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Sample records for thiamine

  1. Thiamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... B vitamins, and found in many vitamin B complex products. Vitamin B complexes generally include vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), ... is required by our bodies to properly use carbohydrates. It also helps maintain proper nerve function.

  2. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5875 Thiamine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Thiamine hydrochloride. (b) Conditions of use...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5878 - Thiamine mononitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5878 Thiamine mononitrate. (a) Product. Thiamine mononitrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5878 - Thiamine mononitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5878 Thiamine mononitrate. (a) Product. Thiamine mononitrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5875 Thiamine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Thiamine hydrochloride. (b) Conditions of use...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5878 - Thiamine mononitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5878 Thiamine mononitrate. (a) Product. Thiamine mononitrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5875 Thiamine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Thiamine hydrochloride. (b) Conditions of use...

  8. The effect of thiamine injection on upstream migration, survival, and thiamine status of putative thiamine-deficient coho salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, J.D.; Williston, B.; Amcoff, P.; Balk, L.; Pecor, C.; Ketola, H.G.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Honeyfield, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    A diet containing a high proportion of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus results in a thiamine deficiency that has been associated with high larval salmonid mortality, known as early mortality syndrome (EMS), but relatively little is known about the effects of the deficiency on adults. Using thiamine injection (50 mg thiamine/kg body weight) of ascending adult female coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch on the Platte River, Michigan, we investigated the effects of thiamine supplementation on migration, adult survival, and thiamine status. The thiamine concentrations of eggs, muscle (red and white), spleen, kidney (head and trunk), and liver and the transketolase activity of the liver, head kidney, and trunk kidney of fish injected with thiamine dissolved in physiological saline (PST) or physiological saline only (PS) were compared with those of uninjected fish. The injection did not affect the number of fish making the 15-km upstream migration to a collection weir but did affect survival once fish reached the upstream weir, where survival of PST-injected fish was almost twice that of controls. The egg and liver thiamine concentrations in PS fish sampled after their upstream migration were significantly lower than those of uninjected fish collected at the downstream weir, but the white muscle thiamine concentration did not differ between the two groups. At the upper weir, thiamine levels in the liver, spleen, head kidney, and trunk kidney of PS fish were indistinguishable from those of uninjected fish (called "wigglers") suffering from a severe deficiency and exhibiting reduced equilibrium, a stage that precedes total loss of equilibrium and death. For PST fish collected at the upstream weir, total thiamine levels in all tissues were significantly elevated over those of PS fish. Based on the limited number of tissues examined, thiamine status was indicated better by tissue thiamine concentration than by transketolase activity. The adult injection method we used appears to

  9. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordon, Barry D.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Elder, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine deficiency, and their decline could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs, or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD. PMID:26971083

  10. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... link) Biotin-Thiamine-Responsive Basal Ganglia Disease Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) THIAMINE METABOLISM DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME 2 (BIOTIN- OR THIAMINE-RESPONSIVE TYPE) ...

  12. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of thiamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chijate, C.; Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.

    1998-06-01

    The results of the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of thiamine (vitamin B 1) are presented. The yields for decomposition of thiamine and the product of radiolytic products were determined. The G values decrease as the dose increases. Some radiolytic products were identified. Decomposition of thiamine was slightly dependent on the presence of oxygen and on the pH of the solution. At pH 4.4 with a concentration of 2.5 × 10 -4 mol L -1 of thiamine in an oxygen free aqueous solution, the G 0 value for decomposition is 5.0.

  13. Thiamin deficiency in people with obesity.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Jennifer C; Arundel, Cherinne; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2015-03-01

    Although obesity has been viewed traditionally as a disease of excess nutrition, evidence suggests that it may also be a disease of malnutrition. Specifically, thiamin deficiency was found in 15.5-29% of obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. It can present with vague signs and symptoms and is often overlooked in patients without alcohol use disorders. This review explores the relatively new discovery of high rates of thiamin deficiency in certain populations of people with obesity, including the effects of thiamin deficiency and potential underlying mechanisms of deficiency in people with obesity. The 2 observational studies that examined the prevalence in preoperative bariatric surgery patients and gaps in our current knowledge (including the prevalence of thiamin deficiency in the general obese population and whether the current RDA for thiamin meets the metabolic needs of overweight or obese adults) are reviewed. Suggestions for future areas of research are included. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Thiamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... potatoes, whole-grain cereals and breads, meats (especially pork and liver), peas, beans, and nuts to increase ... To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a ...

  15. Thiamin

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23193625 . Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 218. Salwen MJ. Vitamins and trace elements. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  16. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate.

  17. Effectiveness of egg immersion in aqueous solutions of thiamine and thiamine analogs for reducing early mortality syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.B.; Brown, L.R.; Brown, M.; Moore, K.; Villella, M.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Williston, B.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Tillitt, D.E.; Zajicek, J.L.; Wolgamood, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protocols used for therapeutic thiamine treatments in salmonine early mortality syndrome (EMS) were investigated in lake trout Salvelinus namaycush and coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch to assess their efficacy. At least 500 mg of thiamine HCl/L added to egg baths was required to produce a sustained elevation of thiamine content in lake trout eggs. Thiamine uptake from egg baths was not influenced by a pH ranging from 5.5 to 7.5 or by a water hardness between 2 and 200 mg CaCO3/L. There was poorer thiamine uptake when initial thiamine levels were low, suggesting that current treatment regimes may not be as effective when thiamine levels are severely depressed and that higher treatment doses are necessary. Exposure of eggs to the more lipid-soluble thiamine analog allithiamine (1,000 mg/L) during water hardening increased egg thiamine levels by 1.5-2.5 nmol/g and was completely effective at reversing EMS. Another more lipid-soluble thiamine analog, benfotiamine (100 mg/L), reduced EMS but did not produce detectable increases in egg thiamine content. Although benfotiamine may be more effective than thiamine at mitigating EMS, it is more expensive than thiamine HCl or allithiamine. In addition, there still needs to be a more thorough examination of dose-response relationships. We conclude that allithiamine is an alternative to the use of thiamine in egg baths as a therapeutic treatment for salmonid EMS. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  19. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  20. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  1. The compartmentation of phosphorylated thiamine derivatives in cultured neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L

    1994-05-26

    Thiamine transport in cultured neuroblastoma cells is mediated by a high-affinity carrier (KM = 40 nM). In contrast, the uptake of the more hydrophobic sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) is unsaturable and its initial transport rate is 20-times faster than for thiamine. In the cytoplasm, sulbutiamine is rapidly hydrolyzed and reduced to free thiamine, the overall process resulting in a rapid and concentrative thiamine accumulation. Incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine into intracellular thiamine diphosphate is slow in both cases. Despite the fact that the diphosphate is probably the direct precursor for both thiamine monophosphate and triphosphate, the specific radioactivity increased much faster for the latter two compounds than for thiamine diphosphate. This suggests the existence of two pools of thiamine diphosphate, the larger one having a very slow turnover (about 17 h); a much smaller, rapidly turning over pool would be the precursor of thiamine mono- and triphosphate. The turnover time for thiamine triphosphate could be estimated to be 1-2 h. When preloading the cells with [14C]sulbutiamine was followed by a chase with the same concentration of the unlabeled compound, the specific radioactivities of thiamine and thiamine monophosphate decreased exponentially as expected, but labeling of the diphosphate continued to increase slowly. Specific radioactivity of thiamine triphosphate increased first, but after 30 min it began to slowly decrease. These results show for the first time the existence of distinct thiamine diphosphate pools in the same homogeneous cell population. They also suggest a complex compartmentation of thiamine metabolism.

