Sample records for thermopiles

  1. Surface-Micromachined Planar Arrays of Thermopiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, Marc C.

    2003-01-01

    Planar two-dimensional arrays of thermopiles intended for use as thermal-imaging detectors are to be fabricated by a process that includes surface micromachining. These thermopile arrays are designed to perform better than do prior two-dimensional thermopile arrays. The lower performance of prior two-dimensional thermopile arrays is attributed to the following causes: The thermopiles are made from low-performance thermoelectric materials. The devices contain dielectric supporting structures, the thermal conductances of which give rise to parasitic losses of heat from detectors to substrates. The bulk-micromachining processes sometimes used to remove substrate material under the pixels, making it difficult to incorporate low-noise readout electronic circuitry. The thermoelectric lines are on the same level as the infrared absorbers, thereby reducing fill factor. The improved pixel design of a thermopile array of the type under development is expected to afford enhanced performance by virtue of the following combination of features: Surface-micromachined detectors are thermally isolated through suspension above readout circuitry. The thermopiles are made of such high-performance thermoelectric materials as Bi-Te and Bi-Sb-Te alloys. Pixel structures are supported only by the thermoelectric materials: there are no supporting dielectric structures that could leak heat by conduction to the substrate.

  2. Thermopile Detector Arrays for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Kenyon, M.; Krueger, T. R.; McCann, T. A.; Chacon, R.; Jones, E. W.; Dickie, M. R.; Schofield, J. T.; McCleese, D. J.; Gaalema, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thermopile detectors are widely used in uncooled applications where small numbers of detectors are required, particularly in low-cost commercial applications or applications requiring accurate radiometry. Arrays of thermopile detectors, however, have not been developed to the extent of uncooled bolometer and pyroelectric/ferroelectric arrays. Efforts at JPL seek to remedy this deficiency by developing high performance thin-film thermopile detectors in both linear and two-dimensional formats. The linear thermopile arrays are produced by bulk micromachining and wire bonded to separate CMOS readout electronic chips. Such arrays are currently being fabricated for the Mars Climate Sounder instrument, scheduled for launch in 2005. Progress is also described towards realizing a two-dimensional thermopile array built over CMOS readout circuitry in the substrate.

  3. New type of multijunction thermopile IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tietun; Guo, Lihui

    1996-09-01

    A newly designed thin-film thermopile infrared detector, which as an absorption layer and a sensitive area on two sides are fabricated using integrated-circuit technology. The device uses a series-connected thermocouples array whose `hot' junction are supported on a thin Myler film of 1 - 3 micrometers thickness. By a special method of fasting the shadow mask, the thermopile with 48 Bi-Sb couples for 2 X 2 mm(superscript 2) area produces a responsivity of 50 - 70 V/W and relaxation time of about 70 ms.

  4. Concept Doped-Silicon Thermopile Detectors for Future Planetary Thermal Imaging Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakew, Brook; Barrentine, Emily M.; Aslam, Shahid; Brown, Ari D.

    2016-10-01

    Presently, uncooled thermopiles are the detectors of choice for thermal mapping in the 4.6-100 μm spectral range. Although cooled detectors like Ge or Si thermistor bolometers, and MgB2 or YBCO superconducting bolometers, have much higher sensitivity, the required active or passive cooling mechanisms add prohibitive cost and mass for long duration missions. Other uncooled detectors, likepyroelectrics, require a motor mechanism to chop against a known reference temperature, which adds unnecessary mission risk. Uncooled vanadium oxide or amorphous Si microbolometer arrays with integrated CMOS readout circuits, not only have lower sensitivity, but also have not been proven to be radiation hard >100 krad (Si) total ionizing dose, and barring additional materials and readout development, their performance has reached a plateau.Uncooled and radiation hard thermopiles with D* ~1x109 cm√Hz/W and time constant τ ~100 ms have been integrated into thermal imaging instruments on several past missions and have extensive flight heritage (Mariner, Voyager, Cassini, LRO, MRO). Thermopile arrays are also on the MERTIS instrument payload on-board the soon to be launched BepiColombo Mission.To date, thermopiles used for spaceflight instrumentation have consisted of either hand assembled "one-off" single thermopile pixels or COTS thermopile pixel arrays both using Bi-Sb or Bi-Te thermoelectric materials. For future high performance imagers, thermal detector arrays with higher D*, lower τ, and high efficiency delineated absorbers are desirable. Existing COTS and other flight thermopile designs require highly specialized and nonstandard processing techniques to fabricate both the Bi-Sb or Bi-Te thermocouples and the gold or silver black absorbers, which put limitations on further development.Our detector arrays will have a D* ≥ 3x109 cm√Hz/W and a thermal time constant ≤ 30 ms at 170 K. They will be produced using proven, standard semiconductor and MEMS fabrication techniques

  5. Roll Angle Estimation Using Thermopiles for a Flight Controlled Mortar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Using Xilinx’s System generator, the entire design was implemented at a relatively high level within Malab’s Simulink. This allowed VHDL code to...thermopile data with a Recursive Least Squares (RLS) filter implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA). These results demonstrate the...accurately estimated by processing the thermopile data with a Recursive Least Squares (RLS) filter implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA

  6. [An ear thermometer based on infrared thermopiles sensor].

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyuan; Qian, Mingli

    2013-09-01

    According to the development of body temperature measurement mode, an ear thermometer with infrared thermopiles sensor is designed for body thermometry Compared with oral thermometer, the accuracy of ear thermometer is acceptable.

  7. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigations in Shallow Cut Grinding by Workpiece Integrated Infrared Thermopile Array.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Marcel; Lang, Walter; Dumstorff, Gerrit

    2017-09-30

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the heat distribution and the occurring temperatures during grinding. Therefore, we did both experimental and numerical investigations. In the first part, we present the integration of an infrared thermopile array in a steel workpiece. Experiments are done by acquiring data from the thermopile array during grinding of a groove in a workpiece made of steel. In the second part, we present numerical investigations in the grinding process to further understand the thermal characteristic during grinding. Finally, we conclude our work. Increasing the feed speed leads to two things: higher heat flux densities in the workpiece and higher temperature gradients in the material.

  9. Magnon-drag thermopile.

    PubMed

    Costache, Marius V; Bridoux, German; Neumann, Ingmar; Valenzuela, Sergio O

    2011-12-18

    Thermoelectric effects in spintronics are gathering increasing attention as a means of managing heat in nanoscale structures and of controlling spin information by using heat flow. Thermal magnons (spin-wave quanta) are expected to play a major role; however, little is known about the underlying physical mechanisms involved. The reason is the lack of information about magnon interactions and of reliable methods to obtain it, in particular for electrical conductors because of the intricate influence of electrons. Here, we demonstrate a conceptually new device that enables us to gather information on magnon-electron scattering and magnon-drag effects. The device resembles a thermopile formed by a large number of pairs of ferromagnetic wires placed between a hot and a cold source and connected thermally in parallel and electrically in series. By controlling the relative orientation of the magnetization in pairs of wires, the magnon drag can be studied independently of the electron and phonon-drag thermoelectric effects. Measurements as a function of temperature reveal the effect on magnon drag following a variation of magnon and phonon populations. This information is crucial to understand the physics of electron-magnon interactions, magnon dynamics and thermal spin transport.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigations in Shallow Cut Grinding by Workpiece Integrated Infrared Thermopile Array

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Marcel; Lang, Walter; Dumstorff, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the heat distribution and the occurring temperatures during grinding. Therefore, we did both experimental and numerical investigations. In the first part, we present the integration of an infrared thermopile array in a steel workpiece. Experiments are done by acquiring data from the thermopile array during grinding of a groove in a workpiece made of steel. In the second part, we present numerical investigations in the grinding process to further understand the thermal characteristic during grinding. Finally, we conclude our work. Increasing the feed speed leads to two things: higher heat flux densities in the workpiece and higher temperature gradients in the material. PMID:28973978

  11. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  12. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  13. Human location estimation using thermopile array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnin, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Utilization of Thermopile sensor at an early stage of human detection is challenging as there are many things that produce thermal heat other than human such as electrical appliances and animals. Therefrom, an algorithm for early presence detection has been developed through the study of human body temperature behaviour with respect to the room temperature. The change in non-contact detected temperature of human varied according to body parts. In an indoor room, upper parts of human body change up to 3°C whereas lower part ranging from 0.58°C to 1.71°C. The average changes in temperature of human is used as a conditional set-point value in the program algorithm to detect human presence. The current position of human and its respective angle is gained when human is presence at certain pixels of Thermopile’s sensor array. Human position is estimated successfully as the developed sensory system is tested to the actuator of a stand fan.

  14. Analytical and Experimental Characterization of a Linear-Array Thermopile Scanning Radiometer for Geo-Synchronous Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Ira J.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently working towards the development of a new technology for cavity-based radiometers. The radiometer consists of a 256-element linear-array thermopile detector mounted on the wall of a mirrored wedgeshaped cavity. The objective of this research is to provide analytical and experimental characterization of the proposed radiometer. A dynamic end-to-end opto-electrothermal model is developed to simulate the performance of the radiometer. Experimental results for prototype thermopile detectors are included. Also presented is the concept of the discrete Green's function to characterize the optical scattering of radiant energy in the cavity, along with a data-processing algorithm to correct for the scattering. Finally, a parametric study of the sensitivity of the discrete Green's function to uncertainties in the surface properties of the cavity is presented.

  15. The self-calibrating sensor of the Eclectic Satellite Pyrheliometer /ESP/ program. [thermopile sensor with cavity-type receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. R.; Frieden, R. G.; Griffin, F. J.; Cone, S. A.; Maschhoff, R. H.; Gniady, J.

    1977-01-01

    A self-calibrating thermopile sensor having a cavity type receiver is described. Its incorporation into pyrheliometric instrumentation, including the electronics and control, is also discussed. Completed devices are capable of solar irradiance measurements with an accuracy to within 0.5% and can detect solar variability to a level approaching 0.001% in space.

  16. Accuracy of silicon versus thermopile radiometers for daily and monthly integrated total hemispherical solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffel, Thomas L.; Myers, Daryl R.

    2010-08-01

    Measurement stations for solar radiation resource assessment data are expensive and labor intensive. For this reason, long-term solar radiation measurements are not widely available. Growing interest in solar renewable energy systems has generated a great number of questions about the quality of data obtained from inexpensive silicon photodiode radiometers versus costly thermopile radiometers. We analyze a year of daily total and monthly mean global horizontal irradiance measurements derived from 1-minute averages of 3-second samples of pyranometer signals. The data were collected simultaneously from both types of radiometers at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. All broadband radiometers in service at SRRL are calibrated annually using an outdoor method with reference radiometers traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. We summarized the data by daily total and monthly mean daily total amounts of solar radiation. Our results show that systematic and random errors (identified in our outdoor calibration process) in each type of radiometer cancel out over periods of one day or more. Daily total and mean monthly daily total solar energy measured by the two pyranometer types compare within 1% to 2%. The individual daily variations among different models of thermopile radiometers may be up to twice as large, up to +/-5%, being highest in the winter (higher average solar zenith angle conditions) and lowest in summer, consistent with the lower solar zenith angle conditions.

  17. Characterization and optimization of polycrystalline Si70%Ge30% for surface micromachined thermopiles in human body applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyang; Fiorini, Paolo; Leonov, Vladimir; Van Hoof, Chris

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the material characterization methods, characterization results and the optimization scheme for polycrystalline Si70%Ge30% (poly-SiGe) from the perspective of its application in a surface micromachined thermopile. Due to its comparative advantages, such as lower thermal conductivity and ease of processing, over other materials, poly-SiGe is chosen to fabricate a surface micromachined thermopile and eventually a wearable thermoelectric generator (TEG) to be used on a human body. To enable optimal design of advanced thermocouple microstructures, poly-SiGe sample materials prepared by two different techniques, namely low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) with in situ doping and rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) with ion implantation, have been characterized. Relevant material properties, including electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity and specific contact resistance, have been reported. For the determination of thermal conductivity, a novel surface-micromachined test structure based on the Seebeck effect is designed, fabricated and measured. Compared to the traditional test structures, it is more advantageous for sample materials with a relatively large Seebeck coefficient, such as poly-SiGe. Based on the characterization results, a further optimization scheme is suggested to allow independent respective optimization of the figure of merit and the specific contact resistance.

  18. A Radiation Hardened by Design CMOS ASIC for Thermopile Readouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; Aslam, S.; DuMonthier, J.

    2012-01-01

    A radiation hardened by design (RHBD) mixed-signal application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been designed for a thermopile readout for operation in the harsh Jovian orbital environment. The multi-channel digitizer (MCD) ASIC includes 18 low noise amplifier channels which have tunable gain/filtering coefficients, a 16-bit sigma-delta analog-digital converter (SDADC) and an on-chip controller. The 18 channels, SDADC and controller were designed to operate with immunity to single event latchup (SEL) and to at least 10 Mrad total ionizing dose (TID). The ASIC also contains a radiation tolerant 16-bit 20 MHz Nyquist ADC for general purpose instrumentation digitizer needs. The ASIC is currently undergoing fabrication in a commercial 180 nm CMOS process. Although this ASIC was designed specifically for the harsh radiation environment of the NASA led JEO mission it is suitable for integration into instrumentation payloads 011 the ESA JUICE mission where the radiation hardness requirements are slightly less stringent.

  19. A MEMS Infrared Thermopile Fabricated from Silicon-On-Insulator with Phononic Crystal Structures and Carbon Nanotube Absorption Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Kory Forrest

    The goal of this project was to examine the possibility of creating a novel thermal infrared detector based on silicon CMOS technology that has been enhanced by the latest nano-engineering discoveries. Silicon typically is not thought as an efficient thermoelectric material. However recent advancements in nanotechnology have improved the potential for a highly sensitive infrared detector based on nano-structured silicon. The thermal conductivity of silicon has been shown to be reduced from 150 W/mK down to 60 W/mK just by decreasing the scale of the silicon from bulk down to the sub-micron scale. Further reduction of the thermal conductivity has been shown by patterning silicon with a phonon crystal structure which has been reported to have thermal conductivities down to 10 W/mK. The phonon crystal structure consists of a 2D array of holes that are etched into the silicon. The size and pitch of the holes are on the order of the mean free path of the phonons in silicon which is approximately 200-500nm. This particular device had 200nm holes on a 400nm pitch. The Seebeck coefficient of silicon can also be enhanced by the reduction of the material from the bulk to sub-micron scale and with degenerate level doping. The combination of decreased thermal conductivity and increased Seebeck coefficient allow silicon to be a promising material for thermoelectric infrared detectors. The highly doped silicon is desired to reduce the electrical resistance of the device. The low electrical resistance is required to reduce the Johnson noise of the device which is the dominant noise source for most thermal detectors. This project designed a MEMS thermopile using a silicon-on-insulator substrate, and a CMOS compatible process. The basic thermopile consists of a silicon dioxide membrane with phononic crystal patterned silicon thermocouples around the edges of the membrane. Vertical aligned, multi-walled, carbon nanotubes were used as the infrared absorption layer. A MEMS

  20. A Thermal Imaging Instrument with Uncooled Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; Barrentine, E.; Brown, A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we performed an instrument concept study for sustainable thermal imaging over land with uncooled detectors. We evaluated two different uncooled detector technologies uncooled microbolometers and thermopiles. We have also evaluated materials for use in in a uncooled thermopile detector concept.

  1. Feasibility Study of Thin Film Thermocouple Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, thermopile detectors, generators, and refrigerators based on bulk materials have been used to measure temperature, generate power for spacecraft, and cool sensors for scientific investigations. New potential uses of small, low-power, thin film thermopiles are in the area of microelectromechanical systems since power requirements decrease as electrical and mechanical machines shrink in size. In this research activity, thin film thermopile devices are fabricated utilizing radio frequency sputter coating and photoresist lift-off techniques. Electrical characterizations are performed on two designs in order to investigate the feasibility of generating small amounts of power, utilizing any available waste heat as the energy source.

  2. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  3. Application of Surface Protective Coating to Enhance Environment-Withstanding Property of the MEMS 2D Wind Direction and Wind Speed Sensor.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyu-Sik; Lee, Dae-Sung; Song, Sang-Woo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-09-19

    In this study, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) two-dimensional (2D) wind direction and wind speed sensor consisting of a square heating source and four thermopiles was manufactured using the heat detection method. The heating source and thermopiles of the manufactured sensor must be exposed to air to detect wind speed and wind direction. Therefore, there are concerns that the sensor could be contaminated by deposition or adhesion of dust, sandy dust, snow, rain, and so forth, in the air, and that the membrane may be damaged by physical shock. Hence, there was a need to protect the heating source, thermopiles, and the membrane from environmental and physical shock. The upper protective coating to protect both the heating source and thermopiles and the lower protective coating to protect the membrane were formed by using high-molecular substances such as SU-8, Teflon and polyimide (PI). The sensor characteristics with the applied protective coatings were evaluated.

  4. The MEDA's Radiometer TIRS for the MARS2020 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Izquierdo, Joel; Sebastián Martínez, Eduardo; Bravo, Andrés; Ferrándiz, Ricardo; Ramos, Miguel; Martínez, Germán; Rodríguez Manfredi, Jose Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The TIRS (Thermal InfraRed Sensor) instrument is one of the payloads of NASA MARS2020 mission, that is expected to take off in 2020, and is designed to operate for at least three Martian years on surface. The TIRS is part of the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA), formed for other environmental sensors, which will be placed in the MARS2020 Rover, and is been developing by the Spanish Center of Astrobiology (CAB).The main objectives of MEDA's Thermal InfraRed Sensor are:-Characterize the net radiative forcing (within 10%), and constrain the conductive forcing at the local surface and near-surface atmosphere.-Record the surface skin temperature and the UV-VIS-NIR irradiance solar flux at an accuracy of [10%] at full range of the atmosphere.TIRS design has heritage from GTS-REMS on the Mars Science Laboratory, in the Curiosity Rover. The aim of the instrument is to measure the radiative flux emitted from the Martian surface, sky and the CO2 atmosphere using five thermopiles sensors in four wavelength bands, model TS100 provided by IPHT (Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena, Germany). The TIRS has three downward pointing thermopiles to measure the IR fluxes emitted by the surface, separating brightness surface temperature from emissivity and surface reflected upward short wave radiation, using the thermopiles IR3 (0.3-3 µm), IR4 (6.5-inf µm), IR5 (8-14 µm). Additionally, it has two more thermopiles pointing to the sky, the thermopiles IR1 (6.5-inf µm) and IR2 (14.5-15.5 µm), which captures the downward fluxes of thermal infrared radiation and air temperature nearby the sensor.Thermopiles are accommodated inside a mechanical assembly that is designed to ensure a low thermal gradient. This assembly also accommodates a calibration plate, aimed to intercept part of the thermopiles FOV, and capable to do an in-flight recalibration.

