Science.gov

Sample records for thermosyphon effect

  1. Hydrodynamic instability of a thermosyphon loop with wall damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Hu, S.-P.

    1992-04-01

    An analysis using linear system theory and Nyquist criterion was carried out in the present study to investigate the hydrodynamic instability of a thermosyphon loop. The analytical results show that the loop becomes more unstable (i.e., the area of the stable region is reduced) if the length of the heater or cooler section increases or the loop aspect ratio W/H decreases. The present results indicate that the consideration of hydrodynamic instability in the thermosyphon loop or many similar engineering systems could be overlooked if the damping effect of wall is present.

  2. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Effects and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Goodenow, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some exposure to gamma irradiation. Non-condensable gas formation from radiation may breakdown water over time and render a portion of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature with accelerated gamma irradiation exposures on the same order of magnitude that is expected in eight years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon; evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some non-condensable gas was evident, however thermosyphon performance was not affected because the non-condensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of non-condensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the non-condensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of selected thermosyphons at temperature and in a vacuum chamber revealed that the non-condensable gas likely diffused out of the thermosyphons over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  3. The heat transfer effects of tube wall on a parallel-loop thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Yueh, C.S.; Weng, C.I. ); Hwang, C.C. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of tube wall heat transfer on the natural convection flows in a parallel loop thermosyphon are investigated analytically. The results show that the thermosyphon with consideration of those effects is more stable than that without the consideration. They also reveal that an increase in the value of thermal diffusivity ratio, [alpha], or radius ratio, [delta], will increase the magnitude of the onset critical Rayleigh number, Ra[sub c] and reduce the velocity of steady flow.

  4. The heat transfer effects of tube wall on a parallel-loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, C. S.; Weng, C. I.; Hwang, C. C.

    1993-04-01

    The effects of heat transfer of the tube wall on the natural convection flows in a parallel loops thermosyphon are investigated analytically. The results show that the thermosyphon with consideration of those effects is more stable than that without the consideration. They also reveal that an increase the value of thermal diffusivity ratio or radius ratio will increase the magnitude of the onset critical Rayleigh number and reduce the velocity of steady flow.

  5. Effectively design and simulate thermosyphon reboiler systems. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Thermosyphon reboilers provide a simple, low-maintenance design for distillation tower reboiler systems. With an understanding of all the factors involved, thermosyphon designs should be more reliable than most other reboiler systems due to an absence of moving parts (pumps) in the process circulation loop. Design of true thermosyphon exchangers requires an intimate knowledge of a distillation tower`s heat balance, temperature levels and pressure balance in there boiler loop. Temperature levels vary strongly with composition gradients depending on the system relative volatilities. Case studies of two industrial units demonstrate implications on exchanger design of the correct and incorrect simulation configuration. The two cases compare a low relative-volatility {alpha} system (ethylene-ethane splitter) and a high {alpha} system (FCCU deethanizer). Main factors include impact on equipment size and design. Proper design criteria for thermosyphon exchanger and distillation tower simulation and for integrating process and equipment design are also shown.

  6. Effectively design and simulate thermosyphon reboiler systems: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W.

    1995-07-01

    Thermosyphon reboilers provide a simple, low-maintenance design for distillation tower reboiler systems. With an understanding of all the factors involved, thermosyphon designs should be more reliable than most other reboiler systems due to an absence of moving parts (pumps) in the process circulation loop. Design of true thermosyphon exchangers requires an intimate knowledge of a distillation tower`s heat balance, temperature levels and pressure balance in the reboiler loop. Temperature levels vary strongly with composition gradients depending on the system`s relative volatilities. Case studies of two industrial units demonstrate implications on exchanger design of the correct and incorrect simulation configuration. The two cases compare a low relative-volatility ({alpha}) system (ethylene-ethane splitter) and a high {alpha} system (FCCU deethanizer). Part 1 covered basic thermosyphon design, advantages and disadvantages. Also, simulation requirements, {alpha} impacts and one-heat-source configurations were discussed. Part 2 continues with configurations of two heat sources at the same and difference temperatures. In addition, comparisons are made between the different designs to show an optimum for each case.

  7. Investigation of the Vibration Effect on the Closed Two-Phase Thermosyphon Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, K.

    2002-01-01

    One of the important problems to be solved while designing aircrafts of various purposes is to maintain the necessary temperature inside them. Besides everything it is necessary to equalize the temperature on the surfaces of various aircraft elements for preventing their deformation. The most promising direction when solving the aforementioned problems is the application of heat pipes as an element of the design. Heat pipes are used as highly efficient heat pipe-lines that, being parts of construction elements, permit to equalize the its temperature . As a result of the experiments, it was possible to prove the possibility of using heat pipes as the means for thermostabilization process of the space vehicle. The extension of the areas of application of heat pipes and thermosyphons has resulted in operating in conditions of vibration effects. It is explained to that vibrations are inherent in some units by its nature. Such installations are the space structures, space station, rockets, air and rocket engines, vessels, other transportation facilities. It is considered, that the vibrations improve the heat and mass transfer processes. Therefore it is customary to neglect of vibration actions goes in margin of safety of action of thermal systems. Actually, in accordance with experiences, the vibrations not only improve the heat change, but also degrade it. Therefore knowledge of the impact of vibrations, intrinsic to the installation, on operational modes of used heat pipes and thermosyphons is necessary for preventing breakdown first of all. One of the way of intensification of heat and mass transfer of processes with phase transitions of working fluid is connected with synthetically created vibration actions. In this case also it is necessary to know frequency bands and amplitudes, which one improve or degrade heat and mass transfer. The research of influencing of vibrations on thermal modes with phase changes of working fluids with reference to heat pipes and

  8. Type of condensers and their cooling effect in the loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Peter; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    This work investigates the cooling effect of three condensers in the loop thermosyphon in horizontal position. The cooling liquid flows in 1-tube condenser circuit. The work compares cooling effect of different types of condensers (flat condenser and ribbed tube condenser) at different thermal load. Cooling effect of condenser is connected with thermal changes in the evaporator. We have found out that the higher the thermal resistance is, the lower the condenser output is. Measurements and calculated values have proved different outputs of condensers.

  9. Effects of heat losses (or gains) from insulated portions of closed-loop thermosyphons with vertical heat transfer sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, M. A.; Baliga, B. R.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of heat losses or gains in the modeling of thermosyphons is investigated analytically using a closed-loop model where the circulating liquid is heated by a constant and uniform heat flux in the heated section of the loop and is cooled in a cooling section maintained at a constant wall temperature; elsewhere the pipes are insulated from the ambient fluid. The results of the analysis indicate that the performance of a closed-loop thermosyphon can be markedly affected by heat gains or losses in the insulated sections of the loop.

  10. Effect of noncondensable gas on the performance of a two-phase closed thermosyphon with wall conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.T.; Wang, S.C. ); Chen, S.L. )

    1991-09-01

    A theoretical analysis is made to investigate the noncondensable gas effect on the performance of a two-phase closed thermosyphon with wall conduction effect considered. In this paper it is shown that the diffusion length of the noncondensable gas increases under the influence of the radial diffusion and the wall conduction effects and these effects are governed mainly by four parameters. The conditions for minimizing these effects are also given.

  11. The Effect of Subcooling on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Doi, Kyoji; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon is used as a heat transfer device in an energy-saving heat transportation system and so forth, because it transports thermal energy without any external power supply such as a pump under a body force field. We previously performed a fundamental study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with a single heated tube evaporator both experimentally and theoretically which was made under the condition of near saturation temperature of liquid in a reservoir. In the present study, the effects of liquid subcooling and the heat input on the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions, and heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were examined experimentally using water, ethanol, benzene and Freon 113 as the working fluids. On the other hand, the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions were theoretically calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  12. A model of flow in a closed-loop thermosyphon including the Soret effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1985-11-01

    This theoretical study addresses the nature of convective motions in a toroidal loop of binary fluid oriented in the vertical plane and heated from below. The boundaries of the loop are impermeable, but gradients of the solute can be set up by Soret diffusion in the direction around the loop. The existence and stability of steady solutions are discussed over the Rayleigh number-Soret coefficient parameter plane. When the Soret coefficient is negative, periodic and chaotic oscillations analogous to those of thermohaline convection are predicted. When the Soret coefficient is positive, relaxation oscillations and low Rayleigh number chaotic motions are found. Both sets of phenomena are predicted to occur for realistic thermosyphon parameters.

  13. Effect of nanofluid concentration on two-phase thermosyphon heat exchanger performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.

    2016-06-01

    An approach - relaying on application of nanofluid as a working fluid, to improve performance of the two-phase thermosyphon heat exchanger (TPTHEx) has been proposed. The prototype heat exchanger consists of two horizontal cylindrical vessels connected by two risers and a downcomer. Tube bundles placed in the lower and upper cylinders work as an evaporator and a condenser, respectively. Distilled water and nanofluid water-Al2O3 solution were used as working fluids. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.01% and 0.1% by weight. A modified Peclet equation and Wilson method were used to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient of the tested TPTHEx. The obtained results indicate better performance of the TPTHEx with nanofluids as working fluid compared to distilled water, independent of nanoparticle concentration tested. However, increase in nanoparticle concentration results in overall heat transfer coefficient decrease of the TPTHEx examined. It has been observed that, independent of nanoparticle concentration tested, decrease in operating pressure results in evaporation heat transfer coefficient increase.

  14. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  15. An experimental investigation of inclined open thermosyphons

    SciTech Connect

    Behnia, M.; Morrison, G.L. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of free convective flow and thermal structures in an open ended inclined cylindrical thermosyphon with application to an evacuated tubular solar collector. The flow structure was visualized using dye and rheoscopic tracer particles and temperature measurements were made by a traversing thermocouple rake. During steady-state uniform heating a significant stagnant region was observed near the closed end of the tube, length of which decreased with increasing wall temperature. For the case of differential heating, with top half of the tube cross section at a higher temperature than the bottom half, there was no stagnant region. When the top half was at lower temperature than the bottom half, there was a significant region of multicellular motion in the closed end of the tube. An inactive stagnant or multicellular region in an evacuated tube solar collector and other open thermosyphons would decrease the effectiveness of the heat transfer through the open end of the tube.

  16. Thermosyphon Flooding Limits in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, James L.; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Fission Power Systems have long been recognized as potential multi-kilowatt power solutions for lunar, Martian, and extended planetary surface missions. Current heat rejection technology associated with fission surface power systems has focused on titanium water thermosyphons embedded in carbon composite radiator panels. The thermosyphons, or wickless heat pipes, are used as a redundant and efficient way to spread the waste heat from the power conversion unit(s) over the radiator surface area where it can be rejected to space. It is well known that thermosyphon performance is reliant on gravitational forces to keep the evaporator wetted with the working fluid. One of the performance limits that can be encountered, if not understood, is the phenomenon of condenser flooding, otherwise known as evaporator dry out. This occurs when the gravity forces acting on the condensed fluid cannot overcome the shear forces created by the vapor escaping the evaporator throat. When this occurs, the heat transfer process is stalled and may not re-stabilize to effective levels without corrective control actions. The flooding limit in earth's gravity environment is well understood as experimentation is readily accessible, but when the environment and gravity change relative to other planetary bodies, experimentation becomes difficult. An innovative experiment was designed and flown on a parabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtain empirical data for analysis. The test data is compared to current correlation models for validation and accuracy.

  17. The effect of axial conduction on a thermosyphon with prescribed heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, M.; Ramos, E.; Trevino, C.; Salazar, O.

    A one-dimensional model of a natural convection loop of arbitrary shape with prescribed heat flux over its entire length is analyzed. The effect of inclusion of axial conduction is considered in detail. Steady state solutions are presented for the velocity and temperature fields. The transcendental equation for the fluid velocity is studied for the special case of a toroidal geometry with sinusoidal heating. The time-dependent toroidal problem is reduced to a set of three ordinary differential equations which have steady, periodic and chaotic solutions. The stability characteristics of the equilibrium solutions are discussed. The nonconducting model is found to exhibit supercritical instability while the conducting model is subcritical.

  18. Study of a thermosyphon with a counter-flow heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertol, A.; Greif, R.

    The transient and steady state heat transfer and fluid flow in a closed thermosyphon loop have been studied. The toroidal thermosyphon is heated over the lower half and cooled over the upper half by an annular, insulated counter-flow heat exchanger in which the flow rate of the coolant is kept constant. The results include the temperature distributions, velocity variations, efficiency and pressure drop across the heat exchanger. Special attention is also given to the effect of the heat exchanger on the stability of the thermosyphon.

  19. Wall shape optimization for a thermosyphon loop featuring corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen Esquivel, Patricio I.; ten Thije Boonkkamp, Jan H. M.; Dam, Jacques A. M.; Mattheij, Robert M. M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper we address the problem of optimal wall-shape design of a single phase laminar thermosyphon loop. The model takes the buoyancy forces into account via the Boussinesq approximation. We focus our study on showing the effects of wall shape on the flow and on the temperature inside the thermosyphon. To this extend we determine the dependency of the flow rate and the increase in temperature, on the geometrical characteristics of the loop. The geometry considered is a set of axially symmetric corrugated pipes described by a set of parameters; namely the pipe inner radius, the period of the corrugation, the amplitude of the corrugation, and the ratio of expansion and contraction regions of a period of the pipe. The governing equations are solved using the Finite Element Method, in combination with an adaptive mesh refinement technique in order to capture the effects of wall shape. We characterize the effects of the amplitude and of the ratio of expansion and contraction. In particular we show that for a given fixed amplitude it is possible to find an optimal ratio of expansion and contraction that minimizes the temperature inside the thermosyphon. The results show that by adequately choosing the design parameters, the performance of the thermosyphon loop can be improved.

  20. Thermosyphon circulation in solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Ranatunga, D. B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of flow rate in thermosyphon solar collectors are compared with experimental measurements obtained using a laser Doppler anemometer. Modifications to the usual method of analysis are proposed to improve the accuracy of the predictions, and the results are compared with flow rate predictions and measurements in other investigations.

  1. Application of functionalized nanofluid in thermosyphon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A water-based functionalized nanofluid was made by surface functionalizing the ordinary silica nanoparticles. The functionalized nanofluid can keep long-term stability. and no sedimentation was observed. The functionalized nanofluid as the working fluid is applied in a thermosyphon to understand the effect of this special nanofluid on the thermal performance of the thermosyphon. The experiment was carried out under steady operating pressures. The same work was also explored for traditional nanofluid (consisting of water and the same silica nanoparticles without functionalization) for comparison. Results indicate that a porous deposition layer exists on the heated surface of the evaporator during the operating process using traditional nanofluid; however, no coating layer exists for functionalized nanofluid. Functionalized nanofluid can enhance the evaporating heat transfer coefficient, while it has generally no effect on the maximum heat flux. Traditional nanofluid deteriorates the evaporating heat transfer coefficient but enhances the maximum heat flux. The existence of the deposition layer affects mainly the thermal performance, and no meaningful nanofluid effect is found in the present study. PMID:21846362

  2. Heat transfer performance of two-phase closed thermosyphon with oxidized CNT/water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Heris, Saeed; Fallahi, Marjan; Shanbedi, Mehdi; Amiri, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of different acids on the thermal performance of oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNT)/water nanofluids in a two-phase closed thermosyphon were studied. The structures morphology and functionalization degree were studied concurrently. The results indicated that strong oxidants increased dispersivity of CNT in the nanofluids. In other words, as the number of COOH groups increased in the nanofluids, an upward trend was also observed in the thermal efficiency of the thermosyphon.

  3. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  4. Natural convection in C-shaped thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, A.A.; Sezai, I.

    1997-08-29

    The present work is concerned with the numerical analysis of natural convection from a C-shaped thermosyphon. The system can be considered as a model for a Trombe wall in passive solar collectors as well as electronic cooling arrangements and it has geophysical applications. The effect of Rayleigh number (1 {times} 10{sup 3} to 1 {times} 10{sup 7}) and aspect ratios of 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, and 10.0 is investigated for a fixed Prandtl number (0.7). Local and average Nusselt numbers for heated and cold walls are discussed. Mass advected by the buoyancy force is calculated and presented for the range of investigated parameters. The flow pattern and isotherm distribution in the gap between the wall and cover plate are presented and discussed.

  5. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc Andrew

    2013-01-01

    An innovative experiment to study the thermosyphon flooding limits was designed and flown on aparabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtainempirical data for analysis. Current correlation models of Faghri and Tien and Chung do not agreewith the data. A new model is presented that predicts the flooding limits for thermosyphons inearths gravity and lunar gravity with a 95 confidence level of +- 5W.

  6. Experiments and simulations on a thermosyphon solar collector with integrated storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toninelli, P.; Mariani, A.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the thermal behaviour of a new type of flat solar collector that integrates the fluid storage tank. Often the main limitation of the solar thermosyphon installations is the prohibition to adopt external storage tanks due to their impact, especially for historical centres of particular architectural significance. To avoid this issue, a new system, that includes the collector and the storage, has been developed. This new apparatus works as a thermosyphon: it is possible to take advantage of the natural convection to avoid using a pump. Experimental tests have been conducted in such a collector with and without the absorbing plate. Furthermore, CFD simulations are reported to analyze in detail the dynamic thermal performance of the innovative solar collector and a good-agreement with the experimental tests has been found. Finally, both in numerical simulations and in experimental data the thermosyphon effect has been verified, obtaining the desired water temperature for domestic applications.

  7. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  8. Heat transfer behavior of a rectangular thermosyphon loop

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.J.; Zelaya, R. )

    1988-05-01

    The thermal performance of a rectangular thermosyphon loop was studied. The analysis, using a one-dimensional approximation, the convectional friction factor, and an empirical correlation for the overall heat transfer in the cooler, was shown to be able to predict accurately the loop performance at steady state or approaching steady state, if the effective length was used to replace the geometeric length in the calculation of loop friction. The steady-state natural circulation flow solution obtained was shown to be a function of a dimensionless group PY or (NuGr/Pr) Y and agrees very well with the experimental results.

  9. Analysis of a transient asymmetrically heated/cooled open thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Cai, J. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a numerical study of transient natural convention in a rectangular open thermosyphon having asymmetric thermal boundary conditions. One vertical wall of the thermosyphon is either heated by constant heat flux ([open quotes]warmup[close quotes]) or cooled by convention to the surroundings ([open quotes]cooldown[close quotes]). The top of the thermosyphon is open to a large reservoir of fluid at constant temperature. The vorticity, energy, and stream-function equations are solved by finite differences on graded mesh. The ADI method and iteration with overrelaxation are used. We find that the thermosyphon performs quite differently during cooldown compared with warmup. In cooldown, flows are mainly confined to the thermosyphon with little momentum and heat exchange with the reservoir. For warmup, the circulation resembles that for a symmetrically heated thermosyphon where there is a large exchange with the reservoir. The difference is explained by the temperature distributions. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cryogenic Nitrogen Thermosyphon Developed and Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Christie, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A two-phase nitrogen thermosyphon was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to efficiently integrate a cryocooler into an insulated liquid-nitrogen-filled tank as part of an advanced development zero-boiloff (ZBO) ground test. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Advanced Space Transportation Program supported this test to improve the performance of in-space propulsion system concepts. Recent studies (ref. 1) have shown significant mass reductions and other advantages when incorporating active cooling in a ZBO configuration, enabling consideration of high-performing cryogenic propellants for long-duration applications in space. Active cooling was integrated via a thermosyphon, made of copper, 42 in. (1070 mm) long with an inner diameter of 0.436 in. (11 mm). It was charged with nitrogen to 225 psia at 300 K, which provided a fill ratio of 15 percent. The temperatures and heat flows through the thermosyphon were monitored during the startup phase of the ZBO test, and steady-state tests were conducted over a range of increasing and decreasing heat flows. The results also were compared with the initial design calculations and with results for a similar thermosyphon. They show that the thermal resistance of the thermosyphon was one-half of that expected--0.2 K/W at a heat flow of 8.0 W. The design calculations also showed that this resistance can be made relatively constant over a wider range of heat flows by making the ratio of evaporator area to condenser area 3:1. The better-than-expected results will translate into reduced integration loss for the ZBO concept.

  11. Heat Transfer in a Two-Phase Closed-Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji

    A two-phase closed-loop thermosyphon is a device which transports heat energy from a heat source to a sink under the body force field and has many practical applications. The critical heat flux of this thermosyphon is larger than that of a non-loop thermosyphon, because the flooding phenomenon occurring in the no-loop one does not occur. In addition, there is another merit that the evaporator and the condencer can be installed in comparatively arbitrary position because these are interconnected by piping. In most previous investigations of the two-phase closed-loop thermosyphons, overall heat resistances were measured. The overall heat resistance, however, consists of three heat resistances; the heat resistances in the evaporator and the condenser, and the transport resistance in the interconnecting pipe. Therefore, we should consider these heat resistances separately. In the present study, we took note of the heat resistances (or heat transfer coefficients) of the evaporator and the condenser. The experiment was performed using two experimental setups and three kinds of test liquid. And, the effects of rotation angle, heat flux, inside temperature (or inside pressure) and liquid charge on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated.

  12. Growth of protein crystals suspended in a closed loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1991-03-01

    The quality of protein crystals often suffers from their growth at a liquid or solid surface. A novel solution growth method was developed to alleviate this problem. A growing crystal is suspended in a specially configured upflow of supersaturated nutrient, which is provided by the effect of fluid buoyancy in a closed loop thermosyphon. The flow rate and supersaturation are controlled by the temperature distribution in the thermosyphon, while contact of the crystal with the wall during growth is practically eliminated. The method was applied to the growth of lysozyme single crystals, with surprising results. While the orthorhombic form of lysozyme grew readily to the suspension limit of this particular apparatus (1.5 mm), the tetragonal form grew only to a maximum size less than 0.1 mm. Seed crystals of tetragonal lysozyme introduced into stagnant batch controls did not experience the growth cessation that the suspended crystals did. A likely cause of this growth cessation is the fluid shear forces on the suspended crystals.

  13. Active control of fluid equilibrium in a thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsun, D. A.; Zyuzgin, A. V.; Polovinkin, K. V.; Putin, G. F.

    2008-08-01

    We have theoretically and experimentally studied the problem of automated control over the mechanical equilibrium of an inhomogeneously heated fluid in a rectangular convection loop (thermosyphon), which comprises two coupled vertical channels with rectangular cross sections arranged in a unit made of a heat-conducting material. The equilibrium is maintained using a control feedback subsystem (controller) capable of responding to the onset of a convective motion by introducing small changes in the spatial orientation of the thermosyphon in the gravitational field. The effect of the dynamic stabilization of the equilibrium, which is unstable in the absence of control, is achieved in a broad range of parameters of the system. It is established that excess feedback leads to the excitation of oscillations in the system. An analysis of the theoretical model showed that these oscillations are related to a delay in the correction introduced by the controller into the state of the system under control. The experimental data are in perfect agreement with the results of analysis of the theoretical model.

  14. The Design of an Ultra-Low Background Thermosyphon for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Busch, Matthew; Daniels, Randy; Fast, James E.; Green, Matthew P.; Reid, Douglas J.

    2013-05-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) is an ultra-low background neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) experiment that will deploy up to 40 kg of high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a detector array with less than 1 event/ton-year in a 4 keV region of interest around the 0νββ signal. HPGe diodes, when used as ionizing radiation detectors, need to be maintained at a temperature close to that of liquid nitrogen (77 K). This work describes the R&D results of a cryogenic system capable of meeting the requirements of low background and the cooling capacity required to successfully operate such a detector system. The MJD germanium detector modules will operate at liquid nitrogen temperature to provide adequate cooling for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. This paper shows the experimental results obtained using a two-phase horizontal thermosyphon using liquid nitrogen as the MJD’s cooling system. The cold test shows that the proposed thermosyphon has sufficient cooling power to handle the heat load of an MJD module. Results for the temperature gradient across the thermosyphon, cooling capacity, and design considerations demonstrate that the thermosyphon can effectively remove the calculated heat load of each module of the experiment. The thermosyphon will be bolted to a cold plate from which detector strings will hang. The thermal conductivity of a mockup of the MJD bolted thermal joint is experimentally determined to be below 0.1 K/W.

  15. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Exposure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James, L.A; Jaworske, Donald, A.; Goodenow, Debra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some gamma irradiation. Noncondensable gas formation from radiation-induced breakdown of water over time may render portions of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature under accelerated gamma irradiation, with exposures on the same order of magnitude as that expected in 8 years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon: evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some noncondensable gas was evident; however, thermosyphon performance was not affected because the noncondensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of noncondensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the noncondensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of one thermosyphon in a vacuum chamber and at temperature revealed that the noncondensable gas diffused out of the thermosyphon over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  16. Mathematical Modelling of Force Convection in a Two-Phase Thermosyphon in Conjugate Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurpeiis, Atlant; Nee, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    A nonlinear non-stationary problem of the conductive-convective heat transfer is addressed (under forced convection conditions) in the thermosyphon of rectangular cross-section. The thermal energy supply is carried out through the lower horizontal border. The mathematical model is formulated in dimensionless variables of "velocity vorticity vector - current function - temperature". The current and temperature distribution lines are obtained, illustrating the effect of the Reynolds number on the thermodynamic structures formation in the analyzed object.

  17. Characterization of a tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger for solar water heating

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, S.D.; Davidson, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Performance of a double-wall, natural convection, two-pass, tube-in-shell heat exchanger designed for use in a solar water heating system is measured. The heat exchanger is mounted along the length of a solar water storage tank. Flow of cold water on the shell side of the heat exchanger is driven solely by buoyancy forces. Hot side fluid is pumped. Flow rate, pressure drop and temperature data needed for a semi-empirical model of the heat exchanger are obtained. Performance is measured for forced convection, hot side volumetric flow rates of 0.016, 0.032 and 0.079 l/s. Temperature difference between hot and cold fluid at the inlets is varied from 0 to 75 degC. Measured values include thermosyphon and forced flow rates, temperature differences across the beat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, and pressure drop due to shear on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. Heat exchanger effectiveness and overall heat transfer area product (UA) are calculated. Thermosyphon mass flow rates are on the order of 0.01 kg/s. Although the low flow rates create thermal stratification of the water storage tank, they restrict energy transfer in the heat exchanger.

  18. Heat Transfer Characteristics in Crank-Shape Thermosyphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hedeaki; Koito, Yasushi

    A two-phase closed thermosyphon is applied to gas-to-gas heat exchangers, the cooling of heat generation devices, the melting of snow, the prevention from icing of water on roads and so on. Generally, straight tubes are used as the thermosyphon. However, because of the limited space for the straight thermosyphon to be installed, it is considered that a bent thermosyphon is enforced to employ. In response to this, fundamental experiments are conducted on the heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase crank shape closed thermosyphon, in which an evaporator and a condenser are vertically positioned, and a connecting adiabatic section is horizontal. Ethylene glycol aqueous solutions which have lower freezing points and hydrofluoroether 7100 and 7200 which do not contain chloride are used as the working fluids Heat transfer coefficients and critical heat fluxes in the thermosyphon are measured by changing the amount of charged working fluid (0.30,0.40,0.50 and 0.60 of the evaporator volume),the temperature of the adiabatic section (40,50,60,70 and 80°C) and heat flux (from 4.0 kW /m2 to critical). The experimental results are shown and compared with those taken using water as the working fluid.

  19. Hydrodynamic instability of solar thermosyphon water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Du, S.C.; Huang, B.J.; Yen, R.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The flow instability of a solar thermosyphon water heater is studied analytically. A system dynamics model is derived by means of a one-dimensional approach and a linear perturbation method. The characteristic equation is obtained and the Nyquist criterion is used to examine the flow stability. The parameter M is a dimensionless parameter of system stability. The stability maps are plotted in terms of 14 parameters. The occurrence of hydrodynamic instability is determined by comparing the stability curves and the designed values of M. Flow instability is shown not to occur in most of solar water heaters commercially available, because the loop friction is relatively high in the design and because solar irradiation in field operation is still not high enough to cause flow instability.

  20. Gas-concentration measurements and analysis for gas-loaded thermosyphons

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Tien, C.L. )

    1988-08-01

    Using a miniature wet-bulb/dry-bulb probe, detailed measurements of noncondensable-gas concentration profiles were made in a gas-loaded two-phase relfux thermosyphon to investigate the effects of orientation and gas/vapor molecular weight combination. Natural convection andd radial diffusion were found to have a large influence on the noncondensable-gas distribution, even when the gas and vapor molecular weights are equal. An axisymmeteric two-dimensional diffusion model is presented to allow evaluation of the relative effects of natural convection versus diffusion. Gas recirculation, axial stratification, regions of unstable flow, and their effects on performance are discussed.

  1. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  2. Convective heat transfer in a closed two-phase thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ani, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A numerical analysis of heat transfer processes and hydrodynamics in a two-phase closed thermosyphon in a fairly wide range of variation of governing parameters has been investigated. A mathematical model is formulated based on the laws of mass conservation, momentum and energy in dimensionless variables "stream function - vorticity vector velocity - temperature". The analysis of the modes of forced and mixed convection for different values of Reynolds number and heat flows in the evaporation zone, the possibility of using two-phase thermosyphon for cooling gas turbine blades, when the heat is coming from the turbine blades to the thermosyphon is recycled a secondary refrigerant has been studied with different values of the centrifugal velocity. Nusselet Number, streamlines, velocity, temperature fields and temperature profile has been calculated during the investigation.

