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Sample records for thermoplastic polyurethane tpu

  1. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties relationship of segmented thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Achim; Borm, Michael; Kaoud, Nouran; Kolodziej, Jan; Neudeck, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) are important polymeric materials for seals. In competition with Acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBR), TPU exhibits higher strength and a considerable better abrasion resistance. The advantage of NBR over TPU is a smaller compression set but however TPU excels in its much shorter processing cycle times. Generally a TPU is a block copolymer composed of hard and soft segments, which plays an important role in determining the material properties. TPU can be processed either to ready moulded parts or can be incorporated by multi component moulding, in both cases it shows decent mechanical properties. In the present work, the relationship between melt-process induced TPU morphology and resultant thermo mechanical properties were examined and determined by means of quasi-static tensile test, creep experiment, tension test and dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA). Scanning electron beam microscope (SEM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were used to study the morphology of the samples. A significant mathematical description of the stress-strain behaviour of TPU was found using a 3 term approach. Moreover it became evident that processing conditions such as processing temperature have crucial influence on morphology as well as short and long-term performance. To be more precise, samples processed at higher temperatures showed a lack of large hard segment agglomerates, a smaller strength for strains up to 250% and higher creep compliance.

  2. Thermal Stability and Fire Properties of Salen and Metallosalens as Fire Retardants in Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU)

    PubMed Central

    Ramgobin, Aditya; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Penverne, Christophe; Bourbigot, Serge

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the synthesis and evaluation of salen based derivatives as fire retardants in thermoplastic polyurethane. Salens, hydroxysalens and their first row transition metal complexes (salen-M) were synthesized (Copper, Manganese, Nickel and Zinc). They were then incorporated in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with a loading as low as 10:1 weight ratio. The thermal stability as well as the fire properties of the formulations were evaluated. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that different coordination metals on the salen could induce different decomposition pathways when mixed with TPU. The Pyrolysis Combustion Flow Calorimetry (PCFC) results showed that some M-salen have the ability to significantly decrease the peak heat release rate (−61% compared to neat TPU) and total heat released (−63% compared to neat TPU) when formulated at 10:1 wt % ratio in TPU. Mass Loss Cone Calorimetry (MLC) results have shown that some additives (salen-Cu and salen-Mn) exhibit very promising performance and they are good candidates as flame-retardants for TPU. PMID:28773025

  3. Toughness Enhancement of Commercial Poly (Hydroxybutyrate-co-Valerate) (PHBV) by Blending with a Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Ausejo, Jennifer; Sánchez-Safont, Estefania; Cabedo, Luis; Gamez-Perez, Jose

    2016-11-01

    Poly(hydroxyl butyrate-co-valerate) (PHBV) is a biopolymer synthesized by microorganisms that is fully biodegradable with improved thermal and tensile properties with respect to some commodity plastics. However, it presents an intrinsic brittleness that limits its potential application in replacing plastics in packaging applications. Films made of blends of PHBV with different contents of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) were prepared by single screw extruder and their fracture toughness behavior was assessed by means of the essential work of fracture (EWF) Method. As the crack propagation was not always stable, a partition method has been used to compare all formulations and to relate results with the morphology of the blends. Indeed, fully characterization of the different PHBV/TPU blends showed that PHBV was incompatible with TPU. The blends showed an improvement of the toughness fracture, finding a maximum with intermediate TPU contents.

  4. Characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/polylactic acid (TPU/PLA) tissue engineering scaffolds fabricated by microcellular injection molding.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Jing, Xin; Jacques, Brianna R; Crone, Wendy C; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) are two kinds of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers that can be used in biomedical applications. PLA has rigid mechanical properties while TPU possesses flexible mechanical properties. Blended TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds at different ratios for tunable properties were fabricated via twin screw extrusion and microcellular injection molding techniques for the first time. Multiple test methods were used to characterize these materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the existence of the two components in the blends; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed the immiscibility between the TPU and PLA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images verified that, at the composition ratios studied, PLA was dispersed as spheres or islands inside the TPU matrix and that this phase morphology further influenced the scaffold's microstructure and surface roughness. The blends exhibited a large range of mechanical properties that covered several human tissue requirements. 3T3 fibroblast cell culture showed that the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and migration properly. Most importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of mass producing biocompatible PLA/TPU scaffolds with tunable microstructures, surface roughnesses, and mechanical properties that have the potential to be used as artificial scaffolds in multiple tissue engineering applications. © 2013.

  5. Characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/polylactic acid (TPU/PLA) tissue engineering scaffolds fabricated by microcellular injection molding

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R.; Jing, Xin; Jacques, Brianna R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) are two kinds of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers that can be used in biomedical applications. PLA has rigid mechanical properties while TPU possesses flexible mechanical properties. Blended TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds at different ratios for tunable properties were fabricated via twin screw extrusion and microcellular injection molding techniques for the first time. Multiple test methods were used to characterize these materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the existence of the two components in the blends; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed the immiscibility between the TPU and PLA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images verified that, at the composition ratios studied, PLA was dispersed as spheres or islands inside the TPU matrix and that this phase morphology further influenced the scaffold’s microstructure and surface roughness. The blends exhibited a large range of mechanical properties that covered several human tissue requirements. 3T3 fibroblast cell culture showed that the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and migration properly. Most importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of mass producing biocompatible PLA/TPU scaffolds with tunable microstructures, surface roughnesses, and mechanical properties that have the potential to be used as artificial scaffolds in multiple tissue engineering applications. PMID:24094186

  6. Effect of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) on the thermal and mechanical properties of polylactic acid (PLA)/curcumin blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifah, I. S. S.; Adnan, M. D. A.; Nor Khairusshima, M. K.; Shaffiar, N. M.; Buys, Y. F.

    2018-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is known to be brittle by nature and thus limits the flexibility of the polymer. A possible solution to enhance the flexibility of PLA is to add a flexible polymeric based material such as thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). In this study, 30-50 wt% of TPU was added into PLA/curcumin blends to improve its flexibility. Thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry shows that further additions of TPU at the expense of PLA did not affect the glass transition temperature, crystallisation temperature and melting temperature of the blends. Fibers of PLA/curcumin/TPU were successfully drawn and Single Fiber Tensile Test (SFTT) showed vast improvement in elongation at break. The initial addition of 30 wt% of TPU to the brittle PLA/curcumin composition causes a significant increase in elongation at break by 39 times and further additions at 50 wt %, the elongation at break increases by 105 times. However, with the increase in elongation, a decrease in strength and Young’s modulus was observed.

  7. Characterization of Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) and Ag Carbon Black TPU Nanocomposite for Potential Application in Additive Manufacturing (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-29

    APPLICATION IN ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING (POSTPRINT) Steven T. Patton, Chenggang Chen, Jianjun Hu, and Lawrence Grazulis University of Dayton Research...CARBON BLACK TPU NANOCOMPOSITE FOR POTENTIAL APPLICATION IN ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5401-0008 5b...and polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) are of interest for additive manufacturing (AM) and flexible electronics. Development/optimization of inks for AM

  8. Carbon nanotube (CNT) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) reinforcement effect on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) scaffolds fabricated via phase separation using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvent.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Jing, Xin; Salick, Max R; Cordie, Travis M; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Although phase separation is a simple method of preparing tissue engineering scaffolds, it suffers from organic solvent residual in the scaffold. Searching for nontoxic solvents and developing effective solvent removal methods are current challenges in scaffold fabrication. In this study, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) scaffolds containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or nanofibrillated cellulose fibers (NFCs) were prepared using low toxicity dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. The effects of two solvent removal approaches on the final scaffold morphology were studied. The freeze drying method caused large pores, with small pores on the pore walls, which created connections between the pores. Meanwhile, the leaching and freeze drying method led to interconnected fine pores with smaller pore diameters. The nucleation effect of CNTs and the phase separation behavior of NFCs in the TPU solution resulted in significant differences in the microstructures of the resulting scaffolds. The mechanical performance of the nanocomposite scaffolds with different morphologies was investigated. Generally, the scaffolds with a fine pore structure showed higher compressive properties, and both the CNTs and NFCs improved the compressive properties of the scaffolds, with greater enhancement found in TPU/NFC nanocomposite scaffolds. In addition, all scaffolds showed good sustainability under cyclical load bearing, and the biocompatibility of the scaffolds was verified via 3T3 fibroblast cell culture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Process property studies of melt blown thermoplastic polyurethane polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youn Eung

    The primary goal of this research was to determine optimum processing conditions to produce commercially acceptable melt blown (MB) thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) webs. The 6-inch MB line and the 20-inch wide Accurate Products MB pilot line at the Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, were utilized for this study. The MB TPU trials were performed in four different phases: Phase 1 focused on the envelope of the MB operating conditions for different TPU polymers; Phase 2 focused on the production of commercially acceptable MB TPU webs; Phase 3 focused on the optimization of the processing conditions of MB TPU webs, and the determination of the significant relationships between processing parameters and web properties utilizing statistical analyses; Based on the first three phases, a more extensive study of fiber and web formation in the MB TPU process was made and a multi liner regression model for the MB TPU process versus properties was also developed in Phase 4. In conclusion, the basic MB process was fundamentally valid for the MB TPU process; however, the MB process was more complicated for TPU than PP, because web structures and properties of MB TPUs are very sensitive to MB process conditions: Furthermore, different TPU grades responded very differently to MB processing and exhibited different web structure and properties. In Phase 3 and Phase 4, small fiber diameters of less than 5mum were produced from TPU237, TPU245 and TPU280 pellets, and the mechanical strengths of MB TPU webs including the tensile strength, tear strength, abrasion resistance and tensile elongation were notably good. In addition, the statistical model showed useful interaction regarding trends for processing parameters versus properties of MB TPU webs. Die and air temperature showed multicollinearity problems and fiber diameter was notably affected by air flow rate, throughput and die/air temperature. It was also shown that most of

  10. Biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethanes incorporating polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela T; Lee, Kyung Min; Qin, Haihu; Mather, Patrick T

    2008-09-01

    A new hybrid thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) system that incorporates an organic, biodegradable poly(D, L-lactide) soft block with a hard block bearing the inorganic polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) moiety is introduced and studied. Changes in the polyol composition made through variation of the hydrophilic initiator molecular weight show direct control of the final transition temperatures. Incorporating POSS into the hard segments allows for excellent elasticity above T(g), as evidenced with dynamic mechanical analysis, not seen in most other biodegradable materials. This elasticity is attributed to physical cross-links formed in the hard block through POSS crystallization, as revealed with wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Increasing the POSS incorporation level in the TPU hard block was observed to increase crystallinity and also the rigidity of the material. The highest incorporation, using a statistical average of three POSS units per hard block, demonstrated one-way shape memory with excellent shape fixing capabilities. In vitro degradation of this sample was also investigated during a two month period. Moderate water uptake and dramatic molecular weight decrease were immediately observed although large mass loss (approximately 20 wt %) was not observed until the two month time point.

  11. Thermoplastic Polyurethanes with Isosorbide Chain Extender

    SciTech Connect

    Javni, Ivan; Bilic, Olivera; Bilic, Nikola

    2015-12-15

    Isosorbide, a renewable diol derived from starch, was used alone or in combination with butane diol (BD) as the chain extender in two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) with 50 and 70% polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG) soft segment concentration (SSC), respectively. In the synthesized TPUs, the hard segment composition was systematically varied in both series following BD/isosorbide molar ratios of 100 : 0; 75 : 25; 50 : 50; 25 : 75, and 0 : 100 to examine in detail the effect of chain extenders on properties of segmented polyurethane elastomers with different morphologies. We found that polyurethanes with 50%more » SSC were hard elastomers with Shore D hardness of around 50, which is consistent with assumed co-continuous morphology. Polymers with 70% SSC displayed lower Shore A hardness of 74–79 (Shore D around 25) as a result of globular hard domains dispersed in the soft matrix. Insertion of isosorbide increased rigidity, melting point and glass transition temperature of hard segments and tensile strength of elastomers with 50% SSC. These effects were weaker or non-existent in 70% SSC series due to the short hard segments and low content of isosorbide. We also found that the thermal stability was lowered by increasing isosorbide content in both series.« less

  12. Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphene Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Strankowski, Michał; Korzeniewski, Piotr; Strankowska, Justyna; A S, Anu; Thomas, Sabu

    2018-01-06

    Polyurethane/graphene nanocomposites were synthesized using commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU, Apilon 52DE55), and two types of graphene derivatives: graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy, TEM, and SEM microscopy and XRD techniques were used to chemically and structurally characterize GNP and RGO nanofillers. The properties of the new TPU nanocomposite materials were studied using thermal analysis techniques (Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG)) to describe the influence of graphene nanofillers on polyurethane matrix. Our investigation describes the comparison of two types of graphene derivatives, commercial one (GNP) and synthesized (RGO) on thermoplastic polyurethanes. These nanofillers provides opportunities to achieve compatibility with the TPU matrix. The property enhancements are attributed commonly to high aspect ratio of graphene nanoplatelets and filler-polymer interactions at the interface. The obtained nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal and mechanical properties due to the good dispersion of both nanofillers into TPU matrix. It was found that the addition of 2 wt % of the nanofiller could lead to a significant reinforcement effect on the TPU matrix. Also, with high content of nanofiller (GNP and RGO), the Payne effect was observed.

  13. Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphene Nanoplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Piotr; Strankowska, Justyna; A. S., Anu; Thomas, Sabu

    2018-01-01

    Polyurethane/graphene nanocomposites were synthesized using commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU, Apilon 52DE55), and two types of graphene derivatives: graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy, TEM, and SEM microscopy and XRD techniques were used to chemically and structurally characterize GNP and RGO nanofillers. The properties of the new TPU nanocomposite materials were studied using thermal analysis techniques (Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG)) to describe the influence of graphene nanofillers on polyurethane matrix. Our investigation describes the comparison of two types of graphene derivatives, commercial one (GNP) and synthesized (RGO) on thermoplastic polyurethanes. These nanofillers provides opportunities to achieve compatibility with the TPU matrix. The property enhancements are attributed commonly to high aspect ratio of graphene nanoplatelets and filler–polymer interactions at the interface. The obtained nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal and mechanical properties due to the good dispersion of both nanofillers into TPU matrix. It was found that the addition of 2 wt % of the nanofiller could lead to a significant reinforcement effect on the TPU matrix. Also, with high content of nanofiller (GNP and RGO), the Payne effect was observed. PMID:29316638

  14. Laser-Marking Mechanism of Thermoplastic Polyurethane/Bi2O3 Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Cao, Zheng; Qiu, Pengfei; Wu, Dun; Liu, Chunlin; Li, Huili; Zhu, He

    2015-11-04

    Using bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) as a laser-marking additive and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) as the matrix, TPU/Bi2O3 composite materials were prepared by melt blending in a torque rheometer. The sheet samples prepared from the TPU/Bi2O3 composites were treated in air by scanning with a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) pulsed laser beam at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Compared with the pure TPU sample, the laser-marked composite samples exhibited differences in marking contrast as the Bi2O3 content increased from 0.1% to 1.0% based on stereomicroscope analysis. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the laser-marked surface material of the composite samples. Furthermore, a mechanism for the laser-effected darkening of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites was proposed. The results herein indicated that the addition of the Bi2O3 laser-sensitive additive to TPU resulted in laser darkening of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites. The marking contrast and visual appearance of the surface of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites after laser irradiation was due to a synergistic effect consisting of carbonization via TPU pyrolysis and reduction of Bi2O3 to black bismuth metal.

  15. Development of electroactive nanofibers based on thermoplastic polyurethane and poly(o-ethoxyaniline) for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Karina Ferreira Noronha; Formaggio, Daniela Maria Ducatti; Tada, Dayane Batista; Cristovan, Fernando Henrique; Guerrini, Lilia Müller

    2017-02-01

    Electroactive nanofibers based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and poly(alkoxy anilines) produced by electrospinning has been explored for biomaterials applications. The thermoplastic polyurethane is a biocompatible polymer with good mechanical properties. The production of TPU nanofibers requires the application of high voltage during electrospinning in order to prepare uniform mats due to its weak ability to elongate during the process. To overcome this limitation, a conductive polymer can be incorporated to the process, allowing generates mats without defects. In this study, poly(o-ethoxyaniline) POEA doped with dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) was blended with thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) by solution method. Films were produced by casting and nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning. The effect of the POEA on morphology, distribution of diameter and cell viability of the nanofibers was evaluated. The results demonstrated that the incorporation of POEA in TPU provided to the mats a suitable morphology for cellular growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 601-607, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development of a new surgical sheet containing both silk fibroin and thermoplastic polyurethane for cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Ryo; Konishi, Hayato; Ozawa, Hideki; Katsumata, Takahiro; Tanaka, Ryou; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Nemoto, Shintaro

    2018-05-01

    The surgical sheets that are currently used for congenital cardiovascular surgery have several drawbacks, including material deterioration, calcification, and pseudo-intimal proliferation resulting in hemodynamic disturbance. The aim of this study was to evaluate a newly developed sheet made from a combination of silk fibroin (SF) and a synthetic polymer, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), for surgical use. The hybrid SF/TPU sheet was a non-woven fabric with nanofibers that was made using the electrospinning method. The mechanical properties of the SF/TPU sheet were characterized. To determine its biocompatibility, part of the wall of the canine descending aorta was replaced with a SF/TPU sheet as a patch. The patches were removed after 3 months and a histological examination was performed. The flexibility, water permeability, and suture retention strength of the SF/TPU sheet were excellent and equivalent to those of existing sheets. The SF/TPU sheet had excellent handling properties and fit well into the vascular wall without needle hole bleeding. The histological examination revealed that the intimal tissue was restored well over the intraluminal surface of the explanted SF/TPU sheet, the absence of calcium deposition, and minimal inflammatory reaction, without signs of degradation. The SF/TPU sheet had excellent mechanical properties and tissue biocompatibility. These favorable features and possible biodegradability of the SF portion warrant a long-term follow-up study.

  17. Fire hazard reduction of hollow glass microspheres in thermoplastic polyurethane composites.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Chuanmei; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Shaoxiang; Chen, Xilei

    2017-06-15

    Nowadays, reducing the fire hazard of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is an important research direction in the fields of fire safety materials. In this article, hollow glass microsphere (HGM) was used to reduce the fire hazard of TPU in combustion process. The fire characteristics including smoke and heat production of TPU composites were evaluated using smoke density test (SDT) and cone calorimeter test (CCT). And the thermal decomposition and flammable properties were further studied using thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-IR) and limiting oxygen index (LOI), etc. The SDT results showed that the luminous flux (LF) of TPU4 containing 2.00wt% HGM was up to 24% at the end of test without flame, which is much higher than that of TPU0 (5%). And, the CCT results indicated that 2.00wt% HGM could make the total smoke release (TSR) decrease from 1019m 2 /m 2 (TPU0) to 757m 2 /m 2 (TPU4), reduced by 26%. The TG-IR results confirmed that HGM could improve the thermal stability of composites and reduce the production of some toxic gases. The above results illustrated HGM had a good prospect in reducing the fire hazard for TPU. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Nonwoven Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tausif, Muhammad; Pliakas, Achilles; O’Haire, Tom; Goswami, Parikshit; Russell, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Reinforcement of flexible fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) composites with standard textile fibres is a potential low cost solution to less critical loading applications. The mechanical behaviour of FRPs based on mechanically bonded nonwoven preforms composed of either low or high modulus fibres in a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrix were compared following compression moulding. Nonwoven preform fibre compositions were selected from lyocell, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyamide (PA) as well as para-aramid fibres (polyphenylene terephthalamide; PPTA). Reinforcement with standard fibres manifold improved the tensile modulus and strength of the reinforced composites and the relationship between fibre, fabric and composite’s mechanical properties was studied. The linear density of fibres and the punch density, a key process variable used to consolidate the nonwoven preform, were varied to study the influence on resulting FRP mechanical properties. In summary, increasing the strength and degree of consolidation of nonwoven preforms did not translate to an increase in the strength of resulting fibre reinforced TPU-composites. The TPU composite strength was mainly dependent upon constituent fibre stress-strain behaviour and fibre segment orientation distribution. PMID:28772977

  19. A novel surface modification of carbon fiber for high-performance thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yizhen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xinling; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Properties of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced composites depend largely on the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and the matrix. In the present work, CF was grafted by 4,4‧-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) molecules after electrochemical oxidation treatment. The existence of functional groups introduced to the fiber surface and the changes of surface roughness were confirmed by FTIR, AFM, XPS, SEM and Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the possible applications of this surface modification of carbon fiber, we examined the mechanical properties as well as the friction and wear performance of pristine CF and MDI-CF reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites with 5-30 wt.% fiber contents, and found that the mechanical properties of TPU composites were all significantly improved. It is remarkable that when fiber content was 30 wt.%, the tensile strength of TPU/MDI-CF was increased by 99.3%, which was greater than TPU/CF (53.2%), and the friction loss of TPU/MDI-CF was decreased by 49.09%. The results of DMA and SEM analysis indicated the positive effects of MDI modification on the interfacial bonding between fibers and matrix. We believed that this simple and effective method could be used to the development of surface modified carbon fiber for high-performance TPU.

  20. 3D printing of high drug loaded dosage forms using thermoplastic polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, G; Samaro, A; Grymonpré, W; Vanhoorne, V; Van Snick, B; Boone, M N; Hellemans, T; Van Hoorebeke, L; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2018-01-30

    It was the aim of this study to develop high drug loaded (>30%, w/w), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)-based dosage forms via fused deposition modelling (FDM). Model drugs with different particle size and aqueous solubility were pre-processed in combination with diverse TPU grades via hot melt extrusion (HME) into filaments with a diameter of 1.75 ± 0.05 mm. Subsequently, TPU-based filaments which featured acceptable quality attributes (i.e. consistent filament diameter, smooth surface morphology and good mechanical properties) were printed into tablets. The sustained release potential of the 3D printed dosage forms was tested in vitro. Moreover, the impact of printing parameters on the in vitro drug release was investigated. TPU-based filaments could be loaded with 60% (w/w) fine drug powder without observing severe shark skinning or inconsistent filament diameter. During 3D printing experiments, HME filaments based on hard TPU grades were successfully converted into personalized dosage forms containing a high concentration of crystalline drug (up to 60%, w/w). In vitro release kinetics were mainly affected by the matrix composition and tablet infill degree. Therefore, this study clearly demonstrated that TPU-based FDM feedstock material offers a lot of formulation freedom for the development of personalized dosage forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Viscoelasticity of new generation thermoplastic polyurethane vibration isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bek, Marko; Betjes, Joris; von Bernstorff, Bernd-Steffen; Emri, Igor

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis of pressure dependence of three thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) materials on vibration isolation. The three TPU Elastollan® materials are 1190A, 1175A, and 1195D. The aim of this investigation was to analyze how much the performance of isolation can be enhanced using patented Dissipative bulk and granular systems technology. The technology uses granular polymeric materials to enhance materials properties (without changing its chemical or molecular composition) by exposing them to "self-pressurization," which shifts material energy absorption maxima toward lower frequencies, to match the excitation frequency of dynamic loading to which a mechanical system is exposed. Relaxation experiments on materials were performed at different isobaric and isothermal states to construct mastercurves, the time-temperature-pressure interrelation was modeled using the Fillers-Moonan-Tschoegl model. Dynamic material functions, related to isolation stiffness and energy absorption, were determined with the Schwarzl approximation. An increase in stiffness and energy absorption at selected hydrostatic pressure, compared to its stiffness and energy absorption at ambient conditions, is represented with κk(p, ω), defining the increase in stiffness and κd(p, ω), defining the increase in energy absorption. The study showed that close to the glassy state, moduli of 1190A and 1195D are about 6-9 times higher compared to 1175A, whereas their properties at ambient conditions are, for all practical purposes, the same. TPU 1190A turns out to be most sensitive to pressure: at 300 MPa its properties are shifted for 5.5 decades, while for 1195D and 1175A this shift is only 3.5 and 1.5 decades, respectively. In conclusion, the stiffness and energy absorption of isolation may be increased with pressure for about 100 times for 1190A and 1195D and for about 10 times for 1175A.

  2. Biodegradation Of thermoplastic polyurethanes from vegetable oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thermoplastic urethanes based on polyricinoleic acid soft segments and MDI/BD hard segments with varied soft segment concentration were prepared. Soft segment concentration was varied fro, 40 to 70 wt %. Biodegradation was studied by respirometry. Segmented polyurethanes with soft segments based ...

  3. Thermoplastic polyurethane/graphene nanocomposites: The effect of graphene oxide on physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, P.; Acierno, D.; Capezzuto, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Di Maio, L.; Lavorgna, M.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) have been widely used for a variety of applications such as fibers, coating, adhesives, and biomedical items because of their melt processability and versatile properties essentially related to their intrinsic two-phase segmented structure. However, their low stiffness and tensile strength as well as their weak barrier properties still limit their use. Currently, improvements of functional properties of plastics are usually obtained by the inclusion of nanofillers which, in this case, should be able to modify the segregated hard/soft domains of TPU matrix. In this frame, noteworthy results have been already achieved by using carbon based fillers as carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanofibers and so on. In this frame, this research was focused on blown films based on TPU composites including 0.2%, 0.5% and 1% of a commercial graphene oxide (GO). These latter were obtained according to a two-step procedure: a co-solvent methodology to obtain a concentrated TPU/graphene master followed by a dilution with the neat TPU matrix by extrusion melt compounding. Film samples were analyzed in terms of thermal, structural and barrier properties. Preliminary results indicated structural modifications of the TPU matrix as a result of the GO included with consequent influences on the water vapor barrier properties.

  4. Hypophosphite/Graphitic Carbon Nitride Hybrids: Preparation and Flame-Retardant Application in Thermoplastic Polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongqian; Fu, Libi; Chen, Xilei; Guo, Jin; Yang, Fuqiang; Wang, Jingui; Zheng, Yuying; Hu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    A series of aluminum hypophosphite (AHPi)/graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) (designated as CAHPi) hybrids were prepared, followed by incorporation into thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). The introduction of CAHPi hybrids into TPU led to a marked reduction in the peak of the heat release rate (pHRR), total heat release, weight loss rate, smoke production rate and total smoke production (TSP). For instance, pHRR and TSP decreased by 40% and 50% for TPU/CAHPi20. Furthermore, the increasing fire growth index and decreasing fire performance index were obtained for TPU/CAHPi systems, suggesting reduced fire hazards. It was found that improved fire safety of TPU nanocomposites was contributed by condensed phase and gas phase mechanisms. On one hand, g-C3N4 accelerated the thermal decomposition of AHPi for the formation of more char layers. On the other hand, g-C3N4 induced AHPi to generate more free radical capture agents when exposed to flame, besides protecting AHPi against thermal oxidation. PMID:28872606

  5. Mechanically robust silver coatings prepared by electroless plating on thermoplastic polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, B.; Vediappan, K.; Oliveira, J. C.; Fonseca, C.

    2018-06-01

    A simple and low-cost surface functionalization method is proposed to activate a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) for the electroless deposition of a silver coating with excellent adhesion and low resistivity. The TPU surface functionalization was performed in solution and consisted in forming a physical interpenetrating network at the TPU surface, involving TPU and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a polymer displaying a strong affinity for metals. The presence of PVP on the TPU surface and its stability in aqueous solution were assessed by ATR-FTIR and contact angle measurements as a function of the PVP concentration and treatment time. A modified Tollens solution was used to grow a silver film on the TPU substrate, by using the electroless plating method. Compact silver films with an average thickness of 12.5 μm and a resistivity of 8.57 mΩ·cm were obtained for a 24 h plating time. The adhesion strength of the silver film proved to be higher than 8.5 N/cm. The resistance to fatigue of the silver films was studied by performing series of compression/stretching tests (150 cycles). It was concluded that the films kept low resistance values, although displaying a higher sensitivity to compression than to stretching. Furthermore, the films keep a good conductivity for strains up to 400%. The excellent electrical and mechanical properties of the films make them suitable candidates for the coating of multipin dry bioelectrodes. Owing to the high affinity of many metals for PVP, this activation technique has the potential to be extended to the deposition of other metals and other polymers as well, provided a suitable solvent is used.

  6. The novel application of chitosan: Effects of cross-linked chitosan on the fire performance of thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Xiaodong; Jin, Xiaodong; Li, Hongfei; Sun, Jun; Gu, Xiaoyu

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a novel flame retardant (ACS) was prepared by crosslinking chitosan with bis-(4-formylphenyl)-phenyl-phosphonate (ABPO). ACS in association with ammonium polyphosphate (APP) and organic modified montmorillonite (OMMT) were used to prepare flame retardant thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite through melt blending. For the TPU sample containing 10% flame retardants, the limiting oxygen index was increased from 20.8 to 29.0%, the vertical burning (UL-94) rating was upgraded from no rating to V-0, and the peak heat release rate was decreased from 1090 to 284 kW/m 2 . The thermal gravity analysis (TGA) indicated that ACS had excellent char formation ability and could greatly enhance the thermal stability of TPU. The tensile strength and elongation at break for flame retardant sample could reach 16.5 MPa and 1443% respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-fabrication QAC-functionalized thermoplastic polyurethane for contact-killing catheter applications.

    PubMed

    Zander, Zachary K; Chen, Peiru; Hsu, Yen-Hao; Dreger, Nathan Z; Savariau, Laura; McRoy, Willie C; Cerchiari, Alec E; Chambers, Sean D; Barton, Hazel A; Becker, Matthew L

    2018-05-11

    The use of catheters is ubiquitous in medicine and the incidence of infection remains unacceptably high despite numerous advances in functional surfaces and drug elution. Herein we report the use of a thermoplastic polyurethane containing an allyl ether side-chain functionality (allyl-TPU) that allows for rapid and convenient surface modification with antimicrobial reagents, post-processing. This post-processing functionalization affords the ability to target appropriate TPU properties and maintain the functional groups on the surface of the device where they do not affect bulk properties. A series of quaternary ammonium thiol compounds (Qx-SH) possessing various hydrocarbon tail lengths (8-14 carbons) were synthesized and attached to the surface using thiol-ene "click" chemistry. A quantitative assessment of the amount of Qx-SH available on the surface was determined using fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Contact-killing assays note the Q8-SH composition has the highest antimicrobial activity, and a live/dead fluorescence assay reveals rapid contact-killing of Staphylococcus aureus (>75% in 5 min) and Escherichia coli (90% in 10 min) inocula. Scale-up and extrusion of allyl-TPU provides catheter prototypes for biofilm formation testing with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and surface-functionalized catheters modified with Q8-SH demonstrate their ability to reduce biofilm formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrical conductivity and piezoresistive response of 3D printed thermoplastic polyurethane/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohimer, Cameron J.; Petrossian, Gayaneh; Ameli, Amir; Mo, Changki; Pötschke, Petra

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging field experiencing rapid growth. This paper presents a feasibility study of using fused-deposition modeling (FDM) techniques with smart materials to fabricate objects with sensing and actuating capabilities. The fabrication of objects with sensing typically requires the integration and assembly of multiple components. Incorporating sensing elements into a single FDM process has the potential to significantly simplify manufacturing. The integration of multiple materials, especially smart materials and those with multi-functional properties, into the FDM process is challenging and still requires further development. Previous works by the authors have demonstrated a good printability of thermoplastic polyurethane/multiwall carbon nanotubes (TPU/MWCNT) while maintaining conductivity and piezoresistive response. This research explores the effects of layer height, nozzle temperature, and bed temperature on the electrical conductivity and piezoresistive response of printed TPU/MWCNT nanocomposites. An impedance analyzer was used to determine the conductivity of printed samples under different printing conditions from 5Hz-13MHz. The samples were then tested under compression loads to measure the piezoresistive response. Results show the conductivity and piezoresistive response are only slightly affected by the print parameters and they can be largely considered independent of the print conditions within the examined ranges of print parameters. This behavior simplifies the printing process design for TPU/MWCNT complex structures. This work demonstrates the possibility of manufacturing embedded and multidirectional flexible strain sensors using an inexpensive and versatile method, with potential applications in soft robotics, flexible electronics, and health monitoring.

  9. Thermoplastic polyurethane-based intravaginal rings for prophylaxis and treatment of (recurrent) bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, G; Vandenbussche, L; Kasmi, S; Nuhn, L; Brouckaert, D; Van Renterghem, J; Grymonpré, W; Vanhoorne, V; Coenye, T; De Geest, B G; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2017-08-30

    The aim of the present study was to develop thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)-based intravaginal rings (IVRs) for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial vaginosis via hot melt extrusion/injection molding. Therefore, different TPU grades were processed in combination with lactic acid or metronidazole, targeting a sustained lactic acid release over a 28day-period and sustained metronidazole release over 4-7days. Hot melt extrusion of lactic acid/TPU combinations required a lower extrusion temperature due to the plasticizing properties of lactic acid, evidenced by the lower glass transition temperature (T g ) and cross-over point (T tanδ = 1 ) values. NIR-chemical imaging data showed a homogenous distribution of lactic acid in TPU matrices at drug loads up to 30% (w/w). The addition of metronidazole did not lower processing temperatures, as the active pharmaceutical ingredient remained crystalline in the TPU matrix. Hydrophobic TPUs with a low ratio between the soft and hard segments (SS/HS ratio) in the polymer structure were suitable carriers for the lactic acid-eluting device over a 28-day period, while hydrophilic TPUs were needed to achieve the required release rate of metronidazole-eluting IVRs. IVRs manufactured with a TPU grade having a higher SS/HS ratio and lactic acid/TPU ratio exhibited a more elastic behavior. The addition of 25% (w/w) metronidazole did not affect the mechanical properties of the IVRs. Hydrophilic TPUs were most prone to biofilm formation by Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus, but the incorporation of metronidazole in the device prevented biofilm formation. Based on the drug eluting performance and mechanical tests, a mixture of lactic acid and Tecoflex™ EG-93A (20/80, w/w) and a combination of metronidazole and Tecophilic™ SP-93A-100 (25/75, w/w) were selected to design IVRs for the prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial vaginosis, respectively. Slug mucosal irritation tests predicted low irritation potency for both devices

  10. Surface grafting of a thermoplastic polyurethane with methacrylic acid by previous plasma surface activation and by ultraviolet irradiation to reduce cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alves, P; Pinto, S; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Bruinink, Arie; de Sousa, Hermínio C; Gil, M H

    2011-02-01

    The material performance, in a biological environment, is mainly mediated by its surface properties and by the combination of chemical, physical, biological, and mechanical properties required, for a specific application. In this study, the surface of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan(®)1180A50) was activated either by plasma or by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. After surface activation, methacrylic acid (MAA) was linked to the surface of TPU in order to improve its reactivity and to reduce cell adhesion. Grafted surfaces were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by contact angle measurements. Blood compatibility studies and cell adhesion tests with human bone marrow cells (HBMC) were also performed. If was found that UV grafting method led to better results than the plasma activation method, since cell adhesion was reduced when methacrylic acid was grafted to the TPU surface by UV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative study between melt granulation/compression and hot melt extrusion/injection molding for the manufacturing of oral sustained release thermoplastic polyurethane matrices.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, G; Mertens, P; Grymonpré, W; Van Bockstal, P J; De Beer, T; Boone, M N; Van Hoorebeke, L; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2016-11-20

    During this project 3 techniques (twin screw melt granulation/compression (TSMG), hot melt extrusion (HME) and injection molding (IM)) were evaluated for the manufacturing of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)-based oral sustained release matrices, containing a high dose of the highly soluble metformin hydrochloride. Whereas formulations with a drug load between 0 and 70% (w/w) could be processed via HME/(IM), the drug content of granules prepared via melt granulation could only be varied between 85 and 90% (w/w) as these formulations contained the proper concentration of binder (i.e. TPU) to obtain a good size distribution of the granules. While release from HME matrices and IM tablets could be sustained over 24h, release from the TPU-based TSMG tablets was too fast (complete release within about 6h) linked to their higher drug load and porosity. By mixing hydrophilic and hydrophobic TPUs the in vitro release kinetics of both formulations could be adjusted: a higher content of hydrophobic TPU was correlated with a slower release rate. Although mini-matrices showed faster release kinetics than IM tablets, this observation was successfully countered by changing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic TPU ratio. In vivo experiments via oral administration to dogs confirmed the versatile potential of the TPU platform as intermediate-strong and low-intermediate sustained characteristics were obtained for the IM tablets and HME mini-matrices, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Soft and Flexible Bilayer Thermoplastic Polyurethane Foam for Development of Bioinspired Artificial Skin.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Sinha, Tridib K; Oh, Jeong Seok; Kim, Jin Kuk

    2018-04-25

    Inspired by the epidermis-dermis composition of human skin, here we have simply developed a lightweight, robust, flexible, and biocompatible single-electrode triboelectric nanogenerator (S-TENG)-based prototype of bilayer artificial skin, by attaching one induction electrode with unfoamed skin layer of microcellular thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) foam, which shows high-performance object manipulation [by responding differently toward different objects, viz., aluminum foil, balloon, cotton glove, human finger, glass, rubber glove, artificial leather, polyimide, poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), paper, and wood], due to electrification and electrostatic induction during contact with the objects having different chemical functionalities. Comparative foaming behavior of ecofriendly supercritical fluids, viz., CO 2 over N 2 under variable temperatures (e.g., 130 and 150 °C) and constant pressure (15 MPa), have been examined here to pursue the soft and flexible triboelectric TPU foam. The foam derived by CO 2 foaming at 150 °C has been prioritized for development of S-TENG. Foam derived by CO 2 foaming at 130 °C did not respond as well due to the smaller cell size, higher hardness, and thicker skin. Inflexible N 2 -derived foam was not considered for S-TENG fabrication. Object manipulation performance has been visualized by principal component analysis (PCA), which shows good discrimination among responses to different objects.

  13. Interfacing superhydrophobic silica nanoparticle films with graphene and thermoplastic polyurethane for wear/abrasion resistance.

    PubMed

    Naderizadeh, Sara; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Bayer, Ilker S

    2018-06-01

    Nanoparticle films are one of the most suitable platforms for obtaining sub-micrometer and nanometer dual-scale surface texture required for liquid repellency. The assembly of superhydrophobic nanoparticles into conformal and strongly adherent films having abrasion-induced wear resistance still poses a significant challenge. Various techniques have been developed over the years to render nanoparticle films with good liquid repellent properties and transparency. However, forming abrasion resistant superhydrophobic nanoparticle films on hard surfaces is challenging. One possibility is to partially embed or weld nanoparticles in thin thermoplastic primers applied over metals. Hexamethyldisilazane-functionalized fumed silica nanoparticle films spray deposited on aluminum surfaces were rendered abrasion resistant by thermally welding them into thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) primer applied a priori over aluminum. Different solvents, nanoparticle concentrations and annealing temperatures were studied to optimize nanoparticle film morphology and hydrophobicity. Thermal annealing at 150 °C enhanced stability and wear resistance of nanoparticle films. A thin thermal interface layer of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) between the primer and the nanoparticle film significantly improved superhydrophobic wear resistance after annealing. As such, superhydrophobic nanocomposite films with the GnPs thermal interface layer displayed superior abrasion-induced wear resistance under 20 kPa compared to films having no GnPs-based thermal interface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim, E-mail: achim.frick@hs-aalen.de; Spadaro, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.spadaro@hs-aalen.de

    2015-12-17

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix ormore » of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.« less

  15. Biobased composites from thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer and cross-linked acrylated-epoxidized soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil is an important sustainable material. Crosslinked acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is brittle without flexibility and the incorporation of thermoplastic polyurethane improves its toughness for industrial applications. The hydrophilic functional groups from both oil and polyurethan...

  16. Manipulating the structure and mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane/polycaprolactone hybrid small diameter vascular scaffolds fabricated via electrospinning using an assembled rotating collector.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Jing, Xin; Yu, Emily; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Qian; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    The success of blood vessel transplants with vascular scaffolds (VSs) highly depends on their structure and mechanical properties. The fabrication of small diameter vascular scaffolds (SDVSs) mimicking the properties of native blood vessels has been a challenge. Herein, we propose a facile method to fabricate thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) hybrid SDVSs via electrospinning using a modified rotating collector. By varying the ratio between the TPU and the PCL, and changing the electrospinning volume, SDVSs with a wavy configuration and different properties could be obtained. Detailed investigation revealed that certain TPU/PCL hybrid SDVSs closely resembled the mechanical behaviors of blood vessels due to the presence of a wavy region and the combination of flexible TPU and rigid PCL, which mimicked the properties of elastin and collagen in blood vessels. The fabricated TPU/PCL SDVSs achieved lumen diameters of 1-3mm, wall thicknesses of 100-570µm, circumferential moduli of 1-6MPa, ultimate strengths of 2-8MPa, over 250% elongation-at-break values, toe regions of 5.3-9.4%, high recoverability, and compliances close to those of human veins. Moreover, these TPU/PCL SDVSs possessed sufficient suture retention strength and burst pressure to fulfill transplantation requirements and maintain normal blood flow. Human endothelial cell culture revealed good biocompatibility of the scaffolds, and cells were able to grow on the inner surface of the tubular scaffolds, indicating promising prospects for use as tissue-engineered vascular grafts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermoplastic polyurethanes with controlled morphology based on methylenediphenyldiisocyanate/isosorbide/butanediol hard segments: Thermoplastic polyurethanes with controlled morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Javni, Ivan; Bilić, Olivera; Bilić, Nikola

    2015-06-30

    Isosorbide, a cyclic, rigid and renewable diol was used as a chain extender in two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes. Isosorbide was used in combination with butane diol or alone to examine the effects on polyurethane morphology. Two series of materials were prepared -one with dispersed hard domains in the matrix of polytetramethylene ether glycol soft segments of molecular weight 1400 (at 70% soft segment concentration-SSC) and the other with co-continuous soft and hard phases at 50% SSC. Morphology of materials was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy, as well as with ultra small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS). The radiusmore » of spherical hard domains, correlation lengths, mean separation distances and boundary layer thickness were measured as a function of isosorbide content.« less

  18. Effects of KMnO4 Treatment on the Flexural, Impact, and Thermal Properties of Sugar Palm Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, A. A.; Bachtiar, D.; Rejab, M. R. M.; Jiang, X. X.; Abas, Falak O.; Abass, Raghad U.; Hasany, S. F.; Siregar, Januar P.

    2018-05-01

    Global warming has had a great impact on environmental changes since the last decade. Eco-friendly industrial products are of great importance to sustain life on earth, including using natural composites. Natural fibers used as fillers are also environmentally valuable because of their biodegradable nature. However, compatibility issues between the fiber and its respective matrix is a major concern. The present work focused on the study of the flexural, impact, and thermal behaviors of environmentally friendly sugar palm fibers (SPF) incorporated into a composite with thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Two techniques (extrusion and compression molding) were used to prepare these composites. The fiber size and dosage were kept constant at 250 µm and 30 wt.% SPF, respectively. The effects of potassium permanganate (KMnO4) treatment on the flexural, impact, and thermal behaviors of the treated SPF with 6% NaOH-reinforced TPU composites were investigated. Three different concentrations of KMnO4 (0.033%, 0.066%, and 0.125%) were studied for this purpose. The characterization of the flexural and impact properties of the new TPU/SPF composites was studied as per American Society for Testing Materials ASTM standards. Thermogravimetric analysis was employed for thermal behavior analysis of the TPU/SPF composites. The best flexural strength, impact strength, and modulus properties (8.118 MPa, 55.185 kJ/m2, and 262.102 MPa, respectively) were obtained with a 0.033% KMnO4-treated sample. However, all flexural strength, impact strength, and modulus properties for the KMnO4-treated samples were lower than the sample treated only with 6% NaOH. The highest thermal stability was also shown by the sample treated with 0.033% KMnO4. Therefore, this method enhanced the thermal properties of the TPU/SPF composites with clear deterioration of the flexural and impact properties.

  19. Electrically Conductive TPU Nanofibrous Composite with High Stretchability for Flexible Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lu; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; He, Xiao-Xiao; Nie, Guang-Di; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Guo, Wen-Zhe; Long, Yun-Ze

    2018-03-01

    Highly stretchable and electrically conductive thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibrous composite based on electrospinning for flexible strain sensor and stretchable conductor has been fabricated via in situ polymerization of polyaniline (PANI) on TPU nanofibrous membrane. The PANI/TPU membrane-based sensor could detect a strain from 0 to 160% with fast response and excellent stability. Meanwhile, the TPU composite has good stability and durability. Besides, the composite could be adapted to various non-flat working environments and could maintain opportune conductivity at different operating temperatures. This work provides an easy operating and low-cost method to fabricate highly stretchable and electrically conductive nanofibrous membrane, which could be applied to detect quick and tiny human actions.