  5. Description of the REMS Ground Temperature Sensor aboard MSL NASA mission to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armiens, C.; Sebastian, E.; Gomez-Elvira, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station, REMS, is part of the payload of the Mars Science Laboratory, MSL, a NASA mission to the red planet recently scheduled to launch on the fall of 2011. REMS comprises several instruments aimed at measuring ground and air temperature, wind speed and direction, ultraviolet radiation, pressure and humidity. The Ground Temperature Sensor, GTS, is a contactless multi band pyrometer. It is composed of three thermopiles measuring in different bands: 8 - 14 um, 16 - 20 um and 14.5 - 15.5 um. The first two bands are optimized for the higher and lower temperatures expected to be present on Mars during the lifetime of the mission. They also avoid the radiation generated by the rover itself, the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, RTG, and the Sun that is reflected on the ground and reaches the thermopiles, as well as the atmospheric emission originated by the CO2. The use of two different bands to measure ground temperature allows the estimation of the emissivity of the surface by means of colour pyrometry algorithms. Thus we may determine not only the brightness temperature but also the real temperature of the ground, i.e., the kinetic temperature. The estimation of the emissivity may serve also to detect changes in the composition of the ground, as, for example, the formation of frost. The third thermopile is centred in the CO2 absorption band, the main component of the Martian atmosphere. This allows the determination of the residual influence that the atmosphere may have in the other two thermopile's bands. The brightness temperature of the air may also be estimated from this third thermopile. During Martian operations, the system may be degraded due to the deposition of dust over the thermopiles' filter. In order to correct for this degradation, the system includes a calibration plate, which partially fills the field of view of the thermopiles. This plate may be heated several degrees. Analyzing the signals before and during

  6. An absolute cavity pyrgeometer to measure the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to international system of units, SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Zeng, Jinan; Scheuch, Jonathan; Hanssen, Leonard; Wilthan, Boris; Myers, Daryl; Stoffel, Tom

    2012-03-01

    This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180° view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U95) of ±3.96 W m-2 with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two

  7. Earpiece with sensors to measure/monitor multiple physiological variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G. (Inventor); Schulze, Arthur E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for positioning sensors relative to one another and anatomic features in a non-invasive device for measuring and monitoring multiple physiological variables from a single site uses an earpiece incorporating a shielded pulse oximetry sensor (POS) having a miniaturized set of LEDs and photosensors configured for pulse oximetry measurements in the reflectance mode and located in the earpiece so as to position the POS against a rear wall of an ear canal. The earpiece also includes a thermopile of no larger than 7 mm. in diameter located on the earpiece to so as to position the thermopile past a second turn of an external auditory meatus so as to view the tympanic membrane. The thermopile includes a reference temperature sensor attached to its base for ambient temperature compensation.

  8. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOEpatents

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  9. Enhanced spectroscopic gas sensors using in-situ grown carbon nanotubes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    De Luca, A.; Cole, M. T.; Milne, W. I.

    2015-05-11

    In this letter, we present a fully complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microelectromechanical system thermopile infrared (IR) detector employing vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an advanced nano-engineered radiation absorbing material. The detector was fabricated using a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process with tungsten metallization, comprising a silicon thermopile and a tungsten resistive micro-heater, both embedded within a dielectric membrane formed by a deep-reactive ion etch following CMOS processing. In-situ CNT growth on the device was achieved by direct thermal chemical vapour deposition using the integrated micro-heater as a micro-reactor. The growth of the CNT absorption layer was verified through scanning electronmore » microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The functional effects of the nanostructured ad-layer were assessed by comparing CNT-coated thermopiles to uncoated thermopiles. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy showed that the radiation absorbing properties of the CNT adlayer significantly enhanced the absorptivity, compared with the uncoated thermopile, across the IR spectrum (3 μm–15.5 μm). This led to a four-fold amplification of the detected infrared signal (4.26 μm) in a CO{sub 2} non-dispersive-IR gas sensor system. The presence of the CNT layer was shown not to degrade the robustness of the uncoated devices, whilst the 50% modulation depth of the detector was only marginally reduced by 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we find that the 50% normalized absorption angular profile is subsequently more collimated by 8°. Our results demonstrate the viability of a CNT-based SOI CMOS IR sensor for low cost air quality monitoring.« less

  10. Compact Focal Plane Assembly for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari; Aslam, Shahid; Huang, Wei-Chung; Steptoe-Jackson, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    A compact radiometric focal plane assembly (FPA) has been designed in which the filters are individually co-registered over compact thermopile pixels. This allows for construction of an ultralightweight and compact radiometric instrument. The FPA also incorporates micromachined baffles in order to mitigate crosstalk and low-pass filter windows in order to eliminate high-frequency radiation. Compact metal mesh bandpass filters were fabricated for the far infrared (FIR) spectral range (17 to 100 microns), a game-changing technology for future planetary FIR instruments. This fabrication approach allows the dimensions of individual metal mesh filters to be tailored with better than 10- micron precision. In contrast, conventional compact filters employed in recent missions and in near-term instruments consist of large filter sheets manually cut into much smaller pieces, which is a much less precise and much more labor-intensive, expensive, and difficult process. Filter performance was validated by integrating them with thermopile arrays. Demonstration of the FPA will require the integration of two technologies. The first technology is compact, lightweight, robust against cryogenic thermal cycling, and radiation-hard micromachined bandpass filters. They consist of a copper mesh supported on a deep reactive ion-etched silicon frame. This design architecture is advantageous when constructing a lightweight and compact instrument because (1) the frame acts like a jig and facilitates filter integration with the FPA, (2) the frame can be designed so as to maximize the FPA field of view, (3) the frame can be simultaneously used as a baffle for mitigating crosstalk, and (4) micron-scale alignment features can be patterned so as to permit high-precision filter stacking and, consequently, increase the filter bandwidth and sharpen the out-of-band rolloff. The second technology consists of leveraging, from another project, compact and lightweight Bi0.87Sb0.13/Sb arrayed thermopiles

  11. Removing nickel from nickel-coated carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardianto, A.; Hertleer, C.; De Mey, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Conductive fibers/yarns are one of the most important materials for smart textiles because of their electrically conductive functionality combined with flexibility and light weight. They can be applied in many fields such as the medical sector, electronics, sensors and even as thermoelectric generators. Temperature sensors, for example, can be made using the thermocouple or thermopile principle which usually uses two different metal wires that can produce a temperature-dependent voltage. However, if metal wires are inserted into a textile structure, they will decrease the flexibility properties of the textile product. Nickel-coated Carbon Fiber (NiCF), a conductive textile yarn, has a potential use as a textile-based thermopile if we can create an alternating region of carbon and nickel along the fiber which in turn it can be used for substituting the metallic thermopile. The idea was to remove nickel from NiCF in order to obtain a yarn that contains alternating zones of carbon and nickel. Due to no literature reporting on how to remove nickel from NiCF, in this paper we investigated some chemicals to remove nickel from NiCF.

  12. Thermal Characteristics of Pyranometers and Pyrgeometers in Atmosphere-Surface Energetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of thermopile, pyranometers (solar, e.g., 0.3 - 3.0 microns) and pyrgeometers (terrestrial, e.g., 4 - 50 microns) have become instruments commonly used for measuring the broadband hemispherical irradiances at the surface in a long-term, monitoring mode for decades. These commercially available radiometers have been manufactured in several countries such as from the United States, Asia, and Europe, and are generally reliable and economical. These worldwide distributions of surface measurements become even more important in the era of Earth remote sensing in studying climate change. However, recent studies from field campaigns have pointed out that erroneous factors (e.g., temperature gradients between the filter dome and detector, emissivity of the thermopile) are responsible for the unacceptable level of uncertainty (e.g., 20 W/sq m). It is best to utilize an energy balance equation to describe the thermal dome effect of pyranometers and pyrgeometers. Therefore, quality of pyranometer and pyrgeometer measurements can be improved largely by applying proper knowledge of the thermal parameters affecting the operation of the thermopile systems. Data correction procedure and algorithm will be presented and discussed.

  13. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  14. Characterization of Thermal Parameters for Improving Pyranometer and Pyrgeometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Ji, Qiang; Rapshun, David; Shu, Peter K.

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of thermopile, pyranometers (solar, e.g., 0.3-3.0 micrometers) and pyrgeometers (terrestrial, e.g., 4-50 micrometers) have become instruments commonly used for measuring the broadband hemispherical irradiances at the surface in a long-term, monitoring mode for decades. These commercially available radiometers have been manufactured in several countries such as from the United States, Asia, and Europe, and are generally reliable and economical. These worldwide distributions of surface measurements become even more important in the era of Earth remote sensing in studying climate change. However, recent studies from field campaigns have pointed out that erroneous factors (e.g., temperature gradients between the filter dome and detector, emissivity of the thermopile) are responsible for the unacceptable level of uncertainty (e.g., 20 W m(exp -2)). Using a newly developed instrument of Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWTP), we have characterized the brightness temperature fields of pyranometers and pyrgeometers under various sky conditions. The QWIP is based on the superlattice (GaAs/AlGaAs) technology and has a noise equivalent temperature (NEAT) less than 0.1 K. The quality of pyranometer and pyrgeometer measure- ments can be improved largely by applying proper knowledge of the thermal parameters affecting the operation of the thermopile systems. Data correction procedure and algorithm will be presented and discussed.

  15. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  16. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  17. High- and Mid-temperature Superconducting Sensors for Far IR/Sub-mm Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Brasunas, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    In this review paper an overview of the potential applications of high Tc (approx. 90 K) superconductors (HTS) and mid-Tc (approx. 39 K) superconductors (MTS) thin films in far IR/Sub-mm thermal detectors is presented. HTSs (YBCO, GdBCO etc.) were discovered in the late 80s while superconductivity in MgB2, an MTS, was discovered in 2001. The sharp transition in transport properties of HTS has allowed the fabrication of composite infrared thermal detectors (bolometers) with better figures of merit than thermopile detectors - thermopiles are currently on board the CIRS instrument on the Cassini mission to Saturn. The potential for developing even more sensitive sensors for IR/Sub-mm applications using MgB2 thin films is assessed. Current MgB2 thin film deposition techniques and film quality are reviewed.

  18. THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, K.C.

    1958-07-22

    The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

  19. A new and inexpensive pyranometer for the visible spectral range.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Andújar, José M; Enrique, Juan M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a new photodiode-based pyranometer for the visible spectral range (approx. 400 to 750 nm), whose principal characteristics are: accuracy, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote programming and operation, interior temperature regulation, cosine error minimisation and all this at a very low cost, tens of times lower than that of commercial thermopile-based devices. This new photodiode-based pyranometer overcomes traditional problems in this type of device and offers similar characteristics to those of thermopile-based pyranometers and, therefore, can be used in any installation where reliable measurement of solar irradiance is necessary, especially in those where cost is a deciding factor in the choice of a meter. This new pyranometer has been registered in the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office under the number P200703162.

  20. A New and Inexpensive Pyranometer for the Visible Spectral Range

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Andújar, José M.; Enrique, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a new photodiode-based pyranometer for the visible spectral range (approx. 400 to 750 nm), whose principal characteristics are: accuracy, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote programming and operation, interior temperature regulation, cosine error minimisation and all this at a very low cost, tens of times lower than that of commercial thermopile-based devices. This new photodiode-based pyranometer overcomes traditional problems in this type of device and offers similar characteristics to those of thermopile-based pyranometers and, therefore, can be used in any installation where reliable measurement of solar irradiance is necessary, especially in those where cost is a deciding factor in the choice of a meter. This new pyranometer has been registered in the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office under the number P200703162. PMID:22408545

  1. Application of a scattered-light radiometric power meter.

    PubMed

    Caron, James N; DiComo, Gregory P; Ting, Antonio C; Fischer, Richard P

    2011-04-01

    The power measurement of high-power continuous-wave laser beams typically calls for the use of water-cooled thermopile power meters. Large thermopile meters have slow response times that can prove insufficient to conduct certain tests, such as determining the influence of atmospheric turbulence on transmitted beam power. To achieve faster response times, we calibrated a digital camera to measure the power level as the optical beam is projected onto a white surface. This scattered-light radiometric power meter saves the expense of purchasing a large area power meter and the required water cooling. In addition, the system can report the power distribution, changes in the position, and the spot size of the beam. This paper presents the theory of the scattered-light radiometric power meter and demonstrates its use during a field test at a 2.2 km optical range. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Ionic thermoelectric gating organic transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental stimuli to record and amplify. While traditional thermoelectric materials are attractive for temperature/heat flow sensing applications, their sensitivity is limited by their low Seebeck coefficient (∼100 μV K−1). Here we take advantage of the large ionic thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient found in polymer electrolytes (∼10,000 μV K−1) to introduce the concept of ionic thermoelectric gating a low-voltage organic transistor. The temperature sensing amplification of such ionic thermoelectric-gated devices is thousands of times superior to that of a single thermoelectric leg in traditional thermopiles. This suggests that ionic thermoelectric sensors offer a way to go beyond the limitations of traditional thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. These findings pave the way for new infrared-gated electronic circuits with potential applications in photonics, thermography and electronic-skins. PMID:28139738

  3. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components. LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The flight spare sensors of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment of the Nimbus 6 and 7 missions were flown aboard the LDEF. The preliminary post retrieval examination and test results are presented here for the sensor windows and filters, the thermopile sensors and a cavity radiometer.

  4. Detecting drift bias and exposure errors in solar and photosynthetically active radiation data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    All-black thermopile pyranometers are commonly used to measure solar radiation. Ensuring that the sensors are stable and free of drift is critical to accurately measure small variations in global solar irradiance (K'), which is a potential driver of changes in surface temperature. We demonstrate tha...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix E to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Water Heaters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... following: a. A thermopile b. Calibrated resistance thermometers c. Precision thermometers d. Calibrated... is used, it shall be made from calibrated thermocouple wire taken from a single spool. Extension wires to the recording device shall also be made from that same spool. 3.2.6 Time Constant. The time...

  6. On the Dome Effect of Flux Radiometers to Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.

    1999-01-01

    Since the introduction of thermopile, pyranometers (solar, e.g., 0.3-3.0 microns) and pyrgeometers (terrestrial, e.g., 4-50 microns) have become instruments commonly used for measuring the broadband hemispherical irradiances at the surface in a long-term, monitoring mode for decades. These commercially available radiometers have been manufactured in several countries such as from the United States, Asia, and Europe, and are generally reliable and economical. These worldwide distributions of surface measurements become even more important in the era of Earth remote sensing in studying climate forcing. However, recent studies from field campaigns have pointed out that erroneous factors (e.g., temperature gradients between the filter dome and detector, emissivity of the thermopile) are responsible for the unacceptable level of uncertainty (e.g., 10-20 W/square Meter). Using a newly developed instrument of Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP), we have characterized the brightness temperature fields of pyranometers and pyrgeometers under various sky conditions. The QWIP is based on the superlattice (GaAs/AlGaAs) technology and has a noise equivalent temperature (NE delta T) less than 0.1 K. The quality of pyranometer and pyrgeometer measurements can be improved largely by applying proper knowledge of the thermal parameters affecting the operation of the thermopile systems. For example, we show a method to determine the "dome factor" (the longwave emission divided by the longwave transmission of a pyrgeometer dome) from field measurements. The results show, and are verified independently by the QWIP, that our dome factors of 0.59 and 0.90 are much smaller than the value of 4.0 assumed by the WMO. Data correction procedure and algorithm will be presented and discussed.

  7. On the Dome Effect of Flux Radiometers to Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.

    1999-01-01

    Since the introduction of thermopile, pyranometers (solar, e.g., 0.3-3.0 micrometers) and pyrgeometers (terrestrial, e.g., 4-50 micrometers) have become instruments commonly used for measuring the broadband hemispherical irradiances at the surface in a long-term, monitoring mode for decades. These commercially available radiometers have been manufactured in several countries such as from the United States, Asia, and Europe, and are generally reliable and economical. These worldwide distributions of surface measurements become even more important in the era of Earth remote sensing in studying climate forcing. However, recent studies from field campaigns have pointed out that erroneous factors (e.g., temperature gradients between the filter dome and detector, emissivity of the thermopile) are responsible for the unacceptable level of uncertainty (e.g., 10-20 W m (exp -2)). Using a newly developed instrument of Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP), we have characterized the brightness temperature fields of pyranometers and pyrgeometers under various sky conditions. The QWIP is based on the superlattice (GaAs/AlGaAs) technology and has a noise equivalent temperature (NE delta T) less than 0.1 K. The quality of pyranometer and pyrgeometer measurements can be improved largely by applying proper knowledge of the thermal parameters affecting the operation of the thermopile systems. For example, we show a method to determine the "dome factor" (the longwave emission divided by the longwave transmission of a pyrgeometer dome) from field measurements. The results show, and are verified independently by the QWIP, that our dome factors of 0.59 and 0.90 are much smaller than the value of 4.0 assumed by the WMO (World Meteorological Organization). Data correction procedure and algorithm will be presented and discussed.

  8. HRR Upgrade to mass loss calorimeter and modified Schlyter test for FR Wood

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced Heat Release Rate (HRR) methodology has been extended to the Mass Loss Calorimeter (MLC) and the Modified Schlyter flame spread test to evaluate fire retardant effectiveness used on wood based materials. Modifications to MLC include installation of thermopile on the chimney walls to correct systematic errors to the sensible HRR calculations to account for...

  9. Micromachined Thermoelectric Sensors and Arrays and Process for Producing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, Marc C. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Linear arrays with up to 63 micromachined thermopile infrared detectors on silicon substrates have been constructed and tested. Each detector consists of a suspended silicon nitride membrane with 11 thermocouples of sputtered Bi-Te and Bi-Sb-Te thermoelectric elements films. At room temperature and under vacuum these detectors exhibit response times of 99 ms, zero frequency D* values of 1.4 x 10(exp 9) cmHz(exp 1/2)/W and responsivity values of 1100 V/W when viewing a 1000 K blackbody source. The only measured source of noise above 20 mHz is Johnson noise from the detector resistance. These results represent the best performance reported to date for an array of thermopile detectors. The arrays are well suited for uncooled dispersive point spectrometers. In another embodiment, also with Bi-Te and Bi-Sb-Te thermoelectric materials on micromachined silicon nitride membranes, detector arrays have been produced with D* values as high as 2.2 x 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W for 83 ms response times.

  10. Measurements of convective and radiative heating in wildland fires

    Treesearch

    David Frankman; Brent W. Webb; Bret W. Butler; Daniel Jimenez; Jason M. Forthofer; Paul Sopko; Kyle S. Shannon; J. Kevin Hiers; Roger D. Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved irradiance and convective heating and cooling of fast-response thermopile sensors were measured in 13 natural and prescribed wildland fires under a variety of fuel and ambient conditions. It was shown that a sensor exposed to the fire environment was subject to rapid fluctuations of convective transfer whereas irradiance measured by a windowed sensor was...