  3. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, Jim; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The condenser flooding phenomenon associated with gravity aided two-phase thermosyphons was studied using parabolic flights to obtain the desired reduced gravity environment (RGE). The experiment was designed and built to test a total of twelve titanium water thermosyphons in multiple gravity environments with the goal of developing a model that would accurately explain the correlation between gravitational forces and the maximum axial heat transfer limit associated with condenser flooding. Results from laboratory testing and parabolic flights are included in this report as part I of a two part series. The data analysis and correlations are included in a follow on paper.

  4. Investigation and Construction of a Thermosyphoning Solar Hot Water System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harvey

    1978-01-01

    Describes how a thermosyphoning solar water heater capable of heating 110 kilogram of water to 80 degree Celsius and maintaining this temperature for 24 hours was constructed by four students in the fifth form of Sekolah Date Abdul Razak, Seremban, Malaysia in 1976. (HM)

  5. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-10-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000oC) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900oC, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE’s) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger.

  6. Application of silver nanofluid containing oleic acid surfactant in a thermosyphon economizer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a recent study on the application of a two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) in a thermosyphon for economizer (TPEC). The TPEC had three sections of equal size; the evaporator, the adiabatic section, and the condenser, of 250 mm × 250 mm × 250 mm (W × L × H). The TPCT was a steel tube of 12.7-mm ID. The filling ratios chosen to study were 30, 50, and 80% with respect to the evaporator length. The volumetric flow rates for the coolant (in the condenser) were 1, 2.5, and 5 l/min. Five working fluids investigated were: water, water-based silver nanofluid with silver concentration 0.5 w/v%, and the nanofluid (NF) mixed with 0.5, 1, and 1.5 w/v% of oleic acid (OA). The operating temperatures were 60, 70, and 80°C. Experimental data showed that the TPEC gave the highest heat flux of about 25 kW/m2 and the highest effectiveness of about 0.3 at a filling ratio of 50%, with the nanofluid containing 1 w/v% of OA. It was further found that the effectiveness of nanofluid and the OA containing nanofluids were superior in effectiveness over water in all experimental conditions came under this study. Moreover, the presence of OA had clearly contributed to raise the effectiveness of the nanofluid. PMID:21711856

  7. Wind-augmented heat transfer in an open thermosyphon tube with large length-diameter ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, G.S.H.; Kirchner, J.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The paper reports an experimental study of the open thermosyphon tube when its heat transfer performance is augmented by the prevailing wind flowing down the inside of an insert tube concentric with the thermosyphon tube. Data are presented for the large length-diameter ratios characteristic of geotechnical applications. A flow model is developed and used to interpret these and other results. Comparisons are made with the performance of liquid-filled thermosyphons.

  8. Flow in a rectangular closed-loop thermosyphon with vertical heat transfer passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, Brian R.; Shadday, Martin A., Jr.

    1986-12-01

    Closed-loop thermosyphons are pipe networks in which the flow is due to simultaneous heating and cooling of different sections of the pipe network. Thermosyphons are commonly modeled one-dimensionally, where wall shear is accounted for by a friction factor. When the heat transfer passages of a thermosyphon are oriented vertically, buoyancy drastically alters the flow, and forced convection friction factor and Nusselt number correlations are no longer applicable. A closed-loop rectangular thermosyphon with vertical heat transfer passages was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Friction factor and Nusselt number correlations for the combined forced/free flow in the vertical legs of the loop were determined numerically.

  9. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  10. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Katsumata, Yoshikazu

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy by natural convective circulation without any external power supply. Therefore, it has been paid attention as a heat transfer equipment for saving energy. A basic investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics in the thermosyphon was performed both experimentally and theoretically. The circulation flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, and heat transfer coefficients in the heated section were measured using water, ethanol and Freon 113 as the working liquids. And, the effects of the heat input and liquid physical properties on the flow and heat transfer characteristics were examined. In the theoretical study, the circulation flow rate was calculated from the force balance between the driving force arising from density differences and the pressure drop in the loop. The comparison of the calculated with experimental results was made concerning the circulation flow rate and pressure and temperature distributions. For water and ethanol, the comparison presented the considerably close agreement. But, for Freon 113, the agreement was insufficient and further detailed investigation is needed.

  11. Thermosyphon coil arrangement for heat pump outdoor unit

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, R.

    1984-05-22

    For a heat pump, the outdoor unit is provided with a coil and a refrigerant flow arrangement there for which is such that in the heating mode of operation of the heat pump they operate in a thermosyphon fashion. The coil has a feed portion and an exit portion leading to a separator drum from which liquid refrigerant is returned through downcomer line for recirculation to the feed portion. The coil is tilted upwardly from entry to exit by the angle alpha to enhance the clearance of the two phases of refrigerant from each other in the heating mode of operation. There is no thermosyphon function in the cooling mode of operation. 9 figs.

  12. Thermosyphon coil arrangement for heat pump outdoor unit

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert

    1984-01-01

    For a heat pump, the outdoor unit is provided with a coil and a refrigerant flow arrangement therefor which is such that in the heating mode of operation of the heat pump they operate in a thermosyphon fashion. The coil 32 has a feed portion 30 and an exit portion 34 leading to a separator drum 36 from which liquid refrigerant is returned through downcomer line 42 for recirculation to the feed portion. The coil is tilted upwardly from entry to exit by the angle alpha to enhance the clearance of the two phases of refrigerant from each other in the heating mode of operation. There is no thermosyphon function in the cooling mode of operation.

  13. Application of CFD methods to the evaluation of flow characteristics of open thermosyphons

    SciTech Connect

    Almenas, K.K.; Floyd, J.E.; McGrattan, K.B.

    1997-07-01

    The open thermosyphon has several characteristics which makes it suitable for verification of CFD codes. Prior experimental research has provided data suitable for benchmarking case histories, furthermore, in spite of its simple natural circulation flow geometry, the open thermosyphon exhibits complicated flow behavior. In this study two different CFD codes are employed to generate parameters which can be compared with known experimental values. A quantitative comparison of experimental and calculated results showed that the experimentally measured energy carrying capacity of this strictly axially-symmetric flow geometry could not be reproduced by 2-D computations. Permutations of the computational model showed that this failure was not a function of noding structure, turbulence models, or even of the CFD code employed. Irrespective of the computational options employed, when compared on the basis of Ra{sub m}, (where Ra{sub m} = Ra*R/L), the calculated results remained a factor of five or more below the experimentally measured data. The CFD generated results had in fact a larger disagreement with experimental data then earlier theoretical computations which employed boundary layer integration techniques. The computations were repeated employing 3-D cylindrical geometry while maintaining the same mesh size as for the 2-D computations. The calculated results showed that above values of Log (Ra{sub m}) = 3, the flow field above the thermosyphon tube, does not maintain axial symmetry. The ascending warm stream and the returning cooler flow break the symmetric flow pattern which is imposed in a 2-D computation and flow around and past each other. Mixing takes place at the interfaces of these streams, but for the most part they maintain a separate identity. The computed energy transport rate increases by a factor of two to four, compared to the 2-D calculations. This moves the calculated result closer to experimentally measured values, but is still not entirely

  14. Performance analysis of a thermosyphon solar water heating system. Part 2: Nighttime performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoneim, Z.A.; Nassr, I.S.

    1995-11-01

    The paper presents an experimental and theoretical analysis of the performance of a thermosyphon solar water heating system under actual operating conditions during nighttime. The system consisted of a 1.8 m by 0.8 m flat plate collector and a 100 liter tank. Detailed temperature-time curves for the system over a 24 hour period were recorded using a stand alone microprocessor-based measurement and control system. Nighttime mass flow rates were calculated using several methods, based on the recorded temperature-time curves, the governing conservation equations and the system thermal losses. Deduced nighttime mass flow rates are in the order of 0.005 kg/sec. The effect of reverse flow was found to increase the system thermal losses by nearly fourfold.

  15. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  16. Heat transfer in an air thermosyphon permafrost protection device

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.L.; Reid, R.L.

    1982-09-01

    Velocity and temperature profiles were measured in a prototype air thermosyphon permafrost protection device. This device, known as the air convection pile, consists of an 18-in. (0.46-m) outer tube containing a shorter concentric 10-in. (0.25-m) tube extending from 10 to 60 ft (3 to 18 m) into the permafrost. Measurements showed a low frequency oscillating flow in both the annulus and inner tube. Heat removal rates compared favorable with an analytical model and previous experimental results, but the annulus velocity profiles were significantly different, possibly due to the oscillation in the flow.

  17. Analysis of thermosyphoning in a steam generator model

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Martinez, G.M.

    1991-10-01

    An analysis of thermosyphoning in a stream generator model is presented. The model considers the transient development of buoyancy-driven steam flow in the steam generator tubing, secondary side heat transfer and an inlet plenum mixing model. Numerical solutions are obtained for conditions intended to simulate the natural circulation phenomena in a 3-Loop pressurized water reactor in a loss-of-coolant accident scenario. The relation between the circulation rate and the heating rate is determined. The sensitivity of the model to various key parameters is examined. 16 refs.

  18. Performance characteristic of thermosyphon heat pipe at radiant heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Peter; Papučík, Štefan; Kaduchová, Katarína

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses about device, which is called heat pipe. This device is with heat source with radiant heat source. Heat pipe is device with high efficiency of heat transfer. The heat pipe, which is describe in this article is termosyphon heat pipe. The experiment with termosyphon heat pipe get a result. On the base of result, it will be in future to create mathematical model in Ansys. Thermosyphon heat pipe is made of copper and distilled water is working fluid. The significance of this experiment consists in getting of the heat transfer and performance characteristic. On the basis of measured and calculated data can be constructed the plots.

  19. A parametric study of heat transfer within a planar thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.; Phillips, G.

    1993-08-01

    The results of a parametric study for a planar thermosyphon are presented. The thermosyphon consists of a ``U-shaped`` geometry, with the center portion of the ``U`` being a solid. The outer legs of the ``U`` are the flow channels. One of the outer surfaces of a channel was held at a constant temperature. The remaining outer surfaces were considered adiabatic. The configuration described is characteristic of passive systems for radioactive waste storage and reactor safety systems. Parameters which were varied included the channel geometry, the thermal conductivity of the solid, and the Ra number. The average Nu number for the constant temperature surface decreased as the inlet channel width decreased, and as the thermal conductivity of the solid increased. A modified Ra number, defined as the Ra number divided by the length to gap ratio for the outer channel, is used in the paper. At low values of the modified Ra number, there is over an order of magnitude decrease in the average Vu number for a change in the inlet channel width from 1.0 to 0.25. But as the value of the modified Ra number increases for any inlet channel width, the average Vu number results approached those of vertical parallel plates, independent of the inlet channel width and the thermal conductivity of the solid. The vertical parallel plate data is approached because the boundary layer flow near the heated plate is unaffected by the surface of the intervening solid.

  20. Experimental analysis of natural convection within a thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.

    1993-09-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a thermosyphon designed to passively cool cylindrical heat sources are experimentally studied. The analysis is based on recognizing the physics of the flow within different regions of the thermosyphon to develop empirical heat transfer correlations. The basic system consists of three concentric cylinders, with an outer channel between the outer two cylinders, and an inner channel between the inner two cylinders. Tests were conducted. with two different process material container diameters, representing the inner cylinder, and several different power levels. The experimentally determined local and average Nu numbers for the inner channel are in good agreement with previous work for natural convection between vertical parallel plates, one uniformly heated and the other thermally insulated. The implication is that the heat transfer off of each surface is independent of the adjacent surface for sufficiently high Ra numbers. The heat transfer is independent because of limited interaction between the boundary layers at sufficiently high Ra numbers. As a result of the limited interaction, the maximum temperature within the system remained constant, or decreased slightly when the radii of the inner cylinders increased for the same amount of heat removal.

  1. The liquid helium thermosyphon for the GEM detector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.

    1993-05-04

    The GEM detector magnet, a horizontal solenoid 19.5 m in diameter and wound with a niobium-titanium cable in conduit, will be located with it`s axis 19.5 m below grade. The conductor is wound on the inside of an aluminum bobbin which is cooled by liquid helium which flows by natural convection in a thermosyphon loop from a large storage dewar located at the ground surface. The function of the thermosyphon system is to absorb the environmental heat load as well as any internally generated heat. In the first category is included that heat which is transfered to the magnet by way of the mechanical supports, the insulation and the current leads. The internally generated heat includes the resistive heating within the normally conducting conductor splices and the inductive heating of the bobbin during current transients. Though similar systems have been employed elsewhere, there are some unique aspects to the present design. By taking advantage of the large vertical head available, the parallel heat exchanger passes within the magnet remain sub-cooled, thus insuring single phase coolant within the magnet. It is believed that this will be the first instance of such a large vertical head being used to this advantage in a helium system.

  2. Laminar flow modelling of a thermosyphon loop at specified wall temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçüka, Serhan; Başaran, Tahsin

    2007-10-01

    A thermosyphon loop is analyzed in this study by use of numerical and experimental techniques. A rectangular loop was constructed using copper pipe and the sections which were heated or cooled were designed as concentric tube heat exchangers. Hot or cold water was circulated outside of these sections, and both the surface temperatures and heat transferred to and from the loop were measured. Within the numerical study both the momentum and energy equations were also solved using a SIMPLEX algorithm. Numerical results were obtained for laminar flow within the circuit when there was uniform wall temperature in the vertically heated and cooled sections of the thermosyphon. The two-dimensional numerical model provided results which agree with those found experimentally from the thermosyphon loop. In addition, a simulation model was constructed using a correlation included both the Grashof and Prandtl numbers to evaluate heat transfer through a thermosyphon loop.

  3. Experimental study on transient behavior of semi-open two-phase thermosyphon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qiao-Hui; Tu, Chuan-Jing

    2004-12-01

    An experimental system was set up to measure the temperature, pressure, heat transfer rate and mass flow rate in a semi-open two-phase thermosyphon. The behaviors of a semi-open two-phase thermosyphon during startup, shutdown and lack of water were studied to get complete understanding of its thermal characteristics. The variation of wall temperature, heat-exchange condition and pressure fluctuations of semi-open two-phase thermosyphons showed that the startup of SOTPT needs about 60-70 min; the startup speed of SOTPT is determined by the startup speed of the condensation section; the average pressure in the heat pipe is equal to the environmental pressure usually; the shutdown of SOTPT needs about 30-50 min; a semi-open two-phase thermosyphon has good response to lack of water accident.

  4. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  5. Thermosyphon Method for Cooling the Rotor Blades of High-Temperature Steam Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, Alexander R.; Temnikova, Elena Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The design scheme of closed two-phase thermosyphon were suggested that can provide standard thermal operation of blades of high-temperature steam turbine. The method for thermosyphon calculation is developed. The example of thermal calculation was implemented, it showed that to cool the steam turbine blades at their heating by high-temperature steam, the heat can be removed in the rear part of the blades by air with the temperature of about 440°C.

  6. Flow instability and bifurcation in gas-loaded reflux thermosyphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, P. F.; Tien, C. L.; Lee, K. W.; Elkouh, N.

    1991-02-01

    In vertical gas-loaded two-phase reflux thermosyphons, the temperature and concentration gradients between the active and shut-off regions can create double-diffusive mixed convection flows. When the noncondensable gas molecular weight is greater than that of the vapor, different steady and time-dependent gas recirculation patterns develop, similar to those observed during Rayleigh-Benard convection in vertical slots. Experimental results presented here show that bifurcations from axisymmetric to three-dimensional, then asymmetric, and finally multiple distinct gas-flow patterns occur as the Rayleigh number increases. Ultimately, a sudden transition to a large-amplitude oscillatory gas flow takes place. Detailed concentration maps and power-density spectra from point wet-bulb temperature measurements clearly chart these transitions. These results impact the design of many condensing systems where noncondensables are present.

  7. The measured performance of an air thermosyphon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, L. S.; Burns, P. J.; Winn, C. B.

    Results of performance tests of a solar thermosyphon test cell are reported. The test cell comprised a structure on a concrete slab with fiberglass insulated walls. The north wall consisted of a styrofoam-insulated gravel-filled box, while the south wall featured double glazing over metal solar collectors. The ceiling was ducted to provide air flow from the south collector to the rock storage, and an air channel was built into the floor. A numerical model was developed of the expected performance of the cell, using an Euler technique to solve the transient energy and momentum equations. The temperature was monitored at various points of the structure and flow visualization studies were made with titanium tetrachloride. Heat was found to be stored in the upper portion of the rock box, which because of its size also inhibited circulation. Thermal comfort was determined to be available due to warm surfaces, rather than warm air.

  8. Fuzzy model representation of thermosyphon solar water heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Kishor, Nand; Narain, Anirudha; Prakash Ranjan, Vibhaw; Das, Mihir Kr.

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this paper is to focus on improvement in prediction accuracy of model for thermosyphon solar water heating (SWH) system. The work employs grey-box modeling approach based on fuzzy system to predict the outlet water temperature of the said system. The prediction performance results are compared with neural network technique, which has been suggested by various researchers in the last one decade. The outlet water temperature prediction by fuzzy modeling technique is analyzed by using 3 models, one with three inputs (inlet water temperature, ambient temperature, solar irradiance), next with two inputs (inlet water temperature, solar irradiance) and last one with single input (solar irradiance/inlet water temperature). An improved prediction performance is observed with three inputs fuzzy model. (author)

  9. Analysis of thermosyphon heat exchangers for use in solar domestic hot water heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Scott David

    1998-11-01

    A recent innovation in the solar industry is the use of thermosyphon heat exchangers. Determining the performance of these systems requires knowledge of how thermosyphon flow rate and heat exchanger performance vary with operating conditions. This study demonstrates that several thermosyphon heat exchanger designs operate in the laminar mixed convection regime. Empirical heat transfer and pressure drop correlations are obtained for three tube-in-shell heat exchangers (four, seven, and nine tube). Thermosyphon flow is on the shell side. Correlations are obtained with uniform heat flux on the tube walls and with a mixture of glycol and water circulating inside the tubes. Ranges of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof numbers are 50 to 1800, 2.5 and 6.0, and 4×105 to 1×108, respectively. Nusselt number correlations are presented in a form that combines the contributions of forced and natural convection, Nu4Mixed=Nu4Forced+Nu4Natural. The Nusselt number is influenced by natural convection when the term Raq0.25/(Re0.5Pr0.33) is greater than unity. Pressure drop through these three designs is not significantly affected by mixed convection because most pressure drop losses are at the heat exchanger inlet and outlet. A comparison and discussion of the performance of several other heat exchanger designs (tube-in-shell and coil-in- shell designs) are presented. Generally, the coil-in- shell heat exchangers perform better than the tube-in- shell heat exchangers. Data from all heat exchanger designs is used to develop a new one-dimensional model for thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating systems. The model requires two empirically determined relationships, pressure drop as a function of water mass flow rate and the overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) as a function of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof number. A testing protocol is presented that describes the procedure to obtain the data for the correlations. Two new TRNSYS component models are presented

  10. Observations on an evaporative, elbow thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, G.S.H.; Fu, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The performance of the evaporative elbow system was found to be superior to that of the nonevaporative system, but comparable to the performance of the linear system. The parametric role of the evaporator wall temperature, the condenser wall temperature, and the vapor saturation temperature was demonstrated, each revealing a similar monotonic effect. With the evaporator upright, the data were found to be similar to, but displaced from, the upright condenser data. The upright evaporator gave the better performance, but not overwhelmingly so. The limit of performance with the condenser upright was found to be dictated by evaporator dryout. In the upright evaporator configuration, the limit may be attributed to flooding in the poorly draining condenser; this limit was indistinguishable from geyser behavior at low vapor pressures. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Experimental study of the flow and heat transfer in a toroidal thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    In this work a toroidal thermosyphon, oriented in the vertical plane, was utilized to study the heat transfer and fluid dynamics of buoyancy-driven flows. Applications for thermosyphons include solar heating and cooling, geothermal power production, and cooling of nuclear reactors and computers. The lower portion of the thermosyphon is heated with a constant heat flux, while the upper portion is cooled by a heat exchanger with an essentially constant cooling wall temperature. This configuration produces density differences in the working fluid which drive the flow in the presence of gravity. The loop exhibits very complex secondary and recirculating flow patterns. Temperature and velocity profiles were measured at the entrance and exit to the heating section in the toroidal thermosyphon operating under steady-flow conditions. Temperature measurements were made with a thermocouple probe. Velocity measurements were made with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) operating in the backscatter mode. The LDA measurements were made despite density gradients and fluctuations in the fluid and were the first detailed velocity measurements to be made in a thermosyphon.

  12. Investigation of the overall transient performance of the industrial two-phase closed loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Charles C. J.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    1992-06-01

    The two-phase closed loop thermosyphon is investigated with emphasis on the overall performance in transient operation. The control volume approach is the base of a global analysis describing the motion of vapor and liquid phases of the thermosyphon system in one-dimensional equations. Interfacial shear forces are neglected as only co-current flows are present. Heat transfer coefficients are based on empirical correlations. It is found that the density ratio vapor-liquid, dimensionless friction coefficient, and water column length determine respectively the overall dynamic behavior characteristics such as response time, damping, and oscillation frequency.

  13. Influence of volume working fluid and ambient temperature on cooling efficiency of loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, P.; Malcho, M.; Jandačka, J.; Matušov, J.

    2014-03-01

    Article deal with research of device for electrical component cooling used to heat transfer working fluid phase change. Amount of heat flux transferred by thermosyphon loop depend from amount working fluid and from ambient temperature where is heat removal too. In article is described proposal construction of thermosyphon loop, comparisons of his cooling efficiency if is filled 40 % and 50 % volume of working fluid and condenser (ambient) temperature from 20, 30 up to 40 °C at heat load from 40 to 360 W.

  14. Application of a two-phase thermosyphon loop with minichannels and a minipump in computer cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop with minichannels and minipump. The one-dimensional separate model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop with minichannels and minipump has been used in calculations. The latest correlations for minichannels available in literature have been applied. This model is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporator, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. A numerical analysis of the mass flux and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been presented.

  15. Thermostabilization System Based on Two-phase Closed Cryogenic Thermosyphon for RED100 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolozdynya, A. I.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Khromov, V. A.; Shafigullin, R. R.; Shakirov, A. V.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Tolstukhin, I. A.

    The RED 100 emission detector requires thermostabilization at about 100K. The heat transfer characteristics of a two-phase closed cryogenic thermosyphon made of copper pipe and bellow flex hoses with nitrogen fluid have been investigated. The thermosyphon consists of sealed pipe enclosed in a vacuum jacket and uses a free-boiling liquid nitrogen pool as a cooling machine. The system is very flexible and can provide heat transfer rate up to 100 W in the temperature range of 80-100 K.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of thermosyphone performance in HVAC system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidan, Adel A.; Najim, Saleh E.; Jalil, Jalal M.

    2016-03-01

    An experimental and numerical investigations are conducted on a Two Phase Closed Thermosyphon (TPCT) charged with six working fluids; namely (water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, butanol and R134a) with filling ratios (40, 50, 60, 70 and 100 %). The TPCT is made from a 0.016 m diameter copper tube, which consists of a 0.15 m evaporator, 0.1 m adiabatic and 0.15 m condenser sections, respectively. Thermocouples are located in the core and on the wall of the TPCT. The main objectives of the experimental investigation are to analyze the effect of the working fluid and filling ratio (liquid inventory) under heat inputs (20-120 W) with a fixed condenser cooling temperature of (25 °C) on the thermal performance of the TPCT. The results are compared with a simulation model using finite difference method in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates by using FORTRAN. The correlations of the phase change for the TPCT based on the theory of thermal resistance are used in the evaporator and condenser sections. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is shown to be accurate within 10 %. The results showed that the maximum heat transport ability is associated with using of water and acetone where it is compared with other fluids under the same range of operating temperatures of 35-50 °C. This is the range between lowest and highest temperatures for the sub-tropical climates.

  17. Upgrading of the thermal performance of two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) using fusel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sözen, Adnan; Menlik, Tayfun; Gürü, Metin; Aktaş, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates how fusel oil affect the thermal performance of a two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) at various states of operation. The present study experimentally demonstrated the effect of using fusel oil comprised of various types of alcohols (1.1 % ethyl alcohol, 74.7 % amyl alcohol, 11.3 % isobutyl alcohol, 4.9 % butyl alcohol and 3.8 % propyl alcohol and 4 % water) in varying ratios on improving the performance of the TPCT. Fusel oil has been obtained from fermentation plants as a by product. A straight copper tube with an inner diameter of 13 mm, outer diameter of 15 mm and length of 1 m was used as the TPCT. The fusel oil was filled up 33.3 % (44.2 ml) of the volume of the TPCT. Three heating power levels (200, 300 and 400 W) were used in the experiments with three different flow rates of cooling water (5, 7.5 and 10 g/s) used in the condenser for cooling the system. An increase of 17.64 % was achieved in efficiency of TPCT when fusel oil was used to replace deionized water at a heat load of 200 W and with a cooling water flow rate of 10 g/s.

  18. Engineering design elements of a two-phase thermosyphon to transfer nuclear thermal energy to a hydrogen plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabharwall, Piyush

    the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000°C) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose in selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900°C, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHEs) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger. This research provides useful insight in making decisions regarding the thermosyphon heat transfer system between the nuclear reactor and chemical plant. Development of very high-temperature reactor technologies for the production of electricity, hydrogen and other energy products is a high priority for a successful national energy future.

  19. Development, testing and certification of the sigma research, maxi-therm-S-101 thermosyphon heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    A thermosyphon liquid-to-air heat exchanger developed for use in heating systems in residential single family dwellings and small commercial applications is described. The cabinet design, rationale for the horizontal positioning of the exchanger, and design of the shut-off valve are discussed. The performance of the heating module is given in tabular form.

  20. Experimental investigation of the heat transfer characteristics of a helium cryogenic thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Z. Q.; Zhang, P.

    2013-10-01

    The heat transfer performance of a cryogenic thermosyphon filled with helium as the working fluid is investigated experimentally with a G-M cryocooler as the heat sink in this study. The cryogenic thermosyphon acts as a thermal link between the cryocooler and the cooled target (the copper evaporator with a large mass). Helium is charged in different filling ratios, and the cooling down process and the heat transfer characteristics of the cryogenic thermosyphon are investigated. The cooling down process of the cooled target can be significantly accelerated by the presence of helium in the cryogenic thermosyphon and the cooling down period can be further shortened by the increase of filling ratio. The heat transfer mode changes from the liquid-vapor phase change to natural convection as the increase of the heating power applied on the evaporator. The heat transfer limit and thermal resistance are discussed for the liquid-vapor phase change heat transfer, and they can be estimated by empirical correlations. For the natural convection heat transfer, it can be enhanced by increasing the filling ratio, and the natural convection of supercritical helium is much stronger than that of gaseous helium.

  1. A flow boiling microchannel thermosyphon for fuel cell thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Patrick Thomas

    To provide a high power density thermal management system for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications, a passively driven thermal management system was assembled to operate in a closed loop two-phase thermosyphon. The system has two major components; a microchannel evaporator plate and a condenser. The microchannel evaporator plate was fabricated with 56 square channels that have a 1 mm x 1 mm cross section and are 115 mm long. Experiments were conducted with a liquid cooled condenser with heat flux as the control variable. Measurements of mass flow rate, temperature field, and pressure drop have been made for the thermosyphon loop. A model is developed to predict the system characteristics such as the temperature and pressure fields, flow rate, flow regime, heat transfer coefficient, and maximum heat flux. When the system is subjected to a heat load that exceeds the maximum heat flux, an unstable flow regime is observed that causes flow reversal and eventual dryout near the evaporator plate wall. This undesirable phenomenon is modeled based on a quasi-steady state assumption, and the model is capable of predicting the heat flux at the onset of instability for quasi-steady two-phase flow. Another focus of this work is the performance of the condenser portion of the loop, which will be air cooled in practice. The aim is to reduce air side thermal resistance and increase the condenser performance, which is accomplished with extended surfaces. A testing facility is assembled to observe the air side heat transfer performance of three aluminum foam samples and three modified carbon foam samples, used as extended surfaces. The aluminum foam samples have a bulk density of 216 kilograms per cubic meter with pore sizes of 0.5, 1, and 2 mm. The modified carbon foam samples have bulk densities of 284, 317, and 400 kilograms per cubic meter and machined flow passages of 3.2 mm. in diameter. Each sample is observed under forced convection with air velocity as the

  2. Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-30

    The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators. The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)

  3. Performance evaluation of a refrigerant-charged thermosyphon solar DHW system

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.; DeAngelis, M.; Morrison, L.; Dougherty, D.

    1981-04-01

    Refrigerant-charged passive solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems, which have recently become commercially available, are generating great interest in the solar community. These systems, which can be installed even in freezing climates, may achieve the high performance and reliability of direct thermosyphon systems. The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) is testing and analyzing a promixing prototype refrigerant-charged thermosyphon system; SERI also plans to evaluate a commercially available system. The prototype was installed in a single-family residence using a stabilized R-11 as the heat transfer fluid. A system analysis was performed based on measured data. The analysis method and preliminary results, which indicate that there is reason to be optimistic about this type of system are discussed.

  4. A reduced-order partial differential equation model for the flow in a thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burroughs, E. A.; Coutsias, E. A.; Romero, L. A.

    2005-10-01

    Flow in a closed-loop thermosyphon heated from below exhibits a sequence of bifurcations with increasing Grashof number. Using the Navier Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation we have derived a model where, in the case of a slender circular loop, the first Fourier modes exactly decouple from all other Fourier modes, leaving a system of three coupled nonlinear partial differential equations that completely describes the flow in the thermosyphon. We have characterized the flow through two bifurcations, identifying stable periodic solutions for flows of Prandtl number greater than 18.5, a much lower value than predicted previously. Because of the quadratic nonlinearity in this system of equations, it is possible to find the global stability limit, and we have proved that it is identical to the first bifurcation point.

