slope gradient does lead to colonisation-induced patterning. The author goes on to consider colonisation in the Rietkerk model, which is also in widespread use: the same conclusions apply for this model provided that a small threshold is imposed on vegetation biomass, below which plant growth is set to zero. Since the two models are quite different mathematically, this suggests that the predictions are a consequence of the basic underlying assumption of water redistribution as the pattern generation mechanism.

  10. Local network parameters can affect inter-network phase lags in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kopell, N

    2006-01-01

    Weakly coupled phase oscillators and strongly coupled relaxation oscillators have different mechanisms for creating stable phase lags. Many oscillations in central pattern generators combine features of each type of coupling: local networks composed of strongly coupled relaxation oscillators are weakly coupled to similar local networks. This paper analyzes the phase lags produced by this combination of mechanisms and shows how the parameters of a local network, such as the decay time of inhibition, can affect the phase lags between the local networks. The analysis is motivated by the crayfish central pattern generator used for swimming, and uses techniques from geometrical singular perturbation theory.

  11. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  12. Tunable nano-pattern generation and photolithography using hybrid Kretschmann and Otto structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuyang; Wang, Chinhua; Hu, Jingpei

    2016-10-01

    We propose a continuous tuning SPPs interference photolithography using hybrid Kretschmann and Otto structures. The patterns are formed by the interference of two kinds of SPPs excited by Kretschmann structure and Otto structure respectively, and the tuning capability is implemented by changing the angle between the two kinds of SPPs beams and varying the amplitude and phase of corresponding incident beams. Numerical results show the flexibility and convenience in tuning of interference patterns and resolutions with high contrast, both one and two dimension periodic patterns can be generated and tuned easily. This proposed method is possible to develop a new tunable SPPs photolithography technique for fabrication of periodic nanostructures.

  13. Synaptic patterning of left-right alternation in a computational model of the rodent hindlimb central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, William Erik; Harris-Warrick, Ronald; Guckenheimer, John

    2011-04-01

    Establishing, maintaining, and modifying the phase relationships between extensor and flexor muscle groups is essential for central pattern generators in the spinal cord to coordinate the hindlimbs well enough to produce the basic walking rhythm. This paper investigates a simplified computational model for the spinal hindlimb central pattern generator (CPG) that is abstracted from experimental data from the rodent spinal cord. This model produces locomotor-like activity with appropriate phase relationships in which right and left muscle groups alternate while extensor and flexor muscle groups alternate. Convergence to this locomotor pattern is slow, however, and the range of parameter values for which the model produces appropriate output is relatively narrow. We examine these aspects of the model's coordination of left-right activity through investigation of successively more complicated subnetworks, focusing on the role of the synaptic architecture in shaping motoneuron phasing. We find unexpected sensitivity in the phase response properties of individual neurons in response to stimulation and a need for high levels of both inhibition and excitation to achieve the walking rhythm. In the absence of cross-cord excitation, equal levels of ipsilateral and contralateral inhibition result in a strong preference for hopping over walking. Inhibition alone can produce the walking rhythm, but contralateral inhibition must be much stronger than ipsilateral inhibition. Cross-cord excitatory connections significantly enhance convergence to the walking rhythm, which is achieved most rapidly with strong crossed excitation and greater contralateral than ipsilateral inhibition. We discuss the implications of these results for CPG architectures based on unit burst generators.

  14. Performance evaluations of MHD generator tests at CDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, V. W.; Lineberry, J. T.; Wu, Y. C. L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data from CDIF coal-fired MHD generator test 90-DIAG-3 are analyzed. The results of two independent studies are presented and compared. Both studies impose experimental data upon modeling to derive information on plasma properties and electrical loss mechanisms. The first technique applies routine electrical data to special solutions of the MHD electrical equations to determine gross electrophysical properties and nonuniformity parameters of the generator medium (plasma plus slag) over one pitch control volumes along the length of the MHD channel. The second technique pits a predictive 1D MHD generator model against input experimental Hall voltage data. The generator model solves for the MHD plasmadynamic and electrical processes required to fit the experimental voltage distribution to determine plasma properties with wall and electrical losses. Among the parameters that are estimated by these methods are conductivity, Hall parameter, interelectrode resistances, and the plasma nonuniformity factors (e.g., G). The magnitude of leakage current (slag or otherwise) can also inferred from these analyses.

  15. Initial second-generation PFB carbonizer pilot plant test results

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J. ); Froehlich, R. ); Bonk, D.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) plants promise higher efficiency with lower costs of electricity and lower stack emissions. With a l6.55 MPa/538{degree}C/538{degree}C/63.5-mm Hg(2400-psig/1000{degree} F/1000{degree}F/2.5-in.Hg) conventional steam cycle and a 3-percent sulfur Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, a 45-percent efficiency and a cost of electricity {approximately} 20 percent lower than that of a pulverized-coal-fired plant with stack gas scrubbing are being projected. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation has constructed and is operating a second-generation PFB pilot plant at the Foster Wheeler research facility (the John Blizard Research Center) in Livingston, New Jersey. Initial results of the pilot plant carbonizer test program supporting the development of this new type of plant are presented.

  16. Student-Generated Content in College Teaching: Content Quality, Behavioural Pattern and Learning Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, X.; Guo, X.; Yu, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of course content, behavioural patterns of students and learning performance in teaching of student-generated content (SGC). A total of 49 third-year university students in educational technology participated in this study. By combining the methods of questionnaire, lag sequence analysis and interview, the study…

  17. The Development of Group Interaction Patterns: How Groups become Adaptive, Generative, and Transformative Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Sessa, Valerie I.

    2007-01-01

    This article integrates the literature on group interaction process analysis and group learning, providing a framework for understanding how patterns of interaction develop. The model proposes how adaptive, generative, and transformative learning processes evolve and vary in their functionality. Environmental triggers for learning, the group's…

  18. Application of a reduced area electrical test pattern to precise pattern registration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominger, James P.

    1991-03-01

    A new reduced area electrically probed registration measurement pattern is described. The pattern is compatible with the Prometrix data acquisition and analysis system, and offers advantages over standard patterns in terms of patten area and versatility of use. The results of the application of the pattern to the measurement of reticle and stepper overlay are presented. With careful analysis of the data, inter- and intrafield reticle overlay errors are determined. Horizontal and vertical measurements of pattern placement within a single field and between fields showed an accuracy of greater than 67 nm and a repeatability of better than 14 nm (3 sigma).

  19. Investigation, Analysis, and Testing of Self-contained Oxygen Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddy, Christopher P.; Haas, Jon P.; Starritt, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Self Contained Oxygen Generators (SCOGs) have widespread use in providing emergency breathing oxygen in a variety of environments including mines, submarines, spacecraft, and aircraft. These devices have definite advantages over storing of gaseous or liquid oxygen. The oxygen is not generated until a chemical briquette containing a chlorate or perchlorate oxidizer and a solid metallic fuel such as iron is ignited starting a thermal decomposition process allowing gaseous oxygen to be produced. These devices are typically very safe to store, easy to operate, and have primarily only a thermal hazard to the operator that can be controlled by barriers or furnaces. Tens of thousands of these devices are operated worldwide every year without major incident. This report examines the rare case of a SCOG whose behavior was both abnormal and lethal. This particular type of SCOG reviewed is nearly identical to a flight qualified version of SCOG slated for use on manned space vehicles. This Investigative Report is a compilation of a NASA effort in conjunction with other interested parties including military and aerospace to understand the causes of the particular SCOG accident and what preventative measures can be taken to ensure this incident is not repeated. This report details the incident and examines the root causes of the observed SCOG behavior from forensic evidence. A summary of chemical and numerical analysis is provided as a background to physical testing of identical SCOG devices. The results and findings of both small scale and full scale testing are documented on a test-by-test basis along with observations and summaries. Finally, conclusions are presented on the findings of this investigation, analysis, and testing along with suggestions on preventative measures for any entity interested in the safe use of these devices.

  20. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Norris, Brian J; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved.

  1. Generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice revealed MAGI-2 expression patterns in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kan-ichiro; Nishimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Ookura, Tetsuya; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 2 (MAGI-2) protein, which is known to localize at the tight junction of epithelial cells, contains multiple copies of the PDZ and WW domains in its structure. Although the expression pattern of Magi2 mRNA in representative organs has been previously published, its detailed cellular distribution at the histological level remains unknown. Such detailed information would be useful to clarify the biological function of MAGI-2. Here, we report the generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice for Magi2 in which exon 6 of the gene was substituted by the Venus-encoding sequence. We detected the expression of the Venus reporter protein in kidney podocytes from these knock-in mice. We also detected Venus reporter protein expression in spermatids within the testes and within neurons in various regions of the brain. Detection of the reporter protein from these diverse locations indicated the endogenous expression of MAGI-2 in these tissues. Our data suggested a potential function of MAGI-2 in the glomerular filtration process and sperm cell maturation. These data indicate that the Venus reporter knock-in mouse for Magi2 is a useful model for the further study of Magi2 gene function.

  2. From central pattern generator to sensory template in the evolution of birdsong.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masakazu

    2010-10-01

    Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and maintain the normal song of their species. The prerequisite for the use of auditory feedback for the control of song is a set of acoustic criteria or a template to which voice must match. The template method perhaps evolved to free birds from fixed central pattern generators, resulting in the evolution of diverse and complex songs among oscine songbirds. The evolution of human speech may have followed a similar course.

  3. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  4. International Space Station United States Oxygen Generator Development Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Mason, Richard K.

    2000-01-01

    A life test of a liquid anode feed oxygen generator assembly (OGA) using SPE(R) (United Technologies Corporation, Hamilton Sundstrand Division) membrane technology was terminated in June of 1999. In the total 15,658 hours of operation at MSFC since delivery in 1995, the OGA has produced 2,103 kilograms (kg) (4,632 pounds mass (lbm)) of oxygen, and 263 kg (579 lbm) of hydrogen. Evaluation of cell stack characteristics and oxygen and hydrogen hydrophilic/hydrophobic membrane separators will be discussed.

  5. Quantum Statistical Testing of a Quantum Random Number Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2014-01-01

    The unobservable elements in a quantum technology, e.g., the quantum state, complicate system verification against promised behavior. Using model-based system engineering, we present methods for verifying the opera- tion of a prototypical quantum random number generator. We begin with the algorithmic design of the QRNG followed by the synthesis of its physical design requirements. We next discuss how quantum statistical testing can be used to verify device behavior as well as detect device bias. We conclude by highlighting how system design and verification methods must influence effort to certify future quantum technologies.

  6. Quantum statistical testing of a quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, Travis S.

    2014-10-01

    The unobservable elements in a quantum technology, e.g., the quantum state, complicate system verification against promised behavior. Using model-based system engineering, we present methods for verifying the operation of a prototypical quantum random number generator. We begin with the algorithmic design of the QRNG followed by the synthesis of its physical design requirements. We next discuss how quantum statistical testing can be used to verify device behavior as well as detect device bias. We conclude by highlighting how system design and verification methods must influence effort to certify future quantum technologies.

  7. The locust frontal ganglion: a multi-tasked central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Ayali, A; Zilberstein, Yael

    2004-01-01

    The locust frontal ganglion (FG) constitutes a major source of innervation to the foregut dilator muscles and thus plays a key role in control of foregut movements. This paper reviews our recent studies on the generation and characteristics of FG motor outputs in two distinct and fundamental locust behaviors: feeding and molting. In an in vitro preparation, isolated from all descending and sensory inputs, the FG was spontaneously active and generated rhythmic multi-unit bursts of action potentials, which could be recorded from all efferent nerves. Thus the FG motor pattern is generated by a central pattern generator within the ganglion. Intracellular recordings suggest that only a small fraction (10-20%) of the FG 100 neurons demonstrate rhythmic activity. The FG motor output in vivo was relatively complex, and strongly dependent on the locust's physiological and behavioral state. Rhythmic activity of the foregut was found to depend on the amount of food present in the crop; animals with full crop demonstrated higher FG burst frequency than those with empty crop. At the molt, the FG generates a distinct motor pattern that could be related to air-swallowing behavior.

  8. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites.

    PubMed

    González Pericot, N; Villoria Sáez, P; Del Río Merino, M; Liébana Carrasco, O

    2014-11-01

    The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  9. Generation, ethnicity, and marriage: historical patterns in the northern United States.

    PubMed

    Landale, N S; Tolnay, S E

    1993-02-01

    Immigration was a prominent feature of American life during the early decades of the twentieth century. About 40% of the white population was of foreign birth or parentage, and immigrants were increasingly from diverse national origins. Using data from the Public Use Microdata Sample of the 1910 U.S. Census, we examine generational and ethnic differences in marital timing. The analysis reveals a striking pattern of delayed marriage among native whites with foreign parents, but marked ethnic variation in the extent of marriage delay within the second generation. We hypothesize that locational factors, especially diverse economic opportunities, were important in shaping this marriage pattern. Separate multilevel analyses are conducted for females and for males living in urban and in rural places. Although significant effects for a variety of contextual factors are found, generational and ethnic differences in nuptial timing persist in multivariate models.

  10. [Relevance of the immunofluorescence pattern for interpretation of the ANA test--the case of the dense fine speckled pattern].

    PubMed

    Dellavance, Alessandra; Leser, Paulo Guilherme; Andrade, Luís Eduardo Coelho

    2007-01-01

    Determination of autoantibodies against cellular antigens (ANA-HEp-2) has undergone several methodological changes over the decades and for an appropriate evaluation of results requires reflection on its sensitivity and specificity properties. Currently the test is known to have high sensitivity and questionable specificity since it is frequently positive in a considerable number of non-autoimmune subjects. Awareness that a substantial portion of the population has a positive ANA-HEp-2 test demands that characteristics permitting to distinguish positive tests in autoimmune patients from positive tests in non-autoimmune subjects be identified. Among these characteristics are noteworthy the titer and the fluorescence pattern. In particular, one must bear in mind that the fluorescence pattern results from recognition by autoantibodies of distinct cellular structures and, therefore, the fluorescence pattern provides a preliminary indication of possible autoantigens targeted by the sera being tested. An emblematic example is the nuclear dense fine speckled pattern. It was originally studied by Ochs and collaborators in 1994 in a restricted number of patients with interstitial cystitis. Further studies demonstrated its frequent occurrence in laboratory practice in individuals with diverse non-autoimmune clinical conditions. Indeed, this pattern is one of the most frequently observed in non-autoimmune patients with an ANA-HEp-2 positive reaction. The present review intends to provide elements allowing the clinician to perform a critical interpretation of results of an ANA-HE-2 test, including analysis of the titer and the fluorescence pattern.

  11. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  12. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  13. NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain Dynamometer Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Douglas; Halse, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Advances in wind turbine drivetrain technologies are necessary to improve reliability and reduce the cost of energy for land-based and offshore wind turbines. The NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain team developed a geared, medium-speed drivetrain that is lighter, more reliable and more efficient than existing designs. One of the objectives of Phase II of the project was to complete the detailed design, fabrication, and dynamometer testing of a 750 kilowatt (kW) drivetrain that includes the key gearbox innovations designed by Romax Technology and power converter innovations designed by DNV Kema Renewables. The purpose of this document is to summarize these tests completed in NREL's National Wind Technology Center 2.5 megawatt (MW) dynamometer.

  14. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Newell, J. D.; Williams, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  15. Thermal vacuum life test facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaton, R. L.; Goebel, C. J.; Amos, W. R.

    In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy (DOE) assigned Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility, now operated by EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, the responsibility for assembling and testing General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Assembled and tested were five RTGs, which included four flight units and one non-flight qualification unit. Figure 1 shows the RTG, which was designed by General Electric AstroSpace Division (GE/ASD) to produce 285 W of electrical power. A detailed description of the processes for RTG assembly and testing is presented by Amos and Goebel (1989). The RTG performance data are described by Bennett, et al., (1986). The flight units will provide electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Galileo mission to Jupiter (two RTGs) and the joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the sun (one RTG). The remaining flight unit will serve as the spare for both missions, and a non-flight qualification unit was assembled and tested to ensure that performance criteria were adequately met.

  16. Mobile testing complex based on an explosive magnetic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurupov, A. V.; Kozlov, A. V.; Gusev, A. N.; Shurupova, N. P.; Zavalova, V. E.; Chulkov, A. N.; Bazelyan, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    A mobile testing complex prototype on the basis of an explosive magnetic generator (MTC EMG) is developed to simulate a lightning current pulse. The main element of this complex is a current pulse generator comprising a EMG with a pulse transformer for energy release into the load. The electric chain of the MTC EMG is theoretically analyzed taking into consideration energy losses in active resistances in the primary circuit of the transformer and the inductive-resistive nature of the load, which resulted in the minimization of energy losses in the primary circuit depending on the electric chain parameters. It was found that, if the energy losses are minimized, the efficiency of transferring the EMG energy into the load exceeds 50%. As a result of the field tests of the MTC EMG, its basic characteristics were determined and the waveforms of the current pulses and voltages in the load were obtained. It is shown that the results of the mathematical simulation of current pulses in the load are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Flexibility of the axial central pattern generator network for locomotion in the salamander.

    PubMed

    Ryczko, D; Knüsel, J; Crespi, A; Lamarque, S; Mathou, A; Ijspeert, A J; Cabelguen, J M

    2015-03-15

    In tetrapods, limb and axial movements are coordinated during locomotion. It is well established that inter- and intralimb coordination show considerable variations during ongoing locomotion. Much less is known about the flexibility of the axial musculoskeletal system during locomotion and the neural mechanisms involved. Here we examined this issue in the salamander Pleurodeles waltlii, which is capable of locomotion in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Kinematics of the trunk and electromyograms from the mid-trunk epaxial myotomes were recorded during four locomotor behaviors in freely moving animals. A similar approach was used during rhythmic struggling movements since this would give some insight into the flexibility of the axial motor system. Our results show that each of the forms of locomotion and the struggling behavior is characterized by a distinct combination of mid-trunk motor patterns and cycle durations. Using in vitro electrophysiological recordings in isolated spinal cords, we observed that the spinal networks activated with bath-applied N-methyl-d-aspartate could generate these axial motor patterns. In these isolated spinal cord preparations, the limb motor nerve activities were coordinated with each mid-trunk motor pattern. Furthermore, isolated mid-trunk spinal cords and hemicords could generate the mid-trunk motor patterns. This indicates that each side of the cord comprises a network able to generate coordinated axial motor activity. The roles of descending and sensory inputs in the behavior-related changes in axial motor coordination are discussed.

  18. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    SciTech Connect

    González Pericot, N.; Villoria Sáez, P.; Del Río Merino, M.; Liébana Carrasco, O.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  19. Sequential generation of two distinct synapse-driven network patterns in developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Allène, Camille; Cattani, Adriano; Ackman, James B; Bonifazi, Paolo; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Cossart, Rosa

    2008-11-26

    Developing cortical networks generate a variety of coherent activity patterns that participate in circuit refinement. Early network oscillations (ENOs) are the dominant network pattern in the rodent neocortex for a short period after birth. These large-scale calcium waves were shown to be largely driven by glutamatergic synapses albeit GABA is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the cortex at such early stages, mediating synapse-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in the hippocampus. Using functional multineuron calcium imaging together with single-cell and field potential recordings to clarify distinct network dynamics in rat cortical slices, we now report that the developing somatosensory cortex generates first ENOs then GDPs, both patterns coexisting for a restricted time period. These patterns markedly differ by their developmental profile, dynamics, and mechanisms: ENOs are generated before cortical GDPs (cGDPs) by the activation of glutamatergic synapses mostly through NMDARs; cENOs are low-frequency oscillations (approximately 0.01 Hz) displaying slow kinetics and gradually involving the entire network. At the end of the first postnatal week, GABA-driven cortical GDPs can be reliably monitored; cGDPs are recurrent oscillations (approximately 0.1 Hz) that repetitively synchronize localized neuronal assemblies. Contrary to cGDPs, cENOs were unexpectedly facilitated by short anoxic conditions suggesting a contribution of glutamate accumulation to their generation. In keeping with this, alterations of extracellular glutamate levels significantly affected cENOs, which are blocked by an enzymatic glutamate scavenger. Moreover, we show that a tonic glutamate current contributes to the neuronal membrane excitability when cENOs dominate network patterns. Therefore, cENOs and cGDPs are two separate aspects of neocortical network maturation that may be differentially engaged in physiological and pathological processes.

  20. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  1. Identifying Patterns of Appraising Tests in First-Year College Students: Implications for Anxiety and Emotion Regulation during Test Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather A.; DiStefano, Christine; Schutz, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored patterns of appraising tests in a large sample of 1st-year college students. Cluster analysis was used to identify homogeneous groups of 1st-year students who shared similar patterns of cognitive appraisals about testing. The authors internally validated findings with an independent sample from the same population of students…

  2. Generation of conical patterns from circular patch antennas and their performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, G.; Shafai, L.

    1985-07-01

    The input and radiation characteristics of circular microstrip antennas operated at higher order modes to generate conical patterns are studied. The effects of varying the substrate parameters on characteristics such as radiation pattern, directivity, bandwidth, efficiency and location of the feedpoint to match a 50 ohm line are investigated. Also, a multifeed technique to operate the antenna at any particular higher order mode is proposed. Successful experiments have used this technique to operate the antenna at the desired higher order modes and the experimental results are in close agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  3. Advanced E-O test capability for Army Next-Generation Automated Test System (NGATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errea, S.; Grigor, J.; King, D. F.; Matis, G.; McHugh, S.; McKechnie, J.; Nehring, B.

    2015-05-01

    The Future E-O (FEO) program was established to develop a flexible, modular, automated test capability as part of the Next Generation Automatic Test System (NGATS) program to support the test and diagnostic needs of currently fielded U.S. Army electro-optical (E-O) devices, as well as being expandable to address the requirements of future Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force E-O systems. Santa Barbara infrared (SBIR) has designed, fabricated, and delivered three (3) prototype FEO for engineering and logistics evaluation prior to anticipated full-scale production beginning in 2016. In addition to presenting a detailed overview of the FEO system hardware design, features and testing capabilities, the integration of SBIR's EO-IR sensor and laser test software package, IRWindows 4™, into FEO to automate the test execution, data collection and analysis, archiving and reporting of results is also described.

  4. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  5. Capacitive charge generation apparatus and method for testing circuits

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.; Barton, D.L.

    1998-07-14

    An electron beam apparatus and method for testing a circuit are disclosed. The electron beam apparatus comprises an electron beam incident on an outer surface of an insulating layer overlying one or more electrical conductors of the circuit for generating a time varying or alternating current electrical potential on the surface; and a measurement unit connected to the circuit for measuring an electrical signal capacitively coupled to the electrical conductors to identify and map a conduction state of each of the electrical conductors, with or without an electrical bias signal being applied to the circuit. The electron beam apparatus can further include a secondary electron detector for forming a secondary electron image for registration with a map of the conduction state of the electrical conductors. The apparatus and method are useful for failure analysis or qualification testing to determine the presence of any open-circuits or short-circuits, and to verify the continuity or integrity of electrical conductors buried below an insulating layer thickness of 1-100 {micro}m or more without damaging or breaking down the insulating layer. The types of electrical circuits that can be tested include integrated circuits, multi-chip modules, printed circuit boards and flexible printed circuits. 7 figs.

  6. Capacitive charge generation apparatus and method for testing circuits

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Barton, Daniel L.

    1998-01-01

    An electron beam apparatus and method for testing a circuit. The electron beam apparatus comprises an electron beam incident on an outer surface of an insulating layer overlying one or more electrical conductors of the circuit for generating a time varying or alternating current electrical potential on the surface; and a measurement unit connected to the circuit for measuring an electrical signal capacitively coupled to the electrical conductors to identify and map a conduction state of each of the electrical conductors, with or without an electrical bias signal being applied to the circuit. The electron beam apparatus can further include a secondary electron detector for forming a secondary electron image for registration with a map of the conduction state of the electrical conductors. The apparatus and method are useful for failure analysis or qualification testing to determine the presence of any open-circuits or short-circuits, and to verify the continuity or integrity of electrical conductors buried below an insulating layer thickness of 1-100 .mu.m or more without damaging or breaking down the insulating layer. The types of electrical circuits that can be tested include integrated circuits, multi-chip modules, printed circuit boards and flexible printed circuits.