  11. Nimbus-6 and -7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) sensor details and component tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, H. V.; Kyle, H. L.; Jacobowitz, H.; Hickey, J.

    1983-01-01

    Construction details and operating characteristics are described for the thermopile (used in the solar and fixed-Earth channels) and the pyroelectric detector (used in the Earth-scanning channels) carried on the Nimbus 6 and the Nimbus 7 satellites for gathering Earth radiation budget data. Properties of the black coating for the detectors, and sensor testing and calibration are discussed.

  12. Flammability properties and radiant fraction of FRT wood plastic composites using mass loss calorimeter under HRR hood

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman; Nicole Stark

    2017-01-01

    A special test arrangement was used to assess the flammability of 4 different wood plastic composites (WPC), most with fire retardants, all of which has a tendency to high smoke production leading to high radiant energy losses to the apparatus walls. The mass loss calorimeter (MLC) was modified to include a thermopile on the exhaust pipe stack to compensate for radiant...

  13. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3. Structural Dynamics, Machinery Dynamics and Vibration Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    and to thermopile, but with a dynamically non similar control . Response limiting was accomplished by electric heat source. The test transient measuring...pulse Improvements = Final eport, Space teats were found to be reasonably simple to and Communications Group , Hughes implement and control . The time...coolant flow components, experimental studies are generally from the core is constricted by the presence r of the control rod drive line (CRDL

  14. Effects of Ionization-Induced Smog on Air Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-30

    After leaving the monochromater, the beam was incident on the window of a HgCdTe Detector ( Infrared Assoc., Inc.), hereafter referred to as the...regulated power supply (Model 68735). The intensity of infrared light produced was measured by a thermopile detector (ORIEL Model 7102), hereafter...process measurements from the bolometer and detector and to control the stepper motor were located outside of the exposure room so as to reduce noise

  15. Thermoelectric ELISA for quantification of 8OHdG in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorova, Gergana

    This research demonstrates the feasibility of a novel method for performing thermoelectric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microfluidic device. The feasibility of the thermoelectric ELISA is demonstrated by measuring the concentration of 8-hydroxy 2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) in urine samples from amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. The detection method is based on formation of a complex between 8OHdG and anti-8OHdG capture antibody conjugated to biotin. The complex is immobilized over the measuring junctions of a thermopile via biotin streptavidin interaction. The concentration of the analyte is determined by using enzyme linked secondary IgG antibody specific to the primary one. The concentration of 8OHdG is determined by the initiation of an enzymatic reaction between glucose and glucose oxidase that is conjugated to the secondary IgG antibody. The heat released by the reaction of glucose and glucose oxidase is measured using an antimony-bismuth thermopile integrated in a microfluidic device. The amount of heat detected by the sensor is inversely proportional to the concentration of 8OHdG. A standard calibration curve using known concentrations of synthetic 8OHdG is generated and used to determine the concentration of the oxidized guanine in mouse urine samples.

  16. Update on the Fabrication and Performance of 2-D Arrays of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Thermal Detectors for Outer-Planets Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Aslam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with better performance than the current thermopile detectors that operate at room temperature will be needed at the focal plane of far-infrared instruments on future planetary exploration missions. We will present an update on recent results from the 2-D array of MgB2 thermal detectors being currently developed at NASA Goddard. Noise and sensitivity results will be presented and compared to thermal detectors currently in use on planetary missions.

  17. Characterization of Robotic Tail Orientation as a Function of Platform Position for Surf-Zone Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    components. The basic components for Robster’s power supply and distribution system were taken from the Bigfoot robot developed by John Herkamp [5...18MAR2009 Changes: Eliminated all references to Bigfoot Arm and Thermopile Commented out sonar II. AGBOT Code v2.1 - 20MAR2009 Changes: Added...anaOutVolts(rt_ch, PW_STOP); anaOutVolts(lt_ch, PW_STOP); //Stops Bigfoot for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) 69

  18. A Novel, High Energy-Density Electrical Storage Device for Electric Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-25

    the Navy’s Earth -to-Orbit coilgun, we used to be ever so careful in assembling thermopile rings on the projectile so that the current produced by the...chosen, placed across the two conductors, to tune in steps between 50 Hz and 50 MHz. possibly operating efficiently in the GHz range. 201 DISTRIBUTION...frequencies depending on the value of capacitor chosen, placed across the two conductors, to tune in steps between 50 Hz and 50 MHz, possibly

  19. The MASCOT Radiometer MARA for the Hayabusa 2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, M.; Knollenberg, J.; Borgs, B.; Hänschke, F.; Kessler, E.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Müller, N.

    2017-07-01

    The MASCOT radiometer MARA is a multi-spectral instrument which measures net radiative flux in six wavelength bands. MARA uses thermopile sensors as sensing elements, and the net flux between the instrument and the surface in the 18° field of view is determined by evaluating the thermoelectric potential between the sensors' absorbing surface and the thermopile's cold-junction. MARA houses 4 bandpass channels in the spectral range of 5.5-7, 8-9.5, 9.5-11.5, and 13.5-15.5 μm, as well as one long-pass channel, which is sensitive in the >3 μm range. In addition, one channel is similar to that used by the Hayabusa 2 orbiter thermal mapper, which uses a wavelength range of 8-12 μm. The primary science objective of the MARA instrument it the determination of the target asteroid's surface brightness temperature, from which surface thermal inertia can be derived. In addition, the spectral bandpass channels will be used to estimate the spectral slope of the surface in the thermal infrared wavelength range. The instrument has been calibrated using a cavity blackbody, and the temperature uncertainty is 1 K in the long pass channel for target temperatures of >173 K. Measurement uncertainty in the spectral bandpasses is 1 K for target temperatures above 273 K.

  20. Comparison of Pyranometers and Reference Cells on Fixed and One-axis Tracking Surfaces

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dooraghi, Michael R; Sengupta, Manajit; Vignola, Frank

    Photovoltaic (PV) system perfomance is monitored by a wide variety of sensors. These instruments range from secondary standard pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers to reference cells. Although instruments are mounted in the plane of array of the modules a wide range of results have been obtained. Some of these difference have been assumed to come from systematic uncertainties associated with the irradiance sensors. This study is an attempt to quantify these differences by comparing the output of selected thermopile-based pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells on a horizontal surface, a fixed-tilt surface, and a one-axis tracking surface. This analysis focusesmore » on clear-sky results from two sites with different climatic conditions. Several important features were observed. Photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells produce widely different results under clear skies, especially at larger angles-of-incidence even though both instruments are based on measuring the short circuit current of solar cells. The difference is caused by the scattering of light as it passes through the glazing of the reference cell or the diffuser lens of the photodioded- base pyranometer. Both instruments are shown to have similar response to the spectral distribution of the irradiance when compared to the thermopile-based pyranometer that has a response nearly independent of the wavelength of light used by PV modules.« less

  1. Earth radiation budget measurement from a spinning satellite: Conceptual design of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Suomi, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design, sensor characteristics, sensor performance and accuracy, and spacecraft and orbital requirements for a spinning wide-field-of-view earth energy budget detector were investigated. The scientific requirements for measurement of the earth's radiative energy budget are presented. Other topics discussed include the observing system concept, solar constant radiometer design, plane flux wide FOV sensor design, fast active cavity theory, fast active cavity design and error analysis, thermopile detectors as an alternative, pre-flight and in-flight calibration plane, system error summary, and interface requirements.

  2. Fabrication of thin film heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors have been constructed in the form of arrays of thermocouples on upper and lower surfaces of an insulating layer, so that flux values are proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surface of the insulation material. The sensor thermocouples are connected in thermopile arrangement, and the structure is patterned with photolithographic techniques. Both chromel-alumel and Pt-Pt/Rh thermocouples have been devised; the later produced 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a 1000 C furnace.

  3. Wide Dynamic Range Multiband Infrared Radiometer for In-Fire Measurements of Wildland Fire Radiant Flux Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremens, R.; Dickinson, M. B.; Hardy, C.; Skowronski, N.; Ellicott, E. A.; Schroeder, W.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a wide dynamic range (24-bit) data acquisition system for collection of radiant flux density (FRFD) data from wildland fires. The data collection subsystem was designed as an Arduino `shield' and incorporates a 24-bit analog-to-digital converter, precision voltage reference, real time clock, microSD card interface, audible annuciator and interface for various digital communication interfaces (RS232, I2C, SPI, etc.). The complete radiometer system consists of our custom-designed `shield', a commercially available Arduino MEGA computer circuit board and a thermopile sensor -amplifier daughter board. Software design and development is greatly assisted by the availability of a library of public-domain, user-implemented software. The daughter board houses a 5-band radiometer using thermopiles designed for this experiment (Dexter Research Corp., Dexter, MI) to allow determination of the total FRFD from the fire (using a wide band thermopile with a KRS-5 window, 0.1 - 30 um), the FRFD as would be received by an orbital asset like MODIS (3.95 um center wavelength (CWL) and 10.95 CWL, corresponding to MODIS bands 21/22 and 31, respectively) and wider bandpass (0.1-5.5 um and 8-14 um) corresponding to the FRFD recorded by `MWIR' and `LWIR' imaging systems. We required a very wide dynamic range system in order to be able to record the flux density from `cold' ground before the fire, through the `hot' flaming combustion stage, to the `cool' phase after passage of the fire front. The recording dynamic range required (with reasonable resolution at the lowest temperatures) is on the order of 106, which is not currently available in commercial instrumentation at a price point, size or feature set that is suitable for wildland fire investigations. The entire unit, along with rechargeable battery power supply is housed in a fireproof aluminum chassis box, which is then mounted on a mast at a height of 5 - 7 m above the fireground floor. We will report initial

  4. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body.

    PubMed

    Socorro, Fabiola; Rodríguez de Rivera, Pedro Jesús; Rodríguez de Rivera, Manuel

    2016-11-06

    We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm², while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm² detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat's temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual's metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity.

  5. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body

    PubMed Central

    Socorro, Fabiola; Rodríguez de Rivera, Pedro Jesús; Rodríguez de Rivera, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm2, while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm2 detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat’s temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual’s metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity. PMID:27827977

  6. Isothermal titration calorimetry in nanoliter droplets with subsecond time constants.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Brad; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2011-10-15

    We reduced the reaction volume in microfabricated suspended-membrane titration calorimeters to nanoliter droplets and improved the sensitivities to below a nanowatt with time constants of around 100 ms. The device performance was characterized using exothermic acid-base neutralizations and a detailed numerical model. The finite element based numerical model allowed us to determine the sensitivities within 1% and the temporal dynamics of the temperature rise in neutralization reactions as a function of droplet size. The model was used to determine the optimum calorimeter design (membrane size and thickness, junction area, and thermopile thickness) and sensitivities for sample volumes of 1 nL for silicon nitride and polymer membranes. We obtained a maximum sensitivity of 153 pW/(Hz)(1/2) for a 1 μm SiN membrane and 79 pW/(Hz)(1/2) for a 1 μm polymer membrane. The time constant of the calorimeter system was determined experimentally using a pulsed laser to increase the temperature of nanoliter sample volumes. For a 2.5 nanoliter sample volume, we experimentally determined a noise equivalent power of 500 pW/(Hz)(1/2) and a 1/e time constant of 110 ms for a modified commercially available infrared sensor with a thin-film thermopile. Furthermore, we demonstrated detection of 1.4 nJ reaction energies from injection of 25 pL of 1 mM HCl into a 2.5 nL droplet of 1 mM NaOH. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Comparison of Pyranometers and Reference Cells on Fixed and One-Axis Tracking Surfaces: Preprint

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dooraghi, Michael R; Sengupta, Manajit; Vignola, Frank

    A wide variety of sensors are used to monitor the irradiance incident on solar modules to evaluate the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. These instruments range from secondary standard pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers to reference cells. Although instruments are mounted in the plane of array of the modules, a wide range of results have been obtained. Some of these difference have been assumed to come from systematic uncertainties associated with the irradiance sensors. This study is an attempt to quantify these differences by comparing the output of selected thermopile pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells on a horizontal surface,more » a fixed-tilt surface, and a one-axis tracking surface. This analysis focuses on clear-sky results from two sites with different climatic conditions. Several important features were observed. Photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells produce widely different results under clear skies, especially at larger angles of incidence, even though both instruments are based on measuring the short-circuit current of solar cells. The difference is caused by the scattering of light as it passes through the glazing of the reference cell or the diffuser lens of the photodioded-base pyranometer. Both instruments are shown to have similar response to the spectral distribution of the irradiance when compared to the thermopile-based pyranometer, which has a response nearly independent of the wavelength of light used by PV modules.« less

  8. Anomalous Nernst effect in a microfabricated thermoelectric element made of chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Hideki; Ikhlas, Muhammad; Kimata, Motoi; Nugroho, Agustinus Agung; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Otani, YoshiChika

    2017-11-01

    Toward realizing a thermopile made of the chiral anti-ferromagnet Mn3Sn, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was employed to microfabricate a thermoelectric element consisting of a Ta/Al2O3/Mn3Sn layered structure. In this device, the Ta layer acts as a heater producing Joule heat diffusing across the Al2O3 insulating layer into the thin Mn3Sn layer. The measured Nernst signal exhibits a clear hysteresis in an applied temperature gradient and magnetic field at 300 K, and its magnitude is proportional to the square of the electrical current applied to the Ta heater. The spontaneous, zero field voltage signal in the device is of the order of a few μV, which is almost the same order of magnitude as observed in the bulk single-crystal Mn3Sn under a temperature gradient. The anomalous Nernst coefficient SANE of the microfabricated element was determined using a temperature gradient simulated by finite-element modeling. The obtained value of SANE is 0.27 μV/K, which is in good agreement with that of the reported experimental value of SANE (0.3 μV/K) for bulk single-crystal Mn3Sn. This result indicates that FIB microfabrication does not significantly alter the thermoelectric properties of bulk Mn3Sn. As the chiral antiferromagnet produces almost no stray field, our study opens the avenue for the fabrication of an efficient thermopile by densely packing the microfabricated antiferromagnetic elements.

  9. USE OF PELTIER COOLERS AS SOIL HEAT FLUX TRANSDUCERS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, H.L.; Campbell, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Peltier coolers were modified and calibrated to serve as soil heat flux transducers. The modification was to fill their interiors with epoxy. The average calibration constant on 21 units was 13. 6 plus or minus 0. 8 kW m** minus **2 V** minus **1 at 20 degree C. This sensitivity is about eight times that of the two thermopile transducers with which comparisons were made. The thermal conductivity of the Peltier cooler transducers was 0. 4 W m** minus **1 degree C** minus **1, which is comparable to that of dry soil.

  10. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing Using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for Use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-sq cm/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  11. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission [1] require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-cm2/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  12. A Novel Non-Intrusive Method to Resolve the Thermal-Dome-Effect of Pyranometers: Radiometric Calibration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lau, K. M.; Hansell, R. A.; Butler, J. J.; Cooper, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally the calibration equation for pyranometers assumes that the measured solar irradiance is solely proportional to the thermopile's output voltage; therefore only a single calibration factor is derived. This causes additional measurement uncertainties because it does not capture sufficient information to correctly account for a pyranometer's thermal effect. In our updated calibration equation, temperatures from the pyranometer's dome and case are incorporated to describe the instrument's thermal behavior, and a new set of calibration constants are determined, thereby reducing measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we demonstrate why a pyranometer's uncertainty using the traditional calibration equation is always larger than a-few-percent, but with the new approach can become much less than 1% after the thermal issue is resolved. The highlighted calibration results are based on NIST-traceable light sources under controlled laboratory conditions. The significance of the new approach lends itself to not only avoiding the uncertainty caused by a pyranometer's thermal effect but also the opportunity to better isolate and characterize other instrumental artifacts, such as angular response and non-linearity of the thermopile, to further reduce additional uncertainties. We also discuss some of the implications, including an example of how the thermal issue can potentially impact climate studies by evaluating aerosol's direct-radiative effect using field measurements with and without considering the pyranometer's thermal effect. The results of radiative transfer model simulation show that a pyranometer's thermal effect on solar irradiance measurements at the surface can be translated into a significant alteration of the calculated distribution of solar energy inside the column atmosphere.

  13. A Novel Nonintrusive Method to Resolve the Thermal Dome Effect of Pyranometers: Radiometric Calibration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji. Q.; Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, K. M.; Hansell, R. A.; Butler, J. J.; Cooper, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally the calibration equation for pyranometers assumes that the measured solar irradiance is solely proportional to the thermopile s output voltage; therefore, only a single calibration factor is derived. This causes additional measurement uncertainties because it does not capture sufficient information to correctly account for a pyranometer s thermal effect. In our updated calibration equation, temperatures from the pyranometer's dome and case are incorporated to describe the instrument's thermal behavior, and a new set of calibration constants are determined, thereby reducing measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we demonstrate why a pyranometer's uncertainty using the traditional calibration equation is always larger than a few percent, but with the new approach can become much less than 1% after the thermal issue is resolved. The highlighted calibration results are based on NIST traceable light sources under controlled laboratory conditions. The significance of the new approach lends itself to not only avoiding the uncertainty caused by a pyranometer's thermal effect but also the opportunity to better isolate and characterize other instrumental artifacts, such as angular response and nonlinearity of the thermopile, to further reduce additional uncertainties. We also discuss some of the implications, including an example of how the thermal issue can potentially impact climate studies by evaluating aerosol s direct radiative effect using field measurements with and without considering the pyranometer s thermal effect. The results of radiative transfer model simulation show that a pyranometer s thermal effect on solar irradiance measurements at the surface can be translated into a significant alteration of the calculated distribution of solar energy inside the column atmosphere.

  14. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  15. Rugged, Low Cost, Environmental Sensors for a Turbulent World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Sandell, C. T.; Wickert, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Ongoing scientific research and resource management require a diverse range of high-quality and low-cost sensors to maximize the number and type of measurements that can be obtained. To accomplish this, we have developed a series of diversified sensors for common environmental applications. The TP-DownHole is an ultra-compact temperature and pressure sensor designed for use in CMT (Continuous Multi-channel Tubing) multi-level wells. Its 1 mm water depth resolution, 30 cm altitude resolution, and rugged design make it ideal for both water level measurements and monitoring barometric pressure and associated temperature changes. The TP-DownHole sensor has also been incorporated into a self-contained, fully independent data recorder for extreme and remote environments. This device (the TP-Solo) is based around the TP-DownHole design, but has self-contained power and data storage and is designed to collect data independently for up to 6 months (logging at once an hour), creating a specialized tool for extreme environment data collection. To gather spectral information, we have also developed a very low cost photodiode-based Lux sensor to measure spectral irradiance; while this does not measure the entire solar radiation spectrum, simple modeling to rescale the remainder of the solar spectrum makes this a cost-effective alternative to a thermopile pyranometer. Lastly, we have developed an instrumentation amplifier which is designed to interface a wide range of sensitive instruments to common data logging systems, such as thermopile pyranometers, thermocouples, and many other analog output sensors. These three instruments are the first in a diverse family aimed to give researchers a set of powerful and low-cost tools for environmental instrumentation.