  2. Thiamine and magnesium deficiencies: keys to disease.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, D

    2015-02-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) is accepted as the cause of beriberi because of its action in the metabolism of simple carbohydrates, mainly as the rate limiting cofactor for the dehydrogenases of pyruvate and alpha-ketoglutarate, both being critical to the action of the citric acid cycle. Transketolase, dependent on thiamine and magnesium, occurs twice in the oxidative pentose pathway, important in production of reducing equivalents. Thiamine is also a cofactor in the dehydrogenase complex in the degradation of the branched chain amino acids, leucine, isoleucine and valine. In spite of these well accepted facts, the overall clinical effects of TD are still poorly understood. Because of the discovery of 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) as the first peroxisomal enzyme in mammals found to be dependent on thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and the ability of thiamine to bind with prion protein, these factors should improve our clinical approach to TD. HACL1 has two important roles in alpha oxidation, the degradation of phytanic acid and shortening of 2-hydroxy long-chain fatty acids so that they can be degraded further by beta oxidation. The downstream effects of a lack of efficiency in this enzyme would be expected to be critical in normal brain metabolism. Although TD has been shown experimentally to produce reversible damage to mitochondria and there are many other causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, finding TD as the potential biochemical lesion would help in differential diagnosis. Stresses imposed by infection, head injury or inoculation can initiate intermittent cerebellar ataxia in thiamine deficiency/dependency. Medication or vaccine reactions appear to be more easily initiated in the more intelligent individuals when asymptomatic marginal malnutrition exists. Erythrocyte transketolase testing has shown that thiamine deficiency is widespread. It is hypothesized that the massive consumption of empty calories, particularly those derived from carbohydrate and fat, results in

  3. Competition for vitamin B1 (thiamin) structures numerous ecological interactions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Clifford E; Angert, Esther R

    2017-06-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a cofactor required for essential biochemical reactions in all living organisms, yet free thiamin is scarce in the environment. The diversity of biochemical pathways involved in the acquisition, degradation, and synthesis of thiamin indicates that organisms have evolved numerous ecological strategies for meeting this nutritional requirement. In this review we synthesize information from multiple disciplines to show how the complex biochemistry of thiamin influences ecological outcomes of interactions between organisms in environments ranging from the open ocean and the Australian outback to the gastrointestinal tract of animals. We highlight population and ecosystem responses to the availability or absence of thiamin. These include widespread mortality of fishes, birds, and mammals, as well as the thiamin-dependent regulation of ocean productivity. Overall, we portray thiamin biochemistry as the foundation for molecularly mediated ecological interactions that influence survival and abundance of a vast array of organisms.

  4. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiamine hydrochloride. 582.5875 Section 582.5875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5878 - Thiamine mononitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiamine mononitrate. 582.5878 Section 582.5878 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiamine hydrochloride. 582.5875 Section 582.5875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5878 - Thiamine mononitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiamine mononitrate. 582.5878 Section 582.5878 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  8. Free-thiamine is a potential biomarker of thiamine transporter-2 deficiency: a treatable cause of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza-Escobar, Juan Darío; Molero-Luis, Marta; Arias, Angela; Oyarzabal, Alfonso; Darín, Niklas; Serrano, Mercedes; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Tondo, Mireia; Hernández, María; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Casado, Mercedes; Gort, Laura; Mayr, Johannes A; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Ribes, Antonia; Artuch, Rafael; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency is caused by mutations in the SLC19A3 gene. As opposed to other causes of Leigh syndrome, early administration of thiamine and biotin has a dramatic and immediate clinical effect. New biochemical markers are needed to aid in early diagnosis and timely therapeutic intervention. Thiamine derivatives were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography in 106 whole blood and 38 cerebrospinal fluid samples from paediatric controls, 16 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with Leigh syndrome, six of whom harboured mutations in the SLC19A3 gene, and 49 patients with other neurological disorders. Free-thiamine was remarkably reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid of five SLC19A3 patients before treatment. In contrast, free-thiamine was slightly decreased in 15.2% of patients with other neurological conditions, and above the reference range in one SLC19A3 patient on thiamine supplementation. We also observed a severe deficiency of free-thiamine and low levels of thiamine diphosphate in fibroblasts from SLC19A3 patients. Surprisingly, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial substrate oxidation rates were within the control range. Thiamine derivatives normalized after the addition of thiamine to the culture medium. In conclusion, we found a profound deficiency of free-thiamine in the CSF and fibroblasts of patients with thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. Thiamine supplementation led to clinical improvement in patients early treated and restored thiamine values in fibroblasts and cerebrospinal fluid. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Widespread episodic thiamine deficiency in Northern Hemisphere wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Lennart; Hägerroth, Per-Åke; Gustavsson, Hanna; Sigg, Lisa; Åkerman, Gun; Ruiz Muñoz, Yolanda; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Tjärnlund, Ulla; Oliveira, Kenneth; Ström, Karin; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlsson, Simon; Ström, Marika; van Manen, Mathijs; Berg, Anna-Lena; Halldórsson, Halldór P.; Strömquist, Jennie; Collier, Tracy K.; Börjeson, Hans; Mörner, Torsten; Hansson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Many wildlife populations are declining at rates higher than can be explained by known threats to biodiversity. Recently, thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency has emerged as a possible contributing cause. Here, thiamine status was systematically investigated in three animal classes: bivalves, ray-finned fishes, and birds. Thiamine diphosphate is required as a cofactor in at least five life-sustaining enzymes that are required for basic cellular metabolism. Analysis of different phosphorylated forms of thiamine, as well as of activities and amount of holoenzyme and apoenzyme forms of thiamine-dependent enzymes, revealed episodically occurring thiamine deficiency in all three animal classes. These biochemical effects were also linked to secondary effects on growth, condition, liver size, blood chemistry and composition, histopathology, swimming behaviour and endurance, parasite infestation, and reproduction. It is unlikely that the thiamine deficiency is caused by impaired phosphorylation within the cells. Rather, the results point towards insufficient amounts of thiamine in the food. By investigating a large geographic area, by extending the focus from lethal to sublethal thiamine deficiency, and by linking biochemical alterations to secondary effects, we demonstrate that the problem of thiamine deficiency is considerably more widespread and severe than previously reported. PMID:27958327

  10. Widespread episodic thiamine deficiency in Northern Hemisphere wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balk, Lennart; Hägerroth, Per-Åke; Gustavsson, Hanna; Sigg, Lisa; Akerman, Gun; Ruiz Muñoz, Yolanda; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Tjarnlund, Ulla; Oliveira, Kenneth; Strom, Karin; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlsson, Simon; Strom, Marika; van Manen, Mathijs; Berg, Anna-Lena; Halldórsson, Halldór P.; Stromquist, Jennie; Collier, Tracy K.; Borjeson, Hans; Morner, Torsten; Hansson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Many wildlife populations are declining at rates higher than can be explained by known threats to biodiversity. Recently, thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency has emerged as a possible contributing cause. Here, thiamine status was systematically investigated in three animal classes: bivalves, ray-finned fishes, and birds. Thiamine diphosphate is required as a cofactor in at least five life-sustaining enzymes that are required for basic cellular metabolism. Analysis of different phosphorylated forms of thiamine, as well as of activities and amount of holoenzyme and apoenzyme forms of thiamine-dependent enzymes, revealed episodically occurring thiamine deficiency in all three animal classes. These biochemical effects were also linked to secondary effects on growth, condition, liver size, blood chemistry and composition, histopathology, swimming behaviour and endurance, parasite infestation, and reproduction. It is unlikely that the thiamine deficiency is caused by impaired phosphorylation within the cells. Rather, the results point towards insufficient amounts of thiamine in the food. By investigating a large geographic area, by extending the focus from lethal to sublethal thiamine deficiency, and by linking biochemical alterations to secondary effects, we demonstrate that the problem of thiamine deficiency is considerably more widespread and severe than previously reported.