  7. Octopamine modulates a central pattern generator associated with egg-laying in the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond; Lange, Angela B

    2014-04-01

    Egg-laying in Locusta migratoria involves the control of a variety of complex behavioural patterns including those that regulate digging of the oviposition hole and retention of eggs during digging. These two behavioural patterns are under the control of central pattern generators (CPGs). The digging and egg-retention CPGs are coordinated and integrated with overlapping locations of neural substrate within the VIIth and VIIIth abdominal ganglia of the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, the egg-retention CPG of the VIIth abdominal ganglion is involved in both egg-retention and protraction of the abdomen during digging. The biogenic amine, octopamine, has peripheral effects on oviduct muscle, relaxing basal tension of the lateral and upper common oviduct and enabling egg passage. Here we show that octopamine also modulates the pattern of the egg-retention CPG by altering the motor pattern that controls the external ventral protractor of the VIIth abdominal segment. There is no change in the motor pattern that goes to the oviducts. Octopamine decreased the frequency of the largest amplitude action potential and decreased burst duration while leading to an increase in cycle duration and interburst interval. The effects of octopamine were greatly reduced in the presence of the α-adrenergic blocker, phentolamine, indicating that the action of octopamine was via a receptor. Thus, octopamine orchestrates events that can lead to oviposition, centrally inhibiting the digging behavior and peripherally relaxing the lateral and common oviducts to enable egg-laying.

  8. SOM-based Pattern Generator: Pattern Generation Based on the Backward Projection in a Self-Organizing Map and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakuya, Hiroshi; Ishiguma, Takahiro

    A major feature of the self-organizing map (SOM) is a topology-preserving projection from the input layer to the competitive layer, and it has been used mainly as an analytical tool for discovering underlying rules in the given data set. Even though recent splendid progress in this area, there are few novel ideas to break such a conventional style. On the contrary, based on its distinctive nature, a new method for generating patterns through backward projection from the competitive layer to the input layer is proposed recently. Moreover, a promising technology for producing animation as a series of backward-projected patterns along with any pathways on the competitive layer is presented. Then, in order to carry out further considerations, some computer simulations with a variety of posed stick figures are tried in this paper. After training, four kinds of pathways, which correspond to different movements such as dancing, exercising and walking, are prepared. Though some of them does not contain any training samples, all of them worked well as we have intended in advance. As a result, it is found that the proposed method shows good performance and it is also confirmed its effectiveness.

  9. Evolving cellular automata for diversity generation and pattern recognition: deterministic versus random strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argollo de Menezes, Marcio; Brigatti, Edgardo; Schwämmle, Veit

    2013-08-01

    Microbiological systems evolve to fulfil their tasks with maximal efficiency. The immune system is a remarkable example, where the distinction between self and non-self is made by means of molecular interaction between self-proteins and antigens, triggering affinity-dependent systemic actions. Specificity of this binding and the infinitude of potential antigenic patterns call for novel mechanisms to generate antibody diversity. Inspired by this problem, we develop a genetic algorithm where agents evolve their strings in the presence of random antigenic strings and reproduce with affinity-dependent rates. We ask what is the best strategy to generate diversity if agents can rearrange their strings a finite number of times. We find that endowing each agent with an inheritable cellular automaton rule for performing rearrangements makes the system more efficient in pattern-matching than if transformations are totally random. In the former implementation, the population evolves to a stationary state where agents with different automata rules coexist.

  10. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  11. Experimental observation of multistability and dynamic attractors in silicon central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Le; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We report on the multistability of chaotic networks of silicon neurons and demonstrate how spatiotemporal sequences of voltage oscillations are selected with timed current stimuli. A three neuron central pattern generator was built by interconnecting Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with mutually inhibitory links mimicking gap junctions. By systematically varying the timing of current stimuli applied to individual neurons, we generate the phase lag maps of neuronal oscillators and study their dependence on the network connectivity. We identify up to six attractors consisting of triphasic sequences of unevenly spaced pulses propagating clockwise and anticlockwise. While confirming theoretical predictions, our experiments reveal more complex oscillatory patterns shaped by the ratio of the pulse width to the oscillation period. Our work contributes to validating the command neuron hypothesis.

  12. Connection topology selection in central pattern generators by maximizing the gain of information.

    PubMed

    Stiesberg, Gregory R; Reyes, Marcelo Bussotti; Varona, Pablo; Pinto, Reynaldo D; Huerta, Ramón

    2007-04-01

    A study of a general central pattern generator (CPG) is carried out by means of a measure of the gain of information between the number of available topology configurations and the output rhythmic activity. The neurons of the CPG are chaotic Hindmarsh-Rose models that cooperate dynamically to generate either chaotic or regular spatiotemporal patterns. These model neurons are implemented by computer simulations and electronic circuits. Out of a random pool of input configurations, a small subset of them maximizes the gain of information. Two important characteristics of this subset are emphasized: (1) the most regular output activities are chosen, and (2) none of the selected input configurations are networks with open topology. These two principles are observed in living CPGs as well as in model CPGs that are the most efficient in controlling mechanical tasks, and they are evidence that the information-theoretical analysis can be an invaluable tool in searching for general properties of CPGs.

  13. Experimental observation of multistability and dynamic attractors in silicon central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Le; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We report on the multistability of chaotic networks of silicon neurons and demonstrate how spatiotemporal sequences of voltage oscillations are selected with timed current stimuli. A three neuron central pattern generator was built by interconnecting Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with mutually inhibitory links mimicking gap junctions. By systematically varying the timing of current stimuli applied to individual neurons, we generate the phase lag maps of neuronal oscillators and study their dependence on the network connectivity. We identify up to six attractors consisting of triphasic sequences of unevenly spaced pulses propagating clockwise and anticlockwise. While confirming theoretical predictions, our experiments reveal more complex oscillatory patterns shaped by the ratio of the pulse width to the oscillation period. Our work contributes to validating the command neuron hypothesis.

  14. TESTING OF THE SECOND GENERATION SPINTEK ROTARY FILTER -11357

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Keefer, M.; Huff, T.

    2011-02-02

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter has been developed under the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) for the purpose of deployment in radioactive service in the DOE complex. The unit that was fabricated and tested is the second generation of the filter that incorporates recommended improvements from previous testing. The completion of this test satisfied a key milestone for the EM technology development program and technology readiness for deployment by Savannah River Remediation in the Small Column Ion Exchange and Sludge Washing processes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) contracted SpinTek Filtration to fabricate a full scale 25 disk rotary filter and perform a 1000 hour endurance test with a simulated SRS sludge. Over 1500 hours of operation have been completed with the filter. SpinTek Filtration fabricated a prototypic 25 disk rotary filter including updates to manufacturing tolerances, an updated design to the rotary joint, improved cooling to the bottom journal, decreases in disk and filter shaft hydraulic resistances. The filter disks were fabricated with 0.5 {micro} pore size, sintered-metal filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation (M050). After fabrication was complete, the filter passed acceptance tests demonstrating rejection of solids and clean water flux with a 50% improvement over the previous filters. Once the acceptance test was complete, a 1000 hour endurance test was initiated simulating a sludge washing process. The test used a simulated SRS Sludge Batch 6 recipe. The insoluble solids started at 5 wt% and were raised to 10 and 15 wt% insoluble solids to simulate the concentration of a large volume tank. The filter system was automated and set up for 24 hour unattended operation. To facilitate this, process control logic was written to operate the filter. During the development it was demonstrated that the method of starting and stopping the filter can affect the build

  15. Phase relationships between segmentally organized oscillators in the leech heartbeat pattern generating network.

    PubMed

    Masino, Mark A; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2002-03-01

    Motor pattern generating networks that produce segmentally distributed motor outflow are often portrayed as a series of coupled segmental oscillators that produce a regular progression (constant phase differences) in their rhythmic activity. The leech heartbeat central pattern generator is paced by a core timing network, which consists of two coupled segmental oscillators in segmental ganglia 3 and 4. The segmental oscillators comprise paired mutually inhibitory oscillator interneurons and the processes of intersegmental coordinating interneurons. As a first step in understanding the coordination of segmental motor outflow by this pattern generator, we describe the functional synaptic interactions, and activity and phase relationships of the heart interneurons of the timing network, in isolated nerve cord preparations. In the timing network, most (approximately 75%) of the coordinating interneuron action potentials were generated at a primary spike initiation site located in ganglion 4 (G4). A secondary spike initiation site in ganglion 3 (G3) became active in the absence of activity at the primary site. Generally, the secondary site was characterized by a reluctance to burst and a lower spike frequency, when compared with the primary site. Oscillator interneurons in G3 inhibited spike activity at both initiation sites, whereas oscillator interneurons in G4 inhibited spike activity only at the primary initiation site. This asymmetry in the control of spike activity in the coordinating interneurons may account for the observation that the phase of the coordinating interneurons is more tightly linked to the G3 than G4 oscillator interneurons. The cycle period of the timing network and the phase difference between the ipsilateral G3 and G4 oscillator interneurons were regular within individual preparations, but varied among preparations. This variation in phase differences observed across preparations implies that modulated intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties

  16. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  17. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  18. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  20. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  1. Key bifurcations of bursting polyrhythms in 3-cell central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Schwabedal, Justus; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey L

    2014-01-01

    We identify and describe the key qualitative rhythmic states in various 3-cell network motifs of a multifunctional central pattern generator (CPG). Such CPGs are neural microcircuits of cells whose synergetic interactions produce multiple states with distinct phase-locked patterns of bursting activity. To study biologically plausible CPG models, we develop a suite of computational tools that reduce the problem of stability and existence of rhythmic patterns in networks to the bifurcation analysis of fixed points and invariant curves of a Poincaré return maps for phase lags between cells. We explore different functional possibilities for motifs involving symmetry breaking and heterogeneity. This is achieved by varying coupling properties of the synapses between the cells and studying the qualitative changes in the structure of the corresponding return maps. Our findings provide a systematic basis for understanding plausible biophysical mechanisms for the regulation of rhythmic patterns generated by various CPGs in the context of motor control such as gait-switching in locomotion. Our analysis does not require knowledge of the equations modeling the system and provides a powerful qualitative approach to studying detailed models of rhythmic behavior. Thus, our approach is applicable to a wide range of biological phenomena beyond motor control.

  2. A method to engineer phase-encoded photon sieve for intensity pattern generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Li; Gao, Yaru; Liu, Chunxiang; Xu, Shicai; Zhang, Meina; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel type of photon sieve where phases of its sieved waves are encoded as radial positions of the pinholes and use such phase-encoded sieves for generating designed intensity patterns in Fresnel domain. The sieve pinholes are arranged around Fresnel-rings to eliminate the quadratic Fresnel phase factor of diffraction of the sieved waves, leading the wave propagation to be equivalent to Fraunhofer diffraction. The pinholes take constant size in this paper and realize equal amplitude in the multiple sieved waves. Their positions are adjusted radially from corresponding rings to encode wave phases, taking effect by resulting in different optical paths from them to the observation plane origin. Then along with wave propagation, the encoded phases are decoded and the required phase differences are obtained in the discrete waves. We first conduct numerical simulations to show satisfactory performance of such phase-encoded photon sieves in generating arbitrarily designed intensity patterns and describe the quality of the reconstructed patterns. Then for qualitatively verifying the phase-encoding method, we experimentally fabricate three such sieves with relatively small pinhole number and obtain the designed patterns.

  3. From Spinal Central Pattern Generators to Cortical Network: Integrated BCI for Walking Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, G.; Duvinage, M.; De Saedeleer, C.; Castermans, T.; Bengoetxea, A.; Petieau, M.; Seetharaman, K.; Hoellinger, T.; Dan, B.; Dutoit, T.; Sylos Labini, F.; Lacquaniti, F.; Ivanenko, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Success in locomotor rehabilitation programs can be improved with the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although a wealth of research has demonstrated that locomotion is largely controlled by spinal mechanisms, the brain is of utmost importance in monitoring locomotor patterns and therefore contains information regarding central pattern generation functioning. In addition, there is also a tight coordination between the upper and lower limbs, which can also be useful in controlling locomotion. The current paper critically investigates different approaches that are applicable to this field: the use of electroencephalogram (EEG), upper limb electromyogram (EMG), or a hybrid of the two neurophysiological signals to control assistive exoskeletons used in locomotion based on programmable central pattern generators (PCPGs) or dynamic recurrent neural networks (DRNNs). Plantar surface tactile stimulation devices combined with virtual reality may provide the sensation of walking while in a supine position for use of training brain signals generated during locomotion. These methods may exploit mechanisms of brain plasticity and assist in the neurorehabilitation of gait in a variety of clinical conditions, including stroke, spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. PMID:22272380

  4. Towards pattern generation and chaotic series prediction with photonic reservoir computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonik, Piotr; Hermans, Michiel; Duport, François; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-01

    Reservoir Computing is a bio-inspired computing paradigm for processing time dependent signals that is particularly well suited for analog implementations. Our team has demonstrated several photonic reservoir computers with performance comparable to digital algorithms on a series of benchmark tasks such as channel equalisation and speech recognition. Recently, we showed that our opto-electronic reservoir computer could be trained online with a simple gradient descent algorithm programmed on an FPGA chip. This setup makes it in principle possible to feed the output signal back into the reservoir, and thus highly enrich the dynamics of the system. This will allow to tackle complex prediction tasks in hardware, such as pattern generation and chaotic and financial series prediction, which have so far only been studied in digital implementations. Here we report simulation results of our opto-electronic setup with an FPGA chip and output feedback applied to pattern generation and Mackey-Glass chaotic series prediction. The simulations take into account the major aspects of our experimental setup. We find that pattern generation can be easily implemented on the current setup with very good results. The Mackey-Glass series prediction task is more complex and requires a large reservoir and more elaborate training algorithm. With these adjustments promising result are obtained, and we now know what improvements are needed to match previously reported numerical results. These simulation results will serve as basis of comparison for experiments we will carry out in the coming months.

  5. From spinal central pattern generators to cortical network: integrated BCI for walking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Duvinage, M; De Saedeleer, C; Castermans, T; Bengoetxea, A; Petieau, M; Seetharaman, K; Hoellinger, T; Dan, B; Dutoit, T; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y

    2012-01-01

    Success in locomotor rehabilitation programs can be improved with the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although a wealth of research has demonstrated that locomotion is largely controlled by spinal mechanisms, the brain is of utmost importance in monitoring locomotor patterns and therefore contains information regarding central pattern generation functioning. In addition, there is also a tight coordination between the upper and lower limbs, which can also be useful in controlling locomotion. The current paper critically investigates different approaches that are applicable to this field: the use of electroencephalogram (EEG), upper limb electromyogram (EMG), or a hybrid of the two neurophysiological signals to control assistive exoskeletons used in locomotion based on programmable central pattern generators (PCPGs) or dynamic recurrent neural networks (DRNNs). Plantar surface tactile stimulation devices combined with virtual reality may provide the sensation of walking while in a supine position for use of training brain signals generated during locomotion. These methods may exploit mechanisms of brain plasticity and assist in the neurorehabilitation of gait in a variety of clinical conditions, including stroke, spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy.

  6. Health Care Waste generation rates and patterns: The case of Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Maamari, Olivia; Brandam, Cedric; Lteif, Roger; Salameh, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze Infectious Health Care Waste generation rates and patterns in Lebanon. Therefore, the quantities generated during five years by 57 hospitals from a total of 163 in the country have been analyzed. The seasonal evolution of Infectious Health Care Waste production and the evolution of the evaluation of the trends over years have been studied. Besides, the generation per capita have been estimated and compared to other countries. The variance between categories and the correlation between number of beds and Infectious Health Care Waste generation have been analyzed. The obtained results showed that the large private hospitals (over 200 beds) are characterized by their high generation rate: an average of 2.45kg per occupied bed(-1)day(-1), whereas the average generation rate for other categories is 0.94kg per occupied bed(-1)day(-1). The weighted mean is 1.14 per occupied kgbed(-1)day(-1). Small public hospitals (i.e. less than 100 beds) have the smallest standard deviation: 0.13, whereas large private hospitals (i.e. over than 200 beds) have the highest standard deviation: 0.40. Infectious Health Care Waste generation has been estimated to 1.42kg/capita/year. The correlation between the numbers of hospitals beds in hospitals and the generation rate per bed is weak. The correlation between Infectious Health Care Waste generation per day and beds number is stronger. The total quantity produced by hospitals has increased over the five past years. These results suggest that the quantities of medical waste are not well controlled, and that hospitals have a defective monitoring management system of their waste. Annual peaks are observed in June, July, and December. Thus, this study, for the first time in Lebanon, has provided information on the infectious waste generation, allowing benchmarking between hospitals and between countries.

  7. The Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test: a field test that simulates the activity pattern of soccer.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, C W; Nuttall, F E; Williams, C

    2000-02-01

    The aims of this study were to describe and determine the test-retest reliability of an exercise protocol, the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (the LIST), which was designed to simulate the activity pattern characteristic of the game of soccer. The protocol consisted of two parts: Part A comprised a fixed period of variable-intensity shuttle running over 20 m; Part B consisted of continuous running, alternating every 20 m between 55% and 95% VO2max, until volitional fatigue. Seven trained games players (age 21.5+/-0.9 years, height 182+/-2 cm, body mass 80.1+/-3.6 kg, VO2max 59.0+/-1.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); mean +/- s(x)) performed the test on two occasions (Trial 1 and Trial 2), at least 7 days apart, to determine the test-retest reliability of the sprint times and running capacity. The physiological and metabolic responses on both occasions were also monitored. The participants ingested water ad libitum during the first trial, and were then prescribed the same amount of water during the second trial. The 15 m sprint times during Trials 1 and 2 averaged 2.42+/-0.04 s and 2.43+/-0.04 s, respectively. Run time during Part B was 6.3+/-2.0 min for Trial 1 and 6.1+/-1.3 min for Trial 2. The 95% limits of agreement for sprint times and run times during Part B were -0.14 to 0.12 s and -3.19 to 2.16 min respectively. There were no differences between trials for heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, body mass change during exercise, or blood lactate and glucose concentrations during the test. Thus, we conclude that the sprint times and the Part B run times were reproducible within the limits previously stated. In addition, the activity pattern and the physiological and metabolic responses closely simulated the match demands of soccer.

  8. Direct observation of microcontact behaviours in pattern-generation step of reverse offset printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Kanazawa, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the nip formed during roll-to-sheet-type reverse offset printing. First, we show that several modes of roof collapses (bottom contact defects) could be formed depending on the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) blanket thickness and pattern size. We regulate the manifestation of the defect modes driven by the local pile-up of the incompressible PDMS, as modelled by the contact mechanics formulation, together with a complementary numerical simulation. In dynamics, we first differentiate between the static nip and dynamic nip during printing, where the width is extended by the kinetically controlled adhesion of the blanket PDMS. Further, we observe that depending on the pattern structure, there was spatial deviation of the microscopic contact and subsequent separation behaviours of the cliché from a macroscopically recognizable nip, and consequently, local detachment rates were heterogeneous in the pattern-generation process of the reverse offset printing, even with a constant machine speed. In addition, we found that the parts of a pattern where the ink transfer fails in a high-speed patterning condition corresponded to the region of the locally enhanced detachment rates found during direct observation.

  9. NeuroPG: open source software for optical pattern generation and data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Benjamin W.; Murphy, Daniel B.; Dapello, Joel A.; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2015-01-01

    Patterned illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) is a powerful tool for optogenetics. Compared to a scanning laser, DMDs are inexpensive and can easily create complex illumination patterns. Combining these complex spatiotemporal illumination patterns with optogenetics allows DMD-equipped microscopes to probe neural circuits by selectively manipulating the activity of many individual cells or many subcellular regions at the same time. To use DMDs to study neural activity, scientists must develop specialized software to coordinate optical stimulation patterns with the acquisition of electrophysiological and fluorescence data. To meet this growing need we have developed an open source optical pattern generation software for neuroscience—NeuroPG—that combines, DMD control, sample visualization, and data acquisition in one application. Built on a MATLAB platform, NeuroPG can also process, analyze, and visualize data. The software is designed specifically for the Mightex Polygon400; however, as an open source package, NeuroPG can be modified to incorporate any data acquisition, imaging, or illumination equipment that is compatible with MATLAB’s Data Acquisition and Image Acquisition toolboxes. PMID:25784873

  10. Generation, Language, Body Mass Index, and Activity Patterns in Hispanic Children

    PubMed Central

    Taverno, Sharon E.; Rollins, Brandi Y.; Francis, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The acculturation hypothesis proposes an overall disadvantage in health outcomes for Hispanic immigrants with more time spent living in the U.S., but little is known about how generational status and language may influence Hispanic children’s relative weight and activity patterns. Purpose The association between generation and language was investigated with relative weight (BMI z-scores), physical activity, screen time, and participation in extracurricular activities (e.g., sports, clubs) in a U.S.-based, nationally representative sample of Hispanic children. Methods Participants included 2,012 Hispanic children aged 6–11 years from the cross-sectional, 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health. Children were grouped according to generational status (1st, 2nd or 3rd), and the primary language spoken in the home (English vs non-English). Primary analyses included adjusted logistic and multinomial logistic regression to examine the relationships among variables; all analyses were conducted between 2008 and 2009. Results Compared to 3rd generation, English speakers, 1st and 2nd generation, non-English speakers were over two times more likely to be obese. Moreover, 1st generation, non-English speakers were half as likely to engage in regular physical activity and sports. Both 1st and 2nd generation, non-English speakers were less likely to participate in clubs compared to 2nd and 3rd generation, English speakers. Overall, all non–English speaking groups reported less screen time compared to 3rd generation, English speakers. Conclusions The hypothesis that Hispanics lose their health protection with more time spent in the U.S. was not supported in this sample of Hispanic children. PMID:20117570

  11. Implementation of a Data Packet Generator Using Pattern Matching for Wearable ECG Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Yun Hong; Jeong, Do Un

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a packet generator using a pattern matching algorithm for real-time abnormal heartbeat detection is proposed. The packet generator creates a very small data packet which conveys sufficient crucial information for health condition analysis. The data packet envelopes real time ECG signals and transmits them to a smartphone via Bluetooth. An Android application was developed specifically to decode the packet and extract ECG information for health condition analysis. Several graphical presentations are displayed and shown on the smartphone. We evaluate the performance of abnormal heartbeat detection accuracy using the MIT/BIH Arrhythmia Database and real time experiments. The experimental result confirm our finding that abnormal heart beat detection is practically possible. We also performed data compression ratio and signal restoration performance evaluations to establish the usefulness of the proposed packet generator and the results were excellent. PMID:25029280

  12. Efficient second harmonic generation using nonlinear substrates patterned by nano-antenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Bar-Lev, Doron; Scheuer, Jacob

    2013-12-02

    We study theoretically various design considerations for efficient generation of second harmonic using a nonlinear substrate patterned with nano-antennas. The analysis is focused on a gap Bowtie nano-antenna array recessed in LiNbO₃ which is shown to be preferable over on surface structures due to field enhancement, field profile and linear and non-linear polarization considerations. In addition, we develop the nano-antenna counterpart of the Boyd-Klienmann model in order to analyze the impact of a Gaussian shaped fundamental beam on the generated second harmonic. Finally, we show that the dielectric properties of the substrate lead to preferable directions for the incident fundamental harmonic and the emission of the second harmonic. Our analyses lead to several design rules which can enhance second and high harmonic generation from nano-antennas arrays by several orders of magnitude.