  20. Flexible and Lightweight Pressure Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotube/Thermoplastic Polyurethane-Aligned Conductive Foam with Superior Compressibility and Stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenju; Dai, Kun; Zhai, Yue; Liu, Hu; Zhan, Pengfei; Gao, Jiachen; Zheng, Guoqiang; Liu, Chuntai; Shen, Changyu

    2017-12-06

    Flexible and lightweight carbon nanotube (CNT)/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) conductive foam with a novel aligned porous structure was fabricated. The density of the aligned porous material was as low as 0.123 g·cm -3 . Homogeneous dispersion of CNTs was achieved through the skeleton of the foam, and an ultralow percolation threshold of 0.0023 vol % was obtained. Compared with the disordered foam, mechanical properties of the aligned foam were enhanced and the piezoresistive stability of the flexible foam was improved significantly. The compression strength of the aligned TPU foam increases by 30.7% at the strain of 50%, and the stress of the aligned foam is 22 times that of the disordered foam at the strain of 90%. Importantly, the resistance variation of the aligned foam shows a fascinating linear characteristic under the applied strain until 77%, which would benefit the application of the foam as a desired pressure sensor. During multiple cyclic compression-release measurements, the aligned conductive CNT/TPU foam represents excellent reversibility and reproducibility in terms of resistance. This nice capability benefits from the aligned porous structure composed of ladderlike cells along the orientation direction. Simultaneously, the human motion detections, such as walk, jump, squat, etc. were demonstrated by using our flexible pressure sensor. Because of the lightweight, flexibility, high compressibility, excellent reversibility, and reproducibility of the conductive aligned foam, the present study is capable of providing new insights into the fabrication of a high-performance pressure sensor.

  1. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  2. Biobased composites from cross-linked soybean oil and thermoplastic polyurethane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil is an important sustainable material. Crosslinked acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is brittle and the incorporation of thermoplastic polyurethane improves its toughness. The hydrophilic functional groups from both oil and polyurethane contribute to the adhesion of the blend compon...

  3. Preparation of ordered mesoporous and macroporous thermoplastic polyurethane surfaces for potential medical applications.

    PubMed

    Chennell, Philip; Feschet-Chassot, Emmanuelle; Sautou, Valérie; Mailhot-Jensen, Bénédicte

    2018-05-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes are widely used in medical devices. In order to limit some of their shortfalls, like microbial attachment, surfaces modifications can be required. In this work, a two-step replication method was used to create ordered macroporous and mesoporous thermoplastic polyurethane surfaces using anodic aluminum oxide as master template. The intermediate mould materials that were tested were polystyrene and a polyacrylate resin with inorganic filler. All obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The initial anodic aluminum oxide surfaces possessed macro or mesopores, function of anodization conditions. The intermediate mould structure correctly replicated the pattern, but the polystyrene surface structures (pillars) were less resistant than the polyacrylate resin ones. The thermoplastic polyurethane pattern possessed macropores or mesopores of about 130 nm or 46 nm diameter and of about 300 nm or 99 nm interpore distances, respectively, in accordance with the initial pattern. Thermoplastic polyurethanes pore depth was however less than initial anodic aluminum oxide pore depth, linked to an incomplete replication during intermediate mould preparation (60 to 90% depth replication). The correct replication of the original pattern confirms that this novel fabrication method is a promising route for surface patterning of thermoplastic polyurethanes that could be used for medical applications.

  4. Multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes for biomedical and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhu

    Polyurethanes are a class of polymers that are capable of tailoring the overall polymer structure and thus final properties by many factors. The great potential in tailoring polymer structures imparts PUs unique mechanical properties and good cytocompatibility, which make them good candidates for many biomedical devices. In this dissertation, three families of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes are synthesized and characterized for biomedical and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2, 3 and 4, a novel family of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes consisting of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are presented. These materials were discovered to be very durable, with strain-to-break higher than 1200%. Heat-triggered reversible plasticity shape memory (RPSM) was observed, where the highly deformed samples completely recovered their as-cast shape within one minute when heating above the transition temperature. Instead of conventional "hard" blocks, entanglements, which result from high molecular weight, served as the physical crosslinks in this system, engendering shape recovery and preventing flow. Moreover, water-triggered shape memory effect of PCL-PEG TPUs is explored, wherein water permeated into the initially oriented PEG domains, causing rapid shape recovery toward the equilibrium shape upon contact with liquid water. The recovery behavior is found to be dependent on PEG weight percentage in the copolymers. By changing the material from bulk film to electrospun fibrous mat, recovery speed was greatly accelerated. The rate of water recovery was manipulated through structural variables, including thickness of bulk film and diameter of e-spun webs. A new, yet simple shape memory cycle, "wet-fixing" is also reported, where both the fixing and recovery ratios can be greatly improved. A detailed microstructural study on one particular composition is presented, revealing the evolution of microphase

  5. Optimizing Injection Molding Parameters of Different Halloysites Type-Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposites via Taguchi Complemented with ANOVA

    PubMed Central

    Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Nassir, Mohamed H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Halloysite nanotubes-thermoplastic polyurethane (HNTs-TPU) nanocomposites are attractive products due to increasing demands for specialized materials. This study attempts to optimize the parameters for injection just before marketing. The study shows the importance of the preparation of the samples and how well these parameters play their roles in the injection. The control parameters for injection are carefully determined to examine the mechanical properties and the density of the HNTs-TPU nanocomposites. Three types of modified HNTs were used as untreated HNTs (uHNTs), sulfuric acid treated (aHNTs) and a combined treatment of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-malonic acid (MA) (treatment (mHNTs)). It was found that mHNTs have the most influential effect of producing HNTs-TPU nanocomposites with the best qualities. One possible reason for this extraordinary result is the effect of SDS as a disperser and MA as a crosslinker between HNTs and PVA. For the highest tensile strength, the control parameters are demonstrated at 150 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 30 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and mHNT (HNTs type). Meanwhile, the optimized combination of the levels for all six control parameters that provide the highest Young’s modulus and highest density was found to be 150 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 32 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 3 wt % (HNTs loading) and mHNT (HNTs type). For the best tensile strain, the six control parameters are found to be 160 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 32 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and mHNT (HNTs type). For the highest hardness, the best parameters are 140 °C (injection temperature), 6 bar (injection pressure), 30 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and mHNT (HNTs type). The analyses are carried out by

  6. Optimizing Injection Molding Parameters of Different Halloysites Type-Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposites via Taguchi Complemented with ANOVA.

    PubMed

    Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Nassir, Mohamed H; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A

    2016-11-22

    Halloysite nanotubes-thermoplastic polyurethane (HNTs-TPU) nanocomposites are attractive products due to increasing demands for specialized materials. This study attempts to optimize the parameters for injection just before marketing. The study shows the importance of the preparation of the samples and how well these parameters play their roles in the injection. The control parameters for injection are carefully determined to examine the mechanical properties and the density of the HNTs-TPU nanocomposites. Three types of modified HNTs were used as untreated HNTs ( u HNTs), sulfuric acid treated ( a HNTs) and a combined treatment of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-malonic acid (MA) (treatment ( m HNTs)). It was found that m HNTs have the most influential effect of producing HNTs-TPU nanocomposites with the best qualities. One possible reason for this extraordinary result is the effect of SDS as a disperser and MA as a crosslinker between HNTs and PVA. For the highest tensile strength, the control parameters are demonstrated at 150 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 30 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and m HNT (HNTs type). Meanwhile, the optimized combination of the levels for all six control parameters that provide the highest Young's modulus and highest density was found to be 150 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 32 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 3 wt % (HNTs loading) and m HNT (HNTs type). For the best tensile strain, the six control parameters are found to be 160 °C (injection temperature), 8 bar (injection pressure), 32 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and m HNT (HNTs type). For the highest hardness, the best parameters are 140 °C (injection temperature), 6 bar (injection pressure), 30 °C (mold temperature), 8 min (injection time), 2 wt % (HNTs loading) and m HNT (HNTs type). The analyses are carried

  7. Hydrophilic thermoplastic polyurethanes for the manufacturing of highly dosed oral sustained release matrices via hot melt extrusion and injection molding.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, G; Van Renterghem, J; Van Bockstal, P J; Kasmi, S; De Geest, B G; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2016-06-15

    Hydrophilic aliphatic thermoplastic polyurethane (Tecophilic™ grades) matrices for high drug loaded oral sustained release dosage forms were formulated via hot melt extrusion/injection molding (HME/IM). Drugs with different aqueous solubility (diprophylline, theophylline and acetaminophen) were processed and their influence on the release kinetics was investigated. Moreover, the effect of Tecophilic™ grade, HME/IM process temperature, extrusion speed, drug load, injection pressure and post-injection pressure on in vitro release kinetics was evaluated for all model drugs. (1)H NMR spectroscopy indicated that all grades have different soft segment/hard segment ratios, allowing different water uptake capacities and thus different release kinetics. Processing temperature of the different Tecophilic™ grades was successfully predicted by using SEC and rheology. Tecophilic™ grades SP60D60, SP93A100 and TG2000 had a lower processing temperature than other grades and were further evaluated for the production of IM tablets. During HME/IM drug loads up to 70% (w/w) were achieved. In addition, Raman mapping and (M)DSC results confirmed the homogenous distribution of mainly crystalline API in all polymer matrices. Besides, hydrophilic TPU based formulations allowed complete and sustained release kinetics without using release modifiers. As release kinetics were mainly affected by drug load and the length of the PEO soft segment, this polymer platform offers a versatile formulation strategy to adjust the release rate of drugs with different aqueous solubility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal and mechanical properties of TPU/PBT reinforced by carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jintao; Liu, Huanyu; Lu, Xiang

    2016-03-09

    In this study, thermal, mechanical properties and processability were performed on a series of carbon fiber (CF) filled thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/poly (butylene terephthalate) (PBT) composites to identify the effect of CF weight fraction on the properties of TPU/PBT. Scanning Electronic Microscope (SEM) show that CFs are uniformly dispersed in TPU/PBT matrix and there are no agglomerations. Melt flow index (MFI) show that the melt viscosity increased with the CF loading. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the introduction of CF into organic materials tend to improve their thermal stability. The mechanical properties indicated that tensile strength and modulus, flexural strength andmore » modulus, improved with an increase in CF loading, but the impact strength decreased by the loading of CF.« less

  9. Enhanced thermal stability of biomedical thermoplastic polyurethane with the addition of cellulose nanocrystals

    Treesearch

    Jen-Chieh Liu; Darren J. Martin; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2015-01-01

    Freeze-dried cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were dispersed in the thermoplastic polyurethane [Pellethane 2363-55D (P55D)] by a solvent casting method to fabricate CNC-reinforced nanocomposites. This study demonstrated that the addition of small amounts (1–5 wt %) of CNCs to P55D increased the thermal degradation temperature while maintaining a similar stiffness,...

  10. Mussel-inspired functionalization of electrochemically exfoliated graphene: Based on self-polymerization of dopamine and its suppression effect on the fire hazards and smoke toxicity of thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Wang, Junling; Pan, Ying; Guo, Wenwen; Mu, Xiaowei; Feng, Xiaming; Yuan, Bihe; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yuan

    2018-06-15

    The suppression effect of graphene in the fire hazards and smoke toxicity of polymer composites has been seriously limited by both mass production and weak interfacial interaction. Though the electrochemical preparation provides an available approach for mass production, exfoliated graphene could not strongly bond with polar polymer chains. Herein, mussel-inspired functionalization of electrochemically exfoliated graphene was successfully processed and added into polar thermoplastic polyurethane matrix (TPU). As confirmed by SEM patterns of fracture surface, functionalized graphene possessing abundant hydroxyl could constitute a forceful chains interaction with TPU. By the incorporation of 2.0 wt % f-GNS, peak heat release rate (pHRR), total heat release (THR), specific extinction area (SEA), as well as smoke produce rate (SPR) of TPU composites were approximately decreased by 59.4%, 27.1%, 31.9%, and 26.7%, respectively. A probable mechanism of fire retardant was hypothesized: well-dispersed f-GNS constituted tortuous path and hindered the exchange process of degradation product with barrier function. Large quantities of degradation product gathered round f-GNS and reacted with flame retardant to produce the cross-linked and high-degree graphited residual char. The simple functionalization for electrochemically exfoliated graphene impels the application of graphene in the fields of flame retardant composites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast-Responding Bio-Based Shape Memory Thermoplastic Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Zoran S; Milić, Jelena; Zhang, Fan; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-07-14

    Novel fast response shape-memory polyurethanes were prepared from bio-based polyols, diphenyl methane diisocyanate and butane diol for the first time. The bio-based polyester polyols were synthesized from 9-hydroxynonanoic acid, a product obtained by ozonolysis of fatty acids extracted from soy oil and castor oil. The morphology of polyurethanes was investigated by synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, which revealed the inter-domain spacing between the hard and soft phases, the degree of phase separation, and the level of intermixing between the hard and soft phases. We also conducted thorough investigations of the thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of the polyurethanes, and found that high crystallization rate of the soft segment gives these polyurethanes unique properties suitable for shape-memory applications, such as adjustable transition temperatures, high degree of elastic elongations, and good mechanical strength. These materials are also potentially biodegradable and biocompatible, therefore suitable for biomedical and environmental applications.

  12. Fast-responding bio-based shape memory thermoplastic polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Zoran S.; Milic, Jelena; Zhang, Fan

    Fast response shape-memory polyurethanes were prepared from bio-based polyols, diphenyl methane diisocyanate and butane diol. The bio-based polyester polyols were synthesized from 9-hydroxynonanoic acid, a product obtained by ozonolysis of fatty acids extracted from soy oil and castor oil. The morphology of polyurethanes was investigated by synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, which revealed the inter-domain spacing between the hard and soft phases, the degree of phase separation, and the level of intermixing between the hard and soft phases. We also conducted thorough investigations of the thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of the polyurethanes, and found that high crystallization rate ofmore » the soft segment gives these polyurethanes unique properties suitable for shapememory applications, such as adjustable transition temperatures, high degree of elastic elongations, and good mechanical strength. In conclusion, these materials are also potentially biodegradable and biocompatible, therefore suitable for biomedical and environmental applications.« less

  13. Fast-responding bio-based shape memory thermoplastic polyurethanes

    DOE PAGES

    Petrovic, Zoran S.; Milic, Jelena; Zhang, Fan; ...

    2017-05-31

    Fast response shape-memory polyurethanes were prepared from bio-based polyols, diphenyl methane diisocyanate and butane diol. The bio-based polyester polyols were synthesized from 9-hydroxynonanoic acid, a product obtained by ozonolysis of fatty acids extracted from soy oil and castor oil. The morphology of polyurethanes was investigated by synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, which revealed the inter-domain spacing between the hard and soft phases, the degree of phase separation, and the level of intermixing between the hard and soft phases. We also conducted thorough investigations of the thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of the polyurethanes, and found that high crystallization rate ofmore » the soft segment gives these polyurethanes unique properties suitable for shapememory applications, such as adjustable transition temperatures, high degree of elastic elongations, and good mechanical strength. In conclusion, these materials are also potentially biodegradable and biocompatible, therefore suitable for biomedical and environmental applications.« less

  14. Transparent Large Strain Thermoplastic Polyurethane Magneto-Active Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Carpen, Ileana; Peck, John; Sola, Francisco; Bail, Justin; Lerch, Bradley; Meador, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Smart adaptive materials are an important class of materials which can be used in space deployable structures, morphing wings, and structural air vehicle components where remote actuation can improve fuel efficiency. Adaptive materials can undergo deformation when exposed to external stimuli such as electric fields, thermal gradients, radiation (IR, UV, etc.), chemical and electrochemical actuation, and magnetic field. Large strain, controlled and repetitive actuation are important characteristics of smart adaptive materials. Polymer nanocomposites can be tailored as shape memory polymers and actuators. Magnetic actuation of polymer nanocomposites using a range of iron, iron cobalt, and iron manganese nanoparticles is presented. The iron-based nanoparticles were synthesized using the soft template (1) and Sun's (2) methods. The nanoparticles shape and size were examined using TEM. The crystalline structure and domain size were evaluated using WAXS. Surface modifications of the nanoparticles were performed to improve dispersion, and were characterized with IR and TGA. TPU nanocomposites exhibited actuation for approximately 2wt% nanoparticle loading in an applied magnetic field. Large deformation and fast recovery were observed. These nanocomposites represent a promising potential for new generation of smart materials.

  15. MRI Evaluation of an Elastic TPU Mesh under Pneumoperitoneum in IPOM Position in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, A; van den Hil, L C L; Ciritsis, A; Eickhoff, R; Kraemer, N A; Bouvy, N D; Müllen, A; Klinge, U; Neumann, U P; Klink, C D

    2018-06-01

    The frequency of laparoscopic approaches increased in hernia surgery over the past years. After mesh placement in IPOM position, the real extent of the meshes configurational changes after termination of pneumoperitoneum is still largely unknown. To prevent a later mesh folding it might be useful to place the mesh while it is kept under tension. Conventionally used meshes may lose their Effective Porosity under these conditions due to poor elastic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate a newly developed elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) containing mesh that retains its Effective Porosity under mechanical strain in IPOM position in a porcine model. It was visualized under pneumoperitoneum using MRI in comparison to polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) meshes with similar structure. In each of ten minipigs, a mesh (TPU containing or native PVDF, 10 × 20 cm) was randomly placed in IPOM position at the center of the abdominal wall. After 8 weeks, six pigs underwent MRI evaluation with and without pneumoperitoneum to assess the visibility and elasticity of the mesh. Finally, pigs were euthanized and abdominal walls were explanted for histological and immunohistochemical assessment. The degree of adhesion formation was documented. Laparoscopic implantation of elastic TPU meshes in IPOM position was feasible and safe in a minipig model. Mesh position could be precisely visualized and assessed with and without pneumoperitoneum using MRI after 8 weeks. Elastic TPU meshes showed a significantly higher surface increase under pneumoperitoneum in comparison to PVDF. Immunohistochemically, the amount of CD45-positive cells was significantly lower and the Collagen I/III ratio was significantly higher in TPU meshes after 8 weeks. There were no differences regarding adhesion formation between study groups. The TPU mesh preserves its elastic properties in IPOM position in a porcine model after 8 weeks. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility

  16. Fabrication of CA/TPU Helical Nanofibers and its Mechanism Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huihui; Zhao, Shihang; Han, Lei

    2018-04-01

    To explore the mechanism of cellulose acetate (CA)/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) on the fabrication of helical nanofibers, a series of experiments were conducted to find the optimum spinning conditions. The experimental results show that the CA (14 wt%, DMAc/acetone, 1/2 volume ratio)/TPU2 (18 wt%, DMAc/acetone, 3/1 volume ratio) system can fabricate helical nanofibers effectively via co-electrospinning. We focus on the interfacial interaction between the polymer components induced by the polymer structure and intrinsic properties, including solution properties, hydrogen bonding, and miscibility behavior of the two solutions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are employed to investigate the interfacial interaction between the two phases of the polymer system. The analysis results provide the explanation of the experimental results that the CA/TPU system has the potential for producing helical nanofibers effectively. This study based on the interfacial interaction between polymer components provides an insight into the mechanism of CA/TPU helical fiber formation and introduces a richer choice of materials for the application of helical fibers.

  17. Rheological behaviour, mechanical properties and morphological aspects of thermoplastic polyurethane reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico; Spena, Paola

    2010-06-01

    Melt blended compounds based on a film grade thermoplastic polyurethane resin filled with relatively low contents of multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been investigated. Materials, prepared through the production of a masterbatch containing 3 wt% of nanotubes and subsequent dilution of the same by addition of matrix pellets, were analyzed in the form of tapes and films always taking the neat matrix, processed in the same conditions, as the reference. Improvements of the matrix extrudability and mechanical benefits showed for all investigated composite samples have been satisfactorily interpreted by morphological observations carried out in both transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Microcellular injection molding process for producing lightweight thermoplastic polyurethane with customizable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingham, Thomas; Kharbas, Hrishikesh; Manitiu, Mihai; Scholz, Guenter; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2018-03-01

    A three-stage molding process involving microcellular injection molding with core retraction and an "out-of-mold" expansion was developed to manufacture thermoplastic polyurethane into lightweight foams of varying local densities, microstructures, and mechanical properties in the same microcellular injection molded part. Two stages of cavity expansion through sequential core retractions and a third expansion in a separate mold at an elevated temperature were carried out. The densities varied from 0.25 to 0.42 g/cm3 (77% to 62% weight reduction). The mechanical properties varied as well. Cyclic compressive strengths and hysteresis loss ratios, together with the microstructures, were characterized and reported.

  19. Fluorinated polyurethane scaffolds for 19F magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Khosrow; Shi, Yang; Schulz, Volkmar; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly employed in implant materials. To reduce the incidence of complications, which in the case of vascular grafts include incorrect placement and restenosis, materials are needed which allow for image-guided implantation, as well as for accurate and efficient postoperative implant imaging. We here describe amorphous fluorinated polymers based on thermoplastic polyurethane (19F-TPU), and show that are useful starting materials for developing tissue-engineered vascular grafts which can be detected using 19F MRI. PMID:28413258

  20. Effect of phosphoric acid on the morphology and tensile properties of halloysite-polyurethane composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Luaibi, Hasan Mohammed; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.

    2018-06-01

    The high aspect ratio of nanoscale reinforcements enhances the tensile properties of pure polymer matrix. The composites were first made by adding halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) at low weight percentages of 1, 2, and 3 wt% to thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Then, HNTs were phosphoric acid-treated before adding to TPU at same weight percentage to create phosphoric acid HNTs-TPU composites. The samples were fabricated using injection moulding. The HNTs-TPU composites were characterized according to the tensile properties including tensile strength, tensile strain and Young's modulus. The loading has shown its highest tensile values at 2 wt% HNTs loading and same findings are shown with the samples that treated with phosphoric acid. The tensile strength increased to reach 24.65 MPa compare with the 17.7 MPa of the neat TPU showing about 26% improvement. For the phosphoric acid-treated composites, the improvement has reached 35% compared to the neat sample. Regarding the tensile stain, the improvement was about 83% at 2 wt% HNTs loading. For Young's modulus, the results obtained in this study have shown that Young's modulus is linearly improved with either the loading content or the phosphoric acid treated achieving its highest values at 3 wt% HNTs of 14.53 MPa and 16.27 MPa for untreated and treated, respectively. FESEM results showed that HNTs were well dispersed in TPU matrix. Thus, HNTs-TPU has improved tensile properties compared with pure TPU due to the addition of nanofiller.

  1. Functionalized low defect graphene nanoribbons and polyurethane composite film for improved gas barrier and mechanical performances.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Cox, Paris J; Kukovecz, Akos; Genorio, Bostjan; Hashim, Daniel P; Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Ruan, Gedeng; Samuel, Errol L G; Sudeep, Parambath M; Konya, Zoltan; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Tour, James M

    2013-11-26

    A thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite film containing hexadecyl-functionalized low-defect graphene nanoribbons (HD-GNRs) was produced by solution casting. The HD-GNRs were well distributed within the polyurethane matrix, leading to phase separation of the TPU. Nitrogen gas effective diffusivity of TPU was decreased by 3 orders of magnitude with only 0.5 wt % HD-GNRs. The incorporation of HD-GNRs also improved the mechanical properties of the composite films, as predicted by the phase separation and indicated by tensile tests and dynamic mechanical analyses. The improved properties of the composite film could lead to potential applications in food packaging and lightweight mobile gas storage containers.

  2. Melt dispersion and electrospinning of non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes in thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Matthew T; Pötschke, Petra; Long, Timothy E

    2009-12-16

    Nanoscale fibers with embedded, aligned, and percolated non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were fabricated through electrospinning dispersions based on melt-compounded thermoplastic polyurethane/MWCNT nanocomposite, with up to 10 wt.-% MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanotubes were highly oriented and percolated throughout the fibers, even at high MWCNT concentrations. The coupling of efficient melt compounding with electrospinning eliminated the need for intensive surface functionalization or sonication of the MWCNTs, and the high aspect ratio as well as the electrical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes were retained. This method provides a more efficient technique to generate one-dimensional nanofibers with aligned MWCNTs. Copyright © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Control of Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomers by Restriction of Crystallization of Soft Segment

    PubMed Central

    Kojio, Ken; Furukawa, Mutsuhisa; Nonaka, Yoshiteru; Nakamura, Sadaharu

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers based on either polyether or polycarbonate (PC)-glycols, 4,4’-dipheylmethane diisocyanate (1,1’-methylenebis(4-isocyanatobenzene)), 1,4-butanediol, were controlled by restriction of crystallization of polymer glycols. For the polyether glycol based-polyurethane elastomers (PUEs), poly(oxytetramethylene) glycol (PTMG), and PTMG incorporating dimethyl groups (PTG-X) and methyl side groups (PTG-L) were employed as a polymer glycol. For the PC-glycol, the randomly copolymerized PC-glycols with hexamethylene (C6) and tetramethylene (C4) units between carbonate groups with various composition ratios (C4/C6 = 0/100, 50/50, 70/30 and 90/10) were employed. The degree of microphase separation and mechanical properties of both the PUEs were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic viscoelastic property measurements and tensile testing. Mechanical properties could be controlled by changing the molar ratio of two different monomer components. PMID:28883371

  4. Hemocompatibility of Inorganic Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Coatings on Thermoplastic Polyurethane Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Paul; Bruckert, Franz; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Major, Roman; Sanak, Marek; Wiesinger, Martin; Heim, Daniel

    2012-04-17

    Biocompatibility improvements for blood contacting materials are of increasing interest for implanted devices and interventional tools. The current study focuses on inorganic (titanium, titanium nitride, titanium oxide) as well as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating materials on polymer surfaces (thermoplastic polyurethane), deposited by magnetron sputtering und pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. DLC was used pure (a-C:H) as well as doped with silicon, titanium, and nitrogen + titanium (a-C:H:Si, a-C:H:Ti, a-C:H:N:Ti). In-vitro testing of the hemocompatibility requires mandatory dynamic test conditions to simulate in-vivo conditions, e.g., realized by a cone-and-plate analyzer. In such tests, titanium- and nitrogen-doped DLC and titanium nitride were found to be optimally anti-thrombotic and better than state-of-the-art polyurethane polymers. This is mainly due to the low tendency to platelet microparticle formation, a high content of remaining platelets in the whole blood after testing and low concentration of platelet activation and aggregation markers. Comparing this result to shear-flow induced cell motility tests with e.g., Dictostelium discoideum cell model organism reveals similar tendencies for the investigated materials.

  5. Hemocompatibility of Inorganic Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Coatings on Thermoplastic Polyurethane Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Juergen M.; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Paul; Bruckert, Franz; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Major, Roman; Sanak, Marek; Wiesinger, Martin; Heim, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatibility improvements for blood contacting materials are of increasing interest for implanted devices and interventional tools. The current study focuses on inorganic (titanium, titanium nitride, titanium oxide) as well as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating materials on polymer surfaces (thermoplastic polyurethane), deposited by magnetron sputtering und pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. DLC was used pure (a-C:H) as well as doped with silicon, titanium, and nitrogen + titanium (a-C:H:Si, a-C:H:Ti, a-C:H:N:Ti). In-vitro testing of the hemocompatibility requires mandatory dynamic test conditions to simulate in-vivo conditions, e.g., realized by a cone-and-plate analyzer. In such tests, titanium- and nitrogen-doped DLC and titanium nitride were found to be optimally anti-thrombotic and better than state-of-the-art polyurethane polymers. This is mainly due to the low tendency to platelet microparticle formation, a high content of remaining platelets in the whole blood after testing and low concentration of platelet activation and aggregation markers. Comparing this result to shear-flow induced cell motility tests with e.g., Dictostelium discoideum cell model organism reveals similar tendencies for the investigated materials. PMID:24955532

  6. Structure-property studies of thermoplastic and thermosetting polyurethanes using palm and soya oils-based polyols.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Al-Mulla, Emad Abbas Jaffar; Kadar, Nurul Khizien Abdul; Ibrahim, Mazlan

    2013-01-01

    Palm and soya oils were converted to monoglycerides via transesterification of triglycerides with glycerol by one step process to produce renewable polyols. Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPPUs) were prepared from the reaction of the monoglycerides which act as polyol with 4,4'-methylenediphenyldiisocyanate (MDI) whereas, thermosetting polyurethanes (TSPUs) were prepared from the reaction of glycerol, MDI and monoglycerides in one pot. Characterization of the polyurethanes was carried out by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, and iodine value and sol-gel fraction. The TSPUs showed good thermal properties compared to TPPUs as well as TSPUs exhibits good properties in pencil hardness and adhesion, however poorer in flexural and impact strength compared to TPPUs. The higher percentage of cross linked fraction, the higher degree of cross linking occurred, which is due to the higher number of double bond presents in the TSPUs. These were reflected in iodine value test as the highest iodine value of the soya-based thermosetting polyurethanes confirmed the highest degree of cross linking. Polyurethanes based on soya oil showed better properties compared to palm oil. This study is a breakthrough development of polyurethane resins using palm and soya oils as one of the raw materials.

  7. nu/TPU -- A DEC TPU compatible editor for UNIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, S. C.

    nu/TPU is a fully programmable text processing utility compatible with the TPU system found on VMS systems. People used to using TPU or EDT on the former Starlink VAX/VMS service will find that nu/TPU is very similar to these editors.

  8. Impact Behavior of Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent with Thermoplastic Polyurethane Interleave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Heimann, Paula J.; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Martin, Richard E.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance and damage resistance is a critical metric for application of polymer matrix composites where failure caused by impact damage could compromise structural performance and safety. As a result, several materials and/or design approaches to improve impact damage tolerance have been investigated over the past several decades. Many composite toughening methodologies impart a trade-off between increased fracture toughness and compromised in-plane strength and modulus. In large part, mechanical tests to evaluate composite damage tolerance include static methods such as Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode failures. However, ballistic impact damage resistance does not always correlate with static properties. The intent of this paper is to evaluate the influence of a thermoplastic polyurethane veil interleave on the static and dynamic performance of composite test articles. Static coupon tests included tension, compression, double cantilever beam, and end notch flexure. Measurement of the resistance to ballistic impact damage were made to evaluate the composites response to high speed impact. The interlayer material showed a decrease of in-plane performance with only a moderate improvement to Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness. However, significant benefit to impact damage tolerance was observed through ballistic tests.

  9. Dispersion and characterization of Thermoplastic Polyurethane/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in co-rotative twin screw extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, Adolfo; Buezas, Ignacio; Giménez, Enrique; Galindo, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    The dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in thermoplastic polyurethanes has been done in co-rotative twin screw extruder through a melt blending process. A specific experimental design was prepared taking into account different compounding parameters such as feeding, temperature profile, screw speed, screw design, and carbon nanotube loading. The obtained samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), light transmission microscopy, dynamic rheometry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The objective of this work has been to study the dispersion quality of the carbon nanotubes and the effect of different compounding parameters to optimize them for industrial scale-up to final applications.

  10. Novel AgNWs-PAN/TPU membrane for point-of-use drinking water electrochemical disinfection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojun; Chen, Chao; Hu, Yongyou; Wen, Junjie; Qin, Yanzhe; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yuancai

    2018-10-01

    The safety of drinking water remains a major challenge in developing countries and point-of-use (POU) drinking water treatment device plays an important role in decentralised drinking water safety. In this study, a novel material, i.e. a silver nanowires-polyacrylonitrile/thermoplastic polyurethane (AgNWs-PAN/TPU) composite membrane, was fabricated via electrospinning and vacuum filtration deposition. Morphological and structural characterisation showed that the PAN/TPU fibres had uniform diameters and enhanced mechanical properties. When added to these fibres, the AgNWs formed a highly conductive network with good physical stability and low silver ion leaching (<100 ppb). A POU device equipped with a AgNWs-PAN/TPU membrane displayed complete removal of 10 5  CFU/mL bacteria, which were inactivated by silver ions released from the AgNWs within 6 h. Furthermore, under a voltage of 1.5 V, the bacteria were completely inactivated within 20-25 min. Inactivation efficiency in 5 mM NaCl solution was higher than those in Na 2 SO 4 and NaNO 3 solutions. We concluded that a strong electric field was formed at the AgNW tips. Additionally, silver ions and chlorine compounds worked synergistically in the disinfection process. This study provides a scientific basis for research and development of silver nanocomposite membranes, with high mechanical strength and high conductivity, for POU drinking water disinfection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microwave-assisted synthesis of isosorbide-derived diols for the preparation of thermally stable thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Nejib; Roso, Martina; Hammami, Nadia; Majdoub, Mustapha; Boaretti, Carlo; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Vianello, Chiara; Maschio, Giuseppe; Modesti, Michele; Lorenzetti, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In order to prepare thermally stable isosorbide-derived thermoplastic polyurethane, the synthesis of two new chiral exo–exo configured diols, prepared from isosorbide, and two types of diphenols (bisphenol A and thiodiphenol) was described. The synthesis conditions were optimized under conventional heating and microwave irradiations. To prove their suitability in polymerization, these monomers were successfully polymerized using 4,4′-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). Both monomers and polymers have been studied by NMR, FT-IR, TGA, DSC; intrinsic viscosity of polymers has also been determined. The results showed the effectiveness of the synthetic strategy proposed; moreover, a dramatic reduction of the reaction time and an important improvement of the monomers yield using microwave irradiation have been demonstrated. The monomers, as well as the polymers, showed excellent thermal stability both in air and nitrogen. It was also shown that the introduction of sulphur in the polyurethane backbone was effective in delaying the onset of degradation as well as the degradation rate. PMID:29491826

  12. Effect of Powder Size and Shape on the SLS Processability and Mechanical Properties of a TPU Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadbakhsh, Sasan; Verbelen, Leander; Vandeputte, Tom; Strobbe, Dieter; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Kruth, Jean-Pierre

    This work investigates the influence of powder size/shape on selective laser sintering (SLS) of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) elastomer. It examines a TPU powder which had been cryogenically milled in two different sizes; coarse powder (D50∼200μm) with rough surfaces in comparison with a fine powder (D50∼63μm) with extremely fine flow additives. It is found that the coarse powder coalesces at lower temperatures and excessively smokes during the SLS processing. In comparison, the fine powder with flow additives is better processable at significantly higher powder bed temperatures, allowing a lower optimum laser energy input which minimizes smoking and degradation of the polymer. In terms of mechanical properties, good coalescence of both powders lead to parts with acceptable shear-punch strengths compared to injection molded parts. However, porosity and degradation from the optimum SLS parameters of the coarse powder drastically reduce the tensile properties to about one-third of the parts made from the fine powders as well as those made by injection molding (IM).

  13. Thermoplastic polyurethanes for the manufacturing of highly dosed oral sustained release matrices via hot melt extrusion and injection molding.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Bart; Vervaeck, Anouk; Hillewaere, Xander K D; Possemiers, Sam; Hansen, Laurent; De Beer, Thomas; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUR) as matrix excipients for the production of oral solid dosage forms via hot melt extrusion (HME) in combination with injection molding (IM). We demonstrated that TPURs enable the production of solid dispersions - crystalline API in a crystalline carrier - at an extrusion temperature below the drug melting temperature (Tm) with a drug content up to 65% (wt.%). The release of metoprolol tartrate was controlled over 24h, whereas a complete release of diprophylline was only possible in combination with a drug release modifier: polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000) or Tween 80. No burst release nor a change in tablet size and geometry was detected for any of the formulations after dissolution testing. The total matrix porosity increased gradually upon drug release. Oral administration of TPUR did not affect the GI ecosystem (pH, bacterial count, short chain fatty acids), monitored via the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME). The high drug load (65 wt.%) in combination with (in vitro and in vivo) controlled release capacity of the formulations, is noteworthy in the field of formulations produced via HME/IM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemically Active, Porous 3D-Printed Thermoplastic Composites.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kent A; Kennedy, Zachary C; Arey, Bruce W; Christ, Josef F; Schaef, Herbert T; Nune, Satish K; Erikson, Rebecca L

    2018-05-02

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibit exceptional properties and are widely investigated because of their structural and functional versatility relevant to catalysis, separations, and sensing applications. However, their commercial or large-scale application is often limited by their powder forms which make integration into devices challenging. Here, we report the production of MOF-thermoplastic polymer composites in well-defined and customizable forms and with complex internal structural features accessed via a standard three-dimensional (3D) printer. MOFs (zeolitic imidazolate framework; ZIF-8) were incorporated homogeneously into both poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrices at high loadings (up to 50% by mass), extruded into filaments, and utilized for on-demand access to 3D structures by fused deposition modeling. Printed, rigid PLA/MOF composites display a large surface area (SA avg = 531 m 2 g -1 ) and hierarchical pore features, whereas flexible TPU/MOF composites achieve a high surface area (SA avg = 706 m 2 g -1 ) by employing a simple method developed to expose obstructed micropores postprinting. Critically, embedded particles in the plastic matrices retain their ability to participate in chemical interactions characteristic of the parent framework. The fabrication strategies were extended to other MOFs and illustrate the potential of 3D printing to create unique porous and high surface area chemically active structures.

  15. Chemically Active, Porous 3D-Printed Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Kent A.; Kennedy, Zachary C.; Arey, Bruce W.

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibit exceptional properties and are widely investigated because of their structural and functional versatility relevant to catalysis, separations, and sensing applications. However, their commercial or large-scale application is often limited by their powder forms. To address this, we report the production of MOF-thermoplastic polymer composites accessed via a standard 3D printer. MOFs (Zeolitic imidazolate framework; ZIF-8) were successfully incorporated homogeneously into both poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrices, extruded into filaments, and utilized for on-demand access to 3D structures by fused-deposition modeling. Printed rigid PLA-MOF composites displayed good structural integrity, high surface area ((SA)avg =more » 531 m2 g-1) and hierarchical pore features. Flexible TPU-MOF composites (SAavg = 706 m2 g-1) were achieved by employing a sacrificial fluoropolymer readily removed post-printing. Critically, embedded particles in the plastic matrices retain their ability to participate in chemical interactions characteristic of the parent MOF. The fabrication strategies can be extended to other MOFs and illustrate the potential of 3D printing to create unique porous and high surface area chemically-active structures.« less

  16. Multi angle laser light scattering evaluation of field exposed thermoplastic photovoltaic encapsulant materials

    DOE PAGES

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; ...

    2016-01-08

    As creep of polymeric materials is potentially a safety concern for photovoltaic modules, the potential for module creep has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. To investigate the possibility of creep, modules were constructed, using several thermoplastic encapsulant materials, into thin-film mock modules and deployed in Mesa, Arizona. The materials examined included poly(ethylene)-co-vinyl acetate (EVA, including formulations both cross-linked and with no curing agent), polyethylene/polyoctene copolymer (PO), poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). The absence of creep in this experiment is attributable to several factors of which themore » most notable one was the unexpected cross-linking of an EVA formulation without a cross-linking agent. It was also found that some materials experienced both chain scission and cross-linking reactions, sometimes with a significant dependence on location within a module. The TPU and EVA samples were found to degrade with cross-linking reactions dominating over chain scission. In contrast, the PO materials degraded with chain scission dominating over cross-linking reactions. Furthermore, we found no significant indications that viscous creep is likely to occur in fielded modules capable of passing the qualification tests, we note that one should consider how a polymer degrades, chain scission or cross-linking, in assessing the suitability of a thermoplastic polymer in terrestrial photovoltaic applications.« less

  17. Properties of Graphene/Shape Memory Thermoplastic Polyurethane Composites Actuating by Various Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Ho; Dao, Trung Dung; Lee, Hyung-il; Jeong, Han Mo; Kim, Byung Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory behavior of crystalline shape memory polyurethane (SPU) reinforced with graphene, which utilizes melting temperature as a shape recovery temperature, was examined with various external actuating stimuli such as direct heating, resistive heating, and infrared (IR) heating. Compatibility of graphene with crystalline SPU was adjusted by altering the structure of the hard segment of the SPU, by changing the structure of the graphene, and by changing the preparation method of the graphene/SPU composite. The SPU made of aromatic 4,4′-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MSPU) exhibited better compatibility with graphene, having an aromatic structure, compared to that made of the aliphatic hexamethylene diisocyanate. The finely dispersed graphene effectively reinforced MSPU, improved shape recovery of MSPU, and served effectively as a filler, triggering shape recovery by resistive or IR heating. Compatibility was enhanced when the graphene was modified with methanol. This improved shape recovery by direct heating, but worsened the conductivity of the composite, and consequently the efficiency of resistive heating for shape recovery also declined. Graphene modified with methanol was more effective than pristine graphene in terms of shape recovery by IR heating. PMID:28788529

  18. Release of bioactive peptides from polyurethane films in vitro and in vivo: Effect of polymer composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Woodruff, Trent M; Clark, Richard J; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-09-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent biocompatibility. Their role as matrices for the delivery of small molecule therapeutics has been widely reported. However, very little is known about the release of bioactive peptides from this class of polymers. Here, we report the release of linear and cyclic peptides from TPUs with different hard and soft segments. Solvent casting of the TPU at room temperature mixed with the different peptides resulted in reproducible efflux profiles with no evidence of drug degradation. Peptide release was dependent on the size as well as the composition of the TPU. Tecoflex 80A (T80A) showed more extensive release than ElastEon 5-325, which correlated with a degree of hydration. It was also shown that the composition of the medium influenced the rate and extent of peptide efflux. Blending the different TPUs allowed for better control of peptide efflux, especially the initial burst effect. Peptide-loaded TPU prolonged the plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory cyclic peptide PMX53, which normally has a plasma half-life of less than 30min. Using a blend of T80A and E5-325, therapeutic plasma levels of PMX53 were observed up to 9days following a single intraperitoneal implantation of the drug-loaded film. PMX53 released from the blended TPUs significantly inhibited B16-F10 melanoma tumor growth in mice demonstrating its bioactivity in vivo. This study provides important findings for TPU-based therapeutic peptide delivery that could improve the pharmacological utility of peptides as therapeutics. Therapeutic peptides can be highly specific and potent pharmacological agents, but are poorly absorbed and rapidly degraded in the body. This can be overcome by using a matrix that protects the peptide in vivo and promotes its slow release so that a therapeutic effect can be achieved over days or weeks. Thermoplastic polyurethanes are a versatile family of polymers that are biocompatible

  19. Processing Optimization of Deformed Plain Woven Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John R.; Vaidya, Uday K.

    2013-12-01

    This research addresses the processing optimization of post-manufactured, plain weave architecture composite panels consisted of four glass layers and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) when formed with only localized heating. Often times, during the production of deep drawn composite parts, a fabric preform experiences various defects, including non-isothermal heating and thickness variations. Minimizing these defects is of utmost importance for mass produceability in a practical manufacturing process. The broad objective of this research was to implement a design of experiments approach to minimize through-thickness composite panel variation during manufacturing by varying the heating time, the temperature of heated components and the clamping pressure. It was concluded that the heated tooling with least area contact was most influential, followed by the length of heating time and the amount of clamping pressure.

  20. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grademore » uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.« less

  1. 3D printing of highly elastic strain sensors using polyurethane/multiwall carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Josef F.; Hohimer, Cameron J.; Aliheidari, Nahal; Ameli, Amir; Mo, Changki; Pötschke, Petra

    2017-04-01

    As the desire for wearable electronics increases and the soft robotics industry advances, the need for novel sensing materials has also increased. Recently, there have been many attempts at producing novel materials, which exhibit piezoresistive behavior. However, one of the major shortcomings in strain sensing technologies is in the fabrication of such sensors. While there is significant research and literature covering the various methods for developing piezoresistive materials, fabricating complex sensor platforms is still a manufacturing challenge. Here, we report a facile method to fabricate multidirectional embedded strain sensors using additive manufacturing technology. Pure thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and TPU/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) nanocomposites were 3D printed in tandem using a low-cost multi-material FDM printer to fabricate uniaxial and biaxial strain sensors with conductive paths embedded within the insulative TPU platform. The sensors were then subjected to a series of cyclic strain loads. The results revealed excellent piezoresistive responses of the sensors with cyclic repeatability in both the axial and transverse directions and in response to strains as high as 50%. Further, while strain-softening did occur in the embedded printed strain sensors, it was predictable and similar to the results found in the literature for bulk polymer nanocomposites. This works demonstrates the possibility of manufacturing embedded and multidirectional flexible strain sensors using an inexpensive and versatile method, with potential applications in soft robotics and flexible electronics and health monitoring.