  11. Widespread episodic thiamine deficiency in Northern Hemisphere wildlife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Lennart; Hägerroth, Per-Åke; Gustavsson, Hanna; Sigg, Lisa; Åkerman, Gun; Ruiz Muñoz, Yolanda; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Tjärnlund, Ulla; Oliveira, Kenneth; Ström, Karin; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlsson, Simon; Ström, Marika; van Manen, Mathijs; Berg, Anna-Lena; Halldórsson, Halldór P.; Strömquist, Jennie; Collier, Tracy K.; Börjeson, Hans; Mörner, Torsten; Hansson, Tomas

    2016-12-01

    Many wildlife populations are declining at rates higher than can be explained by known threats to biodiversity. Recently, thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency has emerged as a possible contributing cause. Here, thiamine status was systematically investigated in three animal classes: bivalves, ray-finned fishes, and birds. Thiamine diphosphate is required as a cofactor in at least five life-sustaining enzymes that are required for basic cellular metabolism. Analysis of different phosphorylated forms of thiamine, as well as of activities and amount of holoenzyme and apoenzyme forms of thiamine-dependent enzymes, revealed episodically occurring thiamine deficiency in all three animal classes. These biochemical effects were also linked to secondary effects on growth, condition, liver size, blood chemistry and composition, histopathology, swimming behaviour and endurance, parasite infestation, and reproduction. It is unlikely that the thiamine deficiency is caused by impaired phosphorylation within the cells. Rather, the results point towards insufficient amounts of thiamine in the food. By investigating a large geographic area, by extending the focus from lethal to sublethal thiamine deficiency, and by linking biochemical alterations to secondary effects, we demonstrate that the problem of thiamine deficiency is considerably more widespread and severe than previously reported.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster Gut Microbiota Provisions Thiamine to Its Host

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microbiota of Drosophila melanogaster has a substantial impact on host physiology and nutrition. Some effects may involve vitamin provisioning, but the relationships between microbe-derived vitamins, diet, and host health remain to be established systematically. We explored the contribution of microbiota in supplying sufficient dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) to support D. melanogaster at different stages of its life cycle. Using chemically defined diets with different levels of available thiamine, we found that the interaction of thiamine concentration and microbiota did not affect the longevity of adult D. melanogaster. Likewise, this interplay did not have an impact on egg production. However, we determined that thiamine availability has a large impact on offspring development, as axenic offspring were unable to develop on a thiamine-free diet. Offspring survived on the diet only when the microbiota was present or added back, demonstrating that the microbiota was able to provide enough thiamine to support host development. Through gnotobiotic studies, we determined that Acetobacter pomorum, a common member of the microbiota, was able to rescue development of larvae raised on the no-thiamine diet. Further, it was the only microbiota member that produced measurable amounts of thiamine when grown on the thiamine-free fly medium. Its close relative Acetobacter pasteurianus also rescued larvae; however, a thiamine auxotrophic mutant strain was unable to support larval growth and development. The results demonstrate that the D. melanogaster microbiota functions to provision thiamine to its host in a low-thiamine environment. PMID:29511074

  13. Maternal influences on thiamine status of walleye Sander vitreus ova.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, M D; Johnston, T A; Brown, L R; Brown, S B; Casselman, J M; Leggett, W C

    2011-03-01

    Concentrations of the various forms of thiamine (vitamin B(1) ) were determined in walleye Sander vitreus ova from three central North American lakes. Total thiamine concentrations in ova from Lake Winnipeg S. vitreus were approximately three times greater (mean 12 nmol g(-1) ) than in those from Lakes Erie or Ontario. The percentage of thiamine in the active form (thiamine pyrophosphate, TPP) was highest in Lake Ontario ova (mean 88%) and lowest in those from Lake Winnipeg (mean 70%). Neither ova total thiamine concentration nor per cent ova thiamine as TPP showed any consistent relationships with maternal age, size, morphometric condition, somatic lipid concentrations or liver lipid concentrations. Ova total thiamine concentration, however, was negatively related to ovum size in some populations, as well as among populations, and was positively related to liver total thiamine concentration. Maternal transfer of thiamine to ova appears to be independent of female ontogenetic or conditional state in S. vitreus. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Lyme disease spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi does not require thiamin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Bian, Jiang; Deng, Yijie; Smith, Alexis; Nunez, Roy E; Li, Michael B; Pal, Utpal; Yu, Ai-Ming; Qiu, Weigang; Ealick, Steven E; Li, Chunhao

    2016-11-21

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (ThDP), the active form of thiamin (vitamin B 1 ), is believed to be an essential cofactor for all living organisms 1,2 . Here, we report the unprecedented result that thiamin is dispensable for the growth of the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) 3 . Bb lacks genes for thiamin biosynthesis and transport as well as known ThDP-dependent enzymes 4 , and we were unable to detect thiamin or its derivatives in Bb cells. We showed that eliminating thiamin in vitro and in vivo using BcmE, an enzyme that degrades thiamin, has no impact on Bb growth and survival during its enzootic infectious cycle. Finally, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis reveals that the level of thiamin and its derivatives in Ixodes scapularis ticks, the enzootic vector of Bb, is extremely low. These results suggest that by dispensing with use of thiamin, Borrelia, and perhaps other tick-transmitted bacterial pathogens, are uniquely adapted to survive in tick vectors before transmitting to mammalian hosts. To our knowledge, such a mechanism has not been reported previously in any living organisms.

  15. Thiamine and fatty acid content of Lake Michigan Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Peters, A.K.; Jones, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional status of Lake Michigan Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is inadequately documented. An investigation was conducted to determine muscle and liver thiamine content and whole body fatty acid composition in small, medium and large Chinook salmon. Muscle and liver thiamine concentrations were highest in small salmon, and tended to decrease with increasing fish size. Muscle thiamine was higher in fall than spring in large salmon. The high percentage of Chinook salmon (24-32% in fall and 58-71% in spring) with muscle thiamine concentration below 500 pmol/g, which has been associated with loss of equilibrium and death in other Great Lake salmonines, suggest that Chinook appear to rely less on thiamine than other Great Lakes species for which such low concentrations would be associated with thiamine deficiency (Brown et al. 2005b). A positive correlation was observed between liver total thiamine and percent liver lipids (r = 0.53, P < 0.0001, n = 119). In medium and large salmon, liver lipids were observed to be low in fish with less than 4,000 pmol/g liver total thiamine. In individuals with greater than 4,000 pmol/g liver thiamine, liver lipid increased with thiamine concentration. Individual fatty acids declined between fall and spring. Essential omega-3 fatty acids appear to be conserved as lipid content declined. Arachidonic acid (C20:4n6), an essential omega-6 fatty acid was not different between fall and spring, although the sum of omega-6 (Sw6) fatty acids declined over winter. Elevated concentrations of saturated fatty acids (sum) were observed in whole body tissue lipid. In summary, thiamine, a dietary essential vitamin, and individual fatty acids were found to vary in Lake Michigan Chinook salmon by fish size and season of the year.