  16. Characterization of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon with phonon-boundary scattering enhanced thermoelectric properties and its application in infrared sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huchuan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-01-14

    Although significantly reducing the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires has been reported, it remains a challenge to integrate silicon nanowires with structure materials and electrodes in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) theoretically and experimentally. By leveraging the phonon-boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as low as around 12 W mK(-1) which is only about 10% of the value of bulk single crystalline silicon. The ZT of n-doped and p-doped 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as 0.067 and 0.024, respectively, while most previously reported data had values of about 0.02 and 0.01 for a poly-Si layer with a thickness of 0.5 μm and above. Thermopile infrared sensors comprising 128 pairs of thermocouples made of either n-doped or p-doped nanometer-thick poly-Si strips in a series connected by an aluminium (Al) metal interconnect layer are fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The measured vacuum specific detectivity (D*) of the n-doped and p-doped thermopile infrared (IR) sensors are 3.00 × 10(8) and 1.83 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 52 nm thick poly-Si, and 5.75 × 10(7) and 3.95 × 10(7) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 300 nm thick poly-Si, respectively. The outstanding thermoelectric properties indicate our approach is promising for diverse applications using ultrathin poly-Si technology.

  17. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  18. Effect of temperature on methanogenesis stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) into biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisakti, B.; Irvan, Mahdalena; Taslim; Turmuzi, M.

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of temperature on methanogenesis stage of conversion of palm oil mill effluent into biogas. Methanogenesis is the second stage of methanogenic anaerobic digestion. Improved performance of the methanogenesis process was determined by measuring the growth of microorganisms, degradation of organic materials, biogas production and composition. Initially, the suitable loading up was determined by varying the HRT 100, 40, 6, and 4.0 days in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with mixing rate 100 rpm, pH 6.7-7.5 at room temperature. Next, effect of temperature on the process was determined by varying temperature at mesophilic range (30-42°C) and thermophilic range (43-55°C). Analysis of total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were conducted in order to study the growth of microorganisms and their abilities in converting organic compound to produce biogas. Degradation of organic content i.e. VS decomposition and COD removal increased with the increasing of temperature. At mesophilic range, VS decomposition and COD removal were 51.56 ± 8.30 and 79.82 ± 6.03, respectively. Meanwhile at thermopilic range, VS decomposition and COD removal were 67.44 ± 3.59 and 79.16 ± 1.75, respectively. Biogas production and its methane content also increased with the increasing of temperature, but CO2 content also increased. Biogas production at mesophilic range was 31.77 ± 3.46 L/kg-ΔVS and methane content was 75 . Meanwhile, biogas production at thermopilic range was 37.03 ± 5.16 L/kg-ΔVS and methane content was 62.25 ± 5.50 .

  19. Going Places No Infrared Temperature Devices Have Gone Before

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Exergen's IRt/c is a self-powered sensor that matches a thermocouple within specified temperature ranges and provides a predictable and repeatable signal outside of this specified range. Possessing an extremely fast time constant, the infrared technology allows users to measure product temperature without touching the product. The IRt/c uses a device called a thermopile to measure temperature and generate current. Traditionally, these devices are not available in a size that would be compatible with the Exergen IRt/c, based on NASA s quarterinch specifications. After going through five circuit designs to find a thermopile that would suit the IRt/c design and match the signal needed for output, Exergen maintains that it developed a model that totaled just 20 percent of the volume of the previous smallest detector in the world. Following completion of the project with Glenn, Exergen continued development of the IRt/c for other customers, spinning off a new product line called the micro IRt/c. This latest development has broadened applications for industries that previously could not use infrared thermometers due to size constraints. The first commercial use of the micro IRt/c involved an original equipment manufacturer that makes laminating machinery consisting of heated rollers in very tight spots. Accurate temperature measurement for this application requires close proximity to the heated rollers. With the micro IRt/c s 50-millisecond time constant, the manufacturer is able to gain closer access to the intended temperature targets for exact readings, thereby increasing productivity and staying ahead of competition.In a separate application, the infrared temperature sensor is being utilized for avalanche warnings in Switzerland. The IRt/c is mounted about 5 meters above the ground to measure the snow cover throughout the mountainous regions of the country.

  20. Solar variability and climate change: An historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Theodore S.

    There is nothing new about the debate over the Sun's influence on terrestrial climate.As early as the late 18th century, widespread concern for the deterioration of the Earth's climate led to speculation about the Sun's role in climate change [Feldman, 1993; Fleming, 1990]. Drawing analogies with variations in the brightness of stars, the British astronomer William Herschel suggested that greater sunspot activity would result in warmer terrestrial climates. Herschel supported his hypothesis by referring to price series for wheat published in Adam Smiths Wealth of Nations [Hufbauer, 1991]. Later, the eminent American physicist Joseph Henry demonstrated by thermopile measurements that, contrary to Herschel's assumption, sunspots were cooler than the unblemished portions of the solar disk.

  1. Micron-Scale Differential Scanning Calorimeter on a Chip

    DOEpatents

    Cavicchi, Richard E; Poirier, Gregory Ernest; Suehle, John S; Gaitan, Michael; Tea, Nim H

    1998-06-30

    A differential scanning microcalorimeter produced on a silicon chip enables microscopic scanning calorimetry measurements of small samples and thin films. The chip may be fabricated using standard CMOS processes. The microcalorimeter includes a reference zone and a sample zone. The reference and sample zones may be at opposite ends of a suspended platform or may reside on separate platforms. An integrated polysilicon heater provides heat to each zone. A thermopile consisting of a succession of thermocouple junctions generates a voltage representing the temperature difference between the reference and sample zones. Temperature differences between the zones provide information about the chemical reactions and phase transitions that occur in a sample placed in the sample zone.

  2. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections tomore » solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.« less

  3. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1991-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. Cassini and Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Fly-by (CRAF), both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is slated for a 1994 launch. Cassini was chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn's orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), for the Cassini mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement, and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce the 1/4 noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique.

  4. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. CRAF and CASSINI, both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is a cometary rendezvous mission slated for a 1994 launch. CASSINI has been chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer (CIRS) that will be proposed for the CASSINI mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce th 1/f noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using an MOCVD technique.

  5. A batch process micromachined thermoelectric energy harvester: fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Leonov, V.; Goedbloed, M.; van Andel, Y.; de Nooijer, M. C.; Elfrink, R.; Wang, Z.; Vullers, R. J. M.

    2010-10-01

    Micromachined thermopiles are considered as a cost-effective solution for energy harvesters working at a small temperature difference and weak heat flows typical for, e.g., the human body. They can be used for powering autonomous wireless sensor nodes in a body area network. In this paper, a micromachined thermoelectric energy harvester with 6 µm high polycrystalline silicon germanium (poly-SiGe) thermocouples fabricated on a 6 inch wafer is presented. An open circuit voltage of 1.49 V and an output power of 0.4 µW can be generated with 3.5 K temperature difference in a model of a wearable micromachined energy harvester of the discussed design, which has a die size of 1.0 mm × 2.5 mm inside a watch-size generator.

  6. A Compact, Multi-view Net Flux Radiometer for Future Uranus and Neptune Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Amato, M.; Atkinson, D. H.; Hewagama, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Mousis, O.

    2017-01-01

    A Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for future probe missions to the icy giants Uranus and Neptune. The baseline design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-3.5 m) and a thermal channel (4-to-300 m). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with band-pass filters are used for each spectral channel and to define a 5 angular acceptance. Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom radiation hard application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The baseline design can easily be changed to increase the number of detector channels from two to seven.

  7. NASA Tech Briefs, May 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Topics covered include: Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators; Wireless Temperature-Monitoring System; Analog Binaural Circuits for Detecting and Locating Leaks; Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators; Surface-Micromachined Planar Arrays of Thermopiles; Cascade Back-Propagation Learning in Neural Networks; Perovskite Superlattices as Tunable Microwave Devices; Rollable Thin-Shell Nanolaminate Mirrors; Flight Tests of a Ministick Controller in an F/A-18 Airplane; Piezoelectrically Actuated Shutter for High Vacuum; Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems; Microscope Cells Containing Multiple Micromachined Wells; Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries; Integrated Arrays of Ion-Sensitive Electrodes; Model of Fluidized Bed Containing Reacting Solids and Gases; Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators; Using Fractional Clock-Period Delays in Telemetry Arraying; Developing Generic Software for Spacecraft Avionics; Numerical Study of Pyrolysis of Biomass in Fluidized Beds; and Assessment of Models of Chemically Reacting Granular Flows.

  8. Noncontact localized internal infrared radiation measurement using an infrared point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaka, Masaki

    2017-12-01

    The techniques for temperature measurement within the human body are important for clinical applications. A method for noncontact local infrared (IR) radiation measurements was investigated deep within an object to simulate how the core human body temperature can be obtained. To isolate the IR light emitted from a specific area within the object from the external noise, the radiating IR light was detected using an IR point detector, which comprises a pinhole and a thermopile positioned at an imaging relation with the region of interest within the object. The structure of the helical filament radiating IR light inside a light bulb was thermally imaged by scanning the bulb in two dimensions. Moreover, this approach was used to effectively measure IR light in the range of human body temperature using a glass plate placed in front of the heat source, mimicking the ocular fundus.

  9. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  10. Noncontact localized internal infrared radiation measurement using an infrared point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaka, Masaki

    2018-06-01

    The techniques for temperature measurement within the human body are important for clinical applications. A method for noncontact local infrared (IR) radiation measurements was investigated deep within an object to simulate how the core human body temperature can be obtained. To isolate the IR light emitted from a specific area within the object from the external noise, the radiating IR light was detected using an IR point detector, which comprises a pinhole and a thermopile positioned at an imaging relation with the region of interest within the object. The structure of the helical filament radiating IR light inside a light bulb was thermally imaged by scanning the bulb in two dimensions. Moreover, this approach was used to effectively measure IR light in the range of human body temperature using a glass plate placed in front of the heat source, mimicking the ocular fundus.

  11. Traceable terahertz power measurement from 1 THz to 5 THz.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Andreas; Kehrt, Mathias; Monte, Christian; Müller, Ralf

    2013-06-17

    The metrology institute in Germany, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), calibrates the spectral responsivity of THz detectors at 2.52 THz traceable to International System of Units. The Terahertz detector calibration facility is equipped with a standard detector calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer at this frequency. In order to extend this service to a broader spectral range in the THz region a new standard detector was developed. This detector is based on a commercial thermopile detector. Its absorber was modified and characterized by spectroscopic methods with respect to its absorptance and reflectance from 1 THz to 5 THz and at the wavelength of a helium-neon laser in the visible spectral range. This offers the possibility of tracing back the THz power responsivity scale to the more accurate responsivity scale in the visible spectral range and thereby to reduce the uncertainty of detector calibrations in the THz range significantly.

  12. On the Use of a Low-Cost Thermal Sensor to Improve Kinect People Detection in a Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Susperregi, Loreto; Sierra, Basilio; Castrillón, Modesto; Lorenzo, Javier; Martínez-Otzeta, Jose María; Lazkano, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Detecting people is a key capability for robots that operate in populated environments. In this paper, we have adopted a hierarchical approach that combines classifiers created using supervised learning in order to identify whether a person is in the view-scope of the robot or not. Our approach makes use of vision, depth and thermal sensors mounted on top of a mobile platform. The set of sensors is set up combining the rich data source offered by a Kinect sensor, which provides vision and depth at low cost, and a thermopile array sensor. Experimental results carried out with a mobile platform in a manufacturing shop floor and in a science museum have shown that the false positive rate achieved using any single cue is drastically reduced. The performance of our algorithm improves other well-known approaches, such as C4 and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG). PMID:24172285

  13. Computer modeling of thermoelectric generator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Shields, V.

    1982-01-01

    Features of the DEGRA 2 computer code for simulating the operations of a spacecraft thermoelectric generator are described. The code models the physical processes occurring during operation. Input variables include the thermoelectric couple geometry and composition, the thermoelectric materials' properties, interfaces and insulation in the thermopile, the heat source characteristics, mission trajectory, and generator electrical requirements. Time steps can be specified and sublimation of the leg and hot shoe is accounted for, as are shorts between legs. Calculations are performed for conduction, Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heating, the cold junction can be adjusted for solar radition, and the legs of the thermoelectric couple are segmented to enhance the approximation accuracy. A trial run covering 18 couple modules yielded data with 0.3% accuracy with regard to test data. The model has been successful with selenide materials, SiGe, and SiN4, with output of all critical operational variables.

  14. Calorimetric determination of the heat of combustion of spent Green River shale at 978 K

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mraw, S.C.; Keweshan, C.F.

    1987-08-01

    A Calvet-type calorimeter was used to measure heats of combustion of spent Colorado oil shales. For Green River shale, the samples were members of a sink-float series spanning oil yields from 87 to 340 L . tonne/sup -1/. Shale samples (30-200 mg) are dropped into the calorimeter at high temperature, and a peak in the thermopile signal records the total enthalpy change of the sample between room temperature and the final temperature. Duplicate samples from the above sink-float series were first retorted at 773 K and then dropped separately into nitrogen and oxygen at 978 K. The resulting heats aremore » subtracted to give the heat of combustion, and the results are compared to values from classical bomb calorimetry. The agreement shows that the heats of combustion of the organic component are well understood but that question remain on the reactions of the mineral components.« less

  15. MEMS-based IR-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Sebastian; Steinbach, Bastian; Biermann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    The series JSIR350 sources are MEMS based infrared emitters. These IR sources are characterized by a high radiation output. Thus, they are excellent for NDIR gas analysis and are ideally suited for using with our pyro-electric or thermopile detectors. The MEMS chips used in Micro-Hybrid's infrared emitters consist of nano-amorphous carbon (NAC). The MEMS chips are produced in the USA. All Micro-Hybrid Emitter are designed and specified to operate up to 850°C. The improvements we have made in the source's packaging enable us to provide IR sources with the best performance on the market. This new technology enables us to seal the housings of infrared radiation sources with soldered infrared filters or windows and thus cause the parts to be impenetrable to gases. Micro-Hybrid provide various ways of adapting our MEMS based infrared emitter JSIR350 to customer specifications, like specific burn-in parameters/characteristic, different industrial standard housings, producible with customized cap, reflector or pin-out.

  16. Laser power meters as an X-ray power diagnostic for LCLS-II

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Heimann, Philip; Moeller, Stefan; Carbajo, Sergio

    For the LCLS-II X-ray instruments, laser power meters are being developed as compact X-ray power diagnostics to operate at soft and tender X-ray photon energies. These diagnostics can be installed at various locations along an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) beamline in order to monitor the transmission of X-ray optics along the beam path. In addition, the power meters will be used to determine the absolute X-ray power at the endstations. Here, thermopile power meters, which measure average power, and have been chosen primarily for their compatibility with the high repetition rates at LCLS-II, are evaluated. Here, a number of characteristicsmore » in the soft X-ray range are presented including linearity, calibrations conducted with a photodiode and a gas monitor detector as well as ultra-high-vacuum compatibility tests using residual gas analysis. The application of these power meters for LCLS-II and other X-ray FEL sources is discussed.« less

  17. Burner ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  18. Laser power meters as an X-ray power diagnostic for LCLS-II.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Philip; Moeller, Stefan; Carbajo, Sergio; Song, Sanghoon; Dakovski, Georgi; Nordlund, Dennis; Fritz, David

    2018-01-01

    For the LCLS-II X-ray instruments, laser power meters are being developed as compact X-ray power diagnostics to operate at soft and tender X-ray photon energies. These diagnostics can be installed at various locations along an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) beamline in order to monitor the transmission of X-ray optics along the beam path. In addition, the power meters will be used to determine the absolute X-ray power at the endstations. Here, thermopile power meters, which measure average power, and have been chosen primarily for their compatibility with the high repetition rates at LCLS-II, are evaluated. A number of characteristics in the soft X-ray range are presented including linearity, calibrations conducted with a photodiode and a gas monitor detector as well as ultra-high-vacuum compatibility tests using residual gas analysis. The application of these power meters for LCLS-II and other X-ray FEL sources is discussed.

  19. Laser power meters as an X-ray power diagnostic for LCLS-II

    DOE PAGES

    Heimann, Philip; Moeller, Stefan; Carbajo, Sergio; ...

    2018-01-01

    For the LCLS-II X-ray instruments, laser power meters are being developed as compact X-ray power diagnostics to operate at soft and tender X-ray photon energies. These diagnostics can be installed at various locations along an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) beamline in order to monitor the transmission of X-ray optics along the beam path. In addition, the power meters will be used to determine the absolute X-ray power at the endstations. Here, thermopile power meters, which measure average power, and have been chosen primarily for their compatibility with the high repetition rates at LCLS-II, are evaluated. Here, a number of characteristicsmore » in the soft X-ray range are presented including linearity, calibrations conducted with a photodiode and a gas monitor detector as well as ultra-high-vacuum compatibility tests using residual gas analysis. The application of these power meters for LCLS-II and other X-ray FEL sources is discussed.« less

  20. A Radiation Hard Multi-Channel Digitizer ASIC for Operation in the Harsh Jovian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Aslam, S.; Akturk, A.; Quilligan, G.

    2011-01-01

    ultimately impact the surface of Europa after the mission is completed. The current JEO mission concept includes a range of instruments on the payload, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiters atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. The payload includes a low mass (3.7 Kg) and low power (< 5 W) Thermal Instrument (TI) concept for measuring possible warm thermal anomalies on Europa s cold surface caused by recent (< 10,000 years) eruptive activity. Regions of anomalously high heat flow will be identified by thermal mapping using a nadir pointing, push-broom filter radiometer that provides far-IR imagery in two broad band spectral wavelength regions, 8-20 m and 20-100 m, for surface temperature measurements with better than a 2 K accuracy and a spatial resolution of 250 m/pixel obtained from a 100 Km orbit. The temperature accuracy permits a search for elevated temperatures when combined with albedo information. The spatial resolution is sufficient to resolve Europa's larger cracks and ridge axial valleys. In order to accomplish the thermal mapping, the TI uses sensitive thermopile arrays that are readout by a custom designed low-noise Multi-Channel Digitizer (MCD) ASIC that resides very close to the thermopile linear array outputs. Both the thermopile array and the MCD ASIC will need to show full functionality within the harsh Jovian radiation environment, operating at cryogenic temperatures, typically 150 K to 170 K. In the following, a radiation mitigation strategy together with a low risk Radiation-Hardened-By-Design (RHBD) methodology using commercial foundry processes is given for the design and manufacture of a MCD ASIC that will meet this challenge.