  2. Stiff, strong, yet tough free-standing dielectric films of graphene nanosheets-polyurethane nanocomposites with very high dielectric constant and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Rahim; Habib, Amir; Gul, Iftikhar Hussain

    2016-01-01

    In this study, graphene nanosheets (GNS) prepared through a liquid exfoliation technique are dispersed in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) at a volume fraction (Vf) of up to 0.19. Then, the electrical and mechanical properties of the obtained composites are characterized. The dielectric spectroscopy shows an excessive variation in dielectric constant (1.1 to 3.53 × 107) and dielectric tangent loss (0.03 to 2515) with varying Vf over the frequency range of 25 kHz to 5 MHz. A considerable enhancement in electrical conductivity (DC) is found, from 3.87 × 10-10 S/m (base polymer) to 53.5 S/m for the 0.19 Vf GNS-TPU nanocomposite. The GNS-TPU composites are mechanically robust, with a considerable increase in stiffness (˜4-fold) and strength (almost twice), maintaining its ductility up to 0.09 Vf GNS. The high dielectric constant at lower frequencies is attributed to the well-established Maxwell-Wagner polarization effect, whereas the high dielectric tangent loss is due to leakage currents as a physical conducting network is formed at high filler loadings. The layered structure, high aspect ratio, and improved dispersion of GNS are the main reasons for the improvement in both the dielectric characteristics and the mechanical properties of the host polymer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Adhesion strength between thermoplastics and its polyurethane coating made by using the technology combination of injection molding and reaction injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloß, P.; Böhme, A.; Müller, J.; Krajewsky, P.; Michaelis, J.

    2014-05-01

    A complete equipment for injection molding (IM) of a thermoplastic (TP) carrier and reaction injection molding (RIM) of polyurethane (PUR) coatings including IM and RIM machines, a color module for PUR, and a robot was built up. A modularly composed sliding split mold was constructed and manufactured allowing different parts including thicker (2 mm thickness) soft touch and thin (0.4 mm) lacquer PUR coatings. As TP PC/ABS and PA6 GF15 compounds were used, and aromatic and aliphatic PUR systems as well. From the parts made by IM+RIM, test specimens for peel force measurements were cut. These investigations were performed prior and after ageing under climatic conditions @ 50 % RH and temperature changes between -30 °C and 90 °C. By varying IM processing parameters, we have found that mold and TP temperatures are particularly important for the adhesion strength between TP and PUR. The waiting time between the end of TP cooling and PUR injection has a minor influence on its mean value. However, to short waiting times may result in inhomogeneous adhesion. It was surprising that surface defects of the TP carrier leads also to inhomogeneous adhesion. We have observed that ageing may cause an increase and decrease of adhesions strength depending on the TP+PUR system used. We have found that the results are valid only for the actual TP and PUR combination. A generalization seems to be inappropriate, hence, the actual combination should be investigated to prevent unwanted surprises when the coated TP part is in its application.

  4. [Modern polyurethanes in cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Gostev, A A; Laktionov, P P; Karpenko, A A

    Currently, there is great clinical demand for synthetic tissue-engineered cardiovascular prostheses with good long-term patency. Polyurethanes belong to the class of polymers with excellent bio- and hemocompatibility. They are known to possess good mechanical properties, but are prone to processes of degradation in conditions of functioning in living organisms. Attempts at solving this problem have resulted in the development of various new subclasses of polyurethanes such as thermoplastic polyether polyurethanes, polyurethanes with a silicone segment, polycarbonate polyurethanes and nanocomposite polyurethanes. This was accompanied and followed by offering a series of new technologies of production of implantable medical devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and others. In the presented review, we discuss biological and mechanical properties of modern subclasses of polyurethanes, as well as modern methods of manufacturing implantable medical devices made of polyurethanes, especially small-diameter vascular prostheses.

  5. Absolute variation of the mechanical characteristics of halloysite reinforced polyurethane nanocomposites complemented by Taguchi and ANOVA approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Nassir, Mohamed H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.

    The variation of the results of the mechanical properties of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) at different HNTs loadings was implemented as a tool for analysis. The preparation of HNTs-TPU nanocomposites was performed under four controlled parameters of mixing temperature, mixing speed, mixing time, and HNTs loading at three levels each to satisfy Taguchi method orthogonal array L9 aiming to optimize these parameters for the best measurements of tensile strength, Young's modulus, and tensile strain (known as responses). The maximum variation of the experimental results for each response was determined and analysed based on the optimized results predicted by Taguchi method and ANOVA. It was found that the maximum absolute variations of the three mentioned responses are 69%, 352%, and 126%, respectively. The analysis has shown that the preparation of the optimized tensile strength requires 1 wt.% HNTs loading (excluding 2 wt.% and 3 wt.%), mixing temperature of 190 °C (excluding 200 °C and 210 °C), and mixing speed of 30 rpm (excluding 40 rpm and 50 rpm). In addition, the analysis has determined that the mixing time at 20 min has no effect on the preparation. The mentioned analysis was fortified by ANOVA, images of FESEM, and DSC results. Seemingly, the agglomeration and distribution of HNTs in the nanocomposite play an important role in the process. The outcome of the analysis could be considered as a very important step towards the reliability of Taguchi method.

  6. Mechanic and surface properties of central-venous port catheters after removal: A comparison of polyurethane and silicon rubber materials.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ulrike; Lorenz, Edelgard; Weimann, Christiane; Sturm, Heinz; Karimov, Ilham; Ettl, Johannes; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Berger, Hermann; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Central venous port devices made of two different polymeric materials, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silicone rubber (SiR), were compared due their material properties. Both naïve catheters as well as catheters after removal from patients were investigated. In lab experiments the influence of various chemo-therapeutic solutions on material properties was investigated, whereas the samples after removal were compared according to the implanted time in patient. The macroscopic, mechanical performance was assessed with dynamic, specially adapted tests for elasticity. The degradation status of the materials was determined with common tools of polymer characterisation, such as infrared spectroscopy, molecular weight measurements and various methods of thermal analysis. The surface morphology was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. A correlation between material properties and clinical performance was proposed. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the polyurethane catheter materials can potentially result in increased susceptibility of the catheter to bloodstream infections and thrombotic complications. The higher mechanic failure, especially with increasing implantation time of the silicone catheters is related to the lower mechanical performance compared to the polyurethane material as well as loss of barium sulphate filler particles near the surface of the catheter. This results in preformed microscopic notches, which act as predetermined sites of fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on preparation and mechanical performance of TPU/nonwoven composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. C.; Xi, B. J.

    2016-07-01

    In order to study the influence of resin content and layer sequence parameters on the mechanical properties of TPU/non-woven composite materials synthesized by moulding pressing technology. The effects of the resin content and layer sequence on composites were discussed. Through experiments and theoretical analysis, it was revealed how resin content, layer sequence impact on mechanical properties of composite. The mechanics properties of TPU/non-woven composite materials are improved. The process is pressure 0.5 MPa, temperature 110 °C and time 120s min. The melting of the TPU infiltrated into the fabric and filled the space between the fibers.

  8. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  9. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a rein- forcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermosetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  10. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic firber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a reinforcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermsetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  11. The influence of electron-beam irradiation on the chemical and the structural properties of medical-grade polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Soonhyouk

    2015-07-01

    Thermo plastic polyurethane (TPU) provides excellent bio-compatibility, flexibility and good irradiation resistance; however, extremely high irradiation doses can alter the structure and the function of macromolecules, resulting in oxidation, chain scission and cross-linking. In this study, the effects of e-beam irradiation on the medical-grade thermo plastic polyurethane were studied. Changes in the chain length and their distribution, as well as changes in the molecular structure were studied. The GPC (gel permeation chromatography) results show that the oxidative decomposition is followed by a decrease in the molecular mass and an increase in polydispersity. This indicates a very inhomogeneous degradation, which is a consequence of the specific course and of the intensity of oxidative degradation. This was confirmed by means of mechanical property measurements. Overall, this study demonstrated that medical-grade TPU was affected by radiation exposure, particularly at high irradiation doses.

  12. Thermoplastic composites for veneering posterior teeth-a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gegauff, Anthony G; Garcia, Jose L; Koelling, Kurt W; Seghi, Robert R

    2002-09-01

    This pilot study was conducted to explore selected commercially-available thermoplastic composites that potentially had physical properties superior to currently available dental systems for restoring esthetic posterior crowns. Polyurethane, polycarbonate, and poly(ethylene/tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) composites and unfilled polyurethane specimens were injection molded to produce shapes adaptive to five standardized mechanical tests. The mechanical testing included abrasive wear rate, yield strength, apparent fracture toughness (strength ratio), flexural strength, and compressive strength. Compared to commercially available dental composites, abrasion wear rates were lower for all materials tested, yield strength was greater for the filled polycarbonates and filled polyurethane resins, fracture toughness testing was invalid (strength ratios were calculated for comparison of the pilot test materials), flexural strength was roughly similar except for the filled ETFE which was significantly greater, and compressive strength was lower. Commercially available thermoplastic resin composites, such as polyurethane, demonstrate the potential for development of an artificial crown material which exceeds the mechanical properties of currently available esthetic systems, if compressive strength can be improved.

  13. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  14. Fabrication of High Content Carbon Nanotube-Polyurethane Sheets with Tailorable Properties.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B; Zou, Shan; Laqua, Kurtis; Barnes, Michael; Simard, Benoit

    2017-09-13

    We have fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT)-polyurethane (TPU) sheets via a one-step filtration method that uses a TPU solvent/nonsolvent combination. This solution method allows for control of the composition and processing conditions, significantly reducing both the filtration time and the need for large volumes of solvent to debundle the CNTs. Through an appropriate selection of the solvents and tuning the solvent/nonsolvent ratio, it is possible to enhance the interaction between the CNTs and the polymer chains in solution and improve the CNT exfoliation in the nanocomposites. The composition of the nanocomposites, which defines the characteristics of the material and its mechanical properties, can be precisely controlled. The highest improvements in tensile properties were achieved at a CNT:TPU weight ratio around 35:65 with a Young's modulus of 1270 MPa, stress at 50% strain of 35 MPa, and strength of 41 MPa, corresponding to ∼10-fold improvement in modulus and ∼7-fold improvement in stress at 50% strain, while maintaining a high failure strain. At the same composition, CNTs with higher aspect ratio produce nanocomposites with greater improvements (e.g., strength of 99 MPa). Electrical conductivity also shows a maximum near the same composition, where it can exceed the values achieved for the pristine nanotube buckypaper. The trend in mechanical and electrical properties was understood in terms of the CNT-TPU interfacial interactions and morphological changes occurring in the nanocomposite sheets as a function of increasing the TPU content. The availability of such a simple method and the understanding of the structure-property relationships are expected to be broadly applicable in the nanocomposites field.

  15. Highly fluorinated polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, E. C., Jr.; Rochow, S. E. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    New polyurethanes containing a high degree of fluorine atoms are reported. The presence of the fluorine atoms in the polyurethane resins provides material having good thermal stability and chemical resistance. These polyurethanes are derived from a new hydroxy-terminated perfluoro polyether. The hydroxy terminated material is reacted with a diisocyanate to produce the polyurethanes. The polyurethanes can be used to form seals, coatings, potting material, hoses and the like.

  16. Highly stretchable nanoalginate based polyurethane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi; Barmar, Mohammad

    2013-06-20

    Highly stretchable elastomeric samples based on cationic polyurethane dispersions-sodium alginate nanoparticles (CPUD/SA) were prepared by the solution blending of sodium alginate and aqueous polyurethane dispersions. CPUDs were synthesized by step growth polymerization technique using N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a source of cationic emulsifier. The chemical structure and thermal-mechanical properties of these systems were characterized using FTIR and DMTA, respectively. The presence of nanoalginate particles including nanobead and nanorod particles were proved by SEM and EDX. It was observed that thermal properties of composites increased with increasing SA content. All prepared samples were known as thermoplastic-elastomers with high percentages of elongation. Excellent compatibility of prepared nanocomposites was proved by the DMTA data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Infrared-actuated recovery of polyurethane filled by reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids with high energy density.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Mengmeng; Guo, Haiqiang; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Optically actuated shape recovery materials receive much interest because of their great ability to control the creation of mechanical motion remotely and precisely. An infrared (IR) triggered actuator based on shape recovery was fabricated using polyurethane (TPU) incorporated by sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO)/sulfonated carbon nanotube (SCNT) hybrid nanofillers. Interconnected SRGO/SCNT hybrid nanofillers at a low weight loading of 1% dispersed in TPU showed good IR absorption and improved the crystallization of soft segments for a large shape deformation. The output force, energy density and recovery time of IR-triggered actuators were dependent on weight ratios of SRGO to SCNT (SRGO:SCNT). TPU nanocomposites filled by a hybrid nanofiller with SRGO:SCNT of 3:1 showed the maximum IR-actuated stress recovery of lifting a 107.6 g weight up 4.7 cm in 18 s. The stress recovery delivered a high energy density of 0.63 J/g and shape recovery force up to 1.2 MPa due to high thermal conductivity (1.473 W/mK) and Young's modulus of 23.4 MPa. Results indicate that a trade-off between the stiffness and efficient heat transfer controlled by synergistic effect between SRGO and SCNT is critical for high mechanical power output of IR-triggered actuators. IR-actuated shape recovery of SRGO/SCNT/TPU nanocomposites combining high energy density and output forces can be further developed for advanced optomechanical systems.

  18. Water-free synthesis of polyurethane foams using highly reactive diisocyanates derived from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Christopher N D; Bulach, Winfried D; Rehahn, Matthias; Klein, Roland

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of a new highly reactive diisocyanate monomer based on hydroxymethylfurfural. It further describes its catalyst-free conversion to linear-chain thermoplastic polyurethanes as well as to cross-linked polyurethane foams. In addition, a novel strategy for the synthesis of polyurethane foams without the necessity of using water is developed. Nitrogen is utilized herein as blowing agent which is formed during Curtius rearrangement of a new furan based carboxylic azide into its corresponding diisocyanate. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Welds in thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. S.

    Welding methods are reviewed that can be effectively used for joining of thermoplastic composites and continuous-fiber thermoplastics. Attention is given to the use of ultrasonic, vibration, hot-plate, resistance, and induction welding techniques. The welding techniques are shown to provide complementary weld qualities for the range of thermoplastic materials that are of interest to industrial and technological applications.

  20. Water as foaming agent for open cell polyurethane structures.

    PubMed

    Haugen, H; Ried, V; Brunner, M; Will, J; Wintermantel, E

    2004-04-01

    The problem of moisture in polymer processing is known to any polymer engineer, as air bubbles may be formed. Hence granulates are generally dried prior to manufacturing. This study tried to develop a novel processing methods for scaffolds with controlled moisture content in thermoplastic polyurethane. The common foaming agents for polyurethane are organic solvents, whose residues remaining in the scaffold may be harmful to adherent cells, protein growth factors or nearby tissues. Water was used as a foaming agent and NaCl was used as porogens to achieve an open-cell structure. The polyether-polyurethane samples were processed in a heated press, and achieved a porosity of 64%. The pore size ranged between 50 and 500 microm. Human fibroblasts adhered and proliferate in the scaffold. A non-toxic production process was developed to manufacture a porous structure with a thermoplastic polyether-polyurethane. The process enables a mass-production of samples with adjustable pore size and porosity. In contrast to an existing method (solvent casting), the processing of the samples was not limited by its thickness. The process parameters, which attribute mostly to the pore building, were filling volume, temperature, NaCl-concentration and water-uptake rate.

  1. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Roger M. Rowell

    2010-01-01

    The wood industry can expand into new sustainable markets with the formation of a new class of composites with the marriage of the wood industry and the plastics industry. The wood component, usually a flour or fiber, is combined with a thermoplastic to form an extrudable, injectable or thermoformable composite that can be used in many non-structural applications....

  2. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Rodney E. Jacobson; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood-plastic composites” refers to any number of composites that contain wood (of any form) and either thermoset or thermoplastic polymers. Thermosets or thermoset polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins, such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar (...

  3. Effects of glycerol monosterate on TPUs crystallization and its foaming behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossieny, N.; Nofar, M.; Shaayegan, V.; Park, C. B.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) containing 0-2 wt% glycerol monosterate (GMS) were compounded by a twin screw compounder and then foamed using a batch process and n-butane. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-pressure DSC were performed to evaluate the effects of GMS and pressurized butane on the crystallization kinetics of TPU. The results showed that the synergistic effect of GMS and high pressure butane significantly promoted hard segment (HS) crystallization in the TPU-GMS samples. The TPU-GMS samples showed significant increase in crystallinity over a wide range of saturation temperatures in the presence of butane compared to neat melt-compounded TPU (PR-TPU). Comparing the foam characteristics of PR-TPU and TPU-GMS samples, it was observed that both samples exhibited microcellular morphology with high cell density over a wide range of processing temperatures of 150°C - 170°C. However at a high foaming temperature (170°C), PR-TPU foams showed high cell coalescence compared to TPU-GMS. Furthermore, TPU-GMS samples showed a much higher expansion ratio compared to PR-TPU over a wide range of processing temperatures. The lubricating effect of GMS assisted the HS to stack together and form crystalline domains. These HS crystalline domains are present at high temperature acting both as a heterogeneous nucleating sites as well as reinforcement leading to the observed microcellular morphology with a high expansion ratio in TPU-GMS samples.

  4. A thermoplastic polyimidesulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A polymer system has been prepared which has the excellent thermoplastic properties generally associated with polysulfones, and the solvent resistance and thermal stability of aromatic polyimides. This material, with improved processability over the base polyimide, can be processed in the 260-325 C range in such a manner as to yield high quality, tough unfilled moldings; strong, high-temperature-resistant adhesive bonds; and well consolidated, graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings (composities). The unfilled moldings have physical properties that are similar to aromatic polysulfones which demonstrates the potential as an engineering thermoplastic. The adhesive bonds exhibit excellent retention of initial strength levels even after thermal aging for 5000 hours at 232 C. The graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings have mechanical properties which makes this polymer attractive for the fabrication of structural composites.

  5. Highly fluorinated polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, E. C., Jr.; Rochow, S. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The reaction perfluorinated hydroxyl terminated polyether with diisocyanate to form polyurethane is discussed. Data are given on the resin's oxidation stability, chemical resistance, and low temperature flexibility.

  6. Response of Polyurethane to Shock Waves: An Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, V.; Rao, Keshava Subba; Thanganayaki, N.; Kumara, H. K. T.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    Formation of polyurethane (PU) in vacuum environment and controlling density of polyurethane foams are the present day challenges. Polyurethane exists in numerous forms ranging from flexible to rigid and lightweight foams to tough, stiff elastomers [1]. PU can be used to produce lightweight foams for insulation or hard rubber used as wheels to transport heavy loads and it can be used in high pressure applications. The largest volumes of commercial PU elastomers are made from toluene diisocyanate (TDI) or diphenylmethane-4, 4'-diisocyanate (MDI) [2]. Linear polyurethanes can be processed into final products by any of the standard thermoplastic processes (injection molding, extrusion, thermoforming) as well as by low pressure cast processes in presence of catalysts. Tin, tetrabutyl titanate and zirconium chelates are few effective catalysts used to produce polyurethane for particular application [3]. Thermoset elastomers are formed due to irreversible cross-links, when polymers are chemically cured. Highly porous biodegradable PU was synthesized by thermally induced phase separation technique used in tissue engineering and also in bio-degradable based fluids [4]. Properties of PU like hardness, stress/strain modulus, tear strength etc, was determine using ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard methods. PU possesses extremely high mechanical properties, excellent abrasion, tear and extrusion resistance. It has outstanding low-temperature limit (-600C) and high temperature limit up to (1500C).

  7. Process Makes Thermoplastic Prepreg Ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Johnson, Gary S.

    1995-01-01

    Manufacturing process produces ribbon of composite material (prepreg) consisting of continuous lengthwise fibers impregnated with thermoplastic resin. Ribbon can later be cut into sheets of required sizes and shapes, stacked, then heated under pressure to form composite-material structural components. Process accommodates variety of thermoplastic resins and variety of fibers.

  8. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  9. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I [Fremont, CA; Hunter, Marion C [Livermore, CA; Krafcik, Karen Lee [Livermore, CA; Morales, Alfredo M [Livermore, CA; Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Domeier, Linda A [Danville, CA

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  10. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Drews, M. J.; Ellison, M. S.; Gantt, B. W.

    1989-01-01

    A process is being developed which evenly coats individual carbon fibers with thermoplastic polymers. In this novel, continuous coating process, the fiber tow bundle is first spread cover a series of convex rollers and then evenly coated with a fine powder of thermoplastic matrix polymer. Next, the fiber is heated internally by passing direct current through the powder coated fiber. The direct current is controlled to allow the carbon fiber temperature to slightly exceed the flow temperature of the matrix polymer. Analysis of the thermoplastic coated carbon fiber tows produced using this continuous process indicates that 30 to 70 vol pct fiber prepregs can be obtained.

  11. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  12. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  13. Synthesis of highly elastic biocompatible polyurethanes based on bio-based isosorbide and poly(tetramethylene glycol) and their properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2014-09-01

    Bio-based high elastic polyurethanes were prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate and various ratios of isosorbide to poly(tetramethylene glycol) as a diol by a simple one-shot bulk polymerization without a catalyst. Successful synthesis of the polyurethanes was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Thermal properties were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The glass transition temperature was -47.8℃. The test results showed that the poly(tetramethylene glycol)/isosorbide-based elastomer exhibited not only excellent stress-strain properties but also superior resilience to the existing polyether-based polyurethane elastomers. The static and dynamic properties of the polyether/isosorbide-based thermoplastic elastomer were more suitable for dynamic applications. Moreover, such rigid diols impart biocompatible and bioactive properties to thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers. Degradation tests performed at 37℃ in phosphate buffer solution showed a mass loss of 4-9% after 8 weeks, except for the polyurethane with the lowest isosorbide content, which showed an initial rapid weight loss. These polyurethanes offer significant promise due to soft, flexible and biocompatible properties for soft tissue augmentation and regeneration. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Synthesis of highly elastic biocompatible polyurethanes based on bio-based isosorbide and poly(tetramethylene glycol) and their properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based high elastic polyurethanes were prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate and various ratios of isosorbide to poly(tetramethylene glycol) as a diol by a simple one-shot bulk polymerization without a catalyst. Successful synthesis of the polyurethanes was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Thermal properties were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The glass transition temperature was −47.8℃. The test results showed that the poly(tetramethylene glycol)/isosorbide-based elastomer exhibited not only excellent stress–strain properties but also superior resilience to the existing polyether-based polyurethane elastomers. The static and dynamic properties of the polyether/isosorbide-based thermoplastic elastomer were more suitable for dynamic applications. Moreover, such rigid diols impart biocompatible and bioactive properties to thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers. Degradation tests performed at 37℃ in phosphate buffer solution showed a mass loss of 4–9% after 8 weeks, except for the polyurethane with the lowest isosorbide content, which showed an initial rapid weight loss. These polyurethanes offer significant promise due to soft, flexible and biocompatible properties for soft tissue augmentation and regeneration. PMID:24812276

  15. Thermoplastic/Nanotube Composite Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggenmueller, Reto; Fischer, John; Winey, Karen

    2000-03-01

    A combination of solvent casting and melt mixing methods are used to compound selected thermoplastics with single-wall carbon nanotubes. Subsequently, melt extrusion is used to form thermoplastic-nanotube composite fibers. The structural characteristics are investigated by electron microscopy and x-ray scattering methods. In addition the electrical, thermal and mechanical properties were measured. Correlations are sought between the viscoelastic properties of the compounded materials, the nanotube loading and elongation ratio after spinning, and the properties of the resultant fibers.

  16. Processable Aromatic Polyimide Thermoplastic Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M; Johnston, Norman J.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Nelson, James B.; Gleason, John R.; Proctor, K. Mason

    1988-01-01

    Method developed for preparing readily-processable thermoplastic polyimides by blending linear, high-molecular-weight, polyimic acid solutions in ether solvents with ultrafine, semicrystalline, thermoplastic polyimide powders. Slurries formed used to make prepregs. Consolidation of prepregs into finsihed composites characterized by excellent melt flow during processing. Applied to film, fiber, fabric, metal, polymer, or composite surfaces. Used to make various stable slurries from which prepregs prepared.

  17. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  18. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W.

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  19. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin bandmore » of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.« less

  20. Annealing Reduces Free Volumes In Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigation conducted to determine free volumes and water-absorption characteristics of two types of thermoplastic polymide as functions of annealing histories. Reductions reach asymptotic values after several annealing cycles. High-temperature thermoplastics excellent candidates for use in aerospace applications. Graphite-fiber composites containing thermoplastic matrices have wide applicability.

  1. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navak, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a program designed to optimize the fabrication procedures for graphite thermoplastic composites are described. The properties of the composites as a function of temperature were measured and graphite thermoplastic fan exit guide vanes were fabricated and tested. Three thermoplastics were included in the investigation: polysulfone, polyethersulfone, and polyarylsulfone. Type HMS graphite was used as the reinforcement. Bending fatigue tests of HMS graphite/polyethersulfone demonstrated a gradual shear failure mode which resulted in a loss of stiffness in the specimens. Preliminary curves were generated to show the loss in stiffness as a function of stress and number of cycles. Fan exit guide vanes of HMS graphite polyethersulfone were satisfactorily fabricated in the final phase of the program. These were found to have stiffness and better fatigue behavior than graphite epoxy vanes which were formerly bill of material.

  2. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  3. Molecular recognition in poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-based thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Eva; Spiering, A J H; van Leeuwen, Ellen N M; Renken, Raymond A E; Dankers, Patricia Y W; Brouwer, Linda A; van Luyn, Marja J A; Harmsen, Martin C; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Meijer, E W

    2006-12-01

    The molecular recognition properties of the hydrogen bonding segments in biodegradable thermoplastic elastomers were explored, aiming at the further functionalization of these potentially interesting biomaterials. A poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-based poly(urea) 2 was synthesized and characterized in terms of mechanical properties, processibility and histocompatibility. Comparison of the data with those obtained from the structurally related poly(urethane urea) 1 revealed that the difference in hard segment structure does not significantly affect the potency for application as a biomaterial. Nevertheless, the small differences in hard block composition had a strong effect on the molecular recognition properties of the hydrogen bonding segments. High selectivity was found for poly(urea) 2 in which bisureidobutylene-functionalized azobenzene dye 3 was selectively incorporated while bisureidopentylene-functionalized azobenzene dye 4 was completely released. In contrast, the incorporation of both dyes in poly(urethane urea) 1 led in both cases to their gradual release in time. Thermal analysis of the polymers in combination with variable temperature infrared experiments indicated that the hard blocks in 1 showed a sharp melting point, whereas those in 2 showed a very broad melting trajectory. This suggests a more precise organization of the hydrogen bonding segments in the hard blocks of poly(urea) 2 compared to poly(urethane urea) 1 and explains the results from the molecular recognition experiments. Preliminary results revealed that a bisureidobutylene-functionalized GRGDS peptide showed more supramolecular interaction with the PCL-based poly(urea), containing the bisureidobutylene recognition unit, as compared to HMW PCL, lacking this recognition unit.

  4. Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as acetamide, Nmethylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  5. 100% Solids Polyurethane Sequestration Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-11

    Distribution Unlimited 100% Solids Polyurethane Sequestration Coating The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: 100% Solids Polyurethane Sequestration Coating Report Title Report developed under Topic #CBD13-101...Final Technical Report Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0010 Proposal #: 63958CHSB1 Project: 100% Solids Polyurethane Sequestration Coating

  6. Microbial degradation of polyurethane, polyester polyurethanes and polyether polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima-Kambe, T; Shigeno-Akutsu, Y; Nomura, N; Onuma, F; Nakahara, T

    1999-02-01

    Polyurethane (PUR) is a polymer derived from the condensation of polyisocyanate and polyol and it is widely used as a base material in various industries. PUR, in particular, polyester PUR, is known to be vulnerable to microbial attack. Recently, environmental pollution by plastic wastes has become a serious issue and polyester PUR had attracted attention because of its biodegradability. There are many reports on the degradation of polyester PUR by microorganisms, especially by fungi. Microbial degradation of polyester PUR is thought to be mainly due to the hydrolysis of ester bonds by esterases. Recently, polyester-PUR-degrading enzymes have been purified and their characteristics reported. Among them, a solid-polyester-PUR-degrading enzyme (PUR esterase) derived from Comamonas acidovorans TB-35 had unique characteristics. This enzyme has a hydrophobic PUR-surface-binding domain and a catalytic domain, and the surface-binding domain was considered as being essential for PUR degradation. This hydrophobic surface-binding domain is also observed in other solid-polyester-degrading enzymes such as poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) depolymerases. There was no significant homology between the amino acid sequence of PUR esterase and that of PHA depolymerases, except in the hydrophobic surface-binding region. Thus, PUR esterase and PHA depolymerase are probably different in terms of their evolutionary origin and it is possible that PUR esterases come to be classified as a new solid-polyester-degrading enzyme family.

  7. Cryomilling of Thermoplastic Powder for Prepreg Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Cryomilling of Thermoplastic Powder for Prepreg Applications by Brian Parquette, Anit Giri, Daniel J. O’Brien, Sarah Brennan, Kyu Cho, and...MD 21005-5066 ARL-TR-6591 September 2013 Cryomilling of Thermoplastic Powder for Prepreg Applications Brian Parquette and Sarah Brennan...COVERED (From - To) 1 March 2012–30 May 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cryomilling of Thermoplastic Powder for Prepreg Applications 5a. CONTRACT

  8. Environmentally Compliant Thermoplastic Powder Coating, Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-07

    TPC flame sprayed application equipment and ethylene acrylic acid (EAA) and ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) copolymers thermoplastic powder...have worked closely with Dow Chemical to develop and optimize their systems using Dow "Envelon" ethylene acrylic acid (EAA) thermoplastic copolymers...provide on/off control. CFS recommends the use of Dow "Envelon" ethylene acrylic acid (EAA) copolymer thermoplastic powder with this unit. The CFS system

  9. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  10. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  11. Portable Device Slices Thermoplastic Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Beverly A.; Boston, Morton W.; Wilson, Maywood L.

    1993-01-01

    Prepreg slitter designed to slit various widths rapidly by use of slicing bar holding several blades, each capable of slicing strip of preset width in single pass. Produces material evenly sliced and does not contain jagged edges. Used for various applications in such batch processes involving composite materials as press molding and autoclaving, and in such continuous processes as pultrusion. Useful to all manufacturers of thermoplastic composites, and in slicing B-staged thermoset composites.

  12. Effects of temperature changes and stress loading on the mechanical and shape memory properties of thermoplastic materials with different glass transition behaviours and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Kohda, Naohisa; Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Ohta, Mitsuru; Naganishi, Atsuko; Murakami, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of temperature changes and stress loading on the mechanical and shape memory properties of thermoplastic materials with different glass transition behaviours and crystal structures. Five thermoplastic materials, polyethylene terephthalate glycol (Duran®, Scheu Dental), polypropylene (Hardcast®, Scheu Dental), and polyurethane (SMP MM®, SMP Technologies) with three different glass transition temperatures (T g) were selected. The T g and crystal structure were assessed using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The deterioration of mechanical properties by thermal cycling and the orthodontic forces during stepwise temperature changes were investigated using nanoindentation testing and custom-made force-measuring system. The mechanical properties were also evaluated by three-point bending tests; shape recovery with heating was then investigated. The mechanical properties for each material were decreased significantly by 2500 cycles and great decrease was observed for Hardcast (crystal plastic) with higher T g (155.5°C) and PU 1 (crystalline or semi-crystalline plastic) with lower T g (29.6°C). The Duran, PU 2, and PU 3 with intermediate T g (75.3°C for Duran, 56.5°C for PU 2, and 80.7°C for PU 3) showed relatively stable mechanical properties with thermal cycling. The polyurethane polymers showed perfect shape memory effect within the range of intraoral temperature changes. The orthodontic force produced by thermoplastic appliances decreased with the stepwise temperature change for all materials. Orthodontic forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances may influence by the T g of the materials, but not the crystal structure. Polyurethane is attractive thermoplastic materials due to their unique shape memory phenomenon, but stress relaxation with temperature changes is expected. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For

  13. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  14. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  15. Stable Polyurethane Coatings for Electronic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Alkane-based polyurethanes resist deterioration while maintaining good dielectric properties. Weight loss after prolonged immersion in hot water far less for alkane-based polyurethanes than for more common ether based polyurethanes, at any given oxygen content. Major uses of polyurethanes are as connector potting materials and conformal coatings for printed circuit boards.

  16. Recovery behaviour of shape memory polyurethane based laminates after thermoforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuiliang; Xu, Wensen; Prasath Balamurugan, G.; Thompson, Michael R.; Nielsen, Kent E.; Brandys, Frank A.

    2017-11-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can be used to produce a new class of decorative films capable of improved formability and shape recovery in polymer laminates, which are increasingly being used for automotive, aerospace, construction and commercial applications. As a relatively new field there is little knowledge on the shape recovery behaviour of laminates with a SMP film and few methods of quantify that behaviour. The influences of different variables that affect the recovery behaviour of thermoplastic shape memory polyurethanes based laminates including ambient temperature (45 °C and 65 °C), material modulus, and adhesive strength were investigated after thermoforming, through both experimental and modelling methods. The empirical model assisted in identifying the contributions of the adhesive to transfer stresses, which dampened the recovery of the laminate with lower shear strength adhesives. Increasing ambient temperature and the film modulus increased both the final angle recovery ratios and recovery rates.

  17. Thermoplastic polymides and composites therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new class polyimide and polyimide precursors based on diaryl oxyalkylene diamines, such as 1,3-bis[4-aminophenoxy]-2,2-dimethyl propane, a process for their preparation and their use as the continuous phase for the manufacture of composites and composite laminates reinforced by reinforcing agents such as carbon fibers, Kevlar.TM., and other similar high strength reinforcing agents. The polyimides and molecular composites obtained from the diamines according to the invention show thermoplastic properties, excellent flex fatigue and fracture resistance, and excellent thermal and oxidative stability.

  18. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Drews, M. J.; Ellison, M. S.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.; Thomas, H. L.

    1988-01-01

    Now that quantities of prepreg were made on the thermoplastic coating line, they are being formed into both textile preform structures and directly into composite samples. The textile preforms include both woven and knitted structures which will be thermoformed into a finished part. In order to determine if the matrix resin is properly adhering to the fibers or if voids are being formed in the coating process, the tensile strength and modulus of these samples will be tested. The matrix uniformity of matrix distribution in these samples is also being determined using an image analyzer.

  19. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because the thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150 °C for up to 5 h or to 125 °C for up to 24 h if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125 °C for up to 5 h if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of

  20. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E; Maher, Cameron A; Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities-that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization

  1. Study of Polyurethane Foaming Dynamics Using a Heat Flow Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koniorczyk, P.; Trzyna, M.; Zmywaczyk, J.; Zygmunt, B.; Preiskorn, M.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the results of the study concerning the effects of fillers addition on the heat flux density \\dot{q}( t ) of foaming of polyurethane-polystyrene porous composite (PSUR) and describes the dynamics of this process during the first 600 s. This foaming process resulted in obtaining porous materials that were based on HFC 365/225 blown rigid polyurethane foam (PUR) matrix, which contained thermoplastic expandable polystyrene (EPS) beads as the filler. In PSUR composites, the EPS beads were expanded after being heated to a temperature above the glass transition temperature of EPS and vaporing gas incorporated inside, by using the heat of exothermic reaction of polyol with isocyanate. From the start (t=0) to the end of the PSUR composite foaming process (t=tk), \\dot{q}( t ) was measured with the use of the heat flow meter. For the purpose of the study two PUR systems were selected: one with high and one with low heat density of foaming process q. EPS beads were selected from the same manufacturer with large and small diameter. The mass fraction of EPS in PSUR foam varied during the measurements. Additionally, a study of volume fractions of expanded EPS phase in PSUR foams as a function of mass fractions of EPS was conducted. In order to verify effects of the EPS addition on the heat flux density during PSUR foaming process, the thermal conductivity measurements were taken.

  2. Thermoplastic film prevents proppant flowback

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.D.; Weaver, J.D.; Parker, M.A.

    1996-02-05

    Thermoplastic film added to proppants is effective and economical for preventing proppant flowback after an hydraulic fracturing treatment. Most other methods, such as resin-coated proppant and fiber, for controlling proppant flowback have drawbacks that added to treatment costs by requiring long downtime, costly additives, or frequent equipment replacement. Thermoplastic film does not react chemically with fracturing fluids. After the proppant is placed in the fracture, the film strips intertwine with the proppant grains or at higher temperatures, the strips become adhesive and shrink forming consolidated clusters that hold open the newly created fractures and prevent proppant from flowing back. Themore » low cost of the film means that the strips can be used throughout the fracturing job or in selected stages. The strips are compatible with fracturing fluid chemistry, including breakers and crosslinkers, and can be used in wells with a wide range of bottom hole temperatures. The end result is a well that can be brought back on-line in a short time with little proppant flowback. This paper reviews the cost benefits and performance of these proppants.« less

  3. Melt Electrowriting of Thermoplastic Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Hochleitner, Gernot; Fürsattel, Eva; Giesa, Reiner; Groll, Jürgen; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Dalton, Paul D

    2018-04-14

    Melt electrowriting (MEW), an additive manufacturing process, is established using polycaprolactone as the benchmark material. In this study, a thermoplastic elastomer, namely, poly(urea-siloxane), is synthesized and characterized to identify how different classes of polymers are compatible with MEW. This polyaddition polymer has reversible hydrogen bonding from the melt upon heating/cooling and highly resolved structures are achieved by MEW. The influence of applied voltage, temperature, and feeding pressure on printing outcomes behavior is optimized. Balancing these parameters, highly uniform and smooth-surfaced fibers with diameters ranging from 10 to 20 µm result. The quality of the 3D MEW scaffolds is excellent, with very accurate fiber stacking capacity-up to 50 layers with minimal defects and good fiber fusion between the layers. There is also minimal fiber sagging between the crossover points, which is a characteristic of thicker MEW scaffolds previously reported with other polymers. In summary, poly(urea-siloxane) demonstrates outstanding compatibility with the MEW process and represents a class of polymer-thermoplastic elastomers-that are, until now, untested with this approach. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  5. Joining of thermoplastic substrates by microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining two or more items having surfaces of thermoplastic material includes the steps of depositing an electrically-conductive material upon the thermoplastic surface of at least one of the items, and then placing the other of the two items adjacent the one item so that the deposited material is in intimate contact with the surfaces of both the one and the other items. The deposited material and the thermoplastic surfaces contacted thereby are then exposed to microwave radiation so that the thermoplastic surfaces in contact with the deposited material melt, and then pressure is applied to the two items so that the melted thermoplastic surfaces fuse to one another. Upon discontinuance of the exposure to the microwave energy, and after permitting the thermoplastic surfaces to cool from the melted condition, the two items are joined together by the fused thermoplastic surfaces. The deposited material has a thickness which is preferably no greater than a skin depth, .delta..sub.s, which is related to the frequency of the microwave radiation and characteristics of the deposited material in accordance with an equation.

  6. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  7. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  8. Consolidation modelling for thermoplastic composites forming simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, H.; Rusanov, A.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    Pre-impregnated thermoplastic composites are widely used in the aerospace industry for their excellent mechanical properties, Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process, the automotive industry has shown increasing interest in this manufacturing processes, in which the reconsolidation is an essential stage. The model of intimate contact is investigated as the consolidation model, compression experiments have been launched to identify the material parameters, several numerical tests show the influents of the temperature and pressure applied during processing. Finally, a new solid-shell prismatic element has been presented for the simulation of consolidation step in the thermoplastic composites forming process.

  9. Nanofiller Presence Enhances Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Profile on Nanoparticles Released during Thermal Decomposition of Nano-enabled Thermoplastics: Potential Environmental Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilpreet; Schifman, Laura Arabella; Watson-Wright, Christa; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Oyanedel-Craver, Vinka; Wohlleben, Wendel; Demokritou, Philip

    2017-05-02

    Nano-enabled products are ultimately destined to reach end-of-life with an important fraction undergoing thermal degradation through waste incineration or accidental fires. Although previous studies have investigated the physicochemical properties of released lifecycle particulate matter (called LCPM) from thermal decomposition of nano-enabled thermoplastics, critical questions about the effect of nanofiller on the chemical composition of LCPM still persist. Here, we investigate the potential nanofiller effects on the profiles of 16 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed on LCPM from thermal decomposition of nano-enabled thermoplastics. We found that nanofiller presence in thermoplastics significantly enhances not only the total PAH concentration in LCPM but most importantly also the high molecular weight (HMW, 4-6 ring) PAHs that are considerably more toxic than the low molecular weight (LMW, 2-3 ring) PAHs. This nano-specific effect was also confirmed during in vitro cellular toxicological evaluation of LCPM for the case of polyurethane thermoplastic enabled with carbon nanotubes (PU-CNT). LCPM from PU-CNT shows significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to PU which could be attributed to its higher HMW PAH concentration. These findings are crucial and make the case that nanofiller presence in thermoplastics can significantly affect the physicochemical and toxicological properties of LCPM released during thermal decomposition.

  10. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  11. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  12. Evaluation of thermoplastic materials : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-04-01

    In order to find a striping material which would last longer and have greater reflectance than the presently used traffic paint, research was performed on three relatively new thermoplastic marking compounds. The manufacturers of these products claim...

  13. Thermoplastic rubberlike material produced at low cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Thermoplastic rubberlike material is prepared by blending a copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate with asphalt and a petroleum distillate. This low cost material is easily molded or extruded and is compatible with a variety of fillers.

  14. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  15. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  16. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  17. Healing efficiency of shape memory polyurethane fiber reinforced syntactic foam under applied load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunmekan, Babatunde

    Shape memory composite materials have received a great deal of interest in recent structural developments, both in sandwich and in lightweight structures. Experimental procedures involving the free body healing of these materials have been carried out; however, it is important to investigate the healing behaviors of these SMP materials while under load. In this study, syntactic foams reinforced with strain-hardened short-shape memory polyurethane fibers (SMPUFs) were prepared to evaluate their ability to heal wide-opened cracks using the two-step biomimetic close-then-heal (CTH) self-healing scheme while under varying loads. The syntactic foam samples manufactured consisted of an epoxy matrix with dispersed thermoplastic particles, glass microballoons and short SMPUFs. The SMPUF strands were cold-drawn (stretched-then-released) for up to four cycles and then cut to 10 mm short fibers before casting the polymer matrix. Three types of syntactic foam specimens, consisting of 5%, 10%, and 15% thermoplastic particle volume fraction compositions, respectively, were manufactured, and notched beam samples were then prepared. Fracture-healing by uniaxial tension was conducted for five cycles on each sample. Material characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), were utilized to highlight the crack healing characteristics and thermal properties. In addition, a high-resolution charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with a resolution of 3.7 x 3.7 μm/pixel was used to capture the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD). It is seen that the healing ability of the composite varies with changes in both the load carried and the volume fraction of thermoplastic particles. As the thermoplastic volume fraction increased from 5% to 10% to 15%, the tensile strength values recorded decreased, but there was also an increase in the healing efficiency. Moreover, SEM images revealed partial healing in samples with lower

  18. Survey of United States Army Reserve (USAR) Troop Program Unit (TPU) soldiers 1989. Tabulation of Questionnaire Responses: Longitudinal Sample: Junior Enlisted Stayers from 1988 to 1989. 1989 Questionnaire Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    AD-A237 531 1989 SURVEY OF UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE (USAR) TROOP PROGRAM UNIT (TPU) SOLDIERS Tabulation of Questionnaire Responses: Longitudinal...Program Unit (TPU) Soldiers . The Tabulation Volumes list questionnaire items and the percent of respondents (weighted to population estimates) who have...Reserve population eligible for selection was defined by the number of personnel rec,,rds on a Dpeber 1988 SIDPERS data base; this totalled 280,265

  19. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8095 - Silylated polyurethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silylated polyurethane. 721.8095... Substances § 721.8095 Silylated polyurethane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a silylated polyurethane (PMN P-95-1356) is...