  16. Beriberi (Thiamine Deficiency) and High Infant Mortality in Northern Laos

    PubMed Central

    Barennes, Hubert; Sengkhamyong, Khouanheuan; René, Jean Pascal; Phimmasane, Maniphet

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile beriberi (thiamine deficiency) occurs mainly in infants breastfed by mothers with inadequate intake of thiamine, typically among vulnerable populations. We describe possible and probable cases of infantile thiamine deficiency in northern Laos. Methodology/Principal Findings Three surveys were conducted in Luang Namtha Province. First, we performed a retrospective survey of all infants with a diagnosis of thiamine deficiency admitted to the 5 hospitals in the province (2007–2009). Second, we prospectively recorded all infants with cardiac failure at Luang Namtha Hospital. Third, we further investigated all mothers with infants (1–6 months) living in 22 villages of the thiamine deficiency patients’ origin. We performed a cross-sectional survey of all mothers and infants using a pre-tested questionnaire, physical examination and squat test. Infant mortality was estimated by verbal autopsy. From March to June 2010, four suspected infants with thiamine deficiency were admitted to Luang Namtha Provincial hospital. All recovered after parenteral thiamine injection. Between 2007 and 2009, 54 infants with possible/probable thiamine deficiency were diagnosed with acute severe cardiac failure, 49 (90.2%) were cured after parenteral thiamine; three died (5.6%). In the 22 villages, of 468 live born infants, 50 (10.6%, 95% CI: 8.0–13.8) died during the first year. A peak of mortality (36 deaths) was reported between 1 and 3 months. Verbal autopsy suggested that 17 deaths (3.6%) were due to suspected infantile thiamine deficiency. Of 127 mothers, 60 (47.2%) reported edema and paresthesia as well as a positive squat test during pregnancy; 125 (98.4%) respected post-partum food avoidance and all ate polished rice. Of 127 infants, 2 (1.6%) had probable thiamine deficiency, and 8 (6.8%) possible thiamine deficiency. Conclusion Thiamine deficiency may be a major cause of infant mortality among ethnic groups in northern Laos. Mothers’ and children

  17. Perinatal consumption of thiamine-fortified fish sauce in rural Cambodia. A randomized clinical trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infantile beriberi, a potentially fatal disease caused by thiamine deficiency, is a public health concern in Cambodia and regions where thiamine-poor white rice is a staple food. Low maternal thiamine intake reduces breast milk thiamine placing breastfed infants at risk of beriberi. The objective wa...

  18. The relationship between thiamine and two symbioses: Root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Miwa; Parniske, Martin; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Lotus japonicus THIC is expressed in all organs, and the encoded protein catalyzes thiamine biosynthesis. Loss of function produces chlorosis, a typical thiamine-deficiency phenotype, and mortality. To investigate thiamine's role in symbiosis, we focused on THI1, a thiamine-biosynthesis gene expressed in roots, nodules, and seeds. The thi1 mutant had green leaves, but formed small nodules and immature seeds. These phenotypes were rescued by THI1 complementation and by exogenous thiamine. Thus, THI1 is required for nodule enlargement and seed maturation. On the other hand, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis was not affected in the thi1 mutant or by exogenous thiamine. However, spores of R. irregularis stored more thiamine than the source (host plants), despite lacking thiamine biosynthesis genes. Therefore, disturbance of the thiamine supply would affect progeny phenotypes such as spore formation and hyphal growth. Further investigation will be required to elucidate thiamine's effect on AM.

  19. Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency: outcome and treatment monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical characteristics distinguishing treatable thiamine transporter-2 deficiency (ThTR2) due to SLC19A3 genetic defects from the other devastating causes of Leigh syndrome are sparse. Methods We report the clinical follow-up after thiamine and biotin supplementation in four children with ThTR2 deficiency presenting with Leigh and biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease phenotypes. We established whole-blood thiamine reference values in 106 non-neurological affected children and monitored thiamine levels in SLC19A3 patients after the initiation of treatment. We compared our results with those of 69 patients with ThTR2 deficiency after a review of the literature. Results At diagnosis, the patients were aged 1 month to 17 years, and all of them showed signs of acute encephalopathy, generalized dystonia, and brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami. One patient died of septicemia, while the remaining patients evidenced clinical and radiological improvements shortly after the initiation of thiamine. Upon follow-up, the patients received a combination of thiamine (10–40 mg/kg/day) and biotin (1–2 mg/kg/day) and remained stable with residual dystonia and speech difficulties. After establishing reference values for the different age groups, whole-blood thiamine quantification was a useful method for treatment monitoring. Conclusions ThTR2 deficiency is a reversible cause of acute dystonia and Leigh encephalopathy in the pediatric years. Brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami may be useful in the differential diagnosis of other causes of Leigh syndrome. Further studies are needed to validate the therapeutic doses of thiamine and how to monitor them in these patients. PMID:24957181

  20. Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency: outcome and treatment monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza-Escobar, Juan Darío; Serrano, Mercedes; Molero, Marta; Oyarzabal, Alfonso; Rebollo, Mónica; Muchart, Jordi; Artuch, Rafael; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén

    2014-06-23

    The clinical characteristics distinguishing treatable thiamine transporter-2 deficiency (ThTR2) due to SLC19A3 genetic defects from the other devastating causes of Leigh syndrome are sparse. We report the clinical follow-up after thiamine and biotin supplementation in four children with ThTR2 deficiency presenting with Leigh and biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease phenotypes. We established whole-blood thiamine reference values in 106 non-neurological affected children and monitored thiamine levels in SLC19A3 patients after the initiation of treatment. We compared our results with those of 69 patients with ThTR2 deficiency after a review of the literature. At diagnosis, the patients were aged 1 month to 17 years, and all of them showed signs of acute encephalopathy, generalized dystonia, and brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami. One patient died of septicemia, while the remaining patients evidenced clinical and radiological improvements shortly after the initiation of thiamine. Upon follow-up, the patients received a combination of thiamine (10-40 mg/kg/day) and biotin (1-2 mg/kg/day) and remained stable with residual dystonia and speech difficulties. After establishing reference values for the different age groups, whole-blood thiamine quantification was a useful method for treatment monitoring. ThTR2 deficiency is a reversible cause of acute dystonia and Leigh encephalopathy in the pediatric years. Brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami may be useful in the differential diagnosis of other causes of Leigh syndrome. Further studies are needed to validate the therapeutic doses of thiamine and how to monitor them in these patients.