  13. Deposition, characterization, patterning and mechanistic study of inorganic resists for next-generation nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Feixiang

    The semiconductor industry has witnessed a continuous decrease in the size of logic, memory and other computer chip components since its birth over half a century ago. The shrinking (scaling) of components has to a large extent been enabled by the development of micro- and now nano-lithographic techniques. This thesis focuses on one central component of lithography, the resist, which is essentially a thin film that when appropriately exposed enables a pattern to be printed onto a surface. Smaller features require an ever more precisely focused photon, electron or ion beam with which to expose the resist. The likely next generation source of radiation that will enable sub-20nm features to be written will employ extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV), 92eV (13.5nm). The work discussed here involves a novel class of inorganic resists (including a solution processed Hf-based resist called HafSOx), as the organic resists that have dominated the microlithography industry for the past few decades have approached fundamental scaling limits. In order to maintain the high throughput required by high volume semiconductor manufacturing, metal oxide resists have been proposed and developed to meet the resolution and sensitivity in EUV lithography. One can think of our resists as the nano-lithographic analog to the silver halide film that dominated the photographic print industry for a century. In this thesis, we mainly describe our work on HafSOx, a "first generation" metal oxide EUV resist system. HafSOx thin films can be deposited by spin-coating a mixed solution of HfOCl2, H2O 2, and H2SO4. Various materials characterization techniques have been employed to achieve a comprehensive understanding of film composition and structure at both surface and bulk level, as well as a mechanistic understanding of the film radiation chemistry. Taking advantage of the high energy x-rays used in the XPS experiment, we developed an experiment to dynamically monitor the photochemistry within the

  14. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  15. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-30

    The objectives of this report period were to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, to complete the hardware and ancillary hardware fabrication, and commence the Test Preparations for the testing of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas generator. Focus during this report period has been on testing the Gas Generator. Because of unacceptable delays encountered in a previously competitively selected test site, CES initiated a re-competition of our testing program and selected an alternate test site. Following that selection, CES used all available resources to make preparations for testing the 10 Mw Gas Generator at the new testing site facilities of NTS at Saugus, CA. A substantial portion of this report period was devoted to Testing Preparations, i.e. test facility development, cold- flow testing, calibration testing, performing igniter ignition testing, and then commencement of the completely assembled Gas Generator Assembly Testing, in process at this writing.

  16. Modelling spinal circuitry involved in locomotor pattern generation: insights from the effects of afferent stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Stecina, Katinka; Shevtsova, Natalia A; McCrea, David A

    2006-01-01

    A computational model of the mammalian spinal cord circuitry incorporating a two-level central pattern generator (CPG) with separate half-centre rhythm generator (RG) and pattern formation (PF) networks has been developed from observations obtained during fictive locomotion in decerebrate cats. Sensory afferents have been incorporated in the model to study the effects of afferent stimulation on locomotor phase switching and step cycle period and on the firing patterns of flexor and extensor motoneurones. Here we show that this CPG structure can be integrated with reflex circuits to reproduce the reorganization of group I reflex pathways occurring during locomotion. During the extensor phase of fictive locomotion, activation of extensor muscle group I afferents increases extensor motoneurone activity and prolongs the extensor phase. This extensor phase prolongation may occur with or without a resetting of the locomotor cycle, which (according to the model) depends on the degree to which sensory input affects the RG and PF circuits, respectively. The same stimulation delivered during flexion produces a temporary resetting to extension without changing the timing of following locomotor cycles. The model reproduces this behaviour by suggesting that this sensory input influences the PF network without affecting the RG. The model also suggests that the different effects of flexor muscle nerve afferent stimulation observed experimentally (phase prolongation versus resetting) result from opposing influences of flexor group I and II afferents on the PF and RG circuits controlling the activity of flexor and extensor motoneurones. The results of modelling provide insights into proprioceptive control of locomotion. PMID:17008375

  17. Toward robust phase-locking in Melibe swim central pattern generator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Allen, Dane; Youker, Joseph; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Small groups of interneurons, abbreviated by CPG for central pattern generators, are arranged into neural networks to generate a variety of core bursting rhythms with specific phase-locked states, on distinct time scales, which govern vital motor behaviors in invertebrates such as chewing and swimming. These movements in lower level animals mimic motions of organs in higher animals due to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Hence, various neurological diseases can be linked to abnormal movement of body parts that are regulated by a malfunctioning CPG. In this paper, we, being inspired by recent experimental studies of neuronal activity patterns recorded from a swimming motion CPG of the sea slug Melibe leonina, examine a mathematical model of a 4-cell network that can plausibly and stably underlie the observed bursting rhythm. We develop a dynamical systems framework for explaining the existence and robustness of phase-locked states in activity patterns produced by the modeled CPGs. The proposed tools can be used for identifying core components for other CPG networks with reliable bursting outcomes and specific phase relationships between the interneurons. Our findings can be employed for identifying or implementing the conditions for normal and pathological functioning of basic CPGs of animals and artificially intelligent prosthetics that can regulate various movements.

  18. Central generation of grooming motor patterns and interlimb coordination in locusts.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, A; Laurent, G

    1996-12-15

    Coordinated bursts of leg motoneuron activity were evoked in locusts with deefferented legs by tactile stimulation of sites that evoke grooming behavior. This suggests that insect thoracic ganglia contain central pattern generators for directed leg movements. Motoneuron recordings were made from metathoracic and mesothoracic nerves, after eliminating all leg motor innervation, as well as all input from the brain, subesophageal ganglion, and prothoracic ganglion. Strong, brief trochanteral levator motoneuron bursts occurred, together with silence of the slow and fast trochanteral depressor motoneurons and activation of the common inhibitor motoneuron. The metathoracic slow tibial extensor motoneuron was active in a pattern distinct from its activity during walking or during rhythms evoked by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. Preparations in which the metathoracic ganglion was isolated from all other ganglia could still produce fictive motor patterns in response to tactile stimulation of metathoracic locations. Bursts of trochanteral levator and depressor motoneurons were clearly coordinated between the left and right metathoracic hemiganglia and also between the mesothoracic and the ipsilateral metathoracic ganglia. These data provide clear evidence for centrally generated interlimb coordination in an insect.

  19. Toward robust phase-locking in Melibe swim central pattern generator models.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Sajiya; Allen, Dane; Youker, Joseph; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Small groups of interneurons, abbreviated by CPG for central pattern generators, are arranged into neural networks to generate a variety of core bursting rhythms with specific phase-locked states, on distinct time scales, which govern vital motor behaviors in invertebrates such as chewing and swimming. These movements in lower level animals mimic motions of organs in higher animals due to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Hence, various neurological diseases can be linked to abnormal movement of body parts that are regulated by a malfunctioning CPG. In this paper, we, being inspired by recent experimental studies of neuronal activity patterns recorded from a swimming motion CPG of the sea slug Melibe leonina, examine a mathematical model of a 4-cell network that can plausibly and stably underlie the observed bursting rhythm. We develop a dynamical systems framework for explaining the existence and robustness of phase-locked states in activity patterns produced by the modeled CPGs. The proposed tools can be used for identifying core components for other CPG networks with reliable bursting outcomes and specific phase relationships between the interneurons. Our findings can be employed for identifying or implementing the conditions for normal and pathological functioning of basic CPGs of animals and artificially intelligent prosthetics that can regulate various movements.

  20. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Isolation of a steam generator. A steam generator will be considered isolated if the water suction pipe to the water pump and the leads to the main switch (steam generator switch) are disconnected, and the... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements...

  1. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Isolation of a steam generator. A steam generator will be considered isolated if the water suction pipe to the water pump and the leads to the main switch (steam generator switch) are disconnected, and the... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements...

  2. Enhancing Students' Learning Process Through Self-Generated Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Elez, Marcos; Pardines, Inmaculada; Garcia, Pablo; Miñana, Guadalupe; Roman, Sara; Sanchez, Margarita; Risco, Jose Luis

    2013-03-01

    The use of new technologies in higher education has surprisingly emphasized students' tendency to adopt a passive behavior in class. Participation and interaction of students are essential to improve academic results. This paper describes an educational experiment aimed at the promotion of students' autonomous learning by requiring them to generate test type questions related to the contents of the course. The main idea is to make the student feel part of the evaluation process by including students' questions in the evaluation exams. A set of applications running on our university online learning environment has been developed in order to provide both students and teachers with the necessary tools for a good interaction between them. Questions uploaded by students are visible to every enrolled student as well as to each involved teacher. In this way, we enhance critical analysis skills, by solving and finding possible mistakes in the questions sent by their fellows. The experiment was applied over 769 students from 12 different courses. Results show that the students who have actively participated in the experiment have obtained better academic performance.

  3. Applicability of Next Generation Sequencing Technology in Microsatellite Instability Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chun; Love, Clare; Beshay, Victoria; Macrae, Finlay; Fox, Stephen; Waring, Paul; Taylor, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a useful marker for risk assessment, prediction of chemotherapy responsiveness and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. Here, we describe a next generation sequencing approach for MSI testing using the MiSeq platform. Different from other MSI capturing strategies that are based on targeted gene capture, we utilize “deep resequencing”, where we focus the sequencing on only the microsatellite regions of interest. We sequenced a series of 44 colorectal tumours with normal controls for five MSI loci (BAT25, BAT26, BAT34c4, D18S55, D5S346) and a second series of six colorectal tumours (no control) with two mononucleotide loci (BAT25, BAT26). In the first series, we were able to determine 17 MSI-High, 1 MSI-Low and 26 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours. In the second series, there were three MSI-High and three MSS tumours. Although there was some variation within individual markers, this NGS method produced the same overall MSI status for each tumour, as obtained with the traditional multiplex PCR-based method. PMID:25685876

  4. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL: DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FIELD TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a generic verification protocol by which EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program tests newly developed equipment for distributed generation of electric power, usually micro-turbine generators and internal combustion engine generators. The protocol will ...

  5. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  6. Micropunching lithography for generating micro- and submicron-patterns on polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Liu, Xinchuan; Luo, Cheng

    2012-07-02

    Conducting polymers have attracted great attention since the discovery of high conductivity in doped polyacetylene in 1977(1). They offer the advantages of low weight, easy tailoring of properties and a wide spectrum of applications(2,3). Due to sensitivity of conducting polymers to environmental conditions (e.g., air, oxygen, moisture, high temperature and chemical solutions), lithographic techniques present significant technical challenges when working with these materials(4). For example, current photolithographic methods, such as ultra-violet (UV), are unsuitable for patterning the conducting polymers due to the involvement of wet and/or dry etching processes in these methods. In addition, current micro/nanosystems mainly have a planar form(5,6). One layer of structures is built on the top surfaces of another layer of fabricated features. Multiple layers of these structures are stacked together to form numerous devices on a common substrate. The sidewall surfaces of the microstructures have not been used in constructing devices. On the other hand, sidewall patterns could be used, for example, to build 3-D circuits, modify fluidic channels and direct horizontal growth of nanowires and nanotubes. A macropunching method has been applied in the manufacturing industry to create macropatterns in a sheet metal for over a hundred years. Motivated by this approach, we have developed a micropunching lithography method (MPL) to overcome the obstacles of patterning conducting polymers and generating sidewall patterns. Like the macropunching method, the MPL also includes two operations (Fig. 1): (i) cutting; and (ii) drawing. The "cutting" operation was applied to pattern three conducting polymers(4), polypyrrole (PPy), Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophen)-poly(4-styrenesulphonate) (PEDOT) and polyaniline (PANI). It was also employed to create Al microstructures(7). The fabricated microstructures of conducting polymers have been used as humidity(8), chemical(8), and glucose

  7. Asymmetry Factors Shaping Regular and Irregular Bursting Rhythms in Central Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Elices, Irene; Varona, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Central Pattern Generator (CPG) circuits are neural networks that generate rhythmic motor patterns. These circuits are typically built of half-center oscillator subcircuits with reciprocally inhibitory connections. Another common property in many CPGs is the remarkable rich spiking-bursting dynamics of their constituent cells, which balance robustness and flexibility to generate their joint coordinated rhythms. In this paper, we use conductance-based models and realistic connection topologies inspired by the crustacean pyloric CPG to address the study of asymmetry factors shaping CPG bursting rhythms. In particular, we assess the role of asymmetric maximal synaptic conductances, time constants and gap-junction connectivity to establish the regularity of half-center oscillator based CPGs. We map and characterize the synaptic parameter space that lead to regular and irregular bursting activity in these networks. The analysis indicates that asymmetric configurations display robust regular rhythms and that large regions of both regular and irregular but coordinated rhythms exist as a function of the asymmetry in the circuit. Our results show that asymmetry both in the maximal conductances and in the temporal dynamics of mutually inhibitory neurons can synergistically contribute to shape wide regimes of regular spiking-bursting activity in CPGs. Finally, we discuss how a closed-loop protocol driven by a regularity goal can be used to find and characterize regular regimes when there is not time to perform an exhaustive search, as in most experimental studies. PMID:28261081

  8. [Central Pattern Generators: Mechanisms of the Activity and Their Role in the Control of "Automatic" Movements].

    PubMed

    Arshavsky, I; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N

    2015-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are a set of interconnected neurons capable of generating a basic pattern of motor output underlying "automatic" movements (breathing, locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and so on) in the absence of afferent signals from the executive motor apparatus. They can be divided into the constitutive CPGs active throughout the entire lifetime (respiratory CPGs) and conditional CPGs controlling episodic movements (locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and others). Since a motor output of CPGs is determined by their internal organization, the activities of the conditional CPGs are initiated by simple commands coming from higher centers. We describe the structural and functional organization of the locomotor CPGs in the marine mollusk Clione limacina, lamprey, frog embryo, and laboratory mammals (cat, mouse, and rat), CPGs controlling the respiratory and swallowing movements in mammals, and CPGs controlling discharges of the electric organ in the gymnotiform fish. It is shown that in all these cases, the generation of rhythmic motor output is based both on the endogenous (pacemaker) activity of specific groups of interneurons and on interneural interactions. These two interrelated mechanisms complement each other, ensuring the high reliability of CPG functionality. We discuss how the experience obtained in studying CPGs can be used to understand mechanisms of more complex functions of the brain, including its cognitive functions.

  9. Asymmetry Factors Shaping Regular and Irregular Bursting Rhythms in Central Pattern Generators.

    PubMed

    Elices, Irene; Varona, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Central Pattern Generator (CPG) circuits are neural networks that generate rhythmic motor patterns. These circuits are typically built of half-center oscillator subcircuits with reciprocally inhibitory connections. Another common property in many CPGs is the remarkable rich spiking-bursting dynamics of their constituent cells, which balance robustness and flexibility to generate their joint coordinated rhythms. In this paper, we use conductance-based models and realistic connection topologies inspired by the crustacean pyloric CPG to address the study of asymmetry factors shaping CPG bursting rhythms. In particular, we assess the role of asymmetric maximal synaptic conductances, time constants and gap-junction connectivity to establish the regularity of half-center oscillator based CPGs. We map and characterize the synaptic parameter space that lead to regular and irregular bursting activity in these networks. The analysis indicates that asymmetric configurations display robust regular rhythms and that large regions of both regular and irregular but coordinated rhythms exist as a function of the asymmetry in the circuit. Our results show that asymmetry both in the maximal conductances and in the temporal dynamics of mutually inhibitory neurons can synergistically contribute to shape wide regimes of regular spiking-bursting activity in CPGs. Finally, we discuss how a closed-loop protocol driven by a regularity goal can be used to find and characterize regular regimes when there is not time to perform an exhaustive search, as in most experimental studies.

  10. Convergence of pattern generator outputs on a common mechanism of diaphragm motor unit recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Seven, Yasin B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Motor units are the final element of neuromotor control. In manner analogous to the organization of neuromotor control in other skeletal muscles, diaphragm motor units comprise phrenic motoneurons located in the cervical spinal cord that innervate the diaphragm muscle, the main inspiratory muscle in mammals. Diaphragm motor units play a primary role in sustaining ventilation, but are also active in other non-ventilatory behaviors, including coughing, sneezing, vomiting, defecation and parturition. Diaphragm muscle fibers comprise all fiber types. Thus, diaphragm motor units display substantial differences in contractile and fatigue properties, but importantly properties of the motoneuron and muscle fibers within a motor unit are matched. As in other skeletal muscles, diaphragm motor units are recruited in order such that motor units that display greater fatigue resistance are recruited earlier and more often than more fatigable motor units. The properties of the motor unit population are critical determinants of the function of a skeletal muscle across the range of possible motor tasks. Accordingly, fatigue-resistant motor units are sufficient to generate the forces necessary for ventilatory behaviors whereas more fatigable units are only activated during expulsive behaviors important for airway clearance. Neuromotor control of diaphragm motor units may reflect selective inputs from distinct pattern generators distributed according to the motor unit properties necessary to accomplish these different motor tasks. In contrast, widely-distributed inputs to phrenic motoneurons from various pattern generators (e.g., for breathing, coughing or vocalization) would dictate recruitment order based on intrinsic electrophysiological properties. PMID:24746055

  11. Stress-induced thermotolerance of ventilatory motor pattern generation in the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Newman, Amy E M; Foerster, Melody; Shoemaker, Kelly L; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2003-11-01

    Ventilation is a crucial motor activity that provides organisms with an adequate circulation of respiratory gases. For animals that exist in harsh environments, an important goal is to protect ventilation under extreme conditions. Heat shock, anoxia, and cold shock are environmental stresses that have previously been shown to trigger protective responses. We used the locust to examine stress-induced thermotolerance by monitoring the ability of the central nervous system to generate ventilatory motor patterns during a subsequent heat exposure. Preparations from pre-stressed animals had an increased incidence of motor pattern recovery following heat-induced failure, however, prior stress did not alter the characteristics of the ventilatory motor pattern. During constant heat exposure at sub-lethal temperatures, we observed a protective effect of heat shock pre-treatment. Serotonin application had similar effects on motor patterns when compared to prior heat shock. These studies are consistent with previous studies that indicate prior exposure to extreme temperatures and hypoxia can protect neural operation against high temperature stress. They further suggest that the protective mechanism is a time-dependent process best revealed during prolonged exposure to extreme temperatures and is mediated by a neuromodulator such as serotonin.

  12. An Efficient Functional Test Generation Method For Processors Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, Ján; Gramatová, Elena

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a new functional test generation method for processors testing based on genetic algorithms and evolutionary strategies. The tests are generated over an instruction set architecture and a processor description. Such functional tests belong to the software-oriented testing. Quality of the tests is evaluated by code coverage of the processor description using simulation. The presented test generation method uses VHDL models of processors and the professional simulator ModelSim. The rules, parameters and fitness functions were defined for various genetic algorithms used in automatic test generation. Functionality and effectiveness were evaluated using the RISC type processor DP32.

  13. Neuropeptide modulation of pattern-generating systems in crustaceans: comparative studies and approaches.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Patsy S; Qu, Xuan; Stanhope, Meredith E

    2016-12-01

    Central pattern generators are subject to modulation by peptides, allowing for flexibility in patterned output. Current techniques used to characterize peptides include mass spectrometry and transcriptomics. In recent years, hundreds of neuropeptides have been sequenced from crustaceans; mass spectrometry has been used to identify peptides and to determine their levels and locations, setting the stage for comparative studies investigating the physiological roles of peptides. Such studies suggest that there is some evolutionary conservation of function, but also divergence of function even within a species. With current baseline data, it should be possible to begin using comparative approaches to ask fundamental questions about why peptides are encoded the way that they are and how this affects nervous system function.

  14. Generation of cell diversity and segmental pattern in the embryonic central nervous system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Technau, Gerhard M; Berger, Christian; Urbach, Rolf

    2006-04-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) involves the transformation of a two-dimensional epithelial sheet of uniform ectodermal cells, the neuroectoderm, into a highly complex three-dimensional structure consisting of a huge variety of different neural cell types. Characteristic numbers of each cell type become arranged in reproducible spatial patterns, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of specific functional contacts. The fruitfly Drosophila is a suitable model to approach the mechanisms controlling the generation of cell diversity and pattern in the developing CNS, as it allows linking of gene function to individually identifiable cells. This review addresses aspects of the formation and specification of neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in Drosophila in the light of recent studies on their segmental diversification.

  15. Coupled chaotic oscillators and their relation to a central pattern generator for artificial quadrupeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Horacio; Yudiarsah, Efta; Romanelli, Lilia; Cerdeira, Hilda A.

    2005-04-01

    Animal locomotion employs different periodic patterns known as animal gaits. In 1993, Collins and Stewart recognized that gaits possessed certain symmetries and characterized the gaits of quadrupeds and bipeds using permutation symmetry groups, which impose constraints on the locomotion center called the central pattern generator (CPG) in the animal brain. They modeled the CPG by coupling four nonlinear oscillators and found that it was possible to reproduce all symmetries of the gaits by changing the coupling strength. Here we propose to extend this idea using coupled chaotic oscillators synchronized using the Pyragas method in order to characterize the CPG symmetries. We also evaluate the time series behavior when the foot is in contact with the ground: this has potential robotic applications.

  16. Models of central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion. II. Secondary gaits.

    PubMed

    Buono, P L

    2001-04-01

    We continue the analysis of the network of symmetrically coupled cells modeling central pattern generators (CPG) for quadruped locomotion proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins by studying secondary gaits. Secondary gaits are modeled by output signals from the CPG where each cell emits one of two different output signals along with exact phase shifts. Examples of secondary gaits are transverse gallop, rotary gallop, and canter. We classify secondary gaits that bifurcate when the Poincaré map of a primary gait has a real eigenvalue crossing the unit circle. In particular, we show that periodic solutions modeling transverse gallop and rotary gallop bifurcate from primary gaits. Moreover, we find gaits from period-doubling bifurcations and analyze plausible footfall patterns. Numerical simulations are performed using the Morris-Lecar equations as cell dynamics.

  17. 46 CFR 111.12-5 - Construction and testing of generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction and testing of generators. 111.12-5 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-5 Construction and testing of generators. Each generator must meet the applicable requirements for construction and...

  18. 46 CFR 111.12-5 - Construction and testing of generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Construction and testing of generators. 111.12-5 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-5 Construction and testing of generators. Each generator must meet the applicable requirements for construction and...

  19. 46 CFR 111.12-5 - Construction and testing of generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction and testing of generators. 111.12-5 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-5 Construction and testing of generators. Each generator must meet the applicable requirements for construction and...

  20. 46 CFR 111.12-5 - Construction and testing of generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction and testing of generators. 111.12-5 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-5 Construction and testing of generators. Each generator must meet the applicable requirements for construction and...

  1. 46 CFR 111.12-5 - Construction and testing of generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Construction and testing of generators. 111.12-5 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-5 Construction and testing of generators. Each generator must meet the applicable requirements for construction and...

  2. SMPTE Test Pattern For Certification Of Medical Diagnostic Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisk, Kenneth G.

    1984-08-01

    Since the invention of x-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, rapid advances have been made in the radiological detection of body abnormalities. This was very evident in the 1960's and 70's when the marriage of computers to radiology gave birth to a new generation of imaging modalities such as computerized tomography, ultrasound, digital radiographic imaging, nuclear medicine, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Many of these devices employ digital computer techniques for signal manipulation, and the resultant analog diagnostic images are displayed on television monitors for viewing and on imaging cathode-ray tubes for a photographic hard copy.

  3. Modelling spinal circuitry involved in locomotor pattern generation: insights from deletions during fictive locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Lafreniere-Roula, Myriam; McCrea, David A

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian spinal cord contains a locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) that can produce alternating rhythmic activity of flexor and extensor motoneurones in the absence of rhythmic input and proprioceptive feedback. During such fictive locomotor activity in decerebrate cats, spontaneous omissions of activity occur simultaneously in multiple agonist motoneurone pools for a number of cycles. During these ‘deletions’, antagonist motoneurone pools usually become tonically active but may also continue to be rhythmic. The rhythmic activity that re-emerges following a deletion is often not phase shifted. This suggests that some neuronal mechanism can maintain the locomotor period when motoneurone activity fails. To account for these observations, a simplified computational model of the spinal circuitry has been developed in which the locomotor CPG consists of two levels: a half-centre rhythm generator (RG) and a pattern formation (PF) network, with reciprocal inhibitory interactions between antagonist neural populations at each level. The model represents a network of interacting neural populations with single interneurones and motoneurones described in the Hodgkin-Huxley style. The model reproduces the range of locomotor periods and phase durations observed during real locomotion in adult cats and permits independent control of the level of motoneurone activity and of step cycle timing. By altering the excitability of neural populations within the PF network, the model can reproduce deletions in which motoneurone activity fails but the phase of locomotor oscillations is maintained. The model also suggests criteria for the functional identification of spinal interneurones involved in the mammalian locomotor pattern generation. PMID:17008376

  4. Testing the Ability of TOPMODEL to Assess the Spatial Continuity and Connectivity of Soil Moisture Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, G.; Roy, A.