  1. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin

    2016-06-02

    This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies on calibration responsivities and the resulting impact on radiometric measurements. The calibration responsivities used in this study are provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at a 45 degree solar zenith angle and responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons to reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturersmore » are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison of the test radiometer under calibration to a reference radiometer of the same type. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1percent to 2 percent differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately enable a reduction in radiometric measurement uncertainties and assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.« less

  2. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  3. Low cost Earth attitude sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberati, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Giorgio; Verzegnassi, Fulvia

    2017-11-01

    A patent-pending, low-cost, moderate performance, Earth Attitude Sensor for LEO satellites is described in this paper. The paper deals with the system concepts, the technology adopted and the simulation results. The sensor comprises three or four narrow field of view mini telescopes pointed towards the Earth edge to detect and measure the variation of the off-nadir angle of the Earth-to-black sky transition using thermopile detectors suitably placed in the foci of the optical min telescopes. The system's innovation consists in the opto-mechanical configuration adopted that is sturdy and has no moving parts being , thus, inherently reliable. In addition, with a view to reducing production costs, the sensor does without hi-rel and is instead mainly based on COTS parts suitably chosen. Besides it is flexible and can be adapted to perform attitude measurement onboard spacecraft flying in orbits other than LEO with a minimum of modifications to the basic design. At present the sensor is under development by IMT and OptoService.

  4. Crystallographic effects during radiative melting of semitransparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, B. W.; Viskanta, R.

    1987-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to illustrate crystallogrpahic effects during radiative melting of unconfined vertical layers of semitransparent material. Radiative melting of a polycrystalline paraffin was performed and the instantaneous layer weight and transmittance were measured using a cantilever beam technique and thermopile radiation detector, respectively. The effects of radiative flux, initial solid subcooling, spectral distribution of the irradiation, and crystal structure of the solid as determined qualitatively by the sample solidification rate were studied. Experimental results show conclusively the dominant influence of cystallographic effects in the form of multiple internal scattering of radiation during the melting process. A theoretical model is formulated to predict the melting rate of the material. Radiation transfer is treated by solving the one-dimensional radiative transfer equation for an absorbing-scattering medium using the discrete ordinates method. Melting rate and global layer reflectance as predicted by the model agree well with experimental data. Parametric studies conducted with the model illustrate the sensitivity of the melting behavior to such variables as incident radiative flux, initial layer opacity (material extinction coefficient), and scattering asymmetry factor.

  5. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  6. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  7. NREL Pyrheliometer Comparisons: September 26-October 7, 2016 (NPC-2016)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Dooraghi, Mike; Andreas, Afshin

    Accurate measurements of direct normal (beam) solar irradiance from pyrheliometers are important for developing and deploying solar energy conversion systems, improving our understanding of the Earth's energy budget for climate change studies, and for other science and technology applications involving solar flux. Providing these measurements places many demands on the quality system used by the operator of commercially available radiometers. Maintaining accurate radiometer calibrations that are traceable to an international standard is the first step in producing research-quality solar irradiance measurements. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) pyrheliometer comparisons (NPCs) are held annually at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) inmore » Golden, Colorado. Open to all pyrheliometer owners and operators, each NPC provides an opportunity to determine the unique World Radiometric Reference transfer factor (WRR-TF) for each participating pyrheliometer. By adjusting all subsequent pyrheliometer measurements by the appropriate WRR-TF, the solar irradiance data are traceable to the WRR. NPC-2016 was September 26 through October 7, 2016. Participants operated 45 absolute cavity radiometers and 27 conventional thermopile-based pyrheliometers to simultaneously measure clear-sky, direct normal solar irradiance during this period.« less

  8. Boundary layer separation and reattachment detection on airfoils by thermal flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-10-24

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results.

  9. Buoyancy Effects in Strongly-Pulsed, Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Johari, H.; Ghaem-Maghami, E.; Stocker, D. P.; Hegde, U. G.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to better understand the combustion behavior of pulsed, turbulent diffusion flames by conducting experiments in microgravity. The fuel jet is fully-modulated (i.e., completely shut off between pulses) by an externally controlled valve system leading to enhanced fuel/air mixing compared to acoustically excited or partially-modulated jets. Experiments are conducted both in laboratories at UW and WPI and in the GRC 2.2s Drop Tower. A single fuel nozzle with diameter d = 2 mm is centered in a combustor 20 20 cm in cross section and 67 cm in height. The gaseous fuel flow (ethylene or a 50/50 ethylene/nitrogen mixture by volume) is fully-modulated by a fast-response solenoid valve with injection times from tau = 4 to tau = 300 ms. The nominal Reynolds number based on the fuel velocity during injection, U(sub jet), is 5,000. A slow oxidizer co-flow properly ventilates the flame and an electrically heated wire loop serves as a continuous ignition source. Diagnostic techniques include video imaging, fine-wire thermocouples and thermopile radiometers, and gas sampling and standard emissions instruments (the last in the laboratory only).

  10. Buoyancy Effects in Strongly-pulsed, Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Johari, H.; Ghaem-Maghami, E.; Stocker, D. P.; Hegde, U. G.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to better understand the combustion behavior of pulsed, turbulent diffusion flames by conducting experiments in microgravity. The fuel jet is fully-modulated (i.e., completely shut off between pulses) by an externally controlled valve system leading to enhanced fuel/air mixing compared to acoustically excited or partially-modulated jets. Experiments are conducted both in laboratories at UW and WPI and in the GRC 2.2s Drop Tower. A single fuel nozzle with diameter d = 2 mm is centered in a combustor 20 x 20 cm in cross section and 67 cm in height. The gaseous fuel flow (ethylene or a 50/50 ethylene/nitrogen mixture by volume) is fully-modulated by a fast-response solenoid valve with injection times from tau = 4 to tau = 300 ms. The nominal Reynolds number based on the fuel velocity during injection, U(sub jet), is 5,000. A slow oxidizer co-flow properly ventilates the flame and an electrically heated wire loop serves as a continuous ignition source. Diagnostic techniques include video imaging, fine-wire thermocouples and thermopile radiometers, and gas sampling and standard emissions instruments (the last in the laboratory only).

  11. Cassini infrared Fourier spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunde, Virgil G.; Ade, Peter A.; Barney, Richard D.; Bergman, D.; Bonnal, Jean-Francois; Borelli, R.; Boyd, D.; Brasunas, John C.; Brown, G.; Calcutt, S. B.; Carroll, F.; Courtin, R.; Cretolle, Jacky; Crooke, Julie A.; Davis, Martin A.; Edberg, S.; Fettig, R.; Flasar, M.; Glenar, David A.; Graham, S.; Hagopian, John G.; Hakun, C. F.; Hayes, Patricia A.; Herath, L.; Horn, Linda; Jennings, Donald E.; Karpati, G.; Kellebenz, C.; Lakew, Brook; Lindsay, J.; Lohr, J.; Lyons, James J.; Martineau, Robert J.; Martino, Anthony J.; Matsumura, M.; McCloskey, J.; Melak, T.; Michel, G.; Morell, Armando; Mosier, C.; Pack, L.; Plants, M.; Robinson, D.; Rodriguez, Louis; Romani, Paul; Schaefer, W. J.; Schmidt, Steve; Trujillo, C.; Vellacott, Tim; Wagner, K.; Yun, D.

    1996-10-01

    The composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote sensing instrument to be flown on the Cassini orbiter. CIRS will retrieve vertical profiles of temperature and gas composition for the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn, from deep in their tropospheres to high in their stratospheres. CIRS will also retrieve information on the thermal properties and composition of Saturn's rings and Saturnian satellites. CIRS consists of a pair of Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs) which together cover the spectral range from 10-1400 cm-1 with a spectral resolution up to 0.5 cm-1. The two interferometers share a 50 cm beryllium Cassegrain telescope. The far-infrared FTS is a polarizing interferometer covering the 10-600 cm-1 range with a pair of thermopile detectors, and a 3.9 mrad field of view. The mid-infrared FTS is a conventional Michelson interferometer covering 200-1400 cm-1 in two spectral bandpasses: 600-1100 cm- 1100-1400 cm(superscript -1 with a 1 by 10 photovoltaic HgCdTe array. Each pixel of the arrays has an approximate 0.3 mrad field of view. The HgCdTe arrays are cooled to approximately 80K with a passive radiative cooler.

  12. In-flight Far-Infrared Performance of the CIRS Instrument on Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Brasunas, John C.; Lakew, Brook; Fettig, Rainer; Jennings, Donald E.; Carlson, Ronald; Kunde, Virgil G.

    2004-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on-board Cassini consists of two interferometers: a conventional Michelson for the mid-infrared; and a Martin-Puplett type in the far-infrared employing wire grid polarizers to split, recombine and analyze the radiation. The far-IR focal plane (FP1) assembly uses two thermopile detectors to measure the final transmitted and reflected beams at the polarizer-analyzer: if one fails, the interferometer can still operate, albeit with a lower efficiency. The combined effect is for good response from 10 to 300/cm, and declining response to 600/cm. This paper will examine in-flight performance of the far-IR interferometer, including NESR and response. Regular noise spikes, resulting from pickup from other electrical sub-systems has been found on the CIRS interferograms, and the removal of these effects is discussed. The radiometric calibration is described, and then we show how the calibration was applied to science data taken during the Jupiter flyby of December 2000. Finally, we discuss signal-to-noise on the calibrated spectra, emphasizing limitations of the current instrument and the potential for improvement in future missions.

  13. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  14. Research on the method of establishing the total radiation meter calibration device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jianqiang; Xia, Ming; Xia, Junwen; Zhang, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Pyranometer is an instrument used to measure the solar radiation, according to pyranometer differs as installation state, can be respectively measured total solar radiation, reflected radiation, or with the help of shading device for measuring scattering radiation. Pyranometer uses the principle of thermoelectric effect, inductive element adopts winding plating type multi junction thermopile, its surface is coated with black coating with high absorption rate. Hot junction in the induction surface, while the cold junction is located in the body, the cold and hot junction produce thermoelectric potential. In the linear range, the output signal is proportional to the solar irradiance. Traceability to national meteorological station, as the unit of the national legal metrology organizations, the responsibility is to transfer value of the sun and the earth radiation value about the national meteorological industry. Using the method of comparison, with indoor calibration of solar simulator, at the same location, standard pyranometer and measured pyranometer were alternately measured radiation irradiance, depending on the irradiation sensitivity standard pyranometer were calculated the radiation sensitivity of measured pyranometer. This paper is mainly about the design and calibration method of the pyranometer indoor device. The uncertainty of the calibration result is also evaluated.

  15. Laser-induced voltages at room temperature in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Pr{sub x}Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Habermeier, H.U.; Jisrawi, N.; Jaeger-Waldau, G.

    Recent reports on high transient transverse voltages at room temperature in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Pr{sub x}Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} single crystal substrates, with a tilt angle between the [001] cubic axis and the substrate surface plane, have been interpreted by thermoelectric fields transverse to a laser-induced temperature gradient which are caused by the non-zero off diagonal elements of the Seebeck tensor. The authors have studied this effect in epitaxially grown Pr-doped, as well as undoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, thin films and observed for a 2 mm long YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{submore » 7} strip exposed to a UV photon fluence of 100 mJ/cm{sup 2} signals as large as 30 V. The unexpected high values for the signals and their doping dependence are discussed within the frame of a model based on a thermopile arrangement, the growth induced defect structure and the doping induced modifications of the material properties.« less

  16. Heat-exchanger concepts for neutral-beam calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. C.; Polk, D. H.; McFarlin, D. J.; Stone, R.

    1981-10-01

    Advanced cooling concepts that permit the design of water cooled heat exchangers for use as calorimeters and beam dumps for advanced neutral beam injection systems were evaluated. Water cooling techniques ranging from pool boiling to high pressure, high velocity swirl flow were considered. Preliminary performance tests were carried out with copper, inconel and molybdenum tubes ranging in size from 0.19 to 0.50 in. diameter. Coolant flow configurations included: (1) smooth tube/straight flow; (2) smooth tube with swirl flow created by tangential injection of the coolant; and (3) axial flow in internally finned tubes. Additionally, the effect of tube L/D was evaluated. A CO2 laser was employed to irradiate a sector of the tube exterior wall; the laser power was incrementally increased until burnout occurred. Absorbed heat fluxes were calculated by dividing the measured coolant heat load by the area of the burn spot on the tube surface. Two six element thermopiles were used to accurately determine the coolant temperature rise. A maximum burnout heat flux near 14 kW/sq cm was obtained for the molybdenum tube swirl flow configuration.

  17. Field Measured Spectral Albedo-Four Years of Data from the Western U.S. Prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Hodges, Gary B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an initial look at four years of spectral measurements used to calculate albedo for the Colorado prairie just east of the Rocky Mountain range foothills. Some issues associated with calculating broadband albedo from thermopile sensors are discussed demonstrating that uncorrected instrument issues have led to incorrect conclusions. Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) is defined for the spectral instruments in this study and used to demonstrate the dramatic changes that can be monitored with this very sensitive product. Examples of albedo wavelength and solar-zenith angle dependence for different stages of vegetative growth and senescence are presented. The spectral albedo of fresh snow and its spectral and solar-zenith angle dependence are discussed and contrasted with other studies of these dependencies. We conclude that fresh snow is consistent with a Lambertian reflector over the solar incidence angles measured; this is contrary to most snow albedo results. Even a slope of a degree or two in the viewed surface can explain the asymmetry in the morning and afternoon albedos for snow and vegetation. Plans for extending these spectral measurements for albedo to longer wavelengths and to additional sites are described.

  18. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-04-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  19. The Antarctic permafrost as a testbed for REMS (Rover Environmental Monitoring Station-Mars Science Laboratory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, B.; Ramos, M.; Sebastián, E.; Armiens, C.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Cabos, W.; de Pablo, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The present climatic characteristics of Mars favor the presence of extense permafrost areas in this lonely planet. Therefore environmental parameters that are included in Martian Rover missions are also used for monitoring thermal soil surface evolution in order to study the permafrost active layer thickness and the energy balance in the soil-atmosphere boundary limit layer. The REMS (Rover Environmental Monitoring Station) is an environmental station designed by the Centro de Astrobiología (CAB- Spain) with the collaboration of national and international partners (CRISA/EADS, UPC and FMI), which is part of the payload of the MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) NASA mission to Mars (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/overview/). This mission is expected to be launched in the final months of 2009, and mainly consists of a Rover, with a complete set of scientific instruments; the Rover will carry the biggest, most advanced suite of instruments for scientific studies ever sent to the Martian surface. Five sensors compose the REMS instrument: ground (GT-REMS) and air temperatures, wind speed and direction, pressure, humidity and ultraviolet radiation (UV-REMS). A simplified setup of the REMS was deployed on Antarctica in the surroundings of the Spanish Antarctic Stations on Livingston and Deception Islands (Maritime Antarctica), where the permafrost distribution is well-known. The aim of the experiment was to check REMS's sensors response against hard environmental conditions and calibrates their measures with standard Antarctic devices. The experimental apparatuses included some standard meteorological and thermopiles sensors corresponding to the REMS. All the sensors are mounted in a 1.8 m mast and include a Pt100 air temperature sensor with shield solar protection on the mast top, a Kipp and Zonnen CNR1 net radiometer for measuring infrared (5-50 μm) and short wave solar (305-2800 nm) radiation at 1.5 m high, GT-REMS sensor and its amplification box at 0.7 m high and finally

  20. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  1. Simplified Method for the Characterization of Rectangular Straw Bales (RSB) Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Leonardo; Goli, Giacomo; Monti, Massimo; Pellegrini, Paolo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Barbari, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    This research aims to design and implement tools and methods focused at the assessment of the thermal properties of full size Rectangular Straw Bales (RSB) of various nature and origin, because their thermal behaviour is one of the key topics in market development of sustainable building materials. As a first approach a method based on a Hot-Box in agreement with the ASTM C1363 - 11 standard was adopted. This method was found to be difficult for the accurate measurement of energy flows. Instead, a method based on a constant energy input was developed. With this approach the thermal conductivity of a Rectangular Straw-Bale (RSB λ) can be determined by knowing the thermal conductivity of the materials used to build the chamber and the internal and external temperature of the samples and of the chamber. A measurement a metering chamber was built and placed inside a climate chamber, maintained at constant temperature. A known quantity of energy was introduced inside the metering chamber. A series of thermopiles detects the temperature of the internal and external surfaces of the metering chamber and of the specimens allowing to calculate the thermal conductivity of RSB in its natural shape. Different cereal samples were tested. The values were found consistent with those published in scientific literature.

  2. Low-cost, compact, and robust gas abundance sensor package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dat; Nehmetallah, George; Gorius, Nicolas; Ferguson, Frank T.; Esper, Jaime; Johnson, Natasha M.; Aslam, Shahid; Nixon, Conor

    2018-05-01

    Gas Abundance Sensor Package (GASP) is a stand-alone scientific instrument that has the capability to measure the concentration of target gases based on a non-dispersive infrared sensor system along with atmospheric reference parameters. The main objective of this work is to develop a GASP system which takes advantage of available technologies and off-the-shelf components to provide a cost-effective solution for localized sampling of gas concentrations. GASP will enable scientists to study the atmosphere and will identify the conditions of the target's planetary local environment. Moreover, due to a recent trend of miniaturization of electronic components and thermopiles detectors, a small size and robust instrument with a reduction in power consumption is developed in this work. This allows GASP to be easily integrated into a variety of small space vehicles such as CubeSats or small satellite system, especially the Micro-Reentry Capsule (MIRCA) prototype vehicle. This prototype is one of the most advanced concepts of small satellites that has the capability to survive the rapid dive into the atmosphere of a planet. In this paper, a fully-operational instrument system will be developed and tested in the laboratory environment as well as flight preparation for a field test of the instrument suite will be described.

  3. Boundary Layer Separation and Reattachment Detection on Airfoils by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-01-01

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results. PMID:23202160

  4. Temperature sensitivity of Eppley broadband radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Broadband radiometers manufactured by Eppley Laboratories Inc. are commonly used to measure irradiance from both ground-based and aircraft platforms. Namely, the pyranometer (Model PSP) measures irradiance in the .3 to 3.0 micron spectral region while the pyrgeometer (Model PIR) senses energy in the 4 to 50 micron region. The two instruments have a similar thermopile construction but different filters to achieve the appropriate spectral selection. During the fall of 1986, the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) commenced with the first cirrus Intensive Field Observation (IFO) conducted in Central Wisconsin. Due to the nature of this field project, pyranometers and pyrgeometers manufactured by Eppley were flown on NCAR's high altitude research aircraft, the Sabreliner. Inherent in the construction of these radiometers is temperature compensation circuitry designed to make the instrument sensitivity nominally constant over a temperature range from -20 to +40 C. Because the Sabreliner flew at high altitudes where temperatures were as cold as -70 C, it was necessary to determine the radiometers relative sensitivity to temperatures below -20 C and apply appropriate corrections to the FIRE radiation data set. A procedure to perform this calibration is outlined. It is meant to serve as a supplement to calibration procedures.