  5. Thermal Interface Evaluation of Heat Transfer from a Pumped Loop to Titanium-Water Thermosyphons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, James L.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in the heat rejection system for lunar outpost fission surface power. Key to their use is heat transfer between a closed loop heat source and the heat pipe evaporators. This work describes laboratory testing of several interfaces that were evaluated for their thermal performance characteristics, in the temperature range of 350 to 400 K, utilizing a water closed loop heat source and multiple thermosyphon evaporator geometries. A gas gap calorimeter was used to measure heat flow at steady state. Thermocouples in the closed loop heat source and on the evaporator were used to measure thermal conductance. The interfaces were in two generic categories, those immersed in the water closed loop heat source and those clamped to the water closed loop heat source with differing thermal conductive agents. In general, immersed evaporators showed better overall performance than their clamped counterparts. Selected clamped evaporator geometries offered promise.

  6. Experimental study on the condensation of a thermosyphon by electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhenxing; Mu, Huaiping; Lei, Jing; Zhang, Jingyin; Li, Zhihong; Liu, Shi

    2016-04-01

    The study on the condensation and the two-phase flow pattern in the condensation section is important to understand the operating mechanisms in a thermosyphon. In this paper, a new electric capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor was designed for the visualization measurement in a liquid by removing the shielding case and sealing with insulating hydrophobic material. It was successfully used to measure the condensation process in a thermosyphon under different operating temperatures. The thermosyphon was made of silica glass, and alcohol was used as a working fluid. The alcohol vapor was cooled to condense through the heat convection with the cooling water. The operating temperature was controlled by a heater with different power outputs. The experimental results show that the alcohol vapor condensed in stripes and unevenly on the wall surface at a low operating temperature. The liquid bridge will be formed periodically at the operating temperature of 90°C, and the time interval between two liquid bridges will be shorter with the increase of the operating temperature. At 117°C or even higher operating temperatures, the complete liquid bridge cannot be formed sometimes due to the difference of the growth rate of the surface wave around the circumference.

  7. Upward and downward heat and mass transfer with miniature periodically operating loop thermosyphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantozzi, Fabio; Filippeschi, Sauro; Latrofa, Enrico Maria

    2004-03-01

    Upward and downward two-phase heat and mass transfer has been considered in the present paper. The heat and mass transfer with the condenser located below the evaporator has been obtained by inserting an accumulator tank in the liquid line of a loop thermosyphon and enforcing a pressure pulsation. In previous papers these heat transfer devices have been called pulsated two phase thermosyphons (PTPT). A mini PTPT has been experimentally investigated. It has shown a stable periodic heat transfer regime weakly influenced by the position of the condenser with respect to the evaporator. In contrast a classical loop mini thermosyphon (diameter of connecting pipes 4 mm) did not achieve a stable functioning for the investigated level differences between evaporator and condenser lower than 0.37 m. The present study shows that the functioning of a PTPT device does not directly depend on the level difference or the presence of noncondensable gas. In order to obtain a natural circulation in mini or micro loops, a periodically operating heat transfer regime should therefore be considered.

  8. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  9. RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; McDuffee, Joel Lee

    2013-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant

  10. Thermal-Hydraulic Mockup Tests with Two-Phase Thermosyphon for Cold Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chan, Y.K.; Lee, D.J.; Chang, C.J.; Hong, W.T.

    2002-07-01

    The improvement and utilization promotion project of the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR-II) is carrying out at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) with a two-phase thermosyphon will be installed in the heavy water reactor of TRR-II. The hydrogen cold loop of TRR-II CNS consists of a cylindrical moderator cell, a single transfer tube, and a condenser. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a two-phase thermosyphon are investigated against the variations of mass inventory, tube geometry and heat loads. The thermal-hydraulic experiments have been performed using a full-scale mockup loop and a Freon-11 as a working fluid. The scaling approach is that the mass-fluxes of the liquid and the vapor in the Wallis correlation are identical between hydrogen and Freon-11. So, the same density ratio and a scaling heat load are applied to the loop. The flooding limitations as a function of initial Freon-11 inventory, transfer tube diameter, transfer tube geometry, and heat loads are presented. (authors)

  11. Thermal characteristics of two phase thermosyphon cooling module for multi-chip device

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.B.; Nam, S.S.; Kim, J.H.; Kwak, H.Y.

    1996-12-31

    A thermosyphonic cooling module (TSCM) has been designed, fabricated and tested to cool the multi-chip plugged into a planar packaging system. The cooling module consists of a cold plate and an integrated condenser. With an allowable temperature rise of 56 C on the surface of the heater, the cooling module TSCM can handle a heat flux about 2.7 W/cm{sup 2}. The transient characteristics of the cooling module have proved to be excellent; that is, when a heat load is applied to the system, steady state can be achieved within 10--15 minutes. It has been found that the length of the vapor channel between the cold plate and the condenser and ambient as well as the condenser temperatures affect the system performance.

  12. Hydrodynamic stability analysis of an industrial two-phase thermosyphon heat rejection system

    SciTech Connect

    Podowski, M.Z.; Zhou, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., which produce enriched uranium, use a thermosyphon heat rejection system. In this system, thermal energy from the process gas (UF[sub 6]) is transferred to a natural convection boiling loop in which the working fluid is CFC-114. When CFC-114, which is a partially halogenated chlorofluorocarbon, dissociates in the atmosphere, it is believed to accelerate the rate of ozone (O[sub 3]) destruction. Because of large CFC-114 fugitive losses from the operating plants and growing environmental concern over ozone depletion, the DOE has begun a program to identify an alternate cooling system design.

  13. Modeling of reflux condensation and countercurrent annular flow in a two-phase closed thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.G.; Tien, C.L.

    1985-12-01

    Reflux condensation in the steam generator tubes of a PWR is a potentially important heat removal mechanism during the cool-down phase following a small-break LOCA. This work studies reflux condensation using the two-phase closed thermosyphon as a model system. An analytical model based on control-volume formulations of mass, momentum, and energy balances for the liquid and vapor flows in each section of the device is developed. Numerical solutions to the system of governing equations are presented for both steady-state and transient operation of the device. While no data with which to compare the results of the transient analysis are currently available, the steady-state solutions compare well with available experimental data on flooding and film thickness. Thus, the analytical approach presented in this work is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for analyzing countercurrent, annular, two-phase flows. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  14. A Thermosyphon Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Design for a Lunar Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, John; Semenov, Sergey

    2009-03-16

    A long titanium-water thermosyphon heat pipe was designed and tested in support of NASA's lunar surface power system. With a {delta}T of 11.6 C, a prototype has been shown to meet the temperature drop specification of 15 C at 400 W and 400 K. The heat pipe is designed to be embedded in a composite radiator panel to spread waste heat delivered by a circulating pumped loop. The major challenge was managing the fluid inventory to balance the conflicting requirements of power capacity and freeze-thaw tolerance. A unique hybrid wick was designed to achieve the required thermal performance and yet store all the working fluid during idle periods in a freeze-thaw tolerant fashion. A non-condensable gas charge was used to boost power capacity at lower operating temperatures. Eighteen prototypes will be built and tested.

  15. Experimental study on the performance characteristics of an enhanced two-phase loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziapour, Behrooz M.; Baygan, Majid; Mohammadnia, Ali

    2015-10-01

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon (TPLT) is an apparatus for heat transmission from the hot section of system (evaporator) to the cold part (condenser), with relatively small temperature differences. The setup used in this study consists of a TPLT, including evaporator, riser, an advanced condenser and downcomer. The condenser inlet has a nozzle. The steam rises from evaporator, flows through the nozzle and sprays on a vertical copper surface inside the condenser. To cool the copper sheet, then a cooler system was installed rear of it. The experimental tests were performed for presence of the nozzle and without it. The results showed that the TPLT efficiency increases for the modified condenser using nozzle. Also, the overall heat transfer coefficient of TPLT is enhanced by the nozzle. In the case of the nozzle with distance of 13 mm from copper sheet, and T e, sat > 55 °C, the value of suddenly increased.

  16. A Thermosyphon Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Design for a Lunar Surface Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, John; Semenov, Sergey

    2009-03-01

    A long titanium-water thermosyphon heat pipe was designed and tested in support of NASA's lunar surface power system. With a ΔT of 11.6 C, a prototype has been shown to meet the temperature drop specification of 15 C at 400 W and 400 K. The heat pipe is designed to be embedded in a composite radiator panel to spread waste heat delivered by a circulating pumped loop. The major challenge was managing the fluid inventory to balance the conflicting requirements of power capacity and freeze-thaw tolerance. A unique hybrid wick was designed to achieve the required thermal performance and yet store all the working fluid during idle periods in a freeze-thaw tolerant fashion. A non-condensable gas charge was used to boost power capacity at lower operating temperatures. Eighteen prototypes will be built and tested.

  17. Non-Isothermal Experimental Study of the Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karthikeyan, Muthu; Huang, Jianming; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques to study non-isothermal transport processes in the constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon (CVBT) were developed using a pentane/quartz system. The transport processes can be evaluated by measuring the liquid film profile, which gives the pressure field, and the temperature field. The axial variation in the capillary pressure was measured using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. Thermoelectric coolers were used to control the temperature level in the condensation region and, therefore, the length of the approximately 'adiabatic' surface region which is a function of the temperature difference between the CVBT surface and the surroundings. High values for the axial thermal conductance in the 'adiabatic' surface region were demonstrated under certain conditions.

  18. A note on the loop thermosyphon with mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for flow in a toroidal fluid loop in which the wall heat transfer coefficient is constant over one half of the loop, and zero over the other. A mathematically low-dimensional form of the model gives reasonably accurate predictions of the steady state mass flow, stability, and the nature of nonsteady motions. Numerical computations with a high-dimensional model illustrate the effects of mixed boundaries and axial heat conduction on the chaotic solutions. Comparisons are made with previous low-dimensional models that are exact only for a spatially uniform heat transfer coefficient.

  19. A note on the loop thermosyphon with mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for flow in a toroidal fluid loop in which the wall heat transfer coefficient is constant over one half of the loop, and zero over the other. A mathematically low-dimensional form of the model gives reasonably accurate predictions of the steady state mass flow, stability, and the nature of nonsteady motions. Numerical computations with a high-dimensional model illustrate the effects of mixed boundaries and axial heat conduction on the chaotic solutions. Comparisons are made with previous low-dimensional models that are exact only for a spatially uniform heat transfer coefficient.

  20. A Study of the Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to better understand the physics of evaporation, condensation, and fluid flow as they affect the heat transfer processes in a constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger (CVBHX). This CVBHX consists of a small enclosed container with a square cross section (inside dimensions. 3 x 3 x 40 mm) partially filled with a liquid. The major portion of the liquid is in the corners, which act as arteries. When a temperature difference is applied to the ends of the CVBHX, evaporation occurs at the hot end and condensation at the cold end resulting in a very effective heat transfer device with great potential in space applications. Liquid is returned by capillary flow in the corners. A complete description of the system and the results obtained to date are given in the papers listed.

  1. Interfacial Force Field Characterization in a Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DasGupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth's gravitational field using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. The effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii - Lifshitz - Pilaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented

  2. Interfacial force field characterization in a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    DasGupta, S.; Plawsky, J.L.; Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth`s gravitational field using an image analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. Effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii-Lifshitz-Pitaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented.

  3. Heat transfer behaviour of silver particles containing oleic acid surfactant: application in a two phase closed rectangular cross sectional thermosyphon (RTPTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuwakietkumjohn, N.; Parametthanuwat, T.

    2016-03-01

    This article focuses on heat transfer behaviour of silver nanoparticles containing oleic acid surfactant (OA) applied as a working fluid in a two-phase closed rectangular cross sectional thermosyphon (RTPTC). Thus, the OA could reduce the surface tension of the working fluid, which improved the colloidal ability and increased the lead-time period for nanoparticles to be uniformly dispersed. It highlights theories for investigating the effects on heat transfer characteristics of RTPTC such as heat transfer rate, thermal resistance, heat transfer coefficients and nanofluids behaviour. The most important heat transfer characteristic to be examined in this experiment is the relative thermal efficiency (R T ). Five working fluids were tested, these include: de-ionized water; de-ionized water base with a silver nanoparticles concentration of 0.5 wt% (NP); and NP containing 0.5; 1; and 1.5 wt% of OA respectively. The results showed that 0.5 wt% NP containing 1 wt% OA produced the best results. It was further found that the heat transfer rate of 0.5 wt% NP containing 1 wt% of OA with a R T value of 1, was the highest across all experimental parameters studied. The NP containing OA demonstrated approximately 80 % higher heat transfer rate than the de-ionized water.

  4. Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, T.N.

    1996-09-01

    Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. Determination of the dispersion constant in a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in a gravitational field using an image analyzing interferometer which is based on computer enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. The experimental results for heptane and pentane menisci were analyzed using the extended Young Laplace Equation. These isothermal results characterized the interfacial force field in-siru at the start of the heat transfer experiments by quantifying the dispersion constant, which is a function of the liquid-solid system and cleaning procedures. The experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and the dispersion constants were compared to that predicted from the DLP theory and good agreements were obtained. The measurements are critical to the subsequent non-isothermal experiments because one of the major variables in the heat sink capability of the Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon, CVBT, is the dispersion constant. In all previous studies of micro heat pipes the value of the dispersion constant has been 'estimated'. One of the major advantages of the current glass cell is the ability to view the extended meniscus at all times. Experimentally, we find that the extended Young-Laplace Equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces.

  6. A 100-W grade closed-cycle thermosyphon cooling system used in HTS rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Brice; Miki, Motohiro; Tsuzuki, Keita; Shinohara, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Hironao; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2012-06-01

    The cooling systems used for rotating High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) machines need a cooling power high enough to ensure a low temperature during various utilization states. Radiation, torque tube or current leads represent hundreds of watts of invasive heat. The architecture also has to allow the rotation of the refrigerant. In this paper, a free-convection thermosyphon using two Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocoolers is presented. The cryogen is mainly neon but helium can be added for an increase of the heat transfer coefficient. The design of the heat exchangers was first optimized with FEM thermal analysis. After manufacture, they were assembled for preliminary experiments and the necessity of annealing was studied for the copper parts. A single evaporator was installed to evaluate the thermal properties of such a heat syphon. The maximum bearable static heat load was also investigated, but was not reached even at 150 W of load. Finally, this cooling system was tested in the cooling down of a 100-kW range HTS rotating machine containing 12 Bi-2223 double-pancake coils (DPC).

  7. Heat-transfer enhancement of two-phase closed thermosyphon using a novel cross-flow condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghel, Babak; Rahimi, Masoud; Almasi, Saeed

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports the heat-transfer performance of a two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) equipped with a novel condenser. Distillated water was used as working fluid, with a volumetric liquid filling ratio of 75 %. An increase in heat flux was used to measure the response of the TPCT, including variations in temperature distribution, thermal resistance, average temperature of each section of TPCT and overall thermal difference. Results show that for various power inputs from 71 to 960 W, the TPCT with the novel condenser had a lower wall-temperature difference between the evaporator and condenser sections than did the unmodified TPCT. Given the experimental data for heat-transfer performance, it was found that the thermal resistance in the TPCT equipped with the proposed condenser was between 10 and 17 % lower than in the one without.

  8. One-dimensional analysis of maximum performance in a closed two-phase thermosyphon with a crossover flow separator

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Groll, M.; Roesler, S.

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to calculate the maximum performance of a thermosyphon with a built-in crossover separator. Mechanisms limiting performance are considered to be a flow instability in a natural-circulation two-phase flow system at low reduced pressures (e.g., for Freon-11, p{sub r} < 0.126) and at low total mass flux and wave film spalling at moderate reduced pressures, respectively. Which limit becomes dominant depends on the operating conditions, as shown by the experimental data. In systematic experiments, various working fluids are used, viz., water, ethanol, Freon-11, and Freon-113. Operating temperature and liquid fill ratio are varied. The present model for maximum performance agrees well (within {+-} 15%) with experimental data.

  9. Thermal hydraulic analysis of two-phase closed thermosyphon cooling system for new cold neutron source moderator of Breazeale research reactor at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, Melaku

    A cold neutron source cooling system is required for the Penn State's next generation cold neutron source facility that can accommodate a variable heat load up to about ˜10W with operating temperature of about 28K. An existing cold neutron source cooling system operating at the University of Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) facility failed to accommodate heat loads upwards of 4W with the moderator temperature reaching a maximum of 44K, which is the critical temperature for the operating fluid neon. The cooling system that was used in the TCNS cooling system was a two-phase closed thermosyphon with a reservoir (TPCTR). The reservoir containing neon gas is kept at room temperature. In this study a detailed thermal analysis of the fundamental operating principles of a TPCTR were carried out. A detailed parametric study of the various geometric and thermo-physical factors that affect the limits of the operational capacity of the TPCTR investigated. A CFD analysis is carried out in order to further refine the heat transfer analysis and understand the flow structure inside the thermosyphon and the two-phase nucleate boiling in the evaporator section of the thermosyphon. In order to help the new design, a variety of ways of increasing the operating range and heat removal capacity of the TPCTR cooling system were analyzed so that it can accommodate the anticipated heat load of 10W or more. It is found, for example, that doubling the pressure of the system will increase the capacity index zeta by 50% for a system with an initial fill ratio FR of 1. A decrease in cryorefrigeration performance angle increases the capacity index. For example taking the current condition of the TCNS system and reducing the angle from the current value of ˜700 by half (˜350) will increase the cooling power 300%. Finally based on detailed analytic and CFD analysis the best operating condition were proposed.

  10. Experimental measurement and mathematical calculation evaporator temperatures of closed loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan; Jandačka, Jozef

    2013-10-01

    The closed loop thermoshypon is device operate with working fluid phase change principle. It is a simple and reliable device providing heat transfer. This device utilizes the thermodynamic pressure difference and gravitation to circulate working fluid and has extremely high effective thermal conductivity. Usually is used to cooling of electronic components. The paper describes a design and construction of this device. As a working fluid was used fluorinert FC-72. Next the paper deal with dependences measurement of evaporator temperatures on waste heat of the electronic component and their verification by means of a mathematic calculation based on physical phenomena of boiling, condensation and heat transfer.

  11. Analytical and experimental study of steady-state convection in a double-loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mihir; Pruzan, D. A.; Torrance, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    Steady-state natural convection in a toroidal loop with a heated diametrical branch and cooled side branches is studied. The loop is rotated to vary the tilt angle of the diametral branch. A one-dimensional analysis provides the fluid velocities and temperature distributions in the loop. The effects of axial conduction are examined. With increasing tilt from the vertical, the fluid in the lower side branch slows down and reverses. The flow through the central branch increases and the main return path is through the upper side branch. For small tilt angles around the horizontal, multiple steady states exist. Comparison experiments on a water-filled glass loop are in qualitative agreement with the analysis and multiple steady states are observed.

  12. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  13. On the determination of the average temperature in a horizontal storage tank and its use in monitoring the performance of a solar thermosyphon system

    SciTech Connect

    Bannerot, R.B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The mass weighted average storage temperature is a useful parameter for evaluating the performance of thermal storage systems. It is commonly used in system simulations since detailed temperature data in the storage medium are not known (or even considered). However, it is rarely used in the evaluation of operating systems because of the difficulty in determining it, especially in potentially multidimensional storage configurations, like a horizontal tank. This paper examines the issue of the evaluation of the average storage temperature, specifically from the point of view of reproducibility and how much data is required for a confident calculation. Unfortunately, this issue was not completely resolved and was shown to be strongly dependent on the locations of the measurements. Two examples are presented that demonstrate the usefulness of knowing the average storage temperature. The examples also give a quantitative demonstration of the effect of withdrawal flow rate on the amount of thermal energy that can be withdrawn from a given system. A reduction in flow rate by a factor of four increased the delivered energy by 70 percent.

  14. Experimental study of high-performance cooling system pipeline diameter and working fluid amount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan; Hrabovsky, Peter; Papučík, Štefan

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with heat transfer resulting from the operation of power electronic components. Heat is removed from the mounting plate, which is the evaporator of the loop thermosyphon to the condenser and by natural convection is transferred to ambient. This work includes proposal of cooling device - loop thermosyphon, with its construct and follow optimization of cooling effect. Optimization proceeds by selecting the quantity of working fluid and selection of diameters vapour line and liquid line of loop thermosyphon.

  15. Secondary flow effects in high tip speed free convection

    SciTech Connect

    Eckels, P.W.; Parker, J.H. Jr.; Patterson, A. )

    1987-02-01

    Experimental analyses of the effects of secondary flows on heat transfer in high tip speed rotating apparatus are not readily available. This paper provides data on the heat transfer within two different test modules which were rotated at high speed with the heat transfer surfaces perpendicular and parallel to the Coriolis acceleration. One module contained a heated wall and another a parallel plate free convection experiment. Uniform heat fluxes were maintained. Rayeigh numbers in excess of 10{sup 15} were achieved with liquid helium as the transfer medium. Some of the findings are that secondary flows can reduce heat transfer by as much as 60% in single-phase heat transfer, the transitions to fully turbulent flow are in agreement with existing prediction methods, the critical heat flux in two-phase flow boiling is significantly increased, forced convection correlations underpredict single-phase thermosyphon performance, and the usual nondimensional parameters of free convection establish similitude between various fluids and speeds. These results suggest that techniques used to enhance heat transfer in the rotating frame should be verified by tests in the rotating frame.

  16. Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977 are presented. Three heat exchangers are developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submerged electric water heating element.

  17. Controlling natural convection in a closed thermosyphon using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, L.; Fichera, A.; Pagano, A.

    . The aim of this paper is to present a neural network-based approach to identification and control of a rectangular natural circulation loop. The first part of the paper defines a NARMAX model for the prediction of the experimental oscillating behavior characterizing the fluid temperature. The model has been generalized and implemented by means of a Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network that has been trained to simulate the system experimental dynamics. In the second part of the paper, the NARMAX model has been used to simulate the plant during the training of another neural network aiming to suppress the undesired oscillating behavior of the system. In order to define the neural controller, a cascade of several couples of neural networks representing both the system and the controller has been used, the number of couples coinciding with the number of steps in which the control action is exerted.

  18. Black Liquid Solar Collector Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichman, F. L.; Austen, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the details of constructing, and use of, a solar collector. Uses a black liquid to absorb the energy, the thermosyphon effect to drive the liquid through the collector, and a floodlamp as a surrogate sun. (GA)

  19. Operation of a U-shaped thermosiphon at small angles of inclination

    SciTech Connect

    Krivonos, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The combined effects of the volume of heat transfer fluid and the angles of inclination of the branches of a thermosyphon on its internal thermal resistance are determined in a parametric analysis for the optimization of the configuration and fluid charge and the thermal efficiency of the thermosyphon. The dependence of the operating temperature gradient on the power input is investigated and the power input optimized on the basis of the results.

  20. No hassle reboiler selection

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.L. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on choosing a reboiler design which depends on several factors: Flow pattern of the feed and the percent vapor of the feed, Viscosity of the feed and Liquid level in the tower feeding the reboiler. These factors make the logic for the reboiler selection guide. By answering the questions in the guide, the engineer focuses on the reboiler design giving the most effective heat transfer for the process feed condition. Standard kettle type exchanger has been the most common and reliable reboiler design. However, thermosyphon reboilers are becoming popular in modularization projects since they reduce investment cost and occupy less space. Some applications do not favor thermosyphon reboiler designs. The decision of when to select a thermosyphon vertical or horizontal reboiler is explored by using the reboiler selection guide. In addition, the design nozzle elevations are discussed for design of the thermosyphon reboiler.

  1. Experimental investigation on the effect of nanofluid on the thermal performance of symmetric sintered U shaped heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarimanesh, Meysam; Yousefi, Tooraj; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the impact of Entrance Power and Silver nanofluid concentration (with base fluid ethanol and DI-water) on heat pipe thermal performance are considered. In order to reach the aim a U-shaped sintered heat pipe is utilized which causes occupied space to decline. The length of the heat pipe is 135 mm in each branch. On account of recognition the effect of working fluid on heat pipe thermal performance, thermal resistance and overall heat transfer coefficient in base working fluid and nano-colloidal silver are measured in the shape of thermosyphon. The working fluid is with volume percentages of 70 ethanol and 30 distilled water. The average size pertaining to the nanoparticle applied is 40 nm. In addition, the influences of nanofluid concentrations are measured by comparing three concentrations 0.001, 0.005, 0.1 vol%. The range of entrance power is from 10 to 40 W and the temperature of coolant has been changed from 20 to 40 °C. The results of the experiment indicate that by increasing entrance power, the temperatures of the condenser, evaporator and working temperature experience a rise. Furthermore, this causes a decrease of thermal resistance and an increase of overall heat transfer coefficient. A comparison of three concentrations reveals that in concentration of 50 ppm, thermal resistance compared to the base fluid has decreased to 42.26 % and overall heat transfer coefficient has gone up to 1883 (W/m2·°K) . Also, due to unexpected changes in concentration of 1000 ppm, the existence of an optimized concentration for the silver nanofluid in this heat pipe with this geometry has been clear.

  2. Use of LHP for cooling power electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, M.; Malcho, M.; Nemec, P.; Kolková, Z.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with use of cooling equipment build on basis two phase thermosyphon loop. This device belongs to a group of loop heat pipe (LHP). This LHP is a two-phase device with extremely high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes the thermodynamic pressure difference to circulate fluid. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980´s. Thermosyphon loop is similar as LHP but it doesn't contain wick and circulation of the fluid using gravitation force instead of capillary pressure as it is in LHP. The work deals with the cooling insulated gate bipolar transistor with 370 W. The paper describes the course of the heat dissipation using ribbed cooler for natural convection and using fin for forced convection. The results are compared with heat dissipation through thermosyphon loop.

  3. Mixed double-diffusive convection in gas-loaded heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. ); Tien, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This study examines mixed double-diffusive convection in gas-loaded heat pipes and two-phase thermosyphons. The numerical simulation and experiments show that steady, laminar natural convection due to the combined effects of temperature and concentration gradients can greatly redistribute the noncondensable gas within the condenser. This change of the gas distribution, however, does not significantly alter the overall condensation heat transfer. This interesting result implies that even with natural convection present, much simpler integral models can still be applied with confidence for the design of variable-conductance heat pipes and thermosyphons.

  4. Interfacial force field characterization of a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon using IAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in a gravitational field using IAI (image analyzing interferometer) which is based on computer enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. The experimental results for heptane and pentane menisci were analyzed using the extended Young-Laplace Equation. These isothermal results characterized the interfacial force field in-situ at the start of the heat transfer experiments by quantifying the dispersion constant for the specific liquid-solid system. The experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressures and the dispersion constants are compared to the subsequent non-isothermal experiments because one of the major variables in the heat sink capability of the CVBT is the dispersion constant. In all previous studies of micro heat pipes the value of the dispersion constant has been 'guesstimated'. The major advantages of the current glass cell is the ability to view the extended meniscus at all times. Experimentally, we find that the extended Young-Laplace Equation is an excellent model for for the force field at the solid-liquid vapor interfaces.

  5. Determination of the dispersion constant in a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, SUNANDO.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in a gravitational field using an image analyzing interferometer which is based on computer enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. The experimental results for heptane and pentane menisci were analyzed using the extended Young-Laplace equation. These isothermal results characterized the interfacial force field in-situ at the start of the heat transfer experiments by quantifying the dispersion constant, which is a function of the liquid-solid system and cleaning procedures. The experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and the dispersion constants were compared to that predicted from the DLP theory and good agreements were obtained. The measurements are critical to the subsequent non-isothermal experiments because one of the major variables in the heat sink capability of the CVBT is the dispersion constant. In all previous studies of micro heat pipes the value of the dispersion constant has been 'guesstimated'. One of the major advantages of the current glass cell is the ability to view the extended meniscus at all times. Experimentally. we find that the extended Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces.

  6. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Andrew J.; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth’s weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  7. Experimental study of stability and transients in a horizontally heated boiling helium thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Four, A.; Baudouy, B.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a liquid helium natural circulation loop with a 4 m long horizontal heated section. Wall temperatures on the heated section, mass flow rate and pressure drop were measured in steady and transient regimes. The stability of the loop has been studied and the power stability limits have been found. Also, different heating configurations were explored and their drawbacks and benefits were observed. The result is that the loop is stable only above a non-zero low power and below a certain upper power limit. The distance from the heating to the vertical riser affects the stability range. It has been found that instabilities at low power or transients following a low power step pulse can produce considerable temperature oscillations, potentially dangerous from the magnet protection point of view.

  8. A proposed regenerative thermosyphon blade cooling system for high efficiency gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Masri, M. A.

    A novel scheme for cooling high-efficiency gas turbine engines is proposed, briefly analyzed, and evaluated. The scheme consists of a self-pumping thermosiphon loop for the rotors and a closed forced-convection loop for the stators. With a suitable coolant, such as liquid metal, the rotating thermosiphon loop is self-pumping. The circulation rates can be large enough that the loop acts as a heat pipe of large conductance between the turbine and the compressor. The flow stability and distribution in the multiple parallel rotating loops are examined, and stable configurations are identified. A simple thermodynamic model for cycle cooling losses is developed and used to evaluate the potential efficiency advantage of using this scheme compared to current air-cooling technology. A gain of five to eight percent is found possible.

  9. Comparison of six generic solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Murphy, L.M.; Noreen, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of residential solar water heating is explored by analyzing six different system types. A figure of merit (that considers both performance and cost) is calculated for each system, providing information for both researchers and industry. Thermosyphon water heaters are determined to be the most cost effective option, and their wider application is recommended once a reliable draindown technique is developed.