    2006-05-01

    Examining hydrologic connectivity as a major control on stormflow generation has emerged as an important field of research in forest hydrology. Knowledge on this new concept, however, has yet to be incorporated in most hydrological models and to be proven useful to simulate the "on-off" behaviour of small humid temperate catchments. In this study, we examine the hydrologic behaviour of a small headwater forested catchment, the Hermine, located in the Laurentians near Montreal, Quebec. This watershed is a textbook case for the application of the popular TOPMODEL. Still, the model does not perform well, especially following extended dry periods. Several explanations have been proposed regarding this issue, chiefly the existence of two or more preferential states and threshold-like processes associated with the spatio-temporal variations of antecedent moisture conditions (AMC). As these dominantly govern the initiation of stormflow, we test here the ability of the model to differentiate random patterns of soil moisture from organized ones. Using the topographic index distribution and the local storage deficit maps produced at each daily time step, the spatial correlation structure of potentially saturated areas and moisture conditions is studied through the use of geostatistical techniques. We also examine the methods of Western et al. (2001) in reference to the use of connectivity statistics to relate different soil moisture patterns with simulated hydrologic responses. From the spatial patterns of soil moisture simulated, TOPMODEL is capable of isolating several hydrologic preferential states, more or less wet with respect to a threshold value based on the mean catchment deficit. The changes in the disruption of spatial continuity of soil moisture are easier to identify when the correlation length among the patterns exhibits a high degree of seasonality. On the other hand, TOPMODEL falls short of representing some complex spatial patterns of disconnected saturated

  5. Vitamin D assessment in primary care: changing patterns of testing

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Katy; Taylor, William; Marks, Eileen; Goodson, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background Over recent years there has been increased interest in the disease burden associated with vitamin D deficiency. This, combined with recognition that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is high in the UK, has led to increased requests for vitamin D assessment from primary care clinicians. Setting A primary care cohort in Liverpool. Question How has the usefulness of vitamin D testing changed over time in identifying deficiency? Methods Vitamin D results from primary care practices in Liverpool were collected between 2007 and 2012, inclusive. Results were allocated to six cohorts based on year of request and each was grouped into three categories (adequate, insufficient and deficient). Results Vitamin D results of 9460 (74%) first tests and 3263 (26%) retests were analysed. Total number of requests increased 11-fold, from 503 in 2007 to 5552 in 2012. Overall 42% of first-test results were deficient (< 30 nmol). With each incremental year, more cases of vitamin D deficiency were detected – but the odds of detecting vitamin D deficiency decreased. Conclusions An exponential increase in the number of vitamin D requests was observed over this six-year period. Although more patients with vitamin deficiency were identified, the increased number of tests represents a significant cost to health services. Moreover, the practice of retesting too soon after treatment can be inappropriate. There is a need to develop clear guidance for assessing vitamin D status in primary care. PMID:26217398

  6. Multiplexed recording with uncorrelated computer-generated reference patterns in coaxial holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Wani, Yotaro; Nomura, Takanori

    2015-05-15

    A computer-generated reference pattern (CGRP) allows improvement in light efficiency and the quality of reconstructed data in coaxial holographic data storage. In this Letter, a multiplexed recording method with uncorrelated CGRPs is proposed. With this method, crosstalk from adjacent holograms is suppressed without shifting a medium. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed method experimentally, shift selectivity is investigated, and then multiplexed recording is performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method enables high-density recording compared with conventional shift multiplexing. In addition, a theoretical analysis implies that at least 100 uncorrelated CGRPs can be designed and used for multiplexed recording.

  7. Evolution and development of a central pattern generator for the swimming of a lamprey.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, A J; Kodjabachian, J

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the design of neural control architectures for locomotion using an evolutionary approach. Inspired by the central pattern generators found in animals, we develop neural controllers that can produce the patterns of oscillations necessary for the swimming of a simulated lamprey. This work is inspired by Ekeberg's neuronal and mechanical model of a lamprey [11] and follows experiments in which swimming controllers were evolved using a simple encoding scheme [25, 26]. Here, controllers are developed using an evolutionary algorithm based on the SGOCE encoding [31, 32] in which a genetic programming approach is used to evolve developmental programs that encode the growing of a dynamical neural network. The developmental programs determine how neurons located on a two-dimensional substrate produce new cells through cellular division and how they form efferent or afferent interconnections. Swimming controllers are generated when the growing networks eventually create connections to the muscles located on both sides of the rectangular substrate. These muscles are part of a two-dimensional mechanical simulation of the body of the lamprey in interaction with water. The motivation of this article is to develop a method for the design of control mechanisms for animal-like locomotion. Such a locomotion is characterized by a large number of actuators, a rhythmic activity, and the fact that efficient motion is only obtained when the actuators are well coordinated. The task of the control mechanism is therefore to transform commands concerning the speed and direction of motion into the signals sent to the multiple actuators. We define a fitness function, based on several simulations of the controller with different commands settings, that rewards the capacity of modulating the speed and the direction of swimming in response to simple, varying input signals. Central pattern generators are thus evolved capable of producing the relatively complex patterns of

  8. Closing the Loop: Integrating Body, Muscle and Environment with Locomotion Central Pattern Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-30

    optimal feedback control, central pattern generator, lamprey , locomotion, neural control Tim Kiemel, Kathleen Hoffman University of Maryland - College Park...between the neural circuitry, body, and fluid environment for swimming locomotion, where the lamprey serves as a model system1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Our...have done for a simple plant model of lamprey swimming (§2.2). In our CPG-based approach (§2.3), we have combined a simple CPG model with the plant model

  9. Connection and coordination: the interplay between architecture and dynamics in evolved model pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Psujek, Sean; Ames, Jeffrey; Beer, Randall D

    2006-03-01

    We undertake a systematic study of the role of neural architecture in shaping the dynamics of evolved model pattern generators for a walking task. First, we consider the minimum number of connections necessary to achieve high performance on this task. Next, we identify architectural motifs associated with high fitness. We then examine how high-fitness architectures differ in their ability to evolve. Finally, we demonstrate the existence of distinct parameter subgroups in some architectures and show that these subgroups are characterized by differences in neuron excitabilities and connection signs.

  10. A motion artifact generation and assessment system for the rapid testing of surface biopotential electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cömert, Alper; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Dry electrodes can reduce cost while increasing the usability and comfort of wearable monitoring systems. They are, however, susceptible to motion artifacts. The present electrode testing methods lack reliability and do not separate the factors that affect the motion artifact. In this paper, we introduce a first generation motion artifact generation and assessment system that generates the speed, amplitude, and pattern-wise programmable movement of the electrode. The system simultaneously measures electrode-skin impedance, the motion artifact, and one channel of an electrocardiogram that contains the motion artifact and monitors the mounting force applied to the electrode. We demonstrate the system by comparing the applied movement and the measured signals for electrode movements up to 6 mm and movement frequencies from 0.4 Hz to 4 Hz. Results show that the impedance change and surface potential are visually clearly related to the applied motion, with average correlations of 0.89 and 0.64, respectively. The applied force, electrode location, and electrode structure all affect the motion artifact. The setup enables the motion of the electrode to be accurately controlled. The system can be used as a precursor to the testing of integrated systems because it enables thorough, repeatable, and robust motion artifact studies. The system allows a deeper insight into motion artifacts and the interplay of the various factors that affect them.

  11. Bio-inspired Optimal Locomotion Reconfigurability of Quadruped Rovers using Central Pattern Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Murtaza

    Legged rovers are often considered as viable solutions for traversing unknown terrain. This work addresses the optimal locomotion reconfigurability of quadruped rovers, which consists of obtaining optimal locomotion modes, and transitioning between them. A 2D sagittal plane rover model is considered based on a domestic cat. Using a Genetic Algorithm, the gait, pose and control variables that minimize torque or maximize speed are found separately. The optimization approach takes into account the elimination of leg impact, while considering the entire variable spectrum. The optimal solutions are consistent with other works on gait optimization, and are similar to gaits found in quadruped animals as well. An online model-free gait planning framework is also implemented, that is based on Central Pattern Generators is implemented. It is used to generate joint and control trajectories for any arbitrarily varying speed profile, and shown to regulate locomotion transition and speed modulation, both endogenously and continuously.

  12. Sensory-induced activation of pattern generators in the absence of supraspinal control.

    PubMed

    Lev-Tov, A; Etlin, A; Blivis, D

    2010-06-01

    Sacrocaudal afferent (SCA) stimulation is used in this work to study neural pathways involved in sensory-activation of central pattern generators (CPGs) in the isolated spinal cord of the neonatal rat. Surgical manipulations of the white matter funiculi and confocal imaging of back-labeled funicular pathways suggest that the CPGs are activated during SCA stimulation by crossed and uncrossed multifunicular projections of sacral neurons and that activation of short projecting proprioneurons is sufficient for the generation of the rhythm by SCA stimulation. The versatile organization of the pathways involved in the SCA-induced rhythm makes it a potent and durable activator of the CPGs in the absence of descending control from the brain. The significance of our findings and their potential clinical use are discussed.

  13. Far-field radiation patterns of second harmonic generation from gold nanoparticles under tightly focused illumination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Wang, Xianghui; Chang, Shengjiang; Zeng, Ming; Shen, Si; Zhang, Na

    2016-04-04

    We study far-field angular radiation patterns of second harmonic generation (SHG) from gold nanosphere, nanocube, nanorod, and nanocup illuminated by tightly focused linearly and radially polarized beams, respectively. It is found that under linearly polarized illumination, far-field forward-scattering SHG (FSHG) dominates second harmonic (SH) responses generated by those gold particles. On the contrary, it is amazing that significant backward-scattering SHG (BSHG) can be observed when those gold nanoparticles are excited by a focused radially polarized beam. For the case of gold nanosphere, the effective point dipole systems are developed to reasonably elucidate this interesting difference. Our investigations suggest that for SHG microscopy with backward detection scheme, tightly focused radially polarized beam could be a promising excitation field to improve the backward SH signal.

  14. The internal flow pattern analysis of a tidal power turbine operating on bidirectional generation-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Luo, Y.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    Using tidal energy can reduce environment pollution, save conventional energy and improve energy structure, hence it presents great advantage and is developing potential. Influenced by flood tide and low tide, a fully functional tidal power station needs to experience six operating modes, including bidirectional generation, pumping and sluice; the internal unsteady flow pattern and dynamic characters are very complicated. Based on a bidirectional tidal generator unit, three-dimensional unsteady flows in the flow path were calculated for four typical operating conditions with the pressure pulsation characteristics analyzed. According to the numerical results, the internal flow characteristics in the flow path were discussed. The influence of gravity to the hydraulic performance and flow characteristics were analysed. The results provide a theoretical analysis method of the hydraulic optimization design of the same type unit as well as a direction for stable operation and optimal scheduling of existing tidal power unit.

  15. Field Testing GEOICE: A Next-Generation Polar Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Winberry, J. P.; Huerta, A. D.; Chung, P.; Parker, T.; Anderson, K. R.; Bilek, S. L.; Carpenter, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the development of a new NSF MRI-community supported seismic observatory designed for studies in ice-covered regions - the Geophysical Earth Observatory for Ice Covered Environs (GEOICE). This project is motivated by the need to densify and optimize the collection of high-quality seismic data relevant to key solid Earth and cryosphere science questions. The GEOICE instruments and their power and other ancillary systems are being designed to require minimal installation time and logistical load (i.e., size and weight), while maximizing ease-of-use in the field. The system is capable of advanced data handling and telemetry while being able to withstand conditions associated with icy environments, including cold/wet conditions and high-latitude solar limitations. The instrument capability will include a hybrid seismograph pool of broadband and intermediate elements for observation of both long-period signals (e.g, long-period surface waves and slow sources) and intermediate-to-short-period signals (e.g., teleseismic body waves, local seismicity, and impulsive or extended glaciogenic signals).Key features will include a design that integrates the seismometer and digitizer into a single, environmentally and mechanically robust housing; very low power requirements (~1 watt) for the intermediate-band systems; and advanced power systems that optimize battery capacity and operational limits. The envisioned ~100 element GEOICE instruments will nearly double the current polar inventory of stations and will be maintained and supported at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center to ensure full and flexible peer-reviewed community use. Prototype instruments are currently deployed in Antarctica and Alaska, with a larger Antarctic deployment planned for the 2015-2016 season. The results of these field tests will help to refine instrumentation design and lead to the production of robust and capable next-generation seismic sensors.

  16. The influence of aspect ratio and stroke pattern on force generation of a bat-inspired membrane wing.

    PubMed

    Schunk, Cosima; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2017-02-06

    Aspect ratio (AR) is one parameter used to predict the flight performance of a bat species based on wing shape. Bats with high AR wings are thought to have superior lift-to-drag ratios and are therefore predicted to be able to fly faster or to sustain longer flights. By contrast, bats with lower AR wings are usually thought to exhibit higher manoeuvrability. However, the half-span ARs of most bat wings fall into a narrow range of about 2.5-4.5. Furthermore, these predictions do not take into account the wide variation in flapping motion observed in bats. To examine the influence of different stroke patterns, we measured lift and drag of highly compliant membrane wings with different bat-relevant ARs. A two degrees of freedom shoulder joint allowed for independent control of flapping amplitude and wing sweep. We tested five models with the same variations of stroke patterns, flapping frequencies and wind speed velocities. Our results suggest that within the relatively small AR range of bat wings, AR has no clear effect on force generation. Instead, the generation of lift by our simple model mostly depends on wingbeat frequency, flapping amplitude and freestream velocity; drag is mostly affected by the flapping amplitude.

  17. Importance of the inherent and the relative surface energies in generating patterned layer in a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Kyung; Kwon, Hyeok Bin; Park, Hongsik; Choe, Eunji; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Park, Jaehoon; Song, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    We report the importance of the inherent and the relative surface energies in generating a patterned organic semiconductor layer through a solution process. The inherent and the relative surface energies of the substrate can be effectively controlled using polydimethylsiloxane in combination with an UV/ozone treatment. The controlled inherent surface energy in each region, as well as the high-order difference of relative surface energy, plays a significant role in generating the patterned layer. In addition, the patterned metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure shows a lower lateral current than the non-patterned MSM structure because the current path is limited.

  18. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hill, David P.; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 new classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.

  19. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    DOE PAGES

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; ...

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 newmore » classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.« less

  20. Retrieval Mode Distinguishes the Testing Effect from the Generation Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Zaromb, Franklin M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of four experiments examined the effects of generation vs. retrieval practice on subsequent retention. Subjects were first exposed to a list of target words. Then the subjects were shown the targets again intact for Read trials or they were shown fragments of the targets. Subjects in Generate conditions were told to complete the fragments…

  1. Low frequency variability of European weather patterns and its impact on power generation in northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masato, Giacomo; Slavov, Georgi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that Europe is becoming increasingly reliant on the power generation from the solar and wind sources. Germany is a leader in such a trend - it is then interesting to study to what extent the low-frequency variability of the European weather patterns impacts the power production in this country. Rather than identifying such patterns starting from the weather angle, four weather regimes are identified that maximize and minimize the production of solar and wind power. The analysis of their past occurrence and trends allows us to estimate the potential amount of energy produced for any given year (assuming a constant installed capacity). It is found that the sole change in such weather regimes over the recent years is able to drive up to a 20% annual difference in power generation. This also throws an interesting challenge at the scientific community, whereby the future projection of these regimes can heavily influence both the short- and long-term Eurozone plans in terms of European renewable energy targets.

  2. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yang Hyeog; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-20

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ∼430 V and ∼55 μA cm(-2), generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ∼500 V and ∼100 μA cm(-2), respectively, which corresponds to ∼50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs.

  3. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeog Kwon, Yang; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-01

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ˜430 V and ˜55 μA cm-2, generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ˜500 V and ˜100 μA cm-2, respectively, which corresponds to ˜50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs.

  4. Endogenous rhythm and pattern-generating circuit interactions in cockroach motor centres

    PubMed Central

    David, Izhak; Holmes, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cockroaches are rapid and stable runners whose gaits emerge from the intricate, and not fully resolved, interplay between endogenous oscillatory pattern-generating networks and sensory feedback that shapes their rhythmic output. Here we studied the endogenous motor output of a brainless, deafferented preparation. We monitored the pilocarpine-induced rhythmic activity of levator and depressor motor neurons in the mesothoracic and metathoracic segments in order to reveal the oscillatory networks’ architecture and interactions. Data analyses included phase relations, latencies between and overlaps of rhythmic bursts, spike frequencies, and the dependence of these parameters on cycle frequency. We found that, overall, ipsilateral connections are stronger than contralateral ones. Our findings revealed asymmetries in connectivity among the different ganglia, in which meta-to-mesothoracic ascending coupling is stronger than meso-to-metathoracic descending coupling. Within-ganglion coupling between the metathoracic hemiganglia is stronger than that in the mesothoracic ganglion. We also report differences in the role and mode of operation of homologue network units (manifested by levator and depressor nerve activity). Many observed characteristics are similar to those exhibited by intact animals, suggesting a dominant role for feedforward control in cockroach locomotion. Based on these data we posit a connectivity scheme among components of the locomotion pattern generating system. PMID:27422902

  5. Control of traveling-wave oscillations and bifurcation behavior in central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Alexandra S.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Understanding synchronous and traveling-wave oscillations, particularly as they relate to transitions between different types of behavior, is a central problem in modeling biological systems. Here, we address this problem in the context of central pattern generators (CPGs). We use contraction theory to establish the global stability of a traveling-wave or synchronous oscillation, determined by the type of coupling. This opens the door to better design of coupling architectures to create the desired type of stable oscillations. We then use coupling that is both amplitude and phase dependent to create either globally stable synchronous or traveling-wave solutions. Using the CPG motor neuron network of a leech as an example, we show that while both traveling and synchronous oscillations can be achieved by several types of coupling, the transition between different types of behavior is dictated by a specific coupling architecture. In particular, it is only the “repulsive” but not the commonly used phase or rotational coupling that can explain the transition to high-frequency synchronous oscillations that have been observed in the heartbeat pattern generator of a leech. This shows that the overall dynamics of a CPG can be highly sensitive to the type of coupling used, even for coupling architectures that are widely believed to produce the same qualitative behavior.

  6. Deciphering the organization and modulation of spinal locomotor central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ian T; Whelan, Patrick J

    2006-06-01

    Networks within our spinal cord generate the basic pattern underlying walking. Over the past decade, much progress has been made in our understanding of their function in a variety of vertebrate species. A significant hurdle has been the identification of candidate populations of neurons that are involved in pattern generation in the spinal cord. Recently, systems neuroscientists in collaboration with molecular biologists have begun to dissect the circuitry underlying spinal locomotor networks. These advances have combined genetic and electrophysiological techniques using in vitro preparations of the mouse spinal cord. This review will discuss new advances in the field of spinal locomotor networks with emphasis on the mouse. Many of the behaviors fundamental to animal life, such as breathing, chewing and locomotion, are rhythmic activities controlled by neuronal networks. Discerning which neurons are members of these networks, their synaptic connectivity and their individual electrophysiological properties is essential to our understanding of how rhythmic motor behaviors are produced. It is well known that the spinal cord contains the basic circuitry to produce locomotion. However, identifying neurons and connections within spinal networks is challenging because cells that comprise the locomotor network form part of a heterogeneous mix of interneurons within the ventral spinal cord. Recently, the merging of electrophysiological and genetic approaches has provided new tools to identify classes of interneurons within the spinal cord that contribute to network function. These new findings will be discussed in this review.

  7. Organisation of the spinal central pattern generators for locomotion in the salamander: biology and modelling.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Stéphanie; Jan Ijspeert, Auke; Ryczko, Dimitri; Nagy, Frédéric; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Among living tetrapods, salamanders are regarded as most closely resembling the first terrestrial vertebrates, and are therefore an interesting group in which the evolutionary changes in the locomotor behaviour from aquatic to terrestrial habitats can be inferred. Salamanders exhibit two locomotor modes: swimming and terrestrial stepping. The swimming is anguilliform and resembles closely that of the lamprey. On the ground, the salamander switches to a stepping gait with axial undulations that is also observed in many reptiles. The salamander is therefore ideally suited for examining the neural mechanisms for the generation of these two locomotor modes, as well as the neural mechanisms of gait transition. In the present paper, we describe the kinematics and patterns of activation of axial and limb muscles during stepping and swimming in adult salamanders. We then review the current neurobiological data about the organisation of the spinal networks underlying swimming and stepping, and the mechanisms of gait transition. Finally we report modelling studies aimed at understanding the organisation and operation of the salamander locomotor circuits. Altogether, the neurobiological and the modelling data support the hypothesis of a phylogenetic conservatism from agnathians to amphibians of the spinal locomotor networks generating axial motor patterns.

  8. Models of central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion. I. Primary gaits.

    PubMed

    Buono, P L; Golubitsky, M

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we continue the analysis of a network of symmetrically coupled cells modeling central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono, and Collins. By a cell we mean a system of ordinary differential equations and by a coupled cell system we mean a network of identical cells with coupling terms. We have three main results in this paper. First, we show that the proposed network is the simplest one modeling the common quadruped gaits of walk, trot, and pace. In doing so we prove a general theorem classifying spatio-temporal symmetries of periodic solutions to equivariant systems of differential equations. We also specialize this theorem to coupled cell systems. Second, this paper focuses on primary gaits; that is, gaits that are modeled by output signals from the central pattern generator where each cell emits the same waveform along with exact phase shifts between cells. Our previous work showed that the network is capable of producing six primary gaits. Here, we show that under mild assumptions on the cells and the coupling of the network, primary gaits can be produced from Hopf bifurcation by varying only coupling strengths of the network. Third, we discuss the stability of primary gaits and exhibit these solutions by performing numerical simulations using the dimensionless Morris-Lecar equations for the cell dynamics.

  9. Control of traveling-wave oscillations and bifurcation behavior in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Alexandra S; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Understanding synchronous and traveling-wave oscillations, particularly as they relate to transitions between different types of behavior, is a central problem in modeling biological systems. Here, we address this problem in the context of central pattern generators (CPGs). We use contraction theory to establish the global stability of a traveling-wave or synchronous oscillation, determined by the type of coupling. This opens the door to better design of coupling architectures to create the desired type of stable oscillations. We then use coupling that is both amplitude and phase dependent to create either globally stable synchronous or traveling-wave solutions. Using the CPG motor neuron network of a leech as an example, we show that while both traveling and synchronous oscillations can be achieved by several types of coupling, the transition between different types of behavior is dictated by a specific coupling architecture. In particular, it is only the "repulsive" but not the commonly used phase or rotational coupling that can explain the transition to high-frequency synchronous oscillations that have been observed in the heartbeat pattern generator of a leech. This shows that the overall dynamics of a CPG can be highly sensitive to the type of coupling used, even for coupling architectures that are widely believed to produce the same qualitative behavior.

  10. Transition of pattern generation: the phenomenon of post-scratching locomotion.

    PubMed

    Trejo, A; Tapia, J A; De la Torre Valdovinos, B; Huidobro, N; Flores, G; Flores-Hernandez, J; Flores, A; Manjarrez, E

    2015-03-12

    A fundamental problem in neurophysiology is the understanding of neuronal mechanisms by which the central nervous system produces a sequence of voluntary or involuntary motor acts from a diverse repertory of movements. These kinds of transitions between motor acts are extremely complex; however, they could be analyzed in a more simple form in decerebrate animals in the context of spinal central pattern generation. Here, we present for the first time a physiological phenomenon of post-scratching locomotion in which decerebrate cats exhibit a compulsory locomotor activity after an episode of scratching. We found flexor, extensor and intermediate single interneurons rhythmically firing in the same phase during both scratching and the subsequent post-scratching locomotion. Because no changes in phase of these neurons from scratching to post-scratching locomotion were found, we suggest that in the lumbar spinal cord there are neurons associated with both motor tasks. Moreover, because of its high reproducibility we suggest that the study of post-scratching fictive locomotion, together with the unitary recording of neurons, could become a useful tool to study neuronal mechanisms underlying transitions from one rhythmic motor task to another, and to study in more detail the central pattern generator circuitry in the spinal cord.

  11. Endogenous rhythm and pattern-generating circuit interactions in cockroach motor centres.

    PubMed

    David, Izhak; Holmes, Philip; Ayali, Amir

    2016-09-15

    Cockroaches are rapid and stable runners whose gaits emerge from the intricate, and not fully resolved, interplay between endogenous oscillatory pattern-generating networks and sensory feedback that shapes their rhythmic output. Here we studied the endogenous motor output of a brainless, deafferented preparation. We monitored the pilocarpine-induced rhythmic activity of levator and depressor motor neurons in the mesothoracic and metathoracic segments in order to reveal the oscillatory networks' architecture and interactions. Data analyses included phase relations, latencies between and overlaps of rhythmic bursts, spike frequencies, and the dependence of these parameters on cycle frequency. We found that, overall, ipsilateral connections are stronger than contralateral ones. Our findings revealed asymmetries in connectivity among the different ganglia, in which meta-to-mesothoracic ascending coupling is stronger than meso-to-metathoracic descending coupling. Within-ganglion coupling between the metathoracic hemiganglia is stronger than that in the mesothoracic ganglion. We also report differences in the role and mode of operation of homologue network units (manifested by levator and depressor nerve activity). Many observed characteristics are similar to those exhibited by intact animals, suggesting a dominant role for feedforward control in cockroach locomotion. Based on these data we posit a connectivity scheme among components of the locomotion pattern generating system.