  5. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for adsorption of dye molecules from textile wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akduman, C.; Akçakoca Kumbasar, E. P.; Morsunbul, S.

    2017-10-01

    The nanofiber membranes prepared by the electrospinning method have unique properties such as high specific surface area and high porosity with fine pores. These properties led electrospun nanofiber membranes to use for the removal of dye molecules from textile wastewater. In this study, a hydrophobic Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) and a hydrophilic Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were selected for producing electrospun nanofibers and their sorption capacities were investigated. The largest sorption capacity reached to maximum 88.31 mg/g, belong to BTCA cross-linked PVA membranes due to hydrophilic character of PVA. Contrary to expectation, hydrophobic character of TPU was dominant and incorporation of CD to the TPU nanofibers did not affect the sorption of the TPU membranes, and showed very low adsorption capacity (14.48 mg/g).

  6. Radiation-induced changes affecting polyester based polyurethane binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierpoint, Sujita Basi

    The application of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers as binders in the high energy explosives particularly when used in weapons presents a significantly complex and challenging problem due to the impact of the aging of this polymer on the useful service life of the explosive. In this work, the effects of radiation on the aging of the polyester based polyurethane were investigated using both electron beam and gamma irradiation at various dose rates in the presence and absence of oxygen. It was found by means of GPC that, in the presence and absence of oxygen, the poly (ester urethane) primarily undergoes cross-linking, by means of a carbon-centered secondary alkyl radical. It was also concluded that the polymer partially undergoes scission of the backbone of the main chain at C-O, N-C, and C-C bonds. Substantial changes in the conditions of irradiation and in dose levels did not affect the cross-linking and scission yields. Experiments were also performed with EPR spectroscopy for the purpose of identifying the initial carbon-centered free radicals and for studying the decay mechanisms of these radicals. It was found that the carbon-centered radical which is produced via C-C scission (primary alkyl radical) is rapidly converted to a long-lived allylic species at higher temperatures; more than 80% radicals are converted to allyl species in 2.5 hours. In the presence of oxygen, the allyl radical undergoes a fast reaction to produce a peroxyl radical; this radical decays with a 1.7 hour half-life by pseudo first-order kinetics to negligible levels in 13 hours. FTIR measurements were conducted to identify the radiation-induced changes to the functional groups in the polyester polyurethane. These measurements show an increase in carbonyl, amine and carboxylic groups as a result of reaction of H atoms with R-C-O·, ·NH-R and R-COO·. The FTIR results also demonstrate the production of the unsaturation resulting from hydrogen atom transfer during intrachain conversion

  7. A Study on New Composite Thermoplastic Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahara, Takehiro; Nakayama, Masanobu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Katoh, Kazushige; Miyazaki, Shigehumi; Maruizumi, Haruki; Hori, Keiichi; Morita, Yasuhiro; Akiba, Ryojiro

    Efforts have been paid to realize a new composite propellant using thermoplastics as a fuel binder and lithium as a metallic fuel. Thermoplastics binder makes it possible the storage of solid propellant in small blocks and to provide propellants blocks into rocket motor case at a quantity needed just before use, which enables the production facility of solid propellant at a minimum level, thus, production cost significantly lower. Lithium has been a candidate for a metallic fuel for the ammonium perchlorate based composite propellants owing to its capability to reduce the hydrogen chloride in the exhaust gas, however, never been used because lithium is not stable at room conditions and complex reaction products between oxygen, nitrogen, and water are formed at the surface of particles and even in the core. However, lithium particles whose surface shell structure is well controlled are rather stable and can be stored in thermoplastics for a long period. Evaluation of several organic thermoplastics whose melting temperatures are easily tractable was made from the standpoint of combustion characteristics, and it is shown that thermoplastics propellants can cover wide range of burning rate spectrum. Formation of well-defined surface shell of lithium particles and its kinetics are also discussed.

  8. Preparation of highly fluorinated polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochow, S. E.; Stump, E. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    New polyurethanes, formed from a reaction of a prepolymer diol and a perfluorinated diisocyanate, are nonflammable and possess high corrosion resistance and good low temperature flexibility. Polymer hardness increases rapidly with increasing ratio of diisocaynate to diol, but its glass transition temperature is not adversely affected.

  9. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  10. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  11. Toxicological Implications of Released Particulate Matter during Thermal Decomposition of Nano-Enabled Thermoplastics

    PubMed Central

    Watson-Wright, Christa; Singh, Dilpreet; Demokritou, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Nano-enabled thermoplastics are part of the growing market of nano-enabled products (NEPs) that have vast utility in several industries and consumer goods. The use and disposal of NEPs at their end of life has raised concerns about the potential release of constituent engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) during thermal decomposition and their impact on environmental health and safety. To investigate this issue, industrially relevant nano-enabled thermoplastics including polyurethane, polycarbonate, and polypropylene containing carbon nanotubes (0.1 and 3% w/v, respectively), polyethylene containing nanoscale iron oxide (5% w/v), and ethylene vinyl acetate containing nanoscale titania (2 and 5% w/v) along with their pure thermoplastic matrices were thermally decomposed using the recently developed lab based Integrated Exposure Generation System (INEXS). The life cycle released particulate matter (called LCPM) was monitored using real time instrumentation, size fractionated, sampled, extracted and prepared for toxicological analysis using primary small airway epithelial cells to assess potential toxicological effects. Various cellular assays were used to assess reactive oxygen species and total glutathione as measurements of oxidative stress along with mitochondrial function, cellular viability, and DNA damage. By comparing toxicological profiles of LCPM released from polymer only (control) with nano-enabled LCPM, potential nanofiller effects due to the use of ENMs were determined. We observed associations between NEP properties such as the percent nanofiller loading, host matrix, and nanofiller chemical composition and the physico-chemical properties of released LCPM, which were linked to biological outcomes. More specifically, an increase in percent nanofiller loading promoted a toxicological response independent of increasing LCPM dose. Importantly, differences in host matrix and nanofiller composition were shown to enhance biological activity and toxicity of LCPM

  12. Toxicological Implications of Released Particulate Matter during Thermal Decomposition of Nano-Enabled Thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Watson-Wright, Christa; Singh, Dilpreet; Demokritou, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Nano-enabled thermoplastics are part of the growing market of nano-enabled products (NEPs) that have vast utility in several industries and consumer goods. The use and disposal of NEPs at their end of life has raised concerns about the potential release of constituent engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) during thermal decomposition and their impact on environmental health and safety. To investigate this issue, industrially relevant nano-enabled thermoplastics including polyurethane, polycarbonate, and polypropylene containing carbon nanotubes (0.1 and 3% w/v, respectively), polyethylene containing nanoscale iron oxide (5% w/v), and ethylene vinyl acetate containing nanoscale titania (2 and 5% w/v) along with their pure thermoplastic matrices were thermally decomposed using the recently developed lab based Integrated Exposure Generation System (INEXS). The life cycle released particulate matter (called LCPM) was monitored using real time instrumentation, size fractionated, sampled, extracted and prepared for toxicological analysis using primary small airway epithelial cells to assess potential toxicological effects. Various cellular assays were used to assess reactive oxygen species and total glutathione as measurements of oxidative stress along with mitochondrial function, cellular viability, and DNA damage. By comparing toxicological profiles of LCPM released from polymer only (control) with nano-enabled LCPM, potential nanofiller effects due to the use of ENMs were determined. We observed associations between NEP properties such as the percent nanofiller loading, host matrix, and nanofiller chemical composition and the physico-chemical properties of released LCPM, which were linked to biological outcomes. More specifically, an increase in percent nanofiller loading promoted a toxicological response independent of increasing LCPM dose. Importantly, differences in host matrix and nanofiller composition were shown to enhance biological activity and toxicity of LCPM

  13. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.; Cash, David L.

    1986-01-01

    A method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer. A solid thermoplastic lymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infusant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  14. Sustained Release Drug Delivery Applications of Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Lowinger, Michael B; Barrett, Stephanie E; Zhang, Feng; Williams, Robert O

    2018-05-09

    Since their introduction over 50 years ago, polyurethanes have been applied to nearly every industry. This review describes applications of polyurethanes to the development of modified release drug delivery. Although drug delivery research leveraging polyurethanes has been ongoing for decades, there has been renewed and substantial interest in the field in recent years. The chemistry of polyurethanes and the mechanisms of drug release from sustained release dosage forms are briefly reviewed. Studies to assess the impact of intrinsic drug properties on release from polyurethane-based formulations are considered. The impact of hydrophilic water swelling polyurethanes on drug diffusivity and release rate is discussed. The role of pore formers in modulating drug release rate is examined. Finally, the value of assessing mechanical properties of the dosage form and approaches taken in the literature are described.

  15. Development of polyurethanes for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Kucińska-Lipka, J; Kalaszczyńska, I; Janik, H

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review recent developments on polyurethanes aimed at the design, synthesis, modifications, and biological properties in the field of bone tissue engineering. Different polyurethane systems are presented and discussed in terms of biodegradation, biocompatibility and bioactivity. A comprehensive discussion is provided of the influence of hard to soft segments ratio, catalysts, stiffness and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes. Interaction with various cells, behavior in vivo and current strategies in enhancing bioactivity of polyurethanes are described. The discussion on the incorporation of biomolecules and growth factors, surface modifications, and obtaining polyurethane-ceramics composites strategies is held. The main emphasis is placed on the progress of polyurethane applications in bone regeneration, including bone void fillers, shape memory scaffolds, and drug carrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deformational characteristics of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indukuri, Kishore K.

    This thesis focuses primarily on the structure-property relationships of poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) triblock copolymer TPEs. First evidence for strain-induced crystallization occurring in certain SEBS block copolymers has been established using unique techniques like deformation calorimetry, combined in-situ small angle X-ray and wide angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD/WAXD). Also the ramifications of such strain-induced crystallization on the mechanical properties like cyclic hysteresis, stress relaxation/creep retention of these SEBS systems have been studied. In addition, the structural changes in the morphology of these systems on deformation have been investigated using combined SAXD/WAXD setup. Small angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at the nano-scale of polystyrene (PS) cylinders, while wide angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at molecular length scales of the amorphous/crystalline domains of the elastomeric mid-block in these systems. New structural features at both these length scales have been observed and incorporated into the overall deformation mechanisms of the material. Continuous processing techniques like extrusion have been used to obtain ultra long-range order and orientation in these SEBS systems. Thus well ordered crystal like hexagonal packing of cylinders, where in each element in this hexagonal lattice can be individually addressed without any grain boundaries can be realized using these robust techniques. The effect of long-range order/orientation on the mechanical properties has been studied. In addition, these well ordered systems serve as model systems for evaluating deformation mechanisms of these SEBS systems, where the relative contributions of each of the phases can be estimated. EPDM/i-PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) have micron size scale phase separated morphologies of EPDM rubber dispersed in a semicrystalline i-PP matrix as a result of the dynamic vulcanization process. Confocal microscopy studies

  17. Identifying thermal breakdown products of thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Marianne; Oury, Benoît; Melin, Sandrine

    2017-07-01

    Polymers processed to produce plastic articles are subjected to temperatures between 150°C and 450°C or more during overheated processing and breakdowns. Heat-based processing of this nature can lead to emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the thermoplastic processing shop. In this study, laboratory experiments, qualitative and quantitative emissions measurement in thermoplastic factories were carried out. The first step was to identify the compounds released depending on the thermoplastic nature, the temperature and the type of process. Then a thermal degradation protocol that can extrapolate the laboratory results to industry scenarios was developed. The influence of three parameters on released thermal breakdown products was studied: the sample preparation methods-manual cutting, ambient, or cold grinding-the heating rate during thermal degradation-5, 10 20, and 50°C/min-and the decomposition method-thermogravimetric analysis and pyrolysis. Laboratory results were compared to atmospheric measurements taken at 13 companies to validate the protocol and thereby ensure its representativeness of industrial thermal processing. This protocol was applied to most commonly used thermoplastics to determine their thermal breakdown products and their thermal behaviour. Emissions data collected by personal exposure monitoring and sampling at the process emission area show airborne concentrations of detected compounds to be in the range of 0-3 mg/m 3 under normal operating conditions. Laser cutting or purging operations generate higher pollution levels in particular formaldehyde which was found in some cases at a concentration above the workplace exposure limit.

  18. Ultrasonic Welding of Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. S.; Page, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic welding of graphite/thermoplastic composite materials eliminates need for fasteners (which require drilling or punching, add weight, and degrade stiffness) and can be totally automated in beam fabrication and assembly jigs. Feasibility of technique has been demonstrated in laboratory tests which show that neither angular orientation nor vacuum affect weld quality.

  19. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  20. Properties of Multiphase Polyurethane Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    segment - diphenylmethane-diisocyanate/ N - methyldiethanolamine (MDI/ MDEA ). Each polymer was synthesized using a two step reaction technique. The number...OF MULTIPHASE POLYURETHANE SYSTEMS Final Report for Period July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983 Naval Air Systems Command Code 5304 C2 ONavy Contract # N 00019...and COB, UA groups. The existence of 3-dimensional hydrogen bonding (two C-O groups bonded to one N -H group) should shift the COB,UA peak to lower

  1. Polyurethanes from fluoroalkyl propyleneglycol polyethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trischler, F. D. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A description is given of highly stable polyurethane polymers prepared by reacting a polyether with a diisocyanate. Compounded stocks of these polymers may be shaped and cured in conventional equipment used in the rubber industry. The solutions are dispersed gels prepared from the polymers and may be used for forming supported or unsupported films for coating fabrics or solid surfaces, and for forming adhesive bonds between a wide variety of plastics, elastomers, fabrics, metals, wood, leather, ceramics and the like.

  2. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  3. The evaluation of epoxy thermoplastic pavement marking material in Virginia : the application : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    Epoxy Thermoplastic (ETP) is a recently developed epoxy-resin-based thermoplastic pavement marking material being promoted by the Federal Highway Administration as a possible substitute for conventional traffic paints and thermoplastics. Its reported...

  4. Formulation, Preparation, and Characterization of Polyurethane Foams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Moises L.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of laboratory-scale polyurethane foams is described with formulations that are easy to implement in experiments for undergraduate students. Particular attention is given to formulation aspects that are based on the main chemical reactions occurring in polyurethane production. This allows students to develop alternative formulations to…

  5. Microwave-assisted synthesis of cyclodextrin polyurethanes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclodextrin (CD) has often been incorporated into polyurethanes in order to facilitate its use in encapsulation or removal of organic species for various applications. In this work a microwave-assisted method has been developed to produce polyurethanes consisting of alpha-, ß-, and gamma-CD and thr...

  6. Effects of mechanical properties of thermoplastic materials on the initial force of thermoplastic appliances.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Naohisa; Iijima, Masahiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Brantley, William A; Ahluwalia, Karamdeep S; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-05-01

    To measure the forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances made from three materials and investigate effects of mechanical properties, material thickness, and amount of activation on orthodontic forces. Three thermoplastic materials, Duran (Scheu Dental), Erkodur (Erkodent Erich Kopp GmbH), and Hardcast (Scheu Dental), with two different thicknesses were selected. Values of elastic modulus and hardness were obtained from nanoindentation measurements at 28°C. A custom-fabricated system with a force sensor was employed to obtain measurements of in vitro force delivered by the thermoplastic appliances for 0.5-mm and 1.0-mm activation for bodily tooth movement. Experimental results were subjected to several statistical analyses. Hardcast had significantly lower elastic modulus and hardness than Duran and Erkodur, whose properties were not significantly different. Appliances fabricated from thicker material (0.75 mm or 0.8 mm) always produced significantly greater force than those fabricated from thinner material (0.4 mm or 0.5 mm). Appliances with 1.0-mm activation produced significantly lower force than those with 0.5-mm activation, except for 0.4-mm thick Hardcast appliances. A strong correlation was found between mechanical properties of the thermoplastic materials and force produced by the appliances. Orthodontic forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances depend on the material, thickness, and amount of activation. Mechanical properties of the polymers obtained by nanoindentation testing are predictive of force delivery by these appliances.

  7. Microscale patterning of thermoplastic polymer surfaces by selective solvent swelling.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, Omid; Chen, Chien-Fu; DeVoe, Don L

    2012-09-04

    A new method for the fabrication of microscale features in thermoplastic substrates is presented. Unlike traditional thermoplastic microfabrication techniques, in which bulk polymer is displaced from the substrate by machining or embossing, a unique process termed orogenic microfabrication has been developed in which selected regions of a thermoplastic surface are raised from the substrate by an irreversible solvent swelling mechanism. The orogenic technique allows thermoplastic surfaces to be patterned using a variety of masking methods, resulting in three-dimensional features that would be difficult to achieve through traditional microfabrication methods. Using cyclic olefin copolymer as a model thermoplastic material, several variations of this process are described to realize growth heights ranging from several nanometers to tens of micrometers, with patterning techniques include direct photoresist masking, patterned UV/ozone surface passivation, elastomeric stamping, and noncontact spotting. Orogenic microfabrication is also demonstrated by direct inkjet printing as a facile photolithography-free masking method for rapid desktop thermoplastic microfabrication.

  8. Microscale Patterning of Thermoplastic Polymer Surfaces by Selective Solvent Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid; Chen, Chien-Fu; DeVoe, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the fabrication of microscale features in thermoplastic substrates is presented. Unlike traditional thermoplastic microfabrication techniques, in which bulk polymer is displaced from the substrate by machining or embossing, a unique process termed orogenic microfabrication has been developed in which selected regions of a thermoplastic surface are raised from the substrate by an irreversible solvent swelling mechanism. The orogenic technique allows thermoplastic surfaces to be patterned using a variety of masking methods, resulting in three-dimensional features that would be difficult to achieve through traditional microfabrication methods. Using cyclic olefin copolymer as a model thermoplastic material, several variations of this process are described to realize growth heights ranging from several nanometers to tens of microns, with patterning techniques include direct photoresist masking, patterned UV/ozone surface passivation, elastomeric stamping, and noncontact spotting. Orogenic microfabrication is also demonstrated by direct inkjet printing as a facile photolithography-free masking method for rapid desktop thermoplastic microfabrication. PMID:22900539

  9. Sulfur Mustard Penetration of Thermoplastic Elastomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    blend of polypropylene and finely dispersed, highly vulcanised EPDM rubber [4]. However its exact composition is a trade secret. The Santoprene grade... rubber or silicone rubber . Compared to thermoplastic elastomers, these thermosetting elastomers are expensive and difficult to process. Therefore a...the last few decades, CBR respirators have generally been manufactured from either butyl rubber (as in the British and Australian S10), or silicone

  10. LARC-TPI and new thermoplastic polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, A.; Ohta, M.

    1987-02-01

    The LARC-TPI linear thermoplastic polyimide has been developed by NASA for high temperature adhesive applications in aerospace structures in the forms of varnish, films, powders, and prepregs. LARC-TPI improves adhesive processability and lowers glass transition temperature, while retaining mechanical, thermal and electrical properties inherent in the polyimides. It may be used as a structural adhesive for metals, composites, ceramics, and films. 8 references.

  11. The Adhesive Bonding of Thermoplastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    o f Science, (wf aplicable ) Technology and Medicine USARDSG-UK 1’ DDRESS (City, S ap ar~ 7I.oe b ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 01’r me f...I I II This thesis first discusses the problems that occur when thermoplastic-based fibre-composite materials are bonded using structural engineering...failure have been understood tnd predicted. Finally, having identified techniques for obtaining good interfacial adhesion,the thesis concludes by

  12. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  13. Pulmonary response to polyurethane dust.

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer, K L; Bingham, E; Barkley, W

    1975-01-01

    Weanling and 9 months or older rats were exposed to particles of an aged (PUF I) or freshly prepared (PUF II) rigid polyurethane foam by intratracheal intubation. The dose was 5 mg of particles. The response of the lung tissue was examined morphologically by serial sacrifices. Inflammation and macrophage activity were the initial responses. Fibrosis developed after 6 months. Nodular scars and perifocal emphysema were seen after 12 months. Four rats had a papillary adenoma in a major bronchus after 18 months exposure to PUF II. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:1175548

  14. Pulmonary response to polyurethane dust.

    PubMed

    Stemmer, K L; Bingham, E; Barkley, W

    1975-06-01

    Weanling and 9 months or older rats were exposed to particles of an aged (PUF I) or freshly prepared (PUF II) rigid polyurethane foam by intratracheal intubation. The dose was 5 mg of particles. The response of the lung tissue was examined morphologically by serial sacrifices. Inflammation and macrophage activity were the initial responses. Fibrosis developed after 6 months. Nodular scars and perifocal emphysema were seen after 12 months. Four rats had a papillary adenoma in a major bronchus after 18 months exposure to PUF II.

  15. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  16. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  17. Polyurethane membranes for surgical gown applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukpabi, Pauline Ozoemena

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a directive requiring all employers to supply personnel protective equipment to employees who are at risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious body fluids. For the healthcare worker, a wide variety of surgical gowns is available commercially but there are concerns over their barrier effectiveness and/or wearer comfort. To successfully create a barrier fabric which combines resistance to fluid penetration with comfort, a complete understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and functional properties is required. In this study, we investigated the surface properties of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in polyurethane membranes intended for use in surgical gowns. The polyurethane membranes were grafted with side chains of varying lengths, polyethylene glycol (PEG) being used for the hydrophilic modifications and perfluoroalkyl compounds (a monofunctional acid and a difunctional amino alcohol) for the hydrophobic modifications. The hydrophilic treatment was intended to improve the comfort properties of monolithic membranes without adversely affecting their barrier properties. The hydrophobic treatment, on the other hand, was intended to improve the fluid repellency and hence barrier properties of microporous membranes without adversely affecting their comfort properties. Reflection infrared spectroscopy showed that fluorine was successfully grafted onto the polyurethane backbone during the hydrophobic modification, but was not sensitive enough to detect PEG grafting in leached polyethylene glycol-treated polyurethanes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the perfluoroalkylated polyurethanes contained up to 40% fluorine on their surfaces and the PEG-treated polyurethanes showed an increase in their C-O content over the unmodified polyurethane. Scanning electron microscopy not only showed that perfluoroalkylation yielded polyurethane membranes with very

  18. Functionalised polyurethane for efficient laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, G. W. J.; Kang, H.; MacMillan, F. J.; Jin, J.; Simpson, M. C.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a valuable tool that offers a much cleaner and more flexible etching process than conventional lithographic techniques. Although much research has been undertaken on commercially available polymers, many challenges still remain, including contamination by debris on the surface, a rough etched appearance and high ablation thresholds. Functionalizing polymers with a photosensitive group is a novel way and effective way to improve the efficiency of laser micromachining. In this study, several polyurethane films grafted with different concentrations of the chromophore anthracene have been synthesized which are specifically designed for 248 nm KrF excimer laser ablation. A series of lines etched with a changing number of pulses and fluences by the nanosecond laser were applied to each polyurethane film. The resultant ablation behaviours were studied through optical interference tomography and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The anthracene grafted polyurethanes showed a vast improvement in both edge quality and the presence of debris compared with the unmodified polyurethane. Under the same laser fluence and number of pulses the spots etched in the anthracene contained polyurethane show sharp depth profiles and smooth surfaces, whereas the spots etched in polyurethane without anthracene group grafted present rough cavities with debris according to the SEM images. The addition of a small amount of anthracene (1.47%) shows a reduction in ablation threshold from unmodified polyurethane showing that the desired effect can be achieved with very little modification to the polymer.

  19. Advanced Thermoplastic Resins for Manufacturing Wind Turbine Blades |

    Science.gov Websites

    Turbine Blades Advanced Thermoplastic Resins for Manufacturing Wind Turbine Blades At its Composites Arkema's Elium liquid thermoplastic resin. Photo of men working on turbine blades in a dome-shaped building composite structures of wind turbine blades. Capabilities Learn more about NREL's IACMI projects and its

  20. Imprinting of confining sites for cell cultures on thermoplastic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D.; Fleenor, E. N.

    1969-01-01

    Prevention of test cell migration beyond the field of observation involves confining cells or cultures in microlagoons made in either a layer of grease or a thermoplastic substrate. Thermoplastic films or dishes are easily imprinted with specifically designed patterns of microlagoons.

  1. Tough poly(arylene ether) thermoplastics as modifiers for bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.; Roemer, W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Several aspects of research on thermoplastics as toughness modifiers are discussed, including the contribution of the backbone chemistry and the concentration of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic to fracture toughness, influence of the molecular weight of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic on neat resin fracture toughness, and the morphology of the thermoplastic modified networks. The results show that fracture toughness of brittle bismaleimide resins can be improved significantly with poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic levels of 20 percent by weight, and that high molecular weight poly(arylene ether) based on bisphenol A provides the highest degree of toughening. Preliminary composite evaluation shows that improvements in neat resin toughness translate into carbon fabric composite.

  2. Follow up of injected polyurethane slab jacking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    GLENN JACKSON BRIDGE FOLLOW-UP REPORT The elevation monitoring in the report entitled Injected Polyurethane Slab Jacking (Soltesz 2000) is continued in this current report. The elevations of the concrete slabs are being monitored to see if polyuretha...

  3. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.; Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  4. Flame Retardants Used in Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The partnership project on flame retardants in furniture seeks to update the health and environmental profiles of flame-retardant chemicals that meet fire safety standards for upholstered consumer products with polyurethane foam

  5. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, D.V.; Cash, D.L.

    1984-11-21

    A solid thermoplastic polymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infustant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  6. Patients’ satisfaction with anatomic polyurethane implants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents patients satisfaction using anatomical polyurethane breast implants. We performed surgery on 525 patients, 370 of which were primary and 155 were secondary to various causes such as capsular contracture, ruptured implants, volume changes, and incorrect positioning of the implant. The advantages of silicone polyurethane covers shown high level of patient satisfaction, low incidence of capsular contracture, and absence of implant rotation, and late seroma. PMID:28497022

  7. Supportability evaluation of thermoplastic and thermoset composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanani, G. R.; Boldi, D.; Cramer, S. G.; Heimerdinger, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    Nearly 300 advanced composite components manufactured by Northrop Corporation are flying on U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy supersonic aircraft as part of a three-year Air Force/Navy/Northrop supportability evaluation. Both thermoplastic and high-temperature thermoset composites were evaluated for their in-service performance on 48 USAF and Navy F-5E fighter and USAFT-38 trainer aircraft in the first large-scale, long-term maintenance evaluation of these advanced materials. Northrop manufactured four types of doors for the project-avionics bay access, oil fill, inlet duct inspection, and a main landing gear door. The doors are made of PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, which is tougher and potentially less expensive to manufacture than conventional composites; and 5250-3 BMI (bismaleimide) thermoset, which is manufactured like a conventional epoxy composite but can withstand higher service temperatures. Results obtained so far indicate that both the BMI and PEEK are durable with PEEK being somewhat better than BMI.

  8. Processing parameters for thermoplastic filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, J.; Leach, D.

    The consolidation pressure and winding speed for thermoplastic filament winding were studied. Thermoplastic composite parts were manufactured from tape prepreg (APC-2); powder-coated, semiconsolidated towpreg; and commingled fiber towpeg. The material used was carbon fiber (AS-4) (60 vol pct) in a PEEK matrix. The parts made were open-ended cylinders of the three materials, 177.8 mmID, 228.6 mm long, 17 plies thick with a 0 deg lay-up angle; and rings, 50 plies of APC-2 thick, 6.35 mm wide (one strip wide), 177.8 mm ID, and a lay-up of 0 deg. Their quality was determined by surface finish and void percentage. The tubes made from APC-2 appeared to have the best quality of the three prepregs. For the rings, the speed of lay down had a significant effect on both the final width of the parts and on the percentage of voids. The pressure of the roller had a significant effect on the final widths at a 99 percent confidence level, but only a significant effect on the percentage of voids at a 95 percent confidence level.

  9. Tough and Sustainable Graft Block Copolymer Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Li, Tuoqi; Mannion, Alexander M.

    Fully sustainable poly[HPMC-g-(PMVL-b-PLLA)] graft block copolymer thermoplastics were prepared from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), β-methyl-δ-valerolactone (MVL), and l-lactide (LLA) using a facile two-step sequential addition approach. In these materials, rubbery PMVL functions as a bridge between the semirigid HPMC backbone and the hard PLLA end blocks. This specific arrangement facilitates PLLA crystallization, which induces microphase separation and physical cross-linking. By changing the backbone molar mass or side chain composition, these thermoplastic materials can be easily tailored to access either plastic or elastomeric behavior. Moreover, the graft block architecture can be utilized to overcome the processing limitations inherent to linear block polymers.more » Good control over molar mass and composition enables the deliberate design of HPMC-g-(PMVL-b-PLLA) samples that are incapable of microphase separation in the melt state. These materials are characterized by relatively low zero shear viscosities in the melt state, an indication of easy processability. The simple and scalable synthetic procedure, use of inexpensive and renewable precursors, and exceptional rheological and mechanical properties make HPMC-g-(PMVL-b-PLLA) polymers attractive for a broad range of applications.« less

  10. Thermoplastic nanofluidic devices for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha M; O'Neil, Colleen E; Uba, Franklin I; Soper, Steven A

    2017-01-31

    Microfluidics is now moving into a developmental stage where basic discoveries are being transitioned into the commercial sector so that these discoveries can affect, for example, healthcare. Thus, high production rate microfabrication technologies, such as thermal embossing and/or injection molding, are being used to produce low-cost consumables appropriate for commercial applications. Based on recent reports, it is clear that nanofluidics offers some attractive process capabilities that may provide unique venues for biomolecular analyses that cannot be realized at the microscale. Thus, it would be attractive to consider early in the developmental cycle of nanofluidics production pipelines that can generate devices possessing sub-150 nm dimensions in a high production mode and at low-cost to accommodate the commercialization of this exciting technology. Recently, functional sub-150 nm thermoplastic nanofluidic devices have been reported that can provide high process yield rates, which can enable commercial translation of nanofluidics. This review presents an overview of recent advancements in the fabrication, assembly, surface modification and the characterization of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices. Also, several examples in which nanoscale phenomena have been exploited for the analysis of biomolecules are highlighted. Lastly, some general conclusions and future outlooks are presented.

  11. Low Cost Processing of Commingled Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasson, Matthew Lee

    A low cost vacuum consolidation process has been investigated for use with commingled thermoplastic matrix composites. In particular, the vacuum consolidation behaviour of commingled polypropylene/glass fibre and commingled nylon/carbon fibre precursors were studied. Laminates were consolidated in a convection oven under vacuum pressure. During processing, the consolidation of the laminate packs was measured by use of non-contact eddy current sensors. The consolidation curves are then used to tune an empirical consolidation model. The overall quality of the resulting laminates is also discussed. Dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and mechanical tensile testing were also performed in order to determine the effects of varying processing parameters on the physical and mechanical properties of the laminates. Through this analysis, it was determined that the nylon/carbon fibre blend was not suitable for vacuum consolidation, while the polypropylene/glass fibre blend is a viable option for vacuum consolidation. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a foundation from which low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) components can be designed and manufactured from thermoplastic matrix composites using a low cost processing technique as an alternative to traditional thermoset composite materials.

  12. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane acrylate...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN P-01...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN P-01...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN P-01...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN P-01...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9959 - Polyurethane polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9959 Polyurethane polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (PMN P-01...

  18. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane acrylate...

  19. Pyrolysis characteristics of typical biomass thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhen; Ba, Ziyu; Yang, Keyan; Zhang, Qingfa; Zhao, Kunpeng; Gu, Shiyan

    The biomass thermoplastic composites were prepared by extrusion molding method with poplar flour, rice husk, cotton stalk and corn stalk. The thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) has also been used for evaluating the pyrolysis process of the composites. The results showed that the pyrolysis process mainly consists of two stages: biomass pyrolysis and the plastic pyrolysis. The increase of biomass content in the composite raised the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature. However, the carbon residue was reduced and the pyrolysis efficiency was better because of synergistic effect of biomass and plastic. The composite with different kinds of biomass have similar pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis efficiency of the composite with corn stalk was best. The calcium carbonate could inhibit pyrolysis process and increase the first stage pyrolysis peak temperature and carbon residue as a filling material of the composite.

  20. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  1. Thermoplastic polymers for improved fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Hilado, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability characteristics of some typical thermoplastic materials currently in use and others being considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied included (1) thermomechanical properties such as glass transition and melt temperature, (2) changes in polymer enthalpy by differential scanning calorimetry, (3) thermogravimetric analysis in anaerobic and oxidative environments, (4) oxygen index, (5) smoke evolution, (6) relative toxicity of the volatile products of pyrolysis, and (7) selected physical properties. The generic polymers that were evaluated included: acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, 9,9 bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) fluorene polycarbonatepoly (dimethyl siloxane) block polymer, phenolphthalein bisphenol A polycarbonate, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyether sulfone, polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride homopolymer, polyvinyl fluoride, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Processing parameters, including molding characteristics of some of the advanced polymers, are described. Test results and relative ranking of some of the flammability, smoke, and toxicity properties are presented.

  2. Thermoplastic Ribbon-Ply Bonding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify key variables in rapid weldbonding of thermoplastic tow (ribbon) and their relationship to matrix polymer properties and to ribbon microstructure. Theoretical models for viscosity, establishment of ply-ply contact, instantaneous (Velcro) bonding, molecular interdiffusion (healing), void growth suppression, and gap filling were reviewed and synthesized. Consideration of the theoretical bonding mechanisms and length scales and of the experimental weld/peel data allow the prediction of such quantities as the time and pressure required to achieve good contact between a ribbon and a flat substrate, the time dependence of bond strength, pressures needed to prevent void growth from dissolved moisture and conditions for filling gaps and smoothing overlaps.

  3. Thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI (trademark), were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the melting of the initial crystallite structure, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bimodal or single modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360 C, respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450 C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior rather satisfactory under the conditions of prolonged thermal annealing. Rheological measurements made in the linear viscoelastic range support the evidence observed in the thermal analysis. Furthermore, the measurements sustain the manufacturer's recommended processing window of 400 to 420 C for this material.

  4. Characterization of thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Reddy, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI, were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the meltings of the initial crystallite structures, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bimodal or single-modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360 C, respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450 C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior satisfactorily under conditions of prolonged thermal annealing.

  5. Chimeric Plastics : a new class of thermoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Mark

    A new class of thermoplastics (dubbed ``Chimerics'') is described that exhibits a high temperature glass transition followed by high performance elastomer properties, prior to melting. These transparent materials are comprised of co-continuous phase-separated block copolymers. One block is an amorphous glass with a high glass transition temperature, and the second is a higher temperature phase transition block creating virtual thermoreversible crosslinks. The material properties are highly influenced by phase separation on the order of 10-30 nanometers. At lower temperatures the polymer reflects the sum of the block copolymer properties. As the amorphous phase glass transition is exceeded, the virtual crosslinks of the higher temperature second phase dominate the plastic properties, resulting in rubber-like elasticity.

  6. Thermoplastic Single-Ply Roof Relieves Water Damage and Inconvenience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Assesses use of thermoplastic single-ply roofs by North Carolina's Mars Hill College to prevent leaks, reduce maintenance costs, and enhance the value of their older historic buildings. Administrators comment on the roof's installation efficiency and cleanliness. (GR)

  7. Methods for Preparing Nanoparticle-Containing Thermoplastic Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    High quality thermoplastic composites and composite laminates containing nanoparticles and/or nanofibers, and methods of producing such composites and laminates are disclosed. The composites comprise a thermoplastic polymer and a plurality of nanoparticles, and may include a fibrous structural reinforcement. The composite laminates are formed from a plurality of nanoparticle-containing composite layers and may be fused to one another via an automated process.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of polyurethane nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strankowska, J.; Piszczyk, Ł.; Strankowski, M.; Danowska, M.; Szutkowski, K.; Jurga, S.; Kwela, J.

    2013-10-01

    Polyurethane PEO-based hydrogels have a broad range of biomedical applicability. They are attractive for drug-controlled delivery systems, surgical implants and wound healing dressings. In this study, a PEO based polyurethane hydrogels containing Cloisite® 30B, an organically modified clay mineral, was synthesized. Structure of nanocomposite hydrogels was determined using XRD technique. Its molecular dynamics was studied by means of NMR spectroscopy, DMA and DSC analysis. The mechanical properties and thermal stability of the systems were improved by incorporation of clay and controlled by varying the clay content in polymeric matrix. Molecular dynamics of polymer chains depends on interaction of Cloisite® 30B nanoparticles with soft segments of polyurethanes. The characteristic nanosize effect is observed.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of cyclodextrin polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Atanu; Appell, Michael; Liu, Zengshe; Cheng, H N

    2015-11-20

    Cyclodextrin (CD) has often been incorporated into polyurethanes in order to facilitate its use in encapsulation or removal of organic species for various applications. In this work a microwave-assisted method has been developed to produce polyurethanes consisting of α-, β-, and γ-CD and three common diisocyanates. As compared to conventional heating, this new synthetic method saves energy, significantly reduces reaction time, and gets similar or improved yield. The reaction products have been fully characterized with (13)C, (1)H, and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. With suitable stoichiometry of starting CD and diisocyanate, the resulting CD polyurethane is organic-soluble and water-insoluble and is shown to remove Nile red dye and phenol from water. Possible applications include the removal of undesirable materials from process streams, toxic compounds from the environment, and encapsulation of color or fragrance molecules. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam; Daniels, Edward; Libera, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam.

  11. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, B.; Daniels, E.; Libera, J.A.

    1999-03-16

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam. 4 figs.

  12. Modeling of skeletal members using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, J.M.F.; Weaver, R.W.

    1983-11-01

    At the request of the University of New Mexico's Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, members of the Plastic Section in the Process Development Division at SNLA undertook the special project of the Chaco Lady. The project consisted of polyurethane foam casting of a disinterred female skull considered to be approximately 1000 years old. Rubber latex molds, supplied by the UNM Anthropology Department, were used to produce the polymeric skull requested. The authors developed for the project a modified foaming process which will be used in future polyurethane castings of archaeological artifacts and contemporary skeletal members at the University.

  13. Zirconia-Polyurethane Aneurysm Clip.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Sang; Cho, Kyung-Il; Kim, Jeong Eun; Jang, Tae-Sik; Ha, Eun Jin; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Son, Young-Je; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Seunghyun; Kim, Chong-Chan; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2018-03-27

    Susceptibility artifacts from metal clips in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging present an obstacle to evaluating the status of clipped aneurysms, parent arteries and adjacent brain parenchyma. We aimed to develop MR-compatible aneurysm clips. Considering the mechanical and biological properties, and MR compatibility of candidate materials, a prototype clip with a zirconia body and a polyurethane head spring (ZC, straight, 9-mm long) was developed. The closing forces, opening width of blades, and in vitro and in vivo artifact volumes in 3 tesla MR imaging were compared among the prototype and commercial metal clips such as a Yasargil ® clip (YC, curved type, 8.3-mm long) and a Sugita ® clip (SC, straight type, 10-mm long). An in vivo animal study was performed with a canine venous pouch aneurysm model. The closing forces (N) at 1 and 8 mm from the blade tip were 2.09 and 3.77 in YC, 1.85 and 3.04 in SC, and 2.05 and 4.60 in ZC. The maximum opening widths (mm) was 6.8, 9.0, and 3.0 in YC, SC, and ZC, respectively. The in vitro artifact volumes of YC, SC and ZC in time-of-flight MR imaging were 26.9, 29.7 and 1.9 times larger than the respective real volumes. The in vivo artifact volumes of YC, SC, and ZC were respectively 21.4, 29.4, and 2.6 times larger than real ones. ZC showed the smallest susceptibility artifacts and satisfactory closing forces. However, the narrow opening width of the blades was a weak point. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Novel polymer blends with thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Ata

    A new class of polymers known as "bioplastics" has emerged and is expanding rapidly. This class consists of polymers that are either bio-based or biodegradable, or both. Among these, polysaccharides, namely starch, are of great interest for several reasons. By gelatinizing starch via plasticizers, it can be processed in the same way as thermoplastic polymers with conventional processing equipment. Hence, these bio-based and biodegradable plastics, with their low source and refinery costs, as well as relatively easy processability, have made them ideal candidates for incorporation into various current plastic products. Four different plasticizers have been chosen here for gelatinization of thermoplastic starch (TPS): glycerol, sorbitol, diglycerol and polyglycerol, with the latter two being used for the first time in such a process. Two methodological categories are used. The first involves a calorimetric method (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) as well as optical microscopy; these are "static" methods where no shear is applied A wide range of starch/water/plasticizer compositions were prepared to explore the gelatinization regime for each plasticizer. The onset and conclusion gelatinization temperatures for sorbitol and glycerol were found to be in the same vicinity, while diglycerol and polyglycerol showed significantly higher transition temperatures. The higher molecular weight and viscosity of polyglycerol allow this transition to occur at an even higher temperature than with diglycerol. This is due to the increase in molecular weight and viscosity of the two new plasticizers, as well as their significant decrease in water solubility. It is demonstrated that the water/plasticizer ratio has a pronounced effect on gelatinization temperatures. When plasticizer content was held constant and water content was increased, it was found that the gelatinization temperature decreased for all the plasticizers. Meanwhile, when the water content was held constant and the

  15. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  16. Manufacturing a 9-Meter Thermoplastic Composite Wind Turbine Blade: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Robynne; Snowberg, David R; Berry, Derek S

    Currently, wind turbine blades are manufactured from a combination of glass and/or carbon fiber composite materials with a thermoset resin such as epoxy, which requires energy-intensive and expensive heating processes to cure. Newly developed in-situ polymerizing thermoplastic resin systems for composite wind turbine blades polymerize at room temperature, eliminating the heating process and significantly reducing the blade manufacturing cycle time and embodied energy, which in turn reduces costs. Thermoplastic materials can also be thermally welded, eliminating the need for adhesive bonds between blade components and increasing the overall strength and reliability of the blades. As well, thermoplastic materials enable end-of-lifemore » blade recycling by reheating and decomposing the materials, which is a limitation of existing blade technology. This paper presents a manufacturing demonstration for a 9-m-long thermoplastic composite wind turbine blade. This blade was constructed in the Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. Johns Manville fiberglass and an Arkema thermoplastic resin called Elium were used. Additional materials included Armacell-recycled polyethylene terephthalate foam from Creative Foam and low-cost carbon- fiber pultruded spar caps (manufactured in collaboration with NREL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Huntsman, Strongwell, and Chomarat). This paper highlights the development of the thermoplastic resin formulations, including an additive designed to control the peak exothermic temperatures. Infusion and cure times of less than 3 hours are also demonstrated, highlighting the efficiency and energy savings associated with manufacturing thermoplastic composite blades.« less

  17. Preparation of eugenol-based polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Luo, Fang; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2018-03-01

    The regenerative eugenol was used as the starting material to prepare diol species by two steps, with a total yield of 28%. Furthermore, the prepared diol reacts with 1,6-hexadiisocyanate(HDI) to afford the corresponding polyurethane (PU). The structure of intermediates and PU are characterized by 1H-NMR or IR.

  18. Time-dependent crashworthiness of polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basit, Munshi Mahbubul; Cheon, Seong Sik

    2018-05-01

    Time-dependent stress-strain relationship as well as crashworthiness of polyurethane foam was investigated under constant impact energy with different velocities, considering inertia and strain-rate effects simultaneously during the impact testing. Even though the impact energies were same, the percentage in increase in densification strain due to higher impact velocities was found, which yielded the wider plateau region, i.e. growth in crashworthiness. This phenomenon is analyzed by the microstructure of polyurethane foam obtained from scanning electron microscopy. The equations, coupled with the Sherwood-Frost model and the impulse-momentum theory, were employed to build the constitutive equation of the polyurethane foam and calculate energy absorption capacity of the foam. The nominal stress-strain curves obtained from the constitutive equation were compared with results from impact tests and were found to be in good agreement. This study is dedicated to guiding designer use polyurethane foam in crashworthiness structures such as an automotive bumper system by providing crashworthiness data, determining the crush mode, and addressing a mathematical model of the crashworthiness.

  19. Polyurethane adhesive with improved high temperature properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A polyurethane resin with paste activator, capable of providing useful bond strengths over the temperature range of -184 C to 149 C, is described. The adhesive system has a pot life of over one hour. Tensile shear strength ratings are given for various adhesive formulations.