  1. Blood thiamine values in captive adult African lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Hoover, John P; DiGesualdo, Cynthia L

    2005-09-01

    Heparinized whole-blood samples from 22 adult African lions (Panthera leo) fed diets considered nutritionally adequate in 10 American Zoo and Aquarium Association member zoos in North America were provided for this study. Blood thiamine values were estimated using a standard microbiological assay method. The mean +/- standard deviation for blood thiamine values was 249.3 +/- 43.5 nmol/L with a range in values from 160 to 350 nmol/L after exclusion of one outlier. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the mean blood thiamine values of male and female lions, or of lions that were over and under 10 yr of age. This range (160 to 350 nmol/L) is proposed as a reasonable estimate of the expected range in blood thiamine values for captive adult African lions as currently fed in North American zoos.

  2. Delayed Language Development Due to Infantile Thiamine Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Azouri-Fattal, Iris; Greenstein, Yoram J.; Guindy, Michal; Blau, Ayala; Zelnik, Nathanel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the language development of 20 children who had been exposed to thiamine (vitamin B[subscript 1]) deficiency in infancy due to feeding with soy-based formula that was accidentally deficient of thiamine. In this case-control study, 20 children (12 males, eight females; mean age 31.8 mo [SD 4.1], range 24-39…

  3. Thiamine and thiaminase status in forage fish of salmonines from Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Zajicek, J.L.; Brown, S.B.; Brown, L.R.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Holey, M.E.; Wright, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary sources of thiamine (vitamin B1) and thiamine-degrading enzymes (thiaminases) are thought to be primary factors in the development of thiamine deficiency among Great Lakes salmonines. We surveyed major forage fish species in Lake Michigan for their content of thiamine, thiamine vitamers, and thiaminase activity. Concentrations of total thiamine were similar (P ≤ 0.05) among most forage fishes (alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, bloater Coregonus hoyi, spottail shiner Notropis hudsonius, deepwater sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii, yellow perch Perca flavescens, ninespine stickleback Pungitius pungitius, and round goby Neogobius melanostomus) and slightly lower in rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax. Concentrations of total thiamine were all above the dietary requirements of coldwater fishes, suggesting the thiamine content of forage fish is not the critical factor in the development of thiamine deficiency in Lake Michigan salmonines. Thiamine pyrophosphate was the predominant form of thiamine in most species of forage fish, followed by free thiamine and thiamine monophosphate. Total thiamine was slightly greater in summer collections of alewife and rainbow smelt than in spring and fall collections, but the same was not true for bloater. Thiaminase activity varied among species and was greatest in gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum, spottail shiner, alewife, and rainbow smelt. Thiaminase activity in alewife varied among collection locations, season (greatest in spring), and size of the fish. Size and condition factors were positively correlated with both total thiamine and thiaminase activity in alewife. Thus, thiamine and thiaminase activity in forage fishes collected in Lake Michigan varied among species, seasons, year caught, and size (or condition). Therefore, multiple factors must be considered in the development of predictive models for the onset of thiamine deficiency in Great Lakes salmonines. Most importantly, thiaminase activity was great in alewives and

  4. Illumina Sequencing Approach to Characterize Thiamine Metabolism Related Bacteria and the Impacts of Thiamine Supplementation on Ruminal Microbiota in Dairy Cows Fed High-Grain Diets.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohua; Xue, Fuguang; Nan, Xuemei; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Kun; Beckers, Yves; Jiang, Linshu; Xiong, Benhai

    2017-01-01

    The requirements of thiamine in adult ruminants are mainly met by ruminal bacterial synthesis, and thiamine deficiencies will occur when dairy cows overfed with high grain diet. However, there is limited knowledge with regard to the ruminal thiamine synthesis bacteria, and whether thiamine deficiency is related to the altered bacterial community by high grain diet is still unclear. To explore thiamine synthesis bacteria and the response of ruminal microbiota to high grain feeding and thiamine supplementation, six rumen-cannulated Holstein cows were randomly assigned into a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Three treatments were control diet (CON, 20% dietary starch, DM basis), high grain diet (HG, 33.2% dietary starch, DM basis) and high grain diet supplemented with 180 mg thiamine/kg DMI (HG+T). On day 21 of each period, rumen content samples were collected at 3 h postfeeding. Ruminal thiamine concentration was detected by high performance liquid chromatography. The microbiota composition was determined using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Cows receiving thiamine supplementation had greater ruminal pH value, acetate and thiamine content in the rumen. Principal coordinate analysis and similarity analysis indicated that HG feeding and thiamine supplementation caused a strong shift in bacterial composition and structure in the rumen. At the genus level, compared with CON group, the relative abundances of 19 genera were significantly changed by HG feeding. Thiamine supplementation increased the abundance of cellulolytic bacteria including Bacteroides, Ruminococcus 1, Pyramidobacter, Succinivibrio , and Ruminobacter , and their increases enhanced the fiber degradation and ruminal acetate production in HG+T group. Christensenellaceae R7, Lachnospira, Succiniclasticum , and Ruminococcaceae NK4A214 exhibited a negative response to thiamine supplementation. Moreover, correlation analysis revealed that ruminal thiamine concentration was positively

  5. Illumina Sequencing Approach to Characterize Thiamine Metabolism Related Bacteria and the Impacts of Thiamine Supplementation on Ruminal Microbiota in Dairy Cows Fed High-Grain Diets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaohua; Xue, Fuguang; Nan, Xuemei; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Kun; Beckers, Yves; Jiang, Linshu; Xiong, Benhai

    2017-01-01

    The requirements of thiamine in adult ruminants are mainly met by ruminal bacterial synthesis, and thiamine deficiencies will occur when dairy cows overfed with high grain diet. However, there is limited knowledge with regard to the ruminal thiamine synthesis bacteria, and whether thiamine deficiency is related to the altered bacterial community by high grain diet is still unclear. To explore thiamine synthesis bacteria and the response of ruminal microbiota to high grain feeding and thiamine supplementation, six rumen-cannulated Holstein cows were randomly assigned into a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Three treatments were control diet (CON, 20% dietary starch, DM basis), high grain diet (HG, 33.2% dietary starch, DM basis) and high grain diet supplemented with 180 mg thiamine/kg DMI (HG+T). On day 21 of each period, rumen content samples were collected at 3 h postfeeding. Ruminal thiamine concentration was detected by high performance liquid chromatography. The microbiota composition was determined using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Cows receiving thiamine supplementation had greater ruminal pH value, acetate and thiamine content in the rumen. Principal coordinate analysis and similarity analysis indicated that HG feeding and thiamine supplementation caused a strong shift in bacterial composition and structure in the rumen. At the genus level, compared with CON group, the relative abundances of 19 genera were significantly changed by HG feeding. Thiamine supplementation increased the abundance of cellulolytic bacteria including Bacteroides, Ruminococcus 1, Pyramidobacter, Succinivibrio, and Ruminobacter, and their increases enhanced the fiber degradation and ruminal acetate production in HG+T group. Christensenellaceae R7, Lachnospira, Succiniclasticum, and Ruminococcaceae NK4A214 exhibited a negative response to thiamine supplementation. Moreover, correlation analysis revealed that ruminal thiamine concentration was positively

  6. Maternal consumption of thiamin-fortified fish sauce during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal and infant thiamin status and breast milk thiamin concentrations.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infantile beriberi, a disease caused by thiamin (vitamin B1) deficiency, remains a public health concern in Cambodia and other parts of Southeast Asia. Infantile beriberi presents during the exclusive breastfeeding period and without treatment commonly results in death within *24 hours of clinical p...