  12. Voltage-dependent switching of sensorimotor integration by a lobster central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Nargeot, Romuald

    2003-06-15

    Behavioral adaptations and the underlying neural plasticity may not simply result from peripheral information conveyed by sensory inputs. Central neuronal networks often spontaneously generate neuronal activity patterns that may also contribute to sensorimotor integration and behavioral adaptations. The present study explored a novel form of sensory-induced plasticity by which the resulting changes in motor output depend essentially on the preexisting functional state of an identified neuron of an endogenously active central network. In the isolated lobster stomatogastric nervous system, electrical stimulation of a mechanosensory nerve transiently inactivated rhythmic spike bursting in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron of the pyloric motor pattern-generating network. Repeated sensory nerve stimulation gradually and long-lastingly strengthened the bursting of the LP neuron to the detriment of sensory-elicited inactivation. This strengthening of pyloric-timed rhythmic activity was enhanced by experimental depolarization of the neuron. Conversely, when the LP neuron was hyperpolarized, the same sensory stimulation paradigm now gradually increased the susceptibility of the pyloric-timed bursting of the network neuron to sensory-elicited inactivation. Modulation of depolarization-activated and hyperpolarization-activated ionic conductances that underlie the intrinsic bursting properties of the LP neuron may contribute via differential voltage-dependent recruitment and effects to the respective adaptive processes. These data therefore suggest a novel state-dependent mechanism by which an endogenously active central network can decrease or increase its responsiveness to the same sensory input.

  13. SSME Seal Test Program: Test results for sawtooth pattern damper seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    Direct and transverse force coefficients for 11, sawtooth-pattern, and damper-seal configurations were examined. The designation damper seal uses a deliberately roughened stator and smooth rotor to increase the net damping force developed by a seal. The designation sawtooth-pattern refers to a stator roughness pattern. The sawtooth pattern yields axial grooves in the stator which are interrupted by spacer elements which act as flow constrictions or dams. All seals use the same smooth rotor and have the same, constant, minimum clearance. The stators examined the consequences of changes in the following design parameters: (1) axial-groove depth; (2) number of teeth: (3) number of sawtooth sections; (4) number of spacer elements; (5) dam width; (6) axially aligned sawtooth sections versus axially-staggered sawtooth sections; and (7) groove geometry. It is found that none of the sawtooth-pattern seal performs as well as the best round-hole-pattern seal. Maximum damping configurations for the sawtooth and round-hole-pattern stators have comparable stiffness performance. Several of the sawtooth pattern stators outperformed the best round-hole pattern seal.

  14. Next-generation Lunar Laser Retroreflectors for Precision Tests of General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci, Emanuele; dell'Agnello, Simone; Delle Monache, Giovanni; Martini, Manuele; Contessa, Stefania; Porcelli, Luca; Tibuzzi, Mattia; Salvatori, Lorenzo; Patrizi, Giordano; Maiello, Mauro; Intaglietta, Nicola; Mondaini, Chiara; Currie, Douglas; Chandler, John; Bianco, Giuseppe; Murphy, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Since 1969, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflectors (CCRs) has supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (GR). When first installed in the 1970s, the Apollo CCRs geometry contributed only a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Today, because of lunar librations, this contribution dominates the error budget, limiting the precision of the experimental tests of gravitational theories. The new MoonLIGHT-2 (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests) apparatus is a new-generation LLR payload developed by the SCF_Lab (http://www.lnf.infn.it/esperimenti/etrusco/) at INFN-LNF in collaboration with the Maryland University. With the unique design of a single large CCR unaffected by librations, MoonLIGHT-2 can increase up to a factor 100 the precision of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession and other General Relativity (GR) tests respect to Apollo CCRs. MoonLIGHT-2 is approved to be launched with the Moon Express mission MEX-1 and will be deployed on the Moon surface in 2018. MoonLIGHT-2 is also proposed for the Roscosmos mission Luna-27. To validate/optimize MoonLIGHT-2 for MEX-1, the SCF_Lab is carrying out a unique experimental test called SCF-Test: the concurrent measurement of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the CCR under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator and simulated space environment. We perform test of GR with current LLR data and also different GR simulation of the expected improvement in GR test provided by MoonLIGHT-2, using the Planetary Ephemeris Program in collaboration with CfA. Our ultimate goal is to improve GR tests by a factor up to 100, and provide constraints on the new gravitational theories like non-miminally coupled gravity and spacetime torision.

  15. 1.5 nm fabrication of test patterns for characterization of metrological systems

    DOE PAGES

    Babin, Sergey; Calafiore, Giuseppe; Peroz, Christophe; ...

    2015-11-06

    Any metrology tool is only as good as it is calibrated. The characterization of metrology systems requires test patterns at a scale about ten times smaller than the measured features. The fabrication of patterns with linewidths down to 1.5 nm is described. The test sample was designed in such a way that the distribution of linewidths appears to be random at any location. This pseudorandom test pattern is used to characterize dimensional metrology equipment over its entire dynamic range by extracting the modulation transfer function of the system. The test pattern contains alternating lines of silicon and tungsten silicide, eachmore » according to its designed width. As a result, the fabricated test samples were imaged using a transmission electron microscope, a scanning electron microscope, and an atomic force microscope. (C) 2015 American Vacuum Society.« less

  16. 1.5 nm fabrication of test patterns for characterization of metrological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babin, Sergey; Calafiore, Giuseppe; Peroz, Christophe; Conley, Raymond; Bouet, Nathalie; Cabrini, Stefano; Chan, Elaine; Lacey, Ian; McKinney, Wayne R.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Vladar, Andras E.

    2015-11-06

    Any metrology tool is only as good as it is calibrated. The characterization of metrology systems requires test patterns at a scale about ten times smaller than the measured features. The fabrication of patterns with linewidths down to 1.5 nm is described. The test sample was designed in such a way that the distribution of linewidths appears to be random at any location. This pseudorandom test pattern is used to characterize dimensional metrology equipment over its entire dynamic range by extracting the modulation transfer function of the system. The test pattern contains alternating lines of silicon and tungsten silicide, each according to its designed width. As a result, the fabricated test samples were imaged using a transmission electron microscope, a scanning electron microscope, and an atomic force microscope. (C) 2015 American Vacuum Society.

  17. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: Androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals. PMID:18262186

  18. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bass, Andrew H; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-05-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals.

  19. Resolution improvement and pattern generator development for the maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ximan

    have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3delta CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  20. Generating Realistic Environments for Cyber Operations Development, Testing, and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    HTTP Content Analysis: Real Versus Generated URLs and URIs ................................. 8  Figure 5. SMTP Content Analysis: Real ( Enron ) Versus...capture for comparison. Content results are based on the Enron email dataset [12], and a simulated SMTP traffic. Clauset et.al showed that power-law...SMTP Content Analysis: Real ( Enron ) Versus Generated Emails Sent and Unique Subject Lines 4.2 Behavioral Measuring Behavioral Realism is a

  1. 78 FR 53483 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  2. 78 FR 53484 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  3. Analysis of Item Response Patterns: Consistency Indices and Their Application to Criterion-Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnisch, Delwyn L.

    The major emphasis of this paper is in the examination of test item response patterns. Tatsuoka and Tatsuoka (1980) have developed two indices of response consistency: the norm-conformity index (NCI) and the individual consistency index (ICI). The NCI provides a measure of the degree of consistency between the response pattern of an individual and…

  4. Population genetics of Mediterranean and Saharan olives: geographic patterns of differentiation and evidence for early generations of admixture

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, G.; El Bakkali, A.; Haouane, H.; Baali-Cherif, D.; Moukhli, A.; Khadari, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The olive (Olea europaea subsp. europaea) was domesticated in the Mediterranean area but its wild relatives are distributed over three continents, from the Mediterranean basin to South Africa and south-western Asia. Recent studies suggested that this crop originated in the Levant while a secondary diversification occurred in most westward areas. A possible contribution of the Saharan subspecies (subsp. laperrinei) has been highlighted, but the data available were too limited to draw definite conclusions. Here, patterns of genetic differentiation in the Mediterranean and Saharan olives are analysed to test for recent admixture between these taxa. Methods Nuclear microsatellite and plastid DNA (ptDNA) data were compiled from previous studies and completed for a sample of 470 cultivars, 390 wild Mediterranean trees and 270 Saharan olives. A network was reconstructed for the ptDNA haplotypes, while a Bayesian clustering method was applied to identify the main gene pools in the data set and then simulate and test for early generations of admixture between Mediterranean and Saharan olives. Key Results Four lineages of ptDNA haplotypes are recognized: three from the Mediterranean basin and one from the Sahara. Only one haplotype, primarily distributed in the Sahara, is shared between laperrinei and europaea. This haplotype is detected once in ‘Dhokar’, a cultivar from the Maghreb. Nuclear microsatellites show geographic patterns of genetic differentiation in the Mediterranean olive that reflect the primary origins of cultivars in the Levant, and indicate a high genetic differentiation between europaea and laperrinei. No first-generation hybrid between europaea and laperrinei is detected, but recent, reciprocal admixture between Mediterranean and Saharan subspecies is found in a few accessions, including ‘Dhokar’. Conclusions This study reports for the first time admixture between Mediterranean and Saharan olives. Although its contribution

  5. Expanding Stress Generation Theory: Test of a Transdiagnostic Model

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Christopher C.; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Originally formulated to understand the recurrence of depressive disorders, the stress generation hypothesis has recently been applied in research on anxiety and externalizing disorders. Results from these investigations, in combination with findings of extensive comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders, suggest the need for an expansion of stress generation models to include the stress generating effects of transdiagnostic pathology as well as those of specific syndromes. Employing latent variable modeling techniques to parse the general and specific elements of commonly co-occurring Axis I syndromes, the current study examined the associations of transdiagnostic internalizing and externalizing dimensions with stressful life events over time. Analyses revealed that, after adjusting for the covariation between the dimensions, internalizing was a significant predictor of interpersonal dependent stress, whereas externalizing was a significant predictor of noninterpersonal dependent stress. Neither latent dimension was associated with the occurrence of independent, or fateful, stressful life events. At the syndrome level, once variance due to the internalizing factor was partialled out, unipolar depression contributed incrementally to the generation of interpersonal dependent stress. In contrast, the presence of panic disorder produced a “stress inhibition” effect, predicting reduced exposure to interpersonal dependent stress. Additionally, dysthymia was associated with an excess of noninterpersonal dependent stress. The latent variable modeling framework used here is discussed in terms of its potential as an integrative model for stress generation research. PMID:22428789

  6. Evaluating the Psychometric Characteristics of Generated Multiple-Choice Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Pugh, Debra; Touchie, Claire; Boulais, André-Philippe; De Champlain, André

    2016-01-01

    Item development is a time- and resource-intensive process. Automatic item generation integrates cognitive modeling with computer technology to systematically generate test items. To date, however, items generated using cognitive modeling procedures have received limited use in operational testing situations. As a result, the psychometric…

  7. A Model-Based Method for Content Validation of Automatically Generated Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xinxin; Gierl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a methodology to recover the item model used to generate multiple-choice test items with a novel graph theory approach. Beginning with the generated test items and working backward to recover the original item model provides a model-based method for validating the content used to automatically generate test…

  8. The Comparability of the Statistical Characteristics of Test Items Generated by Computer Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisner, Richard; And Others

    This paper presents a study on the generation of mathematics test items using algorithmic methods. The history of this approach is briefly reviewed and is followed by a survey of the research to date on the statistical parallelism of algorithmically generated mathematics items. Results are presented for 8 parallel test forms generated using 16…

  9. Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.

    1983-07-01

    A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

  10. Advanced electron-beam pattern generation technology for 180-nm masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Sauer, Charles A.; Wang, William; Vernon, Matthew; Prior, Richard; Pearce-Percy, Henry T.; Cole, Damon M.; Mankos, Marian

    1997-02-01

    Optical lithography will be the dominant technique used for 180 nm generation production devices. With a reduced feature size on the wafer, 4X optical reduction, optical proximity correction (OPC), and phase shift lithography techniques, mask-related errors become even more critical to wafer yield. In addition, small feature sizes and lithography enhancement techniques require finer edge resolution. Clearly, new patten generation tools are needed for this generation of maskmaking requirements. Multipass gray (MPG) writing strategy was introduced with the MEBESR 4500S. The ability to deliver a 4X improvement in dose while improving throughput is a significant advantage over previous MEBES systems. Since MPG is used in conjunction with offset scan voting, reduction in butting of over 50% has been demonstrated with MPG. Higher doses are now possible with use of a multipass writing strategy and a brighter source. As a result, resists with higher contrast and process robustness can be used. A significant improvement in uniformity is noted with the new process, an essential step needed in meeting 180 nm requirements. Dry etch is essential to meet these new requirements and with sufficient process margin to be manufacturable. This paper describes the key electron-beam pattern generation technology necessary to meet the requirement of 180 nm masks, including a high dose field- emission gun and column capable of delivering 800 A/cm2; complete dynamic beam correction; a digital stage servo to provide stable, reproducible stage control under high acceleration conditions; a high speed data path to support 320 MHz beam blanking and a 10 nm data address. This paper also examines the improvements made to the MEBES platform and documents the resulting improvements and compares these results to the requirements for 180 nm masks.

  11. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. 268.7 Section 268.7 Protection of Environment... Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. (a) Requirements for generators: (1) A generator of hazardous waste must determine if the waste has to be...

  12. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. 268.7 Section 268.7 Protection of Environment... Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. (a) Requirements for generators: (1) A generator of hazardous waste must determine if the waste has to be...

  13. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. 268.7 Section 268.7 Protection of Environment... Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. (a) Requirements for generators: (1) A generator of hazardous waste must determine if the waste has to be...

  14. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. 268.7 Section 268.7 Protection of Environment... Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. (a) Requirements for generators: (1) A generator of hazardous waste must determine if the waste has to be...

  15. 40 CFR 268.7 - Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. 268.7 Section 268.7 Protection of Environment... Testing, tracking, and recordkeeping requirements for generators, treaters, and disposal facilities. (a) Requirements for generators: (1) A generator of hazardous waste must determine if the waste has to be...

  16. The next generation of microbiological testing of poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbiological testing of food products is a common practice of food processors to ensure compliance with food safety criteria. Sampling on its own is of limited value, but when applied regularly at different stages of the food chain, microbiology testing can be an integral part of a quality contr...

  17. Towards a Framework for Generating Tests to Satisfy Complex Code Coverage in Java Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staats, Matt

    2009-01-01

    We present work on a prototype tool based on the JavaPathfinder (JPF) model checker for automatically generating tests satisfying the MC/DC code coverage criterion. Using the Eclipse IDE, developers and testers can quickly instrument Java source code with JPF annotations covering all MC/DC coverage obligations, and JPF can then be used to automatically generate tests that satisfy these obligations. The prototype extension to JPF enables various tasks useful in automatic test generation to be performed, such as test suite reduction and execution of generated tests.

  18. Generating Tonal Distinctions in Mandarin Chinese Using an Electrolarynx with Preprogrammed Tone Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liana; Nagle, Kathy; Heaton, James T.

    2016-01-01

    An electrolarynx (EL) is a valuable rehabilitative option for individuals who have undergone laryngectomy, but current monotone ELs do not support controlled variations in fundamental frequency for producing tonal languages. The present study examined the production and perception of Mandarin Chinese using a customized hand-held EL driven by computer software to generate tonal distinctions (tonal EL). Four native Mandarin speakers were trained to articulate their speech coincidentally with preprogrammed tonal patterns in order to produce mono- and di-syllabic words with a monotone EL and tonal EL. Three native Mandarin speakers later transcribed and rated the speech samples for intelligibility and acceptability. Results indicated that words produced using the tonal EL were significantly more intelligible and acceptable than those produced using the monotone EL. PMID:26951783

  19. Generating Tonal Distinctions in Mandarin Chinese Using an Electrolarynx with Preprogrammed Tone Patterns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liana; Nagle, Kathy; Heaton, James T

    2016-04-01

    An electrolarynx (EL) is a valuable rehabilitative option for individuals who have undergone laryngectomy, but current monotone ELs do not support controlled variations in fundamental frequency for producing tonal languages. The present study examined the production and perception of Mandarin Chinese using a customized hand-held EL driven by computer software to generate tonal distinctions (tonal EL). Four native Mandarin speakers were trained to articulate their speech coincidentally with preprogrammed tonal patterns in order to produce mono- and di-syllabic words with a monotone EL and tonal EL. Three native Mandarin speakers later transcribed and rated the speech samples for intelligibility and acceptability. Results indicated that words produced using the tonal EL were significantly more intelligible and acceptable than those produced using the monotone EL.

  20. Cell polarity-driven instability generates self-organized, fractal patterning of cell layers.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Timothy J; Federici, Fernán; Steiner, Paul J; Kan, Anton; Haseloff, Jim

    2013-12-20

    As a model system to study physical interactions in multicellular systems, we used layers of Escherichia coli cells, which exhibit little or no intrinsic coordination of growth. This system effectively isolates the effects of cell shape, growth, and division on spatial self-organization. Tracking the development of fluorescence-labeled cellular domains, we observed the emergence of striking fractal patterns with jagged, self-similar shapes. We then used a large-scale, cellular biophysical model to show that local instabilities due to polar cell-shape, repeatedly propagated by uniaxial growth and division, are responsible for generating this fractal geometry. Confirming this result, a mutant of E. coli with spherical shape forms smooth, nonfractal cellular domains. These results demonstrate that even populations of relatively simple bacterial cells can possess emergent properties due to purely physical interactions. Therefore, accurate physico-genetic models of cell growth will be essential for the design and understanding of genetically programmed multicellular systems.

  1. [Study on the control of dynamic artificial limb ankle based on central pattern generator].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Xu, Caiyu; Li, Mingyue; Su, Longtao

    2014-12-01

    In order to obtain the normal gait for the prosthesis-carrier with the change of external environment and gait, we designed a model of dynamic ankle prosthesis and control system and introduced the strategy of central pattern generator (CPG) about the moving trail of dynamic ankle prosthesis. The dynamic parts, which are incorporated in the model of dynamic ankle prosthesis, provide power in order to have anthropic function and character. The tool of Matlab/simulink was used to simulate the strategy. The simulation results showed that the strategy of CPG learn- ing control in this study was effective and could track the reference trail rapidly and fit the moving trail of a person's normal limb. It can make the prosthetic timely regulation and action, enhance the prosthetic intelligence. It has im- portant practical value for intelligent prosthesis development based on this analysis of technology.

  2. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus. PMID:23365558

  3. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  4. Emergent central pattern generator behavior in gap-junction-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kyle G; Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (I(AHP)) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus.

  5. On the derivation and tuning of phase oscillator models for lamprey central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Várkonyi, Péter L; Kiemel, Tim; Hoffman, Kathleen; Cohen, Avis H; Holmes, Philip

    2008-10-01

    Using phase response curves and averaging theory, we derive phase oscillator models for the lamprey central pattern generator from two biophysically-based segmental models. The first one relies on network dynamics within a segment to produce the rhythm, while the second contains bursting cells. We study intersegmental coordination and show that the former class of models shows more robust behavior over the animal's range of swimming frequencies. The network-based model can also easily produce approximately constant phase lags along the spinal cord, as observed experimentally. Precise control of phase lags in the network-based model is obtained by varying the relative strengths of its six different connection types with distance in a phase model with separate coupling functions for each connection type. The phase model also describes the effect of randomized connections, accurately predicting how quickly random network-based models approach the determinisitic model as the number of connections increases.

  6. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators.

  7. Optimum projection pattern generation for grey-level coded structured light illumination systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras-Aguilar, Rosario; Falaggis, Konstantinos; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    Structured light illumination (SLI) systems are well-established optical inspection techniques for noncontact 3D surface measurements. A common technique is multi-frequency sinusoidal SLI that obtains the phase map at various fringe periods in order to estimate the absolute phase, and hence, the 3D surface information. Nevertheless, multi-frequency SLI systems employ multiple measurement planes (e.g. four phase shifted frames) to obtain the phase at a given fringe period. It is therefore an age old challenge to obtain the absolute surface information using fewer measurement frames. Grey level (GL) coding techniques have been developed as an attempt to reduce the number of planes needed, because a spatio-temporal GL sequence employing p discrete grey-levels and m frames has the potential to unwrap up to pm fringes. Nevertheless, one major disadvantage of GL based SLI techniques is that there are often errors near the border of each stripe, because an ideal stepwise intensity change cannot be measured. If the step-change in intensity is a single discrete grey-level unit, this problem can usually be overcome by applying an appropriate threshold. However, severe errors occur if the intensity change at the border of the stripe exceeds several discrete grey-level units. In this work, an optimum GL based technique is presented that generates a series of projection patterns with a minimal gradient in the intensity. It is shown that when using this technique, the errors near the border of the stripes can be significantly reduced. This improvement is achieved with the choice generated patterns, and does not involve additional hardware or special post-processing techniques. The performance of that method is validated using both simulations and experiments. The reported technique is generic, works with an arbitrary number of frames, and can employ an arbitrary number of grey-levels.

  8. A connectionist central pattern generator for the aquatic and terrestrial gaits of a simulated salamander.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, A J

    2001-05-01

    This article investigates the neural mechanisms underlying salamander locomotion, and develops a biologically plausible connectionist model of a central pattern generator capable of producing the typical aquatic and terrestrial gaits of the salamander. It investigates, in particular, what type of neural circuitry can produce and modulate the two locomotor programs identified within the salamander's spinal cord; namely, a traveling wave of neural activity for swimming and a standing wave for trotting. A two-dimensional biomechanical simulation of the salamander's body is developed whose muscle contraction is determined by the locomotion controller simulated as a leaky-integrator neural network. While the connectivity of the neural circuitry underlying locomotion in the salamander has not been decoded for the moment, this article presents the design of a neural circuit that has a general organization corresponding to that hypothesized by neurobiologists. In particular, the locomotion controller is based on a body central pattern generator (CPG) corresponding to a lamprey-like swimming controller, and is extended with a limb CPG for controlling the salamander's limbs. The complete controller is developed in three stages: first the development of segmental oscillators, second the development of intersegmental coupling for the making of a lamprey-like swimming CPG, and finally the development of the limb CPG and its coupling to the body CPG. A genetic algorithm is used to determine the parameters of the neural circuit for the different stages, given a high-level description of the desired state space trajectories of the different subnetworks. A controller is thus developed that can produce neural activities and locomotion gaits very similar to those observed in the real salamander. By varying the tonic (i.e. non-oscillating) excitation applied to the network, the speed, direction and type of gait can be varied.

  9. A muscarinic cholinergic mechanism underlies activation of the central pattern generator for locust flight.

    PubMed

    Buhl, Edgar; Schildberger, Klaus; Stevenson, Paul A

    2008-07-01

    A central question in behavioural control is how central pattern generators (CPGs) for locomotion are activated. This paper disputes the key role generally accredited to octopamine in activating the CPG for insect flight. In deafferented locusts, fictive flight was initiated by bath application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, the acetylcholine analogue carbachol, and the acetylcholinesterase blocker eserine, but not by nicotine. Furthermore, in addition to octopamine, various other amines including dopamine, tyramine and histamine all induced fictive flight, but not serotonin or the amine-precursor amino acid tyrosine. However, flight initiation was not reversibly blocked by aminergic antagonists, and was still readily elicited by both natural stimulation (wind) and pilocarpine in reserpinized, amine-depleted locusts. By contrast, the muscarinic antagonists atropine and scopolamine reversibly blocked flight initiated by wind, cholinergic agonists, octopamine, and by selective stimulation of a flight-initiating interneurone (TCG). The short delay from TCG stimulation to flight onset suggests that TCG acts directly on the flight CPG, and accordingly that TCG, or its follower cell within the flight generating circuit, is cholinergic. We conclude that acetylcholine acting via muscarinic receptors is the key neurotransmitter in the mechanism underlying the natural activation of the locust flight CPG. Amines are not essential for this, but must be considered as potential neuromodulators for facilitating flight release and tuning the motor pattern. We speculate that muscarinic activation coupled to aminergic facilitation may be a general feature of behavioural control in insects for ensuring conditional recruitment of individual motor programs in accordance with momentary adaptive requirements.