  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Pyrheliometer Comparisons: 24 September - 5 October 2012 (NPC-2012)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.

    2013-05-01

    The NREL Pyrheliometer Comparisons for 2012 (NPC-2012) were held at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, from September 24 through October 5 for the purpose of transferring the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) to participating instrument. Twenty scientists and engineers operated 32 absolute cavity radiometers and 18 conventional thermopile-based pyrheliometers to simultaneously measure clear-sky direct normal irradiance during the comparisons. The transfer standard group of reference radiometers for NPC-2012 consisted of four NREL radiometers with direct traceability to the WRR, having participated in the Eleventh International Pyrheliometer Comparisons (IPC-XI) hosted by the World Radiation Center in the fall ofmore » 2010. As the result of NPC-2012, each participating absolute cavity radiometer was assigned a new WRR transfer factor, computed as the reference irradiance computed by the transfer standard group divided by the observed irradiance from the participating radiometer. The performance of the transfer standard group during NPC-2012 was consistent with previous comparisons, including IPC-XI. The measurement performance of the transfer standard group allowed the transfer of the WRR to each participating radiometer with an estimated uncertainty of +/- 0.33% with respect to the International System of Units.« less

  6. Design and Characterization of a High Resolution Microfluidic Heat Flux Sensor with Thermal Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung-Ki; Kim, Jung-Kyun; Cho, Sung-Cheon; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state. PMID:22163568

  7. Large anomalous Nernst effect at room temperature in a chiral antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlas, Muhammad; Tomita, Takahiro; Koretsune, Takashi; Suzuki, Michi-To; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Arita, Ryotaro; Otani, Yoshichika; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2017-11-01

    A temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic conductor can generate a transverse voltage drop perpendicular to both the magnetization and heat current. This anomalous Nernst effect has been considered to be proportional to the magnetization, and thus observed only in ferromagnets. Theoretically, however, the anomalous Nernst effect provides a measure of the Berry curvature at the Fermi energy, and so may be seen in magnets with no net magnetization. Here, we report the observation of a large anomalous Nernst effect in the chiral antiferromagnet Mn 3Sn (ref. ). Despite a very small magnetization ~0.002 μB per Mn, the transverse Seebeck coefficient at zero magnetic field is ~0.35 μV K-1 at room temperature and reaches ~0.6 μV K-1 at 200 K, which is comparable to the maximum value known for a ferromagnetic metal. Our first-principles calculations reveal that this arises from a significantly enhanced Berry curvature associated with Weyl points near the Fermi energy. As this effect is geometrically convenient for thermoelectric power generation--it enables a lateral configuration of modules to cover a heat source--these observations suggest that a new class of thermoelectric materials could be developed that exploit topological magnets to fabricate efficient, densely integrated thermopiles.

  8. Variability of pulsed energy outputs from three dermatology lasers during multiple simulated treatments.

    PubMed

    Britton, Jason

    2018-01-20

    Dermatology laser treatments are undertaken at regional departments using lasers of different powers and wavelengths. In order to achieve good outcomes, there needs to be good consistency of laser output across different weeks as it is custom and practice to break down the treatments into individual fractions. Departments will also collect information from test patches to help decide on the most appropriate treatment parameters for individual patients. The objective of these experiments is to assess the variability of the energy outputs from a small number of lasers across multiple weeks at realistic parameters. The energy outputs from 3 lasers were measured at realistic treatment parameters using a thermopile detector across a period of 6 weeks. All lasers fired in single-pulse mode demonstrated good repeatability of energy output. In spite of one of the lasers being scheduled for a dye canister change in the next 2 weeks, there was good energy matching between the two devices with only a 4%-5% variation in measured energies. Based on the results presented, clinical outcomes should not be influenced by variability in the energy outputs of the dermatology lasers used as part of the treatment procedure. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A micro dew point sensor with a thermal detection principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, M.; Merz, J.; Hummel, W.-J.; Glosch, H.; Messner, S.; Zengerle, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present a dew point temperature sensor with the thermal detection of condensed water on a thin membrane, fabricated by silicon micromachining. The membrane (600 × 600 × ~1 µm3) is part of a silicon chip and contains a heating element as well as a thermopile for temperature measurement. By dynamically heating the membrane and simultaneously analyzing the transient increase of its temperature it is detected whether condensed water is on the membrane or not. To cool the membrane down, a peltier cooler is used and electronically controlled in a way that the temperature of the membrane is constantly held at a value where condensation of water begins. This temperature is measured and output as dew point temperature. The sensor system works in a wide range of dew point temperatures between 1 K and down to 44 K below air temperature. In experimental investigations it could be proven that the deviation of the measured dew point temperatures compared to reference values is below ±0.2 K in an air temperature range of 22 to 70 °C. At low dew point temperatures of -20 °C (air temperature = 22 °C) the deviation increases to nearly -1 K.

  10. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The Passive Exposure of Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Components (PEERBEC) experiment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission was composed of sensors and components associated with the measurement of the earth radiation budget (ERB) from satellites. These components included the flight spare sensors from the ERB experiment which operated on Nimbus 6 and 7 satellites. The experiment components and materials as well as the pertinent background and ancillary information necessary for the understanding of the intended mission and the results are described. The extent and timing of the LDEF mission brought the exposure from solar minimum between cycles 21 and 22 through the solar maximum of cycle 22. The orbital decay, coupled with the events of solar maximum, caused the LDEF to be exposed to a broader range of space environmental effects than were anticipated. The mission spanned almost six years concurrent with the 12 year (to date) Nimbus 7 operations. Preliminary information is presented on the following: (1) the changes in transmittance experienced by the interference filters; (2) the results of retesting of the thermopile sensors, which appear to be relatively unaffected by the exposure; and (3) the results of the recalibration of the APEX cavity radiometer. The degradation and recovery of the filters of the Nimbus 7 ERB are also discussed relative to the apparent atomic oxygen cleaning which also applies to the LDEF.

  11. Characterization of Pu-238 Heat Source Granule Containment

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Richardson, Paul Dean II; Sanchez, Joey Leo; Wall, Angelique Dinorah

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Themoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. Essentially these are nuclear batteries that convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of 238Pu, in the form of 238PuO 2 granules. The granules are contained by 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the 238PuO 2 granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. An outer layer of Hastalloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in thismore » 238PuO 2 containment system. Any compromise in the strength member seen during destructive testing required by the RTG surveillance program is characterized. The T-111 strength member is characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in the Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of microphotographs. SEM mat further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).« less

  12. New gene cluster from the thermophile Bacillus fordii MH602 in the conversion of DL-5-substituted hydantoins to L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yan-Zhen; Wan, Yong-Min; He, Bing-Fang; Ying, Han-Jie; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2009-12-01

    The thermophile Bacillus fordii MH602 was screened for stereospecifically hydrolyzing DL-5-substituted hydantoins to L-alpha-amino acids. Since the reaction at higher temperature, the advantageous for enhancement of substrate solubility and for racemization of DL-5-substituted hydantoins during the conversion were achieved. The hydantoin metabolism gene cluster from thermophile was firstly reported in this paper. The genes involved in hydantoin utilization (hyu) were isolated on an 8.2 kb DNA fragment by Restriction Site-dependent PCR, and six ORFs were identified by DNA sequence analysis. The hyu gene cluster contained four genes with novel cluster organization characteristics: the hydantoinase gene hyuH, putative transport protein hyuP, hyperprotein hyuHP, and L-carbamoylase gene hyuC. The hyuH and hyuC genes were heterogeneously expressed in E. coli. The results indicated that hyuH and hyuC are involved in the conversion of DL-5-substituted hydantoins to an N-carbamyl intermediate that is subsequently converted to L-alpha-amino acids. Hydantoinase and carbamoylase from B. fordii MH602 comparing respectively with reported hydantoinase and carbamoylase showed the highest identities of 71% and 39%. The novel cluster organization characteristics and the difference of the key enzymes between thermopile B. fordii MH602 and other mesophiles were presumed to be related to the evolutionary origins of concerned metabolism.

  13. Assessment of Uncertainties for the NIST 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus: Extended Analysis for Low-Density Fibrous-Glass Thermal Insulation.

    PubMed

    Zarr, Robert R

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of uncertainties for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate apparatus is presented. The uncertainties are reported in a format consistent with current NIST policy on the expression of measurement uncertainty. The report describes a procedure for determination of component uncertainties for thermal conductivity and thermal resistance for the apparatus under operation in either the double-sided or single-sided mode of operation. An extensive example for computation of uncertainties for the single-sided mode of operation is provided for a low-density fibrous-glass blanket thermal insulation. For this material, the relative expanded uncertainty for thermal resistance increases from 1 % for a thickness of 25.4 mm to 3 % for a thickness of 228.6 mm. Although these uncertainties have been developed for a particular insulation material, the procedure and, to a lesser extent, the results are applicable to other insulation materials measured at a mean temperature close to 297 K (23.9 °C, 75 °F). The analysis identifies dominant components of uncertainty and, thus, potential areas for future improvement in the measurement process. For the NIST 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate apparatus, considerable improvement, especially at higher values of thermal resistance, may be realized by developing better control strategies for guarding that include better measurement techniques for the guard gap thermopile voltage and the temperature sensors.

  14. Assessment of Uncertainties for the NIST 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus: Extended Analysis for Low-Density Fibrous-Glass Thermal Insulation

    PubMed Central

    Zarr, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of uncertainties for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate apparatus is presented. The uncertainties are reported in a format consistent with current NIST policy on the expression of measurement uncertainty. The report describes a procedure for determination of component uncertainties for thermal conductivity and thermal resistance for the apparatus under operation in either the double-sided or single-sided mode of operation. An extensive example for computation of uncertainties for the single-sided mode of operation is provided for a low-density fibrous-glass blanket thermal insulation. For this material, the relative expanded uncertainty for thermal resistance increases from 1 % for a thickness of 25.4 mm to 3 % for a thickness of 228.6 mm. Although these uncertainties have been developed for a particular insulation material, the procedure and, to a lesser extent, the results are applicable to other insulation materials measured at a mean temperature close to 297 K (23.9 °C, 75 °F). The analysis identifies dominant components of uncertainty and, thus, potential areas for future improvement in the measurement process. For the NIST 1016 mm Guarded-Hot-Plate apparatus, considerable improvement, especially at higher values of thermal resistance, may be realized by developing better control strategies for guarding that include better measurement techniques for the guard gap thermopile voltage and the temperature sensors. PMID:27134779

  15. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  16. An improved maximum permissible exposure meter for safety assessments of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, D. A.; Evans, D. R.; Tyrer, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    Current interest in laser radiation safety requires demonstration that a laser system has been designed to prevent exposure to levels of laser radiation exceeding the Maximum Permissible Exposure. In some simple systems it is possible to prove this by calculation, but in most cases it is preferable to confirm calculated results with a measurement. This measurement may be made with commercially available equipment, but there are limitations with this approach. A custom designed instrument is presented in which the full range of measurement issues have been addressed. Important features of the instrument are the design and optimisation of detector heads for the measurement task, and consideration of user interface requirements. Three designs for detector head are presented, these cover the majority of common laser types. Detector heads are designed to optimise the performance of relatively low cost detector elements for this measurement task. The three detector head designs are suitable for interfacing to photodiodes, low power thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. Design of the user interface was an important aspect of the work. A user interface which is designed for the specific application minimises the risk of user error or misinterpretation of the measurement results. A palmtop computer was used to provide an advanced user interface. User requirements were considered in order that the final implement was well matched to the task of laser radiation hazard audits.

  17. Nano-Calorimetry based point of care biosensor for metabolic disease management.

    PubMed

    Kazura, Evan; Lubbers, Brad R; Dawson, Elliott; Phillips, John A; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2017-09-01

    Point of care (POC) diagnostics represents one of the fastest growing health care technology segments. Developments in microfabrication have led to the development of highly-sensitive nanocalorimeters ideal for directly measuring heat generated in POC biosensors. Here we present a novel nano-calorimeter-based biosensor design with differential sensing to eliminate common mode noise and capillary microfluidic channels for sample delivery to the thermoelectric sensor. The calorimeter has a resolution of 1.4 ± 0.2 nJ/(Hz) 1/2 utilizing a 27 junction bismuth/titanium thermopile, with a total Seebeck coefficient of 2160 μV/K. Sample is wicked to the calorimeter through a capillary channel making it suitable for monitoring blood obtained through a finger prick (<1 μL sample required). We demonstrate device performance in a model assay using catalase, achieving a threshold for hydrogen peroxide quantification of 50 μM. The potential for our device as a POC blood test for metabolic diseases is shown through the quantification of phenylalanine (Phe) in serum, an unmet necessary service in the management of Phenylketonuria (PKU). Pegylated phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PEG-PAL) was utilized to react with Phe, but reliable detection was limited to <5 mM due to low enzymatic activity. The POC biosensor concept can be multiplexed and adapted to a large number of metabolic diseases utilizing different immobilized enzymes.

  18. Evaluation of a newly developed mid-infrared sensor for real-time monitoring of yeast fermentations.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Robert; Geoerg, Daniel; Staubach, Jens; Raedle, Matthias; Methner, Frank-Juergen; Beuermann, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    A mid-infrared (MIR) sensor using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique has been developed for real-time monitoring in biotechnology. The MIR-ATR sensor consists of an IR emitter as light source, a zinc selenide ATR prism as boundary to the process, and four thermopile detectors, each equipped with an optical bandpass filter. The suitability of the sensor for practical application was tested during aerobic batch-fermentations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneous monitoring of glucose and ethanol. The performance of the sensor was compared to a commercial Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectrometer by on-line measurements in a bypass loop. Sensor and spectrometer were calibrated by multiple linear regression (MLR) in order to link the measured absorbance in the transmission ranges of the four optical sensor channels to the analyte concentrations. For reference analysis, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied. Process monitoring using the sensor yielded in standard errors of prediction (SEP) of 6.15 g/L and 1.36 g/L for glucose and ethanol. In the case of the FT-MIR spectrometer the corresponding SEP values were 4.34 g/L and 0.61 g/L, respectively. The advantages of optical multi-channel mid-infrared sensors in comparison to FT-MIR spectrometer setups are the compactness, easy process implementation and lower price. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  20. Development of on-line laser power monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chien-Fang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Li, Kuan-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Since the laser was invented, laser has been applied in many fields such as material processing, communication, measurement, biomedical engineering, defense industries and etc. Laser power is an important parameter in laser material processing, i.e. laser cutting, and laser drilling. However, the laser power is easily affected by the environment temperature, we tend to monitor the laser power status, ensuring there is an effective material processing. Besides, the response time of current laser power meters is too long, they cannot measure laser power accurately in a short time. To be more precisely, we can know the status of laser power and help us to achieve an effective material processing at the same time. To monitor the laser power, this study utilize a CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) camera to develop an on-line laser power monitoring system. The CMOS camera captures images of incident laser beam after it is split and attenuated by beam splitter and neutral density filter. By comparing the average brightness of the beam spots and measurement results from laser power meter, laser power can be estimated. Under continuous measuring mode, the average measuring error is about 3%, and the response time is at least 3.6 second shorter than thermopile power meters; under trigger measuring mode which enables the CMOS camera to synchronize with intermittent laser output, the average measuring error is less than 3%, and the shortest response time is 20 millisecond.

  1. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  2. Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Richardson Ii, P D; Thronas, D L; Romero, J P

    2008-01-01

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. Themore » T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.« less

  3. Micromachined nanocalorimetric sensor for ultra-low-volume cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Erik A; Weaver, John M R; Bourova, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr; Cobbold, Peter H; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2002-05-01

    Current strategies for cell-based screening generally focus on the development of highly specific assays, which require an understanding of the nature of the signaling molecules and cellular pathways involved. In contrast, changes in temperature of cells provides a measure of altered cellular metabolism that is not stimulus specific and hence could have widespread applications in cell-based screening of receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as in the assessment of toxicity of new lead compounds. Consequently, we have developed a micromachined nanocalorimetric biological sensor using a small number of isolated living cells integrated within a subnanoliter format, which is capable of detecting 13 nW of generated power from the cells, upon exposure to a chemical or pharmaceutical stimulus. The sensor comprises a 10-junction gold and nickel thermopile, integrated on a silicon chip which was back-etched to span a 800-nm-thick membrane of silicon nitride. The thin-film membrane, which supported the sensing junctions of the thermoelectric transducer, gave the system a temperature resolution of 0.125 mK, a low heat capacity of 1.2 nJ mK(-1), and a rapid (unfiltered) response time of 12 ms. The application of the system in ultra-low-volume cell-based assays could provide a rapid endogenous screen. It offers important additional advantages over existing methods in that it is generic in nature, it does not require the use of recombinant cell lines or of detailed assay development, and finally, it can enable the use of primary cell lines or tissue biopsies.

  4. Thermoelectric energy harvesting from diurnal heat flow in the upper soil layer

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Whalen, Scott A.; Dykhuizen, Ronald C.

    2012-09-26

    We built and tested a subterranean thermoelectric power source that converts diurnal heat flow through the upper soil layer into electricity. This paper describes the operation, design, and performance of the device. Key features of the power source include the use of bismuth-telluride thermopiles optimized for small ΔT and aerogel insulation to minimize thermal losses. The device weighs 0.24 kg and was designed with a flat form factor measuring 12 × 12 × 1.7 cm to facilitate modularity, packing, and assembly into larger arrays. One full year of field testing was performed between June 2009 and May 2010 in Albuquerque,more » New Mexico where the device generated an average power output of 1.1 mW. The season with the highest performance was spring (March–May) while the season of lowest performance was winter (November–January). During May 2010, the device generated an average power of 1.5 mW and a peak power of 9.8 mW at 9.3 V. Ten years of continuous operation at 1.1 mW would yield an energy density and specific energy of 1384 W h/L and 1430 W h/kg respectively, which is competitive with chemical batteries and is orders of magnitude greater than published subterranean and ambient thermoelectric harvesters. Numerical simulations show that performance is sensitive to the thermal properties of the soil and environmental conditions. This class of energy harvester may provide an option for supplemental power, or possibly primary power, for low power remote sensing applications.« less

  5. A 0.18 micrometer CMOS Thermopile Readout ASIC Immune to 50 MRAD Total Ionizing Dose (SI) and Single Event Latchup to 174MeV-cm(exp 2)/mg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, Gerard T.; Aslam, Shahid; Lakew, Brook; DuMonthier, Jeffery J.; Katz, Richard B.; Kleyner, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Radiation hardened by design (RHBD) techniques allow commercial CMOS circuits to operate in high total ionizing dose and particle fluence environments. Our radiation hard multi-channel digitizer (MCD) ASIC (Figure 1) is a versatile analog system on a chip (SoC) fabricated in 180nm CMOS. It provides 18 chopper stabilized amplifier channels, a 16- bit sigma-delta analog-digital converter (SDADC) and an on-chip controller. The MCD was evaluated at Goddard Space Flight Center and Texas A&M University's radiation effects facilities and found to be immune to single event latchup (SEL) and total ionizing dose (TID) at 174 MeV-cm(exp 2)/mg and 50 Mrad (Si) respectively.