  20. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  1. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  2. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  3. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  4. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  5. Polyvinyl Alcohol Microspheres Reinforced Thermoplastic Starch Composites

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Dongdong; Li, Bengang; Yin, Peng; Li, Panxin

    2018-01-01

    We reported a new method to prepare polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/thermoplastic starch (TPS) composites by using polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMS). The PVAMS/TPS composites were characterized using tensile test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results exhibited that adding small amounts of PVAMSs can effectively improve the mechanical strength and toughness of the composites, especially for the 1 wt %PVAMS in TPS matrix, with a tensile strength of 3.5 MPa, an elongation at break at 71.73% and an impact strength of 33.4 kJ/m2. Furthermore, the SEM and shift in the tan δ peak (Tα and Tβ) at the maximum value of 69.87 and −36.52 °C indicates that the PVAMS decreased the mobility of the amorphous starch molecules due to the strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds between PVAMS and TPS. The peak temperature of maximum decomposition rate (Tp) of 1 wt % PVAMS/TPS composites increased about 5 °C compared with TPS in TGA curves. PMID:29690506

  6. Interlaminar interaction in paper thermoplastic laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prambauer, M.; Paulik, C.; Burgstaller, C.

    2016-07-01

    Bio-based composites are a research topic since several decades, which aims for sustainable and durable materials. In the scope of this research, many different sources for biobased reinforcements have been investigated. Typical issues associated with the use of such are property variations due to cultivation area and climate, besides the influences of the type, pretreatment and fibre geometry. Another issue can be the availability of such natural fibres. Due to these reasons, we started using paper sheets as reinforcements in laminate composites with thermoplastic materials. In preliminary studies with polypropylene composites, we found good mechanical properties, even higher than could be expected by estimating the composite properties from the constituents by applying simple rule of mixtures type models. We suspect, besides some effect of paper compaction, interlaminar effects to be the reason for this. Therefore, the aim of this work is to investigate the effects of the interfacial interaction on the different paper laminate properties due to different matrix polymers. For this work, we used polypropylene, polyamide 6 and 12 as well as polystyrene. Composites were produced via compression moulding and samples for mechanical testing and density evaluation were cut from the moulded plates. The results from mechanical tests show, that there is a reinforcing effect, regardless of matrix polymer used. Simple rule of mixtures evaluations show, that the different matrices exhibit different degrees of interaction, based on their chemical structure. In addition, also influences due to processing were found.

  7. A Thermoplasticity Model for Oil Shale

    DOE PAGES

    White, Joshua A.; Burnham, Alan K.; Camp, David W.

    2016-03-31

    Several regions of the world have abundant oil shale resources, but accessing this energy supply poses a number of challenges. One particular difficulty is the thermomechanical behavior of the material. When heated to sufficient temperatures, thermal conversion of kerogen to oil, gas, and other products takes place. This alteration of microstructure leads to a complex geomechanical response. In this work, we develop a thermoplasticity model for oil shale. The model is based on critical state plasticity, a framework often used for modeling clays and soft rocks. The model described here allows for both hardening due to mechanical deformation and softeningmore » due to thermal processes. In particular, the preconsolidation pressure—defining the onset of plastic volumetric compaction—is controlled by a state variable representing the kerogen content of the material. As kerogen is converted to other phases, the material weakens and plastic compaction begins. We calibrate and compare the proposed model to a suite of high-temperature uniaxial and triaxial experiments on core samples from a pilot in situ processing operation in the Green River Formation. In conclusion, we also describe avenues for future work to improve understanding and prediction of the geomechanical behavior of oil shale operations.« less

  8. Photochromic Inorganic/Organic Thermoplastic Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Li, Jing; Huo, Mengmeng; Li, Naixu; Zhou, Jiancheng; Li, Tuoqi; Jiang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Photochromic materials are an important class of "smart materials" and are broadly utilized in technological devices. However, most photochromic materials reported so far are composed of inorganic compounds that are challenging to process and suffer from poor mechanical performance, severely limiting their applications in various markets. In this paper, inorganic photochromic tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) nanocrystals are conveniently grafted with polymers to hurdle the deficiency in processability and mechanical properties. This new type of photochromic material can be thermally processed into desired geometries like disks and dog-bone specimens. Fully reversible photochromic response under UV light is also achieved for WO 3 -graft polymers, exhibiting tunable response rate, outperforming the pristine WO 3 nanocrystals. Notably, the resulted graft polymers show extraordinary mechanical performance with excellent ductility (≈800% breaking strain) and relatively high breaking strength (≈2 MPa). These discoveries elucidate an effective pathway to design smart inorganic/organic hybrid thermoplastic elastomers endowed with outstanding photochromic and mechanical properties as well as exceptional processability. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Development and characterization of hybrid thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Priyanka Chandrashekhar

    This work is aimed at studying the possibility of using interply hybrid woven thermoplastic semi-pregs in secondary structures in aircrafts at TenCate Advanced Composites, Netherlands and Purdue University. Three different interply hybrids were designed from combination of Cetex(c) carbon-PPS semi-preg, Owen corning's woven glass with PPS sheets and discontinuous chopped Cetex(c) carbon-PPS semi-preg to get desired flexural, out of plane and bearing properties. The design calculations are done based on classical laminate theory and the selection of materials to be used with carbon-PPS was done based on cost and availability. The Hybrid laminate performances are analyzed and compared to the conventional Cetex (c) Carbon-PPS semi-preg laminates. Observations are reported on three point bend test (European standard 2562), four point bend test(ASTM D6415-99) and bearing test (Airbus standards AITM 1-0009) for the laminates and it was found that hybrid laminates show a reduction of 5-10% in bending stiffness, 20-40% reduction in out-of-plane strength and 2-5%reduction in bearing with a cost reduction of 20-30%. The research identifies and documents the different factors responsible for failures and reduction in strength in the Hybrids.

  10. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  11. Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Caroline B.; Carlson, Monica L.; Toda, Koji; DeWind, Nicholas K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The success of many neuroscientific studies depends upon adequate head fixation of awake, behaving animals. Typically, this is achieved by surgically affixing a head-restraint prosthesis to the skull. New Method Here we report the use of thermoplastic masks to non-invasively restrain monkeys’ heads. Mesh thermoplastic sheets become pliable when heated and can then be molded to an individual monkey’s head. After cooling, the custom mask retains this shape indefinitely for day-to-day use. Results We successfully trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to perform cognitive tasks while wearing thermoplastic masks. Using these masks, we achieved a level of head stability sufficient for high-resolution eye-tracking and intracranial electrophysiology. Comparison with Existing Method Compared with traditional head-posts, we find that thermoplastic masks perform at least as well during infrared eye-tracking and single-neuron recordings, allow for clearer magnetic resonance image acquisition, enable freer placement of a transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, and impose lower financial and time costs on the lab. Conclusions We conclude that thermoplastic masks are a viable non-invasive form of primate head restraint that enable a wide range of neuroscientific experiments. PMID:26112334

  12. Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Carlson, Monica L; Toda, Koji; DeWind, Nicholas K; Platt, Michael L

    2015-09-30

    The success of many neuroscientific studies depends upon adequate head fixation of awake, behaving animals. Typically, this is achieved by surgically affixing a head-restraint prosthesis to the skull. Here we report the use of thermoplastic masks to non-invasively restrain monkeys' heads. Mesh thermoplastic sheets become pliable when heated and can then be molded to an individual monkey's head. After cooling, the custom mask retains this shape indefinitely for day-to-day use. We successfully trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to perform cognitive tasks while wearing thermoplastic masks. Using these masks, we achieved a level of head stability sufficient for high-resolution eye-tracking and intracranial electrophysiology. Compared with traditional head-posts, we find that thermoplastic masks perform at least as well during infrared eye-tracking and single-neuron recordings, allow for clearer magnetic resonance image acquisition, enable freer placement of a transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, and impose lower financial and time costs on the lab. We conclude that thermoplastic masks are a viable non-invasive form of primate head restraint that enable a wide range of neuroscientific experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Materials for Heated Head Automated Thermoplastic Tape Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is currently pursuing multiple paths to develop out of autoclave (OOA) polymeric composite materials and processes. Polymeric composite materials development includes the synthesis of new and/or modified thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix resins designed for specific OOA processes. OOA processes currently under investigation include vacuum bag only (VBO) prepreg/composite fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and heated head automated thermoplastic tape placement (HHATP). This paper will discuss the NASA Langley HHATP facility and capabilities and recent work on characterizing thermoplastic tape quality and requirements for quality part production. Samples of three distinct versions of APC-2 (AS4/PEEK) thermoplastic dry tape were obtained from two materials vendors, TENCATE, Inc. and CYTEC Engineered Materials** (standard grade and an experimental batch). Random specimens were taken from each of these samples and subjected to photo-microscopy and surface profilometry. The CYTEC standard grade of APC-2 tape had the most voids and splits and the highest surface roughness and/or waviness. Since the APC-2 tape is composed of a thermoplastic matrix, it offers the flexibility of reprocessing to improve quality, and thereby improve final quality of HHATP laminates. Discussions will also include potential research areas and future work that is required to advance the state of the art in the HHATP process for composite fabrication.

  14. Process for preparing solvent resistant, thermoplastic aromatic poly(imidesulfone)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process for preparing a thermoplastic poly(midesulfone) is disclosed. This resulting material has thermoplastic properties which are generally associated with polysulfones but not polyimides, and solvent resistant which is generally associated with polyimides but not polysulfones. This system is processable in the 250 to 350 C range for molding, adhesive and laminating applications. This unique thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is obtained by incorporating an aromatic sulfone moiety into the backbone of an aromatic linear polyimide by dissolving a quantity of a 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) in a solution of 3,3'-diaminodiphenylsulfone and bis(2-methoxyethyl)ether, precipitating the reactant product in water, filtering and drying the recovered poly(amide-acid sulfone) and converting it to the poly(imidesulfone) by heating.

  15. Nanocellular thermoplastic foam and process for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lingbo; Costeux, Stephane; Patankar, Kshitish A.

    Prepare a thermoplastic polymer foam having a porosity of 70% or more and at least one of: (i) an average cell size of 200 nanometers or less; and (ii) a nucleation density of at least 1.times.1015 effective nucleation sites per cubic centimeter of foamable polymer composition not including blowing agent using a foamable polymer composition containing a thermoplastic polymer selected from styrenic polymer and (meth)acrylic polymers, a blowing agent comprising at least 20 mole-percent carbon dioxide based on moles of blowing agent and an additive having a Total Hansen Solubility Parameter that differs from that of carbon dioxide by lessmore » than 2 and that is present at a concentration of 0.01 to 1.5 weight parts per hundred weight parts thermoplastic polymer.« less

  16. Marine biofouling resistance of polyurethane with biodegradation and hydrolyzation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Ma, Chunfeng; Ma, Jielin; Gan, Tiansheng; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2014-03-26

    We have prepared polyurethane with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) as the segments of the main chain and poly(triisopropylsilyl acrylate) (PTIPSA) as the side chains by a combination of radical polymerization and a condensation reaction. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation studies show that polyurethane can degrade in the presence of enzyme and the degradation rate decreases with the PTIPSA content. Our studies also demonstrate that polyurethane is able to hydrolyze in artificial seawater and the hydrolysis rate increases as the PTIPSA content increases. Moreover, hydrolysis leads to a hydrophilic surface that is favorable to reduction of the frictional drag under dynamic conditions. Marine field tests reveal that polyurethane has good antifouling ability because polyurethane with a biodegradable PCL main chain and hydrolyzable PTIPSA side chains can form a self-renewal surface. Polyurethane was also used to carry and release a relatively environmentally friendly antifoulant, and the combined system exhibits a much higher antifouling performance even in a static marine environment.

  17. Interlaminar fracture in carbon fiber/thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Bascom, W. D.; Allred, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The surfaces of commercial carbon fibers are generally chemically cleaned or oxidized and then coated with an oligomeric sizing to optimize their adhesion to epoxy matrix resins. Evidence from fractography, from embedded fiber testing and from fracture energies suggests that these standard treatments are relatively ineffective for thermoplastic matrices. This evidence is reviewed and model thermoplastic composites (polyphenylene oxide/high strain carbon fibers) are used to demonstrate how differences in adhesion can lead to a twofold change in interlaminar fracture toughness. The potential for improved adhesion via plasma modification of fiber surfaces is discussed. Finally, a surprising case of fiber-catalyzed resin degradation is described.

  18. Viscous and thermal modelling of thermoplastic composites forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Eduardo; Liang, Biao; Hamila, Nahiene; Boisse, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process. It is suitable for automotive composite parts manufacturing. The simulation of thermoplastic prepreg forming is achieved by alternate thermal and mechanical analyses. The thermal properties are obtained from a mesoscopic analysis and a homogenization procedure. The forming simulation is based on a viscous-hyperelastic approach. The thermal simulations define the coefficients of the mechanical model that depend on the temperature. The forming simulations modify the boundary conditions and the internal geometry of the thermal analyses. The comparison of the simulation with an experimental thermoforming of a part representative of automotive applications shows the efficiency of the approach.

  19. Thermoplastic Explosive Compositions on the Base of Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, V. P.; Smirnov, S. P.; Kolganov, E. V.; Pechenev, Yu. G.

    2006-08-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane is an azostructural compound known as CL-20. We performed a series of experiments with CL-20 synthesized in Russia to evaluate the possibility to use it in pressed high explosive compositions. We used it in thermoplastic compositions both with an inert binder and energetic binder. The compositions were conventionally named CL-20И and CL-20A. It was determined that the thermoplastic compositions had the most high detonation parameters and a level of sensitivity to mechanical effects acceptable to allow their processing. Their detonation characteristics were compared with that of some known foreign compositions based on CL-20.

  20. Fine modeling of reinforced thermoplastic filament winding container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chenghong; Huang, Jinhao; Wu, Liang; Luo, Xiangpeng

    2018-05-01

    Reinforced thermoplastic containers has been widely used because of its corrosion-resistant, fatigue-resistant features. The characteristics of the liner and wound layer material and the different winding methods lead to the fact that the model obtained according to the ordinary pressure vessel modeling method does not reflect the actual situation of the reinforced thermoplastic container. In this paper, the thickness of stratified winding was calculated based on the principle of constant fiber total volume and equal cross-sectional area. ANSYS ACP module was used to refine the full winding container and provide a reference for engineering simulation solution.

  1. LARC-TPI: A multi-purpose thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    A linear thermoplastic polyimide, LARC-TPI, was characterized and developed for a variety of high temperature applications. In its fully imidized form, this material can be used as an adhesive for bonding metals such as titanium, aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. LARC-TPI was evaluated as a thermoplastic for bonding large pieces of polyimide film to produce flexible, 100 void-free laminates for flexible circuit applications. The development of LARC-TPI as a potential molding powder, composite matrix resin, high temperature film and fiber is also discussed.

  2. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  3. Investigation into reversion of polyurethane encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of high humidity (95% RH) at 60 C, 70 C, 85 C and 100 C on the solid-to-liquid reversion of polyurethane elastomers (used for potting electrical connectors and conformal coating printed circuit boards) was investigated. Hardness measurements were conducted on eleven elastomers to track reversion for a 101-day period. The primary purpose of the tests was to provide data to predict service life for the polyurethane elastomers. This was not accomplished as the hardness did not deteriorate rapidly enough at the lower test temperatures. The tests did determine that the potting and coating materials most widely used on the S-1C Program are susceptible to reversion but appear adequate for service in the S-1C environment.

  4. Structures and Properties of Polyurethanes. Part II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-23

    effect was observed for polymethyl methacrylate (222, 2721. The polyol, which contain fluorine , decrease adhesion, in spite DOC = 79011112 PAGE S4% of...small differences in the hardness of films on the basis of the fluorine -bearing polyol and generally accepted polyol. Is investigated the etfect ot...polyurethane, to rigid surface. DOC 79011112 P A * S The effect of the solvent, utilized for obtaining the varnish , on adhesion is investigated in

  5. Conductive plastics: comparing alternative nanotechnologies by performance and life cycle release probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel; Tomović, Željko

    2017-03-01

    Nanocomposites can be considered safe during their life cycle as long as the nanofillers remain embedded in the matrix. Therefore, a possible release of nanofillers has to be assessed before commercialization. This report addresses possible life cycle release scenarios for carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene, and carbon black (CB) from a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrix. The content of each nanofiller was adjusted to achieve the same conductivity level. The nanofillers reduced the rate of nanoscale releases during mechanical processing with decreasing release in the order neat TPU, TPU-CNT, TPU-graphene, and TPU-CB. Released fragments were dominated by the polymer matrix with embedded or surface-protruding nanofillers. During electron microscopy analysis, free CB was observed, however, there was no free CNT or graphene. Quantitatively, the presence of free nanofillers remained below the detection limit of <0.01% of generated dust. Further, both the production process and type of mechanical processing showed a significant impact with higher release rates for injection-molded compared to extruded and sanded compared to drilled materials. Due to its optimal performance for further development, extruded TPU-CNT was investigated in a combined, stepwise worst case scenario (mechanical processing after weathering). After weathering by simulated sunlight and rain, CNT were visible at the surface of the nanocomposite; after additional sanding, fragments showed protruding CNT, but free CNT were not detected. In summary, this preliminary exposure assessment showed no indication that recommended occupational exposure limits for carbonaceous nanomaterials can be exceeded during the life cycle of the specific TPU nanocomposites and conditions investigated in this study.

  6. UV-Surface Treatment of Fungal Resistant Polyether Polyurethane Film-Induced Growth of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lando, Gabriela Albara; Marconatto, Letícia; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are the cause of some major environmental impacts due to their low degradation rates. Polyurethanes (PU) are widely used synthetic polymers, and their growing use in industry has produced an increase in plastic waste. A commercial polyether-based thermoplastic PU with hydrolytic stability and fungus resistance was only attacked by an entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhiziumanisopliae, when the films were pre-treated with Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the presence of reactive atmospheres. Water contact angle, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode (FTIR-ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and profilometer measurements were mainly used for analysis. Permanent hydrophilic PU films were produced by the UV-assisted treatments. Pristine polyether PU films incubated for 10, 30, and 60 days did not show any indication of fungal growth. On the contrary, when using oxygen in the UV pre-treatment a layer of fungi spores covered the sample, indicating a great adherence of the microorganisms to the polymer. However, if acrylic acid vapors were used during the UV pre-treatment, a visible attack by the entomopathogenic fungi was observed. SEM and FTIR-ATR data showed clear evidence of fungal development: growth and ramifications of hyphae on the polymer surface with the increase in UV pre-treatment time and fungus incubation time. The results indicated that the simple UV surface activation process has proven to be a promising alternative for polyether PU waste management. PMID:28718785

  7. UV-Surface Treatment of Fungal Resistant Polyether Polyurethane Film-Induced Growth of Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Lando, Gabriela Albara; Marconatto, Letícia; Kessler, Felipe; Lopes, William; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Weibel, Daniel Eduardo

    2017-07-18

    Synthetic polymers are the cause of some major environmental impacts due to their low degradation rates. Polyurethanes (PU) are widely used synthetic polymers, and their growing use in industry has produced an increase in plastic waste. A commercial polyether-based thermoplastic PU with hydrolytic stability and fungus resistance was only attacked by an entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhiziumanisopliae , when the films were pre-treated with Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the presence of reactive atmospheres. Water contact angle, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode (FTIR-ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and profilometer measurements were mainly used for analysis. Permanent hydrophilic PU films were produced by the UV-assisted treatments. Pristine polyether PU films incubated for 10, 30, and 60 days did not show any indication of fungal growth. On the contrary, when using oxygen in the UV pre-treatment a layer of fungi spores covered the sample, indicating a great adherence of the microorganisms to the polymer. However, if acrylic acid vapors were used during the UV pre-treatment, a visible attack by the entomopathogenic fungi was observed. SEM and FTIR-ATR data showed clear evidence of fungal development: growth and ramifications of hyphae on the polymer surface with the increase in UV pre-treatment time and fungus incubation time. The results indicated that the simple UV surface activation process has proven to be a promising alternative for polyether PU waste management.

  8. On-line consolidation of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Jen

    An on-line consolidation system, which includes a computer-controlled filament winding machine and a consolidation head assembly, has been designed and constructed to fabricate composite parts from thermoplastic towpregs. A statistical approach was used to determine the significant processing parameters and their effect on the mechanical and physical properties of composite cylinders fabricated by on-line consolidation. A central composite experimental design was used to select the processing conditions for manufacturing the composite cylinders. The thickness, density, void content, degree of crystallinity and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) were measured for each composite cylinder. Micrographs showed that complete intimate contact and uniform fiber-matrix distribution were achieved. The degree of crystallinity of the cylinders was found to be in the range of 25-30%. Under optimum processing conditions, an ILSS of 58 MPa and a void content of <1% were achieved for APC-2 (PEEK/Carbon fiber) composite cylinders. An in-situ measurement system which uses a slip ring assembly and a computer data acquisition system was developed to obtain temperature data during winding. Composite cylinders were manufactured with eight K-type thermocouples installed in various locations inside the cylinder. The temperature distribution inside the composite cylinder during winding was measured for different processing conditions. ABAQUS finite element models of the different processes that occur during on-line consolidation were constructed. The first model was used to determine the convective heat transfer coefficient for the hot-air heat source. A convective heat transfer coefficient of 260 w/msp{2°}K was obtained by matching the calculated temperature history to the in-situ measurement data. To predict temperature distribution during winding an ABAQUS winding simulation model was developed. The winding speed was modeled by incrementally moving the convective boundary conditions

  9. Processing and characterization of unidirectional thermoplastic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Kameshwaran

    The manufacture of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic nanocomposites is discussed for the case of E-Glass reinforced polypropylene (PP) matrix and for E-Glass reinforced Polyamide-6 (Nylon-6), with and without dispersed nanoclay (montmorillonite) platelets. The E-Glass/PP nanocomposite was manufactured using pultrusion, whereas the E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite was manufactured using compression molding. Mechanical characterization of nanocomposites were performed and compared with traditional microcomposites. Compressive as well as shear strength of nanocomposites was improved by improving the yield strength of the surrounding matrix through the dispersion of nanoclay. Significant improvements were achieved in compressive strength and shear strength with relatively low nanoclay loadings. Initially, polypropylene with and without nanoclay were melt intercalated using a single-screw extruder and the pultruded nanocomposite was fabricated using extruded pre-impregnated (pre-preg) tapes. Compression tests were performed as mandated by ASTM guidelines. SEM and TEM characterization revealed presence of nanoclay in an intercalated and partially exfoliated morphology. Mechanical tests confirmed significant improvements in compressive strength (˜122% at 10% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜60% at 3% nanoclay loading) in modified pultruded E-Glass/PP nanocomposites in comparison with baseline properties. Uniaxial tensile tests showed a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.4%) with 3% nanoclay loading. Subsequently, E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite panels were manufactured by compression molding. Compression tests were performed according to IITRI guidelines, whereas short beam shear and uni-axial tensile tests were performed according to ASTM standards. Mechanical tests confirmed strength enhancement with nanoclay addition, with a significant improvement in compressive strength (50% at 4% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜36% at 4% nanoclay loading

  10. Hybridized Thermoplastic Aramids: Enabling Material Technology For Future Force Headgear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    keeping the complete helmet weight the same. Design Material Rolled steel Hadfield Steel Kevlar 29/PVB Phenolic Kevlar 129/PVB...Material Rolled steel Hadfield Steel Kevlar 29/PVB Phenolic Kevlar 129/PVB phenolic Thermoplastic aramid Twaron/PVB phenolic ...Deflection RESULTS Improved Fiber, Fiber Architecture, and Matrix Materials Enable Performance Enhancement PASGT: 19 Ply S735 Kevlar with PVB Phenolic

  11. PVD coating for optical applications on temperature-resistant thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzert, Peter; Schulz, Ulrike; Kaiser, Norbert

    2004-02-01

    The performance of the high temperature resistant polymers Pleximid, APEC and Ultrason as substrate materials in plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition processes was studied and compared with well-known thermoplastics for optical applications. Different effects of UV irradiation and plasma exposure on the polymers' optical features, surface energy and adhesion properties for oxide layers, typically used for interference multilayer coatings, are shown.

  12. Method for preparing spherical thermoplastic particles of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.

    1975-11-17

    Spherical particles of thermoplastic material of virtually uniform roundness and diameter are prepared by cutting monofilaments of a selected diameter into rod-like segments of a selected uniform length which are then heated in a viscous liquid to effect the formation of the spherical particles.

  13. Development and evaluation of thermoplastic street maintenance material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemens, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    An all-weather permanent street patching material was investigated for flexible and rigid pavements. The economic, operational, and material requirements are discussed along with the results of field tests with various mixtures of EVA resins and asphalt. Cost analyses for thermoplastic patching methods are included.

  14. The compression of wood/thermoplastic fiber mats during consolidation

    Treesearch

    Karl R. Englund; Michael P. Wolcott; John C. Hermanson

    2004-01-01

    Secondary processing of non-woven wood and wood/thermoplastic fiber mats is generally performed using compression molding, where heated platens or dies form the final product. Although the study and use of wood-fiber composites is widespread, few research efforts have explicitly described the fundamentals of mat consolidation. In contrast, the wood composite literature...

  15. The Place for Thermoplastic Composites in Structural Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    The molten tube is then squashed flat and consolidated into ribbon form by continuous opposed-belt laminating. Existing graphite-epoxy pultrusion...the solid form it must have a molecular weight that exceeds the critical entanglement value. Thus thermoplastic materials of commercial worth almost

  16. Re-rounding of deflected thermoplastic conduit, phase I.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    Shad Sargand (ORCID 0000-0002-1633-1045), Andrew Russ (ORCID 0000-0001-7743-2109), and Kevin White (0000-0002-2902-2524) This study investigated the potential benefits of re-rounding of thermoplastic pipe, a process for reducing the deflection of ins...

  17. Tests Of Polyurethane And Dichromate Coats On Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine relative effectiveness of new polyurethane and more-conventional dichromate coat in helping to retard corrosion of anodized 6061-T6 aluminum. Concludes by suggesting greater protection against corrosion achieved by combining polyurethane-sealing method with hard-anodizing method and by increasing thickness of coat.

  18. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  19. Cryogenic line insulation made from prefabricated polyurethane shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, G.

    1975-01-01

    Prefabricated polyurethane foam insulation is inexpensive and easily installed on cryogenic lines. Insulation sections are semicircular half shells. Pair of half shells is placed to surround cryogenic line. Cylindrically-shaped knit sock is pulled over insulation then covered with polyurethane resin to seal system.

  20. Molecular simulation of fibronectin adsorption onto polyurethane surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyethylene glycol-based polyurethanes have been widely used in biomedical applications, however are prone to swelling. A natural polyol, castor oil can be incorporated into these polyurethanes to control the degree of the swelling, which alters mechanical properties and protein adsorption characte...

  1. Skeletal myotube formation enhanced by electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of electrically conductive materials made from electrospun single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with polyurethane to promote myoblast differentiation into myotubes in the presence and absence of electrical stimulation. Methods and results After electrical stimulation, the number of multinucleated myotubes on the electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds was significantly larger than that on nonconductive electrospun polyurethane scaffolds (5% and 10% w/v polyurethane). In the absence of electrical stimulation, myoblasts also differentiated on the electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds, as evidenced by expression of Myf-5 and myosin heavy chains. The myotube number and length were significantly greater on the electrospun carbon nanotubes with 10% w/v polyurethane than on those with 5% w/v polyurethane. The results suggest that, in the absence of electrical stimulation, skeletal myotube formation is dependent on the morphology of the electrospun scaffolds, while with electrical stimulation it is dependent on the electrical conductivity of the scaffolds. Conclusion This study indicates that electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotubes can be used to modulate skeletal myotube formation with or without application of electrical stimulation. PMID:22072883

  2. Biodegradative Activities of Selected Environmental Fungi on a Polyester Polyurethane Varnish and Polyether Polyurethane Foams

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Barragán, Joyce; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Vargas-Suárez, Martín; González-Hernández, Ricardo; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyurethane (PU) is widely used in many aspects of modern life because of its versatility and resistance. However, PU waste disposal generates large problems, since it is slowly degraded, there are limited recycling processes, and its destruction may generate toxic compounds. In this work, we isolated fungal strains able to grow in mineral medium with a polyester PU (PS-PU; Impranil DLN) or a polyether PU (PE-PU; Poly Lack) varnish as the only carbon source. Of the eight best Impranil-degrading strains, the six best degraders belonged to the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex, including the species C. pseudocladosporioides, C. tenuissimum, C. asperulatum, and C. montecillanum, and the two others were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum. The best Impranil degrader, C. pseudocladosporioides strain T1.PL.1, degraded up to 87% after 14 days of incubation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of Impranil degradation by this strain showed a loss of carbonyl groups (1,729 cm−1) and N—H bonds (1,540 and 1,261 cm−1), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed a decrease in ester compounds and increase in alcohols and hexane diisocyanate, indicating the hydrolysis of ester and urethane bonds. Extracellular esterase and low urease, but not protease activities were detected at 7 and 14 days of culture in Impranil. The best eight Impranil-degrading fungi were also able to degrade solid foams of the highly recalcitrant PE-PU type to different extents, with the highest levels generating up to 65% of dry-weight losses not previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of fungus-treated foams showed melted and thinner cell wall structures than the non-fungus-treated ones, demonstrating fungal biodegradative action on PE-PU. IMPORTANCE Polyurethane waste disposal has become a serious problem. In this work, fungal strains able to efficiently degrade different types of

  3. Biodegradative Activities of Selected Environmental Fungi on a Polyester Polyurethane Varnish and Polyether Polyurethane Foams.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Barragán, Joyce; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Vargas-Suárez, Martín; González-Hernández, Ricardo; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; Loza-Tavera, Herminia

    2016-09-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is widely used in many aspects of modern life because of its versatility and resistance. However, PU waste disposal generates large problems, since it is slowly degraded, there are limited recycling processes, and its destruction may generate toxic compounds. In this work, we isolated fungal strains able to grow in mineral medium with a polyester PU (PS-PU; Impranil DLN) or a polyether PU (PE-PU; Poly Lack) varnish as the only carbon source. Of the eight best Impranil-degrading strains, the six best degraders belonged to the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex, including the species C. pseudocladosporioides, C. tenuissimum, C. asperulatum, and C. montecillanum, and the two others were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum The best Impranil degrader, C. pseudocladosporioides strain T1.PL.1, degraded up to 87% after 14 days of incubation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of Impranil degradation by this strain showed a loss of carbonyl groups (1,729 cm(-1)) and N-H bonds (1,540 and 1,261 cm(-1)), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed a decrease in ester compounds and increase in alcohols and hexane diisocyanate, indicating the hydrolysis of ester and urethane bonds. Extracellular esterase and low urease, but not protease activities were detected at 7 and 14 days of culture in Impranil. The best eight Impranil-degrading fungi were also able to degrade solid foams of the highly recalcitrant PE-PU type to different extents, with the highest levels generating up to 65% of dry-weight losses not previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of fungus-treated foams showed melted and thinner cell wall structures than the non-fungus-treated ones, demonstrating fungal biodegradative action on PE-PU. Polyurethane waste disposal has become a serious problem. In this work, fungal strains able to efficiently degrade different types of polyurethanes are reported, and

  4. Development of segmented polyurethane elastomers with low iodine content exhibiting radiopacity and blood compatibility.

    PubMed

    Dawlee, S; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2011-10-01

    Biofunctionally active and inherently radiopaque polymers are the emerging need for biomedical applications. Novel segmented polyurethane elastomer with inherent radiopacity was prepared using aliphatic chain extender 2,3-diiodo-2-butene-1,4-diol, polyol polytetramethylene glycol and 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) for blood compatible applications. Aliphatic polyurethane was also prepared using hexamethylene diisocyanate for comparison. X-ray analysis of the polyurethanes revealed good radiopacity even at a relatively low concentration of 3% iodine in aromatic polyurethane and 10% in aliphatic polyurethane. The polyurethanes also possessed excellent thermal stability. MDI-based polyurethane showed considerably higher tensile strength than the analogous HDI-based polyurethane. MDI-based aromatic polyurethane exhibited a dynamic surface morphology in aqueous medium, resulting in the segregation of hydrophilic domains which was more conducive to anti-thrombogenic properties. The polyurethane was cytocompatible with L929 fibroblast cells, non-hemolytic, and possessed good blood compatibility.

  5. New polyurethane nanocomposites based on soya oil.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Abd Khadir, Nurul Khizrien; Jaffar Al-Mulla, Emad Abbas

    2014-01-01

    New polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites were prepared from a dispersion of 0 - 5% montmorillonite (MMT) clay with isocyanate and soya oil polyol that was synthesized via transesterification of triglycerides to reduce petroleum dependence. FT-IR spectra indicate the presence of hydrogen bonding between nanoclay and the polymer matrix, whereas the exfoliated structure of clay layers was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Optical microscopy, mechanical and thermal analyses were done to investigate significant improvement of the nanocomposites. The results showed PU-3% nanoclay (NC) showed optimum results in mechanical properties such as tensile and flexural strength but the lowest in impact strength.

  6. Experimental Polyurethane Foam Roof Systems - II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    distribution unlimited. qt’, B 11 1 A F FN 1 5.6,-’ ,". I Rf- IE I0 Edthat, I.f "" Roofs, energy conservation, insulation, sprayed polyurethane foam...pcriod is presented, and thle energy savings realized by Oamning thle roof’ are prese nted. Libirary Card Naval Civil lFiginvee.ig I alora tor)i...the energy savings I reali/ed by foaming the roof are presented.I Unclassified rC~U~tTY CL ASSIrICATIO)N OF THISt PAGi-h WI-., . I -d CONTENTS Page

  7. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  8. The relative fire resistance of select thermoplastic materials. [for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The relative thermal stability, flammability, and related thermochemical properties of some thermoplastic materials currently used in aircraft interiors as well as of some candidate thermoplastics were investigated. Currently used materials that were evaluated include acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polyvinyl fluoride. Candidate thermoplastic materials evaluated include: 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) block polymer, chlorinated polyvinylchloride homopolymer, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyethersulfone, polyphenylene sulfide, polyarylsulfone, and polyvinylidene fluoride.

  9. Full-Scale Testing of Thermoplastic Composite I-Beams for Bridges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 17 -1 8 ACSIM Technology Standards Group Full-Scale Testing of Thermoplastic Composite I-Beams for Bridges Co ns tr...default. ACSIM Technology Standards Group ERDC/CERL TR-17-18 June 2017 Full-Scale Testing of Thermoplastic Composite I-Beams for Bridges Ghassan... tests were con- ducted on commercially available, thermoplastic polymer composite I- beams at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and

  10. Polycyanurates and Polycarbonates Based on Eugenol: Alternatives to Thermosetting and Thermoplastic Polymers Based on Bisphenol A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-14

    to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House Thermosetting and Thermoplastic Polymers based on Bisphenol A 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Francisco, CA, 14 August 2014. PA#14389 14. ABSTRACT Polycyanurate thermosetting networks, polycarbonate thermoplastics, and homogenous polycarbonate...ON EUGENOL: ALTERNATIVES TO THERMOSETTING AND THERMOPLASTIC POLYMES BASED ON BISPHENOL A 14 August 2014 Andrew J. Guenthner1, Benjamin G. Harvey2

  11. The bactericidal activity of glutaraldehyde-impregnated polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sehmi, Sandeep K; Allan, Elaine; MacRobert, Alexander J; Parkin, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Although glutaraldehyde is known to be bactericidal in solution, its potential use to create novel antibacterial polymers suitable for use in healthcare environments has not been evaluated. Here, novel materials were prepared in which glutaraldehyde was either incorporated into polyurethane using a simple "swell-encapsulation-shrink" method (hereafter referred to as "glutaraldehyde-impregnated polyurethane"), or simply applied to the polymer surface (hereafter referred to as "glutaraldehyde-coated polyurethane"). The antibacterial activity of glutaraldehyde-impregnated and glutaraldehyde-coated polyurethane samples was tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Glutaraldehyde-impregnated polyurethane resulted in a 99.9% reduction in the numbers of E. coli within 2 h and a similar reduction of S. aureus within 1 h, whereas only a minimal reduction in bacterial numbers was observed when the biocide was bound to the polymer surface. After 15 days, however, the bactericidal activity of the impregnated material was substantially reduced presumably due to polymerization of glutaraldehyde. Thus, although glutaraldehyde retains antibacterial activity when impregnated into polyurethane, activity is not maintained for extended periods of time. Future work should examine the potential of chemical modification of glutaraldehyde and/or polyurethane to improve the useful lifespan of this novel antibacterial polymer. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Large-Strain Transparent Magnetoactive Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses polymer nano - composite superparamagnetic actuators that were prepared by the addition of organically modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited large deformations under a magnetostatic field with a low loading level of 0.1 wt% in a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU) matrix. The maximum actuation deformation of the nanocomposite films increased exponentially with increasing nanoparticle concentration. The cyclic deformation actuation of a high-loading magnetic nanocomposite film was examined in a low magnetic field, and it exhibited excellent reproducibility and controllability. Low-loading TPU nanocomposite films (0.1-2 wt%) were transparent to semitransparent in the visible wavelength range, owing to good dispersion of the magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetoactuation phenomena were also demonstrated in a high-modulus, high-temperature polyimide resin with less mechanical deformation.

  13. A thermoplastic polyimidesulfone. [synthesis of processable and solvent resistant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A polymer system has been prepared which has the excellent thermoplastic properties generally associated with polysulfones, and the solvent resistance and thermal stability of aromatic polyimides. This material, with improved processability over the base polyimide, can be processed in the 260-325 C range in such a manner as to yield high quality, tough unfilled moldings; strong, high-temperature-resistant adhesive bonds; and well consolidated, graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings (composites). The unfilled moldings have physical properties that are similar to aromatic polysulfones which demonstrates the potential as an engineering thermoplastic. The adhesive bonds exhibit excellent retention of initial strength levels even after thermal aging for 5000 hours at 232 C. The graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings have mechanical properties which makes this polymer attractive for the fabrication of structural composites.

  14. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of thermoplastic composites induction welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Barbara; Nele, Luigi; Galise, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a numerical simulation and experimental test of the induction welding of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTPCs) was provided. The thermoplastic Polyamide 66 (PA66) with carbon fiber fabric was used. Using a dedicated software (JMag Designer), the influence of the fundamental process parameters such as temperature, current and holding time was investigated. In order to validate the results of the simulations, and therefore the numerical model used, experimental tests were carried out, and the temperature values measured during the tests were compared with the aid of an optical pyrometer, with those provided by the numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated by single lap shear tests.

  15. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  16. Application of Low Melting Point Thermoplastics to Hybrid Rocket Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yutaka; Jikei, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Ryuichi; Kato, Nobuji; Hori, Keiichi

    This paper introduces the application of low melting point thermoplastics (LT) to hybrid rocket fuel. LT made by Katazen Corporation has an excellent mechanical property comparing with other thermoplastics and prospect of high surface regression rate because it has a similar physical property with low melting point of paraffin fuel which has high regression rate probably due to the entrainment mass transfer mechanism that droplets continuously depart out of the surface melt layer. Several different types of LT developed by Katazen Corporation for this use have been evaluated in the measurements of regression rate, mechanical properties These results show the LTs have the higher regression rate and better mechanical properties comparing with conventional hybrid rocket fuels. Observation was also made using a small 2D combustor, and the entrainment mass transfer mechanism is confirmed with the LT fuels.

  17. Microwave facilities for welding thermoplastic composites and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ku, H S; Siores, E; Ball, J A

    1999-01-01

    The wide range of applications of microwave technology in manufacturing industries has been well documented (NRC, 1994; Thuery, 1992). In this paper, a new way of joining fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites with or without primers is presented. The microwave facility used is also discussed. The effect of power input and cycle time on the heat affected zone (HAZ) is detailed together with the underlying principles of test piece material interactions with the electromagnetic field. The process of autogenous joining of 33% by weight of random glass fibre reinforced Nylon 66, polystyrene (PS) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) as well as 23.3% by weight of carbon fibre reinforced PS thermoplastic composites is discussed together with developments using filler materials, or primers in the heterogenous joining mode. The weldability dependence on the dielectric loss tangent of these materials at elevated temperatures is also described.

  18. Method for shaping sheet thermoplastic and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akilian, Mireille K. (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Processes and apparati for shaping sheet glass or thermoplastic materials use force from a layer of a flowing fluid, such as air, between the sheet and a mandrel at close to the softening temperature of the thermoplastic. The shape is preserved by cooling. The shape of the air bearing mandrel and the pressure distribution of the fluid contribute to the final shape. A process can be conducted on one or two surfaces such that the force from the air layer is on one or two surfaces of the sheet. The gap size between the sheet and mandrel determines the pressure profile in the gap, which also determines the final sheet shape. In general, smaller gaps lead to larger viscous forces. The pressure profile depends on the shape of the mandrel, the size of the fluid gap and the sheet and the fluid supply pressure.

  19. Process for Preparing a Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process for preparing a tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide is provided. The process comprises the steps of (a) providing 4.4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride to 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride at a mole ratio ranging from about 25 mole percent to 75 mole percent to 75 mole percent to about 25 mole percent; (b) adding 3,4'-oxydianiline to form a mixture; (c) adding a polar aprotic or polar protic solvent to the mixture to form a solution having a percentage of solids capable of maintaining polymer solubility; (d) stirring the solution to allow it to react; (e) adding an azeotropic solvent to the solution and heating to remove water; (f) cooling the solution of step (e) to room temperature and recovering the tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide.

  20. Screw-actuated displacement micropumps for thermoplastic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Han, J Y; Rahmanian, O D; Kendall, E L; Fleming, N; DeVoe, D L

    2016-10-05

    The fabrication of on-chip displacement pumps integrated into thermoplastic chips is explored as a simple and low cost method for achieving precise and programmable flow control for disposable microfluidic systems. The displacement pumps consist of stainless steel screws inserted into threaded ports machined into a thermoplastic substrate which also serve as on-chip reagent storage reservoirs. Three different methods for pump sealing are investigated to enable high pressure flows without leakage, and software-defined control of multiple pumps is demonstrated in a self-contained platform using a compact and self-contained microcontroller for operation. Using this system, flow rates ranging from 0.5-40 μl min -1 are demonstrated. The pumps are combined with on-chip burst valves to fully seal multiple reagents into fabricated chips while providing on-demand fluid distribution in a downstream microfluidic network, and demonstrated for the generation of size-tunable water-in-oil emulsions.

  1. Multiaxial Cyclic Thermoplasticity Analysis with Besseling's Subvolume Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A modification was formulated to Besseling's Subvolume Method to allow it to use multilinear stress-strain curves which are temperature dependent to perform cyclic thermoplasticity analyses. This method automotically reproduces certain aspects of real material behavior important in the analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine (AGTE) components. These include the Bauschinger effect, cross-hardening, and memory. This constitutive equation was implemented in a finite element computer program called CYANIDE. Subsequently, classical time dependent plasticity (creep) was added to the program. Since its inception, this program was assessed against laboratory and component testing and engine experience. The ability of this program to simulate AGTE material response characteristics was verified by this experience and its utility in providing data for life analyses was demonstrated. In this area of life analysis, the multiaxial thermoplasticity capabilities of the method have proved a match for the actual AGTE life experience.

  2. A review: fabrication of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Janik, H; Marzec, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is the fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds that can be used for the reconstruction and regeneration of damaged or deformed tissues and organs. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to create either fibrous or porous scaffolds from polymers, metals, composite materials and ceramics. However, the most promising materials are biodegradable polymers due to their comprehensive mechanical properties, ability to control the rate of degradation and similarities to natural tissue structures. Polyurethanes (PUs) are attractive candidates for scaffold fabrication, since they are biocompatible, and have excellent mechanical properties and mechanical flexibility. PU can be applied to various methods of porous scaffold fabrication, among which are solvent casting/particulate leaching, thermally induced phase separation, gas foaming, emulsion freeze-drying and melt moulding. Scaffold properties obtained by these techniques, including pore size, interconnectivity and total porosity, all depend on the thermal processing parameters, and the porogen agent and solvents used. In this review, various polyurethane systems for scaffolds are discussed, as well as methods of fabrication, including the latest developments, and their advantages and disadvantages. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Polyurethane Foam Impact Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, M. E.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Reinhart, W. D.; Wong, M. K.