  7. Reversible generalized dystonia and encephalopathy from thiamine transporter 2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mercedes; Rebollo, Mónica; Depienne, Christel; Rastetter, Agnès; Fernández-Álvarez, Emilio; Muchart, Jordi; Martorell, Loreto; Artuch, Rafael; Obeso, José A; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén

    2012-09-01

    Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency, a condition resulting from mutations in the SLC19A3 gene, has been described in patients with subacute dystonia and striatal necrosis. The condition responds extremely well to treatment with biotin and has thus been named biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease. Recently, this deficiency has also been related to Wernicke's-like encephalopathy and atypical infantile spasms, showing heterogeneous responses to biotin and/or thiamine. Two Spanish siblings with a biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease phenotype and mutations in SLC19A3 presented with acute episodes of generalized dystonia, rigidity, and symmetrical lesions involving the striatum, midline nuclei of the thalami, and the cortex of cerebral hemispheres as shown by magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical features resolved rapidly after thiamine administration. Despite the rarity of thiamine transporter-2 deficiency, it should be suspected in patients with acute dystonia and basal ganglia injury, as thiamine can halt disease evolution and prevent further episodes. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Benfotiamine, a synthetic S-acyl thiamine derivative, has different mechanisms of action and a different pharmacological profile than lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Volvert, Marie-Laure; Seyen, Sandrine; Piette, Marie; Evrard, Brigitte; Gangolf, Marjorie; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2008-01-01

    Background Lipid-soluble thiamine precursors have a much higher bioavailability than genuine thiamine and therefore are more suitable for therapeutic purposes. Benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate), an amphiphilic S-acyl thiamine derivative, prevents the progression of diabetic complications, probably by increasing tissue levels of thiamine diphosphate and so enhancing transketolase activity. As the brain is particularly sensitive to thiamine deficiency, we wanted to test whether intracellular thiamine and thiamine phosphate levels are increased in the brain after oral benfotiamine administration. Results Benfotiamine that is practically insoluble in water, organic solvents or oil was solubilized in 200 mM hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and the mice received a single oral administration of 100 mg/kg. Though thiamine levels rapidly increased in blood and liver to reach a maximum after one or two hours, no significant increase was observed in the brain. When mice received a daily oral administration of benfotiamine for 14 days, thiamine derivatives were increased significantly in the liver but not in the brain, compared to control mice. In addition, incubation of cultured neuroblastoma cells with 10 μM benfotiamine did not lead to increased intracellular thiamine levels. Moreover, in thiamine-depleted neuroblastoma cells, intracellular thiamine contents increased more rapidly after addition of thiamine to the culture medium than after addition of benfotiamine for which a lag period was observed. Conclusion Our results show that, though benfotiamine strongly increases thiamine levels in blood and liver, it has no significant effect in the brain. This would explain why beneficial effects of benfotiamine have only been observed in peripheral tissues, while sulbutiamine, a lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivative, that increases thiamine derivatives in the brain as well as in cultured cells, acts as a central nervous system drug. We propose that

  9. Benfotiamine, a synthetic S-acyl thiamine derivative, has different mechanisms of action and a different pharmacological profile than lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Volvert, Marie-Laure; Seyen, Sandrine; Piette, Marie; Evrard, Brigitte; Gangolf, Marjorie; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2008-06-12

    Lipid-soluble thiamine precursors have a much higher bioavailability than genuine thiamine and therefore are more suitable for therapeutic purposes. Benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate), an amphiphilic S-acyl thiamine derivative, prevents the progression of diabetic complications, probably by increasing tissue levels of thiamine diphosphate and so enhancing transketolase activity. As the brain is particularly sensitive to thiamine deficiency, we wanted to test whether intracellular thiamine and thiamine phosphate levels are increased in the brain after oral benfotiamine administration. Benfotiamine that is practically insoluble in water, organic solvents or oil was solubilized in 200 mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and the mice received a single oral administration of 100 mg/kg. Though thiamine levels rapidly increased in blood and liver to reach a maximum after one or two hours, no significant increase was observed in the brain. When mice received a daily oral administration of benfotiamine for 14 days, thiamine derivatives were increased significantly in the liver but not in the brain, compared to control mice. In addition, incubation of cultured neuroblastoma cells with 10 muM benfotiamine did not lead to increased intracellular thiamine levels. Moreover, in thiamine-depleted neuroblastoma cells, intracellular thiamine contents increased more rapidly after addition of thiamine to the culture medium than after addition of benfotiamine for which a lag period was observed. Our results show that, though benfotiamine strongly increases thiamine levels in blood and liver, it has no significant effect in the brain. This would explain why beneficial effects of benfotiamine have only been observed in peripheral tissues, while sulbutiamine, a lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivative, that increases thiamine derivatives in the brain as well as in cultured cells, acts as a central nervous system drug. We propose that benfotiamine only penetrates the cells

  10. Overexpression of Thiamin Biosynthesis Genes in Rice Increases Leaf and Unpolished Grain Thiamin Content But Not Resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Thomas, Nicholas; Ronald, Pamela C.; Goyer, Aymeric

    2016-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), also known as vitamin B1, serves as an enzymatic cofactor in glucose metabolism, the Krebs cycle, and branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in all living organisms. Unlike plants and microorganisms, humans are not able to synthesize ThDP de novo and must obtain it from their diet. Staple crops such as rice are poor sources of thiamin. Hence, populations that mainly consume rice commonly suffer thiamin deficiency. In addition to thiamin’s nutritional function, studies in rice have shown that some thiamin biosynthesis genes are involved in resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes a serious disease in rice fields. This study shows that overexpression of two thiamin biosynthesis genes, 4-methyl-5-β-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate synthase and 4-amino-2-methyl-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine phosphate synthase, involved in the first steps of the thiazole and pyrimidine synthesis branches, respectively, increased thiamin content up to fivefold in unpolished seeds that retain the bran. However, thiamin levels in polished seeds with removed bran were similar to those found in polished control seeds. Plants with higher accumulation of thiamin did not show enhanced resistance to X. oryzae. These results indicate that stacking of two traits can enhance thiamin accumulation in rice unpolished grain. We discuss potential roadblocks that prevent thiamin accumulation in the endosperm. PMID:27242822

  11. The relationship between lactate and thiamine levels in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Ari; Graver, Amanda; Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; Liu, Xiaowen; Uber, Amy; Gautam, Shiva; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-02-01

    Thiamine functions as an important cofactor in aerobic metabolism and thiamine deficiency can contribute to lactic acidosis. Although increased rates of thiamine deficiency have been described in diabetic outpatients, this phenomenon has not been studied in relation to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In the present study, we hypothesize that thiamine deficiency is associated with elevated lactate in patients with DKA. This was a prospective observational study of patients presenting to a tertiary care center with DKA. Patient demographics, laboratory results, and outcomes were recorded. A one-time blood draw was performed and analyzed for plasma thiamine levels. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. Eight patients (25%) were thiamine deficient, with levels lower than 9 nmol/L. A negative correlation between lactic acid and plasma thiamine levels was found (r = -0.56, P = .002). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for APACHE II scores (P = .009). Thiamine levels were directly related to admission serum bicarbonate (r = 0.44, P = .019), and patients with thiamine deficiency maintained lower bicarbonate levels over the first 24 hours (slopes parallel with a difference of 4.083, P = .002). Patients with DKA had a high prevalence of thiamine deficiency. Thiamine levels were inversely related to lactate levels among patients with DKA. A study of thiamine supplementation in DKA is warranted. © 2013.