  6. Process Analytical Technology in Freeze-Drying: Detection of the Secondary Solute + Water Crystallization with Heat Flux Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2018-04-01

    In situ and non-invasive detection of solute crystallization during freeze-drying would facilitate cycle optimization and scale-up from the laboratory to commercial manufacturing scale. The objective of the study is to evaluate heat flux sensor (HFS) as a tool for monitoring solute crystallization and other first-order phase transitions (e.g., onset of freezing). HFS is a thin-film differential thermopile, which acts as a transducer to generate an electrical signal proportional to the total heat applied to its surface. In this study, HFS is used to detect both primary (ice formation) and secondary (also known as eutectic) solute + water crystallization during cooling and heating of solutions in a freeze-dryer. Binary water-solute mixtures with typical excipients concentrations (e.g., 0.9% of NaCl and 5% mannitol) and fill volumes (1 to 3 ml/vial) are studied. Secondary crystallization is detected by the HFS during cooling in all experiments with NaCl solutions, whereas timing of mannitol crystallization depends on the cooling conditions. In particular, mannitol crystallization takes place during cooling, if the cooling rate is lower than the critical value. On the other hand, if the cooling rate exceeds the critical cooling rate, mannitol crystallization during cooling is prevented, and crystallization occurs during subsequent warming or annealing. It is also observed that, while controlled ice nucleation allows initiation of the primary freezing event in different vials simultaneously, there is a noticeable vial-to-vial difference in the timing of secondary crystallization. The HFS could be a valuable process monitoring tool for non-invasive detection of various crystallization events during freeze-drying manufacturing.

  7. The effects of gamma irradiation on micro-hotplates with integrated temperature sensing diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Laurent A.; André, Nicolas; Boufouss, El Hafed; Gérard, Pierre; Ali, Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin; Flandre, Denis

    2014-06-01

    Micro-hotplates are MEMS structures of interest for low-power gas sensing, lab-on-chips and space applications, such as micro-thrusters. Micro-hotplates usually consist in a Joule heater suspended on a thin-film membrane while thermopiles or thermodiodes are added as temperature sensors and for feedback control. The implementation of micro-hotplates using a Silicon-On-Insulator technology makes them suited for co-integration with analog integrated circuits and operation at elevated environmental temperatures in a range from 200 to 300 °C, while the heater allows thermal cycling in the kHz regime up to 700 °C, e.g. necessary for the activation of gas sensitive metal-oxide on top of the membrane, with mWrange electrical power. The demonstrated resistance of micro-hotplates to gamma radiations can extend their use in nuclear plants, biomedical sterilization and space applications. In this work, we present results from electrical tests on micro-hotplates during their irradiation by Cobalt-60 gamma rays with total doses up to 18.90 kGy. The micro-hotplates are fabricated using a commercial 1.0 μm Silicon-On-Insulator technology with a tungsten Joule heater, which allows power-controlled operation above 600 °C with less than 60 mW, and temperature sensing silicon diodes located on the membrane and on the bulk. We show the immunity of the sensing platform to the harsh radiation environment. Beside the good tolerance of the thermodiodes and the membrane materials to the total radiation dose, the thermodiode located on the heating membrane is constantly annealed during irradiation and keeps a constant sensitivity while post-irradiation annealing can restore the thermodiode.

  8. Miniaturized multi channel infrared optical gas sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllenstein, Jürgen; Eberhardt, Andre; Rademacher, Sven; Schmitt, Katrin

    2011-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy uses the characteristic absorption of the molecules in the mid infrared and allows the determination of the gases and their concentration. Especially by the absorption at longer wavelengths between 8 μm and 12 μm, the so called "fingerprint" region, the molecules can be measured with highest selectivity. We present an infrared optical filter photometer for the analytical determination of trace gases in the air. The challenge in developing the filter photometer was the construction of a multi-channel system using a novel filter wheel concept - which acts as a chopper too- in order to measure simultaneously four gases: carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and ammonia. The system consists of a broadband infrared emitter, a long path cell with 1.7m optical path length, a filter wheel and analogue and digital signal processing. Multi channel filter photometers normally need one filter and one detector per target gas. There are small detection units with one, two or more detectors with integrated filters available on the market. One filter is normally used as reference at a wavelength without any cross-sensitivities to possible interfering gases (e.g. at 3.95 μm is an "atmospheric window" - a small spectral band without absorbing gases in the atmosphere). The advantage of a filter-wheel set-up is that a single IR-detector can be used, which reduces the signal drift enormously. Pyroelectric and thermopile detectors are often integrated in these kinds of spectrometers. For both detector types a modulation of the light is required and can be done - without an additional chopper - with the filter wheel.

  9. Determination of the Thermal Offset of the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeffelin, Martial; Kato, Seiji; Smith, Amie M.; Rutledge, C. Ken; Charlock, Thomas P.; Mahan, J. Robert

    2001-01-01

    Eppley's precision spectral pyranometer (PSP) is used in networks around the world to measure downwelling diffuse and global solar irradiance at the surface of the Earth. In recent years several studies have shown significant discrepancy between irradiances measured by pyranometers and those computed by atmospheric radiative transfer models. Pyranometer measurements have been questioned because observed diffuse irradiances sometimes are below theoretical minimum values for a pure molecular atmosphere, and at night the instruments often produce nonzero signals ranging between + 5 and - 10 W/sq m. We install thermistor sondes in the body of a PSP as well as on its inner dome to monitor the temperature gradients within the instrument, and we operate a pyrgeometer (PIR) instrument side by side with the PSP. We derive a relationship between the PSP output and thermal radiative exchange by the dome and the detector and a relationship between the PSP output and the PIR thermopile output (net-IR). We determine the true PSP offset by quickly capping the instrument at set time intervals. For a ventilated and shaded PSP, the thermal offset can reach - 15 W/sq m under clear skies, whereas it remains close to zero for low overcast clouds. We estimate the PSP thermal offset by two methods: (1) using the PSP temperatures and (2) using the PIR net-IR signal. The offset computed from the PSP temperatures yields a reliable estimate of the true offset (+/- 1 W/sq m). The offset computed from net-IR is consistent with the true offset at night and under overcast skies but predicts only part of the true range under clear skies.

  10. Materials Chemistry Issues in the Development of a Single-Crystal Solar/Thermal Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Biering, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    A translucent crystal concentrates and transmits energy to a heat exchanger, which in turn heats a propellant gas, working gas of a dynamic power system, or a thermopile. Materials are the limiting issue in such a system. Central is the durability of the crystal, which must maintain the required chemical, physical/optical, and mechanical properties as it is heated and cooled. This report summarizes available data to date on the materials issues with this system. We focus on the current leading candidate materials, which are sapphire (Al2O3) for higher temperatures and silica (SiO2) for lower temperatures. We use data from thermochemical calculations; laboratory coupon tests with silica and sapphire; and system tests with sapphire. The required chemical properties include low-vapor pressure and interfacial stability with supporting structural materials. Optical properties such as transmittance and index of refraction must be maintained. Thermomechanical stability is a major challenge for a large, single-crystal ceramic and has been discussed in another report. In addition to the crystal, other materials in the proposed system include refractory metals (Nb, Ta, Mo, W, and Re), carbon (C), and high-temperature ceramic insulation. The major issue here is low levels of oxygen, which lead to volatile refractory metal oxides and rapid consumption of the refractory metal. Interfacial reactions between the ceramic crystal and refractory metal are also discussed. Finally, high-temperature ceramic insulating materials are also likely to be used in this system. Outgassing is a major issue for these materials. The products of outgassing are typically reactive with the refractory metals and must be minimized.

  11. Determination of the thermal offset of the Eppley precision spectral pyranometer.

    PubMed

    Haeffelin, M; Kato, S; Smith, A M; Rutledge, C K; Charlock, T P; Mahan, J R

    2001-02-01

    Eppley's precision spectral pyranometer (PSP) is used in networks around the world to measure downwelling diffuse and global solar irradiance at the surface of the Earth. In recent years several studies have shown significant discrepancy between irradiances measured by pyranometers and those computed by atmospheric radiative transfer models. Pyranometer measurements have been questioned because observed diffuse irradiances sometimes are below theoretical minimum values for a pure molecular atmosphere, and at night the instruments often produce nonzero signals ranging between +5 and -10 W m(-2). We install thermistor sondes in the body of a PSP as well as on its inner dome to monitor the temperature gradients within the instrument, and we operate a pyrgeometer (PIR) instrument side by side with the PSP. We derive a relationship between the PSP output and thermal radiative exchange by the dome and the detector and a relationship between the PSP output and the PIR thermopile output (net-IR). We determine the true PSP offset by quickly capping the instrument at set time intervals. For a ventilated and shaded PSP, the thermal offset can reach -15 W m(-2) under clear skies, whereas it remains close to zero for low overcast clouds. We estimate the PSP thermal offset by two methods: (1) using the PSP temperatures and (2) using the PIR net-IR signal. The offset computed from the PSP temperatures yields a reliable estimate of the true offset (+/-1 W m(-2)). The offset computed from net-IR is consistent with the true offset at night and under overcast skies but predicts only part of the true range under clear skies.

  12. Crystal Structure of Hyperthermophilic Endo-β-1,4-glucanase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baisong; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Yuguo; Lou, Zhiyong; Rao, Zihe; Feng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Endo-β-1,4-glucanase from thermophilic Fervidobacterium nodosum Rt17-B1 (FnCel5A), a new member of glycosyl hydrolase family 5, is highly thermostable and exhibits the highest activity on carboxymethylcellulose among the reported homologues. To understand the structural basis for the thermostability and catalytic mechanism, we report here the crystal structures of FnCel5A and the complex with glucose at atomic resolution. FnCel5A exhibited a (β/α)8-barrel structure typical of clan GH-A of the glycoside hydrolase families with a large and deep catalytic pocket located in the C-terminal end of the β-strands that may permit substrate access. A comparison of the structure of FnCel5A with related structures from thermopile Clostridium thermocellum, mesophile Clostridium cellulolyticum, and psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis showed significant differences in intramolecular interactions (salt bridges and hydrogen bonds) that may account for the difference in their thermostabilities. The substrate complex structure in combination with a mutagenesis analysis of the catalytic residues implicates a distinctive catalytic module Glu167-His226-Glu283, which suggests that the histidine may function as an intermediate for the electron transfer network between the typical Glu-Glu catalytic module. Further investigation suggested that the aromatic residues Trp61, Trp204, Phe231, and Trp240 as well as polar residues Asn51, His127, Tyr228, and His235 in the active site not only participated in substrate binding but also provided a unique microenvironment suitable for catalysis. These results provide substantial insight into the unique characteristics of FnCel5A for catalysis and adaptation to extreme temperature. PMID:22128157

  13. The origin of the initial heat associated with a single impulse in mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, J. V.; Keynes, R. D.; Ritchie, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the temperature changes associated with the passage of a single impulse in rabbit desheated vagus nerves. 2. The initial changes consist of an evolution of positive heat followed by a reabsorption of most of it; i.e. there is a phase of positive and a phase of negative heat production. 3. The size of the positive heat, its time of onset, and the time of onset of the negative heat have been measured by an analogue method of analysis. In addition, these parameters, together with the size of the negative heat and the duration of both phases of initial heat, have been studied with the aid of a computer, and also by conventional heat block analysis. 4. At about 5° C the measured positive heat is 7·2 μcal/g. impulse. It starts as soon as the compound action potential reaches the thermopile and lasts for about 107 msec. 5. This positive heat decreases with increasing temperature, the ratio of heat at 4° C to that at 14° C being 1·86. 6. The measured negative heat at about 5° C is 4·9 μcal/g. impulse. It starts 102 msec after the onset of positive heat, and lasts for about 240 msec. 7. When the sodium of Locke solution is replaced by lithium the positive heat is reduced by 19%, but the negative heat is increased by 22%. 8. In potassium-free solutions the positive heat is hardly affected (increase of 5%), but the negative heat is more than doubled. As a result the nerve may become briefly colder than its initial temperature by about 2 μ° C. 9. The effect of sodium-deficient solutions on the positive heat is somewhat variable, but the negative heat is consistently diminished. 10. Replacement of the chloride of Locke solution by sulphate or nitrate has little effect on the positive heat. The negative heat is reduced in size by 26% and in duration by 22%. 11. Replacement of most of the sodium of Locke solution by barium reduces or abolishes the negative heat, and increases the measured size of the positive heat nearly threefold. 12

  14. Decadal Variability of Surface Incident Solar Radiation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun

    2015-04-01

    Observations have reported a widespread dimming of surface incident solar radiation (Rs) from the 1950s to the 1980s and a brightening afterwards. However, none of the state-of-the-art earth system models, including those from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), could successfully reproduce the dimming/brightening rates over China. This study provides metadata and reference data to investigate the observed variability of Rs in China. From 1958 to 1990, diffuse solar radiation (Rsdif) and direct solar radiation (Rsdir) was measured separately in China, from which Rs was calculated a sum. However, pyranometers used to measure Rsdif had a strong sensitivity drift problem, which introduced a spurious decreasing trend to Rsdif and Rs measurements. The observed Rsdir did not suffer from such sensitivity drift problem. From 1990 to 1993, the old instruments were replaced and measuring stations were relocated in China, which introduced an abrupt increase in the observed Rs. After 1993, Rs was measured by solid black thermopile pyranometers. Comprehensive comparisons between observation-based and model-based Rs performed in this research have shown that sunshine duration (SunDu)-derived Rs is of high quality and provide accurate estimate of decadal variability of Rs over China. SunDu-derived Rs averaged over 105 stations in China decreased at -2.9 W m-2 per decade from 1961 to 1990 and remained stable afterward. This decadal variability has been confirmed by the observed Rsdir, independent studies on aerosols and diurnal temperature range, and can be reproduced by certain high-quality earth system models. However, neither satellite retrievals (the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Project Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX SRB)) nor reanalyses (ERA-Interim and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA)) can accurately reproduce such decadal variability of Rs over China for their exclusion of annual variability of tropospheric

  15. Impact of solar ultraviolet radiation on atopic dermatitis symptoms in young children: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Minji; Kim, Hyunmi; Jung, Kwon; Eo, Soomi; Ahn, Mijin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2017-09-01

    There are controversial data about the effects of sun exposure on atopic dermatitis (AD). We evaluated the association between solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and AD symptoms in children. Eighty-two children under 6 years (48 boys and 34 girls) with AD living in Seoul, Korea, were enrolled and followed for 12 months between September 2013 and August 2014. Daily symptoms were recorded to describe the degree of itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dryness, oozing, and edema. We assessed solar UVR by measuring radiation heat flux over the 290-400 nm wavelength range using thermopiles. A generalized linear mixed model and a generalized additive mixed model were used to evaluate the effects of UVR exposure on AD symptoms after adjusting for age, sex, outdoor temperature, outdoor humidity, and ambient air pollution. Symptom records of 12 915 person-days were analyzed. UVR showed a significantly positive relationship with AD symptoms. Over the study period, an increase in UVR by 10 W/cm 2 was associated with a 1.46% increase in AD symptoms (95% CI: 0.85-2.07) on the exposure day. An increase in the 6-day average level of UVR of the previous 5 days and the current day by 10 W/cm 2 was associated with a 3.58% (95% CI: 2.60-4.56) increase in AD symptoms. UVR exposure significantly increased AD symptoms in autumn, but decreased them in winter. Atopic dermatitis symptoms in children are likely to be affected by exposure to solar UVR with a cumulative effect, and this effect is different according to season. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  16. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1995-04-26

    The authors goal in the ARM program is the improvement of radiation models used in GCMs, especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. They are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that they combined with surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. They have also developed algorithmsmore » to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifolter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR). However, the major objective of the program has been the development of two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer. The MFRSR, has become a workhose at the CART site in Oklahoma and Kansas, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. They have spent most of their effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, they have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, they have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, they have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. In each case the authors have attempted to validate the approach using independent measurements or retrievals of the parameters under investigation. With the exception of the ozone intercomparison, the corroborative measurements have been made at the SGP CART site. This report highlights these

  17. The effect of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and thermal radiation in turbulent, non-premixed methane flames

    DOE PAGES

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Williams, Timothy C.

    2016-07-12

    Non-premixed oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas is used in industrial applications where high-intensity heat is required, such as glass manufacturing and metal forging and shaping. In these applications, the high flame temperatures achieved by oxy-fuel combustion increase radiative heat transfer to the surfaces of interest and soot formation within the flame is desired for further augmentation of radiation. However, the high cost of cryogenic air separation has limited the penetration of oxy-fuel combustion technologies. New approaches to air separation are being developed that may reduce oxygen production costs, but only for intermediate levels of oxygen enrichment of air. To determinemore » the influence of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and radiation, we developed a non-premixed coannular burner in which oxygen concentrations and oxidizer flow rates can be independently varied, to distinguish the effects of turbulent mixing intensity from oxygen enrichment on soot formation and flame radiation. Local radiation intensities, soot concentrations, and soot temperatures have been measured using a thin-film thermopile, planar laser-induced incandescence (LII), and two-color imaging pyrometry, respectively. The measurements show that soot formation increases as the oxygen concentration decreases from 100% to 50%, helping to moderate a decrease in overall flame radiation. An increase in turbulence intensity has a marked effect on flame height, soot formation and thermal radiation, leading to decreases in all of these. The soot temperature decreases with a decrease in the oxygen concentration and increases with an increase in turbulent mixing intensity. Altogether, the results suggest that properly designed oxygen-enriched burners that enhance soot formation for intermediate levels of oxygen purity may be able to achieve thermal radiation intensities as high as 85% of traditional oxy-fuel burners utilizing high-purity oxygen.« less

  18. The effect of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and thermal radiation in turbulent, non-premixed methane flames

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Williams, Timothy C.