  10. The threshold value of heat flux for thermosyphon microfilm heat transfer with the testing sample partially immersed in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyuan, Wu; Shouyun, Peng; Liufang, Chen; Hongqi, Xie

    To simulate the performance of condenser-boiler in an air separation plant, the boiling section formed by 1m long plate-fin narrow channel is only partially immersed in liquid nitrogen. When the heating power supplied to whole section of the testing sample is maintained constant the boiling temperature difference is increased by 0.19K only with reduction in immersion depth of 40cm. It is concluded that the condenser-boiler will be operated in a safe condition even when the immersion reduced by 40% as long as the heat flux is maintained above a threshold value.

  11. Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwal

    2009-07-01

    Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

  12. Numerical solution of fluid flow and heat tranfer problems with surface radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, S.; Bhatia, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical scheme, based on the finite element method, to solve strongly coupled fluid flow and heat transfer problems. The surface radiation effect for gray, diffuse and isothermal surfaces is considered. A procedure for obtaining the view factors between the radiating surfaces is discussed. The overall solution strategy is verified by comparing the available results with those obtained using this approach. An analysis of a thermosyphon is undertaken and the effect of considering the surface radiation is clearly explained.

  13. Performance enhancement of an experimental air conditioning system by using TiO2/methanol nanofluid in heat pipe heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monirimanesh, Negin; Nowee, S. Mostafa; Khayyami, Shideh; Abrishamchi, Iman

    2016-05-01

    The effect of using nanofluid in thermosyphon-type heat pipe heat exchangers on energy conservation of an air-conditioning system was sought in this study. Innovatively, two heat exchangers in-series were deployed using TiO2/methanol nanofluids with 0-4 wt% concentrations as working fluids. The impacts of temperature and relative humidity on the effectiveness of 2 and 4-row heat exchangers were analyzed experimentally and more that 40 % energy saving was obtained.

  14. Simulation of natural convection in a rectangular loop using finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D W; Hamm, L L; Kehoe, A B

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element analysis of natural convection in a rectangular loop is presented. A psi-omega formulation of the Boussinesque approximation to the Navier-Stokes equation is solved by the false transient technique. Streamlines and isotherms at Ra = 10/sup 4/ are shown for three different modes of heating. The results indicate that corner effects should be considered when modeling flow patterns in thermosyphons.

  15. Two phase heat exchanger symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J.T.; Kitto, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented at the conference on the subject of heat transfer mechanics and instrumentation. Theoretical and experimental data are provided in each paper. The topics covered are: temperature effects of steel; optimization of design of two-phase heat exchanges; thermosyphon system and low grade waste heat recovery; condensation heat transfer in plate heat exchangers; forced convective boiling; and performance analysis of full bundle submerged boilers.

  16. Comparison of natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.; Liu, W.

    1998-09-15

    Thermosyphon heat exchangers are used in indirect solar water heating systems to avoid using a pump to circulate water from the storage tank to the heat exchanger. In this study, the authors consider the effect of heat exchanger design on system performance. They also compare performance of a system with thermosyphon flow to the same system with a 40W pump in the water loop. In the first part of the study, the authors consider the impact of heat exchanger design on the thermal performance of both one- and two-collector solar water heaters. The comparison is based on Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) OG300 simulations. The thermosyphon heat exchangers considered are (1) a one-pass, double wall, 0.22 m{sup 2}, four tube-in-shell heat exchanger manufactured by AAA Service and Supply, Inc., (the Quad-Rod); (2) a two-pass, double wall, 0.2 m{sup 2}, tube-in-shell made by Heliodyne, Inc., but not intended for commercial development; (3) a one-pass, single wall, 0.28 m{sup 2}, 31 tube-in-shell heat exchanger from Young Radiator Company, and (4) a one-pass single-wall, 0.61 m{sup 2}, four coil-in-shell heat exchanger made by ThermoDynamics Ltd. The authors compare performance of the systems with thermosyphon heat exchangers to a system with a 40 W pump used with the Quad-Rod heat exchanger. In the second part of the study, the effects of reducing frictional losses through the heat exchanger and/or the pipes connecting the heat exchanger to the storage tank, and increasing heat transfer area are evaluated in terms of OG300 ratings.

  17. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Techniacl progress report, June 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  18. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, September 15, 1996--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  19. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  20. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, December 31, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  1. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-02-15

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined.

  2. An experimental study of natural convection in a toroidal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, C.H. ); Greif, R.; Humphrey, J.A.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Velocity and temperature profiles were measured at the entrance and exit to the heating section of a toroidal thermosyphon loop operating under steady flow conditions for a range of heat inputs. Velocity measurements were made with a laser-Doppler velocimeter and temperature measurements with a small thermocouple probe. Detailed results are presented for the longitudinal and circumferential components of the velocity for four heat inputs. The data for cross-stream secondary flows and streamwise flow reversals emphasize the importance of including three-dimensional effects in analyses of these systems.

  3. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    SciTech Connect

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  4. Design and Performance of a Hybrid PV/T Solar Water Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, Th.; Georgostathis, P.; Sarris, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present design considerations and experimental results of a thermosyphonic hybrid PV/T solar system that is investigated at the University of Patras. Hybrid PV/T systems can provide electrical and thermal energy, thus achieving a higher energy conversion rate of the absorbed solar radiation. We tested outdoors PV/T prototypes consisted of pc-Si PV modules and heat exchanger of copper sheet with copper pipes, for two system types (PVT/UNGL and PVT/GL). We used commercial PV modules, which give about 12%-15% efficiency, depending on the operating temperature and the use or not of additional glazing. During the experiments the generated electricity was transmitted to a load, simulating real system operation. Steady state tests of the system were performed outdoors to determine collector thermal efficiency. The glazed PV/T collector presents remarkably higher thermal output than the unglazed PV/T collector, but the electrical output of it is reduced due to additional optical losses. The experimental study of the tested thermosyphonic hybrid PV/T solar device showed that it can perform effectively during all year long, achieving at least 40° C of hot water and producing electricity at a satisfactory level.

  5. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for use on initial lunar surface power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxiliary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2007). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n). These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  6. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-21

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa{sup n}. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  7. Evaluating Heat Pipe Performance in 1/6 g Acceleration: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; McCollum, Timothy A.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James L.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Heat pipes composed of titanium and water are being considered for use in the heat rejection system of a fission power system option for lunar exploration. Placed vertically on the lunar surface, the heat pipes would operate as thermosyphons in the 1/6 g environment. The design of thermosyphons for such an application is determined, in part, by the flooding limit. Flooding is composed of two components, the thickness of the fluid film on the walls of the thermosyphon and the interaction of the fluid flow with the concurrent vapor counter flow. Both the fluid thickness contribution and interfacial shear contribution are inversely proportional to gravity. Hence, evaluating the performance of a thermosyphon in a 1 g environment on Earth may inadvertently lead to overestimating the performance of the same thermosyphon as experienced in the 1/6 g environment on the moon. Several concepts of varying complexity have been proposed for evaluating thermosyphon performance in reduced gravity, ranging from tilting the thermosyphons on Earth based on a cosine function, to flying heat pipes on a low-g aircraft. This paper summarizes the problems and prospects for evaluating thermosyphon performance in 1/6 g.

  8. Gauging Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foord, Kathleen A.; Haar, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Books by education experts and speakers at national professional conferences have inspired many school leaders to initiate professional learning communities (PLCs). Sustaining them effectively to raise student achievement is another matter. How can one know whether a PLC is moving toward a desired outcome? Measuring effectiveness requires an…

  9. Thermal Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Sylvia S.; Coutant, Charles C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effect of temperature on the biosphere water, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes the effects of temperature on growth, production, and embryonic and larval development. A list of 401 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Psychopharmaceuticals: effects and side effects

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Nathan S.

    1959-01-01

    Drugs which affect psychological behaviour are being used in vast amounts nowadays, with, in all too many cases, but scant regard for their exact uses or possible side effects. This article contains a clinical classification of these drugs, followed by an account of their principal side effects and the means of obviating them. PMID:14409889

  11. Health Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter . Additional information regarding the health effects of climate change and references to supporting literature can be found ... globalchange.gov/engage/activities-products/NCA3/technical-inputs . Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health ...

  12. Comparison of the effects of Al2O3 and CuO nanoparticles on the performance of a solar flat-plate collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuswamy, Dinesh Babu; Madhavan, Venkata Ramanan; Mohan, Mukunthan

    2015-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of solar flat-plate collectors further, a study had been carried out wherein the conventional working fluid was replaced by nanofluids. A 25-L/day solar flat-plate water heater with collector area of 0.5 {m}^2 has been designed and fabricated. The thermosyphon system of the solar water heater was monitored at 15 locations using T-type thermocouples. Alumina and CuO nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and X-ray diffraction techniques and dispersed using ultrasonic mechanism. To stabilize the system at an optimum level, the collector is operated with volume fractions of 0.2% and 0.4% of synthesized Al2O3 and CuO nanoparticles mixed with distilled water and used in the solar flat-plate collector. The temperature profile was compared with different volume fractions of the nanoparticles in the flowing medium. Enhanced heat transfer was observed in the solar flat-plate collector using nanoparticles, and hence, it is inferred that addition of nanoparticles improves the efficiency of the solar water heaters. This paper details the temperature profile observed in the collectors, variation of insolation over the day, and change in efficiency both on the primary side (collector) and on the secondary side (storage tank) of the solar water heater.

  13. Effects and Effectiveness of Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Grigsby, Jim; Kaehny, Margaret M.; Sandberg, Elliot J.; Schlenker, Robert E.; Shaughnessy, Peter W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of telemedicine has recently undergone rapid growth and proliferation. Although the feasibility of many applications has been tested for nearly 30 years, data concerning the costs, effects, and effectiveness of telemedicine are limited. Consequently, the development of a strategy for coverage, payment, and utilization policy has been hindered. Telemedicine continues to expand, and pressure for policy development increases in the context of Federal budget cuts and major changes in health service financing. This article reviews the literature on the effects and medical effectiveness of telemedicine. It concludes with several recommendations for research, followed by a discussion of several specific questions, the answers to which might have a bearing on policy development. PMID:10153466

  14. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  15. Tectonomagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.

    1978-01-01

    We know that earthquakes result from the sudden release of elastic strain, the end product, most likely, of a long period of gradual stress accumulation in the crust. At the U.S Geological Survey, our magnetic fields studies have two main directions. First, a determination of the magnetic behavior accompanying shallow earthquakes (seismomagnetic effects). Second, a long-term monitoring of the magnetic field in the vicinity of an active fault to detect magnetic changes due to general tectonic activity, particularly that which ultimately leads to earthquakes. These magnetic changes are generally termed "tectonomagnetic effects." 

  16. Sleeper Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Daphne; Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.

    2007-01-01

    Early experience preserves and refines many capabilities that emerge prenatally. Here we describe another role that it plays--establishing the neural substrate for capabilities that emerge at a much later point in development. The evidence comes from sleeper effects: permanent deficits when early experience was absent in capabilities that normally…

  17. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2014 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: anaerobic wastewater and sludge treatment, biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, membrane biological treatment, sewage sludge pyrolysis, natural treatment, resource recovery, electrolysis, oxidation and adsorption treatment.

  18. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  19. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk

  20. Proceedings: International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, V. J.; Bowen, S. L.

    This document contains a collection of papers from the Fourth International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions. Topics covered include: some topics on melting heat transfer problems; osmotic model of ice segregation; thermosyphon applications in cold regions; an analytic study of liquid solidification in low Peclet number forced flows inside a parallel plate channel concerning axial heat conduction; freezing within laminar fast-growing thermally developing region of a uniform heat flux cooled parallel plate duct; the morphology of ice layers in curved rectangular channels; effect of heat conductor plates on ice formation near a wall; freezing characteristics of water flow in a horizontal cooled tube with the separated region; stability of thick ice formation in pipes; experiments and analysis of pipe freezing; experimental study of freezing of water in a closed circular tube with pressure increasing; and effects of a porous medium in a flow passage with miter bend.

  1. Blazhko Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teays, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The cause of the Blazhko effect, the long-term modulation of the light and radial velocity curves of some RR Lyr stars, is still not understood. The observational characteristics of the Blazhko effect are discussed. Some preliminary results are presented from two recent campaigns to observe RR Lyr, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer along with ground-based spectroscopy and photometry, throughout a pulsation cycle, at a variety of Blazhko phases. A set of ultraviolet light curves have been generated from low dispersion IUE spectra. In addition, the (visual) light curves from IUE's Fine Error Sensor are analyzed using the Fourier decomposition technique. The values of the parameters Psi(sub 21) and R(sub 21) at different Blazhko phases of RR Lyr span the range of values found for non-Blazhko variables of similar period.

  2. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment.

  3. Zeeman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The splitting of a spectral line into two, three or more components, that occurs when the source of that line lies within a magnetic field. This phenomenon is named after the Dutch physicist, Pieter Zeeman (1865-1943), who discovered the effect in the laboratory, in 1896. The separation of the components of a line is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and the number of components,...

  4. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  5. Erosion Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater in this THEMIS image is a model illustration to the effects of erosion on Mars. The degraded crater rim and several landslides observed in crater walls is evidence to the mass wasting of materials. Layering in crater walls also suggests the presence of materials that erode at varying rates.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 31.6, Longitude 44.3 East (315.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  6. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings.

  7. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to build as efficient a compressor as possible. Over the last several years improvements to the design of screw compressors has made them efficiently competitive with other types of compressors, especially at large loads. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate four different methods of cooling a 250 horsepower compressor and determine their effects on the efficiency of the compressor. Two conventional methods, liquid injection and thermosyphon cooling, and two new methods, V-PLUS and Fresco oil injection, are investigated. The screw compressor used in the tests was a VRS-500 screw compressor made by the Vilter Manufacturing Corporation. 6 figs.

  8. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G. . Ray W. Herrick Labs.); Fresco, A. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to design and build as efficient a compressor as possible. In a screw compressor it appears that the way the compressor is cooled can have an effect on the compressor's efficiency. This paper presents experimental data on three different screw compressor cooling methods: Liquid Refrigerant Injection Cooling System; Thermosyphon Cooling System; and Oil Injection System. All tests were conducted on a hot gas bypass system using refrigerant R-22. The data taken shows that the Oil Injection System is slightly better than the other two. These tests should be repeated with a higher oil flow rate and ammonia as the working fluid. 10 figs.

  9. Progress in the studies of passive heat removal in the next European torus under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, A. ); Renda, V.; Papa, L. . Joint Research Centre); Fenoglio, F. )

    1989-12-01

    Within the framework of safety analysis for the next European torus, a decay heat hazards assessment is under way in Ispra. Undercooling accidents (loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents (LOCAs and LOFAs)) due to pump failure have been investigated assuming an automatic plasma shutdown in both cases. The passive heat removal mechanisms considered include radiation between components and residual cooling by the thermosyphon effect in the main cooling circuits. Conservative thermohydraulic calculations have been made to determine coolant velocity and temperature transients to avoid water boiling int he circuits. Results show that during a LOFA, water boiling can be avoided provided that the water inertia is large enough, and material melting temperatures are not reached during a LOCA.

  10. Heat transfer simulation of composite devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, L.

    Composite devices are built from elements of various sizes, shapes, materials, and functions. The present investigation is concerned with composite devices in which, during their normal operation, heat is produced that has to be dissipated in some suitable way. In connection with this requirement, a cooling agent can be made to flow through the system by means of a pump or by an exploitation of the thermosyphon effect. Simultaneous processes in composite devices are considered along with a physical mathematical modelling conception, network models, and hierarchic and mixed models. Attention is given to the simulation of thermohydrodynamical systems, the application of simultaneous heat and mass flow network models, and the simulation of thermomechanical systems.

  11. Development of an advanced solar augmented water heater. Final report Feb 80-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, H.; Morrison, D.; de Winter, F.

    1982-06-01

    A program was undertaken to design, construct and test two advanced prototype solar augmented gas water heaters. Computer analyses and experimental work were used to optimize components and characterize performance. The resulting design includes a solar preheat tank, a gas-fired backup tank, the collector loop pump and all operating controls contained in a single cylindrical package. The backup tank is positioned above the solar preheat tank. The connection between the solar and backup tanks is effectively a thermal diode which restricts heat transfer from the backup to the solar tank but allows the backup tank to become an integral part of solar storage whenever the solar tank temperature surpasses the backup tank set point temperature. Solar heat is supplied through a jacketed tank drainback system. Gas heat is supplied through a two phase thermosyphon heat exchanger. Testing showed the system to operate efficiently and reliably.

  12. Cooling of high power generators and motors for electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, J. L.

    1984-03-01

    This study reviews the history and development of marine electric propulsion drives, the types of electric propulsion, and the inherent losses which occur within the synchronous ac machines typically used for high-power propulsion systems. A thorough review of the literature pertaining to heat transfer in electrical machinery is made. In particular, the use of liquid cooling in various flow configurations, including buoyancy-driven thermosyphons and two-phase thermosyphons is analyzed. Forced-liquid cooling is feasible, but the required rotating seals are a problem in reliability. Closed-loop thermosyphon cooling appears feasible at high rotational speeds, although a secondary heat exchange through the shaft is required. Closed, two-phase thermosyphons and heat pipes are also feasible, but require forced-air circulation for heat rejection to the ambient. Since all of these concepts deserve additional attention, areas for further research and development are recommended.

  13. Water-storage-tube systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hemker, P.

    1981-12-24

    Passive solar collection/storage/distribution systems were surveyed, designed, fabricated, and mechanically and thermally tested. The types studied were clear and opaque fiberglass tubes, metal tubes with plastic liners, and thermosyphoning tubes. (MHR)

  14. Social Context Effects on School Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Murphy, Joseph

    In this two-part paper, an attempt is made to examine the relationship between social contexts and effective schools and specifically to contribute to the development of a conceptual model for understanding how social contexts influence the operation of effective schools and student learning. In the first part, school effects research is drawn…

  15. Liquid-cooling technology for gas turbines - Review and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Fossen, G. J., Jr.; Stepka, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    After a brief review of past efforts involving the forced-convection cooling of gas turbines, the paper surveys the state of the art of the liquid cooling of gas turbines. Emphasis is placed on thermosyphon methods of cooling, including those utilizing closed, open, and closed-loop thermosyphons; other methods, including sweat, spray and stator cooling, are also discussed. The more significant research efforts, design data, correlations, and analytical methods are mentioned and voids in technology are summarized.

  16. Experimental Investigation Into Thermal Siphon Used as an Intermediate Circuit of an Integrated Cooling System Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, L.A.; Gabaraev, B.A.; Solovjev, S.L.; Shpansky, S.B.

    2002-07-01

    In the paper the results of study in heat transfer capacity of the thermosyphon mock-up which is considered as an intermediate circuit of the reactor under design, are presented. The mock-up design, the test rig and the experimental results are described. It is shown that the simplest mathematical model describes the processes of power transfer by the thermosyphon under certain conditions. (authors)

  17. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  18. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report describes the thermodynamic testing and modeling of a thermosyphon heat exchanger used in solar water heating systems. Testing of a four tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger was performed in two parts. The first portion of the test increased the collector fluid while the storage tank remained isothermal. After the collector fluid temperature was raised to 95 C, the second part of the test allowed the storage tank to gain heat. The test was performed for two collector flow rates. Measured values included collector side forced flow rate, temperature differences across the heat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, vertical water temperature profile in the heat exchanger, and pressure drop on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. The overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) values obtained confirmed that models which assume UA depends solely on thermosyphon flow rate do not adequately characterize thermosyphon heat exchangers. This is because heat transfer in thermosyphon exchangers occurs in the mixed convection, rather than forced flow, regime. A linear regression equation was developed to better predict UA using the Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers and dimensionless parameters based on fluid properties calculated for the average hot and cold leg temperatures. 9 figs.

  19. The mirror effect and the spacing effect.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Bennet

    2003-09-01

    In the mirror effect, there are fewer false negatives (misses) and false positives (false alarms) for rare (low-frequency) words than for common (high-frequency) words. In the spacing effect, recognition accuracy is positively related to the interval (spacing or lag) between two presentations of an item. These effects are related in that they are both manifestations of a leapfrog effect (a weaker item jumps over a stronger item). They seem to be puzzles for traditional strength theory and at least some current global-matching models. A computational strength-based model (EICL) is proposed that incorporates excitation, inhibition, and a closed-loop learning algorithm. The model consists of three nonlinear coupled stochastic difference equations, one each for excitation (x), inhibition (y), and context (z). Strength is the algebraic sum (i.e., s = x - y + z). These equations are used to form a toy lexicon that serves as a basis for the experimental manipulations. The model can simulate the mirror effect forced-choice inequalities and the spacing effect for single-item recognition, all parameters are random variables, and the same parameter values are used for both the mirror and the spacing effects. No parameter values varied with the independent variables (word frequency for the mirror effect, lag for the spacing effect), so the model, not the parameters, is doing the work. PMID:14620350

  20. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  1. Improving School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John, Ed.; Mortimore, Peter, Ed.

    School effectiveness is an issue that has preoccupied researchers and policymakers for 3 decades. To study how ineffective schools become effective and what constitutes an effective school, the Improving School Effectiveness Project was carried out in Scotland from 1995 to 1997. This project forms the basis of discussion in this book, which has 11…

  2. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  3. Regulation with placebo effects.

    PubMed

    Malani, Anup

    2008-12-01

    A growing scientific literature supports the existence of placebo effects from a wide range of health interventions and for a range of medical conditions. This Article reviews this literature, examines the implications for law and policy, and suggests future areas for research on placebo effects. In particular, it makes the case for altering the drug approval process to account for, if not credit, placebo effects. It recommends that evidence of placebo effects be permitted as a defense in cases alleging violations of informed consent or false advertising. Finally, it finds that tort law already has doctrines such as joint and several liability to account for placebo effects. Future research on placebo effects should focus on whether awareness of placebo effects can disable these effects and whether subjects can control their own placebo effects. PMID:19353835

  4. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  5. Effective College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses other writings on effective college teaching and then presents his list of necessary characteristics for the effective teacher, stressing the interpersonal dimension of the teaching-learning situation. (MF)

  6. Side Effects (Management)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  7. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified the effectiveness of Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the e...

  8. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  9. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  10. The Nocebo Effect.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence is emerging for a phenomenon known as the nocebo effect. This is when a person is conditioned to expect a negative response, or to anticipate negative effects from an experience. These findings highlight the importantance of effective communication with patients and the influence that good anxiety and pain management control can have in improving treatment outcomes. The placebo effect has been widely researched, but new studies have shown that nocebo can have a greater effect than placebo The nocebo effect is prevalent in interactions between patients and healthcare workers. Research has demonstrated that if a patient deems a healthcare professional not to understand or believe them, this can cause distress, and the physiological effect can reduce the prognosis of treatment. It has also been demonstrated that patients who are anxious or expect pain during a procedure, feel more pain because of this negative expectation. PMID:27145562

  11. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. PMID:27343033

  12. The butterfly effect of the "butterfly effect".

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J

    2009-07-01

    The "Butterfly Effect" metaphor states with variance that the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil can cause a tornado in Texas. This metaphor has become part of the common vernacular of Western culture. In this paper I discuss the origins of the metaphor, examine its current usage within popular culture, and present an argument as to why it is popular. I propose that the metaphor is a type of semantic attractor, a narrative device with invariant meaning but audience-specific contextualization. Finally I address whether the Butterfly Effect metaphor is a good example of itself. PMID:19527619

  13. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  14. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  15. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency. PMID:25401364

  16. Atomic lighthouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Kaiser, R.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Bachelard, R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  17. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  18. Dynamic ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Gilbert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A research program is underway at the NASA Langley Research Center to study the effect of rate of descent on ground effects. A series of powered models were tested in the Vortex Research Facility under conditions with rate of descent and in the 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel under identical conditions but without rate of descent. These results indicate that the rate of descent can have a significant impact on ground effects particularly if vectored or reversed thrust is used.

  19. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  20. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  1. Primacy Effects in Attributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Francis T.

    Previous research has suggested the existence of a primacy effect in the attribution of ability. To test if the primacy effect occurs in situations where specific cues about the person and nature of the test materials are lacking or greatly reduced, college students corrected a multiple-choice test in which a phantom stimulus person correctly…

  2. Behaviours of Effective Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhead, Roslyn; Nediger, William

    The purpose of this 2-year-long qualitative and quantitative field study was to investigate the behaviors of effective secondary school principals in their respective school districts, to find commonalities in the behavior of principals who were deemed by their peers to preside over effective schools, and to report the interim results. The…

  3. Effective Online Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2006-01-01

    Effective online teaching is a popular topic in today's educational technology journals due to the vital role that educators play in the teaching and learning process. The author will provide insights into effective online teachers and highlight training and mentoring practices for online instructors at the University of Phoenix.

  4. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  5. Organizational Effectiveness of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    1982-01-01

    Because organizational effectiveness of schools is difficult to define, a model is needed to explain the complexities of the concept. Two models offer some promise. One is the goal model, which defines effectiveness as the degree to which organizations meet or surpass their goals (either official or operational). The other is the system resource…

  6. JPL Radiation Effects Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorbourn, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Effects Group investigates the effects of space radiation on present and future microelectronic and optoelectronic technologies, evaluate the risk of using them in specific space missions, and recommend component and design techniques for JPL and NASA programs to reduce reliability risk from space radiation.

  7. Overview of atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rote, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Effluents from the transportation system are the major cause of Satellite Power System related atmospheric effects. These effects are discussed and include inadvertent weather modification, air quality degradation, compositional changes in the stratosphere and mesosphere, formation of noctilucent clouds, plasma density changes, airglow enhancements, and changes in composition and dynamics of the plasmasphere and magnetosphere.

  8. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  9. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  10. The Kaye Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, "The Kaye effect", as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid…

  11. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  12. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  13. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  14. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  15. Developing Effective Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T.J.

    In this introductory work, the main principles on which British companies are basing management development programs are presented, and stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial talent are set forth: stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial t"lent are set forth: program planning based on clear objectives and communication;…

  16. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  17. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Phillip A.

    Determining the characteristics of effective teaching has been a problem for more than 50 years. Studies attempting to rate characteristics or to devise a fair evaluation method abound, but one necessary perspective must not be overlooked: that of the student. An effective teacher transmits knowledge with a blend of intensity and empathy that…

  19. Bulk Topological Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Timothy H; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon; Hughes, Taylor L

    2016-02-26

    Existing proximity effects stem from systems with a local order parameter, such as a local magnetic moment or a local superconducting pairing amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that despite lacking a local order parameter, topological phases also may give rise to a proximity effect of a distinctively inverted nature. We focus on a general construction in which a topological phase is extensively coupled to a second system, and we argue that, in many cases, the inverse topological order will be induced on the second system. To support our arguments, we rigorously establish this "bulk topological proximity effect" for all gapped free-fermion topological phases and representative integrable models of interacting topological phases. We present a terrace construction which illustrates the phenomenological consequences of this proximity effect. Finally, we discuss generalizations beyond our framework, including how intrinsic topological order may also exhibit this effect.

  20. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  1. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  2. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  3. Cardiovascular Effects of Felypressin

    PubMed Central

    Cecanho, Rodrigo; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Ranali, José

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of felypressin (FEL) were studied in Wistar rats. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements were taken in awake rats treated with vasopressin (AVP), FEL, or epinephrine (EPI). Each group received either an intravenous (IV) or an intracerebroventricular V1 receptor antagonist, saline, area postrema removal, or sham surgery. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls (P < .05) were applied. Felypressin and AVP induced a pressor effect, and bradycardia was inhibited by IV V1 antagonist. Intracerebroventricular V1 antagonist and area postrema removal enhanced their pressor effects. Epinephrine induced a higher pressor effect and a similar bradycardia that was not affected by the treatments. It was concluded that FEL depends on V1 receptors to induce pressor and bradycardic effects, and that it produces a high relationship between bradycardia and mean arterial pressure variation depending on area postrema and central V1 receptors. These effects are potentially less harmful to the cardiovascular system than the effects of EPI. PMID:17177590

  4. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  5. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group.

  6. Bustling argon: biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhouheng; Zhang, Rongjia; Sun, Xuejun

    2013-10-03

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option.

  7. Effective Frequency Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, C. Laurence; Weng, Chi Y.

    2002-01-01

    An effective monochromatic frequency technique is described to represent the effects of finite spectral bandwidth for active and passive measurements centered on an absorption line, a trough region, or a slowly varying spectral feature. For Gaussian and rectangular laser line shapes, the effective frequency is shown to have a simple form which depends only on the instrumental line shape and bandwidth and not on the absorption line profile. The technique yields accuracies better than 0.1% for bandwidths less than 0.2 times the atmospheric line width.

  8. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  9. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  10. Vaccine herd effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  11. Developing Effective Working Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two workshops are described in detail. One explores ways to increase the effectiveness of work groups and includes the workshop leader's personal observations. The second involves training transformational leaders, whose characteristics include idealized influence, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational…

  12. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  13. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  14. Aerobrake plasmadynamics - Macroscopic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1990-06-01

    The flow around an aerobraking spacecraft (such as the Aeroassist Flight Experiment reentry vehicle) will contain a region of partially ionized gas, that is, a plasma. It is shown here by numerical simulation that macroscopic plasmadynamic effects (which are not included in standard aerothermodynamic simulations) will have a noticeable effect on the reentry flow field. In particular, there are thermoelectric phenomena which can have a major influence in flow dynamics at the front of an ionizing bowshock. These thermoelectric phenomena arise because of the presence of large density and temperature gradients at the front of a reentry bowshock, and they include strong local magnetic fields, electric currents, and ohmic heating. One important result is the dramatic increase in temperature (over the case where plasma effects are neglected) at a reentry shock front; the implication is that macroscopic plasmadynamic effects can no longer be neglected in simulations of hypersonic reentry flow fields.