  12. Perinatal consumption of thiamin-fortified fish sauce in rural Cambodia: a randomized controlled efficacy trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Importance: Infantile beriberi, a potentially fatal disease caused by thiamin deficiency, remains a public health concern in Cambodia and regions where B-vitamin poor, polished white rice is a staple food. Low maternal thiamin intake reduces breast milk thiamin concentrations, placing breastfed infa...

  13. The relationship between lactate and thiamine levels in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis⋆

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Ari; Graver, Amanda; Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; Liu, Xiaowen; Uber, Amy; Gautam, Shiva; Donnino, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Thiamine functions as an important cofactor in aerobic metabolism and thiamine deficiency can contribute to lactic acidosis. Although increased rates of thiamine deficiency have been described in diabetic outpatients, this phenomenon has not been studied in relation to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In the present study, we hypothesize that thiamine deficiency is associated with elevated lactate in patients with DKA. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational study of patients presenting to a tertiary care center with DKA. Patient demographics, laboratory results, and outcomes were recorded. A one-time blood draw was performed and analyzed for plasma thiamine levels. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled. Eight patients (25%) were thiamine deficient, with levels lower than 9 nmol/L. A negative correlation between lactic acid and plasma thiamine levels was found (r = −0.56, P = .002). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for APACHE II scores (P = .009). Thiamine levels were directly related to admission serum bicarbonate (r = 0.44, P = .019), and patients with thiamine deficiency maintained lower bicarbonate levels over the first 24 hours (slopes parallel with a difference of 4.083, P = .002). Conclusions Patients with DKA had a high prevalence of thiamine deficiency. Thiamine levels were inversely related to lactate levels among patients with DKA. A study of thiamine supplementation in DKA is warranted. PMID:23993771

  14. Thiamine in septic shock patients with alcohol use disorders: An observational pilot study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mathias Johan; Moskowitz, Ari; Patel, Parth Vijay; Grossestreuer, Anne Victoria; Uber, Amy; Stankovic, Nikola; Andersen, Lars Wiuff; Donnino, Michael William

    2018-02-01

    Alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have been associated with increased sepsis-related mortality. As patients with AUDs are often thiamine deficient, we investigated practice patterns relating to thiamine administration in patients with AUDs presenting with septic shock and explored the association between receipt of thiamine and mortality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with septic shock between 2008 and 2014 at a single tertiary care center. We identified patients with an AUD diagnosis, orders for microbial cultures and use of antibiotics, vasopressor dependency, and lactate levels≥4mmol/L. We excluded those who received thiamine later than 48h of sepsis onset. We included 53 patients. Thirty-four (64%) patients received thiamine. Five patients (15%) received their first thiamine dose in the emergency department. The median time to thiamine administration was 9 (quartiles: 4, 18) hours. The first thiamine dose was most often given parenterally (68%) and for 100mg (88%). In those receiving thiamine, 15/34 (44%) died, compared to 15/19 (79%) of those not receiving thiamine, p=0.02. A considerable proportion of patients with AUDs admitted for septic shock do not receive thiamine. Thiamine administration in this patient population was associated with decreased mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thiamine Deficiency Induces Anorexia by Inhibiting Hypothalamic AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Alimov, Alexander; Wang, Haiping; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Katz, Wendy; Xu, Mei; Ke, Zun-Ji; Luo, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16 days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by 9 folds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17–24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic AMPK is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight. PMID:24607345

  16. Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qinglin; Wang, Honghai; Xie, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics. PMID:21234302

  17. Prevalence of clinical thiamine deficiency in individuals with medically complicated obesity.

    PubMed

    Nath, Anand; Tran, Tung; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine is a vitamin whose deficient can result in multiorgan symptoms. We described an 18% prevalence of clinical thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery. Our hypotheses are that individuals with medically complicated obesity frequently have clinical thiamine deficiency and that diabetes mellitus is a mechanism for development of clinical thiamine deficiency. This is a single institution, retrospective observational study of consecutive patients with a body mass index of at least 35 kg/m 2 who were evaluated in preoperative gastrointestinal bariatric clinic from 2013 to 2015. Each patient underwent a symptom survey. Clinical thiamine deficiency is defined by both (1) consistent clinical symptom and (2) either a low whole-blood thiamine concentration or significant improvement of or resolution of consistent clinical symptoms after receiving thiamine supplementation. After excluding 101 individuals with prior bariatric surgery or heavy alcohol consumption, 400 patients were included in the study. Sixty-six patients (16.5% of 400) fulfill a diagnosis of clinical thiamine deficiency, with 9 (14% of 66) having consistent gastrointestinal manifestations, 46 (70% of 66) having cardiac manifestations, 39 (59% of 66) having peripheral neurologic manifestations, and 3 (5% of 66) having neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diabetes mellitus is not a risk factor (P=.59). Higher body mass index is a significant risk for clinical thiamine deficiency (P=.007). Clinical thiamine deficiency is common in these individuals and a higher body mass index is an identified risk factor. Mechanisms explaining development of thiamine deficiency in obese individuals remain unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia: early diagnosis may be effective in preventing deafness.

    PubMed

    Onal, Hasan; Bariş, Safa; Ozdil, Mine; Yeşil, Gözde; Altun, Gürkan; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Aydin, Ahmet; Celkan, Tiraje

    2009-01-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the SLC19A2 gene, encoding a high-affinity thiamine transporter protein, THTR-1, are responsible for the clinical features associated with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome in which treatment with pharmacological doses of thiamine correct the megaloblastic anemia and diabetes mellitus. The anemia can recur when thiamine is withdrawn. Thiamine may be effective in preventing deafness if started before two months. Our patient was found homozygous for a mutation, 242insA, in the nucleic acid sequence of exon B, with insertion of an adenine introducing a stop codon at codon 52 in the high-affinity thiamine transporter gene, SLC19A2, on chromosome 1q23.3.

  19. Kinetic Fluorescence Experiment for the Determination of Thiamine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Nathan W.