    1999-06-01

    Uniaxial strain impact experiments with a rigid polyurethane foam of nominal density 0.22g/cc are reported. A 6 mm thick foam impactor is mounted on the face of a projectile and impacts a thin (1 mm) target plate of aluminum or copper, on which the rear free surface velocity history is acquired with a VISAR. Impact velocities ranged from 300 to 1500 m/s. The velocity record monitors the initial shock from the foam transmitted through the target, followed by a reverberation within the target plate as the wave interacts with the compressed foam at the impact interface and the free recording surface. These one-dimensional uniaxial strain impact experiments were modeled using a traditional p-alpha porous material model for the distended polyurethane, which generally captured the motion imparted to the target by the foam. Some of the high frequency aspects of the data, reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the foam, can be recovered with computations of fully 3-dimensional explicit representations of this porous material.

  4. Castor Oil Based Polyurethanes: Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalino, AD; Salen, VA; Reyes, LQ

    2017-09-01

    In this study, polyurethanes based on castor oil and 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) were synthesized with varying weight ratio of the castor oil and HMDI. The formation of urethane linkages was verified through the use of a fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The hydrophilicity of the films was evaluated through the use of a contact angle meter and it was found that the contact angle of all the films were below 90 degrees which confirms their hydrophilicity. The thermal stability of the PU films were studies through the use of a thermal gravimetric analyzer and found that all of the polyurethane films exhibited two weight loss events at elevated temperatures wherein the first weight loss event was observed to occur at 285°C to 384°C while the second weight loss event was observed at around 521°C to 551°C. The hardness, elastic modulus, and tensile elongation of the PU films were determined by using a universal testing machine (UTM) where it was found out that the hardness and the elastic modulus of the film is directly proportional with HMDI loading while the tensile elongation is inversely proportional to it. Lastly, it was known through the swelling studies of the PU films that it does not swell, this is due to the presence of unreacted triglycerides in the material, which prevents water from permeating to the films.

  5. Thermal Performance of Aircraft Polyurethane Seat Cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft seat materials were evaluated in terms of their thermal performance. The materials were evaluated using (a) thermogravimetric analysis, (b) differential scanning calorimetry, (c) a modified NBS smoke chamber to determine the rate of mass loss and (d) the NASA T-3 apparatus to determine the thermal efficiency. In this paper, the modified NBS smoke chamber will be described in detail since it provided the most conclusive results. The NBS smoke chamber was modified to measure the weight loss of material when exposed to a radiant heat source over the range of 2.5 to 7.5 W/sq cm. This chamber has been utilized to evaluate the thermal performance of various heat blocking layers utilized to protect the polyurethane cushioning foam used in aircraft seats. Various kinds of heat blocking layers were evaluated by monitoring the weight loss of miniature seat cushions when exposed to the radiant heat. The effectiveness of aluminized heat blocking systems was demonstrated when compared to conventional heat blocking layers such as neoprene. All heat blocking systems showed good fire protection capabilities when compared to the state-of-the-art, i.e., wool-nylon over polyurethane foam.

  6. Laminated thermoplastic composite material from recycled high density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a materials-science, educational experiment is presented. The student should understand the fundamentals of polymer processing and mechanical property testing of materials. The ability to use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards is also necessary for designing material test specimens and testing procedures. The objectives of the experiment are (1) to understand the concept of laminated composite materials, processing, testing, and quality assurance of thermoplastic composites and (2) to observe an application example of recycled plastics.

  7. Mechanical properties of green composites based on thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornes, F.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; Fenollar, O.; Boronat, T.; Garcia-Sanoguera, D.

    2010-06-01

    The present work is focused on study of "green composites" elaborated from thermoplastic starch (TPS) as polymer matrix and a fiber from natural origin (rush) as reinforced fiber. The effect of the fiber content has been studied by means of the mechanical properties. The composite resulting presents a lack of interaction between matrix and fiber that represents a performance decrease. However the biodegradability behavior of the resulting composite raise this composite as useful an industrial level.

  8. Structural response of bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall

    1991-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the structural response and failure characteristics of selected bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear-webs are presented. Results are given for specimens with one stiffeneer, with two stiffeners, and different stiffener geometries. Selected analytical results that were obtained with the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed computer code are presented. Analytical results that describe normal and transverse shear stress are also presented.

  9. Distribution of Oil in a PP/EPDM Thermoplastic Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yutaka; Okada, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi

    Distribution of oil in a commercial PP(polypropylene)/EPDM(ethylene-propyrene-diene rubber) thermoplastic elastomer was analyzed by light scattering. It was shown that the oil preferentially stays in EPDM particles at low temperatures and it migrates to PP matrix at high temperatures. That is, the oil is expected to play a dual role; softener at ambient temperature and plasticizer at processing temperature. The temperature dependence of oil distribution was nicely interpreted by a thermodynamic discussion.

  10. Ultrasonic assisted consolidation of commingled thermoplastic/glass fibers rovings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Montagna, Francesco; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Thermoplastic matrix composites are finding new applications in different industrial area thanks to their intrinsic advantages related to environmental compatibility and processability. The approach presented in this work consists in the development of a technology for the simultaneous deposition and consolidation of commingled thermoplastic rovings through to the application of high energy ultrasound. An experimental equipment, integrating both fiber impregnation and ply consolidation in a single process, has been designed and tested. It is made of an ultrasonic welder, whose titanium sonotrode is integrated on a filament winding machine. During winding, the commingled roving is at the same time in contact with the mandrel and the horn. The intermolecular friction generated by ultrasound is able to melt the thermoplastic matrix and impregnate the reinforcement fibers. The heat transfer phenomena occurring during the in situ consolidation were simulated solving by finite element (FE) analysis an energy balance accounting for the heat generated by ultrasonic waves and the melting characteristics of the matrix. To this aim, a calorimetric characterization of the thermoplastic matrix has been carried out to obtain the input parameters for the model. The FE analysis has enabled to predict the temperature distribution in the composite during heating and cooling The simulation results have been validated by the measurement of the temperature evolution during ultrasonic consolidation. The reliability of the developed consolidation equipment was proved by producing hoop wound cylinder prototypes using commingled continuous E-glass rovings and Polypropylene (PP) filaments. The consolidated composite cylinders are characterized by high mechanical properties, with values comparable with the theoretical ones predicted by the micromechanical analysis.

  11. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  12. Elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, C. T.; Gates, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to characterize the nonlinear and rate dependent behavior of a continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite. This model was incorporated into a finite element program for the analysis of laminated plates and shells. Details on the finite element formulation with the proposed constitutive model were presented. The numerical results were compared with experimental data for uniaxial tension and three-point bending tests of (+ or - 45 deg)3s APC-2 laminates.

  13. Process for preparing tapes from thermoplastic polymers and carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Furst, Howard (Inventor); Gurion, Zev (Inventor); McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Orwoll, Richard D. (Inventor); Palangio, Daniel (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process for use in preparing tapes or rovings, which are formed from a thermoplastic material used to impregnate longitudinally extended bundles of carbon fibers. The process involves the steps of (a) gas spreading a tow of carbon fibers; (b) feeding the spread tow into a crosshead die; (c) impregnating the tow in the die with a thermoplastic polymer; (d) withdrawing the impregnated tow from the die; and (e) gas cooling the impregnated tow with a jet of air. The crosshead die useful in the instant invention includes a horizontally extended, carbon fiber bundle inlet channel, means for providing melted polymer under pressure to the die, means for dividing the polymeric material flowing into the die into an upper flow channel and a lower flow channel disposed above and below the moving carbon fiber bundle, means for applying the thermoplastic material from both the upper and lower channels to the fiber bundle, and means for withdrawing the resulting tape from the die.

  14. Material, process, and product design of thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Heming

    Thermoplastic composites made of polypropylene (PP) and E-glass fibers were investigated experimentally as well as theoretically for two new classes of product designs. The first application was for reinforcement of wood. Commingled PP/glass yarn was consolidated and bonded on wood panel using a tie layer. The processing parameters, including temperature, pressure, heating time, cooling time, bonding strength, and bending strength were tested experimentally and evaluated analytically. The thermoplastic adhesive interface was investigated with environmental scanning electron microscopy. The wood/composite structural design was optimized and evaluated using a Graphic Method. In the second application, we evaluated use of thermoplastic composites for explosion containment in an arrester. PP/glass yarn was fabricated in a sleeve form and wrapped around the arrester. After consolidation, the flexible composite sleeve forms a solid composite shell. The composite shell acts as a protection layer in a surge test to contain the fragments of the arrester. The manufacturing process for forming the composite shell was designed. Woven, knitted, and braided textile composite shells made of commingled PP/glass yarn were tested and evaluated. Mechanical performance of the woven, knitted, and braided composite shells was examined analytically. The theoretical predictions were used to verify the experimental results.

  15. Mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, one polyethylene terephthalate, one polycarbonate) and, as a control, a conventional heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were used in this study. The flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL), the elastic modulus, and the Charpy impact strength of the denture base resins were measured according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 1567 and ISO 1567:1999/Amd 1:2003. The descending order of the FS-PL was: conventional PMMA > polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate > two polyamides. The descending order of the elastic moduli was: conventional PMMA > polycarbonate > polyethylene terephthalate > two polyamides. The descending order of the Charpy impact strength was: polyamide (Nylon PACM12) > polycarbonate > polyamide (Nylon 12), polyethylene terephthalate > conventional PMMA. All of the injection-molded thermoplastic resins had significantly lower FS-PL, lower elastic moduli, and higher or similar impact strength compared to the conventional PMMA. The polyamide denture base resins had low FS-PL and low elastic moduli; one of them possessed very high impact strength, and the other had low impact strength. The polyethylene terephthalate denture base resin showed a moderately high FS-PL, moderate elastic modulus, and low impact strength. The polycarbonate denture base resin had a moderately high FS-PL, moderately high elastic modulus, and moderate impact strength.

  16. Polyurethane-covered mammary implants: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Gasperoni, C; Salgarello, M; Gargani, G

    1992-10-01

    Polyurethane-covered mammary implants are the implants of choice in aesthetic and reconstructive mammary surgery. These implants give very good results in regard to breast contour and consistency, and have a very low complication rate. We present our 12-year experience using polyurethane-covered prostheses. We place the implant mostly in the subglandular or subcutaneous site, and their capsular contracture rate is extremely low (3.3%). Based on our experience, we also review the other complications and side effects occurring with polyurethane prostheses and discuss them in detail.

  17. Uncertainty Analysis of Decomposing Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Romero, Vicente J.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are necessary to determine where to allocate resources for improved predictions in support of our nation's nuclear safety mission. Yet, sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are not commonly performed on complex combustion models because the calculations are time consuming, CPU intensive, nontrivial exercises that can lead to deceptive results. To illustrate these ideas, a variety of sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were used to determine the uncertainty associated with thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam exposed to high radiative flux boundary conditions. The polyurethane used in this study is a rigid closed-cell foam used as an encapsulant. Related polyurethane binders such as Estane are used in many energetic materials of interest to the JANNAF community. The complex, finite element foam decomposition model used in this study has 25 input parameters that include chemistry, polymer structure, and thermophysical properties. The response variable was selected as the steady-state decomposition front velocity calculated as the derivative of the decomposition front location versus time. An analytical mean value sensitivity/uncertainty (MV) analysis was used to determine the standard deviation by taking numerical derivatives of the response variable with respect to each of the 25 input parameters. Since the response variable is also a derivative, the standard deviation was essentially determined from a second derivative that was extremely sensitive to numerical noise. To minimize the numerical noise, 50-micrometer element dimensions and approximately 1-msec time steps were required to obtain stable uncertainty results. As an alternative method to determine the uncertainty and sensitivity in the decomposition front velocity, surrogate response surfaces were generated for use with a constrained Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique. Two surrogate response surfaces were investigated: 1) a linear surrogate response surface (LIN) and 2

  18. Polyurethane foam for roadway stabilization NH Route 129, Loudon, NH.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-12

    This report summarizes the evaluation of the performance of polyurethane foam as a method of roadway : stabilization for a rural roadway experiencing substantial frost heaving. : NHDOT is responsible for many roads which have evolved from gravel road...

  19. Polyurethane foam for roadway stabilization NH route 129, Loudon, NH.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-12

    This report summarizes the evaluation of the performance of polyurethane foam as a method of roadway : stabilization for a rural roadway experiencing substantial frost heaving. : NHDOT is responsible for many roads which have evolved from gravel road...

  20. Thermal Stability of Aqueous Polyurethanes Depending on the Applied Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Cakic, Suzana; Nikolic, Goran; Lacnjevac, Caslav; Gligoric, Miladin; Stamenkovic, Jakov; Rajkovic, Milos B.; Barac, Miroljub

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability of aqueous polyurethanes has been measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis. The aqueous polyurethanes (aqPUR) with catalysts of different selectivity have been studied by use of the dynamic method. To obtain degradations of 0.025, 0.05, and 0.10, employing the dynamic method, the heating rates of 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 °C min-1 have been used in the range of 30-500 °C. Using the more selective catalysts in the aqueous polyurethanes, the total resulting time of the decompositon has been on the increase at all degrees of the degradation and at the particular starting temperature. This paper shows that the dynamic method based on the thermogravimetric analysis can be used to assess the thermal stability of the aqueous polyurethanes using the catalysts of different selectivity.

  1. Organically Modified Nanoclay-Reinforced Rigid Polyurethane Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong Tae; Qian, Yuqiang; Lindsay, Chris; Stein, Andreas; Macosko, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The nanodispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes was investigated to produce organoclay-reinforced rigid gas barrier films. Reducing gas transport can improve the insulation performance of closed cell polyurethane foam. In a previous study, the dispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes without organic modification was not sufficient due to the non-uniform dispersion morphology. When vermiculite was modified by cation exchange with long-chain quaternary ammonium cations, the dispersion in methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was significantly improved. Dispersion was improved by combining high intensity dispersive mixing with efficient distributive mixing. Polymerization conditions were also optimized in order to provide a high state of nanodispersion in the polyurethane nanocomposite. The dispersions were characterized using rheological, microscopic and scattering/diffraction techniques. The final nanocomposites showed enhancement of mechanical properties and reduction in permeability to carbon dioxide at low clay concentration (around 2 wt percent).

  2. Nano-engineered polyurethane resin-modified concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    The goal of the proposed work is to investigate the application of nano-engineered polyurethane (NEPU) emulsions for latex modified : concrete (LMC). NEPU emulsions are non-toxic, environment friendly, durable over a wide temperature range, provide b...

  3. Rigid open-cell polyurethane foam for cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Lindquist, C. R.; Niendorf, L. R.; Nies, G. E.; Perkins, P. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Lightweight polyurethane foam assembled in panels is effective spacer material for construction of self-evacuating multilayer insulation panels for cryogenic liquid tanks. Spacer material separates radiation shields with barrier that minimizes conductive and convective heat transfer between shields.

  4. Synthesis of a Novel Biodegradable Polyurethane with Phosphatidylcholines

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Niancao; Chen, Yuanwei; Luo, Xianglin

    2010-01-01

    A novel polyurethane was successfully synthesized by chain-extension of biodegradable poly (l-lactide) functionalized phosphatidylcholine (PC) with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as chain extender (PUR-PC). The molecular weights, glass transition temperature (Tg) increased significantly after the chain-extension. The hydrophilicity of PUR-PC was better than the one without PC, according to a water absorption test. Moreover, the number of adhesive platelets and anamorphic platelets on PUR-PC film were both less than those on PUR film. These preliminary results suggest that this novel polyurethane might be a better scaffold than traditional biodegradable polyurethanes for tissue engineering due to its better blood compatibility. Besides, this study also provides a new method to prepare PC-modified biodegradable polyurethanes. PMID:20480047

  5. Soy-based UV resistant polyurethane pultruded composites.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-02-01

    Aliphatic polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites were synthesized using organically modified nanoclays. X-Ray diffraction results : confirmed good exfoliation of nanoclay particles in the PU resin system. With the addition of just 1% of nanoclay in the bas...

  6. Investigation of wear resistance of polyurethanes in abrasive soil mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiórkowski, Jerzy; Ligier, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of polyurethane wear in different abrasive soil masses. Two types of polyurethanes of various chemical compositions and untreated 38GSA steel were tested, the latter being used as a reference standard. The study was conducted in natural soil mass at a "rotating bowl" stand. Relative wear resistance was determined from measurements of mass wear for the materials under study. The condition of the surface of the materials under wear test was analysed.

  7. Validation of Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters chartered the Acquisition Pollution Prevention (AP2) Office to coordinate agency activities affecting pollution prevention issues identified during system and component acquisition and sustainment processes. The primary objective of this effort is to demonstrate and validate alternatives to aliphatic isocyanate polyurethane coatings. Successful completion of this project will result in one or more isocyanate-free coating systems qualified for use at Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA centers participating in this study. The objective of this project is to qualify the candidates under the specifications for the standard system. This project will compare coating performance of the proposed alternatives to existing coating systems or standards.

  8. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticles coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ilisei, Simona; Luca, Constantin

    2014-02-01

    The present paper is focused on a study regarding the possibility of obtaining hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticle coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold. The method applied is based on a combined strategy involving hydroxyapatite biomimetic deposition on polyurethane surface using a Supersaturated Calcification Solution (SCS), combined with silver ions reduction and in-situ crystallization processes on hydroxyapatite-polyurethane surface by sample immersing in AgNO3 solution. The morphology, composition and phase structure of the prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The data obtained show that a layer of hydroxyapatite was deposited on porous polyurethane support and the silver nanoparticles (average size 34.71 nm) were dispersed among and even on the hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane surface acts as a reducer and a stabilizing agent for silver ions. The surface plasmon resonance peak in UV-Vis absorption spectra showed an absorption maximum at 415 nm, indicating formation of silver nanoparticles. The hydroxyapatite-silver polyurethane scaffolds were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the obtained data were indicative of good antibacterial properties of the materials. © 2013.

  10. Hydrophilic polyurethane matrix promotes chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Sandeep M; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Cheah, Calvin; Arzumand, Ayesha; Yuan, Yuan; Richardson, Caley A; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2015-09-01

    Segmental polyurethanes exhibit biphasic morphology and can control cell fate by providing distinct matrix guided signals to increase the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based hydrophilic polyurethanes can deliver differential signals to MSCs through their matrix phases where hard segments are cell-interactive domains and PEG based soft segments are minimally interactive with cells. These coordinated communications can modulate cell-matrix interactions to control cell shape and size for chondrogenesis. Biphasic character and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes with gel like architecture provide a synthetic matrix conducive for chondrogenesis of MSCs, as evidenced by deposition of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Compared to monophasic hydrogels, presence of cell interactive domains in hydrophilic polyurethanes gels can balance cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These results demonstrate the correlation between lineage commitment and the changes in cell shape, cell-matrix interaction, and cell-cell adhesion during chondrogenic differentiation which is regulated by polyurethane phase morphology, and thus, represent hydrophilic polyurethanes as promising synthetic matrices for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Polyurethane foam-covered breast implants: a justified choice?

    PubMed

    Scarpa, C; Borso, G F; Vindigni, V; Bassetto, F

    2015-01-01

    Even if the safety of the polyurethane prosthesis has been the subject of many studies and professional and public controversies. Nowadays, polyurethane covered implants are very popular in plastic surgery for the treatment of capsular contracture. We have identified 41 papers (1 is a communication of the FDA) by using search browsers such as Pubmed, Medline, and eMedicine. Eleven manuscripts have been used for an introduction, and the remaining thirty have been subdivided into three tables whose results have been summarized in three main chapters: (1) capsular formation and contracture, (2) complications, (3) biodegradation and cancer risk. (1) The polyurethanic capsule is a well defined foreign body reaction characterized by synovial metaplasia, a thin layer of disarranged collagen fibers and a high vascularization. These features make possible a "young" capsule and a low occurrence of capsular contracture even over a long period (10 years); (2) the polyurethane implants may be difficult to remove but there is no evidence that they cause an increase in the other complications; (3) there is no evidence of polyurethane related cancer in long-term studies (after 5 years). Polyurethane foam covered breast implants remain a valid choice for the treatment of capsular contracture even if it would be very useful to verify the ease of removal of the prosthesis and to continue investigations on biodegradation products.

  12. Hydrophilic polyurethane matrix promotes chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Nalluri, Sandeep M.; Krishnan, G. Rajesh; Cheah, Calvin; Arzumand, Ayesha; Yuan, Yuan; Richardson, Caley A.; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2016-01-01

    Segmental polyurethanes exhibit biphasic morphology and can control cell fate by providing distinct matrix guided signals to increase the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based hydrophilic polyurethanes can deliver differential signals to MSCs through their matrix phases where hard segments are cell-interactive domains and PEG based soft segments are minimally interactive with cells. These coordinated communications can modulate cell–matrix interactions to control cell shape and size for chondrogenesis. Biphasic character and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes with gel like architecture provide a synthetic matrix conducive for chondrogenesis of MSCs, as evidenced by deposition of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Compared to monophasic hydrogels, presence of cell interactive domains in hydrophilic polyurethanes gels can balance cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. These results demonstrate the correlation between lineage commitment and the changes in cell shape, cell–matrix interaction, and cell–cell adhesion during chondrogenic differentiation which is regulated by polyurethane phase morphology, and thus, represent hydrophilic polyurethanes as promising synthetic matrices for cartilage regeneration. PMID:26046282

  13. Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Kevlar KM2® Style 705 PVB phenolic woven aramid composite was included. A developmental unidirectional thermoplastic aramid fiber, Honeywell...Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates by...Unidirectional Composite Laminates Lionel R. Vargas-Gonzalez, Shawn M. Walsh, and James C. Gurganus Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  14. Thermal Degradation, Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Wheat Straw Flour Filled Recycled Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Karakus, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of wheat straw flour (WF) filled thermoplastic composites were measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphology and mechanical properties were also studied using scanning electron microscope and universal testing machine, respectively. Presence of WF in thermoplastic matrix reduced the degradation temperature of the composites. One for WF and one for thermoplastics, two main decomposition peaks were observed. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between WFs and thermoplastic. WFs were embedded into the thermoplastic matrix indicating improved adhesion. However, the bonding was not perfect because some debonding can also be seen on the interface of WFs and thermoplastic matrix. In the case of mechanical properties of WF filled recycled thermoplastic, HDPE and PP based composites provided similar tensile and flexural properties. The addition of coupling agents improved the properties of thermoplastic composites. MAPE coupling agents performed better in HDPE while MAPP coupling agents were superior in PP based composites. The composites produced with the combination of 50-percent mixture of recycled HDPE and PP performed similar with the use of both coupling agents. All produced composites provided flexural properties required by the ASTM standard for polyolefin-based plastic lumber decking boards. PMID:27879719

  15. Effects of weathering on color loss of natural fiber thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    R.H. Falk; C. Felton; T. Lundin

    2001-01-01

    The technology currently exists to manufacture natural fiber thermoplastic composites from recycled materials. Development of commodity-building products from these composites would open up huge markets for waste-based materials in the US. To date, the construction industry has only accepted wood thermoplastic composite lumber (and only for limited applications). In...

  16. Effects of weathering on color loss of natural fiber : thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton; Thomas Lundin

    2000-01-01

    The technology currently exists to manufacture natural fiber-thermoplastic composites from recycled materials. Development of commodity building products from these composites would open huge markets for waste-based materials in the United States. To date, the construction industry has only accepted wood-thermoplastic composite lumber and only for limited applications...

  17. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polyethylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. The WPC typically use virgin or recycled thermoplastic as the substrate and wood fiber as the filler. A major application of the WPC is in non-structural building appli...

  18. Collagenase-labile polyurethane urea synthesis and processing into hollow fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-Li; Hong, Yi; Little, Steven R; Wagner, William R

    2014-08-11

    As a means to stimulate wound healing, a hollow fiber membrane system might be placed within a wound bed to provide local and externally regulated controlled delivery of regenerative factors. After sufficient healing, it would be desirable to triggerably degrade these fibers as opposed to pulling them out. Accordingly, a series of enzymatically degradable thermoplastic elastomers was developed as potential hollow fiber base material. Polyurethane ureas (PUUs) were synthesized based on 1, 4-diisocyanatobutane, polycaprolactone (PCL) diol and polyethylene glycol (PEG) at different molar fractions as soft segments, and collagenase-sensitive peptide GGGLGPAGGK-NH2 as a chain extender (defined as PUU-CLxEGy-peptide, where x and y are the respective molar percents). In these polymers, PEG in the polymer backbone decreased tensile strengths and initial moduli of solvent-cast films in the wet state, while increasing water absorption. Collagenase degradation was observed at 75% relative PEG content in the soft segment. Control PUUs with putrescine or nonsense peptide chain extenders did not degrade acutely in collagenase. Conduits electrospun from PUU-CL25EG75-peptide and PUU-CL50EG50-peptide exhibited appropriate mechanical strength and sustained release of a model protein from the tube lumen for 7 days. Collapse of PUU-CL25EG75-peptide tubes occurred after collagenase degradation for 3 days. In conclusion, through molecular design, synthesis and characterization, a collagenase-labile PUU-CL25EG75-peptide polymer was identified that exhibited the desired traits of triggerable lability, processability, and the capacity to act as a membrane to facilitate controlled protein release.

  19. Prediction of wrinklings and porosities of thermoplastic composits after thermostamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamila, Nahiene; Guzman-Maldonado, Eduardo; Xiong, Hu; Wang, Peng; Boisse, Philippe; Bikard, Jerome

    2018-05-01

    During thermoforming process, the consolidation deformation mode of thermoplastic prepregs is one of the key deformation modes especially in the consolidation step, where the two resin flow phenomena: resin percolation and transverse squeeze flow, play an important role. This occurs a viscosity behavior for consolidation mode. Based on a visco-hyper-elastic model for the characterization of thermoplastic prepregs proposed by Guzman, which involves different independent modes of deformation: elongation mode, bending mode with thermo-dependent, and viscoelastic in-plan shearing mode with thermo-dependent, a viscoelastic model completed with consolidation behavior will be presented in this paper. A completed three-dimensional mechanical behavior with compaction effect for thermoplastic pre-impregnated composites is constituted, and the associated parameters are identified by compaction test. Moreover, a seven-node prismatic solid-shell finite element approach is used for the forming simulation. To subdue transverse shear locking, an intermediate material frame related to the element sides is introduced in order to fix nodal transverse shear strain components. Indeed, the enhanced assumed strain method and a reduced integration scheme are combined offering a linear varying strain field along the thickness direction to circumvent thickness locking, and an hourglass stabilization procedure is employed in order to correct the element's rank deficiency for pinching. An additional node is added at the center providing a quadratic interpolation of the displacement in the thickness direction. The predominance of this element is the ability of three dimensional analysis, especially for the transverse stress existence through the thickness of material, which is essential for the consolidation modelling. Finally, an intimate contact model is employed to predict the evolution of the consolidation which permits the microstructure prediction of void presented through the prepreg

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites Using Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Meghan

    Advanced composite materials have great potential for facilitating energy efficient product design and their manufacture if improvements are made to current composite manufacturing processes. This thesis focuses on the development of a novel manufacturing process for thermoplastic composite structures entitled Laser-Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing ('LUAM'), which is intended to combine the benefits of laser processing technology, developed by Automated Dynamics Inc., with ultrasonic bonding technology that is used commercially for unreinforced polymers. These technologies used together have the potential to significantly reduce the energy consumption and void content of thermoplastic composites made using Automated Fiber Placement (AFP). To develop LUAM in a methodical manner with minimal risk, a staged approach was devised whereby coupon-level mechanical testing and prototyping utilizing existing equipment was accomplished. Four key tasks have been identified for this effort: Benchmarking, Ultrasonic Compaction, Laser Assisted Ultrasonic Compaction, and Demonstration and Characterization of LUAM. This thesis specifically addresses Tasks 1 and 2, i.e. Benchmarking and Ultrasonic Compaction, respectively. Task 1, fabricating test specimens using two traditional processes (autoclave and thermal press) and testing structural performance and dimensional accuracy, provide results of a benchmarking study by which the performance of all future phases will be gauged. Task 2, fabricating test specimens using a non-traditional process (ultrasonic conpaction) and evaluating in a similar fashion, explores the the role of ultrasonic processing parameters using three different thermoplastic composite materials. Further development of LUAM, although beyond the scope of this thesis, will combine laser and ultrasonic technology and eventually demonstrate a working system.

  1. Computational modelling of a thermoforming process for thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szegda, D.; Song, J.; Warby, M. K.; Whiteman, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    Plastic packaging waste currently forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and as such is causing increasing environmental concerns. Such packaging is largely non-biodegradable and is particularly difficult to recycle or to reuse due to its complex composition. Apart from limited recycling of some easily identifiable packaging wastes, such as bottles, most packaging waste ends up in landfill sites. In recent years, in an attempt to address this problem in the case of plastic packaging, the development of packaging materials from renewable plant resources has received increasing attention and a wide range of bioplastic materials based on starch are now available. Environmentally these bioplastic materials also reduce reliance on oil resources and have the advantage that they are biodegradable and can be composted upon disposal to reduce the environmental impact. Many food packaging containers are produced by thermoforming processes in which thin sheets are inflated under pressure into moulds to produce the required thin wall structures. Hitherto these thin sheets have almost exclusively been made of oil-based polymers and it is for these that computational models of thermoforming processes have been developed. Recently, in the context of bioplastics, commercial thermoplastic starch sheet materials have been developed. The behaviour of such materials is influenced both by temperature and, because of the inherent hydrophilic characteristics of the materials, by moisture content. Both of these aspects affect the behaviour of bioplastic sheets during the thermoforming process. This paper describes experimental work and work on the computational modelling of thermoforming processes for thermoplastic starch sheets in an attempt to address the combined effects of temperature and moisture content. After a discussion of the background of packaging and biomaterials, a mathematical model for the deformation of a membrane into a mould is presented, together with its

  2. Use of Vacuum Bagging for Fabricating Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Christopher L.; Simon, Andrew J.; Liu, Wei; Fredrickson, Carl; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a novel thermal bonding method for thermoplastic microfluidic devices. This simple method employs a modified vacuum bagging technique, a concept borrowed from the aerospace industry, to produce conventional thick substrate microfluidic devices, as well as multi-layer film devices. The bonds produced using this method are superior to those obtained using conventional thermal bonding methods, including thermal lamination, and are capable of sustaining burst pressures in excess of 550 kPa. To illustrate the utility of this method, thick substrate devices were produced, as well as a six-layer film device that incorporated several complex features. PMID:25329244

  3. Theoretical and experimental investigations of a thermoplastic constitutive law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdebel, U.

    1984-12-01

    A thermoplastic constitutive law allowing combinations of isotropic and kinematic hardening as well as deviations from the normality rule was examined. Since the energy balance for thermomechanical processes is taken into account, the consistent connection to thermodynamic laws is guaranteed. The experimental verification of material parameters is described; it is performed by isothermal tension-torsion tests on thin-walled tubes at different temperatures. The materials functions allow the extension to nonisothermal (adiabatic) processes. The comparison between theoretical and exprimental results is not entirely satisfactory and demonstrates the remaining inconsistencies. Suggestions which could lead to a better description of the behavior of elastoplastic materials are made.

  4. Tough, high performance, addition-type thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A tough, high performance polyimide is provided by reacting a triple bond conjugated with an aromatic ring in a bisethynyl compound with the active double bond in a compound containing a double bond activated toward the formation of a Diels-Adler type adduct, especially a bismaleimide, a biscitraconimide, or a benzoquinone, or mixtures thereof. Addition curing of this product produces a high linear polymeric structure and heat treating the highly linear polymeric structure produces a thermally stable aromatic addition-type thermoplastic polyimide, which finds utility in the preparation of molding compounds, adhesive compositions, and polymer matrix composites.

  5. Thermoplastic adhesives based on 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride (IDPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; Stclair, Terry L.; Pratt, J. Richard

    1988-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyimides were prepared and evaluated as adhesives. These materials are based on 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphathalic anhydride (IDAP) and either metaphenylene diamine (MPD) or 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone (DBAP). Both polymers exhibit excellent adhesive properties; however, the IDPA-MPD is the more attractive system because of a combination of high mechanical and physical properties as well as being made from commercially attractive monomers. The IDPA-MPD is an isomeric form of the commercially available adhesive and matrix resin, LARC-TPI and both systems have the same glass transition temperature and exhibit similar adhesive properties.

  6. Nonlinear mechanical behavior of thermoplastic matrix materials for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent theories of nonlinear mechanical response are quantitatively compared and related to experimental data. Computer techniques are formulated to handle the numerical integration and iterative procedures needed to solve the associated sets of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Problems encountered during these formulations are discussed and some open questions described. Bearing in mind these cautions, the consequences of changing parameters that appear in the formulations on the resulting engineering properties are discussed. Hence, engineering approaches to the analysis of thermoplastic matrix material can be suggested.

  7. Induction Consolidation of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsen, Marc R

    2012-06-14

    This project has focused on the area of energy efficient consolidation and molding of fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite components as an energy efficient alternative to the conventional processing methods such as autoclave processing. The expanding application of composite materials in wind energy, automotive, and aerospace provides an attractive energy efficiency target for process development. The intent is to have this efficient processing along with the recyclable thermoplastic materials ready for large scale application before these high production volume levels are reached. Therefore, the process can be implemented in a timely manner to realize the maximum economic, energy, and environmental efficiencies.more » Under this project an increased understanding of the use of induction heating with smart susceptors applied to consolidation of thermoplastic has been achieved. This was done by the establishment of processing equipment and tooling and the subsequent demonstration of this fabrication technology by consolidating/molding of entry level components for each of the participating industrial segments, wind energy, aerospace, and automotive. This understanding adds to the nation's capability to affordably manufacture high quality lightweight high performance components from advanced recyclable composite materials in a lean and energy efficient manner. The use of induction heating with smart susceptors is a precisely controlled low energy method for the consolidation and molding of thermoplastic composites. The smart susceptor provides intrinsic thermal control based on the interaction with the magnetic field from the induction coil thereby producing highly repeatable processing. The low energy usage is enabled by the fact that only the smart susceptor surface of the tool is heated, not the entire tool. Therefore much less mass is heated resulting in significantly less required energy to consolidate/mold the desired composite components. This energy

  8. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Fused Deposition Technique for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, Paolo; Alitta, Gianluca; Sala, Giuseppe; Di Landro, Luca

    2017-02-01

    A simple technique for the production of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic by fused deposition modeling, which involves a common 3D printer with quite limited modifications, is presented. An adequate setting of processing parameters and deposition path allows to obtain components with well-enhanced mechanical characteristics compared to conventional 3D printed items. The most relevant problems related to the simultaneous feeding of fibers and polymer are discussed. The properties of obtained aramid fiber reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) in terms of impregnation quality and of mechanical response are measured.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF CFC AND HCFC SUBSTITUTES FOR BLOWING POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identiry chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbon substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. The substantial ongoing effort is identifying third-generation blowing agets for polyurethane foams to repla...

  11. The influence of chemical structure on thermal properties and surface morphology of polyurethane materials.

    PubMed

    Brzeska, Joanna; Morawska, Magda; Heimowska, Aleksandra; Sikorska, Wanda; Wałach, Wojciech; Hercog, Anna; Kowalczuk, Marek; Rutkowska, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The surface morphology and thermal properties of polyurethanes can be correlated to their chemical composition. The hydrophilicity, surface morphology, and thermal properties of polyurethanes (differed in soft segments and in linear/cross-linked structure) were investigated. The influence of poly([ R , S ]-3-hydroxybutyrate) presence in soft segments and blending of polyurethane with polylactide on surface topography were also estimated. The linear polyurethanes (partially crystalline) had the granular surface, whereas the surface of cross-linked polyurethanes (almost amorphous) was smooth. Round aggregates of polylactide un-uniformly distributed in matrix of polyurethane were clearly visible. It was concluded that some modification of soft segment (by mixing of poly([ R , S ]-3-hydroxybutyrate) with different polydiols and polytriol) and blending of polyurethanes with small amount of polylactide influence on crystallinity and surface topography of obtained polyurethanes.

  12. Fiber glass prevents cracking of polyurethane foam insulation on cryogenic vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forge, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Fiber glass material, placed between polyurethane foam insulation and the outer surfaces of cryogenic vessels, retains its resilience at cryogenic temperatures and provides an expansion layer between the metal surfaces and the polyurethane foam, preventing cracking of the latter.

  13. Integrated high pressure manifold for thermoplastic microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghvami, S. Ali; Fraden, Seth

    2017-11-01

    We introduce an integrated tubing manifold for thermoplastic microfluidic chips that tolerates high pressure. In contrast to easy tubing in PDMS microfluidic devices, tube connection has been challenging for plastic microfluidics. Our integrated manifold connection tolerates 360 psi while conventional PDMS connections fail at 50 psi. Important design considerations are incorporation of a quick-connect, leak-free and high-pressure manifold for the inlets and outlets on the lid and registration marks that allow the precise alignment of the inlets and outlets. In our method, devices are comprised of two molded pieces joined together to create a sealed device. The first piece contains the microfluidic features and the second contains the inlet and outlet manifold, a frame for rigidity and a viewing window. The mold for the lid with integrated manifold is CNC milled from aluminium. A cone shape PDMS component which acts as an O-ring, seals the connection between molded manifold and tubing. The lid piece with integrated inlet and outlets will be a standard piece and can be used for different chips and designs. Sealing the thermoplastic device is accomplished by timed immersion of the lid in a mixture of volatile and non-volatile solvents followed by application of heat and pressure.

  14. Extrusion foaming of protein-based thermoplastic and polyethylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, Chanelle; Lay, Mark C.; Verbeek, Casparus J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Currently the extrusion foamability of Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP) is being investigated at the University of Waikato in collaboration with the Biopolymer Network Ltd (NZ). NTP has been developed from bloodmeal (>86 wt% protein), a co-product of the meat industry, by adding denaturants and plasticisers (tri-ethylene glycol and water) allowing it to be extruded and injection moulded. NTP alone does not readily foam when sodium bicarbonate is used as a chemical blowing agent as its extensional viscosity is too high. The thermoplastic properties of NTP were modified by blending it with different weight fractions of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH) compatibiliser. Extrusion foaming was conducted in two ways, firstly using the existing water content in the material as the blowing agent and secondly by adding sodium bicarbonate. When processed in a twin screw extruder (L/D 25 and 10 mm die) the material readily expanded due to the internal moisture content alone, with a conditioned expansion ratio of up to ± 0.13. Cell structure was non-uniform exhibiting a broad range cell sizes at various stages of formation with some coalescence. The cell size reduced through the addition of sodium bicarbonate, overall more cells were observed and the structure was more uniform, however ruptured cells were also visible on the extrudate skin. Increasing die temperature and introducing water cooling reduced cell size, but the increased die temperature resulted in surface degradation.

  15. The analysis of thermoplastic characteristics of special polymer sulfur composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Książek, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Specific chemical environments step out in the industry objects. Portland cement composites (concrete and mortar) were impregnated by using the special polymerized sulfur and technical soot as a filler (polymer sulfur composite). Sulfur and technical soot was applied as the industrial waste. Portland cement composites were made of the same aggregate, cement and water. The process of special polymer sulfur composite applied as the industrial waste is a thermal treatment process in the temperature of about 150-155°C. The result of such treatment is special polymer sulfur composite in a liquid state. This paper presents the plastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of special polymer sulfur composites, with isotropic porous matrix, reinforced by disoriented ellipsoidal inclusions with orthotropic symmetry of the thermoplastic properties. The investigations are based on the stochastic differential equations of solid mechanics. A model and algorithm for calculating the effective characteristics of special polymer sulfur composites are suggested. The effective thermoplastic characteristics of special polymer sulfur composites, with disoriented ellipsoidal inclusions, are calculated in two stages: First, the properties of materials with oriented inclusions are determined, and then effective constants of a composite with disoriented inclusions are determined on the basis of the Voigt or Rice scheme. A brief summary of new products related to special polymer sulfur composites is given as follows: Impregnation, repair, overlays and precast polymer concrete will be presented. Special polymer sulfur as polymer coating impregnation, which has received little attention in recent years, currently has some very interesting applications.

  16. Sustainable Triblock Copolymers for Application as Thermoplastic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenyue; Wang, Shu; Ganewatta, Mitra; Tang, Chuanbing; Robertson, Megan

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), combining the processing advantages of thermoplastics with the flexibility and extensibility of elastomeric materials, have found versatile applications in industry, including electronics, clothing, adhesives, and automotive components. ABA triblock copolymers, in which A represents glassy endblocks and B the rubbery midblock, are commercially available as TPEs, such as poly(styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (SBS) or poly(styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene) (SIS). However, the commercial TPEs are derived from fossil fuels. The finite availability of fossil fuels and the environmental impact of the petroleum manufacturing have led to the increased interest in the development of alternative polymeric materials from sustainable sources. Rosin acids are promising replacement for the petroleum source due to their abundance in conifers, rigid molecular structures, and ease of functionalization. In this study, we explored the utilization of a rosin acid derivative, poly(dehydroabietic ethyl methacrylate) (PDAEMA), as a sustainable alternative for the glassy domain. The triblock copolymer poly(dehydroabietic ethyl methacrylate-b-n-butyl acylate-b-dehydroabietic ethyl methacrylate) (DnBD) was synthesized and characterized. DnBD exhibited tunable morphological and thermal properties. Tensile testing revealed elastomeric behavior.

  17. Thermoplastic processing of proteins for film formation--a review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Izquierdo, V M; Krochta, J M

    2008-03-01

    Increasing interest in high-quality food products with increased shelf life and reduced environmental impact has encouraged the study and development of edible and/or biodegradable polymer films and coatings. Edible films provide the opportunity to effectively control mass transfer among different components in a food or between the food and its surrounding environment. The diversity of proteins that results from an almost limitless number of side-chain amino-acid sequential arrangements allows for a wide range of interactions and chemical reactions to take place as proteins denature and cross-link during heat processing. Proteins such as wheat gluten, corn zein, soy protein, myofibrillar proteins, and whey proteins have been successfully formed into films using thermoplastic processes such as compression molding and extrusion. Thermoplastic processing can result in a highly efficient manufacturing method with commercial potential for large-scale production of edible films due to the low moisture levels, high temperatures, and short times used. Addition of water, glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, and other plasticizers allows the proteins to undergo the glass transition and facilitates deformation and processability without thermal degradation. Target film variables, important in predicting biopackage performance under various conditions, include mechanical, thermal, barrier, and microstructural properties. Comparisons of film properties should be made with care since results depend on parameters such as film-forming materials, film formulation, fabrication method, operating conditions, testing equipment, and testing conditions. Film applications include their use as wraps, pouches, bags, casings, and sachets to protect foods, reduce waste, and improve package recyclability.

  18. Fly ash reinforced thermoplastic vulcanizates obtained from waste tire powder.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, V; Xiu, Zhang Zhen; Xu, Deng; Lee, Sung Hyo; Kim, Jin Kuk; Kang, Dong Jin; Bang, Dae-Suk

    2009-03-01

    Novel thermoplastic composites made from two major industrial and consumer wastes, fly ash and waste tire powder, have been developed. The effect of increasing fly ash loadings on performance characteristics such as tensile strength, thermal, dynamic mechanical and magnetic properties has been investigated. The morphology of the blends shows that fly ash particles have more affinity and adhesion towards the rubbery phase when compared to the plastic phase. The fracture surface of the composites shows extensive debonding of fly ash particles. Thermal analysis of the composites shows a progressive increase in activation energy with increase in fly ash loadings. Additionally, morphological studies of the ash residue after 90% thermal degradation shows extensive changes occurring in both the polymer and filler phases. The processing ability of the thermoplastics has been carried out in a Monsanto processability testing machine as a function of shear rate and temperature. Shear thinning behavior, typical of particulate polymer systems, has been observed irrespective of the testing temperatures. Magnetic properties and percolation behavior of the composites have also been evaluated.