  15. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions to the different drugs. The doctors, nurses, and pharmacists will describe what to look out for in ... will be monitored very closely by doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to make sure that all side effects are ...

  16. Strategies for Effective Outsourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moneta, Larry; Dillon, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes strategies that can be employed for effective outsourcing in higher education settings. Several models of outsourcing are identified and described, and examples of institutions using each model are provided. (GCP)

  17. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  18. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... you or your family member has ever had heat stroke, or suffered from the condition in a previous surgery, be sure to tell the physician anesthesiologist. Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or ...

  19. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  20. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  1. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  2. The lisse effect revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Lisse effect is a rarely noted phenomenon occurring when infiltration caused by intense rain seals the surface soil layer to airflow, trapping air in the unsaturated zone. Compression of air by the advancing front results in a pressure increase that produces a water-level rise in an observation well screened below the water table that is several times as large as the distance penetrated by the wetting front. The effect is triggered by intense rains and results in a very rapid water-level rise, followed by a recession lasting a few days. The Lisse effect was first noted and explained by Thal Larsen in 1932 from water-level observations obtained in a shallow well in the village of Lisse, Holland. The original explanation does not account for the increased air pressure pushing up on the bottom of the wetting front. Analysis of the effect of this upward pressure indicates that a negative pressure head at the base of the wetting front, ??f, analogous to that postulated by Green and Ampt (1911) to explain initially rapid infiltration rates into unsaturated soils, is involved in producing the Lisse effect. Analysis of recorded observations of the Lisse effect by Larsen and others indicates that the water-level rise, which typically ranges from 0.10 to 0.55 m, should be only slightly larger than |??f| and that the depth of penetration of the wetting front is no more than several millimeters.

  3. Effective Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto

    In this chapter we study a particular case of multiphase systems, namely two-phase materials in which one of the phases is randomly dispersed in the other, so that the composite can be viewed on a macroscale as an effective continuum, with well defined properties. In general, the theoretical determination of the parameter for an effective medium requires, as a rule, the solution of a corresponding transport problem at the microscale, which takes into account the morphology of the system and its evolution. As the mathematical problem is well-posed on a microscale, this can be accomplished using, for example, the multiple scale approach shown in Chap. 11 ; however, the task requires massive computations and is therefore difficult to implement from the practical standpoint. Here, instead, we focus on a deterministic approach to the problem, where the geometry and spatial configuration of the particles comprising the included phase are given and the solution to the microscale problem is therefore sought analytically. As examples, we study the effective thermal conductivity of solid reinforced materials (Sect. 10.1), the effective viscosity of non-colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.2), the effective permeability of porous materials (10.3) and the effective self- and gradient diffusivities of colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.4). Then, in Sect. 10.5, an alternative dynamic definition of the transport coefficients is considered, which can also serve as a basis to determine the effective properties of complex systems.

  4. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  5. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating. PMID:15992683

  6. The negative repetition effect.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Peterson, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising negative repetition effect, in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and across pairs, the target words were drawn from a small set of categories. In the repetition condition, the pairs were initially presented in a random order and then presented a 2nd time blocked by the category of the target words. In the single presentation condition, the pairs were presented only in the blocked order. Participants in the former condition recalled fewer target words on a free recall test despite having seen the word pairs twice (the negative repetition effect). This phenomenon is explored in a series of 5 experiments assessing 3 theoretical accounts of the effect. The experiments demonstrate that the negative repetition effect generalizes over multiple encoding conditions (reading and generative encoding), over different memory tests (free and cued recall), and over delay (5 min and 2 days). The results argue against a retrieval account and a levels-of-processing account but are consistent with the item-specific-relational account, the account upon which the effect was initially predicated. PMID:23421508

  7. Liner environment effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataramani, K. S.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Liner Environment Effects Study Program is aimed at establishing a broad heat transfer data base under controlled experimental conditions by quantifying the effects of the combustion system conditions on the combustor liner thermal loading and on the flame radiation characteristics. Five liner concepts spanning the spectrum of liner design technology from the very simple to the most advanced concepts are investigated. These concepts comprise an uncooled liner, a conventional film cooled liner, an impingement/film cooled liner, a laser drilled liner approaching the concept of a porous wall, and a siliconized silicon carbide ceramic liner. Effect of fuel type is covered by using fuels containing 11.8, 12.8, and 14% hydrogen. Tests at 100, 200, and 300 psia provide a basis for evaluating the effect of pressure on the heat transfer. The effects of the atomization quality and spray characteristics are examined by varying the fuel spray Sauter mean diameter and the spray angle. Additional varied parameters include reference velocity, a wide range of equivalence ratio, cooling flow rate, coolant temperature and the velocity of the coolant stream on the backside of the liner.

  8. Relativistic effects in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsimirskii, K.B.

    1995-11-01

    Relativistic effects become apparent when the velocity of the electron is arbitrarily close to the speed of light (137 au) without actually attaining it (in heavy atoms of elements at the end of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table). At the orbital level, the relativistic effect is apparent in the radial contraction of penetrating s and p shells, expansion of nonpenetrating d and f shells, and the spin-orbit splitting of p-,d-, and f-shells. The appearance of a relativistic effect is indicated in the variation in the electronic configurations of the atoms in the Periodic Table, the appearance of new types of closed electron shells (6s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 6p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 7s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 5d{sub 3/2}{sup 4}), the stabilization of unstable oxidation states of heavy elements, the characteristic variation in the ionization enthalpies of heavy atoms, their electron affinity, hydration energies, redox potentials, and optical electronegativities. In the spectra of coordination compounds, a relativistic effect is observed when comparing the position of the charge transfer bands in analogous compounds, the parameters characterizing the ligand field strength (10Dq), the interatomic distances and angles in compounds of heavy elements. A relativistic effect is also apparent in the ability of heavy metals to form clusters and superclusters. Relativistic corrections also affect other properties of heavy metal compounds (force constants, dipole moments, biological activity, etc.).

  9. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    SciTech Connect

    Kouprianova, I.; Ek, D.; Showalter, R.; Bergman, M.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE.

  10. Transgenerational genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2010-12-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to 'missing heritability'. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans.

  11. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  12. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  14. Giving effective presentations.

    PubMed

    Englehart, Nadine

    2004-03-01

    Apprehension about oral communication, or public speaking is rated as the number one fear among most individuals. Developing skill in, and comfort with, public speaking is important whether we are presenting oral reports and proposals, responding to questions, or training co-workers. Effective speakers are able to communicate information in a way that stimulates interest, helps the audience to understand and remember, and influences attitudes and behaviours. Many of us think that effective speakers are born rather than made. In truth most successful speakers work hard and invest a great deal of time and effort in to improving their speaking capabilities. Effective public speaking is a learned skill and activity that requires lots of practice. Like other learned skills, having a strategy with clear action steps can help you achieve your goal. PMID:15116467

  15. Effective Documentation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1997-01-01

    Quality assurance programs provide a very effective means to monitor and evaluate medical care. Quality assurance involves: (1) Identify a problem; (2) Determine the source and nature of the problem; (3) Develop policies and methods to effect improvement; (4) Implement those polices; (5) Monitor the methods applied; and (6) Evaluate their effectiveness. Because this definition of quality assurance so closely resembles the Nursing Process, the health unit staff was able to use their knowledge of the nursing process to develop many forms which improve the quality of patient care. These forms include the NASA DFRC Service Report, the occupational injury form (Incident Report), the patient survey (Pre-hospital Evaluation/Care Report), the Laboratory Log Sheet, the 911 Run Sheet, and the Patient Assessment Stamp. Examples and steps which are followed to generate these reports are described.

  16. Quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, T.; Tasaki, S.; Prigogine, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 1977, Misra and Sudarshan showed, based on the quantum measurement theory, that an unstable particle will never be found to decay when it is continuously observed. They called it the quantum Zeno effect (or paradox). More generally the quantum Zeno effect is associated to the inhibition of transitions by frequent measurements. This possibility has attracted much interest over the last years. Recently, Itano, Heinzen, Bollinger and Wineland have reported that they succeeded in observing the quantum Zeno effect. This would indeed be an important step towards the understanding of the role of the observer in quantum mechanics. However, in the present paper, we will show that their results can be recovered through conventional quantum mechanics and do not involve a repeated reduction (or collapse) of the wave function.

  17. The quantum sweeper effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  18. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  19. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    PubMed

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-01-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  20. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David R.; Medina, Douglas J.; Hawk, Larry W.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Richards, Jerry B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect “accelerated-HRE.” Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior. PMID:24409128

  1. A tactile suffix effect.

    PubMed

    Watkins, M J; Watkins, O C

    1974-01-01

    Evidence for a representational tactile memory was obtained from a tactile analogue of the auditory suffix effect. In two experiments, a short sequence of tactile stimuli applied to the fingers was followed by an acoustic (control) or tactile (suffix) recall signal. The serial position curves for the two conditions were compared. They revealed similar and strong primacy effects, but recall of the last few stimuli was higher in the control condition. This terminal control advantage was attributed to the retention of raw tactile information.

  2. Contamination effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The in-situ optical surface measurement system is a facility designed to study the deleterious effects of particulate materials on the surface reflectivities of optical materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). This arrangement is designed to simulate the on-orbit effects of contamination and degradation of optical surfaces. This simulation is accomplished through the use of non-coherent VUV sources illuminating optical surfaces located in a high vacuum chamber. Several sources of contamination are employed. The reflectivity is measured both at the specular reflection as well as at two scattered positions, forward and reverse. The system components are described and an operating procedure is given.

  3. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton.

  4. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential.

  5. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed.

  6. Modeling Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  7. Vascular effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Almeida Rezende, Bruno; Pereira, Aline Carvalho; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia Soares

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with various biological properties particularly in the cardiovascular system, including antiatherogenic, antioxidant, vasodilation, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet activities. These biological properties have been evaluated in several experimental and clinical studies. In addition, extensive reviews have discussed the antiatherogenic effect of these polyphenols. However, limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic vascular effects of these compounds. This review brings together some recent studies, to establish the different signaling pathways involved in the molecular mechanisms that underlie the vasodilation induced by flavonoids.

  8. Quantum spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bernevig, B Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2006-03-17

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. The existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2(e/4pi). The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  9. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton. PMID:26205852

  10. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  11. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  12. Conducting Effective Simulator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerling, Kenneth D.

    This paper describes the simulator phase of Commonwealth Edison's program for training and licensing operators of nuclear power stations. Topics covered include (1) preparing the students before starting the simulator phase; (2) the simulator schedule and the number of students that can be trained effectively in a class; (3) format and structure…

  13. Contaminant effects on fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, V.W.; Hodson, P.V.; Nriagu, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the effects of water pollution on fish and fisheries. Topics include: monitoring lead pollution in fish, metallothionein and acclimation to heavy metals in fish, modeling approaches, appraising the status of fisheries, and assessing the health of aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  15. Building Effective Afterschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashola, Olatokunbo S.

    Through a comprehensive review of various afterschool programs across the United States, this resource provides a practical overview of the research and best practices that can be easily adapted and applied in the development of highly effective afterschool programs. chapters focus on: (1) "Why Afterschool Programs?" (benefits, challenges, and…

  16. Is Effective Teaching Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Helen; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the ecological validity of using observation-based scores to evaluate individual teachers' effectiveness, mirroring their use by school administrators. Using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, the authors asked (a) how similar are teachers' emotional support, classroom organization, and instructional support scores from…

  17. Case 26: Somogyi effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This individual has a classic manifestation of the Somogyi effect, which is fasting morning hyperglycemia in response to hypoglycemia in the early morning and late night hours. The danger is that if night-time blood glucose levels are not measured, the physician may interpret the patient as having h...

  18. Creating an Effective Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray; Griffis, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Newsletters are an important resource or form of media. They offer a cost-effective way to keep people informed, as well as to promote events and programs. Production of a newsletter makes an excellent project, relevant to real-world communication, for technology students. This article presents an activity on how to create a short newsletter. The…

  19. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products. PMID:23715638

  20. Effective Internet Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Janine

    2001-01-01

    Describes how teachers can help students learn to use effectively the wealth of knowledge on the Internet by organizing research in advance, planning carefully and structuring assignments as students conduct their own research, and teaching students to evaluate web sites. (SR)

  1. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  2. Commentary: Expanding on Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelham, William E., Jr.; Massetti, Greta M.

    2003-01-01

    Atkins, Graczyk, Frazier, and Abdul-Adil (2003) make the point that there have been three limitations of mental health services for children and families in low-income, urban settings: (a) accessibility; (b) effectiveness; and (c) sustainability. Their article focuses extensively on improving access and addressing issues of sustainability in…

  3. Holding Effective Board Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Advice and tested methods for management of meetings from superintendents and board members are combined in this reference book on conducting effective school board meetings. Intended for a wide readership, it contains three chapters and an exhibit section comprising over one-third of the document. Following a brief introduction, chapter 1,…

  4. Creating Effective Multimedia Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information on several critical themes related to multimedia instruction for those involved in the design, development, or use of computer delivered instruction. Addresses software product life cycle; systematic approach to design; multimedia design and development teams; production values; critical components of effective multimedia;…

  5. Qualities of Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Richard, Holly B.; Catano, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    You know how important principals are in advancing student achievement and school success, but it's not been exactly clear which components of the principal's job are the highest priority... until now. Following on the results-based approach from the ASCD best-seller "Qualities of Effective Teachers", James Stronge and his coauthors…

  6. Drug effects on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-10-01

    Many drugs can adversely affect spermatogenesis. These effects can occur either by directly inhibiting sperm or testicular function or indirectly by impairing the hypothalamic pituitary testicular axis. In this paper, we will review the drugs that are known to adversely impact spermatogenesis, and/or sperm function and detail what is known about the mechanisms through which these compounds impair fertility in men.

  7. Effective Use of Usenet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1992-01-01

    Continues a description of the Usenet computer network that began in the previous issue. The effective use of Usenet is discussed, including how to screen out unwanted information, the most helpful newsgroups to access, and setting up news reader software. Ideas for library outreach services via Usenet are also suggested. (LRW)

  8. Reading and Writing Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Carol; Burt, Lorna

    This workbook, designed for workplace literacy courses, covers effective reading and writing. Introductory materials include objectives, a topical outline, sources, and information on time for the course and continuing education credits. The 16 sessions of the course cover the following topics: job terms; abbreviations, acronyms, and pictorial…

  9. Heterologous vaccine effects.

    PubMed

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Aaby, Peter; Shann, Frank; Netea, Mihai G; Levy, Ofer; Louis, Jacques; Picot, Valentina; Greenberg, Michael; Warren, William

    2016-07-25

    The heterologous or non-specific effects (NSEs) of vaccines, at times defined as "off-target effects" suggest that they can affect the immune response to organisms other than their pathogen-specific intended purpose. These NSEs have been the subject of clinical, immunological and epidemiological studies and are increasingly recognized as an important biological process by a growing group of immunologists and epidemiologists. Much remain to be learned about the extent and underlying mechanisms for these effects. The conference "Off-target effects of vaccination" held in Annecy-France (June 8-10 2015) intended to take a holistic approach drawing from the fields of immunology, systems biology, epidemiology, bioinformatics, public health and regulatory science to address fundamental questions of immunological mechanisms, as well as translational questions about vaccines NSEs. NSE observations were examined using case-studies on live attenuated vaccines and non-live vaccines followed by discussion of studies of possible biological mechanisms. Some possible pathways forward in the study of vaccines NSE were identified and discussed by the expert group. PMID:27312214

  10. Confirming Testlet Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    A testlet is a cluster of items that share a common passage, scenario, or other context. These items might measure something in common beyond the trait measured by the test as a whole; if so, the model for the item responses should allow for this testlet trait. But modeling testlet effects that are negligible makes the model unnecessarily…

  11. Increasing Managerial Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Norman C.

    1977-01-01

    According to the author, effective management training programs bridge the gap between what is taught in the classroom and what is applied on the job. Five design criteria for transfer of training are described: Managerial philosophy, feedback from others, the why as well as the how of management, problem solving, and time for reflection on the…

  12. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles looks at computerization and unions in Australia, France, and India; bargaining agreements about technological innovation in India, the United Kingdom, and the United States; and the effects of technology on the labor force in the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and the United States. (SK)

  13. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  14. Effective Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  15. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  16. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  17. DCPS Effective Schools Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    DCPS is committed to providing "all" students with the caliber of education they deserve. The goal of the DCPS Effective Schools Framework is to ensure that every child, in every classroom, has access to a high-quality and engaging standards-based instructional program, and that all school supports are aligned to support teaching and learning. The…

  18. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  19. Effective Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parratt, Smitty

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of understanding nonverbal communication in enhancing the personal and work relationships of interpreters and increasing their effectiveness in meeting the needs of customers. Discusses the mystique of body language, cultural variation in the use of gestures, the stages of an encounter, interpreting gesture clusters, and…

  20. Cardiovascular effects of gliptins.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile.

  1. [Pharmacological effects of hordenine].

    PubMed

    Hapke, H J; Strathmann, W

    1995-06-01

    Hordenine is an ingredient of some plants which are used as feed for animals, i.e. in sprouting barley. After ingestion of such feed hordenine may be detected in blood or urine of horses which in case of racing horses may be the facts of using prohibited compounds. Results of some experiments in pharmacological models show that hordenine is an indirectly acting adrenergic drug. It liberates norepinephrine from stores. In isolated organs and those structures with reduced epinephrine contents the hordenine-effect is only very poor. Experiments in intact animals (rats, dogs) show that hordenine has a positive inotropic effect upon the heart, increases systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow volume, inhibits gut movements but has no effect upon the psychomotorical behaviour of mice. All effects are short and only possible after high doses which are not to be expected after ingestion of hordenine containing feed for horses. A measurable increase of the performance of racing horses is quite improbable.

  2. Effective Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert N.

    Beginning with the observation that educators are faced with rising public expectations, declining resources, and increased public criticism, this paper describes a six-fold model for determining how staff development is operating and how it can be made to operate more effectively, in a self-renewing manner. The six dimensions consist of the…

  3. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  4. Research and Teacher Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David

    This paper presents one researcher's premise that the most important variable in determining classroom effectiveness is the congruence of the delivered curriculum with the desired outcomes or, that students be given the opportunity to learn what is expected of them. This theory presupposes that curriculum expectations be made clear to students,…

  5. Tips for Effective Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Kevin F.

    2009-01-01

    School business officials' days are filled with numbers and reports--audits, balance sheets, check registers, financial statements, journal entries, vouchers, and warrant reports, just to name a few. Those are all important tools that school business officers use to manage the financial resources of the district effectively. However, they are also…

  6. Teaching Effective Interviewing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Frankie

    Through careful preparation and followup, students can insure successful job interviews. If they evaluate their own skills and expectations and assess employer characteristics before interviews, they can increase their credibility with interviewers and make more effective job decisions. If they anticipate irrelevant or illegal questions on such…

  7. Teacher Effectiveness: A Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Myrtle

    1969-01-01

    This document summarizes the highlights of research on teacher effectiveness and concludes with recommendations based on a synthesis of this past work. The various methodologies that have been used are discussed, from rating scales to objective observation techniques, such as OScAR and the ecological studies. The major problems in teacher…

  8. Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the results of an NRA funded program entitled Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase that received funding through a NASA NRA (NRA8-31) and was monitored by personnel in the NASA Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Program. The NASA Project number was 02029. The Satellite Contamination and Materials Outgassing Knowledgebase (SCMOK) was created as a part of the earlier NRA8-20. One of the previous tasks and part of the previously developed Knowledgebase was to accumulate data from facilities using QCMs to measure the outgassing data for satellite materials. The main object of this current program was to increase the number of material outgassing datasets from 250 up to approximately 500. As a part of this effort, a round-robin series of materials outgassing measurements program was also executed that allowed comparison of the results for the same materials tested in 10 different test facilities. Other programs tasks included obtaining datasets or information packages for 1) optical effects of contaminants on optical surfaces, thermal radiators, and sensor systems and 2) space environmental effects data and incorporating these data into the already existing NASA/SEE Knowledgebase.

  9. Effective Thinking Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Rod

    1997-01-01

    Effective Thinking Outdoors (ETO) is an organization that teaches thinking skills and strategies via significant outdoor experiences. Identifies the three elements of thinking as creativity, play, and persistence; presents a graphic depiction of the problem-solving process and aims; and describes an ETO exercise, determining old routes of travel…

  10. Radiation: Doses, Effects, Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lean, Geoffrey, Ed.

    Few scientific issues arouse as much public controversy as the effects of radiation. This booklet is an attempt to summarize what is known about radiation and provide a basis for further discussion and debate. The first four chapters of the booklet are based on the most recent reports to the United Nations' General Assembly by the United Nations…

  11. Giving effective poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J A

    1998-08-27

    Giving an effective poster presentation can be easy and rewarding with attention to a few proven concepts. Define your audience. Keep the words and graphics clear, concise, and eye-catching. Remember, you have three seconds to attract attention and 30 seconds to get your message across.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, D M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of alcohol on the heart include modification of the risk of coronary artery disease, the development of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, exacerbation of conduction disorders, atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias, and an increased risk of hypertension, hemorrhagic stroke, infectious endocarditis, and fetal heart abnormalities. PMID:2686174

  13. Effectively using multiple technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassak, Marshall

    2015-07-01

    Details regarding three examples where students were engaged in mathematics reasoning in effective and productive ways are shared. Technology in these instances allowed for students to share their thinking in ways that might not have otherwise been possible. These examples also serve to show how the choice of technology influences the mathematics to be learned from a mathematical task.

  14. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting. PMID:24345130

  15. Alexandrite effect spectropyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2006-08-01

    Alexandrite crystal is commonly used for making alexandrite laser, and it also has a less-known phenomenon called the alexandrite effect that refers to the color change between different light sources. A novel spectropyrometer for temperature measurement of a radiating body utilizing the alexandrite effect is introduced. The alexandrite effect method for temperature measurement is based on the relationship between the temperature of blackbody and the hue-angle in the CIELAB color space. The alexandrite effect spectropyrometer consists of an optical probe, a spectrometer, a computer, and an alexandrite filter. It measures the spectral power distribution of a radiating body through the alexandrite filter, calculates the hue-angle, and determines the temperature. The spectropyrometer is suitable for temperature measurement of any radiating body with or without spectral lines in its spectral power distribution from 1000 K to 100000 K. The spectropyrometer is particularly useful for high to ultrahigh temperature measurement of any radiating bodies with spectral line emissions, such as electric arcs and discharges, plasmas, and high temperature flames.

  16. Indicators of Administrative Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, Charles E.; Hofmann, Richard J.

    Ten personal characteristics and seven administrative skills that differentiated effective from ineffective university leaders were assessed by multiple discriminate analysis. The personal characteristics identified by previous research (Skipper, 1975, 1977) are: responsibility, integrity, self-control, intellectual efficiency, flexibility,…

  17. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  18. Effective Intervention for Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Randie; Kellner, Millicent H.; Green, Stuart; Elias, Maurice J.

    2012-01-01

    Most professional educators are aware that every school should have an effective approach to harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB) prevention in which every member of the school community participates. Regardless of the approach a school takes, all students and all staff members should be knowledgeable participants who have been trained to…

  19. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  20. Brain effects of melanocortins.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Alfio; Tacchi, Raffaella; Vergoni, Anna Valeria

    2009-01-01

    The melanocortins (alpha, beta and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormones: MSHs; adrenocorticotrophic hormone: ACTH), a family of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides having in common the tetrapeptide sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp, have progressively revealed an incredibly wide range of extra-hormonal effects, so to become one of the most promising source of innovative drugs for many, important and widespread pathological conditions. The discovery of their effects on some brain functions, independently made by William Ferrari and David De Wied about half a century ago, led to the formulation of the term "neuropeptide" at a time when no demonstration of the actual production of peptide molecules by neurons, in the brain, was still available, and there were no receptors characterized for these molecules. In the course of the subsequent decades it came out that melanocortins, besides inducing one of the most complex and bizarre behavioural syndromes (excessive grooming, crises of stretchings and yawnings, repeated episodes of spontaneous penile erection and ejaculation, increased sexual receptivity), play a key role in functions of fundamental physiological importance as well as impressive therapeutic effects in different pathological conditions. If serendipity had been an important determinant in the discovery of the above-mentioned first-noticed extra-hormonal effects of melanocortins, many of the subsequent discoveries in the pharmacology of these peptides (feeding inhibition, shock reversal, role in opiate tolerance/withdrawal, etc.) have been the result of a planned research, aimed at testing the "pro-nociceptive/anti-nociceptive homeostatic system" hypothesis. The discovery of melanocortin receptors, and the ensuing synthesis of selective ligands with agonist or antagonist activity, is generating completely innovative drugs for the treatment of a potentially very long list of important and widespread pathological conditions: sexual impotence, frigidity

  1. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  2. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  3. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health effects of air pollution Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that is not clean can hurt ... important to know about the health effects that air pollution can have on you and others. Once you ...

  4. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Assessment Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified stormwater BMP effectiveness as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of existing Stormwater ...

  5. Lightning Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, Richard E.

    2004-03-01

    Lightning Physics and Effects is not a lightning book; it is a lightning encyclopedia. Rarely in the history of science has one contribution covered a subject with such depth and thoroughness as to set the enduring standard for years, perhaps even decades, to come. This contribution covers all aspects of lightning, including lightning physics, lightning protection, and the interaction of lightning with a variety of objects and systems as well as the environment. The style of writing is well within the ability of the technical non-expert and anyone interested in lightning and its effects. Potential readers will include physicists; engineers working in the power industry, communications, computer, and aviation industries; atmospheric scientists; geophysicists; meteorologists; atmospheric chemists; foresters; ecologists; physicians working in the area of electrical trauma; and, lastly, architects. This comprehensive reference volume contains over 300 illustrations, 70 tables with quantitative information, and over 6000 reference and bibliography entries.

  6. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings.

  7. Establishing effective working relationships.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-02-24

    This article, the second in a series of 11, provides support and offers advice to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence. In particular, the article discusses how to establish effective working relationships and emphasises the importance of the student-mentor or student-practice teacher relationship. It examines the essential qualities, attributes and characteristics of an effective mentor or practice teacher. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements for these roles as stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

  8. Cardiovascular effects of smoking.

    PubMed

    Mancia, G; Groppelli, A; Casadei, R; Omboni, S; Mutti, E; Parati, G

    1990-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) increases with smoking and this factor interacts with hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in raising the incidence of this condition in a greater than linear fashion. This can be explained by the adverse effect of smoking on plasma fibrogen, platelet turnover and lipid profile. It may also be accounted for, however, by the acute bradycardia, increase in blood pressure and generalized vasoconstriction accompanying smoking, due to a nicotine-dependent activation of the sympathetic nervous system. These effects (which in heavy smokers can raise blood pressure permanently) are only partly offset by beta-blockers and can only be abolished by opposing the cardiac and vascular sympathetic influences by alpha and beta-blockade combined.

  9. Coulomb effects in femtoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Radoslaw; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2009-09-15

    The correlation function of two identical particles - pions or kaons - interacting via Coulomb potential is computed. The particles are emitted from an anisotropic particle's source of finite lifetime. In the case of pions, the effect of halo is taken into account as an additional particle's source of large spatial extension. The relativistic effects are discussed in detail. The Bowler-Sinyukov procedure to remove the Coulomb interaction is carefully tested. In the absence of halo the procedure is shown to work very well even for an extremely anisotropic source. When the halo is taken into account the free correlation function, which is extracted by means of the Bowler-Sinyukov procedure, is distorted at small relative momenta but the source parameters are still correctly reproduced.

  10. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  11. Endocrine effects of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd T; Dobs, Adrian S

    2002-11-01

    In the 35 years since the active compound of marijuana, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated, the psychological and physiological impact of marijuana use has been actively investigated. Animal models have demonstrated that cannabinoid administration acutely alters multiple hormonal systems, including the suppression of the gonadal steroids, growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid hormone and the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These effects are mediated by binding to the endogenous cannabinoid receptor in or near the hypothalamus. Despite these findings in animals, the effects in humans have been inconsistent, and discrepancies are likely due in part to the development of tolerance. The long-term consequences of marijuana use in humans on endocrine systems remain unclear.

  12. Latent effects decision analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J. Arlin; Werner, Paul W.

    2004-08-24

    Latent effects on a system are broken down into components ranging from those far removed in time from the system under study (latent) to those which closely effect changes in the system. Each component is provided with weighted inputs either by a user or from outputs of other components. A non-linear mathematical process known as `soft aggregation` is performed on the inputs to each component to provide information relating to the component. This information is combined in decreasing order of latency to the system to provide a quantifiable measure of an attribute of a system (e.g., safety) or to test hypotheses (e.g., for forensic deduction or decisions about various system design options).

  13. Spin Hall effect devices.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Tomas; Wunderlich, Jörg; Olejník, Kamil

    2012-05-01

    The spin Hall effect is a relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomenon that can be used to electrically generate or detect spin currents in non-magnetic systems. Here we review the experimental results that, since the first experimental observation of the spin Hall effect less than 10 years ago, have established the basic physical understanding of the phenomenon, and the role that several of the spin Hall devices have had in the demonstration of spintronic functionalities and physical phenomena. We have attempted to organize the experiments in a chronological order, while simultaneously dividing the Review into sections on semiconductor or metal spin Hall devices, and on optical or electrical spin Hall experiments. The spin Hall device studies are placed in a broader context of the field of spin injection, manipulation, and detection in non-magnetic conductors.