  10. A modeling approach on why simple central pattern generators are built of irregular neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Marcelo Bussotti; Carelli, Pedro Valadão; Sartorelli, José Carlos; Pinto, Reynaldo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The crustacean pyloric Central Pattern Generator (CPG) is a nervous circuit that endogenously provides periodic motor patterns. Even after about 40 years of intensive studies, the rhythm genesis is still not rigorously understood in this CPG, mainly because it is made of neurons with irregular intrinsic activity. Using mathematical models we addressed the question of using a network of irregularly behaving elements to generate periodic oscillations, and we show some advantages of using non-periodic neurons with intrinsic behavior in the transition from bursting to tonic spiking (as found in biological pyloric CPGs) as building components. We studied two- and three-neuron model CPGs built either with Hindmarsh-Rose or with conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley-like model neurons. By changing a model's parameter we could span the neuron's intrinsic dynamical behavior from slow periodic bursting to fast tonic spiking, passing through a transition where irregular bursting was observed. Two-neuron CPG, half center oscillator (HCO), was obtained for each intrinsic behavior of the neurons by coupling them with mutual symmetric synaptic inhibition. Most of these HCOs presented regular antiphasic bursting activity and the changes of the bursting frequencies was studied as a function of the inhibitory synaptic strength. Among all HCOs, those made of intrinsic irregular neurons presented a wider burst frequency range while keeping a reliable regular oscillatory (bursting) behavior. HCOs of periodic neurons tended to be either hard to change their behavior with synaptic strength variations (slow periodic burster neurons) or unable to perform a physiologically meaningful rhythm (fast tonic spiking neurons). Moreover, 3-neuron CPGs with connectivity and output similar to those of the pyloric CPG presented the same results.

  11. Detecting, measuring, and testing dyadic patterns in the actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kenny, David A; Ledermann, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Family researchers have used the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to study romantic couples, parent-child dyads, and siblings. We discuss a new method to detect, measure, and test different theoretically important patterns in the APIM: equal actor and partner effect (couple pattern); same size, but different signs of actor and partner effects (contrast pattern); and zero partner effects (actor-only pattern). To measure these different patterns, as well as others, we propose the estimation of the parameter k, which equals the partner effect divided by the actor effect. For both indistinguishable dyad members (e.g., twins) and distinguishable dyad members (e.g., heterosexual couples), we propose strategies for estimating and testing different models. We illustrate our new approach with four data sets.

  12. Central pattern generators for locomotion control in animals and robots: a review.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, Auke Jan

    2008-05-01

    The problem of controlling locomotion is an area in which neuroscience and robotics can fruitfully interact. In this article, I will review research carried out on locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e. neural circuits capable of producing coordinated patterns of high-dimensional rhythmic output signals while receiving only simple, low-dimensional, input signals. The review will first cover neurobiological observations concerning locomotor CPGs and their numerical modelling, with a special focus on vertebrates. It will then cover how CPG models implemented as neural networks or systems of coupled oscillators can be used in robotics for controlling the locomotion of articulated robots. The review also presents how robots can be used as scientific tools to obtain a better understanding of the functioning of biological CPGs. Finally, various methods for designing CPGs to control specific modes of locomotion will be briefly reviewed. In this process, I will discuss different types of CPG models, the pros and cons of using CPGs with robots, and the pros and cons of using robots as scientific tools. Open research topics both in biology and in robotics will also be discussed.

  13. Neuromodulator-evoked synaptic metaplasticity within a central pattern generator network.

    PubMed

    Kvarta, Mark D; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Johnson, Bruce R

    2012-11-01

    Synapses show short-term activity-dependent dynamics that alter the strength of neuronal interactions. This synaptic plasticity can be tuned by neuromodulation as a form of metaplasticity. We examined neuromodulator-induced metaplasticity at a graded chemical synapse in a model central pattern generator (CPG), the pyloric network of the spiny lobster stomatogastric ganglion. Dopamine, serotonin, and octopamine each produce a unique motor pattern from the pyloric network, partially through their modulation of synaptic strength in the network. We characterized synaptic depression and its amine modulation at the graded synapse from the pyloric dilator neuron to the lateral pyloric neuron (PD→LP synapse), driving the PD neuron with both long square pulses and trains of realistic waveforms over a range of presynaptic voltages. We found that the three amines can differentially affect the amplitude of graded synaptic transmission independently of the synaptic dynamics. Low concentrations of dopamine had weak and variable effects on the strength of the graded inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (gIPSPs) but reliably accelerated the onset of synaptic depression and recovery from depression independently of gIPSP amplitude. Octopamine enhanced gIPSP amplitude but decreased the amount of synaptic depression; it slowed the onset of depression and accelerated its recovery during square pulse stimulation. Serotonin reduced gIPSP amplitude but increased the amount of synaptic depression and accelerated the onset of depression. These results suggest that amine-induced metaplasticity at graded chemical synapses can alter the parameters of synaptic dynamics in multiple and independent ways.

  14. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S.

    2016-01-01

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  15. Drosophila poised enhancers are generated during tissue patterning with the help of repression

    PubMed Central

    Koenecke, Nina; Johnston, Jeff; He, Qiye; Meier, Samuel; Zeitlinger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Histone modifications are frequently used as markers for enhancer states, but how to interpret enhancer states in the context of embryonic development is not clear. The poised enhancer signature, involving H3K4me1 and low levels of H3K27ac, has been reported to mark inactive enhancers that are poised for future activation. However, future activation is not always observed, and alternative reasons for the widespread occurrence of this enhancer signature have not been investigated. By analyzing enhancers during dorsal-ventral (DV) axis formation in the Drosophila embryo, we find that the poised enhancer signature is specifically generated during patterning in the tissue where the enhancers are not induced, including at enhancers that are known to be repressed by a transcriptional repressor. These results suggest that, rather than serving exclusively as an intermediate step before future activation, the poised enhancer state may be a mark for spatial regulation during tissue patterning. We discuss the possibility that the poised enhancer state is more generally the result of repression by transcriptional repressors. PMID:27979994

  16. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  17. Correlation of hierarchal Upper Silurian stacking patterns generated by Milankovitch orbital forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, D.J.; Ketterer, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation in Pennsylvania and Maryland is entirely divisible into meter-scale allocycles. Stacking patterns of these allocycles reveal a hierarchy consistent with predictions based on the Milankovitch model of orbital forcing. Asymmetrical Sixth-Order cycles (PACs), bounded by surfaces produced by precessional sea-level rises, are divisible into a lower highstand portion and an upper lowstand portion separated by a sharp sea-level fall surface produced by a rapid sea-level drop within the precessional cycle. Sixth-Order cycles may be genetically grouped into Fifth-Order (100 ky.) and subsequently, Fourth-Order (400 ky.) cycles, each of which exhibits a distinct internal symmetry. Fifth-Order cycles, on average three to four meters in thickness, are composed of a basal transgressive portion consisting of two PACs followed by two or three successively regressive PACs. Four Fifth-Order cycles constitute a complete Fourth-Order cycle, in which the second Fifth-Order cycle contains facies representing the deepest or least restricted paleoenvironments. In each case, the fundamental Sixth-Order cycles were generated by the precessional signal modulated by orbital eccentricity variations. Over distances in excess of 100 km, Wills Creek facies change laterally from nearshore marine to fluvial coastal plain. Stacking patterns in these distinct facies are identical, and thus correlative, indicating the basin-wide extent of the stratigraphic events which produced these patterns. These correlations demonstrate that Milankovitch-driven eustatic sea-level fluctuations were occurring during the Late Silurian.

  18. Dopamine modulation of transient potassium current evokes phase shifts in a central pattern generator network.

    PubMed

    Harris-Warrick, R M; Coniglio, L M; Barazangi, N; Guckenheimer, J; Gueron, S

    1995-01-01

    Bath application of dopamine modifies the rhythmic motor pattern generated by the 14 neuron pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus. Among other effects, dopamine excites many of the pyloric constrictor (PY) neurons to fire at high frequency and phase-advances the timing of their activity in the motor pattern. These responses arise in part from direct actions of dopamine to modulate the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of the PY cells, and can be studied in synaptically isolated neurons. The rate of rebound following a hyperpolarizing prestep and the spike frequency during a subsequent depolarization are both accelerated by dopamine. Based on theoretical simulations, Hartline (1979) suggested that the rate of postinhibitory rebound in stomatogastric neurons could vary with the amount of voltage-sensitive transient potassium current (IA). Consistent with this prediction, we found that dopamine evokes a net conductance decrease in synaptically isolated PY neurons. In voltage clamp, dopamine reduces IA, specifically by reducing the amplitude of the slowly inactivating component of the current and shifting its voltage activation curve in the depolarized direction. 4-Aminopyridine, a selective blocker of IA in stomatogastric neurons, mimics and occludes the effects of dopamine on isolated PY neurons. A conductance-based mathematical model of the PY neuron shows appropriate changes in activity upon quantitative modification of the IA parameters affected by dopamine. These results demonstrate that dopamine excites and phase-advances the PY neurons in the rhythmic pyloric motor pattern at least in part by reducing the transient K+ current, IA.

  19. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-03-31

    The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

  20. BEAT: A Web-Based Boolean Expression Fault-Based Test Case Generation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, T. Y.; Grant, D. D.; Lau, M. F.; Ng, S. P.; Vasa, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    BEAT is a Web-based system that generates fault-based test cases from Boolean expressions. It is based on the integration of our several fault-based test case selection strategies. The generated test cases are considered to be fault-based, because they are aiming at the detection of particular faults. For example, when the Boolean expression is in…

  1. R. F. testing of the third generation defense communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, J.; Massaro, M.

    1980-01-01

    The approach taken to test a completed DSCS communications satellite on a system level is described. Areas to be described are measuring RF isolation of separate communications subsystems and a test method which insures that one RF subsystem does not interfere with another. In addition, the method of complying with MIL-STD-1541 in the area of demonstrating safety of electroexplosive devices in an RF field is discussed.

  2. Biomarkers in neonatology: the next generation of tests.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pak C; Lam, Hugh S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, neonatal clinicians have commonly used host response biomarkers to diagnose and assess the severity of systemic infection. Most of these biomarkers, such as acute-phase proteins or cytokines, are non-specific immunomodulating mediators of the inflammatory cascade. With advances in biochemical/genetic research, it is anticipated that future biomarkers will be 'organ and/or disease specific'. There is also the quest for discovery of 'novel' biomarkers to assist diagnosis and prognosis of neonatal diseases using powerful mass-screening techniques, e.g. the next-generation sequencing, proteomics and arrays. This article aims to introduce the concept of the next generation of biomarkers to practising neonatal clinicians, and, hopefully, to integrate basic science research into day-to-day clinical practice in the future.

  3. NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery (NIHTB-CB): the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test.

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Tulsky, David S; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Weintraub, Sandra; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    The NIH Toolbox (NIHTB) Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed within the NIHTB for the Assessment of Neurological Behavior and Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). This study highlights validation data collected in adults ages 18-85 on this measure and reports descriptive data, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and preliminary work creating a composite index of processing speed. Results indicated good test-retest reliability. There was also evidence for both convergent and discriminant validity; the Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test demonstrated moderate significant correlations with other processing speed tests (i.e., WAIS-IV Coding, Symbol Search and Processing Speed Index), small significant correlations with measures of working memory (i.e., WAIS-IV Letter-Number Sequencing and PASAT), and non-significant correlations with a test of vocabulary comprehension (i.e., PPVT-IV). Finally, analyses comparing and combining scores on the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test with other measures of simple reaction time from the NIHTB-CB indicated that a Processing Speed Composite score performed better than any test examined in isolation. The NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test exhibits several strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages, 3-85 years), it is short and easy to administer, and it has high construct validity.

  4. 270 Volt Direct Current Generating System Design, Development and Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Figure 3-1 Rotor Lamination 9 Table 3-1 Electrical Performance Characteristics 10 Table 3-2 Bore Stresses - PSi 17 I Table 3-3 Materials and...bridge, interphase transformer and filter capacitors. The main generator stator and rotor consist of laminated structures assembled from cobalt-iron alloy...instant the voltage difference between the two bridges and thereby ensures 120 degree conduction and balanced load sharing by each of the 12 output

  5. Testing, Selection, and Implementation of Random Number Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    U.S. Army Research Laboratory ATTN: AMSRD-ARL-SL-BD Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5068 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL...NUMBER (Include area code) 410-278-6832 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 /98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 ii Contents 1. Random Number Generators 1...Linear RNGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.4.2 The Characteristic Polynomial

  6. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Samson, Edward; Mar Blanca, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89 96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy.

  7. Motor Neurons Tune Premotor Activity in a Vertebrate Central Pattern Generator.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Kristy J; Perry, Wick M; Yamaguchi, Ayako; Zornik, Erik

    2017-03-22

    Central patterns generators (CPGs) are neural circuits that drive rhythmic motor output without sensory feedback. Vertebrate CPGs are generally believed to operate in a top-down manner in which premotor interneurons activate motor neurons that in turn drive muscles. In contrast, the frog (Xenopus laevis) vocal CPG contains a functionally unexplored neuronal projection from the motor nucleus to the premotor nucleus, indicating a recurrent pathway that may contribute to rhythm generation. In this study, we characterized the function of this bottom-up connection. The X. laevis vocal CPG produces a 50-60 Hz "fast trill" song used by males during courtship. We recorded "fictive vocalizations" in the in vitro CPG from the laryngeal nerve while simultaneously recording premotor activity at the population and single-cell level. We show that transecting the motor-to-premotor projection eliminated the characteristic firing rate of premotor neurons. Silencing motor neurons with the intracellular sodium channel blocker QX-314 also disrupted premotor rhythms, as did blockade of nicotinic synapses in the motor nucleus (the putative location of motor neuron-to-interneuron connections). Electrically stimulating the laryngeal nerve elicited primarily IPSPs in premotor neurons that could be blocked by a nicotinic receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that an inhibitory signal, activated by motor neurons, is required for proper CPG function. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first example of a CPG in which precise premotor rhythms are tuned by motor neuron activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neural circuits that produce rhythmic behaviors. In vertebrates, motor neurons are not commonly known to contribute to CPG function, with the exception of a few spinal circuits where the functional significance of motor neuron feedback is still poorly understood. The frog hindbrain vocal circuit contains a previously unexplored connection from

  8. GMOtrack: generator of cost-effective GMO testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Petra Krau; Gruden, Kristina; Morisset, Dany; Lavrac, Nada; Stebih, Dejan; Rotter, Ana; Zel, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Commercialization of numerous genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has already been approved worldwide, and several additional GMOs are in the approval process. Many countries have adopted legislation to deal with GMO-related issues such as food safety, environmental concerns, and consumers' right of choice, making GMO traceability a necessity. The growing extent of GMO testing makes it important to study optimal GMO detection and identification strategies. This paper formally defines the problem of routine laboratory-level GMO tracking as a cost optimization problem, thus proposing a shift from "the same strategy for all samples" to "sample-centered GMO testing strategies." An algorithm (GMOtrack) for finding optimal two-phase (screening-identification) testing strategies is proposed. The advantages of cost optimization with increasing GMO presence on the market are demonstrated, showing that optimization approaches to analytic GMO traceability can result in major cost reductions. The optimal testing strategies are laboratory-dependent, as the costs depend on prior probabilities of local GMO presence, which are exemplified on food and feed samples. The proposed GMOtrack approach, publicly available under the terms of the General Public License, can be extended to other domains where complex testing is involved, such as safety and quality assurance in the food supply chain.

  9. Feedback control of variability in the cycle period of a central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Ryan M; Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A; Canavier, Carmen C; Prinz, Astrid A

    2015-11-01

    We address how feedback to a bursting biological pacemaker with intrinsic variability in cycle length can affect that variability. Specifically, we examine a hybrid circuit constructed of an isolated crab anterior burster (AB)/pyloric dilator (PD) pyloric pacemaker receiving virtual feedback via dynamic clamp. This virtual feedback generates artificial synaptic input to PD with timing determined by adjustable phase response dynamics that mimic average burst intervals generated by the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) in the intact pyloric network. Using this system, we measure network period variability dependence on the feedback element's phase response dynamics and find that a constant response interval confers minimum variability. We further find that these optimal dynamics are characteristic of the biological pyloric network. Building upon our previous theoretical work mapping the firing intervals in one cycle onto the firing intervals in the next cycle, we create a theoretical map of the distribution of all firing intervals in one cycle to the distribution of firing intervals in the next cycle. We then obtain an integral equation for a stationary self-consistent distribution of the network periods of the hybrid circuit, which can be solved numerically given the uncoupled pacemaker's distribution of intrinsic periods, the nature of the network's feedback, and the phase resetting characteristics of the pacemaker. The stationary distributions obtained in this manner are strongly predictive of the experimentally observed distributions of hybrid network period. This theoretical framework can provide insight into optimal feedback schemes for minimizing variability to increase reliability or maximizing variability to increase flexibility in central pattern generators driven by pacemakers with feedback.

  10. Feedback control of variability in the cycle period of a central pattern generator

    PubMed Central

    Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.; Canavier, Carmen C.; Prinz, Astrid A.

    2015-01-01

    We address how feedback to a bursting biological pacemaker with intrinsic variability in cycle length can affect that variability. Specifically, we examine a hybrid circuit constructed of an isolated crab anterior burster (AB)/pyloric dilator (PD) pyloric pacemaker receiving virtual feedback via dynamic clamp. This virtual feedback generates artificial synaptic input to PD with timing determined by adjustable phase response dynamics that mimic average burst intervals generated by the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) in the intact pyloric network. Using this system, we measure network period variability dependence on the feedback element's phase response dynamics and find that a constant response interval confers minimum variability. We further find that these optimal dynamics are characteristic of the biological pyloric network. Building upon our previous theoretical work mapping the firing intervals in one cycle onto the firing intervals in the next cycle, we create a theoretical map of the distribution of all firing intervals in one cycle to the distribution of firing intervals in the next cycle. We then obtain an integral equation for a stationary self-consistent distribution of the network periods of the hybrid circuit, which can be solved numerically given the uncoupled pacemaker's distribution of intrinsic periods, the nature of the network's feedback, and the phase resetting characteristics of the pacemaker. The stationary distributions obtained in this manner are strongly predictive of the experimentally observed distributions of hybrid network period. This theoretical framework can provide insight into optimal feedback schemes for minimizing variability to increase reliability or maximizing variability to increase flexibility in central pattern generators driven by pacemakers with feedback. PMID:26334008

  11. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedure for detecting aberrant response times.…

  12. Patch-test reaction patterns in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Jochen; Schnuch, Axel; Uter, Wolfgang

    2003-10-01

    Patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis often need to be patch tested in order to detect possible contact sensitization. However, it is unknown whether immunologic or other peculiarities of atopic skin are related to altered patch-test reaction patterns. Our study was aimed at answering this question, because patch-test reaction patterns are of considerable practical importance in the reading and interpretation of patch tests. Therefore, we compared patterns of patch-test reactions in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis and in control patients matched for sex, age, reason for testing and test centre. Patch-test results from 9 centres (2322 patients with a disposition to atopic dermatitis and 2126 matched controls) were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were tested with nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, potassium dichromate, lanolin alcohol, formaldehyde and mercury ammonium chloride. Patch tests applied for 1 day with readings on days 1, 2 and 3 were evaluated in order to cover the early phase of the reactions. Not unexpectedly, we found that, compared to the matched controls, patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis tended to have more doubtful and irritant reactions on day 1. As a new observation, it turned out that they had less reactions of crescendo pattern and more strong reactions on day 3. All these differences were slight/insignificant. A higher skin irritability in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis is a likely explanation. In conclusion, standard methods for patch testing can be applied in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis, but minor differences in reaction patterns should be considered.

  13. Math Test Generator. Volume 1: Basic Skills. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Joel; Gintz, Chris

    This computer software program helps to make classroom worksheets, take home assignments, and school mathematics tests easy to design and manufacture. The accompanying printed teaching guide provides technical information for setting up and using the program, along with sample worksheets and instructions on how to create them using the software.…

  14. Math Test Generator. Volume 2: Special Skills [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Joel; Gintz, Chris

    This computer software program helps to make classroom worksheets, take home assignments, and school mathematics tests easy to design and manufacture. The accompanying printed teaching guide provides technical information for setting up and using the program, along with sample worksheets and instructions on how to create them using the software.…

  15. 40 CFR 86.1333 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heavy-duty transient engine cycles for Otto-cycle and diesel engines are listed in appendix I((f) (1...) in these listings. (1) To unnormalize rpm, use the following equations: (i) For diesel engines... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Exhaust Test Procedures...

  16. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... all flow measurements used to calculate test atmosphere concentrations shall be documented and... corrections shall be clearly shown. All flow measurements given in volume units shall be standardized to 25 °C... Section 53.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  17. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... all flow measurements used to calculate test atmosphere concentrations shall be documented and... corrections shall be clearly shown. All flow measurements given in volume units shall be standardized to 25 °C... Section 53.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test. The torque and rpm feedback signals may be filtered. (d) Idle Speed Enhancement Devices (e.g... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... longer, the average feedback torque must be within ±10 ft-lbs of zero. To allow for transition, up to...

  19. NEXT GENERATION LEACHING TESTS FOR EVALUATING LEACHING OF INORGANIC CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the U.S. as in other countries, there is increased interest in using industrial by-products as alternative or secondary materials, helping to conserve virgin or raw materials. The LEAF and associated test methods are being used to develop the source term for leaching or any i...

  20. Pattern-dependent Role of NMDA receptors in Action Potential Generation: Consequences on ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J. Paige

    2005-01-01

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERKs) with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs, and ERK activation, could be overcome with the addition of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to APV, in contrast to that induced with 5 Hz or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation. PMID:16049179

  1. Parametric Analysis of a Hover Test Vehicle using Advanced Test Generation and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Schumann, Johann; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Large complex aerospace systems are generally validated in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. This is due to the large parameter space, and complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different systems that contribute to the performance of the aerospace system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis by applying a combination of technologies to the area of flight envelop assessment. We utilize n-factor (2,3) combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. The data generated is automatically analyzed through a combination of unsupervised learning using a Bayesian multivariate clustering technique (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the machine-learning tool TAR3, a treatment learner. Covariance analysis with scatter plots and likelihood contours are used to visualize correlations between simulation parameters and simulation results, a task that requires tool support, especially for large and complex models. We present results of simulation experiments for a cold-gas-powered hover test vehicle.

  2. Idler-efficiency-enhanced long-wave infrared beam generation using aperiodic orientation-patterned GaAs gratings.

    PubMed

    Gürkan Figen, Ziya; Aytür, Orhan; Arıkan, Orhan

    2016-03-20

    In this paper, we design aperiodic gratings based on orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) for converting 2.1 μm pump laser radiation into long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) in an idler-efficiency-enhanced scheme. These single OP-GaAs gratings placed in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) or an optical parametric generator (OPG) can simultaneously phase match two optical parametric amplification (OPA) processes, OPA 1 and OPA 2. We use two design methods that allow simultaneous phase matching of two arbitrary χ(2) processes and also free adjustment of their relative strength. The first aperiodic grating design method (Method 1) relies on generating a grating structure that has domain walls located at the zeros of the summation of two cosine functions, each of which has a spatial frequency that equals one of the phase-mismatch terms of the two processes. Some of the domain walls are discarded considering the minimum domain length that is achievable in the production process. In this paper, we propose a second design method (Method 2) that relies on discretizing the crystal length with sample lengths that are much smaller than the minimum domain length and testing each sample's contribution in such a way that the sign of the nonlinearity maximizes the magnitude sum of the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform of the grating function at the relevant phase mismatches. Method 2 produces a similar performance as Method 1 in terms of the maximization of the height of either Fourier peak located at the relevant phase mismatch while allowing an adjustable relative height for the two peaks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that aperiodic OP-GaAs gratings have been proposed for efficient long-wave infrared beam generation based on simultaneous phase matching.