    Non-premixed oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas is used in industrial applications where high-intensity heat is required, such as glass manufacturing and metal forging and shaping. In these applications, the high flame temperatures achieved by oxy-fuel combustion increase radiative heat transfer to the surfaces of interest and soot formation within the flame is desired for further augmentation of radiation. However, the high cost of cryogenic air separation has limited the penetration of oxy-fuel combustion technologies. New approaches to air separation are being developed that may reduce oxygen production costs, but only for intermediate levels of oxygen enrichment of air. To determinemore » the influence of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and radiation, we developed a non-premixed coannular burner in which oxygen concentrations and oxidizer flow rates can be independently varied, to distinguish the effects of turbulent mixing intensity from oxygen enrichment on soot formation and flame radiation. Local radiation intensities, soot concentrations, and soot temperatures have been measured using a thin-film thermopile, planar laser-induced incandescence (LII), and two-color imaging pyrometry, respectively. The measurements show that soot formation increases as the oxygen concentration decreases from 100% to 50%, helping to moderate a decrease in overall flame radiation. An increase in turbulence intensity has a marked effect on flame height, soot formation and thermal radiation, leading to decreases in all of these. The soot temperature decreases with a decrease in the oxygen concentration and increases with an increase in turbulent mixing intensity. Altogether, the results suggest that properly designed oxygen-enriched burners that enhance soot formation for intermediate levels of oxygen purity may be able to achieve thermal radiation intensities as high as 85% of traditional oxy-fuel burners utilizing high-purity oxygen.« less

  19. MIR-ATR sensor for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geörg, Daniel; Schalk, Robert; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Beuermann, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    A mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) sensor has been developed for chemical reaction monitoring. The optical setup of the compact and low-priced sensor consists of an IR emitter as light source, a zinc selenide (ZnSe) ATR prism as boundary to the process, and four thermopile detectors, each equipped with an optical bandpass filter. The practical applicability was tested during esterification of ethanol and formic acid to ethyl formate and water as a model reaction with subsequent distillation. For reference analysis, a Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectrometer with diamond ATR module was applied. On-line measurements using the MIR-ATR sensor and the FT-MIR spectrometer were performed in a bypass loop. The sensor was calibrated by multiple linear regression in order to link the measured absorbance in the four optical channels to the analyte concentrations. The analytical potential of the MIR-ATR sensor was demonstrated by simultaneous real-time monitoring of all four chemical substances involved in the esterification and distillation process. The temporal courses of the sensor signals are in accordance with the concentration values achieved by the commercial FT-MIR spectrometer. The standard error of prediction for ethanol, formic acid, ethyl formate, and water were 0.38 mol L  -  1, 0.48 mol L  -  1, 0.38 mol L  -  1, and 1.12 mol L  -  1, respectively. A procedure based on MIR spectra is presented to simulate the response characteristics of the sensor if the transmission ranges of the filters are varied. Using this tool analyte specific bandpass filters for a particular chemical reaction can be identified. By exchanging the optical filters, the sensor can be adapted to a wide range of processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and beverage industries.

  20. A low cost mid-infrared sensor for on line contamination monitoring of lubricating oils in marine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mohammadi, L.; Kullmann, F.; Holzki, M.; Sigloch, S.; Klotzbuecher, T.; Spiesen, J.; Tommingas, T.; Weismann, P.; Kimber, G.

    2010-04-01

    The chemical and physical condition of oils in marine engines must be monitored to ensure optimum performance of the engine and to avoid damage by degraded oil not adequately lubricating the engine. Routine monitoring requires expensive laboratory testing and highly skilled analysts. This work describes the adaptation and implementation of a mid infrared (MIR) sensor module for continued oil condition monitoring in two-stroke and four-stroke diesel engines. The developed sensor module will help to reduce costs in oil analysis by eliminating the need to collect and send samples to a laboratory for analysis. The online MIR-Sensor module measures the contamination of oil with water, soot, as well as the degradation indicated by the TBN (Total Base Number) value. For the analysis of water, TBN, and soot in marine engine oils, four spectral regions of interest have been identified. The optical absorption in these bands correlating with the contaminations is measured simultaneously by using a four-field thermopile detector, combined with appropriate bandpass filters. Recording of the MIR-absorption was performed in a transmission mode using a flow-through cell with appropriate path length. Since in this case no spectrometer is required, the sensor including the light source, the flowthrough- cell, and the detector can be realised at low cost and in a very compact manner. The optical configuration of the sensor with minimal component number and signal intensity optimisation at the four-field detector was implemented by using non-sequential ray tracing simulation. The used calibration model was robust enough to predict accurately the value for soot, water, and TBN concentration for two-stroke and four-stroke engine oils. The sensor device is designed for direct installation on the host engine or machine and, therefore, becoming an integral part of the lubrication system. It can also be used as a portable stand-alone system for machine fluid analysis in the field.

  1. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibrationmore » service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These

  2. Waveguide infrared spectrometer platform for point and standoff chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Suneet; Henning, Pat; Landers, Frank; Weling, Ani

    2004-03-01

    Advanced autonomous detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals has long been a major military concern. At present, our capability to rapidly assess the immediate environment is severely limited and our domestic infrastructure is burdened by the meticulous procedures required to rule out false threats. While significant advances have recently been accomplished in remote spectral sensing using rugged FTIRs and point detectors, efforts towards low cost chemical discrimination have been lacking. Foster-Miller has developed a unique waveguide spectrometer which is a paradigm shift from the conventional FTIR approach. The spectrometer provides spectral discrimination over the 3-14 μm range and will be the spectrometer platform for both active and passive detection. Foster-Miller has leveraged its innovations in infrared fiber-optic probes and the recent development of a waveguide spectrometer to build a novel infrared sensor platform for both point and stand-off chemical sensing. A monolithic wedge-grating optic provides the spectral dispersion with low cost thermopile point or array detectors picking off the diffracted wavelengths from the optic. The integrated optic provides spectral discrimination between 3-12 μm with resolution at 16 cm-1 or better and overall optical throughput approaching 35%. The device has a fixed cylindrical grating bonded to the edge of a ZnSe conditioning "wedge". The conditioning optic overcomes limitations of concave gratings as it accepts high angle (large FOV) light at the narrow end of the wedge and progressively conditions it to be near normal to the grating. On return, the diffracted wavelengths are concentrated on the discrete or array detector (pixel) elements by the wedge, providing throughput comparable to that of an FTIR. The waveguide spectrometer coupled to ATR probes, flow through liquid cells or multipass gas cells provides significant cost advantage over conventional sampling methodologies. We will

  3. NASA Tech Briefs, June 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Topics include: Real-Time Minimization of Tracking Error for Aircraft Systems; Detecting an Extreme Minority Class in Hyperspectral Data Using Machine Learning; KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive; Visualizing Acquisition, Processing, and Network Statistics Through Database Queries; Simulating Data Flow via Multiple Secure Connections; Systems and Services for Near-Real-Time Web Access to NPP Data; CCSDS Telemetry Decoder VHDL Core; Thermal Response of a High-Power Switch to Short Pulses; Solar Panel and System Design to Reduce Heating and Optimize Corridors for Lower-Risk Planetary Aerobraking; Low-Cost, Very Large Diamond-Turned Metal Mirror; Very-High-Load-Capacity Air Bearing Spindle for Large Diamond Turning Machines; Elevated-Temperature, Highly Emissive Coating for Energy Dissipation of Large Surfaces; Catalyst for Treatment and Control of Post-Combustion Emissions; Thermally Activated Crack Healing Mechanism for Metallic Materials; Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites; Self-Healing Glass Sealants for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Electrolyzer Cells; Micromachined Thermopile Arrays with Novel Thermo - electric Materials; Low-Cost, High-Performance MMOD Shielding; Head-Mounted Display Latency Measurement Rig; Workspace-Safe Operation of a Force- or Impedance-Controlled Robot; Cryogenic Mixing Pump with No Moving Parts; Seal Design Feature for Redundancy Verification; Dexterous Humanoid Robot; Tethered Vehicle Control and Tracking System; Lunar Organic Waste Reformer; Digital Laser Frequency Stabilization via Cavity Locking Employing Low-Frequency Direct Modulation; Deep UV Discharge Lamps in Capillary Quartz Tubes with Light Output Coupled to an Optical Fiber; Speech Acquisition and Automatic Speech Recognition for Integrated Spacesuit Audio Systems, Version II; Advanced Sensor Technology for Algal Biotechnology; High-Speed Spectral Mapper; "Ascent - Commemorating Shuttle" - A NASA Film and Multimedia Project DVD; High-Pressure, Reduced-Kinetics Mechanism for N

  4. Radiation Budget Instrument (RBI) for JPSS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, Elena; Priestley, Kory; Dunn, Barry; Cageao, Richard; Barki, Anum; Osmundsen, Jim; Turczynski, Craig; Abedin, Nurul

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Budget Instrument (RBI) will be one of five instruments flying aboard the JPSS-2 spacecraft, a polar-orbiting sun-synchronous satellite in Low Earth Orbit. RBI is a passive remote sensing instrument that will follow the successful legacy of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments to make measurement of Earth's short and longwave radiation budget. The goal of RBI is to provide an independent measurement of the broadband reflected solar radiance and Earth's emitted thermal radiance by using three spectral bands (Shortwave, Longwave, and Total) that will have the same overlapped point spread function (PSF) footprint on Earth. To ensure precise NIST-traceable calibration in space the RBI sensor is designed to use a visible calibration target (VCT), a solar calibration target (SCT), and an infrared calibration target (ICT) containing phase change cells (PCC) to enable on-board temperature calibration. The VCT is a thermally controlled integrating sphere with space grade Spectralon covering the inner surface. Two sides of the sphere will have fiber-coupled laser diodes in the UV to IR wavelength region. An electrical substitution radiometer on the integrating sphere will monitor the long term stability of the sources and the possible degradation of the Spectralon in space. In addition the radiometric calibration operations will use the Spectralon diffusers of the SCT to provide accurate measurements of Solar degradation. All those stable on-orbit references will ensure that calibration stability is maintained over the RBI sensor lifetime. For the preflight calibration the RBI will view five calibration sources - two integrating spheres and three CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder ) -like blackbodies whose outputs will be validated with NIST calibration approach. Thermopile are the selected detectors for the RBI. The sensor has a requirement to perform lunar calibration in addition to solar calibration in space in a way similar to CERES

  5. A FURTHER EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EXCITATION OF INFECTIONS OF THE THROAT

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Samuel B.; Mudd, Stuart; Goldman, Alfred

    1920-01-01

    Improvements are described in the method of following temperature changes, and thus alterations in vasomotor tone, in exposed mucous membranes. Invention of an applicator holder, by means of which more sure and stable apposition of the thermopile terminals to the mucous surface may be effected has been the chief advance. Minor improvements have been the use of a saliva ejector and of better calibration technique. The palatine tonsils, like the palate, pharynx, and skin, react to chilling of the body surface with reflex vasoconstriction and ischemia. On rewarming the subject the tonsils quickly more than recover their former blood supply, actually becoming hyperemic; the skin returns to about its control condition; the pharynx and palate remain somewhat ischemic. The hypothesis is advanced that one factor in the beneficial hardening effect of cold bathing and outdoor living, with its incident heightened immunity to respiratory infection, may be the training of the vasomotor system in the direction of development in the pharynx of a reaction of hyperemia following chilling, similar to that observed in the tonsils of the present subjects. With inhalation of amyl nitrite, the skin temperature has always shown a sharp transient rise. The mucous membrane, if relatively ischemic, responds by a rise corresponding to the skin flush. If already hyperemic, local vasodilation in the mucous membrane with amyl nitrite is more than counterbalanced by the lowering of the general blood pressure, and the temperature falls. The flora of the pharynx and tonsils, studied by the unsatisfactory method described, showed, in several instances, after experimentation changes apparently due to proliferation of one of the microorganisms already present. In one case Streptococcus hæmolyticus, in one Micrococcus catarrhalis, and in a third Bacillus influenzæ was the organism showing a relative increase in numbers. The first two instances were associated with sore throat, the third with slight

  6. Optical depth retrievals from Delta-T SPN1 measurements of broadband solar irradiance at ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The SPN1 radiometer, manufactured by Delta-T Devices Ltd., is an instrument designed for the measurement of global solar irradiance and its components (diffuse, direct) at ground level. In the present study, the direct irradiance component has been used to retrieve an effective total optical depth, by applying the Beer-Lambert law to the broadband measurements. The results have been compared with spectral total optical depths derived from two Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01 sun-sky radiometers, located at the Burjassot site in Valencia (Spain), during years 2013 - 2015. The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. In turn, the Beer-Lambert law has been applied to the broadband direct solar component to obtain an effective total optical depth, representative of the total extinction in the atmosphere. For the assessment of the total optical depth values retrieved with the SPN1, two different sun-sky radiometers (Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01L) have been employed. Both instruments belong to the international networks AERONET and SKYNET. The modified SUNRAD package has been applied in both Cimel and Prede instruments. Cloud affected data has been removed by applying the Smirnov cloud-screening procedure in the SUNRAD algorithm. The broadband SPN1 total optical depth has been analysed by comparison with the spectral total optical depth from the sun-sky radiometer measurements at wavelengths 440, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. The slopes and intercepts have been estimated to be 0.47 - 0.98 and 0.055 - 0.16 with increasing wavelength. The average correlation coefficients and RMSD were 0.80 - 0.83 and 0.034 - 0.036 for all the channels. The

  7. Evaluation of the Delta-T SPN1 radiometer for the measurement of solar irradiance components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick; Utrillas, Maria Pilar

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyse the performance of an SPN1 radiometer built by Delta-T Devices Ltd. to retrieve global solar irradiance at ground and its components (diffuse, direct) in comparison with measurements from two Kipp&Zonen CMP21 radiometers and a Kipp&Zonen CHP1 pirheliometer, mounted on an active Solys-2 suntracker at the Burjassot site (Valencia, Spain) using data acquired every minute during years 2013 - 2015. The measurement site is close to sea level (60 m a.s.l.), near the Mediterranean coast (10 km) and within the metropolitan area of Valencia City (over 1.500.000 inhabitants). The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. The SPN1 pyranometer measures the irradiance between 400 and 2700 nm, and the nominal uncertainty for the individual readings is about 8% ± 10 W/m2 (5% for the daily averages). The pyranometer Kipp&Zonen CMP21 model is a secondary standard for the measurement of broadband solar global irradiance in horizontal planes. Two ventilated CMP21 are used for the measurement of the global and diffuse irradiances. The expected total daily uncertainty of the radiometer is estimated to be 2%. The pirheliometer Kipp&Zonen CHP1 is designed for the measurement of the direct irradiance. The principles are similar to the CMP21 pyranometer. The results of the comparison show that the global irradiance from the SPN1 compares very well with the CMP21, with absolute RMSD and MBD differences below the combined uncertainties (15 W/m2 and -5.4 W/m2, respectively; relative RMSD of 3.1%). Both datasets are very well correlated, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.997 and a slope and intercept very close to 1 and 0

  8. The Small Bodies Thermal Mapper: An Instrument for Future Missions to Study the Compositional and Thermal Properties of Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Bowles, Neil; Calcutt, Simon; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Glotch, Timothy; Edwards, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Sounder (CMS) instrument currently flying on the UK's TechDemoSat-1 spacecraft in low Earth orbit. This gives a significant level of flight heritage with optimisations for the expected Phobos environment. The SBTM instrument uses a two-dimensional uncooled thermal detector array to provide imaging of Phobos. In addition, ten narrow-band infrared filters located around diagnostic mineral spectral features provide additional compositional discrimination. For the SBTM, the optimisations studied include options for the detector and filters required to cover the wide range of diurnal temperatures expected at Phobos (e.g. 130 to > 300 K) [e.g. Kuzmin et al., 2003]. Options studied include the use of a broadband micro bolometer array (e.g. http://www.ulis-ir.com/uploads/Products/PICO640E-041-BroadBand.pdf) or a thermopile detector [Foote et al., 1998] array. Optimisation of filter band passes for remote measurement of composition is also considered, based on mineral spectra measured under simulated Phobos environment [e.g. Glotch et al., 2014].

  9. Development of a luminescence planetary surface dating instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Lapp, T.; Andersen, M. T.; Hannemann, S.; Murray, A. S.; Duller, G. A. T.; Merrrisen, J.

    2012-04-01

    samples can be heated using an innovative heating concept where the sample disc (aluminium) absorbs energy from an IR laser below and a thermopile detector ensures the temperature control. The samples can thus be heated in a controlled manner to ~300°C for thermoluminescence (TL) or to ~250°C for elevated temperature optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements. Calibration doses are given by a miniature X-ray tube, although to reduce power consumption the irradiator may be replaced by an unshielded beta source in a flight model. There is an artificial phosphor chip fixed to the rotating plate for checks on 'in situ' performance, calibration or surface dose-rate measurements. The rotation of the samples is automatically controlled to ensure correct positioning for dose measurements, and for sample loading or unloading. The luminescence signals can be measured in 3D time-resolved mode; these signals give information on mineralogy as well as age. The PSDI has been tested thoroughly and the results show a standard deviation of 1-2% for repeated measurements using different optical schemes. In terms of measurements of Martian analogue basalt samples, the sensitivity of the PSDI is better than the standard laboratory reader that weighs ~80 kg. Moreover, the PSDI has a greater number of measurement schemes which can all be programmed and run remotely. This combination offers the flexibility required to date deposits of previously unknown luminescence/dosimetric characteristics. We conclude that this instrument is a very promising candidate for a future Mars mission.

  10. L'effet Peltier appliqué à la conception et la réalisation d'un nouveau capteur de débit massique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattiau, F.; Gaviot, E.; Thery, P.

    1993-08-01

    The present paper deals with design and realization of a new mass flow sensor using the Peltier effect. The sensor, shaped as a bimetallic printed circuit includes three continuous parallel strips coated with a great deal of metal plated spots. In such a device, the central track performs as a classical thermoelectrical circuitry whose both plated and uncoated parts provide the thermopile junctions. The two outer strips are subjected to electrical currents so as to generate numerous small thermal gradients owing to the Peltier effect. Then, the resulting differences in temperature induce a Seebeck e.m.f. on to the close inner strip acting as a receiver. The thermal coupling between transmitters and receiver tracks depends on any variation of the surrounding environment heat transfert coefficient. Therefore, such a device allows us to detect any shift in physical properties related to the apparent thermal conductivity. In the special case of a steady state fluid, the induced e.m.f. in the receiving track hinges on the thermal conductivity. When the fluid is in relative motion along the sensor, the velocity can be read out as a function of voltage. As an application, the thermoelectric circuit is placed in a tube conducting a fluid flow, in order to design a new mass flowmeter. Experimental results show that when subjected to a steady mass flow rate the e.m.f. remains still, even though the pressure is allowed to vary through the pipe. Actually, the supplied information depends only on the mass flow rate. The main advantage of this measurement method, when compared with classical hot wire devices, is that any change in the surrounding environment average temperature does not induce any significant shift on the output voltage. On the other hand, when operated in a wide temperature range, easy compensating techniques can be used to provide accurate and reliable performance over large temperature variations. Le travail présenté est relatif à la conception et la r