  14. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential. PMID:27103364

  15. Radiation effects in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, J.

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to electronic components, materials are, in general, quite resistant to the conditions encountered in space from the point of view of radiation effects. There exist however some groups of materials which can cause concern, particularly when they are used on the outside of spacecraft. These include fluorinated polymers, oxide glasses and paints. Normally only very sensitive properties like the thermo-optical ones may be significantly degraded in near earth space. The extremely used geostationary orbit is the most dangerous in this respect. Another characteristic of materials is that degration is a complex phenomenon, of which particulate radiation is not the only cause. Synergistic effects are the rule and the influence of the complete space environment including temperature, UV radiation, particles, contamination, etc. must be assessed. This strongly complicates the ground simulation experiments.

  16. Observables in effective gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, Steven B.; Marolf, Donald; Hartle, James B.

    2006-09-15

    We address the construction and interpretation of diffeomorphism-invariant observables in a low-energy effective theory of quantum gravity. The observables we consider are constructed as integrals over the space of coordinates, in analogy to the construction of gauge-invariant observables in Yang-Mills theory via traces. As such, they are explicitly nonlocal. Nevertheless we describe how, in suitable quantum states and in a suitable limit, the familiar physics of local quantum field theory can be recovered from appropriate such observables, which we term ''pseudolocal.'' We consider measurement of pseudolocal observables, and describe how such measurements are limited by both quantum effects and gravitational interactions. These limitations support suggestions that theories of quantum gravity associated with finite regions of spacetime contain far fewer degrees of freedom than do local field theories.

  17. Phytoestrogens and their effects.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2014-10-15

    The chemical structure, classification, source, metabolism, physiological and health effects of plant phytoestrogens and mechanisms of their action are reviewed. The available knowledge suggests that phytoestrogens can affect a number of physiological and pathological processes related to reproduction, bone remodeling, skin, cardiovascular, nervous, immune systems and metabolism. Due to these effects, phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing diet can be useful for the prevention and treatment of menopausal symptoms, skin aging, osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, immune and metabolic diseases. Possible problems in understanding and application of phytoestrogens (multiple targets and multiple estrogen receptor -dependent and -independent mechanisms of action, the discrepancy between the results of experimental and clinical studies, adequate source of phytoestrogen) have been discussed.

  18. Developmental effects of dioxins.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, L S

    1995-01-01

    The potent developmental toxicity of dioxin in multiple species has been known for a number of years. However, recent studies have indicated that dioxin also induces functional developmental defects, many of which are delayed. Subtle structural deficits, not detectable at birth, have also been described in multiple species and in both sexes. Certain defects have been reported not only in animals but also in children prenatally exposed to complex mixtures containing dioxinlike compounds. None of the effects can be attributed to modulation of any one endocrine system. For example, dioxin does not bind to the estrogen receptor, but it can cause effects that are both estrogenic and antiestrogenic. However, viewing dioxin and related compounds as endocrine disruptors that may alter multiple pathways sheds some light on the complexities of this potent class of growth dysregulators. PMID:8593882

  19. Safety Intervention Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

    2001-10-16

    Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

  20. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  1. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Lucía; Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width.

  2. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  3. Transgenerational effects of NMs.

    PubMed

    Poma, Anna; Colafarina, Sabrina; Fontecchio, Gabriella; Chichiriccò, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are present in a number of commercially available products but there are uncertainties as to whether the unique properties that support their commercial use may also pose potential health risks. Information is missing concerning the influence of nanomaterials on the overall reproductive outcome and transgenerational effects in animals and plants. To obtain this information, long-term studies would be required using animal models phylogenetically close to humans and exposure conditions that reflect realistic scenarios with regard to dosages and admission. The nanoreprotoxicology literature published to date is largely descriptive in nature regarding the effects of nanoparticles. The mechanisms, which determine particle reproduction compatibility, are mostly elusive at the moment. Thus, it is recommended that future research explore the interactions between nanomaterials and transgenerational matter on a molecular level. It would, for instance, be of major importance to understand the behaviour of nanoparticles inside the cells but also their genotoxic and epigenetic effects. Recent studies have shown that intravenous and/or intra-abdominal administration of nanoparticles to mice results in their accumulation in the cells of many tissues, including the brain and the testis, suggesting that they easily pass through the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers. In parallel embryo development after exposure to nanoparticles should be comparatively investigated. The majority of studies on embryo toxicology have concentrated on piscine embryos, mostly derived from zebrafish. Plants for human food as an important component of the ecosystem need also to be taken into account when evaluating transgenerational effects of engineered nanomaterials in crops.

  4. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    We organize the effective (self-)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter (DM) cutoff scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting DM induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of DM properties.

  5. The Kaye effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-11-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur. This article is a written version of the oral contribution of the German team to the 21st IYPT competition, which was awarded first prize by an international jury. The article has been edited by European Journal of Physics.

  6. Cardiovascular Effects of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Martin G.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the literature on the cardiovascular effects of caffeine indicates that moderate caffeine consumption does not cause cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, or an increased incidence of coronary heart disease. Caffeine use is often associated with atherogenic behavior, such as cigarette smoking. Failure to take into account covariables for cardiovascular disease could be responsible for commonly held misconceptions about caffeine and heart disease. PMID:21221403

  7. Magnetic effects on thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Bojkovski, Jovan; Drnovšek, Janko; Geršak, Gregor

    2014-03-01

    Thermometers in laboratory environment and industrial applications are often subject to extraneous, usually unwanted and uncontrolled magnetic fields. Magnetic field influence can be minimized, but cannot be fully cancelled out. Even more, in most cases, there is no awareness of the existence of magnetic fields, let alone their effect on measurement instrumentation. In the past, sensitivity to high dc magnetic fields has been investigated in cryogenics and at high temperatures. More recently, the magnetic effect on weak dc magnetic fields was presented. The goal of this paper was to analyse and empirically and experimentally prove the magnetic sensitivity of thermocouples exposed to low magnetic fields: both dc and ac. Precision and uniform alternating and direct magnetic flux densities were generated by means of permanent magnets and power amplifiers with air-cored coils. The magnetic effect on ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic thermocouples at liquid-nitrogen-boiling point (-196 °C), ice point (0 °C), in water (17 °C) and at melting point of gallium fixed point cell (29.7646 °C) was investigated. Magnetic-field-dependent temperature errors of up to 700 mK (at 5.3 mT: dc) and up to 1 °C (at 10 mT: ac 50 Hz magnetic fields) were detected. From the results, it can be concluded that, ideally for temperature measurements of the highest accuracy in the above-cryogenic temperature range, magnetic sensitivity should be estimated and taken into account either as the correction of an error and/or as an additional source of measurement uncertainty. Special consideration should be given to thermocouple orientation relative to the magnetic field direction, influence of metal enclosures and magnetization effects on ferromagnetic components of thermocouples.

  8. Immunologic effects of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Meydani, S N; Ha, W K

    2000-04-01

    Many investigators have studied the therapeutic and preventive effects of yogurt and lactic acid bacteria, which are commonly used in yogurt production, on diseases such as cancer, infection, gastrointestinal disorders, and asthma. Because the immune system is an important contributor to all of these diseases, an immunostimulatory effect of yogurt has been proposed and investigated by using mainly animal models and, occasionally, human subjects. Although the results of these studies, in general, support the notion that yogurt has immunostimulatory effects, problems with study design, lack of appropriate controls, inappropriate route of administration, sole use of in vitro indicators of the immune response, and short duration of most of the studies limit the interpretation of the results and the conclusions drawn from them. Nevertheless, these studies in toto provide a strong rationale for the hypothesis that increased yogurt consumption, particularly in immunocompromised populations such as the elderly, may enhance the immune response, which would in turn increase resistance to immune-related diseases. This hypothesis, however, needs to be substantiated by well-designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human studies of an adequate duration in which several in vivo and in vitro indexes of peripheral and gut-associated immune response are tested.

  9. Cardioprotective effects of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Miriyala, Sumitra; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Rengarajulu, Puvanakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric, is extracted from the powdered dry rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn (Zingiberaceae) and it has been used for centuries in indigenous medicine. We have shown that curcumin has a protective role against myocardial necrosis in rats. The antioxidant activity of curcumin could be attributed to the phenolic and methoxy groups in conjunction with the 1,3-diketone-conjugated diene system, for scavenging of the oxygen radicals. In addition, curcumin is shown to enhance the activities of detoxifying enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase in vivo. We have also shown that oxygen free radicals exacerbate cardiac damage and curcumin induces cardioprotective effect and it also inhibits free-radical generation in myocardial ischemia in rats. This chapter on the cardioprotective effects of curcumin covers the following aspects: (1) the history of curcumin and its discovery as a potent drug with relevance to cardiovascular diseases; (2) mechanistic role of curcumin in vitro, emphasizing the antiplatelet and anticoagulant effects; (3) cardiovascular properties of curcumin; (4) application of curcumin in different animal models (viz. myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmia in vitro and in vivo); (5) curcumin free-radical scavenging activity, particularly against O2 radical and depletion of the oxidative stress. PMID:17569220

  10. Amifostine and hematologic effects.

    PubMed

    Sriswasdi, C; Jootar, S; Giles, F J

    2000-04-01

    Amifostine is a protective agent of normal tissue from adverse effects of radiochemotherapy. It is the prodrug that is dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase on plasma membrane into the active form named WR-1065. More than 90 per cent of the drug is cleared from plasma in 6 minutes and the peak tissue concentration is 10-30 minutes after intravenous administration. Amifostine has the selective property to protect normal tissue but not cancer cells by mainly scavenging free radicals induced by radiation and chemocytotoxic agents. Both preclinical and clinical studies of this drug provide the significant protection of hematopoietic progentitors from a broad range of cytotoxic agents such as cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, vinblastine, carboplatin, mitomycin-C, fotemustine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin and radiation as well. Moreover, this drug can protect other normal organs or tissues including kidney, salivary gland, liver, heart, lung and small intestine. Amifostine is quite safe, the two major side effects are vomiting and hypotension, and the minor effects are flushing, sneezing, dizziness, chills, metallic taste etc. The drug was approved by the FDA of U.S.A. for use as a cytoprotectant in cyclophosphamide and cisplatin treatment for advanced ovarian cancer and non small cell lung cancer. PMID:10808697

  11. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng-yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing; An, Jia-ze

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca2+ influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection. PMID:25221579

  12. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng-Yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing; An, Jia-Ze

    2014-07-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca(2+) influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection.

  13. Generalized Effective Radiance Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Radiance temperature is one of the most important and widely used concepts in radiation thermometry. The usual definition of radiance temperature does not strictly apply for complex situations, such as when surrounding radiation is non-negligible or when corrections are applied to measurements made using an inappropriate emissivity setting. A novel concept, generalized effective radiance temperature (GERT), that adopts a graybody as the reference radiator is proposed in this study to express and explain the actual measurands that exist extensively in practical radiation thermometry applications; for example, a measurement result by a spectral-band radiation thermometer whose instrumental emissivity setting is less than 1. An effective wavelength approach has been developed to elucidate the relationship between a thermometer-dependent temperature (reading from an actual spectral-band radiation thermometer) and the object-side parameter GERT. The characteristics of GERT and the effective wavelength of a GERT measurement are discussed. Choosing an arbitrary emissivity setting to correct for the emissivity of a real target is equivalent to using this value as the emissivity of the reference graybody of the GERT. The GERT can be used in calibrations of both sources and thermometers.

  14. Cascading Effects Following Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Gerald R.; Forgatch, Marion S.; DeGarmo, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Four different sources for cascade effects were examined using 9-year process and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a preventive intervention using Parent Management Training – Oregon Model (PMTO™). The social interaction learning (SIL) model of child antisocial behavior serves as one basis for predicting change. A second source addresses the issue of comorbid relationships among clinical diagnoses. The third source, collateral changes, describes events in which changes in one family member correlate with changes in another. The fourth component is based on the long-term effects of reducing coercion and increasing positive interpersonal processes within the family. New findings from the 9-year follow-up show that mothers experienced benefits as measured by standard of living (i.e., income, occupation, education, and financial stress) and frequency of police arrests. It is assumed that PMTO reduces the level of coercion, which sets the stage for a massive increase in positive social interaction. In effect, PMTO alters the family environment and thereby opens doors to healthy new social environments. PMID:20883592

  15. Cascading effects following intervention.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Gerald R; Forgatch, Marion S; Degarmo, David S

    2010-11-01

    Four different sources for cascade effects were examined using 9-year process and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial of a preventive intervention using the Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™). The social interaction learning model of child antisocial behavior serves as one basis for predicting change. A second source addresses the issue of comorbid relationships among clinical diagnoses. The third source, collateral changes, describes events in which changes in one family member correlate with changes in another. The fourth component is based on the long-term effects of reducing coercion and increasing positive interpersonal processes within the family. New findings from the 9-year follow-up show that mothers experienced benefits as measured by standard of living (i.e., income, occupation, education, and financial stress) and frequency of police arrests. It is assumed that PMTO reduces the level of coercion, which sets the stage for a massive increase in positive social interaction. In effect, PMTO alters the family environment and thereby opens doors to healthy new social environments. PMID:20883592

  16. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  17. Advanced heat-pipe heat exchanger and microprocessor-based modulating burner controls development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstein, A.; Cohen, B.; Feldman, S.; Spatz, M.; Smith, E.

    1986-03-01

    The development of a novel condensing heat exchanger, a modulating gas burner, and a zone-controlled residential warm-air heating system is described. The condensing heat exchanger uses ten thermosyphons which are manifolded at both the condenser and evaporator ends to achieve a compact low-cost design. Initial tests have demonstrated a + 92 percent steady-state efficiency for a conventional clamshell furnace operating with the thermosyphon heat exchanger located outside the furnace cabinet. A 100,000 -Btu/hr modulating burner has also been developed. Comprehensive study of the burner's operating characteristics has produced guidelines for the design and application of the device. Finally, the modulating burner has been incorporated into a zone-controlled heating system. In parallel with the development of the preceding heating system components, the performance of thermosyphons over a wide range of operating conditions is being explored with the objective of improving design procedures for incorporating these devices into heat exchangers.

  18. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, May 15, 1996--July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report very briefly summarizes study results and includes an experimental plan developed for the fundamental study of heat transfer in thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers. The study will investigate the influence of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the thermosyphon flow side of the heat exchanger, and the influence of the flow rate on the forced flow side of the heat exchanger. Detailed temperature, flow rate, and pressure data will be obtained for four, seven, and nine tube-in-shell heat exchanger designs. Correlations will be developed for the heat transfer and friction coefficients, and a semi-empirical model will be developed to predict the performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heaters.

  19. The Flash Grab Effect

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Patrick; Anstis, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    When an object moves back and forth, its trajectory appears significantly shorter than it actually is. The object appears to stop and reverse well before its actual reversal point, as if there is some averaging of location within a window of about 100 ms (Sinico et al, 2009). Surprisingly, if a bar is flashed at the physical end point of the trajectory, right on top of the object, just as it reverses direction, the flash is also shifted – grabbed by the object – and is seen at the perceived endpoint of the trajectory rather than the physical endpoint. This can shift the perceived location of the flash by as much as 2 or 3 times its physical size and by up to several degrees of visual angle. We first show that the position shift of the flash is generated by the trajectory shortening, as the same shift is seen with or without the flash. The flash itself is only grabbed if it is presented within a small spatiotemporal attraction zone around the physical end point of the trajectory. Any flash falling in that zone is pulled toward the perceived endpoint. The effect scales linearly with speed, up to a maximum, and is independent of the contrast of the moving stimulus once it is above 5%. Finally, we demonstrate that this position shift requires attention. These results reveal a new “flash grab” effect in the family of motion-induced position shifts. Although it most resembles the flash drag effect, it differs from this in the following ways: 1) it has a different temporal profile, 2) it requires attention, 3) it is about 10 times larger. PMID:23872166

  20. Antidepressant effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Price, W A; Giannini, A J

    1985-11-01

    The authors present a case report that provides support for a relationship between estrogen and the menstrual cycle on the 1 hand and affective disorders on the other. The patient in this case, a 35-year old woman, suffered from a rapid cycling affective disorder that was severely affected by her menstrual cycle and responded positively to oral contraceptives (OCs). The patient had a 24-year history of numerous manic and depressive episodes, the 1st of which coincided with menarche. She had noted that, 4 days before menses, she would experience symptoms of premenstrual tension syndrome (PMS) and often the onset of an affective episode. Treatment with a series of psychotropic agents had not been effective in controlling the number of episodes. However, the patient reported that there had been an 8-9-month period in the past when she had taken OCs and had fewer symptoms. Thus, the patient was placed on Ortho-Novum as well as imipramine. At the 9-month follow-up, she reported there had been no further episodes of depression or mania. The exact mechanism behind estrogen's psychotropic effect is unclear, although it increases the central availability of norepinephrine and induces changes in dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic receptors. Beta-endorphin levels covary with estrogen levels, and estrogen seems to affect every major neurotransmitter system. The fact that estrogen has not consistently been shown to be effective in this regard may only signify the existence of a distinct subclass of affective disorders closely linked to the menstrual cycle. This subclass may have some type of dysfunction within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that contributes to mood swings.

  1. 'The Kesterson effect'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    Hypothesized to be derived from Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks, selenium contamination of the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge is traced through irrigation drainage to the source bedrock of the California Coast Ranges. This biogeochemical pathway of selenium is defined here as the 'Kesterson effect.' At the refuge ponds, this effect culminated in 1983 in a 64% rate of deformity and death of embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds. From the previous companion paper on irrigation drainage, the Kesterson effect has been implicated in nine of 11 reconnaissance areas studied in the western United States. Deformities have resulted in at least five of these sites. Climatic, geologic, hydrologic, and soil conditions in these reconnaissance areas are similar to those in the area surrounding Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge in the west-central San Joaquin Valley of California, in California, selenium as selenate, was ultimately found weathered with sulfur from marine sources in soluble sodium and magnesium sulfate salts, which are concentrated by evaporation on farmland soils. The Se, mobilized by irrigation drainage, is bioaccumulated to toxic levels in refuge wetland ponds that are located mainly in hydrologically closed basins and thus act as concentrating disposal points. The depositional environment of the ponds may be similar to that of the nutrient-rich continental shelf edge and slope in which Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene sediments found to be seleniferous in the California Coast Ranges were deposited. Bioaccumulation may be therefore a primary mechanism of selenium enrichment in ancient sediments in addition to that of the formerly suggested Cretaceous volcanic pathway.

  2. Effecting dietary change.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Ashley J; Mathers, John C

    2004-11-01

    A world epidemic of diet-related chronic disease is currently being faced. In the UK incidence of obesity alone has tripled in the last 20 years and this trend is predicted to continue. Consensus exists for the urgent need for a change in diet and other lifestyle factors and for the direction and targets for this change. The evidence for how this change can be achieved is less certain. It has been established that disease processes begin in childhood. Recent evidence indicates that dietary habits too are established in childhood but that these habits are amenable to change. While establishing a healthy lifestyle in childhood is paramount, interventions have the potential to promote positive change throughout the life course. Success in reversing current trends in diet-related disease will depend on commitment from legislators, health professionals, industry and individuals, and this collaboration must seek to address not only the food choices of the individual but also the environment that influences such choices. Recent public health policy development in England, if fully supported and implemented, is a positive move towards this goal. Evidence for effective strategies to promote dietary change at the individual level is emerging and three reviews of this evidence are discussed. In addition, three recent dietary intervention studies, in three different settings and with different methods and aims, are presented to illustrate methods of effecting dietary change. Further work is required on what factors influence the eating behaviour and physical activity of individuals. There is a need for further theory-based research on which to develop more effective strategies to enable individuals to adopt healthier lifestyles.

  3. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  4. Interface effects on nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Brad Richard

    2009-12-01

    Nanoelectronics consist of devices with active electronic components on the nanometer length scale. At such dimensions most, if not all, atoms or molecules composing the active device region must be on or near a surface. Also, materials effectively confined to two dimensions, or when subject to abrupt boundary conditions, generally do not behave the same as materials inside three dimensional, continuous structures. This dissertation is a quantitative determination of how surfaces and interfaces in organic nanoelectronic devices affect properties such as charge transport, electronic structure, and material fluctuations. Si/SiO2 is a model gate/gate dielectric for organic thin film transistors, therefore proper characterization and measurement of the effects of the SiO2/organic interface on device structures is extremely important. I fabricated pentacene thin film transistors on Si/SiO2 and varied the conduction channel thickness from effectively bulk (˜40nm) to 2 continuous conducting layers to examine the effect of substrate on noise generation. The electronic spectral noise was measured and the generator of the noise was determined to be due to the random spatial dependence of grain boundaries, independent of proximity to the gate oxide. This result led me to investigate the mechanisms of pentacene grain formation, including the role of small quantities of impurities, on silicon dioxide substrates. Through a series of nucleation, growth and morphology studies, I determined that impurities assist in nucleation on SiO2, decreasing the stable nucleus size by a third and increasing the overall number of grains. The pentacene growth and morphology studies prompted further exploration of pentacene crystal growth on SiO2. I developed a method of making atomically clean ultra-thin oxide films, with surface chemistry and growth properties similar to the standard thick oxides. These ultra-thin oxides were measured to be as smooth as cleaned silicon and then used as

  5. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  6. Assuring reliability program effectiveness.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide simple identification and description of techniques that have proved to be most useful either in developing a new product or in improving reliability of an established product. The first reliability task is obtaining and organizing parts failure rate data. Other tasks are parts screening, tabulation of general failure rates, preventive maintenance, prediction of new product reliability, and statistical demonstration of achieved reliability. Five principal tasks for improving reliability involve the physics of failure research, derating of internal stresses, control of external stresses, functional redundancy, and failure effects control. A final task is the training and motivation of reliability specialist engineers.

  7. Assessments of astronaut effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Robert M.; Helmreich, Robert L.; Fogg, Louis; Mcfadden, Terry J.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and convergent validity of three methods of peer and supervisory ratings of the effectiveness of individual NASA astronauts and their relationships with flight assignments. These two techniques were found to be reliable and relatively convergent. Seniority and a peer-rated Performance and Competence factor proved to be most closely associated with flight assignments, while supervisor ratings and a peer-rated Group Living and Personality factor were found to be unrelated. Results have implications for the selection and training of astronauts.

  8. Holographic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Luca; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  9. Earthquake occurrence and effects.

    PubMed

    Adams, R D

    1990-01-01

    Although earthquakes are mainly concentrated in zones close to boundaries of tectonic plates of the Earth's lithosphere, infrequent events away from the main seismic regions can cause major disasters. The major cause of damage and injury following earthquakes is elastic vibration, rather than fault displacement. This vibration at a particular site will depend not only on the size and distance of the earthquake but also on the local soil conditions. Earthquake prediction is not yet generally fruitful in avoiding earthquake disasters, but much useful planning to reduce earthquake effects can be done by studying the general earthquake hazard in an area, and taking some simple precautions. PMID:2347628

  10. Environmental Effects of BPA

    PubMed Central

    Canesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Research on bisphenol A (BPA) as an environmental contaminant has now major regulatory implications toward the ecosystem health, and hence it is incumbent on scientists to do their research to the highest standards possible, in order that the most appropriate decisions are made to mitigate the impacts to aquatic wildlife. However, the contribution given so far appears rather fragmented. The present overview aims to collect available information on the effects of BPA on aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates to provide a general scenario and to suggest future developments toward more comprehensive approaches useful for aquatic species protection. PMID:26674307

  11. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This databank is the collation of radiation test data submitted by many testers and serves as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. It contains radiation sensitivity results from ground tests and is divided into two sections. Section A lists total dose damage information, and section B lists single event upset cross sections, I.E., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup).

  12. Reflux condensation in a closed tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.L.

    1984-10-01

    Reflux condensation which may have an appreciable effect on the reflood process in the reactor core during the loss-of-coolant accident is investigated experimentally and analytically in the present work using the vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon. The condensation heat transfer coefficients of the countercurrent vapor-liquid flows are locally measured along the condenser wall. The results indicate that Nusselt's solution for film condensation cannot interpret satisfactorily the observed trend. Further improvements are made to consider the effects of interfacial shear, waviness and non-condensable gas on condensation. The vapor shear retards the condensate flow and thus increases the film thickness, which results in lower heat transfer coefficients than those calculated from Nusselt theory. Modified Fanning friction factors which account for the augmentation of interfacial shear through phase change are used to evaluate the reduction of heat transfer by vapor shear. On the other hand, the waves appearing on the interface can enhance heat transfer rates. Such enhancement is determined by solving numerically the nonlinear equation for the wavy interface. When non-condensable gases are present in the system, they will accumulate at the condenser end forming a gas barrier to the vapor and shut off that portion. A two-dimensional model is developed to include both axial and radial diffusion of gas mass. This two-dimensional analysis indicates the inadequacy of the common one-dimensional diffuse-front model in considering only axial diffusion of gas in most physical systems.

  13. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  14. Photoprotective effects of nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Damian, Diona L

    2010-04-01

    Sun protective measures can reduce numbers of both precancerous actinic keratoses and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas within relatively short periods of time even in high-risk populations. Sunscreens, which tend to provide greater protection against shortwave UVB than against longer wavelength UVA radiation, can however provide only partial protection from the mutagenic and immune suppressive effects of sunlight. In large part, this reflects poor compliance with proper sunscreen application and reapplication. Skin cancer is by far the most common malignancy in Caucasian populations, and additional strategies to reduce the morbidity and economic burden of this disease are now urgently needed. Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3, is an inexpensive agent which is used for a variety of dermatological applications with little or no toxicity even at high doses. Nicotinamide has photoprotective effects against carcinogenesis and immune suppression in mice, and is photoimmunoprotective in humans when used as a lotion or orally. UV irradiation depletes keratinocytes of cellular energy and nicotinamide, which is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, may act at least in part by providing energy repletion to irradiated cells.

  15. Acrolein health effects.

    PubMed

    Faroon, O; Roney, N; Taylor, J; Ashizawa, A; Lumpkin, M H; Plewak, D J

    2008-08-01

    Acrolein is a chemical used as an intermediate reactive aldehyde in chemical industry. It is used for synthesis of many organic substances, methionine production, and methyl chloride refrigerant. The general population is exposed to acrolein via smoking, second-hand smoke, exposure to wood and plastic smoke. Firefighters and population living or working in areas with heavy automotive traffic may expose to higher level of acrolein via inhalation of smoke or automotive exhaust. Degradation of acrolein in all environmental media occurs rapidly, therefore, environmental accumulation is not expected. Acrolein degrade in 6A days when applied to surface water, and it has not been found as a contaminant in municipal drinking water. Acrolein vapor may cause eye, nasal and respiratory tract irritations in low level exposure. A decrease in breathing rate was reported by volunteers acutely exposed to 0.3A ppm of acrolein. At similar level, mild nasal epithelial dysplasia, necrosis, and focal basal cell metaplasia have been observed in rats. The acrolein effects on gastrointestinal mucosa in the animals include epithelial hyperplasia, ulceration, and hemorrhage. The severity of the effects is dose dependent. Acrolein induces the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal irritations by inducing the release of peptides in nerve terminals innervating these systems. Levels of acrolein between 22 and 249 ppm for 10 min induced a dose-related decrease in substance P (a short-chain polypeptide that functions as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator).

  16. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  17. Radiation effects in space.

    PubMed

    Fry, R J

    1986-01-01

    The radiation protection guidelines of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are under review by Scientific Committee 75 of the National Council Protection and Measurements. The re-evaluation of the current guidelines is necessary, first, because of the increase in information about radiation risks since 1970 when the original recommendations were made and second, the population at risk has changed. For example, women have joined the ranks of the astronauts. Two types of radiation, protons and heavy ions, are of particular concern in space. Unfortunately, there is less information about the effects on tissues and cancer by these radiations than by other radiations. The choice of Quality Factors (Q) for obtaining dose equivalents for these radiations, is an important aspect of the risk estimate for space travel. There are not sufficient data for the induction of late effects by either protons or by heavy ions. The current information suggests a RBE for the relative protons of about 1, whereas, a RBE of 20 for tumor induction by heavy ions, such as iron-56, appears appropriate. The recommendations for the dose equivalent career limits for skin and the lens of the eye have been reduced but the 30-day and annual limits have been raised.

  18. Strategies for effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  19. NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CURCUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Greg M.; Teter, Bruce; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases result in the loss of functional neurons and synapses. Although future stem cell therapies offer some hope, current treatments for most of these diseases are less than adequate and our best hope is to prevent these devastating diseases. Neuroprotective approaches work best prior to the initiation of damage, suggesting that some safe and effective prophylaxis would be highly desirable. Curcumin has an outstanding safety profile and a number of pleiotropic actions with potential for neuroprotective efficacy, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-protein-aggregate activities. These can be achieved at sub-micromolar levels. Curcumin’s dose–response curves are strongly dose dependent and often biphasic so that in vitro data need to be cautiously interpreted; many effects might not be achievable in target tissues in vivo with oral dosing. However, despite concerns about poor oral bioavailability, curcumin has at least 10 known neuroprotective actions and many of these might be realized in vivo. Indeed, accumulating cell culture and animal model data show that dietary curcumin is a strong candidate for use in the prevention or treatment of major disabling age-related neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and stroke. Promising results have already led to ongoing pilot clinical trials. PMID:17569212

  20. Meditation: Process and effects.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has become popular in many Western nations, especially the USA. An increasing body of research shows various health benefits associated with meditation and these findings have sparked interest in the field of medicine. The practice of meditation originated in the ancient Vedic times of India and is described in the ancient Vedic texts. Meditation is one of the modalities used in Ayurveda (Science of Life), the comprehensive, natural health care system that originated in the ancient Vedic times of India. The term "meditation" is now loosely used to refer to a large number of diverse techniques. According to Vedic science, the true purpose of meditation is to connect oneself to one's deep inner Self. Techniques which achieve that goal serve the true purpose of meditation. Neurological and physiological correlates of meditation have been investigated previously. This article describes the process of meditation at a more fundamental level and aims to shed light on the deeper underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects associated with meditation. Research on the effects of meditation is summarized. PMID:27313408

  1. The Creative Stereotype Effect

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N.