  19. Investigations on laser transmission welding of absorber-free thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander; Britten, Simon W.; Engelmann, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Within the plastic industry laser transmission welding ranks among the most important joining techniques and opens up new application areas continuously. So far, a big disadvantage of the process was the fact that the joining partners need different optical properties. Since thermoplastics are transparent for the radiation of conventional beam sources (800- 1100 nm) the absorbance of one of the joining partners has to be enhanced by adding an infrared absorber (IR-absorber). Until recently, welding of absorber-free parts has not been possible. New diode lasers provide a broad variety of wavelengths which allows exploiting intrinsic absorption bands of thermoplastics. The use of a proper wavelength in combination with special optics enables laser welding of two optically identical polymer parts without absorbers which can be utilized in a large number of applications primarily in the medical and food industry, where the use of absorbers usually entails costly and time-consuming authorization processes. In this paper some aspects of the process are considered as the influence of the focal position, which is crucial when both joining partners have equal optical properties. After a theoretical consideration, an evaluation is carried out based on welding trials with polycarbonate (PC). Further aspects such as gap bridging capability and the influence of thickness of the upper joining partner are investigated as well.

  20. Durability of one-part polyurethane bonds to wood improved by HMR coupling agent

    Treesearch

    Charles B. Vick; E. Arnold Okkonen

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study on the strength and durability of a new class of wood adhesives called one-part polyurethanes, four commercial one-part polyurethanes, along with a resorcinol-formaldehyde adhesive representing a standard of performance, were compared in bonds to yellow birch and Douglas-fir in a series of industry-accepted tests (7). The polyurethanes all performed...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8079 - Isophorone diisocyanate neopentyl glycol adipate polyurethane prepolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... glycol adipate polyurethane prepolymer. 721.8079 Section 721.8079 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... adipate polyurethane prepolymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1... polyurethane prepolymer (PMN P-94-1743) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1294 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions. 63.1294 Section 63.1294 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1294 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a new...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or... polyurethane foam process, with the following exception. Diisocyanates may be used to flush the mixhead and...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1294 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions. 63.1294 Section 63.1294 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1294 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a new...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1294 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions. 63.1294 Section 63.1294 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1294 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—diisocyanate emissions. Each new and existing slabstock affected source shall comply...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1294 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions. 63.1294 Section 63.1294 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1294 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1294 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-diisocyanate emissions. 63.1294 Section 63.1294 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1294 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—diisocyanate emissions. Each new and existing slabstock affected source shall comply...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a new...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or... polyurethane foam process, with the following exception. Diisocyanates may be used to flush the mixhead and...

  17. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40-50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  18. Dielectric Characterization of PCL-Based Thermoplastic Materials for Microwave Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Shea, Jacob D.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of a polycaprolactone (PCL)-based thermoplastic mesh as a tissue-immobilization interface for microwave imaging and microwave hyperthermia treatment. An investigation of the dielectric properties of two PCL-based thermoplastic materials in the frequency range of 0.5 – 3.5 GHz is presented. The frequency-dependent dielectric constant and effective conductivity of the PCL-based thermoplastics are characterized using measurements of microstrip transmission lines fabricated on substrates comprised of the thermoplastic meshes. We also examine the impact of the presence of a PCL-based thermoplastic mesh on microwave breast imaging. We use a numerical test bed comprised of a previously reported three-dimensional anatomically realistic breast phantom and a multi-frequency microwave inverse scattering algorithm. We demonstrate that the PCL-based thermoplastic material and the assumed biocompatible medium of vegetable oil are sufficiently well matched such that the PCL layer may be neglected by the imaging solution without sacrificing imaging quality. Our results suggest that PCL-based thermoplastics are promising materials as tissue immobilization structures for microwave diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21622068

  19. Impact fragmentation of polyurethane and polypropylene cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Daisuke; Preechasupanya, Worrayut; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    The impact fragmentation of a bulk polyurethane elastomer (PU) and polypropylene (PP) cylinder have been investigated using a Cu plate projectile launched by a propellant gun at a velocity of 0.53-1.4 km/s. A projectile drills into a PU sample and forms a cavity in the sample. A small number of tiny fragments are formed. When the projectile smashes in at 1.4 km/s, the PU cylinder bursts and PU fragments form. On the other hand, a brittle fracture occurs on the PP cylinder. The mass of fragments from the PU sample generated at a lower impact velocity is distributed in the lognormal form, whereas the mass of fragments from the PU sample generated by a 1.4 km/s impact follows a power-law distribution. The fragment mass distribution of the PP sample generated at a lower impact velocity obeys the power-law form, whereas that generated at a higher impact velocity follows the lognormal form.

  20. Design and Synthesis of Waterborne Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo-Young; Ji, Zhaoxia; Tseng, Ling-Fang; Turner, Sara A; Villanueva, Dinara A; Johnson, Rhiannon; Albano, Ariana; Langer, Robert

    2018-05-01

    Waterborne polyurethanes (WBPUs) have attracted increasing attention in a wide range of industrial applications because of their versatile properties as well as ecofriendly nature. Although extensive research has been carried out on WBPU synthesis, the roles of some of the key synthesis components remain unclear. In this study, through systematically controlling and fine tuning the precursor compositions and reaction conditions, over 300 WBPUs are synthesized. This research enables the roles of several key components that govern WBPU physicochemical properties and ultimately the potential WBPU applications to be identified. Using hair styling as an example, it is demonstrated that only the WBPUs with an optimal range of properties (e.g., Young's modulus >150 MPa, elongation at break: 15-300%, moisture uptake <10%) can achieve strong styling performance. To further improve the natural-feel sensory benefits in the final styling products, a number of fatty acids with different carbon chain lengths or unsaturation levels are incorporated into WBPUs. Among the ten fatty acids studied, linoleic acid is identified as the most preferred additive. Both in vitro and in vivo testing demonstrate that WBPUs with optimal properties are promising materials for developing strong, long-lasting styling products with natural feel. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  2. Biodegradation of Polyester Polyurethane by Endophytic Fungi▿

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jonathan R.; Huang, Jeffrey; Anand, Pria; Kucera, Kaury; Sandoval, Amanda G.; Dantzler, Kathleen W.; Hickman, DaShawn; Jee, Justin; Kimovec, Farrah M.; Koppstein, David; Marks, Daniel H.; Mittermiller, Paul A.; Núñez, Salvador Joel; Santiago, Marina; Townes, Maria A.; Vishnevetsky, Michael; Williams, Neely E.; Vargas, Mario Percy Núñez; Boulanger, Lori-Ann; Bascom-Slack, Carol; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Bioremediation is an important approach to waste reduction that relies on biological processes to break down a variety of pollutants. This is made possible by the vast metabolic diversity of the microbial world. To explore this diversity for the breakdown of plastic, we screened several dozen endophytic fungi for their ability to degrade the synthetic polymer polyester polyurethane (PUR). Several organisms demonstrated the ability to efficiently degrade PUR in both solid and liquid suspensions. Particularly robust activity was observed among several isolates in the genus Pestalotiopsis, although it was not a universal feature of this genus. Two Pestalotiopsis microspora isolates were uniquely able to grow on PUR as the sole carbon source under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Molecular characterization of this activity suggests that a serine hydrolase is responsible for degradation of PUR. The broad distribution of activity observed and the unprecedented case of anaerobic growth using PUR as the sole carbon source suggest that endophytes are a promising source of biodiversity from which to screen for metabolic properties useful for bioremediation. PMID:21764951

  3. Thermal performance of aircraft polyurethane seat cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were conducted on 7.6 x 7.6 cm samples of polyurethane seat cushion material in a modified National Bureau of Standards smoke density chamber to simulate real life conditions for an onboard aircraft fire or post-crash fire. In this study, a non-flaming heat radiation condition was simulated. Two aluminized polymeric fabrics (Norfab 11HT-26-A and Preox 1100-4) and one neoprene type material in two thicknesses (Vonar 2 and 3) were tested as heat blocking layers to protect the urethane foam from rapid heat degradation. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to characterize thermally the materials tested. It was found that Vonar 2 or 3 provided approximately equal thermal protection to F.R. urethane as the aluminized fabrics, but at a significant weight penalty. The efficiency of the foams to absorb heat per unit mass loss when protected with the heat blocking layer decreases in the heating range of 2.5-5.0 W/sq cm, but remains unchanged or slightly increases in the range of 5.0-7.5 W/sq cm. The results show that at all heat flux ranges tested the usage of a heat blocking layer in aircraft seats significantly improves their thermal performance.

  4. Melt electrospinning of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Karchin, Ari; Simonovsky, Felix I.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Sanders, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning from the melt, in contrast to from solution, is an attractive tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing process as it allows for the formation of small diameter fibers while eliminating potentially cytotoxic solvents. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on scaffold formation via melt electrospinning. This is likely due to the technical challenges related to the need for a well-controlled high temperature setup and the difficulty in developing an appropriate polymer. In this paper, a biodegradable and thermally stable polyurethane (PU) is described specifically for use in melt electrospinning. Polymer formulations of aliphatic PUs based on (CH2)4-content diisocyanates, polycaprolactone (PCL), 1,4-butanediamine and 1,4-butanediol (BD) were evaluated for utility in the melt electrospinning process. The final polymer formulation, a catalyst-purified PU based on 1,4-butane diisocyanate, PCL and BD in a 4/1/3 molar ratio with a weight-average molecular weight of about 40 kDa, yielded a nontoxic polymer that could be readily electrospun from the melt. Scaffolds electrospun from this polymer contained point bonds between fibers and mechanical properties analogous to many in vivo soft tissues. PMID:21640853

  5. Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jonathan R; Huang, Jeffrey; Anand, Pria; Kucera, Kaury; Sandoval, Amanda G; Dantzler, Kathleen W; Hickman, DaShawn; Jee, Justin; Kimovec, Farrah M; Koppstein, David; Marks, Daniel H; Mittermiller, Paul A; Núñez, Salvador Joel; Santiago, Marina; Townes, Maria A; Vishnevetsky, Michael; Williams, Neely E; Vargas, Mario Percy Núñez; Boulanger, Lori-Ann; Bascom-Slack, Carol; Strobel, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    Bioremediation is an important approach to waste reduction that relies on biological processes to break down a variety of pollutants. This is made possible by the vast metabolic diversity of the microbial world. To explore this diversity for the breakdown of plastic, we screened several dozen endophytic fungi for their ability to degrade the synthetic polymer polyester polyurethane (PUR). Several organisms demonstrated the ability to efficiently degrade PUR in both solid and liquid suspensions. Particularly robust activity was observed among several isolates in the genus Pestalotiopsis, although it was not a universal feature of this genus. Two Pestalotiopsis microspora isolates were uniquely able to grow on PUR as the sole carbon source under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Molecular characterization of this activity suggests that a serine hydrolase is responsible for degradation of PUR. The broad distribution of activity observed and the unprecedented case of anaerobic growth using PUR as the sole carbon source suggest that endophytes are a promising source of biodiversity from which to screen for metabolic properties useful for bioremediation.

  6. Sub-second thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses by ultrasonic beating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiang; Liang, Xiong; Wu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Gong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The work proposed a novel thermoplastic forming approach–the ultrasonic beating forming (UBF) method for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) in present work. The rapid forming approach can finish the thermoplastic forming of BMGs in less than one second, avoiding the time-dependent crystallization and oxidation to the most extent. Besides, the UBF is also proved to be competent in the fabrication of structures with the length scale ranging from macro scale to nano scale. Our results propose a novel route for the thermoplastic forming of BMGs and have promising applications in the rapid fabrication of macro to nano scale products and devices. PMID:26644149

  7. Analytical and experimental evaluation of techniques for the fabrication of thermoplastic hologram storage devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on recording information on thermoplastic are given. A description was given of a typical fabrication configuration, the recording sequence, and the samples which were examined. There are basically three configurations which can be used for the recording of information on thermoplastic. The most popular technique uses corona which furnishes free charge. The necessary energy for deformation is derived from a charge layer atop the thermoplastic. The other two techniques simply use a dc potential in place of the corona for deformation energy.

  8. High performance thermoplastics: A review of neat resin and composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Norman J.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    A review was made of the principal thermoplastics used to fabricate high performance composites. Neat resin tensile and fracture toughness properties, glass transition temperatures (Tg), crystalline melt temperatures (Tm) and approximate processing conditions are presented. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites made from many of these thermoplastics are given, including flexural, longitudinal tensile, transverse tensile and in-plane shear properties as well as short beam shear and compressive strengths and interlaminar fracture toughness. Attractive features and problems involved in the use of thermo-plastics as matrices for high performance composites are discussed.

  9. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line in...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line in...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line in...

  12. Electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. T., Jr.

    1982-08-01

    The electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam, used for electronic encapsulation, was measured during thermal decomposition to 3400 C. At higher temperatures the conductance continues to increase. With pressure loaded electrical leads, sample softening results in eventual contact between electrodes which produces electrical shorting. Air and nitrogen environments show no significant dependence of the conductivity on the atmosphere over the temperature range. The insulating characteristics of polyurethane foam below approx. 2700 C are similar to those for silicone based materials used for electronic case housings and are better than those for phenolics. At higher temperatures (greater than or equal to 2700 C) the phenolics appear to be better insulators to approx. 5000 C and the silicones to approx. 6000 C. It is concluded that the Sylgard 184/GMB encapsulant is a significantly better insulator at high temperature than the rigid polyurethane foam.

  13. Alginate based polyurethanes: A review of recent advances and perspective.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zia, Fatima; Zuber, Mohammad; Rehman, Saima; Ahmad, Mirza Nadeem

    2015-08-01

    The trend of using biopolymers in combination with synthetic polymers was increasing rapidly from last two or three decades. Polysaccharide based biopolymers especially starch, cellulose, chitin, chitosan, alginate, etc. found extensive applications for different industrial uses, as they are biocompatible, biodegradable, bio-renewable resources and chiefly environment friendly. Segment block copolymer character of polyurethanes that endows them a broad range of versatility in terms of tailoring their properties was employed in conjunction with various natural polymers resulted in modified biomaterials. Alginate is biodegradable, biocompatible, bioactive, less toxic and low cost anionic polysaccharide, as a part of structural component of bacteria and brown algae (sea weed) is quite abundant in nature. It is used in combination with polyurethanes to form elastomers, nano-composites, hydrogels, etc. that especially revolutionized the food and biomedical industries. The review summarized the development in alginate based polyurethanes with their potential applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Starch based polyurethanes: A critical review updating recent literature.

    PubMed

    Zia, Fatima; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Kamal, Shagufta; Aslam, Nosheen

    2015-12-10

    Recent advancements in material science and technology made it obvious that use of renewable feed stock is the need of hour. Polymer industry steadily moved to get rid of its dependence on non-renewable resources. Starch, the second largest occurring biomass (renewable) on this planet provides a cheap and eco-friendly way to form huge variety of materials on blending with other biodegradable polymers. Specific structural versatility design for individual application and tailor-made properties have established the polyurethane (PU) as an important and popular class of synthetic biodegradable polymers. Blending of starch with polyurethane is relatively a developing area in PU chemistry but with lot of attraction for researchers. Herein, various starch based polyurethane materials including blends, grafts, copolymers, composites and nano-composites, as well as the prospects and latest developments are discussed. Additionally, an overview of starch based polymeric materials, including their potential applications are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by polyurethane-immobilized Flavobacterium cells.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, K T; Crawford, R L

    1989-01-01

    Polyurethane-immobilized Flavobacterium cells (ATCC 39723) degraded pentachlorophenol (PCP) at initial concentrations as high as 300 mg liter-1. The reversible binding of PCP to the polyurethane was shown to be important in the protection of the cells from inhibition of PCP degradation. The degradation activity of the bacteria was monitored for 150 days in semicontinuous batch reactors. The degradation rate dropped by about 0.6% per day. PCP was degraded in a continuous-culture bioreactor at a rate of 3.5 to 4 mg g of foam-1 day-1 for 25 days. Electron micrographs of the polyurethane suggested that the cells were entrapped within 50- to 500-microns-diameter pockets in the foam. PMID:2508552

  16. Some physical and mechanical properties of recycled polyurethane foam blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bledzki, A. K.; Zicans, J.; Merijs Meri, R.; Kardasz, D.

    2008-09-01

    Blends of secondary rigid polyurethane foams (RPUFs) with soft polyurethane foams (SPUFs) were investigated. The effect of SPUF content and its chemical nature on some physical and mechanical properties of the blends was evaluated. Owing to the stronger intermolecular interaction and higher values of cohesion energy, the blends of RPUFs with polyester SPUFs showed higher mechanical properties than those with polyether SPUFs. The density, hardness, ultimate strength, and the tensile, shear, and flexural moduli increased, while the impact toughness, ultimate elongation, and damping characteristics decreased with increasing RPUF content in the blends.

  17. Electrically conductive polyurethanes for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles M.; Nash, M. A.; Poole-Warren, Laura A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical interfacing with neural tissue poses significant problems due to host response to the material. This response generally leads to fibrous encapsulation and increased impedance across the electrode. In neural electrodes such as cochlear implants, an elastomeric material like silicone is used as an insulator for the metal electrode. This project ultimately aims to produce a polymer electrode with elastomeric mechanical properties, metal like conductivity and capability. The approach taken was to produce a nanocomposite elastomeric material based on polyurethane (PU) and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are ideal due to their high aspect ratio as well as being a ballistic conductor. The choice of PU is based on its elastomeric properties, processability and biocompatibility. Multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) were dispersed ultrasonically in various dispersive solutions before being added at up to 20wt% to a 5wt% PU (Pellethane80A) in Dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Films were then solvent cast in a vacuum oven overnight. The resulting films were tested for conductivity using a two-probe technique and mechanically tested using an Instron tensiometer. The percolation threshold (p) of the PU/MWNT films occurred at loadings of between 7 and 10 wt% in this polymer system. Conductivity of the films (above p) was comparable to those for similar systems reported in the literature at up to approximately 7x10-2 Scm-1. Although PU stiffness increased with increased %loading of nanotubes, all composites were highly flexible and maintained elastomeric properties. From these preliminary results we have demonstrated electrical conductivity. So far it is evident that a superior percolation threshold is dependent on the degree of dispersion of the nanotubes. This has prompted work into investigating other preparations of the films, including melt-processing and electrospinning.

  18. Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by Aspergillus tubingensis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sehroon; Nadir, Sadia; Shah, Zia Ullah; Shah, Aamer Ali; Karunarathna, Samantha C; Xu, Jianchu; Khan, Afsar; Munir, Shahzad; Hasan, Fariha

    2017-06-01

    The xenobiotic nature and lack of degradability of polymeric materials has resulted in vast levels of environmental pollution and numerous health hazards. Different strategies have been developed and still more research is being in progress to reduce the impact of these polymeric materials. This work aimed to isolate and characterize polyester polyurethane (PU) degrading fungi from the soil of a general city waste disposal site in Islamabad, Pakistan. A novel PU degrading fungus was isolated from soil and identified as Aspergillus tubingensis on the basis of colony morphology, macro- and micro-morphology, molecular and phylogenetic analyses. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways in the presence of 2% glucose: (a) on SDA agar plate, (b) in liquid MSM, and (c) after burial in soil. Our results indicated that this strain of A. tubingensis was capable of degrading PU. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we were able to visually confirm that the mycelium of A. tubingensis colonized the PU material, causing surface degradation and scarring. The formation or breakage of chemical bonds during the biodegradation process of PU was confirmed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The biodegradation of PU was higher when plate culture method was employed, followed by the liquid culture method and soil burial technique. Notably, after two months in liquid medium, the PU film was totally degraded into smaller pieces. Based on a comprehensive literature search, it can be stated that this is the first report showing A. tubingensis capable of degrading PU. This work provides insight into the role of A. tubingensis towards solving the dilemma of PU wastes through biodegradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuous welding of unidirectional fiber reinforced thermoplastic tape material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schledjewski, Ralf

    2017-10-01

    Continuous welding techniques like thermoplastic tape placement with in situ consolidation offer several advantages over traditional manufacturing processes like autoclave consolidation, thermoforming, etc. However, still there is a need to solve several important processing issues before it becomes a viable economic process. Intensive process analysis and optimization has been carried out in the past through experimental investigation, model definition and simulation development. Today process simulation is capable to predict resulting consolidation quality. Effects of material imperfections or process parameter variations are well known. But using this knowledge to control the process based on online process monitoring and according adaption of the process parameters is still challenging. Solving inverse problems and using methods for automated code generation allowing fast implementation of algorithms on targets are required. The paper explains the placement technique in general. Process-material-property-relationships and typical material imperfections are described. Furthermore, online monitoring techniques and how to use them for a model based process control system are presented.

  20. Water-Assisted Production of Thermoplastic Nanocomposites: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Karger-Kocsis, József; Kmetty, Ákos; Lendvai, László; Drakopoulos, Stavros X.; Bárány, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Water-assisted, or more generally liquid-mediated, melt compounding of nanocomposites is basically a combination of solution-assisted and traditional melt mixing methods. It is an emerging technique to overcome several disadvantages of the above two. Water or aqueous liquids with additives, do not work merely as temporary carrier materials of suitable nanofillers. During batchwise and continuous compounding, these liquids are fully or partly evaporated. In the latter case, the residual liquid is working as a plasticizer. This processing technique contributes to a better dispersion of the nanofillers and affects markedly the morphology and properties of the resulting nanocomposites. A survey is given below on the present praxis and possible future developments of water-assisted melt mixing techniques for the production of thermoplastic nanocomposites. PMID:28787925

  1. Biodegradation of thermoplastic starch/eggshell powder composites.

    PubMed

    Bootklad, Munlika; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2013-09-12

    Thermoplastic starch (TPS) was prepared using compression molding and chicken eggshell was used as a filler. The effect of the eggshell powder (EP) on the properties of TPS was compared with the effect of commercial calcium carbonate (CC). The organic compound on the surface of the eggshell powder acted as a coupling agent that resulted in a strong adhesion between the eggshell powder and the TPS matrix, as confirmed by SEM micrographs. The biodegradation was determined by the soil burial test. The TPS/EP composites were more rapidly degraded than the TPS/CC composites. In addition, the eggshell powder improved the water resistance and thermal stability of the TPS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design and Synthesis of Multigraft Copolymer Thermoplastic Elastomers: Superelastomers

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Huiqun; Lu, Wei; Wang, Weiyu; ...

    2017-09-28

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) have been widely studied because of their recyclability, good processibility, low production cost, and unique performance. The building of graft-type architectures can greatly improve mechanical properties of TPEs. This review focuses on the advances in different approaches to synthesize multigraft copolymer TPEs. Anionic polymerization techniques allow for the synthesis of well-defined macromolecular structures and compositions, with great control over the molecular weight, polydispersity, branch spacing, number of branch points, and branch point functionality. Progress in emulsion polymerization offers potential approaches to commercialize these types of materials with low production cost via simple operations. Moreover, the use ofmore » multigraft architecturesprovides a solution to the limited elongational properties of all-acrylic TPEs, which can greatly expand their potential application range. The combination of different polymerization techniques, the introduction of new chemical compositions, and the incorporation of sustainable sources are expected to be further investigated in this area in coming years.« less

  3. Water-Assisted Production of Thermoplastic Nanocomposites: A Review.

    PubMed

    Karger-Kocsis, József; Kmetty, Ákos; Lendvai, László; Drakopoulos, Stavros X; Bárány, Tamás

    2014-12-29

    Water-assisted, or more generally liquid-mediated, melt compounding of nanocomposites is basically a combination of solution-assisted and traditional melt mixing methods. It is an emerging technique to overcome several disadvantages of the above two. Water or aqueous liquids with additives, do not work merely as temporary carrier materials of suitable nanofillers. During batchwise and continuous compounding, these liquids are fully or partly evaporated. In the latter case, the residual liquid is working as a plasticizer. This processing technique contributes to a better dispersion of the nanofillers and affects markedly the morphology and properties of the resulting nanocomposites. A survey is given below on the present praxis and possible future developments of water-assisted melt mixing techniques for the production of thermoplastic nanocomposites.

  4. Thermochemical characterization of some thermally stable thermoplastic and thermoset polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability properties of some thermally stable polymers considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied include: (1) thermomechanical properties such as glass transition and melt temperature; (2) dynamic thermogravimetric analysis in anaerobic environment; (3) flammability properties such as oxygen index, flame spread, and smoke evolution; and (4) selected physical properties. The thermoplastic polymers evaluated include polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) and polyether sulfone. The thermoset polymers evaluated include epoxy, bismaleimide, a modified phenolic, and polyaromatic melamine resin. These resins were primarily used in the fabrication of glass-reinforced prepregs for the construction of experimental panels. Test results and relative rankings of some of the flammability parameters are presented, and the relationship of the molecular structure, char yield, and flammability properties of these polymers are discussed.

  5. Tape Placement Head for Applying Thermoplastic Tape to an Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, Ralph D. (Inventor); Funck, Steve B. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor); Lamontia, Mark A. (Inventor); Johnson, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A tape placement head for applying thermoplastic tape to an object includes a heated feeder which guides the tape/tow to a heated zone. The heated zone has a line compactor having a single row of at least one movable heated member. An area compactor is located in the heated zone downstream from the line compactor. The area compactor includes a plurality of rows of movable feet which are extendable toward the tape/tow different distances with respect to each other to conform to the shape of the object. A shim is located between the heated compactors and the tape/tow. A chilled compactor is in a chilled zone downstream from the heated zone. The chilled zone includes a line chilled compactor and an area chilled compactor. A chilled shim is mounted between the chilled compactor and the tape/tow.

  6. An automated technique for manufacturing thermoplastic stringers in continuous length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Baxevani, E.; Spelz, U.

    In the present work an automated Continuous Compression Moulding Technique for the manufacture of stringers in continuous length is presented. The method combines pultrusion and hot-pressing. The technique is utilized for the production of L-shape stringers which are widely applied in aerospace constructions. The investigation was carried out on carbon reinforced PEEK (C/PEEK), as well as, for comparison, on the thermoplastic composites carbon reinforced polyethersulfon (C/PES), glass and carbon reinforced polyphenylene-sulfide (G/PPS, C/PPS) and Kevlar reinforced Polyamide 6 (K/PA 6). For the materials investigated the optimized process parameters for manufacturing the L-shape stringers were derived experimentally. To achieve this goal, the quality of the produced parts was controlled by using non-destructive testing techniques. Parts providing satisfactory quality were also tested destructively to measure their mechanical properties. The investigation results have shown the suitability of the technique to produce continuous length stringers.

  7. Characteristics of Thermoplastic Potato Starch/Bentonite Nanocomposite Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, N. H.; Muhammad, N.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Sandu, I. G.; Wan, C. L. Mei

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of bentonite towards thermoplastic potato starch nanocomposite films on the mechanical, microstructure and physical properties. The nanocomposite films were prepared using bentonite nano filler (0, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) through solution casting technique. Obtained result indicate that, tensile strength increased significantly with increasing bentonite content and the highest tensile strength was recorded for nanocomposite film with 20% bentonite content. Meanwhile, elongation at break increased as the bentonite content increased from 0 to 15%, however significantly decreased at 20% bentonite content due to ductile structure and anti-plasticizing effect. Besides, good dispersion between bentonite nano filler and starch matrix with slightly remaining anglomerates was evident in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image. Overall result shows that the addition of bentonite nano filler in potato starch film significantly influenced the properties of the films.

  8. High-pressure needle interface for thermoplastic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Liu, J; Hromada, L P; Tsao, C W; Chang, C C; DeVoe, D L

    2009-01-07

    A robust and low dead volume world-to-chip interface for thermoplastic microfluidics has been developed. The high pressure fluidic port employs a stainless steel needle inserted into a mating hole aligned to an embedded microchannel, with an interference fit used to increase pressure resistance. Alternately, a self-tapping threaded needle screwed into a mating hole is also demonstrated. In both cases, the flat bottom needle ports seat directly against the microchannel substrate, ensuring low interfacial dead volumes. Low dispersion is observed for dye bands passing the interfaces. The needle ports offer sufficient pull-out forces for applications such as liquid chromatography that require high internal fluid pressures, with the epoxy-free interfaces compatible with internal microchannel pressures above 40 MPa.

  9. Thermoplastic microchannel fabrication using carbon dioxide laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Lee, Chia-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-Ping

    2006-04-14

    We report the procedures of machining microchannels on Vivak co-polyester thermoplastic substrates using a simple industrial CO(2) laser marker. To avoid overheating the substrates, we develop low-power marking techniques in nearly anaerobic environment. These procedures are able to machine microchannels at various aspect ratios. Either straight or serpent channel can be easily marked. Like the wire-embossed channel walls, the ablated channel surfaces become charged after alkaline hydrolysis treatment. Stable electroosmotic flow in the charged conduit is observed to be of the same order of magnitude as that in fused silica capillary. Typical dynamic coating protocols to alter the conduit surface properties are transferable to the ablated channels. The effects of buffer acidity on electroosmotic mobility in both bare and coated channels are similar to those in fused silica capillaries. Using video microscopy we also demonstrate that this device is useful in distinguishing the electrophoretic mobility of bare and latex particles from that of functionalized ones.

  10. Effect of supramolecular structures on thermoplastic zein-lignin bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Maria; Verdolotti, Letizia; Di Maio, Ernesto; Aurilia, Marco; Iannace, Salvatore

    2011-09-28

    The effect of alkaline lignin (AL) and sodium lignosulfonate (LSS) on the structure of thermoplastic zein (TPZ) was studied. Protein structural changes and the nature of the physical interaction between lignin and zein were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and correlated with physical properties. Most relevant protein structural changes were observed at low AL concentration, where strong H-bondings between the functional groups of AL and the amino acids in zein induced a destructuring of inter- and intramolecular interactions in α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn secondary structures. This destructuring allowed for an extensive protein conformational modification which, in turn, resulted in a strong improvement of the physical properties of the bionanocomposite.

  11. Instability-related delamination growth in thermoset and thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Carlsson, Leif A.; Rothschilds, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Mixed-mode crack propagation in compressively loaded thermoset and thermoplastic composite columns with an imbedded through-width delamination is investigated. Beam theory is used to analyze the geometrically nonlinear load-deformation relationship of the delaminated subregion. The elastic restraint model (ERM), combined with existing FSM modeling of the crack-tip region, yields expressions for the Mode I and Mode II components of the strain energy release rate G(I) and G(II) to predict the critical load at the onset of delamination growth. Experimental data were generated for geometries yielding a wide range of G(I)/G(II) ratios at the onset of crack growth. A linear mixed-mode crack growth criterion in conjunctuion with the ERM provides good agreement between predicted and measured critical loads for both materials studied.

  12. Diode Laser Assisted Filament Winding of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Squeo, Erica Anna; Prosperi, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A new consolidation method for the laser-assisted filament winding of thermoplastic prepregs is discussed: for the first time a diode laser is used, as well as long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene prepregs. A consolidation apparatus was built by means of a CNC motion table, a stepper motor and a simple tensioner. Preliminary tests were performed in a hoop winding configuration: only the winding speed was changed, and all the other process parameters (laser power, distance from the laser focus, consolidation force) were kept constant. Small wound rings with an internal diameter of 25 mm were produced and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the composite agglomeration in dependence of the winding speed. At lower winding speeds, a strong interpenetration of adjacent layers was observed.

  13. A review of recent developments in joining high-performance thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, K. C.

    1991-06-01

    There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of thermoplastic polymers as matrices in fiber reinforced composites for high performance applications, such as those encountered in the aerospace industry. These materials include polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), polyetherimide (PEI), polyamideimide (PAI), polyamides, polyimides, and polysulphones. A literature review is provided on the different ways of joining high performance thermoplastic composites by adhesive and fusion bonding. The discussion on adhesive bonding includes examination of the performance of specific adhesive/thermoplastic combinations and of techniques for the preparation of composite surfaces: abrasion, etching, flame, and plasma treatments. Thermoplastic composite welding techniques discussed in depth include the following: heated press welding, resistance welding, induction welding, and ultrasonic welding. Works which examine or compare applications for these bonding techniques are also reviewed.

  14. Damage healing ability of a shape-memory-polymer-based particulate composite with small thermoplastic contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nji, Jones; Li, Guoqiang

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of a shape-memory-polymer (SMP)-based particulate composite to heal structural-length scale damage with small thermoplastic additive contents through a close-then-heal (CTH) self-healing scheme that was introduced in a previous study (Li and Uppu 2010 Comput. Sci. Technol. 70 1419-27). The idea is to achieve reasonable healing efficiencies with minimal sacrifice in structural load capacity. By first closing cracks, the gap between two crack surfaces is narrowed and a lesser amount of thermoplastic particles is required to achieve healing. The particulate composite was fabricated by dispersing copolyester thermoplastic particles in a shape memory polymer matrix. It is found that, for small thermoplastic contents of less than 10%, the CTH scheme followed in this study heals structural-length scale damage in the SMP particulate composite to a meaningful extent and with less sacrifice of structural capacity.

  15. Thermosetting epoxy resin/thermoplastic system with combined shape memory and self-healing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Wang, Jingjie; Lu, Haibao; Xu, Ben; Fu, Yongqing; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile strategy was proposed to construct a thermosetting/thermoplastic system with both shape memory and self-healing properties based on commercial epoxy resin and poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-PCL. Thermoplastic material is capable of re-structuring and changing the stiffness/modulus when the temperature is above melting temperature. PCL microfiber was used as a plasticizer in epoxy resin-based blends, and served as a ‘hard segment’ to fix a temporary shape of the composites during shape memory cycles. In this study, the electrospun PCL membrane with a porous network structure enabled a homogenous PCL fibrous distribution and optimized interaction between fiber and epoxy resin. The self-healing capability is achieved by phase transition during curing of the composites. The mechanism of the shape memory effect of the thermosetting (rubber)/thermoplastic composite is attributed to the structural design of the thermoplastic network inside the thermosetting resin/rubber matrix.

  16. Plastic wastes as modifiers of the thermoplasticity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Diez; C. Barriocanal; R. Alvarez

    2005-12-01

    Plastic waste recycling represents a major challenge in environmental protection with different routes now available for dealing with mechanical, chemical, and energy recycling. New concepts in plastic waste recycling have emerged so that now such wastes can be used to replace fossil fuels, either as an energy source or as a secondary raw material. Our objective is to explore the modification of the thermoplastic properties of coal in order to assess the possibility of adding plastic waste to coal for the production of metallurgical coke. Two bituminous coals of different rank and thermoplastic properties were used as a base componentmore » of blends with plastic wastes such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and acrilonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS). In all cases, the addition of plastic waste led to a reduction in Gieseler maximum fluidity, the extent of the reduction depending on the fluidity of the base coal, and the amount, the molecular structure, and the thermal behavior of the polymer. As a consequence, the amount of volatile matter released by the plastic waste before, during, and after the maximum fluidity of the coal and the hydrogen-donor and hydrogen-acceptor capacities of the polymer were concluded to be key factors in influencing the extent of the reduction in fluidity and the development of anisotropic carbons. The incorporation of the plastic to the carbon matrix was clearly established in semicokes produced from blends of a high-fluid coal and the plastic tested by SEM examination. 42 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.« less

  17. Field Testing of Thermoplastic Encapsulants in High-Temperature Installations

    DOE PAGES

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; ...

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in using thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules, but concerns have been raised about whether these would be mechanically stable at high temperatures in the field. This has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. We constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials, of which only two were formulated to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with thermal insulation on the back side in Mesa, Arizona, in the summer (hot-dry), and an identicalmore » module set was exposed in environmental chambers. High-precision creep measurements (±20 μm) and electrical performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials operating in the melt or rubbery state during outdoor deployment, no significant creep was seen because of their high viscosity, lower operating temperature at the edges, and/or the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants with age despite the absence of a crosslinking agent. Only an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant formulated without a peroxide crosslinking agent crept significantly. When the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced creep further and was not detectable even for the EVA without peroxide. Because of the propensity of some polymeric materials to crosslink as they age, typical thermoplastic encapsulants would be unlikely to result in creep in the vast majority of installations.« less

  18. Carbon nanotubes in blends of polycaprolactone/thermoplastic starch.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Ata; Favis, Basil D

    2013-10-15

    Despite the importance of polymer-polymer multiphase systems, very little work has been carried out on the preferred localization of solid inclusions in such multiphase systems. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are dispersed with polycaprolactone (PCL) and thermoplastic starch (TPS) at several CNT contents via a combined solution/twin-screw extrusion melt mixing method. A PCL/CNT masterbatch was first prepared and then blended with 20 wt% TPS. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy images reveal a CNT localization principally in the TPS phase and partly at the PCL/TPS interface, with no further change by annealing. This indicates a strong driving force for the CNTs toward TPS. Young's model predicts that the nanotubes should be located at the interface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of extracted CNTs quantitatively confirms an encapsulation by TPS and reveals a covalent bonding of CNTs with thermoplastic starch. It appears likely that the nanotubes migrate to the interface, react with TPS and then are subsequently drawn into the low viscosity TPS phase. In a low shear rate/low shear stress internal mixer the nanotubes are found both in the PCL phase and at the PCL/TPS interface and have not completed the transit to the TPS phase. This latter result indicates the importance of choosing appropriate processing conditions in order to minimize kinetic effects. The addition of CNTs to PCL results in an increase in the crystallization temperature and a decrease in the percent crystallinity confirming the heterogeneous nucleating effect of the nanotubes. Finally, DMA analysis reveals a dramatic decrease in the starch rich phase transition temperature (~26 °C), for the system with nanotubes located in the TPS phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Study of Failure Characteristics in Thermoplastic Composite Laminates Due to an Eccentric Circular Discontinuity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Bose, Ohio Appni’-sd for puauc t&cw 189 12 29 023 I [ AFIT /GAE /ENY/ 89D-06 A STUDY OF FAILURE CHARACTERISTICS IN THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITE LAMINATES DUE...distribution unlimited I ,I AFIT / GAE / ENY /89D-06 A STUDY OF FAILURE CHARACTERISTICS IN THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITE LAMINATES DUE TO AN ECCENTRIC CIRCULAR...the Flight Dynamics Laboratory. Dr. Sandhu provided me with an insight into composite materials, and testing techniques, that will benefit me for a

  20. Photoinitiated grafting of porous polymer monoliths and thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J. [Oakland, CA; Svec, Frantisek [Alameda, CA; Rohr, Thomas [Leiden, NL

    2008-10-07

    A microfluidic device preferably made of a thermoplastic polymer that includes a channel or a multiplicity of channels whose surfaces are modified by photografting. The device further includes a porous polymer monolith prepared via UV initiated polymerization within the channel, and functionalization of the pore surface of the monolith using photografting. Processes for making such surface modifications of thermoplastic polymers and porous polymer monoliths are set forth.

  1. The crystallization of tough thermoplastic resins in the presence of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theil, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of the thermoplastic resins poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and poly(aryl-ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) in the presence and in the abscence of carbon fibers was studied. How carbon fiber surfaces in composites affect the crystallization of tough thermoplastic polymers that may serve as matrix resins were determined. The crystallization kinetics of such substances can provide useful information about the crystallization mechanisms and, thus, indicate if the presence of carbon fibers cause any changes in such mechanisms.

  2. Creep and creep-recovery of a thermoplastic resin and composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clem

    1988-01-01

    The database on advanced thermoplastic composites, which is currently available to industry, contains little data on the creep and viscoelastic behavior. This behavior is nevertheless considered important, particularly for extended-service reliability in structural applications. The creep deformation of a specific thermoplastic resin and composite is reviewed. The problem to relate the data obtained on the resin to the data obtained on the composite is discussed.

  3. High performance thermoplastics - A review of neat resin and composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Norman J.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    A review was made of the principal thermoplastics used to fabricate high performance composites. Neat resin tensile and fracture toughness properties, glass transition temperatures (Tg), crystalline melt temperatures (Tm) and approximate processing conditions are presented. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites made from many of these thermoplastics are given, including flexural, longitudinal tensile, transverse tensile and in-plane shear properties as well as short beam shear and compressive strengths and interlaminar fracture toughness.

  4. Cyanide toxicity from the thermal degradation of rigid polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Bell, R H; Stemmer, K L; Barkley, W; Hollingsworth, L D

    1979-09-01

    Thermal degradation products (tdp) from a model, rigid polyurethane foam were collected in such a manner as to eliminate carbon monoxide and other gases with low boiling points. The effects in rats resulting from intratracheal intubation (I.T.) of the tdp are discussed. Cyanide was found to be a major factor associated with severe toxic responses of the experimental rats.

  5. WEATHERING DEGRADATION OF A POLYURETHANE COATING. (R828081E01)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The degradation of polyurethane topcoat over a chromate pigmented epoxy primer was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) after the coated pane...

  6. Improved primer for bonding polyurethane adhesives to metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constanza, L. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primer ensures effective bonding integrity of polyurethane adhesives on metal surfaces at temperatures ranging from minus 423 degrees to plus 120 degrees F. It provides greater metal surface protection and bond strengths over this temperature range than could be attained with other adhesive systems.

  7. Sorption of Triangular Silver Nanoplates on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furletov, A. A.; Apyari, V. V.; Garshev, A. V.; Volkov, P. A.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Dmitrienko, S. G.

    2018-02-01

    The sorption of triangular silver nanoplates on polyurethane foam is investigated as a procedure for creating a nanocomposite sensing material for subsequent use in optical means of chemical analysis. Triangular silver nanoplates are synthesized and characterized, and a simple sorption technique for the formation of a composite material based on these nanoplates is proposed.

  8. Fiber-modified polyurethane foam for ballistic protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. H.; Parker, J. A.; Rosser, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Closed-cell, semirigid, fiber-loaded, self-extinguishing polyurethane foam material fills voids around fuel cells in aircraft. Material prevents leakage of fuel and spreading of fire in case of ballistic incendiary impact. It also protects fuel cell in case of exterior fire.

  9. Post-processing flame-retardant for polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P.; Sidman, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of polyurethane form with elastomer formulation after processing makes foam fire resistant without compromising physical properties. In testing, once ignition source is removed, combustion stops. Treatment also prevents molten particle formation, generates no smoke or toxic gases in fire, and does not deteriorate under prolonged exposure to Sun.

  10. Novel polyurethanes from xylan and TDI: Preparation and characterization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this work a novel polyurethane was developed involving xylan and tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). Polymer synthesis was achieved via conventional heat or microwave-assisted reaction in dimethylsulfoxide. Because xylan has multiple OH groups on each polymer chain, the TDI/xylan molar ratio neede...

  11. Cell–material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix

    PubMed Central

    Dicesare, Patrick; Fox, Wade M.; Hill, Michael J.; Krishnan, G. Rajesh; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2013-01-01

    Cell–matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell–matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. PMID:23255285

  12. Self-organization of the reticular structure of polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. R.; Roldugin, V. I.

    2010-08-01

    The morphology of block samples and coatings of reticular polyurethane were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The morphology was correlated with the internal stresses that appeared in the coatings during their formation. A scenario of the self-assembly of complex structures in reticular polymers was suggested. The boundary between the structural elements of the supermolecular level was found to be strained.

  13. Studies on polyurethane adhesives and surface modification of hydrophobic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Jayaraman

    This thesis work deals with (a) Curing of reactive, hot-melt polyurethane adhesives and (b) Adsorption studies using different interactions. Research on polyurethanes involves characterization of polyurethane prepolymers and a novel mechanism to cure isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymer by a "trigger" mechanism. Curing of isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymers has been shown to be influenced by morphology and environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity. Although the initial composition, final morphology and curing kinetics are known, information regarding the intermediate prepolymer mixture is yet to be established. Polyurethane prepolymers prepared by the reaction of diisocyanates with the primary hydroxyls of polyester diol (PHMA) and secondary hydroxyls of polyether diol (PPG) were characterized. The morphology and crystallization kinetics of a polyurethane prepolymer was compared with a blend of PPG prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PPG with diisocyanate) and a PHMA prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PHMA with diisocyanate) to study the effect of copolymer formed in the polyurethane prepolymer on the above-mentioned properties. Although the morphology of the polyurethane prepolymer is determined in the first few minutes of application, the chemical curing of isocyanate-terminated prepolymer occurs over hours to days. In the literature, different techniques are described to follow the curing kinetics. But there is no established technique to control the curing of polyurethane prepolymer. To make the curing process independent of environmental factors, a novel approach using a trigger mechanism was designed and implemented by using ammonium salts as curing agents. Ammonium salts that are stable at room temperature but decompose on heating to yield active hydrogen-containing compounds, NH3 and H2O, were used as 'Trojan horses' to cure the prepolymer chemically. Research on adsorption

  14. Novel route of synthesis for cellulose fiber-based hybrid polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhwan, F. H.; Ilmiati, S.; Kurnia Adi, H.; Arumsari, R.; Chalid, M.