  3. Concept and analytical basis for revistas - A fast, flexible computer/graphic system for generating periodic satellite coverage patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of satellite coverage patterns is facilitated by three basic strategies: use of a simplified physical model, permitting rapid closed-form calculation; separation of earth rotation and nodal precession from initial geometric analyses; and use of symmetries to construct traces of indefinite length by repetitive transposition of basic one-quadrant elements. The complete coverage patterns generated consist of a basic nadir trace plus a number of associated off-nadir traces, one for each sensor swath edge to be delineated. Each trace is generated by transposing one or two of the basic quadrant elements into a circle on a nonrotating earth model sphere, after which the circle is expanded into the actual 'helical' pattern by adding rotational displacements to the longitude coordinates. The procedure adapts to the important periodic coverage cases by direct insertion of the characteristic integers N and R (days and orbital revolutions, respectively, per coverage period).

  4. Cognitive Operations in the Generation Effect on a Recall Test: Role of Aging and Divided Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taconnat, Laurence; Isingrini, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Generation effect (generated words are better memorized than read words) of anagrams, rhymes, and associates of target words was examined in young, elderly, and very old subjects. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that only young subjects benefit from the generation effect in a free-recall test when the rule is of a phonological nature. Experiments 3, 4,…

  5. The Hyper-X Antenna Radiation Pattern Tests and Radio Frequency System Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Mark W.; Kelley, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the antenna radiation pattern measurements of the Hyper-X, X-43 ship 2 aircraft. One test was conducted at the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) Benefield Anechoic Facility (BAF) on January 24-January 27, 2000. A second test was done at MicroCraft in Tullahoma Tennessee by the Naval Air Weapons Center (NAWC) China Lake, California on September 8, 2001. The overall test objective was to gather qualitative antenna radiation pattern data from installed antennas on the HXRV. This objective was accomplished by collecting antenna radiation patterns at selected elevations of the HXRV. The test data was used to identify areas of RF coverage and assist in positioning the P-3 aircraft for best RF reception. The antenna pattern data presented nulls and possible low RF reception areas around the aircraft. This led to a redesign of the RF system. The redesigned system provided redundancy in case a telemetry transmitter should fail. The redesign provided more complete RF coverage within the antenna's capabilities. A second look at the flight path and necessary data collection led to a change in the beacon transponder system.

  6. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    E.W. Baxter

    2002-06-30

    The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, completion of the hardware and ancillary hardware fabrication and commence the Test Preparations for the testing of the non-polluting unique power turbine driven Gas Generator. Focus during this report period has been on completing the Gas Generator fabrication of hardware and ancillary hardware, and completion of unit closeout brazing and bonding. Because of unacceptable delays encountered in a previously competitively selected test site, CES initiated a re-competition of our testing program and selected an alternate test site. Following that selection, CES used all available resources to make preparations for testing the 10 Mw Gas Generator at the new testing site facilities of NTS at Saugus, CA.

  7. Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement (ITEMS) Module: Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the design and development of our educational assessments are resulting in the unprecedented demand for a large and continuous supply of content-specific test items. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation (AIG). AIG is the process of using item models to generate test items with the aid of computer…

  8. Next-generation PIR security sensors: concept testing and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.

    2009-05-01

    In previous presentations to this SPIE forum a new technology was outlined aimed at replacing pyroelectric sensors with resistance microbolometer MOEMS-based sensors capable of vastly superior performance. The technology can be implemented as either a PCB replacement to current sensors, giving extended detection range and ability to sense slow temperature change, or a 'smart' sensor with further performance enhancements and imaging capability. This paper reports the results of new laboratory and field tests of a laboratory prototype sensor and extrapolates these results to performance of production sensors. In particular, results are presented for NETD, detection range for human targets and detection of simulated electrical faults and developing fires. Previous results were reported for FPA operated without evacuation and using a low cost plastic Fresnel lens. However with wafer level packaging now becoming widely available in MEMS and CMOS foundries, much high performance can be achieved, opening up many additional applications. Performance of new FPAs designed for vacuum packaging is highlighted.

  9. Development and Demonstration of an Ada Test Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this project we have built a prototype system that performs Feasible Path Analysis on Ada programs: given a description of a set of control flow paths through a procedure, and a predicate at a program point feasible path analysis determines if there is input data which causes execution to flow down some path in the collection reaching the point so that tile predicate is true. Feasible path analysis can be applied to program testing, program slicing, array bounds checking, and other forms of anomaly checking. FPA is central to most applications of program analysis. But, because this problem is formally unsolvable, syntactic-based approximations are used in its place. For example, in dead-code analysis the problem is to determine if there are any input values which cause execution to reach a specified program point. Instead an approximation to this problem is computed: determine whether there is a control flow path from the start of the program to the point. This syntactic approximation is efficiently computable and conservative: if there is no such path the program point is clearly unreachable, but if there is such a path, the analysis is inconclusive, and the code is assumed to be live. Such conservative analysis too often yields unsatisfactory results because the approximation is too weak. As another example, consider data flow analysis. A du-pair is a pair of program points such that the first point is a definition of a variable and the second point a use and for which there exists a definition-free path from the definition to the use. The sharper, semantic definition of a du-pair requires that there be a feasible definition-free path from the definition to the use. A compiler using du-pairs for detecting dead variables may miss optimizations by not considering feasibility. Similarly, a program analyzer computing program slices to merge parallel versions may report conflicts where none exist. In the context of software testing, feasibility analysis plays an

  10. Energy efficient walking with central pattern generators: from passive dynamic walking to biologically inspired control.

    PubMed

    Verdaasdonk, B W; Koopman, H F J M; van der Helm, F C T

    2009-07-01

    Like human walking, passive dynamic walking-i.e. walking down a slope with no actuation except gravity-is energy efficient by exploiting the natural dynamics. In the animal world, neural oscillators termed central pattern generators (CPGs) provide the basic rhythm for muscular activity in locomotion. We present a CPG model, which automatically tunes into the resonance frequency of the passive dynamics of a bipedal walker, i.e. the CPG model exhibits resonance tuning behavior. Each leg is coupled to its own CPG, controlling the hip moment of force. Resonance tuning above the endogenous frequency of the CPG-i.e. the CPG's eigenfrequency-is achieved by feedback of both limb angles to their corresponding CPG, while integration of the limb angles provides resonance tuning at and below the endogenous frequency of the CPG. Feedback of the angular velocity of both limbs to their corresponding CPG compensates for the time delay in the loop coupling each limb to its CPG. The resonance tuning behavior of the CPG model allows the gait velocity to be controlled by a single parameter, while retaining the energy efficiency of passive dynamic walking.

  11. Energy efficient and robust rhythmic limb movement by central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Verdaasdonk, B W; Koopman, H F J M; Helm, F C T Van Der

    2006-05-01

    Humans show great energy efficiency and robustness in rhythmic tasks, such as walking and arm swinging. In this study a mathematical model of rhythmic limb movement is presented, which shows that tight local coupling of Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) to limbs could explain part of this behavior. Afferent feedback to flexor and extensor centers of the CPG is crucial in providing energy efficiency by means of resonance tuning. Feedback of positional information provides resonance tuning above the endogenous frequency of the CPG. Integral feedback provides resonance tuning at and below the endogenous frequency. Feedback of velocity information is necessary to compensate for the time delay in the loop, coupling limb to CPG; without velocity feedback bi-stability occurs and resonance tuning is not possible at high movement frequencies. The concepts of energy efficient and robust control of rhythmic limb movements are also applicable to robotics. It is the first CPG model, which provides resonance tuning at natural limb frequencies above and below its endogenous frequency.

  12. Modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in rats with central pattern generator hardware.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; Zhao, Le; Moraes, Davi J A; Paton, Julian F R

    2013-01-15

    We report on the modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in rats with central pattern generator (CPG) hardware made of silicon neurons. The neurons are made to compete through mutually inhibitory synapses to provide timed electrical oscillations that stimulate the peripheral end of vagus nerve at specific points of the respiratory cycle: the inspiratory phase (φ(1)), the early expiratory phase (φ(2)) and the late expiratory phase (φ(3)). In this way the CPG hardware mimics the neuron populations in the brainstem which through connections with cardiac vagal motoneurones control respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Here, we time the output of the CPG hardware from the phrenic nerve activity recorded from rats while monitoring heart rate changes evoked by vagal nerve stimulation (derived from ECG) controlled by the CPG. This neuroelectric stimulation has the effect of reducing the heart rate and increasing the arterial pressure. The artificially induced RSA strongly depends on the timing of pulses within the breathing cycle. It is strongest when the vagus nerve is stimulated during the inspiratory phase (φ(1)) or the early expiratory phase (φ(2)) in which case the heart rate slows by 50% of the normal rate. Heart rate modulation is less when the same exact stimulus is applied during the late expiratory phase (φ(3)). These trials show that neurostimulation by CPG hardware can augment respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The CPG hardware technology opens a new line of therapeutic possibilities for prosthetic devices that restore RSA in patients where respiratory-cardiac coupling has been lost.

  13. The contribution of a central pattern generator in a reflex-based neuromuscular model.

    PubMed

    Dzeladini, Florin; van den Kieboom, Jesse; Ijspeert, Auke

    2014-01-01

    Although the concept of central pattern generators (CPGs) controlling locomotion in vertebrates is widely accepted, the presence of specialized CPGs in human locomotion is still a matter of debate. An interesting numerical model developed in the 90s' demonstrated the important role CPGs could play in human locomotion, both in terms of stability against perturbations, and in terms of speed control. Recently, a reflex-based neuro-musculo-skeletal model has been proposed, showing a level of stability to perturbations similar to the previous model, without any CPG components. Although exhibiting striking similarities with human gaits, the lack of CPG makes the control of speed/step length in the model difficult. In this paper, we hypothesize that a CPG component will offer a meaningful way of controlling the locomotion speed. After introducing the CPG component in the reflex model, and taking advantage of the resulting properties, a simple model for gait modulation is presented. The results highlight the advantages of a CPG as feedforward component in terms of gait modulation.

  14. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  15. Evolution of Courtship Songs in Xenopus : Vocal Pattern Generation and Sound Production.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Elizabeth C; Kelley, Darcy B

    2015-01-01

    The extant species of African clawed frogs (Xenopus and Silurana) provide an opportunity to link the evolution of vocal characters to changes in the responsible cellular and molecular mechanisms. In this review, we integrate several robust lines of research: evolutionary trajectories of Xenopus vocalizations, cellular and circuit-level mechanisms of vocalization in selected Xenopus model species, and Xenopus evolutionary history and speciation mechanisms. Integrating recent findings allows us to generate and test specific hypotheses about the evolution of Xenopus vocal circuits. We propose that reduced vocal sex differences in some Xenopus species result from species-specific losses of sexually differentiated neural and neuromuscular features. Modification of sex-hormone-regulated developmental mechanisms is a strong candidate mechanism for reduced vocal sex differences.

  16. Sub-wavelength pattern generation by laser direct writing via repeated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Klein-Wiele, Jan-Hendrik; Simon, Peter

    2013-01-14

    A simple technique is presented allowing the fabrication of high density periodic patterns via direct laser ablation. Applying fluence control for reducing the ablated feature sizes combined with lateral translation of an interference pattern between two (or more) irradiation cycles, sub-wavelength period patterns (< 200 nm) are created. Variation of the amount and direction of translation and the applied intensities during subsequent irradiation steps leads to variable pattern design as demonstrated for polymeric and silicon samples.

  17. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production. PMID:24289275

  18. Classifying performance impairment in response to sleep loss using pattern recognition algorithms on single session testing

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Sullivan, Jason P.; Anderson, Clare; Cohen, Daniel A.; Barger, Laura K.; Lockley, Steven W.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently no “gold standard” marker of cognitive performance impairment resulting from sleep loss. We utilized pattern recognition algorithms to determine which features of data collected under controlled laboratory conditions could most reliably identify cognitive performance impairment in response to sleep loss using data from only one testing session, such as would occur in the “real world” or field conditions. A training set for testing the pattern recognition algorithms was developed using objective Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) data collected from laboratory studies during which subjects were sleep deprived for 26 – 52 hours. The algorithm was then tested in data from both laboratory and field experiments. The pattern recognition algorithm was able to identify performance impairment with a single testing session in individuals studied under laboratory conditions using PVT, KSS, length of time awake and time of day information with sensitivity and specificity as high as 82%. When this algorithm was tested on data collected under real-world conditions from individuals whose data were not in the training set, accuracy of predictions for individuals categorized with low performance impairment were as high as 98%. Predictions for medium and severe performance impairment were less accurate. We conclude that pattern recognition algorithms may be a promising method for identifying performance impairment in individuals using only current information about the individual’s behavior. Single testing features (e.g., number of PVT lapses) with high correlation with performance impairment in the laboratory setting may not be the best indicators of performance impairment under real-world conditions. Pattern recognition algorithms should be further tested for their ability to be used in conjunction with other assessments of sleepiness in real-world conditions to quantify performance impairment in

  19. Decomposing risk: landscape structure and wolf behavior generate different predation patterns in two sympatric ungulates.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Vincenzo; Sand, Hakan; Zimmermann, Barbara; Mattisson, Jenny; Wabakken, Petter; Linnell, John D C

    2013-10-01

    Recolonizing carnivores can have a large impact on the status of wild ungulates, which have often modified their behavior in the absence of predation. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of reestablished predator-prey systems is crucial to predict their potential ecosystem effects. We decomposed the spatial structure of predation by recolonizing wolves (Canis lupus) on two sympatric ungulates, moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), in Scandinavia during a 10-year study. We monitored 18 wolves with GPS collars, distributed over 12 territories, and collected records from predation events. By using conditional logistic regression, we assessed the contributions of three main factors, the utilization patterns of each wolf territory, the spatial distribution of both prey species, and fine-scale landscape structure, in determining the spatial structure of moose and roe deer predation risk. The reestablished predator-prey system showed a remarkable spatial variation in kill occurrence at the intra-territorial level, with kill probabilities varying by several orders of magnitude inside the same territory. Variation in predation risk was evident also when a spatially homogeneous probability for a wolf to encounter a prey was simulated. Even inside the same territory, with the same landscape structure, and when exposed to predation by the same wolves, the two prey species experienced an opposite spatial distribution of predation risk. In particular, increased predation risk for moose was associated with open areas, especially clearcuts and young forest stands, whereas risk was lowered for roe deer in the same habitat types. Thus, fine-scale landscape structure can generate contrasting predation risk patterns in sympatric ungulates, so that they can experience large differences in the spatial distribution of risk and refuge areas when exposed to predation by a recolonizing predator. Territories with an earlier recolonization were not associated with a lower

  20. Clinical patterns and results of radioallergosorbent test (RAST) and skin tests in penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Kraft, D; Wide, L

    1976-06-01

    Seventy-nine patients with acute or former reactions to penicillin were investigated by a benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific RAST and/or by skin tests with penicilloyl-polylysine (PPL), benzylpenicillin and penicilloic acid and the results were correlated with the different clinical pictures. Positive RAST and skin test results could be found in patients with anaphylactic shock, urticaria and serum sickness-like reaction and sometimes in a special group of exanthems, which are characterized by the existence of many different lesions at the same time, therefore called 'polymorphic exanthems', and often observed after high-dosage penicillin therapy. In cases of scarlatiniform or morbilliform exanthems no positive results were found. The BPO-specific RAST showed an overall correlation of 95-I% with skin tests using PPL. However, some patients with positive skin tests to benzylpenicillin and penicilloic acid did no have detectable circulating IgE antibodies to BPO. This emphasizes the need for including these antigens in in vitro methods. The RAST was informative even at the allergic reaction or in the first 15 days afterwards and seems to be very valuable for early diagnosis of penicillin allergy especially in cases when many drugs have been given.

  1. Real-time biomimetic Central Pattern Generators in an FPGA for hybrid experiments

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This investigation of the leech heartbeat neural network system led to the development of a low resources, real-time, biomimetic digital hardware for use in hybrid experiments. The leech heartbeat neural network is one of the simplest central pattern generators (CPG). In biology, CPG provide the rhythmic bursts of spikes that form the basis for all muscle contraction orders (heartbeat) and locomotion (walking, running, etc.). The leech neural network system was previously investigated and this CPG formalized in the Hodgkin–Huxley neural model (HH), the most complex devised to date. However, the resources required for a neural model are proportional to its complexity. In response to this issue, this article describes a biomimetic implementation of a network of 240 CPGs in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), using a simple model (Izhikevich) and proposes a new synapse model: activity-dependent depression synapse. The network implementation architecture operates on a single computation core. This digital system works in real-time, requires few resources, and has the same bursting activity behavior as the complex model. The implementation of this CPG was initially validated by comparing it with a simulation of the complex model. Its activity was then matched with pharmacological data from the rat spinal cord activity. This digital system opens the way for future hybrid experiments and represents an important step toward hybridization of biological tissue and artificial neural networks. This CPG network is also likely to be useful for mimicking the locomotion activity of various animals and developing hybrid experiments for neuroprosthesis development. PMID:24319408

  2. Setting the Pace: New Insights into Central Pattern Generator Interactions in Box Jellyfish Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Stöckl, Anna Lisa; Petie, Ronald; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) produce rhythmic behaviour across all animal phyla. Cnidarians, which have a radially symmetric nervous system and pacemaker centres in multiples of four, provide an interesting comparison to bilaterian animals for studying the coordination between CPGs. The box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora is remarkable among cnidarians due to its most elaborate visual system. Together with their ability to actively swim and steer, they use their visual system for multiple types of behaviour. The four swim CPGs are directly regulated by visual input. In this study, we addressed the question of how the four pacemaker centres of this radial symmetric cnidarian interact. We based our investigation on high speed camera observations of the timing of swim pulses of tethered animals (Tripedalia cystophora) with one or four rhopalia, under different simple light regimes. Additionally, we developed a numerical model of pacemaker interactions based on the inter pulse interval distribution of animals with one rhopalium. We showed that the model with fully resetting coupling and hyperpolarization of the pacemaker potential below baseline fitted the experimental data best. Moreover, the model of four swim pacemakers alone underscored the proportion of long inter pulse intervals (IPIs) considerably. Both in terms of the long IPIs as well as the overall swim pulse distribution, the simulation of two CPGs provided a better fit than that of four. We therefore suggest additional sources of pacemaker control than just visual input. We provide guidelines for future research on the physiological linkage of the cubozoan CPGs and show the insight from bilaterian CPG research, which show that pacemakers have to be studied in their bodily and nervous environment to capture all their functional features, are also manifest in cnidarians. PMID:22073288

  3. Real-time biomimetic Central Pattern Generators in an FPGA for hybrid experiments.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This investigation of the leech heartbeat neural network system led to the development of a low resources, real-time, biomimetic digital hardware for use in hybrid experiments. The leech heartbeat neural network is one of the simplest central pattern generators (CPG). In biology, CPG provide the rhythmic bursts of spikes that form the basis for all muscle contraction orders (heartbeat) and locomotion (walking, running, etc.). The leech neural network system was previously investigated and this CPG formalized in the Hodgkin-Huxley neural model (HH), the most complex devised to date. However, the resources required for a neural model are proportional to its complexity. In response to this issue, this article describes a biomimetic implementation of a network of 240 CPGs in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), using a simple model (Izhikevich) and proposes a new synapse model: activity-dependent depression synapse. The network implementation architecture operates on a single computation core. This digital system works in real-time, requires few resources, and has the same bursting activity behavior as the complex model. The implementation of this CPG was initially validated by comparing it with a simulation of the complex model. Its activity was then matched with pharmacological data from the rat spinal cord activity. This digital system opens the way for future hybrid experiments and represents an important step toward hybridization of biological tissue and artificial neural networks. This CPG network is also likely to be useful for mimicking the locomotion activity of various animals and developing hybrid experiments for neuroprosthesis development.

  4. Characterization of sacral interneurons that mediate activation of locomotor pattern generators by sacrocaudal afferent input.

    PubMed

    Etlin, Alex; Finkel, Eran; Mor, Yoav; O'Donovan, Michael J; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2013-01-09

    Identification of the neural pathways involved in retraining the spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) by afferent input in the absence of descending supraspinal control is feasible in isolated rodent spinal cords where the locomotor CPGs are potently activated by sacrocaudal afferent (SCA) input. Here we study the involvement of sacral neurons projecting rostrally through the ventral funiculi (VF) in activation of the CPGs by sensory stimulation. Fluorescent labeling and immunostaining showed that VF neurons are innervated by primary afferents immunoreactive for vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 and by intraspinal neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that 55% of the VF neurons were activated by SCA stimulation. The activity of VF neurons and the sacral and lumbar CPGs was abolished when non-NMDA receptors in the sacral segments were blocked by the antagonist CNQX. When sacral NMDA receptors were blocked by APV, the sacral CPGs were suppressed, VF neurons with nonrhythmic activity were recruited and a moderate-drive locomotor rhythm developed during SCA stimulation. In contrast, when the sacral CPGs were activated by SCA stimulation, rhythmic and nonrhythmic VF neurons were recruited and the locomotor rhythm was most powerful. The activity of 73 and 27% of the rhythmic VF neurons was in-phase with the ipsilateral and contralateral motor output, respectively. Collectively, our studies indicate that sacral VF neurons serve as a major link between SCA and the hindlimb CPGs and that the ability of SCA to induce stepping can be enhanced by the sacral CPGs. The nature of the ascending drive to lumbar CPGs, the identity of subpopulations of VF neurons, and their potential role in activating the locomotor rhythm are discussed.

  5. The role of heterarchical control in the evolution of central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A H

    1992-01-01

    The acceptance of the concept of central pattern generators (CPGs) led to the perception that descending inputs initiate stereotyped movements, such as locomotion, but play relatively minor roles after the movement begins. Sensory input could entrain the CPG, and the CPG was responsive to the proper inputs for switching, etc. Evidence is here presented that the influences of both descending and sensory inputs are two-way. Descending inputs are shown to be involved in an ongoing manner during locomotion, as it has been found that CPGs are phasically driving the same descending systems that themselves activate the CPGs. Similarly, sensory inputs are being actively processed by the CPG and, here again, produce a two-way interaction between sensory input and CPGs. Finally, mechanical factors are shown to be major contributors to the form of the movement. Thus, overall the CPG can only be considered as one of several contributors to any movement; all concurrently process the flow of information. Control is viewed as distributed, that is, as heterarchical as opposed to hierarchical. Because of the complexity of interaction between the levels of the system, it is argued that any change in the body will propagate through the system and effect the final output regardless of where the change originates. Thus, ontogenetic and phylogenetic changes must have influences felt throughout the entire system. Examples are presented to demonstrate that this is, indeed, the case. The effect of these changes will primarily be manifest in the interface between the layers, that is, in the interface between the descending and sensory inputs and the CPG, so that the changes can be adaptively accommodated on a moment by moment basis when necessary.

  6. Designing responsive pattern generators: stable heteroclinic channel cycles for modeling and control.

    PubMed

    Horchler, Andrew D; Daltorio, Kathryn A; Chiel, Hillel J; Quinn, Roger D

    2015-02-25

    A striking feature of biological pattern generators is their ability to respond immediately to multisensory perturbations by modulating the dwell time at a particular phase of oscillation, which can vary force output, range of motion, or other characteristics of a physical system. Stable heteroclinic channels (SHCs) are a dynamical architecture that can provide such responsiveness to artificial devices such as robots. SHCs are composed of sequences of saddle equilibrium points, which yields exquisite sensitivity. The strength of the vector fields in the neighborhood of these equilibria determines the responsiveness to perturbations and how long trajectories dwell in the vicinity of a saddle. For SHC cycles, the addition of stochastic noise results in oscillation with a regular mean period. In this paper, we parameterize noise-driven Lotka-Volterra SHC cycles such that each saddle can be independently designed to have a desired mean sub-period. The first step in the design process is an analytic approximation, which results in mean sub-periods that are within 2% of the specified sub-period for a typical parameter set. Further, after measuring the resultant sub-periods over sufficient numbers of cycles, the magnitude of the noise can be adjusted to control the mean period with accuracy close to that of the integration step size. With these relationships, SHCs can be more easily employed in engineering and modeling applications. For applications that require smooth state transitions, this parameterization permits each state's distribution of periods to be independently specified. Moreover, for modeling context-dependent behaviors, continuously varying inputs in each state dimension can rapidly precipitate transitions to alter frequency and phase.