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals’ performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective. PMID:26863143

  2. Meditation: Process and effects

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has become popular in many Western nations, especially the USA. An increasing body of research shows various health benefits associated with meditation and these findings have sparked interest in the field of medicine. The practice of meditation originated in the ancient Vedic times of India and is described in the ancient Vedic texts. Meditation is one of the modalities used in Ayurveda (Science of Life), the comprehensive, natural health care system that originated in the ancient Vedic times of India. The term “meditation” is now loosely used to refer to a large number of diverse techniques. According to Vedic science, the true purpose of meditation is to connect oneself to one's deep inner Self. Techniques which achieve that goal serve the true purpose of meditation. Neurological and physiological correlates of meditation have been investigated previously. This article describes the process of meditation at a more fundamental level and aims to shed light on the deeper underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects associated with meditation. Research on the effects of meditation is summarized. PMID:27313408

  3. An effective Z'

    DOE PAGES

    Fox, Patrick J.; Liu, Jia; Tucker-Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2011-12-06

    We describe a method to couple Z' gauge bosons to the standard model (SM), without charging the SM fields under the U(1)', but instead through effective higher-dimension operators. This method allows complete control over the tree-level couplings of the Z' and does not require altering the structure of any of the SM couplings, nor does it contain anomalies or require introduction of fields in nonstandard SM representations. Moreover, such interactions arise from simple renormalizable extensions of the SM—the addition of vectorlike matter that mixes with SM fermions when the U(1)' is broken. We apply effective Z' models as explanations ofmore » various recent anomalies: the D0 same-sign dimuon asymmetry, the CDF W+di-jet excess and the CDF top forward-backward asymmetry. In the case of the W+di-jet excess we also discuss several complementary analyses that may shed light on the nature of the discrepancy. We consider the possibility of non-Abelian groups, and discuss implications for the phenomenology of dark matter as well.« less

  4. Microwave field effect transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Ho-Chung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrodes of a high power, microwave field effect transistor are substantially matched to external input and output networks. The field effect transistor includes a metal ground plane layer, a dielectric layer on the ground plane layer, a gallium arsenide active region on the dielectric layer, and substantially coplanar spaced source, gate, and drain electrodes having active segments covering the active region. The active segment of the gate electrode is located between edges of the active segments of the source and drain electrodes. The gate and drain electrodes include inactive pads remote from the active segments. The pads are connected directly to the input and output networks. The source electrode is connected to the ground plane layer. The space between the electrodes and the geometry of the electrodes extablish parasitic shunt capacitances and series inductances that provide substantial matches between the input network and the gate electrode and between the output network and the drain electrode. Many of the devices are connected in parallel and share a common active region, so that each pair of adjacent devices shares the same source electrodes and each pair of adjacent devices shares the same drain electrodes. The gate electrodes for the parallel devices are formed by a continuous stripe that extends between adjacent devices and is connected at different points to the common gate pad.

  5. The Effective Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  6. Behavioral effects of microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microwaves can produce sensations of warmth and sound in humans. In other species, they also can serve as cues, they may be avoided, and they can disrupt ongoing behavior. These actions appear to be due to heat produced by energy absorption. The rate of absorption depends on the microwave parameters and the electrical and geometric properties of the subject. We therefore, cannot predict the human response to microwaves based on data from other animals without appropriate scaling considerations. At low levels of exposure, microwaves can produce changes in behavior without large, or even measureable, changes in body temperature. Thermoregulatory behavior may respond to those low levels of heat, and thereby affect other behavior occurring concurrently. There are no data that demonstrate that behavioral effects of microwaves depend on any mechanism other than reactions to heat. Our interpretation of whether a reported behavioral effect indicates that microwaves may be hazardous depends on our having a complete description of the experiment and on our criteria of behavioral toxicity.

  7. An effective Z'

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patrick J.; Liu, Jia; Tucker-Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2011-12-06

    We describe a method to couple Z' gauge bosons to the standard model (SM), without charging the SM fields under the U(1)', but instead through effective higher-dimension operators. This method allows complete control over the tree-level couplings of the Z' and does not require altering the structure of any of the SM couplings, nor does it contain anomalies or require introduction of fields in nonstandard SM representations. Moreover, such interactions arise from simple renormalizable extensions of the SM—the addition of vectorlike matter that mixes with SM fermions when the U(1)' is broken. We apply effective Z' models as explanations of various recent anomalies: the D0 same-sign dimuon asymmetry, the CDF W+di-jet excess and the CDF top forward-backward asymmetry. In the case of the W+di-jet excess we also discuss several complementary analyses that may shed light on the nature of the discrepancy. We consider the possibility of non-Abelian groups, and discuss implications for the phenomenology of dark matter as well.

  8. Astroinfect Effect - Revised Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, A. V.

    Space activities lead to a lasting pollution of the Solar System. Light pressure, gravitational interaction with the planets, collisions and explosions (similar to spontaneous explosions of Earth satellite) of artefacts in the outer parts of the planetary system can lead to effective, inevitable spontaneous leakage of interplanetary trash into the interstellar medium, even in the absence of interstellar flights. If there are alien artefacts between the stars, some of them are likely to fall down to Earth at times [1,2]. They could be non-sterile, so sporadic interstellar panspermia is possible [3]. The minimum pollution threshold for such panspermia was estimated [2] for 2 m-microartefacts at the level of Galactic cosmic radiation of 4 x 10-7 rad/s [4]. However, C. Mileikowsky showed that, if the X-rays are taken into consideration, the interstellar dose rate is ~3 x 10- 5 rad/s [5]. At this high dose rate the microartefacts must be sterilised at the distances >0.1 pc from the planetary system, hence they cannot be an effective agent of interstellar panspermia. Sufficient protection of microbial spores is possible inside macroartefacts. Therefore, the panspermia model and the corresponding minimum pollution threshold must be re-examined.

  9. Achieving effective supervision.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, David J; Spence, Susan H; Wilson, Jill; Crow, Natasha

    2002-09-01

    Supervision probably does have benefits both for the maintenance and improvement of clinical skills and for job satisfaction, but the data are very thin and almost non-existent in the area of alcohol and other drugs services. Because of the potential complexity of objectives and roles in supervision, a structured agreement appears to be an important part of the effective supervision relationship. Because sessions can degenerate easily into unstructured socialization, agendas and session objectives may also be important. While a working alliance based on mutual respect and trust is an essential base for the supervision relationship, procedures for direct observation of clinical skills, demonstration of new procedures and skills practice with detailed feedback appear critical to supervision's impact on practice. To ensure effective supervision, there needs not only to be a minimum of personnel and resources, but also a compatibility with the values and procedures of management and staff, access to supervision training and consultation and sufficient incentives to ensure it continues. PMID:12270075

  10. Effects of Therapist's Nonverbal Communication on Rated Skill and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Mark; Rogers, Ronald W.

    1980-01-01

    Nonverbal cues of immediacy significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. A therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and effectiveness. (Author)

  11. Basic optics of effect materials.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Effect materials derive their color and effect primarily from thin-film interference. Effect materials have evolved over the decades from simple guanine crystals to the complex multilayer optical structures of today. The development of new complex effect materials requires an understanding of the optics of effect materials. Such an understanding would also benefit the cosmetic formulator as these new effect materials are introduced. The root of this understanding begins with basic optics. This paper covers the nature of light, interference of waves, thin-film interference, color from interference, and color travel.

  12. Hilbert Space Effect-Representations of Effect Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riečanová, Z.; Zajac, M.

    2012-12-01

    In answer to open questions (posed in [12]) we prove that an effect algebra has a Hilbert space effect-representation iff E possesses an ordering set of states. These are, up to isomorphism, all intervals and all their sub-effect algebras in the set of all positive linear operators on any Hilbert space H. Nevertheless, there are effect algebras E, elements of which are linear operators in a Hilbert space, but E does not have such a representation.

  13. 75 FR 10411 - Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Agency), through the FCA Board (Board), issued a final rule under part 617 on December 22, 2009 (74 FR... CFR part 617 published on December 22, 2009 (74 FR 67970) is effective March 2, 2010. FOR FURTHER... 12 CFR Part 617 RIN 3052-AC45 Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date AGENCY:...

  14. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  15. [Are antidepressants really effective?].

    PubMed

    Ammendola, S; Kornreich, C

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used for a long time and it is estimated that about 10 % of the belgian population is taking some of them each year. However, there are important controversies about their real efficacy. We review successively arguments for and against their efficacy. On the one hand, meta-analysis have shown no big efficacy differences between antidepressants and placebo. On the other hand, those meta-analysis have been criticized for their methodology. Animal models show a real effect of antidepressants on the brain and clinical observations, such as an impact on suicide prevention, the possibility of induced manic switch, and an efficacy on anxiety disorders are in favour of a real efficacy. Given our current state of knowledge about them it seems appropriate to continue to use anti-depressants in the treatment of depressive patients. PMID:26749632

  16. Effective suppressibility of chaos.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-06-01

    Suppression of chaos is a relevant phenomenon that can take place in nonlinear dynamical systems when a parameter is varied. Here, we investigate the possibilities of effectively suppressing the chaotic motion of a dynamical system by a specific time independent variation of a parameter of our system. In realistic situations, we need to be very careful with the experimental conditions and the accuracy of the parameter measurements. We define the suppressibility, a new measure taking values in the parameter space, that allows us to detect which chaotic motions can be suppressed, what possible new choices of the parameter guarantee their suppression, and how small the parameter variations from the initial chaotic state to the final periodic one are. We apply this measure to a Duffing oscillator and a system consisting on ten globally coupled Hénon maps. We offer as our main result tool sets that can be used as guides to suppress chaotic dynamics. PMID:23822472

  17. Genetic effects of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, S; Zimmerman, A M

    Marijuana and its constitutive cannabinoids--tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), and cannabidiol (CBD)--markedly affect mammalian cells. Cytogenetic studies have revealed that cannabinoids induce chromosome aberrations in both in vivo and in vitro studies. These aberrations include chromosomal breaks, deletions, translocations, errors in chromosomal segregation, and hypoploidy, and are due to the clastogenic action of cannabinoids or to cannabinoid-induced disruption of mitotic events or both. Conflicting reports of the cytogenetic effects of cannabinoids are partially explained by the different experimental protocols, cell types, and animals used by investigators. Cannabinoids also suppress macromolecular synthesis (DNA, RNA, and protein) as well as reduce the level of histone gene expression. In general these studies show that cannabinoids are detrimental to the health of an individual.

  18. Dynamic effects of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic effects of combustion are due to the evolution of exothermic energy and its deposition in the compressible medium where the process takes place. The paper examines the dynamics of combustion phenomena, including ignition, turbulent flame propagation (inflammation), explosion, and detonation, with emphasis on their exothermic characteristics. Ignition and explosion are treated as problems of nonlinear mechanics, and their dynamic behavior is described in terms of phase space models and cinematographic laser shear interferograms. The results of a numerical random vortex model of turbulent flame propagation are confirmed in a combustion tunnel experiment, where it was observed that a fresh mixture of burnt and unburnt gases can sustain combustion with a relatively small expenditure of overall mass flow, due to the increasing specific volume of burnt gases inside the flame front. An isentropic pressure wave is found to precede the accelerating flame in the process of detonation, and components of this presssure wave are shown to propagate at local sonic velocities.

  19. The effective bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; von Harling, Benedict; Serone, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We study the numerical bounds obtained using a conformal-bootstrap method — advocated in ref. [1] but never implemented so far — where different points in the plane of conformal cross ratios z and overline{z} are sampled. In contrast to the most used method based on derivatives evaluated at the symmetric point z=overline{z}=1/2 , we can consistently "integrate out" higher-dimensional operators and get a reduced simpler, and faster to solve, set of bootstrap equations. We test this "effective" bootstrap by studying the 3D Ising and O( n) vector models and bounds on generic 4D CFTs, for which extensive results are already available in the literature. We also determine the scaling dimensions of certain scalar operators in the O( n) vector models, with n = 2, 3, 4, which have not yet been computed using bootstrap techniques.

  20. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  1. Pathogenic effects of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Kannerstein, M; Churg, J; McCaughey, E; Selikoff, I J

    1977-12-01

    The enormous increase in the use of asbestos during this century has necessitated the intensive study of its pathogenic effects. The occurrence of pulmonary parenchymal and pleural fibrosis and an increased prevalence of pulmonary and gastrointestinal carcinoma and of pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma have been established. A relationship, also, to laryngeal carcinoma is probable. Mesothelioma has been associated with indirect occupational, domestic, and neighborhood exposure, and the possibility of a similar correlation of pulmonary carcinoma with low exposure has been suggested. Pulmonary fibrosis and pleural plaques have been demonstrated under these circumstances. The physical characteristics of the asbestos fiber appear to be the principal factors in its carcinogenic action. The ability of fine, short fibers, especially fragmented chrysotile, to reach the pleura would appear to account for many of the pathogenetic and anatomical features of asbestos-related disease.

  2. Radiation Effects In Space

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  3. The Energy Diameter Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Garza, R; Hernandez, A; Souers, P C

    2007-07-10

    We explore various relations for the detonation energy and velocity as they relate to the inverse radius of the cylinder. The detonation rate-inverse slope relation seen in reactive flow models can be used to derive the familiar Eyring equation. Generalized inverse radii can be shown to fit large quantities of cylinder results. A rough relation between detonation energy and detonation velocity is found from collected JWL values. Cylinder test data for ammonium nitrate mixes down to 6.35 mm radii are presented, and a size energy effect is shown to exist in the Cylinder test data. The relation that detonation energy is roughly proportional to the square of the detonation velocity is shown by data and calculation.

  4. The Energy Diameter Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P; Vitello, P; Garza, R; Hernandez, A

    2007-04-20

    Various relations for the detonation energy and velocity as they relate to the inverse radius of the cylinder are explored. The detonation rate-inverse slope relation seen in reactive flow models can be used to derive the familiar Eyring equation. Generalized inverse radii can be shown to fit large quantities of cylinder and sphere results. A rough relation between detonation energy and detonation velocity is found from collected JWL values. Cylinder test data for ammonium nitrate mixes down to 6.35 mm radii are presented, and a size energy effect is shown to exist in the Cylinder test data. The relation that detonation energy is roughly proportional to the square of the detonation velocity is shown by data and calculation.

  5. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  6. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  7. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  8. Hot chocolate effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  9. The hot chocolate effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1982-05-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  10. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  11. Biological effects of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M. )

    1989-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone, a classic anthropogenic air pollutant, is going to remain a troublesome byproduct of contemporary civilization for many decades. We have known for some time that the hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides from motor vehicles, together with actinic radiation, account for local and regional photochemistry leading to prolonged afternoon ozone peaks. We also now know that agricultural burning and intensive animal husbandry elevate regional and mesoscale concentrations of ozone and its precursors, and that remote background levels of ozone have been rising steadily throughout this century. The changes we will have to make in emission controls to appreciably reduce current tropospheric ozone levels will have profound effects on our transportation systems, consumer products, and lifestyles. As a society, we will have to make difficult choices about the levels of ozone-associated health, welfare, and natural system damage we will tolerate, or conversely, how much we are willing to pay for controls which can minimize the damage.

  12. Encoding effects of remindings.

    PubMed

    Ross, B H; Bradshaw, G L

    1994-09-01

    Understanding requires prior knowledge. Most theories and empirical work on understanding have focused on the use of general prior knowledge. In the experiments presented here, we examined the role of specific prior episodes in understanding. Subjects read ambiguous stories that had some superficial cue to make them think back to an earlier story. Experiment 1 shows that a superficial cue to an earlier story affects how the new story is interpreted. Experiment 2, in which a reading-time measure was used, provides evidence that this effect of the earlier story occurs during the initial understanding of the new story. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of understanding and the use of remindings in analogy.

  13. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  14. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  15. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period.

  16. Cool Pool development. Quarterly technical report No. 3, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Batts, D.

    1980-09-01

    The Cool Pool is a shaded evaporating pool that is connected to thermal mass storage in a thermosyphon configuration. The system requires no moveable insulation. The pool is placed outside a building, and the thermal mass, vertical tubes full of water, are inside the living space. The pool must be elevated so that its water level is as high or higher than the water level in the tubes for thermosyphoning to work properly. The pool is shaded to prevent heating by direct solar radiation. A schematic of the Cool Pool is shown and how it works is described. Tests performed at Living Systems at Winters, California and analytical results are discussed.

  17. Flight effects of fan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chestnutt, D.

    1982-09-01

    Simulation of inflight fan noise and flight effects was discussed. The status of the overall program on the flight effects of fan noise was reviewed, and flight to static noise comparisons with the JT15D engine were displayed.

  18. Hall Effect in a Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an apparatus and procedure for conducting an undergraduate laboratory experiment to quantitatively study the Hall effect in a plasma. Includes background information on the Hall effect and rationale for conducting the experiment. (JN)

  19. Flight effects of fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chestnutt, D. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Simulation of inflight fan noise and flight effects was discussed. The status of the overall program on the flight effects of fan noise was reviewed, and flight to static noise comparisons with the JT15D engine were displayed.

  20. Union Effects on Teacher Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberts, Randall W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of collective bargaining on several factors known to be determinants of student achievement in the public schools, particularly its effect on the teacher's allocation of time among various activities. (Author/SSH)

  1. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  2. Effective potential and quadratic divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, M.B. ); Jones, D.R.T. )

    1992-12-01

    We use the effective potential to give a simple derivation of Veltman's formula for the quadratic divergence in the Higgs self-energy. We also comment on the effect of going beyond the one-loop approximation.

  3. Coping – Late Side Effects

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatment can cause late side effects that may not show up for months or years after treatment. These late effects may include heart and lung problems, bone loss, eye and hearing changes, lymphedema, and other problems

  4. The effect of seal width on regenerator effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of axial conduction on regenerator effectiveness has been studied in the past under the assumption of zero seal width. The effect of axial conduction coupled with finite seal width is presented in this paper. A method for calculating effectiveness assuming axial conduction and finite seal width is presented. Results of sample calculations are presented to give the designer a feel for the dependence of seal width effects on system-parameter values. It is shown that for typical regenerator designs, reductions in effectiveness due to axial conduction coupled with finite seal width can be twice as great as those due to axial conduction under the assumption of zero seal width. Also, it is shown that the required regenerator size to achieve a given effectiveness can increase dramatically when finite seal width is considered in design procedures. It is concluded that consideration of axial conduction should include finite seal width.

  5. Attention and the Testing Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Picklesimer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Memory retrieval often enhances still later memory as evidenced by the testing effect. Divided attention (DA) is known to produce different effects on encoding and retrieval, substantially disrupting the former and often producing little effect on the latter. The present experiments examine whether the mnemonic consequences of retrieval are…

  6. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  7. Cognitive Constraints and Island Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmeister, Philip; Sag, Ivan A.

    2010-01-01

    Competence-based theories of island effects play a central role in generative grammar, yet the graded nature of many syntactic islands has never been properly accounted for. Categorical syntactic accounts of island effects have persisted in spite of a wealth of data suggesting that island effects are not categorical in nature and that…

  8. Effective Programs for Latino Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E., Ed.; Calderon, Margarita, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents the current state of research on effective instructional programs for Hispanic American students. The 10 chapters are: (1) "Effective Programs for Latino Students in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Olatokunbo S. Fashola, Robert E. Slavin, Margarita Calderon, and Richard Duran); (2) "Effective Dropout Prevention…

  9. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  10. Effects of Security actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Ramona; Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne; Nyberg, Lars; Johansson, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today's performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today. The project includes several aspects such as: • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures • in which way do one learn from past accidents • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases • etc There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient "tools" in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of

  11. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  12. Enhanced Evaporation Strength through Fast Water Permeation in Graphene-Oxide Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Li Tong, Wei; Ong, Wee-Jun; Chai, Siang-Piao; Tan, Ming K.; Mun Hung, Yew

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristic of fast water permeation in laminated graphene oxide (GO) sheets has facilitated the development of ultrathin and ultrafast nanofiltration membranes. Here we report the application of fast water permeation property of immersed GO deposition for enhancing the performance of a GO/water nanofluid charged two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT). By benchmarking its performance against a silver oxide/water nanofluid charged TPCT, the enhancement of evaporation strength is found to be essentially attributed to the fast water permeation property of GO deposition instead of the enhanced surface wettability of the deposited layer. The expansion of interlayer distance between the graphitic planes of GO deposited layer enables intercalation of bilayer water for fast water permeation. The capillary force attributed to the frictionless interaction between the atomically smooth, hydrophobic carbon structures and the well-ordered hydrogen bonds of water molecules is sufficiently strong to overcome the gravitational force. As a result, a thin water film is formed on the GO deposited layers, inducing filmwise evaporation which is more effective than its interfacial counterpart, appreciably enhanced the overall performance of TPCT. This study paves the way for a promising start of employing the fast water permeation property of GO in thermal applications. PMID:26100977

  13. Enhanced Evaporation Strength through Fast Water Permeation in Graphene-Oxide Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei Li; Ong, Wee-Jun; Chai, Siang-Piao; Tan, Ming K; Hung, Yew Mun

    2015-06-23

    The unique characteristic of fast water permeation in laminated graphene oxide (GO) sheets has facilitated the development of ultrathin and ultrafast nanofiltration membranes. Here we report the application of fast water permeation property of immersed GO deposition for enhancing the performance of a GO/water nanofluid charged two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT). By benchmarking its performance against a silver oxide/water nanofluid charged TPCT, the enhancement of evaporation strength is found to be essentially attributed to the fast water permeation property of GO deposition instead of the enhanced surface wettability of the deposited layer. The expansion of interlayer distance between the graphitic planes of GO deposited layer enables intercalation of bilayer water for fast water permeation. The capillary force attributed to the frictionless interaction between the atomically smooth, hydrophobic carbon structures and the well-ordered hydrogen bonds of water molecules is sufficiently strong to overcome the gravitational force. As a result, a thin water film is formed on the GO deposited layers, inducing filmwise evaporation which is more effective than its interfacial counterpart, appreciably enhanced the overall performance of TPCT. This study paves the way for a promising start of employing the fast water permeation property of GO in thermal applications.

  14. Pulsating Heat pipe Only for Space (PHOS): results of the REXUS 18 sounding rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Manzoni, M.; Marengo, M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) are tested on board REXUS 18 sounding rocket in order to obtain data over a relatively long microgravity period (approximately 90 s). The CLPHPs are partially filled with FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 mm) and slightly smaller (1.6 mm) than the critical diameter evaluated in static Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP effectively works as a Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the characteristic slug and plug flow pattern forms inside the tube and the heat exchange is triggered by thermally driven self-sustained oscillations of the working fluid. On the other hand, the large diameter CLPHP works as a two- phase thermosyphon in vertical position and doesn't work in horizontal position: in this particular condition, the working fluid stratifies within the device as the surface tension force is no longer able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs in reduced gravity conditions: as the gravity reduces the buoyancy forces becomes less intense and it is possible to recreate the typical PHP flow pattern also for larger inner tube diameters. This allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience low gravity conditions due to a failure in the yoyo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  15. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  16. Enhanced Evaporation Strength through Fast Water Permeation in Graphene-Oxide Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei Li; Ong, Wee-Jun; Chai, Siang-Piao; Tan, Ming K; Hung, Yew Mun

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristic of fast water permeation in laminated graphene oxide (GO) sheets has facilitated the development of ultrathin and ultrafast nanofiltration membranes. Here we report the application of fast water permeation property of immersed GO deposition for enhancing the performance of a GO/water nanofluid charged two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT). By benchmarking its performance against a silver oxide/water nanofluid charged TPCT, the enhancement of evaporation strength is found to be essentially attributed to the fast water permeation property of GO deposition instead of the enhanced surface wettability of the deposited layer. The expansion of interlayer distance between the graphitic planes of GO deposited layer enables intercalation of bilayer water for fast water permeation. The capillary force attributed to the frictionless interaction between the atomically smooth, hydrophobic carbon structures and the well-ordered hydrogen bonds of water molecules is sufficiently strong to overcome the gravitational force. As a result, a thin water film is formed on the GO deposited layers, inducing filmwise evaporation which is more effective than its interfacial counterpart, appreciably enhanced the overall performance of TPCT. This study paves the way for a promising start of employing the fast water permeation property of GO in thermal applications. PMID:26100977

  17. Effective Physics Study Habits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the methods of efficient study habits and how they can be used by students to help them improve learning physics. In particular, we deal with ideas pertaining to the most effective techniques needed to help students improve their physics study skills. These ideas were developed as part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), an outreach grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. In the presentation, focus on topics such as the skills of how to develop long term memory, how to improve concentration power, how to take class notes, how to prepare for and take exams, how to study scientific subjects such as physics. We argue that the student who conscientiously uses the methods of efficient study habits will be able to achieve higher results than the student who does not; moreover, a student equipped with the proper study skills will spend much less time to learn a subject than a student who has no good study habits. The underlying issue here is not the quantity of time allocated to the study efforts by the student, but the efficiency and quality of actions. This work is supported by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education as part of IMPACTSEED grant.

  18. Effective family planning programs.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A G

    1973-01-01

    Organizational and content features of various national family planning programs are reviewed. The Thai program is cited as an example of a family planning program organized on a massive unipurpose compaign basis. The Korean and Taiwan programs have utilized special field workers while upgrading the general health care network. 3 major problems with family planning programs are: 1) the lack of experience with such programs; 2) lack of commitment at the highest political levels; and 3) medical conservatism. Utilization of all available contraceptive methods instead of reliance on 1 method would improve most programs. Nursing and auxiliary personnel could be trained to take over the work of physicians in family planning programs. This is already being done with IUD insertion and pill prescription in several programs. The postpartum tubal ligation approach has proven effective and should be extended. There is a place in all national programs for both the private and the commercial sectors. Incentives for clinics, personnel, and acceptors might spread family planning more rapidly.

  19. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  20. Effective family planning programs.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A G

    1973-01-01

    Organizational and content features of various national family planning programs are reviewed. The Thai program is cited as an example of a family planning program organized on a massive unipurpose compaign basis. The Korean and Taiwan programs have utilized special field workers while upgrading the general health care network. 3 major problems with family planning programs are: 1) the lack of experience with such programs; 2) lack of commitment at the highest political levels; and 3) medical conservatism. Utilization of all available contraceptive methods instead of reliance on 1 method would improve most programs. Nursing and auxiliary personnel could be trained to take over the work of physicians in family planning programs. This is already being done with IUD insertion and pill prescription in several programs. The postpartum tubal ligation approach has proven effective and should be extended. There is a place in all national programs for both the private and the commercial sectors. Incentives for clinics, personnel, and acceptors might spread family planning more rapidly. PMID:12309877

  1. A clear catalyst effect.

    PubMed

    Molitor, C

    1994-06-01

    A member of the International Council on Management of Population Programs (ICOMP) says that training women to manage and harbor employable skills has a very large multiplier effect. An international nongovernmental organization (NGO) based in Kuala Lumpur and established in 1973 to improve the performance of family planning programs in Asian developing countries through better management techniques, ICOMP boasts 35 developing countries as members. The organization's mandate has expanded over the years such that they now provide management and skills training programs through local NGOs in developing countries. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has been assisting ICOMP's training programs in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, and the Philippines since 1989 with two technical assistance grants totalling $681,000. This is the first time that the Bank has supported training exclusively for women. Although the ADB planned to reach only 940 women under the first technical assistance, it eventually helped train more than 1200; an additional 1300 women have attended the courses offered under the Bank's second grant. Training courses are aimed at disadvantaged women who need training in employment skills, women engaged in community development or income-generating projects who need to develop basic management skills, and officials of the participating women NGOs who need training in organizing, developing, and implementing income-generating projects. The author discusses other elements of training aimed at improving the social and economic status of women, along with experiences of the Bangladesh Association for Community Education and the MELATI Foundation of Jakarta, Indonesia.

  2. The nemesis effect.

    PubMed

    Bright, C

    1999-01-01

    Environmental pressures are converging in ways that are likely to create a growing number of unanticipated crises. Two representative surprise crises involve the forests of Eastern North America and the coral reefs. These examples reveal 13 of the worst pressures inflicted on the planet and on mankind: climate change, acid rain, increasing ultraviolet light penetration, increasing tropospheric ozone levels, habitat loss, freshwater diversion, bioinvasion, alteration of fire cycles, persistent organic pollutants, nitrogen pollution, overfishing, population growth, and infectious diseases. It is noted that these crises will demand a fix, and each fix will require money, time, and political capital. However, ¿fixing¿ is not enough, since there is no realistic expectation of reducing the potential for additional crises. Hence, the best possible way of controlling such events is to do a better job of managing systems in their entirety. In view of this, several important principles are given; these include the following: 1) monoculture technologies are brittle; 2) direct opposition to a natural force usually invites failure or a form of success that is just as bad; 3) thinking through the likely systemic effects of a plan will help locate the risks, as well as indirect opportunities; 4) institutional pluralism can create a public space that no single institution could have created alone. PMID:12349644

  3. Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharian, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the vacuum expectation value of the current density for a charged scalar field on a slice of anti-de Sitter (AdS) space with toroidally compact dimensions. Along the compact dimensions periodicity conditions are imposed on the field operator with general phases and the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter gives rise to Aharonov-Bohm-like effects on the vacuum currents. The current density along compact dimensions is a periodic function of the gauge field flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. It vanishes on the AdS boundary and, near the horizon, to the leading order, it is conformally related to the corresponding quantity in Minkowski bulk for a massless field. For large values of the length of the compact dimension compared with the AdS curvature radius, the vacuum current decays as power-law for both massless and massive fields. This behavior is essentially different from the corresponding one in Minkowski background, where the currents for a massive field are suppressed exponentially.