    2017-07-01

    Polyurethanes, obtained by the reaction of a diisocyanate compound with bifunctional or multifunctional reagent such as diols or polyols, have been studied intensively and well developed. The wide range modifier such as chemical structures and molecular weight to build polyurethanes led to designs of materials that may easily meet the functional product demand and to the extraordinary spreading of these materials in market. Properties of the obtained polymer are related to the chemical structure of polyurethane backbone. A number polyurethanes prepared from biomass-based monomers have been reported. Cellulose fiber, as a biomass material is containing abundant hydroxyl, promising material as chain extender for building hybrid polyurethanes. In previous researches, cellulose fiber was used as filler in synthesis of polyurethane composites. This paper reported a novel route of hybrid polyurethane synthesis, which a cellulose fiber was used as chain extender. The experiment performed by reacting 4,4’-Methylenebis (cyclohexyl isocyanate) (HMDI) and polyethylene glycol with variation of molecular weight to obtained pre-polyurethane, continued by adding micro fiber cellulose (MFC) with variation of type and composition in the mixture. The experiment was evaluated by NMR, FTIR, SEM and STA measurement. NMR and FTIR confirmed the reaction of the hybrid polyurethane. STA showed hybrid polyurethane has good thermal stability. SEM showed good distribution and dispersion of sorghum-based MFC.

  15. The Modification of Polyurethane Foams Using New Boroorganic Polyols (II) Polyurethane Foams from Boron-Modified Hydroxypropyl Urea Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150°C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

  16. Abrasion and fatigue resistance of PDMS containing multiblock polyurethanes after accelerated water exposure at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Kimberly A; Wilson, Charles L; Himes, Adam K; Dawson, James W; Haddad, Tarek D; Buckalew, Adam J; Miller, Jennifer P; Untereker, Darrel F; Simha, Narendra K

    2013-11-01

    Segmented polyurethane multiblock polymers containing polydimethylsiloxane and polyether soft segments form tough and easily processed thermoplastic elastomers (PDMS-urethanes). Two commercially available examples, PurSil 35 (denoted as P35) and Elast-Eon E2A (denoted as E2A), were evaluated for abrasion and fatigue resistance after immersion in 85 °C buffered water for up to 80 weeks. We previously reported that water exposure in these experiments resulted in a molar mass reduction, where the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction is supported by a straight forward Arrhenius analysis over a range of accelerated temperatures (37-85 °C). We also showed that the ultimate tensile properties of P35 and E2A were significantly compromised when the molar mass was reduced. Here, we show that the reduction in molar mass also correlated with a reduction in both the abrasion and fatigue resistance. The instantaneous wear rate of both P35 and E2A, when exposed to the reciprocating motion of an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) jacketed cable, increased with the inverse of the number averaged molar mass (1/Mn). Both materials showed a change in the wear surface when the number-averaged molar mass was reduced to ≈ 16 kg/mole, where a smooth wear surface transitioned to a 'spalling-like' pattern, leaving the wear surface with ≈ 0.3 mm cracks that propagated beyond the contact surface. The fatigue crack growth rate for P35 and E2A also increased in proportion to 1/Mn, after the molar mass was reduced below a critical value of ≈30 kg/mole. Interestingly, this critical molar mass coincided with that at which the single cycle stress-strain response changed from strain hardening to strain softening. The changes in both abrasion and fatigue resistance, key predictors for long term reliability of cardiac leads, after exposure of this class of PDMS-urethanes to water suggests that these materials are susceptible to mechanical compromise in vivo. Copyright © 2013 The Authors

  17. Modelling of the mechanical behavior of a polyurethane finger interphalangeal joint endoprosthesis after surface modification by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, A.; Svistkov, A.; Iziumov, R.; Osorgina, I.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.; McKenzie, D.

    2016-04-01

    Production of biocompatible implants made of polyurethane treated with plasma is very perspective. During plasma treatment the surface of polyurethane acquires unique physic-chemical properties. However such treatment may change the mechanical properties of polyurethane which may adversely affect the deformation behaviour of the real implant. Therefore careful study of the mechanical properties of the plasma-modified polyurethane is needed. In this paper, experimental observations of the elastic characteristics of plasma treated polyurethane and modelling of the deformation behaviour of polyurethane bio-implants are reported.

  18. Nerve regeneration using tubular scaffolds from biodegradable polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Hausner, T; Schmidhammer, R; Zandieh, S; Hopf, R; Schultz, A; Gogolewski, S; Hertz, H; Redl, H

    2007-01-01

    In severe nerve lesion, nerve defects and in brachial plexus reconstruction, autologous nerve grafting is the golden standard. Although, nerve grafting technique is the best available approach a major disadvantages exists: there is a limited source of autologous nerve grafts. This study presents data on the use of tubular scaffolds with uniaxial pore orientation from experimental biodegradable polyurethanes coated with fibrin sealant to regenerate a 8 mm resected segment of rat sciatic nerve. Tubular scaffolds: prepared by extrusion of the polymer solution in DMF into water coagulation bath. The polymer used for the preparation of tubular scaffolds was a biodegradable polyurethane based on hexamethylene diisocyanate, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and dianhydro-D-sorbitol. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL: Eighteen Sprague Dawley rats underwent mid-thigh sciatic nerve transection and were randomly assigned to two experimental groups with immediate repair: (1) tubular scaffold, (2) 180 degrees rotated sciatic nerve segment (control). Serial functional measurements (toe spread test, placing tests) were performed weekly from 3rd to 12th week after nerve repair. On week 12, electrophysiological assessment was performed. Sciatic nerve and scaffold/nerve grafts were harvested for histomorphometric analysis. Collagenic connective tissue, Schwann cells and axons were evaluated in the proximal nerve stump, the scaffold/nerve graft and the distal nerve stump. The implants have uniaxially-oriented pore structure with a pore size in the range of 2 micorm (the pore wall) and 75 x 700 microm (elongated pores in the implant lumen). The skin of the tubular implants was nonporous. Animals which underwent repair with tubular scaffolds of biodegradable polyurethanes coated with diluted fibrin sealant had no significant functional differences compared with the nerve graft group. Control group resulted in a trend-wise better electrophysiological recovery but did not show statistically significant

  19. Cost-Benefit Analysis for Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2007-01-01

    NASA and Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) have similar missions and therefore similar facilities and structures in similar environments. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the application of an applied coating system. The most common topcoats used in coating systems are polyurethanes that contain isocyanates. Isocyanates are classified as potential human carcinogens and are known to cause cancer in animals. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate and validate alternatives to aliphatic isocyanate polyurethanes resulting in one or more isocyanate-free coatings qualified for use at AFSPC and NASA installations participating in this project. This Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) quantifies the estimated capital and process costs of coating alternatives and cost savings relative to the current coatings. The estimates in this CBA are to be used for assessing the relative merits of the selected alternatives. The actual economic effects at any specific facility will depend on the alternative material or technology implemented, the number of actual applications converted, future workloads, and other factors . The participants initially considered eighteen (18) alternative coatings as described in the Potential Alternatives Report entitled Potential Alternatives Report for Validation of Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes, prepared by ITB. Of those, 8 alternatives were selected for testing in accordance with the Joint Test Protocol entitled Joint Test Protocol for Validation of Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes, and the Field Test Plan entitled Field Evaluations Test Plan for Validation of Alternatives 10 Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes, both of which were prepared by ITB. A joint Test Report entitled Joint Test Report for Validation of Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes, prepared by ITB, documents the results of the laboratory and field testing, as well as any

  20. Impact of Medium and Substrate on Growth of Pseudomonas Fluorescens Biofilms on Polyurethane Paint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    biofilm formation on polyurethane (PU) coatings, and to define how those parameters contribute to polyurethane biodegradation. We used a batch flow system...determine which factors best support the growth and persistence of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms . Factors that enhance biofilm formation and...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4131 IMPACT OF MEDIUM AND SUBSTRATE ON GROWTH OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS BIOFILMS ON POLYURETHANE PAINT Wendy L. Goodson

  1. Bio-Based Polyurethane Containing Isosorbide for Use in Composites and Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7259 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Bio-Based Polyurethane Containing Isosorbide for Use in Composites and...copyright notation hereon. ARL-TR-7259 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Bio-Based Polyurethane Containing Isosorbide for Use...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bio-Based Polyurethane Containing Isosorbide for Use in Composites and Coatings 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  2. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Yung, Winco K C; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-09

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  3. Improved construction materials for polar regions using microcellular thermoplastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Microcellular polymer foams (MCF) are thermoplastic foams with very small cell diameters, less than 10 microns, and very large cell densities, 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 15) cells per cubic centimeter of unfoamed material. The concept of foaming polymers with microcellular voids was conceived to reduce the amount of material used for mass-produced items without compromising the mechanical properties. The reasoning behind this concept was that if voids smaller than the critical flaw size pre-existing in polymers were introduced into the matrix, they would not affect the overall strength of the product. MCF polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were examined to determine the effects of the microstructure towards the mechanical properties of the materials at room and arctic temperatures. Batch process parameters were discovered for these materials and foamed samples of three densities were produced for each material. To quantify the toughness and strength of these polymers, the tensile yield strength, tensile toughness, and impact resistance were measured at room and arctic temperatures. The feasibility of MCF polymers has been demonstrated by the consistent and repeatable MCF microstructures formed, but the improvements in the mechanical properties were not conclusive. Therefore the usefulness of the MCF polymers to replace other materials in arctic environments is questionable.

  4. Development of thermoplastic starch blown film by incorporating plasticized chitosan.

    PubMed

    Dang, Khanh Minh; Yoksan, Rangrong

    2015-01-22

    The objective of the present work was to improve blown film extrusion processability and properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) film by incorporating plasticized chitosan, with a content of 0.37-1.45%. The effects of chitosan on extrusion processability and melt flow ability of TPS, as well as that on appearance, optical properties, thermal properties, viscoelastic properties and tensile properties of the films were investigated. The possible interactions between chitosan and starch molecules were evaluated by FTIR and XRD techniques. Chitosan and starch molecules could interact via hydrogen bonds, as confirmed from the blue shift of OH bands and the reduction of V-type crystal formation. Although the incorporation of chitosan caused decreased extensibility and melt flow ability, as well as increased yellowness and opacity, the films possessed better extrusion processability, increased tensile strength, rigidity, thermal stability and UV absorption, as well as reduced water absorption and surface stickiness. The obtained TPS/chitosan-based films offer real potential application in the food industry, e.g. as edible films. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feasibility of tailoring of press formed thermoplastic composite parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinke, J.

    2018-05-01

    The Tailor Made Blank concept is widely accepted in the production of sheet metal parts. By joining, adding and subtracting materials, and sometimes even applying different alloys, parts can be produced more efficiently by cost and/or weight, and new design options have been discovered. This paper is about the manufacture of press formed parts of Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics and the evaluation whether the Tailoring concept, though adapted to the material behavior of FRTP, can be applied to these composites as well. From research, the first results and ideas are presented. One of the ideas is the multistep forming process, creating parts with thickness variations and combinations of fibre orientations that are usually not feasible using common press forming strategies. Another idea is the blending of different prepreg materials in one component. This might be useful in case of specific details, like for areas of mechanical fastening or to avoid carbon/metal contact, otherwise resulting in severe corrosion. In a brief overview, future perspectives of the potential of the Tailoring concept are presented.

  6. Consolidation of graphite thermoplastic textile preforms for primary aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J.; Mahon, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of innovative cost effective material forms and processes is being considered for fabrication of future primary aircraft structures. Processes that have been identified as meeting these goals are textile preforms that use resin transfer molding (RTM) and consolidation forming. The Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications (NCWFA) program has as its objective the integration of innovative design concepts with cost effective fabrication processes to develop damage-tolerant structures that can perform at a design ultimate strain level of 6000 micro-inch/inch. In this on-going effort, design trade studies were conducted to arrive at advanced wing designs that integrate new material forms with innovative structural concepts and cost effective fabrication methods. The focus has been on minimizing part count (mechanical fasteners, clips, number of stiffeners, etc.), by using cost effective textile reinforcement concepts that provide improved damage tolerance and out-of-plane load capability, low-cost resin transfer molding processing, and thermoplastic forming concepts. The fabrication of representative Y spars by consolidation methods will be described. The Y spars were fabricated using AS4 (6K)/PEEK 150g commingled angle interlock 0/90-degree woven preforms with +45-degree commingled plies stitched using high strength Toray carbon thread and processed by autoclave consolidation.

  7. Quantitative Analyses of the Modes of Deformation in Engineering Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, B. G.; Bubeck, R. A.; Scott, R. L.; Heaney, M. D.

    1998-03-01

    Synchrotron-based real-time small-angle X-ray scattering (RTSAXS) studies have been performed on rubber-toughened engineering thermoplastics with amorphous and semi-crystalline matrices. Scattering patterns are measured at successive time intervals of 3 ms were analyzed to determine the plastic strain due to crazing. Simultaneous measurements of the absorption of the primary beam by the sample permits the total plastic strain to be concurrently computed. The plastic strain due to other deformation mechanisms (e.g., particle cavitation and macroscopic shear yield can be determined from the difference between the total and craze-derived plastic strains. The contribution from macroscopic shear deformation can be determined from video-based optical data measured simultaneously with the X-ray data. These types of time-resolved experiments result in the generation of prodigious quantities of data, the analysis of which can considerably delay the determination of key results. A newly developed software package that runs in WINDOWSa 95 permits the rapid analysis of the relative contributions of the deformation modes from these time-resolved experiments. Examples of using these techniques on ABS-type and QUESTRAa syndiotactic polystyrene type engineering resins will be given.

  8. Clinical validation of a nanodiamond-embedded thermoplastic biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kee, Theodore; Liang, Zhangrui; Hsiou, Desiree; Miya, Darron; Wu, Brian; Osawa, Eiji; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua; Kang, Mo K.; Ho, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising drug delivery and imaging agents due to their uniquely faceted surfaces with diverse chemical groups, electrostatic properties, and biocompatibility. Based on the potential to harness ND properties to clinically address a broad range of disease indications, this work reports the in-human administration of NDs through the development of ND-embedded gutta percha (NDGP), a thermoplastic biomaterial that addresses reinfection and bone loss following root canal therapy (RCT). RCT served as the first clinical indication for NDs since the procedure sites involved nearby circulation, localized administration, and image-guided treatment progress monitoring, which are analogous to many clinical indications. This randomized, single-blind interventional treatment study evaluated NDGP equivalence with unmodified GP. This progress report assessed one control-arm and three treatment-arm patients. At 3-mo and 6-mo follow-up appointments, no adverse events were observed, and lesion healing was confirmed in the NDGP-treated patients. Therefore, this study is a foundation for the continued clinical translation of NDs and other nanomaterials for a broad spectrum of applications. PMID:29078364

  9. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  10. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-01-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy. PMID:27501761

  11. Strong, Resilient, and Sustainable Aliphatic Polyester Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Annabelle; Kurokawa, Naruki; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2017-05-03

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) composed of ABA block polymers exhibit a wide variety of properties and are easily processable as they contain physical, rather than chemical, cross-links. Poly(γ-methyl-ε-caprolactone) (PγMCL) is an amorphous polymer with a low entanglement molar mass (M e = 2.9 kg mol –1), making it a suitable choice for tough elastomers. Incorporating PγMCL as the midblock with polylactide (PLA) end blocks (f LA = 0.17) results in TPEs with high stresses and elongations at break (σ B = 24 ± 2 MPa and ε B = 1029 ± 20%, respectively) and low levels of hysteresis. The use ofmore » isotactic PLA as the end blocks (f LLA = 0.17) increases the strength and toughness of the material (σ B = 30 ± 4 MPa, ε B = 988 ± 30%) due to its semicrystalline nature. This study aims to demonstrate how the outstanding properties in these sustainable materials are a result of the entanglements, glass transition temperature, segment–segment interaction parameter, and crystallinity, resulting in comparable properties to the commercially relevant styrene-based TPEs.« less

  12. Optimization of Buckypaper-enhanced Multifunctional Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongrui; Liang, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    A series of flattened-nanotube reinforced thermoplastic composites are sizably fabricated as a function of buckypaper loading. The effects of the volume fraction, nanotube alignment and length on the tensile performance of the composites are factored into a general expression. The incorporation of self-reinforcing polyphenylene resin (Parmax) into a highly aligned buckypaper frame at an optimal weight ratio boosts the tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the buckypaper/Parmax composite to 1145 MPa and 150 GPa, respectively, far exceeding those of Parmax and aligned buckypaper individually. The composite also exhibits improved thermal (>65 W/m-K) and electrical (~700 S/cm) conductivities, as well as high thermoelectric power (22 μV/K) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the composite displays a heterogeneously complex structure. The hexyl groups of Parmax noncovalently interact with the honeycomb structure of the flattened nanotube through π-stacking and CH-π interaction, correspondingly improving the dispersity of polymer on the nanotube surface and the interfacial stress transferring while the high alignment degrees of nanotube facilitate phonon and charge transport in the composites. PMID:28205637

  13. Extrusion and characterization of thermoplastic starch sheets from "macho" banana.

    PubMed

    Alanís-López, P; Pérez-González, J; Rendón-Villalobos, R; Jiménez-Pérez, A; Solorza-Feria, J

    2011-08-01

    Starch isolated from macho banana was oxidized by using 2.5% and 3.5% (w/w) of sodium hypochlorite. Native and oxidized starches with glycerol were processed using a conical twin screw extruder to obtain thermoplastic laminates or sheets, which were partially characterized. Oxidized banana starches presented higher moisture and total starch but lower ash, protein, lipids, and apparent amylose content than the native starch. Micrographs of sheets from oxidized starches showed wrinkles and cavities presumably caused by the plasticizer, but with less free glycerol and unplasticized starch granules than those from native starch. Sheets from oxidized starch showed a notorious increase in all thermal parameters (To, Tp, and ΔH), mechanical properties (tensile strength, elongation at break, and elasticity), and solubility. Banana starch X-ray diffraction patterns corresponded to a mixture of the A- and B-type polymorphs, with apparently slightly higher crystallinity in oxidized specimens than in native starch. A similar trend was observed in the corresponding sheets. Due to the pollution problem caused by the conventional plastics, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable sheets, because they may have the potential to replace conventional packaging materials. Banana starch might be an interesting raw material to be used as edible sheet, coating or in food packaging, and preservation, because it is biodegradable, cheap, innocuous, and abundant. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. The development of an alternative thermoplastic powder prepregging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, A. L.; Hyer, M. W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Loos, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    An alternative powder prepregging technique is discussed that is based on the deposition of powder onto carbon fibers that have been moistened using an ultrasonic humidifier. The dry fiber tow is initially spread to allow a greater amount of the fiber surface to be exposed to the powder, thus ensuring a significant amount of intimate contact between the fiber and the matrix. Moisture in the form of ultrafine water droplets is then deposited onto the spread fiber tow. The moisture promotes adhesion to the fiber until the powder can be tacked to the fibers by melting. Powdered resin is then sieved onto the fibers and then tacked onto the fibers by quick heating in a convective oven. This study focuses on the production of prepregs and laminates made with LaRC-TPI (thermoplastic polyimide) using this process. Although the process appears to be successful, early evaluation was hampered by poor interfacial adhesion. The adhesion problem, however, seems to be the result of a material system incompatibility, rather than being influenced by the process.

  15. Tunable optical response of bowtie nanoantenna arrays on thermoplastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharac, N.; Sharma, H.; Veysi, M.; Sanderson, R. N.; Khine, M.; Capolino, F.; Ragan, R.

    2016-03-01

    Thermally responsive polymers present an interesting avenue for tuning the optical properties of nanomaterials on their surfaces by varying their periodicity and shape using facile processing methods. Gold bowtie nanoantenna arrays are fabricated using nanosphere lithography on prestressed polyolefin (PO), a thermoplastic polymer, and optical properties are investigated via a combination of spectroscopy and electromagnetic simulations to correlate shape evolution with optical response. Geometric features of bowtie nanoantennas evolve by annealing at temperatures between 105 °C and 135 °C by releasing the degree of prestress in PO. Due to the higher modulus of Au versus PO, compressive stress occurs on Au bowtie regions on PO, which leads to surface buckling at the two highest annealing temperatures; regions with a 5 nm gap between bowtie nanoantennas are observed and the average reduction is 75%. Reflectance spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations both demonstrate the ability to tune the plasmon resonance wavelength with a window of approximately 90 nm in the range of annealing temperatures investigated. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements demonstrate that maximum enhancement is observed as the excitation wavelength approaches the plasmon resonance of Au bowtie nanoantennas. Both the size and morphology tunability offered by PO allows for customizing optical response.

  16. Characteristics of thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar blend: Thermal, tensile, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Jumaidin, R; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior of biodegradable sugar palm starch (SPS) based thermoplastic containing agar in the range of 10-40wt%. The thermoplastics were melt-mixed and then hot pressed at 140°C for 10min. SEM investigation showed good miscibility between SPS and agar. FT-IR analysis confirmed that SPS and agar were compatible and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds existed between them. Incorporation of agar increased the thermoplastic starch tensile properties (Young's modulus and tensile strength). The thermal stability and moisture uptake increased with increasing agar content. The present work shows that starch-based thermoplastics with 30wt% agar content have the highest tensile strength. Higher content of agar (40wt%) resulted to more rough cleavage fracture and slight decrease in the tensile strength. In conclusion, the addition of agar improved the thermal and tensile properties of thermoplastic SPS which widened the potential application of this eco-friendly material. The most promising applications for this eco-friendly material are short-life products such as packaging, container, tray, etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A.; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-09-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline β-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications.

  18. Synthesis of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Polyurethanes with S-Nitrosothiol-Containing Hard and Soft Segments

    PubMed Central

    Coneski, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polyurethanes capable of releasing up to 0.20 μmol NO cm−2 were synthesized by incorporating active S-nitrosothiol functionalities into hard and soft segment domains using thiol group protection and post-polymerization modifications, respectively. The nitrosothiol position within the hard and soft segment domains of the polyurethanes impacted both the total NO release and NO release kinetics. The NO storage and release properties were correlated to both chain extender modification and ensuing phase miscibility of the polyurethanes. Thorough material characterization is provided to examine the effects of hard and soft segment modifications on the resultant polyurethane properties. PMID:23418409

  19. Performance Evaluation of a Commercial Polyurethane Coating in Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobin, M.; Malik, A. U.; Al-Muaili, F.; Al-Hajri, M.

    2012-07-01

    A material evaluation study has been carried out to determine corrosion behavior of a commercial polyurethane coating system (Souplethane 5) in the marine environment. The coating system is solvent free, two-component polyurethane protective coating. The performance of the coating on steel and rebar concrete was evaluated by conducting different types of tests which include atmospheric exposure, immersion in 5% sodium chloride solution, exposure to splash zone in seawater, salt fog, sabkha soil burial, and electrochemical tests, which include potentiodynamic polarization and AC impedance measurements. Uncoated, coated, and coated scribed specimens were used in each study. In general, the coating showed good corrosion resistance in marine environment. However, the coated samples, when subjected to break under applied compressive load, showed partial or complete detachment from the substrate, e.g., steel and rebar concrete. This appears to be the major drawback of the coating while applying on steel and concrete structures.

  20. Assessment of Multiaxial Mechanical Response of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettarin, Valeria; Fasce, Laura A.; Frontini, Patricia M.

    2014-02-01

    Multiaxial deformation behavior and failure surface of rigid polyurethane foams were determined using standard experimental facilities. Two commercial foams of different densities were assayed under uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial stress states. These different stress states were reached in a uniaxial universal testing machine using suitable testing configurations which imply the use of special grips and lateral restricted samples. Actual strains were monitored with a video extensometer. Polyurethane foams exhibited typical isotropic brittle behavior, except under compressive loads where the response turned out to be ductile. A general failure surface in the stress space which accounts for density effects could be successfully generated. All of failure data, determined at the loss of linear elasticity point, collapsed in a single locus defined as the combination of a brittle crushing of closed-cell cellular materials criterion capped by an elastic buckling criterion.

  1. Properties of rigid polyurethane foams filled with glass microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushin, V.; Bel'kova, L.; Sevastyanova, I.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of hollow glass microspheres with a density of 125 kg/m3 on the properties of low-density (54-90 kg/m3) rigid polyurethane foams is investigated. The thermal expansion coefficient of the foams and their properties in tension and compression in relation to the content of the microspheres (0.5-5 wt.%) are determined. An increase in the characteristics of the material in compression in the foam rise direction with increasing content of filler is revealed. The limiting content of the microspheres above which the mechanical characteristics of the filled foams begin to decrease is found. The distribution of the microspheres in elements of the cellular structure of the polyurethane foams is examined.

  2. Tests of two new polyurethane foam wheelchair tires.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J; Kauzlarich, J J; Thacker, J G

    1989-01-01

    The performance characteristics of four 24-inch wheelchair tires are considered; one pneumatic and three airless. Specifically, two new airless polyurethane foam tires (circular and tapered cross-section) were compared to both a molded polyisoprene tire and a rubber pneumatic tire. Rolling resistance, coefficient of static friction, spring rate, tire roll-off, impact absorption, wear resistance, and resistance to compression set were the characteristics considered for the basis of comparison. Although the pneumatic tire is preferred by many wheelchair users, the two new polyurethane foam tires were found to offer a performance similar to the high-pressure pneumatic tire. In addition, the foam tires are less expensive and lighter in weight than the other tires tested.

  3. Glycolysis recycling of rigid waste polyurethane foam from refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Cao, Z B; Chen, Y; Zhang, X J; Qian, G R; Chu, Y L; Zhou, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth of rigid waste polyurethane (WPUR) foam from refrigerators attracts the attention all over the world. In this study, glycolysis was chosen to treat WPUR from scrapped refrigerators collected in Shanghai, China. Glycolysis reagents and catalysts were selected. The results indicated that the glycolysis efficiency of ethylene glycol (EG) was higher than that of diethylene glycol, and the catalytic efficiency of alkali metal salts (NaOH) was more excellent than that of triethanolamine and organic salts of alkali metal (NaAc). When EG was 100%WPUR as a glycolysis reagent and NaOH was 1%WPUR as a catalyst at a constant temperature of 197.85°C for 2 h, the glycolysis product had the highest glycolysis conversion rate. In order to maximize the recycling of WPUR, regenerative Polyurethane was performed by adding 10% distilled mixed polyol, which conformed to the QB/T 26689-2011 requirements.

  4. Towards development of nanofibrous large strain flexible strain sensors with programmable shape memory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Asif, H.; Naguib, H. E.

    2018-05-01

    Electrospun polymeric fibers can be used as strain sensors due to their large surface to weight/volume ratio, high porosity and pore interconnectivity. Large strain flexible strain sensors are used in numerous applications including rehabilitation, health monitoring, and sports performance monitoring where large strain detection should be accommodated by the sensor. This has boosted the demand for a stretchable, flexible and highly sensitive sensor able to detect a wide range of mechanically induced deformations. Herein, a physically cross-linked polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) blend is made into nanofiber networks via electrospinning. The PLA/TPU weight ratio is optimized to obtain a maximum attainable strain of 100% while maintaining its mechanical integrity. The TPU/PLA fibers also allowed for their thermally activated recovery due to shape memory properties of the substrate. This novel feature enhances the sensor’s performance as it is no longer limited by its plastic deformation. Using spray coating method, a homogeneous layer of single-walled carbon nanotube is deposited onto the as-spun fiber mat to induce electrical conductivity to the surface of the fibers. It is shown that stretching and bending the sensor result in a highly sensitive and linear response with a maximum gauge factor of 33.

  5. High temperature electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. T., Jr.

    1984-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of three rigid polyurethane foams prepared using different formulations was measured to approx. 320 C. The materials exhibit similar conductivity characteristics, showing a pronounced increase in conductivity with increasing temperature. The insulating characteristics to approx. 200 C are better than that for phenolic materials (glass fabric reinforced), and are similar to those for silicone materials (glass microsphere reinforced). At higher temperatures (500 to 600 C), the phenolics and silicones are better insulators.

  6. Preparation of linear hydroxy substituted polyphosphazenes. [flame retardant polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of partially hydroxy-substituted phosphazene prepolymers amenable to processing into cellular, flexible polyurethane foams was investigated. Factors determined include (1) the environment of the hydroxyl group; (2) the ease of the hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene polymerization; (3) the nature of the nonreactive substituents; and (4) the mode of introduction of the hydroxyl entity. The specific approaches taken, the rationale of the selections made, and the results are discussed.

  7. Amphiphilic Polyurethane Hydrogels as Smart Carriers for Acidic Hydrophobic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Lucas P; Trinca, Rafael B; Isabel Felisberti, Maria

    2018-05-14

    Amphiphilic hydrogels are widely reported as systems with great potential for controlled drug release. Nevertheless, the majority of studies make use of functionalization or attachment of drugs to the polymer chains. In this study, we propose a strategy of combining amphiphilic polyurethanes with pH-responsive drugs to develop smart drug carriers. While the amphiphilic character of the polymer imparts an efficient load of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, the drug's characteristics determine the selectivity of the medium delivery. Drug loading and release behavior as well as hydrolytic degradation of chemically crosslinked polyurethane hydrogels based on PEG and PCL-triol (PU (polyurethane) hydrogels) synthesized by an easy one-pot route were studied. PU hydrogels have been shown to successfully load the hydrophobic acidic drug sodium diclofenac, reaching a partition coefficient of 8 between the most hydrophobic PU and diclofenac/ethanol solutions. Moreover, an oral administration simulation was conducted by changing the environment from an acidic to a neutral medium. PU hydrogels release less than 5 % of the drug in an acidic medium; however, in a PBS pH 7.4 solution, diclofenac is delivered in a sustained fashion for up to 40 hours, achieving 80% of cumulative release. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Vegetable Oil-Based Hyperbranched Thermosetting Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The highly branched polyurethanes and vegetable oil-based polymer nanocomposites have been showing fruitful advantages across a spectrum of potential field of applications.Mesua ferreaL. seed oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane (HBPU)/clay nanocomposites were prepared at different dose levels by in situ polymerization technique. The performances of epoxy-cured thermosetting nanocomposites are reported for the first time. The partially exfoliated structure of clay layers was confirmed by XRD and TEM. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of H bonding between nanoclay and the polymer matrix. The present investigation outlines the significant improvement of tensile strength, scratch hardness, thermostability, water vapor permeability, and adhesive strength without much influencing impact resistance, bending, and elongation at break of the nanocomposites compared to pristine HBPU thermoset. An increment of two times the tensile strength, 6 °C of melting point, and 111 °C of thermo-stability were achieved by the formation of nanocomposites. An excellent shape recovery of about 96–99% was observed for the nanocomposites. Thus, the formation of partially exfoliated clay/vegetable oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane nanocomposites significantly improved the performance. PMID:20596546

  9. Preparation and properties of adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan; Cao, Yu-Yang; Wu, Shou-Peng; Li, Zai-Feng

    2012-12-01

    Adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea (PUU) elastomers with different crosslinking density were prepared by using hydroxyl-terminated liquid butadiene-nitrile (HTBN), toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and chain extender 3,5-dimethyl thio-toluene diamine (DMTDA) as raw materials, dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as initiator, and N,N'-m-phenylene dimaleimide (HVA-2) as the crosslinking agent. The influences of the crosslinking density and temperature on the structure and properties of such elastomers were investigated. The crosslinking density of PUU elastomer was tested by the NMR method. It is found that when the content of HVA-2 is 1.5%, the mechanical properties of polyurethane elastomer achieve optimal performance. By testing thermal performance of PUU, compared with linear PUU, the thermal stability of the elastomers has a marked improvement. With the addition of HVA-2, the loss factor tan δ decreases. FT-IR spectral studies of PUU elastomer at various temperatures were performed. From this study, heat-resistance polyurethane could be prepared, and the properties of PUU at high temperature could be improved obviously.

  10. Vegetable Oil-Based Hyperbranched Thermosetting Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Deka, Harekrishna; Karak, Niranjan

    2009-04-25

    The highly branched polyurethanes and vegetable oil-based polymer nanocomposites have been showing fruitful advantages across a spectrum of potential field of applications. Mesua ferrea L. seed oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane (HBPU)/clay nanocomposites were prepared at different dose levels by in situ polymerization technique. The performances of epoxy-cured thermosetting nanocomposites are reported for the first time. The partially exfoliated structure of clay layers was confirmed by XRD and TEM. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of H bonding between nanoclay and the polymer matrix. The present investigation outlines the significant improvement of tensile strength, scratch hardness, thermostability, water vapor permeability, and adhesive strength without much influencing impact resistance, bending, and elongation at break of the nanocomposites compared to pristine HBPU thermoset. An increment of two times the tensile strength, 6 degrees C of melting point, and 111 degrees C of thermo-stability were achieved by the formation of nanocomposites. An excellent shape recovery of about 96-99% was observed for the nanocomposites. Thus, the formation of partially exfoliated clay/vegetable oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane nanocomposites significantly improved the performance.

  11. Triggerable Degradation of Polyurethanes for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cancan; Huang, Yihui; Wu, Jinglei; Tang, Liping; Hong, Yi

    2015-09-16

    Tissue engineered and bioactive scaffolds with different degradation rates are required for the regeneration of diverse tissues/organs. To optimize tissue regeneration in different tissues, it is desirable that the degradation rate of scaffolds can be manipulated to comply with various stages of tissue regeneration. Unfortunately, the degradation of most degradable polymers relies solely on passive controlled degradation mechanisms. To overcome this challenge, we report a new family of reduction-sensitive biodegradable elastomeric polyurethanes containing various amounts of disulfide bonds (PU-SS), in which degradation can be initiated and accelerated with the supplement of a biological product: antioxidant-glutathione (GSH). The polyurethanes can be processed into films and electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Synthesized materials exhibited robust mechanical properties and high elasticity. Accelerated degradation of the materials was observed in the presence of GSH, and the rate of such degradation depends on the amount of disulfide present in the polymer backbone. The polymers and their degradation products exhibited no apparent cell toxicity while the electrospun scaffolds supported fibroblast growth in vitro. The in vivo subcutaneous implantation model showed that the polymers prompt minimal inflammatory responses, and as anticipated, the polymer with the higher disulfide bond amount had faster degradation in vivo. This new family of polyurethanes offers tremendous potential for directed scaffold degradation to promote maximal tissue regeneration.

  12. A multilayered polyurethane foam technique for skin graft immobilization.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motoki; Ito, Erika; Kato, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shoichi; Morita, Akimichi

    2012-02-01

    Several techniques are applicable for skin graft immobilization. Although the sponge dressing is a popular technique, pressure failure near the center of the graft is a weakness of the technique that can result in engraftment failure. To evaluate the efficacy of a new skin graft immobilization technique using multilayered polyurethane foam in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-six patients underwent a full-thickness skin graft. Multiple layers of a hydrocellular polyurethane foam dressing were used for skin graft immobilization. In addition, we created an in vitro skin graft model that allowed us to estimate immobilization pressure at the center and edges of skin grafts of various sizes. Overall mean graft survival was 88.9%. In the head and neck region (19 patients), mean graft survival was 93.6%. Based on the in vitro outcomes, this technique supplies effective pressure (<30 mmHg) to the center region of the skin graft. This multilayered polyurethane foam dressing is simple, safe, and effective for skin graft immobilization. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Green waste cooking oil-based rigid polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderus, N. F.; Tahir, S. M.

    2017-11-01

    Polyurethane is a versatile polymer traditionally prepared using petroleum-based raw material. Petroleum, however, is a non-renewable material and polyurethane produced was found to be non-biodegradable. In quest for a more environmentally friendly alternative, wastecooking oil, a highly abundant domestic waste with easily derivatized structure, is a viable candidate to replace petroleum. In this study,an investigation to determine physical and chemical properties of rigid polyurethane (PU) foam from waste cooking oil (WCO) was carried out. WCO was first adsorbed by using coconut husk activated carbon adsorbent prior to be used for polyol synthesis. The purified WCO was then used to synthesize polyol via transesterification reaction to yield alcohol groups in the WCO chains structure. Finally, the WCO-based polyol was used to prepare rigid PU foam. The optimum formulation for PU formation was found to be 90 polyol: 60 glycerol: 54 water: 40 diethanolamine: 23 diisocyanate. The rigid PU foam has density of 208.4 kg/m3 with maximum compressive strength and capability to receive load at 0.03 MPa and 0.09 kN, respectively. WCO-based PU can potentially be used to replace petroleum-based PU as house construction materials such as insulation panels.

  14. PLATELET ADHESION TO POLYURETHANE UREA UNDER PULSATILE FLOW CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Navitsky, Michael A.; Taylor, Joshua O.; Smith, Alexander B.; Slattery, Margaret J.; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s−1. The aim of the current work is to determine platelet adhesion properties to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system is used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g. cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments retain the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk is rotated in platelet rich bovine plasma for two hours with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow is found to exponentially decay with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels are found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices. PMID:24721222

  15. Solvent resistant thermoplastic aromatic poly(imidesulfone) and process for preparing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing a thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is disclosed. This resulting material has thermoplastic properties which are generally associated with polysulfones but not polyimides, and solvent resistance which is generally associated with polyimides but not polysulfones. This system is processable in the 250 to 350 C range for molding, adhesive and laminating applications. This unique thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is obtained by incorporating an aromatic sulfone moiety into the backbone of an aromatic linear polyimide by dissolving a quantity of a 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) in a solution of 3,3'-diaminodiphenylsulfone and bis(2-methoxyethyl)ether, precipitating the reactant product in water, filtering and drying the recovered poly(amide-acid sulfone) and converting it to the poly(imidesulfone) by heating.

  16. The Effect of Adhesion Interaction on the Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Basalt Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtannik, P. I.; Kabak, A. I.; Yakovchuk, Yu. Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of temperature, adhesion time, and surface treatment of a reinforcing filler on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic basalt plastics based on a high-density polyethylene and a copolymer of 1,3,5-trioxane with 1,3-dioxolan is investigated. An extreme dependence for the adhesive strength in a thermoplastic-basalt fiber system is established and its effect on the mechanical properties of basalt plastics and the influence of the adhesion contact time on the adhesive strength in the system are clarified. The surface modification of basalt fibers in acidic and alkaline media intensifies the adhesion of thermoplastics to them owing to a more developed surface of the reinforcing fibers after etching. It is found that the treatment in the acidic medium is more efficient and considerably improves the mechanical properties of basalt plastics.

  17. Evaluation of impact-affected areas of glass fibre thermoplastic composites from thermographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Simeoli, G.; Russo, P.; Meola, C.

    2016-07-01

    The usefulness of an infrared imaging device, in terms of both acting as a mechanism for surface thermal monitoring when a specimen is being impacted and as a non-destructive evaluation technique, has already been proved. Nevertheless, past investigation has focused on mainly thermoset-matrix composites with little attention towards thermoplastic ones. Conversely, these thermoplastic composites are becoming ever more attractive to the aeronautical sector. Their main advantage lies in the possibility of modifying their interface strength by adjusting the composition of the matrix. However, for a proper exploitation of new materials it is necessary to detail their characterization. The purpose of the present paper is to focus on the use of infrared thermography (IRT) to gain information on the behaviour of thermoplastic composites under impact. In addition, attention is given to image processing algorithms with the aim of more effectively measuring the extension of the impact-affected area.4

  18. High process yield rates of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices using a hybrid thermal assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Uba, Franklin I; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A

    2015-02-21

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) and with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high T(g) (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower T(g). Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25-250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (T(g) = 104 °C) and sealed with a cover plate (T(g) = 75 °C) at a temperature significantly below the T(g) of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels.

  19. The essential work of fracture of thermoplastic orthodontic retainer materials.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Albert L; Beeman, Cynthia S; Hicks, E Preston; Bush, Heather M; Mitchell, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate whether oral cleansing agents affect the essential work of fracture (EWF) and plastic work of fracture (PWF) for two types of orthodontic thermoplastic retainer materials. Polyethylene-terephthalate-glycol (PETG; Tru-Tain Splint) and polypropylene/ethylene-propylene rubber (PP-EPR) blend (Essix-C+) sheets were compared. For each material, six sets of 25 sheets were thermoformed into double-edge-notched-tension specimens; subsets of five specimens were formed with internotch distances (L) equal to 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 mm, respectively. Sets were stored (160 hours, 25 degrees C) in air (DRY), distilled water (DW), Original Listerine (LIS), mint Crest ProHealth (CPH), 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), or Polident solution (POL). Specimens were fractured in tension at 2.54 mm/min. Areas under load-elongation curves were measured to determine total work of fracture (W(f)). Linear regressions (W(f) vs L [n = 25]) yielded intercepts (EWF) and slopes (PWF). Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were used to evaluate differences in EWF and PWF estimates. PP-EPR blends showed higher EWFs after storage in HP vs storage in DW. PP-EPR blend showed higher EWFs after storage in CPH vs PETG. After HP storage, PP-EPR exhibited lower PWFs than with any other storage conditions. PP-EPR exhibited higher PWFs than PETG after storage in DRY, DW, and LIS. Compared with DW, none of the cleansers decreased the energy to initiate fracture. With one exception, no cleanser decreased the energy to continue plastic fracture extension. In PP-EPR blend, increased resistance to fracture initiation was observed with CPH and HP, yet, surprisingly, HP decreased resistance to plastic fracture growth.

  20. Characterising the thermoforming behaviour of glass fibre textile reinforced thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhtz, M.; Maron, B.; Hornig, A.; Müller, M.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.

    2018-05-01

    Textile reinforced thermoplastic composites are predestined for highly automated medium- and high-volume production processes. The presented work focusses on experimental studies of different types of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene (GF-PP) semi-finished thermoplastic textiles to characterise the forming behaviour. The main deformation modes fabric shear, tension, thought-thickness compression and bending are investigated with special emphasis on the impact of the textile structure, the deformation temperature and rate dependency. The understanding of the fundamental forming behaviour is required to allow FEM based assessment and improvement of thermoforming process chains.

  1. Lignin-derived thermoplastic co-polymers and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.; Saito, Tomonori; Pickel, Joseph M.; Baker, Frederick S.; Eberle, Claude Clifford; Norris, Robert E.; Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2014-06-10

    The present invention relates to a crosslinked lignin comprising a lignin structure having methylene or ethylene linking groups therein crosslinking between phenyl ring carbon atoms, wherein said crosslinked lignin is crosslinked to an extent that it has a number-average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g/mol, is melt-processible, and has either a glass transition temperature of at least 100.degree. C., or is substantially soluble in a polar organic solvent or aqueous alkaline solution. Thermoplastic copolymers containing the crosslinked lignin are also described. Methods for producing the crosslinked lignin and thermoplastic copolymers are also described.

  2. Characterization of elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, K. J.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK (APC-2) thermoplastic composite were characterized at 24 C (75 F) and 121 C (250 F) by using a one-parameter viscoplasticity model. To determine the strain-rate effects, uniaxial tension tests were performed on unidirectional off-axis coupon specimens with different monotonic strain rates. A modified Bodner and Partom's model was also used to describe the viscoplasticity of the thermoplastic composite. The experimental results showed that viscoplastic behavior can be characterized quite well using the one-parameter overstress viscoplasticity model.

  3. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA equipment leaks. Each owner or operator of a new or existing slabstock affected...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA equipment leaks. Each owner or operator of a new or existing slabstock affected...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... emissions from leaks from transfer pumps, valves, connectors, pressure-relief valves, and open-ended lines...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... emissions from leaks from transfer pumps, valves, connectors, pressure-relief valves, and open-ended lines...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... emissions from leaks from transfer pumps, valves, connectors, pressure-relief valves, and open-ended lines...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. Each owner or operator of a...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1295 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels. 63.1295 Section 63.1295 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1295 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. Each owner or operator of a new or existing...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. Each owner or operator of a...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1295 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels. 63.1295 Section 63.1295 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1295 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA storage vessels. Each owner or operator of a new or existing slabstock affected...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA emissions from the production line. (a) Each owner or...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... procedures in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section, unless a recovery device is used. Slabstock foam...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... procedures in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section, unless a recovery device is used. Slabstock foam...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1295 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA storage vessels. 63.1295 Section 63.1295 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1295 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA storage vessels. Each owner or operator of a new or existing slabstock affected...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. Each owner or operator of a new or existing...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—source-wide emission limitation. Each owner or operator of a new or existing slabstock...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam... procedures in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section, unless a recovery device is used. Slabstock foam...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA emissions from the production line. (a) Each owner or...