  7. Bidirectional plasticity of pontine pneumotaxic postinspiratory drive: implication for a pontomedullary respiratory central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Song, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The "pneumotaxic center" in the rostral dorsolateral pons as delineated by Lumsden nine decades ago is known to play an important role in promoting the inspiratory off-switch (IOS) for inspiratory-expiratory phase transition as a fail-safe mechanism for preventing apneusis in the absence of vagal input. Traditionally, the pontine pneumotaxic mechanism has been thought to contribute a tonic descending input that lowers the IOS threshold in medullary respiratory central pattern generator (rCPG) circuits, but otherwise does not constitute part of the rCPG. Recent evidence indicates that descending input from the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) within the pneumotaxic center is essential for gating the postinspiratory phase of the three-phase respiratory rhythm to control the IOS in vagotomized animals. A critical question arising is whether such a descending pneumotaxic input from KFN that drives postinspiratory activity is tonic (null hypothesis) or rhythmic with postinspiratory phase modulation (alternative hypothesis). Here, we show that multifarious evidence reported in the literature collectively indicates that the descending pneumotaxic input may exhibit NMDA receptor-dependent short-term plasticity in the form of a biphasic neural differentiator that bidirectionally and phase-selectively modulates postinspiratory phase duration in response to vagal and peripheral chemoreceptor inputs independent of the responses in inspiratory and late-expiratory activities. The phase-selectivity property of the descending pneumotaxic input implicates a population of pontine early-expiratory (postinspiratory/expiratory-decrementing) neurons as the most likely neural correlate of the pneumotaxic mechanism that drives post-I activity, suggesting that the pontine pneumotaxic mechanism may be an integral part of a pontomedullary rCPG that underlies the three-phase respiratory rhythm.

  8. Brief Report: Eye-Movement Patterns during an Embedded Figures Test in Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keehn, Brandon; Brenner, Laurie A.; Ramos, Aurora I.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Marshall, Sandra P.; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined fixation frequency and duration during an Embedded Figures Test (EFT) in an effort to better understand the attentional and perceptual processes by which individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve accelerated EFT performance. In particular, we aimed to elucidate differences in the patterns of eye-movement in…

  9. MULTICORR: A Computer Program for Fast, Accurate, Small-Sample Testing of Correlational Pattern Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiger, James H.

    1979-01-01

    The program presented computes a chi-square statistic for testing pattern hypotheses on correlation matrices. The statistic is based on a multivariate generalization of the Fisher r-to-z transformation. This statistic has small sample performance which is superior to an analogous likelihood ratio statistic obtained via the analysis of covariance…

  10. Massive alterations of the methylation patterns around DNA transposons in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid.

    PubMed

    Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and reproducible genomic changes can be induced during the early stages of the life of nascent allopolyploid species. In a previous study, it was shown that following allopolyploidization, cytosine methylation changes can affect up to 11% of the wheat genome. However, the methylation patterns around transposable elements (TEs) were never studied in detail. We used transposon methylation display (TMD) to assess the methylation patterns of CCGG sites flanking three TE families (Balduin, Apollo, and Thalos) in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid. In addition, transposon display (TD), using a methylation-insensitive restriction enzyme, was applied to search for genomic rearrangements at the TE insertion sites. We observed that up to 54% of CCGG sites flanking the three TE families showed changes in methylation patterns in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, where hypermethylation was predominant. Over 70% of the changes in TMD patterns occurred in the first two generations of the newly formed allohexaploid. Furthermore, analysis of 555 TE insertion sites by TD and 18 cases by site-specific PCR revealed a full additive pattern in the allohexaploid, an indication for lack of massive rearrangements. These data indicate that following allopolyplodization, DNA-TE insertion sites can undergo a significantly high level of methylation changes compared with methylation changes of other genomic sequences.

  11. Influence of bromine substitution pattern on the singlet oxygen generation efficiency of two-photon absorbing chromophores.

    PubMed

    Lanoë, Pierre-Henri; Gallavardin, Thibault; Dupin, Aurore; Maury, Olivier; Baldeck, Patrice L; Lindgren, Mikael; Monnereau, Cyrille; Andraud, Chantal

    2012-08-21

    A molecular engineering strategy based on rational variations of the bromine substitution pattern in two-photon absorbing singlet oxygen sensitizers allows studying the relations that exist between the positioning of an inter-system crossing promoter on the charge-transfer chromophore and its ability to generate singlet oxygen.

  12. Design of a Facility to Test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Meer, David W.; Brace, Michael H.; Dugala, Gina

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a high efficiency generator, is being considered for space missions. An engineering unit, the ASRG engineering unit (EU), was designed and fabricated by Lockheed Martin under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently under extended operation test at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to generate performance data and validate the life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. A special test facility was designed and built for the ASRG EU. This paper summarizes details of the test facility design, including the mechanical mounting, heat-rejection system, argon system, control systems, and maintenance. The effort proceeded from requirements definition through design, analysis, build, and test. Initial testing and facility performance results are discussed.

  13. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a "reshaping" function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal "reshaping" functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good "reshaping" function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion.

  14. A 3D Optical Surface Profilometer Using a Dual-Frequency Liquid Crystal-Based Dynamic Fringe Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kyung-Il; Kim, Mugeon; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Heewon; Kim, Byeonggon; Hahn, JoonKu; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a liquid crystal (LC)-based 3D optical surface profilometer that can utilize multiple fringe patterns to extract an enhanced 3D surface depth profile. To avoid the optical phase ambiguity and enhance the 3D depth extraction, 16 interference patterns were generated by the LC-based dynamic fringe pattern generator (DFPG) using four-step phase shifting and four-step spatial frequency varying schemes. The DFPG had one common slit with an electrically controllable birefringence (ECB) LC mode and four switching slits with a twisted nematic LC mode. The spatial frequency of the projected fringe pattern could be controlled by selecting one of the switching slits. In addition, moving fringe patterns were obtainable by applying voltages to the ECB LC layer, which varied the phase difference between the common and the selected switching slits. Notably, the DFPG switching time required to project 16 fringe patterns was minimized by utilizing the dual-frequency modulation of the driving waveform to switch the LC layers. We calculated the phase modulation of the DFPG and reconstructed the depth profile of 3D objects using a discrete Fourier transform method and geometric optical parameters. PMID:27801812

  15. The Negative Testing and Negative Generation Effects Are Eliminated by Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Although retrieval often enhances subsequent memory (the testing effect), a negative testing effect has recently been documented in which prior retrieval harms later recall compared with restudying. The negative testing effect was predicated on the negative generation effect and the item-specific-relational framework. The present experiments…

  16. Field Test Protocol. Standard Internal Load Generation for Unoccupied Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Christensen, D.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.

    2011-06-01

    This document describes a simple and general way to generate House Simulation Protocol (HSP)-consistent internal sensible and latent loads in unoccupied homes. It is newly updated based on recent experience, and provides instructions on how to calculate and set up the operational profiles in unoccupied homes. The document is split into two sections: how to calculate the internal load magnitude and schedule, and then what tools and methods should be used to generate those internal loads to achieve research goals.

  17. Field Test Protocol: Standard Internal Load Generation in Unoccupied Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Christensen, D.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.

    2011-06-01

    This document describes a simple and general way to generate House Simulation Protocol (HSP)-consistent internal sensible and latent loads in unoccupied homes. It is newly updated based on recent experience, and provides instructions on how to calculate and set up the operational profiles in unoccupied homes. The document is split into two sections: how to calculate the internal load magnitude and schedule, and then what tools and methods should be used to generate those internal loads to achieve research goals.

  18. Effect of HF Heating Array Directivity Pattern on the Frequency Response of Generated ELF/VLF.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    hhEEE|hhEE 1H ; 11:j28 111125 . mm 11111 II ll1 111 .8 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TESI CHART I fJC ’RL_-SCI-475l I( .-cmon Numters: 1.5.1. 3.1.4, 3.2.1,.3.3...the high power HF heating facility at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. The pattern was calculated using pattern multi- plication and method of...high power HF heating facility at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. The pattern was calculated using pattern multiplication and method of

  19. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

  20. Generating Tap Test Images with a Free-Hand Motorized Tapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D.; Foreman, C.; Hsu, D.

    2009-03-01

    Previously we have described the Computer Aided Tap Tester (CATT), a simple instrumented probe and software that facilitates the generation of tap test C-scans in field environments. Early in the CATT development it was noted that inspectors prefer hand tapping at random locations over the part, eventually covering the part to the satisfaction of the inspector. To speed inspections, a regimented method of tapping was incorporated into the CATT via a grid laid over the part. Although the CATT system is quite simple to use, the method of tapping at each grid location in a pre-determined raster pattern continues to encounter resistance from the inspectors. The preferred free scanning of the inspection area dovetails nicely with the GenScan system previously reported on, where the operator scans over the inspection area freely, starting with larger pixels, and refines the geometry of flaw indications with finer pixels. As part of an Air Force project, we are merging the CATT instrumented tap data with position encoding and pixel change on-the-fly features of the GenScan. A description and demonstration of its operation will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory under Contract♯FA8650-04-C-5228 at Iowa State University's Center for NDE.

  1. Validation of a two-generational reproduction test in Daphnia magna: An interlaboratory exercise.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Campos, Bruno; Rivetti, Claudia; LeBlanc, Gerald A; Eytcheson, Stephanie; McKnight, Stephanie; Tobor-Kaplon, Marysia; de Vries Buitenweg, Selinda; Choi, Suhyon; Choi, Jinhee; Sarapultseva, Elena I; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès; Coke, Maïra; Pandard, Pascal; Chaumot, Arnaud; Quéau, Hervé; Delorme, Nicolas; Geffard, Olivier; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Watanabe, Haruna; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Lopes, Isabel; Pestana, João L T; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pereira, Cecilia Manuela; De Schamphelaere, Karel

    2017-02-01

    Effects observed within one generation disregard potential detrimental effects that may appear across generations. Previously we have developed a two generation Daphnia magna reproduction test using the OECD TG 211 protocol with a few amendments, including initiating the second generation with third brood neonates produced from first generation individuals. Here we showed the results of an inter-laboratory calibration exercise among 12 partners that aimed to test the robustness and consistency of a two generation Daphnia magna reproduction test. Pyperonyl butoxide (PBO) was used as a test compound. Following experiments, PBO residues were determined by TQD-LC/MS/MS. Chemical analysis denoted minor deviations of measured PBO concentrations in freshly prepared and old test solutions and between real and nominal concentrations in all labs. Other test conditions (water, food, D. magna clone, type of test vessel) varied across partners as allowed in the OECD test guidelines. Cumulative fecundity and intrinsic population growth rates (r) were used to estimate "No observed effect concentrations "NOEC using the solvent control as the control treatment. EC10 and EC-50 values were obtained regression analyses. Eleven of the twelve labs succeeded in meeting the OECD criteria of producing >60 offspring per female in control treatments during 21days in each of the two consecutive generations. Analysis of variance partitioning of cumulative fecundity indicated a relatively good performance of most labs with most of the variance accounted for by PBO (56.4%) and PBO by interlaboratory interactions (20.2%), with multigenerational effects within and across PBO concentrations explaining about 6% of the variance. EC50 values for reproduction and population growth rates were on average 16.6 and 20.8% lower among second generation individuals, respectively. In summary these results suggest that the proposed assay is reproducible but cumulative toxicity in the second generation cannot

  2. Computerized In Vitro Test for Chemical Toxicity Based on Tetrahymena Swimming Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Matsos, Helen C.; Cronise, Raymond J.; Looger, Loren L.; Relwani, Rachna A.; Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for rapidly determining chemical toxicity have been evaluated as an alternative to the rabbit eye initancy test (Draize). The toxicity monitor includes an automated scoring of how motile biological cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis) slow down or otherwise change their swimming patterns in a hostile chemical environment. The method, called the motility assay (MA), is tested for 30 s to determine the chemical toxicity in 20 aqueous samples containing trace organics and salts. With equal or better detection limits, results compare favorably to in vivo animal tests of eye irritancy.

  3. Using aberration test patterns to optimize the performance of EUV aerial imaging microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Han, Hak-Seung; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-06-16

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a prototype EUV-wavelength zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements of EUV reticles. To simplify and improve the alignment procedure we have created and tested arrays of aberration-sensitive patterns on EUV reticles and we have compared their images collected with the AIT to the expected shapes obtained by simulating the theoretical wavefront of the system. We obtained a consistent measure of coma and astigmatism in the center of the field of view using two different patterns, revealing a misalignment condition in the optics.

  4. Plant species richness belowground: higher richness and new patterns revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Opik, Maarja; Metsis, Madis; Lilje, Liisa; Davison, John; Vasar, Martti; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D; Pärtel, Meelis

    2012-04-01

    Variation in plant species richness has been described using only aboveground vegetation. The species richness of roots and rhizomes has never been compared with aboveground richness in natural plant communities. We made direct comparisons of grassland plant richness in identical volumes (0.1 × 0.1 × 0.1 m) above and below the soil surface, using conventional species identification to measure aboveground richness and 454 sequencing of the chloroplast trnL(UAA) intron to measure belowground richness. We described above- and belowground richness at multiple spatial scales (from a neighbourhood scale of centimetres to a community scale of hundreds of metres), and related variation in richness to soil fertility. Tests using reference material indicated that 454 sequencing captured patterns of species composition and abundance with acceptable accuracy. At neighbourhood scales, belowground richness was up to two times greater than aboveground richness. The relationship between above- and belowground richness was significantly different from linear: beyond a certain level of belowground richness, aboveground richness did not increase further. Belowground richness also exceeded that of aboveground at the community scale, indicating that some species are temporarily dormant and absent aboveground. Similar to other grassland studies, aboveground richness declined with increasing soil fertility; in contrast, the number of species found only belowground increased significantly with fertility. These results indicate that conventional aboveground studies of plant richness may overlook many coexisting species, and that belowground richness becomes relatively more important in conditions where aboveground richness decreases. Measuring plant belowground richness can considerably alter perceptions of biodiversity and its responses to natural and anthropogenic factors.

  5. Testing of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is a high-efficiency generator being developed for potential use on a Discovery 12 space mission. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit was delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center in 2008 and has been undergoing extended operation testing to generate long-term performance data for an integrated system. It has also been used for tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs, both when controlled with an alternating current (AC) bus and with a digital controller. The ASRG EU currently has over 27,000 hours of operation. This paper summarizes all of the tests that have been conducted on the ASRG EU over the past 3 years and provides an overview of the test results and what was learned.

  6. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs: Part 2, Chaotic vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show that the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate a high acceleration, high frequency environment on a test surface. A companion paper derives some of the mechanical relations for the system. This paper shows that a sinusoidal shaker input can be used to excite deterministic chaotic dynamics of the system yielding a random vibration environment on the test surface, or a random motion of the shaker can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. Numerical examples are presented to show the kind of environments that can be generated in this system. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D. L.; Paez, T. L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate high frequency, high acceleration environment on a test surface. A companion paper (Reference 1) shows that a sinusoidal or random shaker input can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. This paper derives the three response components that occur on the test surface due to an impact on the bottom surface and the base driven response from the shaker input. These response components are used to generate impulse response functions and frequency response functions which are used in the companion paper to derive power spectral density functions for the overall response. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Vocal behavior and vocal central pattern generator organization diverge among toadfishes.

    PubMed

    Chagnaud, Boris P; Bass, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Among fishes, acoustic communication is best studied in toadfishes, a single order and family that includes species commonly known as toadfish and midshipman. However, there is a lack of comparative anatomical and physiological studies, making it difficult to identify both shared and derived mechanisms of vocalization among toadfishes. Here, vocal nerve labeling and intracellular in vivo recording and staining delineated the hindbrain vocal network of the Gulf toadfish Opsanus beta. Dextran-biotin labeling of the vocal nerve or intracellular neurobiotin fills of motoneurons delineated a midline vocal motor nucleus (VMN). Motoneurons showed bilaterally extensive dendritic arbors both within and lateral to the paired motor nuclei. The motoneuron activity matched that of the spike-like vocal nerve motor volley that determines the natural call duration and frequency. Ipsilateral vocal nerve labeling with biocytin or neurobiotin yielded dense bilateral transneuronal filling of motoneurons and coextensive columns of premotor neurons. These premotor neurons generated pacemaker-like action potentials matched 1:1 with vocal nerve and motoneuron firing. Transneuronal transport further revealed connectivity within and between the pacemaker-motor circuit and a rostral prepacemaker nucleus. Unlike the pacemaker-motor circuit, prepacemaker firing did not match the frequency of vocal nerve activity but instead was predictive of the duration of the vocal nerve volley that codes for call duration. Transneuronally labeled terminal-like boutons also occurred in auditory-recipient hindbrain nuclei, including neurons innervating the inner ear and lateral line organs. Together with studies of midshipman, we propose that separate premotor populations coding vocal frequency and duration with direct premotor coupling to auditory-lateral line nuclei are plesiomorphic characters for toadfishes. Unlike in midshipman, transneuronal labeling in toadfishes reveals an expansive column of

  9. Modular organization of the multipartite central pattern generator for turtle rostral scratch: knee-related interneurons during deletions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul S G; Daniels-McQueen, Susan; Lai, Jessica; Liu, Z; Corman, Tanya S

    2016-06-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neuronal networks in the spinal cord that generate rhythmic patterns of motor activity in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. For many vertebrate rhythmic behaviors, CPGs generate normal patterns of motor neuron activities as well as variations of the normal patterns, termed deletions, in which bursts in one or more motor nerves are absent from one or more cycles of the rhythm. Prior work with hip-extensor deletions during turtle rostral scratch supports hypotheses of hip-extensor interneurons in a hip-extensor module and of hip-flexor interneurons in a hip-flexor module. We present here single-unit interneuronal recording data that support hypotheses of knee-extensor interneurons in a knee-extensor module and of knee-flexor interneurons in a knee-flexor module. Members of knee-related modules are not members of hip-related modules and vice versa. These results in turtle provide experimental support at the single-unit interneuronal level for the organizational concept that the rostral-scratch CPG for the turtle hindlimb is multipartite, that is, composed of more than two modules. This work, when combined with experimental and computational work in other vertebrates, does not support the classical view that the vertebrate limb CPG is bipartite with only two modules, one controlling all the flexors of the limb and the other controlling all the extensors of the limb. Instead, these results support the general principle that spinal CPGs are multipartite.

  10. Vibration Testing of the Pluto/New Horizons Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Charles D. Griffin

    2006-06-01

    The Radioisotopic Thermal Generator (RTG) for the Pluto/New Horizons spacecraft was subjected to a flight dynamic acceptance test to demonstrate that it would perform successfully following launch. Seven RTGs of this type had been assembled and tested at Mound, Ohio from 1984 to 1997. This paper chronicles major events in establishing a new vibration test laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory and the nineteen days of dynamic testing.

  11. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... particle delivery system shall consist of a blower system and a wind tunnel having a test section of... particles delivered to the test section of the wind tunnel shall be established using the operating... wind tunnel is not critical. However, the cross-sectional uniformity of the particle concentration...

  12. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... particle delivery system shall consist of a blower system and a wind tunnel having a test section of... particles delivered to the test section of the wind tunnel shall be established using the operating... wind tunnel is not critical. However, the cross-sectional uniformity of the particle concentration...

  13. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... particle delivery system shall consist of a blower system and a wind tunnel having a test section of... particles delivered to the test section of the wind tunnel shall be established using the operating... wind tunnel is not critical. However, the cross-sectional uniformity of the particle concentration...

  14. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... particle delivery system shall consist of a blower system and a wind tunnel having a test section of... particles delivered to the test section of the wind tunnel shall be established using the operating... wind tunnel is not critical. However, the cross-sectional uniformity of the particle concentration...

  15. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or better (e.g., hot-wire anemometry). The mean wind speed in the test section of the wind tunnel... section shall be determined during the tests using an appropriate technique (e.g., hot-wire anemometry... volumetric units. (g) Schematic drawings of the particle delivery system (wind tunnel and blower system)...

  16. Large-Scale Multiobjective Static Test Generation for Web-Based Testing with Integer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, M. L.; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, A. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based testing has become a ubiquitous self-assessment method for online learning. One useful feature that is missing from today's web-based testing systems is the reliable capability to fulfill different assessment requirements of students based on a large-scale question data set. A promising approach for supporting large-scale web-based…

  17. Effects of ion channel noise on neural circuits: an application to the respiratory pattern generator to investigate breathing variability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Dhingra, Rishi R; Dick, Thomas E; Galán, Roberto F

    2017-01-01

    Neural activity generally displays irregular firing patterns even in circuits with apparently regular outputs, such as motor pattern generators, in which the output frequency fluctuates randomly around a mean value. This "circuit noise" is inherited from the random firing of single neurons, which emerges from stochastic ion channel gating (channel noise), spontaneous neurotransmitter release, and its diffusion and binding to synaptic receptors. Here we demonstrate how to expand conductance-based network models that are originally deterministic to include realistic, physiological noise, focusing on stochastic ion channel gating. We illustrate this procedure with a well-established conductance-based model of the respiratory pattern generator, which allows us to investigate how channel noise affects neural dynamics at the circuit level and, in particular, to understand the relationship between the respiratory pattern and its breath-to-breath variability. We show that as the channel number increases, the duration of inspiration and expiration varies, and so does the coefficient of variation of the breath-to-breath interval, which attains a minimum when the mean duration of expiration slightly exceeds that of inspiration. For small channel numbers, the variability of the expiratory phase dominates over that of the inspiratory phase, and vice versa for large channel numbers. Among the four different cell types in the respiratory pattern generator, pacemaker cells exhibit the highest sensitivity to channel noise. The model shows that suppressing input from the pons leads to longer inspiratory phases, a reduction in breathing frequency, and larger breath-to-breath variability, whereas enhanced input from the raphe nucleus increases breathing frequency without changing its pattern.

  18. Multiple hypotheses testing of fish incidence patterns in an urbanized ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Higgins, C.L.; Shavlik, C.E.; Pope, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories have focused traditionally on natural processes with little attempt to incorporate anthropogenic influences despite the fact that humans are such an integral part of virtually all ecosystems. A series of alternate models that incorporated anthropogenic factors and traditional ecological mechanisms of invasion to account for fish incidence patterns in urban lakes was tested. The models were based on fish biology, human intervention, and habitat characteristics. However, the only models to account for empirical patterns were those that included fish invasiveness, which incorporated species-specific information about overall tolerance and fecundity. This suggests that species-specific characteristics are more important in general distributional patterns than human-mediated dispersal. Better information of illegal stocking activities is needed to improve human-mediated models, and more insight into basic life history of ubiquitous species is needed to truly understand underlying mechanisms of biotic homogenization. ?? Springer 2005.

  19. Traveling-wave pattern generator controls movement and organization of sensory feedback in a spinal cord model.

    PubMed

    Kaske, Alexander; Winberg, Gösta; Cöster, Joakim

    2003-01-01

    A traveling wave in a two-dimensional spinal cord model constitutes a stable pattern generator for quadruped gaits. In the context of the somatotopic organization of the spinal cord, this pattern generator is sufficient to generate stable locomotive limb trajectories. The elastic properties of muscles alone, providing linear negative feedback, are sufficient to stabilize stance and locomotion in the presence of perturbative forces. We further show that such a pattern generator is capable of organizing sensory processing in the spinal cord. A single-layer perceptron was trained to associate the sensory feedback from the limb (coding force, length, and change of length for each muscle) with the two-dimensional activity profile of the traveling wave. This resulted in a well-defined spatial organization of the connections within the spinal network along a rostrocaudal axis. The spinal network driven by peripheral afferents alone supported autonomous locomotion in the positive feedback mode, whereas in the negative feedback mode stance was stabilized in response to perturbations. Systematic variation of a parameter representing the effect of gamma-motor neurons on muscle spindle activity in our model led to a corresponding shift of limb position during stance and locomotion, resulting in a systematic displacement alteration of foot positions.

  20. Design of a Facility to Test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Meer, David W.; Brace, Michael H.; Dugala, Gina

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is being considered to power deep space missions. An engineering unit, the ASRG-EU, was designed and fabricated by Lockheed Martin under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently on an extended operation test at NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate the life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. A special test facility was designed and built for testing the ASRG-EU. Details of the test facility design are discussed. The facility can operate the convertors under AC bus control or with the ASRG-EU controller. It can regulate input thermal power in either a fixed temperature or fixed power mode. An enclosure circulates cooled air around the ASRG-EU to remove heat rejected from the ASRG-EU by convection. A custom monitoring and data acquisition system supports the test. Various safety features, which allow 2417 unattended operation, are discussed.