  4. Context effects on choice.

    PubMed

    Goldshmidt, J N; Lattal, K M; Fantino, E

    1998-11-01

    Four pigeons responded on a concurrent-chains schedule in four experiments that examined whether the effectiveness of a stimulus as a conditioned reinforcer is best described by a global approach, as measured by the average interreinforcement interval, or by a local contextual approach, as measured by the onset of the stimulus preceding the conditioned reinforcer. The interreinforcement interval was manipulated by the inclusion of an intertrial interval, which increased the overall time to reinforcement but did not change the local contingencies on a given trial A global analysis predicted choice for the richer alternative to decrease with the inclusion of an intertrial interval, whereas a local analysis predicted no change in preference. Experiment 1 examined sensitivity to intertrial intervals when each was signaled by the same houselight that operated throughout the session. In Experiment 2, the intertrial interval always was signaled by the stimulus correlated with the richer terminal link. In Experiment 3, the intertrial interval was signaled by the keylights correlated with the initial links and two novel houselights. Experiment 4 provided free food pseudorandomly during the intertrial interval. In all experiments, subjects' preferences were consistent with a local analysis of choice in concurrent chains. These results are discussed in terms of delay-reduction theory, which traditionally has failed to distinguish global and local contexts.

  5. Landslides - Cause and effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  6. [Effects of traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Herbst, Gesa; Jaeger, Ulrich; Leichsenring, Falk; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis PTSD does not adequately describe the impact of exposure to childhood trauma of the developing child. The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of different interpersonal trauma types and to describe the long-term effects of maltreatment and neglect in a clinical sample of 34 adolescents. The majority (62%) of the sample was exposed to two different types of trauma during childhood. Emotional abuse and emotional neglect have been the most common trauma types (59%; 53%). 71% of the traumatized adolescents did not meet the criteria for PTSD. The most common diagnosis in the sample was Borderline Personality Disorder. All average scores at SCL-90-Symptom-Scale were clinical significant. Half of the sample reported suicide attempts and self destructive behavior. One third reported substance abuse and aggressive behavior against others respectively. None of the traumatized adolescents had a positive Self-concept. Altogether the results show that abused children and adolescents have a range of psychological sequelae that are not captured in the PTSD diagnostic criteria. Therefore the results support the necessity for a new and more precise diagnosis for chronically traumatized children and adolescents. PMID:19961125

  7. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigana, Vishal V. R.; Aluru, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1 /f "-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1 /f2 "-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps.

  8. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, Giuseppe; Mascia, Fabrizio; Gualano, Luciano; Di Bella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT), the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate). The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation). All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases. PMID:23348932

  9. The nemesis effect.

    PubMed

    Bright, C

    1999-01-01

    Environmental pressures are converging in ways that are likely to create a growing number of unanticipated crises. Two representative surprise crises involve the forests of Eastern North America and the coral reefs. These examples reveal 13 of the worst pressures inflicted on the planet and on mankind: climate change, acid rain, increasing ultraviolet light penetration, increasing tropospheric ozone levels, habitat loss, freshwater diversion, bioinvasion, alteration of fire cycles, persistent organic pollutants, nitrogen pollution, overfishing, population growth, and infectious diseases. It is noted that these crises will demand a fix, and each fix will require money, time, and political capital. However, ¿fixing¿ is not enough, since there is no realistic expectation of reducing the potential for additional crises. Hence, the best possible way of controlling such events is to do a better job of managing systems in their entirety. In view of this, several important principles are given; these include the following: 1) monoculture technologies are brittle; 2) direct opposition to a natural force usually invites failure or a form of success that is just as bad; 3) thinking through the likely systemic effects of a plan will help locate the risks, as well as indirect opportunities; 4) institutional pluralism can create a public space that no single institution could have created alone.

  10. The photorefractive effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.M. ); Kukhtarev, N.V. )

    1990-10-01

    When Arthur Ashkin and his colleagues at Bell Laboratories first noticed the photorefractive effect some 25 years ago, they considered the phenomenon a curiosity at best and a complete nuisance at worst. Today photorefractive materials are being shaped into components for a new generation of computers that exploit light instead of electricity. During the past 25 years investigators have discovered a wide variety of photorefractive materials, including insulators, semiconductors and organic compounds. Photorefractive materials, like film emulsions, change rapidly when exposed to bright light, respond slowly when subjected to dim light and capture sharp detail when struck by some intricate pattern of light. Unlike film, photorefractive materials are erasable: images can be stored or obliterated at whim or by design. By virtue of their sensitivity, robustness, and unique optical properties, photorefractive materials have the potential to be fashioned into data-processing elements for optical computers. In theory, these devices would allow optical computers to process information at much faster rates than their electronic counterparts. Employing photorefractive materials, workers have already developed the optical analogue to the transistor: if two laser beams interact within a photorefractive material, one beam can control, switch or amplify the second beam. Photorefractive materials also lie at the heart of devices that trace the edges of images, that connect networks of lasers and that store three-dimensional images.

  11. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Nandigana, Vishal V R; Aluru, N R

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1/f"-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1/f^{2}"-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps. PMID:27575159

  12. Context effects on choice.

    PubMed Central

    Goldshmidt, J N; Lattal, K M; Fantino, E

    1998-01-01

    Four pigeons responded on a concurrent-chains schedule in four experiments that examined whether the effectiveness of a stimulus as a conditioned reinforcer is best described by a global approach, as measured by the average interreinforcement interval, or by a local contextual approach, as measured by the onset of the stimulus preceding the conditioned reinforcer. The interreinforcement interval was manipulated by the inclusion of an intertrial interval, which increased the overall time to reinforcement but did not change the local contingencies on a given trial A global analysis predicted choice for the richer alternative to decrease with the inclusion of an intertrial interval, whereas a local analysis predicted no change in preference. Experiment 1 examined sensitivity to intertrial intervals when each was signaled by the same houselight that operated throughout the session. In Experiment 2, the intertrial interval always was signaled by the stimulus correlated with the richer terminal link. In Experiment 3, the intertrial interval was signaled by the keylights correlated with the initial links and two novel houselights. Experiment 4 provided free food pseudorandomly during the intertrial interval. In all experiments, subjects' preferences were consistent with a local analysis of choice in concurrent chains. These results are discussed in terms of delay-reduction theory, which traditionally has failed to distinguish global and local contexts. PMID:9821681

  13. Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to post-perceptual processes such as memory retrieval and/or reporting biases. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is, indeed, open to such objections. Here we investigate RB using a "single-frame" paradigm introduced by Johnston and Hale (1984) in which memory demands are minimal. Subjects made only a single judgement about whether one masked target word was the same or different than a post-target probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods to assess sensitivity and bias effects. In the critical condition for RB a precue of the post-target word was provided prior to the target stimulus (identity precue), so that the required judgement amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was either an unrelated word or a dummy.

  14. Effectively Rebutting Climate Misinformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science faces one of the best funded misinformation campaigns in history. The challenge for climate communicators is that misinformation is extremely difficult to dislodge, even after people understand that it's incorrect. Understanding how the human brain processes information is crucial to successful rebuttal. To avoid the danger of reinforcing misinformation (known as the 'backfire effect'), emphasis should be on positive facts, not the myth. Another key to dislodging myths is replacing them with an alternate narrative. In order to provide a narrative about arguments that misrepresent climate science, a broader understanding of how these arguments mislead is required. Movements that deny a scientific consensus have 5 characteristics in common and these also apply to climate denial. The arguments against the scientific consensus involve conspiracy theories, fake experts, cherry picking, logical fallacies and misrepresentation or impossible expectations. Learning to identify these rhetorical techniques is an important tool in the climate communication toolbox. I discuss examples of misrepresentations of climate science and the rhetorical techniques employed. I demonstrate how to respond to these arguments by explaining the facts of climate science while in the process, providing an alternate narrative.

  15. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  16. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  17. Ecological carryover effects complicate conservation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    Ecological carryover effects occur when an individual's previous history and experiences explain their current performance. It is becoming clear that ecological carryover effects are a common phenomenon across taxa, and have the potential to play an important role in governing individual fitness and population dynamics. Carryover effects may reduce the success of conservation efforts aimed at slowing or reversing biodiversity loss. Failure to consider carryover effects might lead to erroneous conclusions about the effectiveness of conservation measures. We suggest that carryover effects are considered explicitly in threat assessment and conservation planning, in order to understand the long-term consequences of stressors, target efforts more effectively, and ensure that the success or failure of conservation efforts is tracked more accurately. We encourage proactive research focused on the proximate mechanisms underlying carryover effects, so that predictive measures of carryover effects in wild populations can be developed and refined. Finally, we suggest that in some cases, positive carryover effects could be exploited for conservation benefit. We conclude that the failure to consider carryover effects in conservation science and practice may put imperiled populations at further risk.

  18. Effective sizes for subdivided populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, R.K. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA ); Rhodes, O.E. Jr.; Sugg, D.W.; Schnabel, A. )

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective size, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal rates.

  19. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  20. Electro-optic effect and photoelastic effect of feroelectric relaxors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kotaro; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    To understand the origin of the electro-optic effect (EO-effect) of ferroelectric relaxors, the relationships among the quadratic EO-coefficient, photoelastic coefficient, and electron density were elucidated. The quadratic EO-coefficient is given by the product of the photoelastic and electrostrictive coefficients. Materials consisting of heavy elements normally exhibit high refractive indices and large photoelastic effects, indicating that the photoelastic coefficient increases with electron density of materials. The photoelastic coefficient was calculated as a function of the electron density of materials. The equations derived in this study were experimentally confirmed using lanthanum-added lead-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) transparent ceramics. It was found that the origin of the EO-effect in ferroelectric relaxors was the photoelastic effect coupled with electric-field-induced strain via the piezoelectric and electrostrictive effects.

  1. Effect of handling on positive and negative contrast effects.

    PubMed

    Fagen, J W; Rycek, R F

    1980-01-01

    The effects of early handling on the exhibition of positive and negative contrast effects were investigated. Over two 4-day testing sessions, animals were given alternating 1-min access periods to 2 bottles containing either 32 or 4% sucrose solutions. Measures of lick rate and latency to switch bottles revealed that both handled and nonhandled animals exhibited contrast effects of equal magnitudes. The results did not support an emotional interpretation of contrast effects but were interpreted as support for the perceptual theory of this phenomenon.

  2. Decomposing the emotional Stroop effect.

    PubMed

    Frings, Christian; Englert, Julia; Wentura, Dirk; Bermeitinger, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The emotional Stroop effect refers to the phenomenon that participants are faster in responding to the ink colour of neutral than of negative word stimuli, possibly reflecting fast and automatic allocation of attention towards negative stimuli. However, this interpretation was challenged by McKenna and Sharma (2004) who found that the emotional Stroop effect reflected a generic slowdown after negative stimuli. In fact, they even found reversed effects in a design in which neutral stimuli more often followed negative stimuli and vice versa. Yet, besides reversing the emotional Stroop effect this contingency might in fact have counteracted the fast effect, which was usually interpreted as the emotional Stroop effect. To decompose the emotional Stroop effect we used a design in which the foregoing and the current valence were uncorrelated and in which the fast and slow effects could be computed independently from each other. We found evidence for both fast and slow effects and discuss the practical implications for researchers using the emotional Stroop task as a measurement and the theoretical implications for researchers interested in the underlying cognitive mechanisms that contribute to the emotional Stroop effect.

  3. The wow effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Pagnotta, Paola; Trentini, Gabriella; Cirotti, Tiziana; Parrettini, Cinzia

    2015-04-01

    Teaching science at elementary school is a hard work for scientists since we usually use to talk to colleagues by using technical and specific words not understandable by general public and school students. Finding plain language for explaining what is the research and for describing scientific topics was the objective of this work. In collaboration with the school teachers, I organized a series of meetings describing the same subject with different approaches and, at the end of the test-period, we did a survey within the 60 students (10-11 years old) for understanding which was the most attractive approach for them. The survey asked to the students the 3 topics (which could be a sentence, an activity or simply a picture) that they remember at most from all the meetings. Later on we asked why they have chosen those topics. The common topic was atmospheric and space science and it was approached by using, books, videos, frontal lectures with the support of pictures and other material, and with direct hands-on lab such as 3D puzzles for building a satellite. Nobody highlights having read a book. The majority of the students (male and female) really appreciated having built their own satellite (wow, I have done it!) and how's the life into the International Space Station (wow, everything flies there and they drink the pee!). Many female students were fascinated by the stars and by the Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti (wow, an Italian woman is there!) while many boys were attracted by the technology evolution (wow, how a mobile phone could be that big?!). Surprisingly 3 students remember a quick (showed for just a few seconds) and blurred picture showing the glory effect by aircraft (wow, a circular rainbow!). The survey shows how the students mostly appreciate the hands-on labs and being active and creative, their attention decreases but it is still active with frontal lectures or videos showing them real examples or something impacting their day-life.

  4. Magnetocaloric effect in manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Koroleva, L. I. Zashchirinskii, D. M.; Morozov, A. S.; Szymczak, R.

    2012-10-15

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}, Sm{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.45}MnO{sub 3}, and PrBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} compounds is studied. The maximum values of MCE ({Delta}T{sub max}) determined by a direct method in the second and third compositions and in La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} are found to be much lower than those calculated from the change of the magnetic part of entropy in the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and the Neel temperature (T{sub N}) range. The negative contribution of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) part of a sample in the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} system at 0.1 {<=} x {<=} 0.3 decreases {Delta}T{sub max} and changes the {Delta}T(T) curve shape, shifting its maximum 20-40 K above T{sub C}. Lower values of {Delta}T{sub max} are detected in the range T{sub C} = 130-142 K in polycrystalline and single-crystal Sm{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.45}MnO{sub 3} samples cooled in air. If such samples were cooled in an oxygen atmosphere (which restores broken Mn-O-Mn bonds and, thus, increases the volume of CE-type AFM clusters), the maximum in the temperature dependence of MCE is located at T{sub N} (243 K) for CE-type AFM clusters. A magnetic field applied to a sample during the MCE measurements transforms these clusters into a ferromagnetic (FM) state, and both types of clusters decompose at T = T{sub N}. The PrBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} composition undergoes an AFM-FM transition at 231 K, and the temperature dependence of its MCE has a sharp minimum at T = 234 K, where MCE is negative, and a broad maximum covering T{sub C}. The absolute values of MCE at both extrema are several times lower than those calculated from the change in the magnetic entropy. These phenomena are explained by the presence of a magnetically heterogeneous FM-AFM state in these manganites.

  5. Geologic effects of hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coch, Nicholas K.

    1994-08-01

    Hurricanes are intense low pressure systems of tropical origin. Hurricane damage results from storm surge, wind, and inland flooding from heavy rainfall. Field observations and remote sensing of recent major hurricanes such as Hugo (1989), Andrew (1992) and Iniki (1992) are providing new insights into the mechanisms producing damage in these major storms. Velocities associated with hurricanes include the counterclockwise vortex winds flowing around the eye and the much slower regional winds that steer hurricane and move it forward. Vectorial addition of theseof these two winds on the higher effective wind speed than on the left side. Coast-parallel hurricane tracks keep the weaker left side of the storm against the coast, whereas coast-normal tracks produce a wide swath of destruction as the more powerful right side of the storm cuts a swath of destruction hundreds of kilometers inland. Storm surge is a function of the wind speed, central pressure, shelf slope, shoreline configuration, and anthropogenic alterations to the shoreline. Maximum surge heights are not under the eye of the hurricane, where the pressure is lowest, but on the right side of the eye at the radius of maximum winds, where the winds are strongest. Flood surge occurs as the hurricane approaches land and drives coastal waters, and superimposed waves, across the shore. Ebb surge occurs when impounded surface water flows seaward as the storm moves inland. Flood and ebb surge damage have been greatly increased in recent hurricanes as a result of anthropogenic changes along the shoreline. Hurricane wind damage occurs on three scales — megascale, mesoscale and microscale. Local wind damage is a function of wind speed, exposure and structural resistance to velocity pressure, wind drag and flying debris. Localized extreme damage is caused by gusts that can locally exceed sustained winds by a factor of two in areas where there is strong convective activity. Geologic changes occuring in hurricanes

  6. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  7. Size Effect in Continuum Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; James W. Foulk; Huestis, Edwin M.; Connelly, Kevin; Song, Bo; Yang, Nancy Y. C.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of some materials (Cu, Ni, Ag, etc.) have been shown to develop strong dependence on the geometric dimensions, resulting in a size effect. Several theories have been proposed to model size effects, but have been based on very few experiments conducted at appropriate scales. Some experimental results implied that size effects are caused by increasing strain gradients and have been used to confirm many strain gradient theories. On the other hand, some recent experiments show that a size effect exists in the absence of strain gradients. This report describes a brief analytical and experimental study trying to clarify the material and experimental issues surrounding the most influential size-effect experiments by Fleck et al (1994). This effort is to understand size effects intended to further develop predictive models.

  8. Antigonococcal effects of vaginal tampons.

    PubMed

    Arko, R J; Wong, K H; Smith, S J; Finley-Price, K G

    1983-04-01

    Different brands of vaginal tampons varied significantly (p less than 0.0001) in their anti-bacterial effects when tested with 46 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Gonococcal strains recovered from patients with disseminated infections were substantially more sensitive to the anti-bacterial effects of tampons than were strains from patients with uncomplicated genital infections. Strains from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease were moderately sensitive. Tampons showing strong in-vitro antigonococcal effects were also generally effective in vivo in eliminating gonococcal infections from subcutaneous chambers in mice. Extracts of the Rely tampon showed no in-vitro antigonococcal effect, however, but did induce antibacterial activity when injected into subcutaneous chambers in mice. These results emphasise the importance of both in-vitro as well as in-vivo testing of tampon materials to elucidate more fully the nature of their antibacterial effects and their potential for affecting vaginal pathogens and disease processes.

  9. Microstructural effects in shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, P.; Benson, D.; Howe, P.M.

    1998-07-01

    The dynamic response of explosive microstructures has been explicitly modeled, with the intention of gaining insight into initiation processes from hotspot formation to transition to detonation. In this paper, the authors focus attention upon the inert material response leading to hotspot ignition. Of interest are particle size and shape effects, constitutive effects of both binder and explosive, and their importance to hotspot formation. Effects of chemical reaction are considered elsewhere.

  10. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  11. (Theory of relative biological effectiveness)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, R.

    1992-06-15

    Research continued on relative biological effectiveness, in the following areas: radial distribution of dose about the path of an energetic heavy ion; the response of E. Coli mutants to ionizing radiations; the application of a fragmentation model to to the calculation of cell survival and mutation with heavy ion beams; biological radiation effects from gamma radiation and heavy ion beams on organisms; cancer induction in the Harderian Gland by HZE particles; and effects of low dose radiations. (CBS)

  12. The Thirring-Lense Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embacher, Franz

    The Thirring-Lense effect is the phenomenon that an observer near a rotating mass, being in a state which is non-rotating with respect to the rest of the universe, experiences extra inertial forces, i.e. becomes dizzy. The first anticipation of the effect goes back to Ernst Mach; its first quantitative prediction on the basis of general relativity was given by Hans Thirring and Joseph Lense. Almost ninety years later, the effect seems to be experimentally verified.

  13. Semiotics and the placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G; Colloca, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in elucidating its neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical understanding of the placebo effect is poorly developed. Application of the semiotic theory developed by the American philosopher Charles Peirce offers a promising account of placebo effects as involving the apprehension and response to signs. The semiotic approach dovetails with the various psychological mechanisms invoked to account for placebo effects, such as conditioning and expectation, and bridges the biological and cultural dimensions of this fascinating phenomenon.

  14. Isotope effects in ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stößer, Reinhard; Herrmann, Werner

    2013-06-07

    In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i) ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii) the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii) the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  15. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  16. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  17. Measurement in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Chubak, Jessica; Rutter, Carolyn M; Kamineni, Aruna; Johnson, Eric A; Stout, Natasha K; Weiss, Noel S; Doria-Rose, V Paul; Doubeni, Chyke A; Buist, Diana S M

    2013-05-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) on preventive services can shape policy and help patients, their providers, and public health practitioners select regimens and programs for disease prevention. Patients and providers need information about the relative effectiveness of various regimens they may choose. Decision makers need information about the relative effectiveness of various programs to offer or recommend. The goal of this paper is to define and differentiate measures of relative effectiveness of regimens and programs for disease prevention. Cancer screening is used to demonstrate how these measures differ in an example of two hypothetical screening regimens and programs. Conceptually and algebraically defined measures of relative regimen and program effectiveness also are presented. The measures evaluate preventive services that range from individual tests through organized, population-wide prevention programs. Examples illustrate how effective screening regimens may not result in effective screening programs and how measures can vary across subgroups and settings. Both regimen and program relative effectiveness measures assess benefits of prevention services in real-world settings, but each addresses different scientific and policy questions. As the body of CER grows, a common lexicon for various measures of relative effectiveness becomes increasingly important to facilitate communication and shared understanding among researchers, healthcare providers, patients, and policymakers.

  18. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  19. The structure of sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Gökaydin, Dinis; Navarro, Daniel J; Ma-Wyatt, Anna; Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of research into sequential effects, extending more than one hundred years. The pattern of sequential effects varies widely with both experimental conditions as well as for different individuals performing the same experiment. Yet this great diversity of results is poorly understood, particularly with respect to individual variation, which save for some passing mentions has largely gone unreported in the literature. Here we seek to understand the way in which sequential effects vary by identifying the causes underlying the differences observed in sequential effects. In order to achieve this goal we perform principal component analysis on a dataset of 158 individual results from participants performing different experiments with the aim of identifying hidden variables responsible for sequential effects. We find a latent structure consisting of 3 components related to sequential effects-2 main and 1 minor. A relationship between the 2 main components and the separate processing of stimuli and of responses is proposed on the basis of previous empirical evidence. It is further speculated that the minor component of sequential effects arises as the consequence of processing delays. Independently of the explanation for the latent variables encountered, this work provides a unified descriptive model for a wide range of different types of sequential effects previously identified in the literature. In addition to explaining individual differences themselves, it is demonstrated how the latent structure uncovered here is useful in understanding the classical problem of the dependence of sequential effects on the interval between successive stimuli. PMID:26523425

  20. Effects beyond Effectiveness: Teaching as a Performative Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Warren Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article develops the familiar metaphor of teaching as performance towards a definition of "teaching as performative act," where words and actions aim to effect cognitive, affective, and behavioral changes in learners. To what extent, however, are the consequences of pedagogical actions commensurate with their intended effects? Can a science…

  1. Costs of antibiotic resistance - separating trait effects and selective effects.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex R; Angst, Daniel C; Schiessl, Konstanze T; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance can impair bacterial growth or competitive ability in the absence of antibiotics, frequently referred to as a 'cost' of resistance. Theory and experiments emphasize the importance of such effects for the distribution of resistance in pathogenic populations. However, recent work shows that costs of resistance are highly variable depending on environmental factors such as nutrient supply and population structure, as well as genetic factors including the mechanism of resistance and genetic background. Here, we suggest that such variation can be better understood by distinguishing between the effects of resistance mechanisms on individual traits such as growth rate or yield ('trait effects') and effects on genotype frequencies over time ('selective effects'). We first give a brief overview of the biological basis of costs of resistance and how trait effects may translate to selective effects in different environmental conditions. We then review empirical evidence of genetic and environmental variation of both types of effects and how such variation may be understood by combining molecular microbiological information with concepts from evolution and ecology. Ultimately, disentangling different types of costs may permit the identification of interventions that maximize the cost of resistance and therefore accelerate its decline.

  2. TOLUENE DOSE-EFFECT META ANALYSIS AND IMPORTANCE OF EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOLUENE DOSE-EFFECT META ANALYSES AND IMPORTANCE OF EFFECTS
    Benignus, V.A., Research Psychologist, ORD, NHEERL, Human Studies Division,
    919-966-6242, benignus.vernon@epa.gov
    Boyes, W.K., Supervisory Health Scientist, ORD, NHEERL, Neurotoxicology Division
    919-541-...

  3. The Worked Example Effect, the Generation Effect, and Element Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ouhao; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The worked example effect indicates that examples providing full guidance on how to solve a problem result in better test performance than a problem-solving condition with no guidance. The generation effect occurs when learners generating responses demonstrate better test performance than learners in a presentation condition that provides an…

  4. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  5. The Estimated Effects of Service Learning on Students' Intercultural Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgo, Cindy A.

    2015-01-01

    As the higher education landscape continues to diversify, intercultural effectiveness comes to the forefront among important outcomes for students. Service learning is one programmatic tool that institutions of higher education can use to foster the development of intercultural effectiveness. This study provides evidence that service learning is…

  6. [Placebo effect in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hideto

    2007-02-01

    "Placebo" is Latin for "I shall please". The placebo effect has been widely documented by randomized placebo-controlled drug studies. One of the best examples of placebo effectiveness is that have been shown in clinical trials of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The placebo effect is observable not only in drug trials but also with deep brain stimulation. Recent advances in research on the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested that motor symptoms of PD can be essentially improved by placebo. A recent study using positron emission tomography (PET) with raclopride demonstrated that release of endogeneous dopamine in the dorsal striatum occurs in placebo-responsive patients with PD. This suggests that placebo-induced expectation of clinical improvement may activate endogenous dopamine in the striatum, and that placebo effectiveness is thus achieved by endogenous dopamine supplementation. Indeed, decreased neuronal activities in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), that were recorded during surgery to implant deep brain stimulation electrodes, correlated well with placebo-induced clinical improvement in patients with PD. Although the detailed pathophysiological mechanism underlying the placebo effects remains uncertain, theoretically, the placebo effect has generally been explained by two different mechanisms: one is conditioning theory (pavlovian conditioning), and the other is cognitive theory (expectation of clinical improvement). Although both mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects, the placebo effect in PD may be attributed more to cognitive mechanisms such as expectation of improvement, because the placebo effect can be obtained in de novo PD patients. There have been accumulating findings that suggest a functional relationship between dopamine and the expectation of clinical improvement (reward). Further basic studies are required to clarify the complex link between dopamine and the reward system, but such findings will contribute to a better

  7. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    PubMed

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  8. Space environment effects (M0006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelo, J. A., Jr.; Madonna, R. G.; Altadonna, L. P.; Dagostino, M. D.; Chang, J. Y.; Alfano, R. R.; Caplan, V. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of long term exposure to the near Earth space environment on advanced electrooptical and radiation sensor components were examined. The effect of long duration spaceflight on the germination rate of selected terrestrial plant seeds is observed in exobiological experiments.

  9. Multigenerational effects of maternal undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Francine H

    2014-06-01

    Intrauterine exposure to reduced nutrient availability can have major effects in determining susceptibility to chronic disease later in life. Martínez et al. (2014) demonstrate multigenerational effects of poor maternal nutrition and evidence of germline transmission through alterations in DNA methylation.

  10. Teaching the Photoelectric Effect Inductively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that students have difficulty understanding the underlying process of the photoelectric effect. Thus, this study sought to utilize an inductively situated lesson for teaching the photoelectric effect, hypothesizing that this type of enquiry would help learners delve deeper into the principles of the phenomenon and provide a…

  11. Counselor Effectiveness Through Radio Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This study determined the effectiveness of the use of radio as a means of providing immediate feedback on student counselors in a practicum setting. Using a non-equivalent group experimental design, 10 experimental subjects were compared to 10 control subjects with respect to counselor effectiveness. The experimental subjects were given immediate…

  12. Effective Schools: Mirror or Mirage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Tommy M.

    1981-01-01

    Identifies and analyzes characteristics which are frequently mentioned as contributing to effective schools. Among the characteristics are that they improve the effectiveness and efficiency of students' work by organizing material and/or instruction, increase the amount of work students perform per unit of time, reduce distractions, and encourage…

  13. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  14. Hiring Effective Secondary School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlothlin, Jason M.; Miller, Lynne Guillot

    2008-01-01

    Today's effective school counselors are integral in education reform, school leadership, and student achievement. It is typically the responsibility of building principals to hire effective school counselors. This article builds on previous literature and provides principals with questions to ask and information to gather that may be helpful in…

  15. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  16. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  17. The Context of Context Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual framework and heuristic model for considering the existence, magnitude, and consequences of context effects are presented through an extension of some generalizability theory concepts. Context effects are often misunderstood, and current measurement models have serious limitations for examining them. Their importance needs to be…

  18. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  19. Gestalt Effect of Self Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Defining self assessment as the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgements about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards, this paper seeks to highlight the gestalt effect of self assessment. The total effect of self assessment on the learner is greater than…

  20. Effective Evaluation through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators in the HPI field can improve their performance program results with effective evaluation through appreciative inquiry. Appreciative inquiry and evaluation have many similarities, and when combined they add value and effectiveness to the measurement of intervention results. Appreciative inquiry is beneficial in many evaluation contexts:…