    1982-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for an experiment which integrates principles of fluorescent and kinetic analysis. In the procedure, mecuric chloride is used as a selective oxidizing agent for converting thiamine to thiochrome. The experiment can be completed in a two-hour laboratory period. (Author/JN)

  20. Thiamine deficiency in Cambodian infants with and without beriberi.

    PubMed

    Coats, Debra; Shelton-Dodge, Kelsey; Ou, Kevanna; Khun, Vannara; Seab, Sommon; Sok, Kimsan; Prou, Chiva; Tortorelli, Silvia; Moyer, Thomas P; Cooper, Lisa E; Begley, Tadhg P; Enders, Felicity; Fischer, Philip R; Topazian, Mark

    2012-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that heavy metal toxicity and consumption of thiaminase-containing foods predispose to symptomatic thiamine deficiency. In a case-control study, thiamine diphosphate (TDP) blood concentrations were measured in 27 infants diagnosed with beriberi at a rural clinic, as well as their mothers and healthy Cambodian and American controls. Blood and urine levels of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and thallium were measured. Local food samples were analyzed for thiaminase activity. Mean TDP level among cases and Cambodian controls was 48 and 56 nmol/L, respectively (P = .08) and was 132 nmol/L in American controls (P < .0001 compared with both Cambodian groups). Mean TDP level of mothers of cases and Cambodian controls was 57 and 57 nmol/L (P = .92), and was 126 nmol/L in American mothers (P < .0001 compared with both Cambodian groups). Cases (but not controls) had lower blood TDP levels than their mothers (P = .02). Infant TDP level decreased with infant age and was positively associated with maternal TDP level. Specific diagnostic criteria for beriberi did not correlate with TDP level. There was no correlation between heavy metal levels and either TDP level or case/control status. No thiaminase activity was observed in food samples. Thiamine deficiency is endemic among infants and nursing mothers in rural southeastern Cambodia and is often clinically inapparent. Neither heavy metal toxicity nor consumption of thiaminase-containing foods account for thiamine deficiency in this region. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Thiamine Biosynthesis Gene THI1 Promotes Nodule Growth and Seed Maturation1

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Miwa; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is essential for living organisms. Unlike animals, plants can synthesize thiamine. In Lotus japonicus, the expression of two thiamine biosynthesis genes, THI1 and THIC, was enhanced by inoculation with rhizobia but not by inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. THIC and THI2 (a THI1 paralog) were expressed in uninoculated leaves. THI2-knockdown plants and the transposon insertion mutant thiC had chlorotic leaves. This typical phenotype of thiamine deficiency was rescued by an exogenous supply of thiamine. In wild-type plants, THI1 was expressed mainly in roots and nodules, and the thi1 mutant had green leaves even in the absence of exogenous thiamine. THI1 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells of nodule primordia. The thi1 mutant had small nodules, and this phenotype was rescued by exogenous thiamine and by THI1 complementation. Exogenous thiamine increased nodule diameter, but the level of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization was unaffected in the thi1 mutant or by exogenous thiamine. Expression of symbiotic marker genes was induced normally, implying that mainly nodule growth was delayed in the thi1 mutant. Furthermore, this mutant formed many immature seeds with reduced seed weight. These results indicate that thiamine biosynthesis mediated by THI1 enhances nodule enlargement and is required for seed development in L. japonicus. PMID:27702844

  2. Thiamine and its phosphate esters in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors in Saudi Arabs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thiamine deficiency has suggested to be linked to several insulin-resistance complications. In this study, we aim to associate circulating thiamine levels among cardiometabolic parameters in an Arab cohort using a simple, sensitive, rapid and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method that has recently been developed. Methods A total of 236 randomly selected, consenting Saudi adult participants (166 males and 70 females) were recruited and screened for the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program–Adult Treatment Panel III definition. Blood thiamine and its derivatives were quantified using HPLC. Results A total of 140 participants (53.9%) had MetS. The levels of thiamine and its derivatives of those with MetS were not significantly different from those without. However, hypertensive subjects had significantly higher urinary thiamine (P = 0.03) as well as significantly lower levels of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) (P = 0.01) and total thiamine (P = 0.02) than the normotensive subjects, even after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Furthermore, age- and BMI-matched participants with elevated blood glucose levels had significantly lower levels of thiamine monophosphate (P = 0.020), TDP (P < 0.001) and total thiamine (P < 0.001) and significantly elevated levels of urinary thiamine (P = 0.005) compared to normoglycemic participants. Conclusions Low thiamine levels are associated with elevated blood glucose and hypertension in Saudi adults. Determination of thiamine status may be considered and corrected among patients with, or at high risk for, MetS, but the question whether thiamine deficiency correction translates to improved cardiometabolic status needs further longitudinal investigation. PMID:24059534

  3. Thiamine and its phosphate esters in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors in Saudi Arabs.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Alokail, Majed S; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Sabico, Shaun

    2013-09-23

    Thiamine deficiency has suggested to be linked to several insulin-resistance complications. In this study, we aim to associate circulating thiamine levels among cardiometabolic parameters in an Arab cohort using a simple, sensitive, rapid and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method that has recently been developed. A total of 236 randomly selected, consenting Saudi adult participants (166 males and 70 females) were recruited and screened for the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III definition. Blood thiamine and its derivatives were quantified using HPLC. A total of 140 participants (53.9%) had MetS. The levels of thiamine and its derivatives of those with MetS were not significantly different from those without. However, hypertensive subjects had significantly higher urinary thiamine (P = 0.03) as well as significantly lower levels of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) (P = 0.01) and total thiamine (P = 0.02) than the normotensive subjects, even after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Furthermore, age- and BMI-matched participants with elevated blood glucose levels had significantly lower levels of thiamine monophosphate (P = 0.020), TDP (P < 0.001) and total thiamine (P < 0.001) and significantly elevated levels of urinary thiamine (P = 0.005) compared to normoglycemic participants. Low thiamine levels are associated with elevated blood glucose and hypertension in Saudi adults. Determination of thiamine status may be considered and corrected among patients with, or at high risk for, MetS, but the question whether thiamine deficiency correction translates to improved cardiometabolic status needs further longitudinal investigation.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Luigi Di Salvo, Martino; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins. PMID:26212886

  5. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  6. A rapid solid-phase extraction fluorometric method for thiamine and riboflavin in salmonid eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, James L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Brown, Scott B.; Brown, Lisa R.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Fitzsimons, John D.

    2005-01-01

    A new method has been developed and successfully applied to the selective measurement of thiamine (nonphosphorylated), total thiamine (sum of thiamine, thiamine monophosphate [TMP], thiamine diphosphate [TDP], and thiamine triphosphate [TTP]), and potentially interfering riboflavin in acidic (2% trichloroacetic acid) extracts of selected salmonid and walleye egg samples. Acidic extracts of eggs were applied directly to end-capped C18, reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns and separated into three fractions by elution with mixtures of PO4 buffer (pH 2), methanol (10%), and acetonitrile (20%). All thiamine compounds recovered in the first two fractions were oxidized to their corresponding thiochromes with alkaline potassium hexacyanoferrate, and we measured the thiochrome fluorescence (excitation at 360 nm, emission at 460 nm) in a 96-well microplate reader. Riboflavin, recovered in third fraction (eluted with pH 2, 20% acetonitrile), was analyzed directly by measuring the fluorescence of this fraction (excitation at 450 nm, emission at 530 nm). Significant portions of the phosphate esters of thiamine (TMP, TDP, and presumably TTP), when present at low concentrations (< 10 nmol of total -thiamine per gram of egg), were not retained by the 100-mg SPE column, and were collected directly during sample loading and in a subsequent phosphoric acid rinse as fraction 1. Free thiamine (nonphosphorylated) and remaining portions of the TDP and TMP were then eluted in the second fraction with 10% methanol/PO4 buffer, whereas the un-ionized, relatively nonpolar riboflavin was eluted in the third fraction with 20% acetonitrile. This new method uses a traditional sample homogenization of egg tissue to extract thiamine compounds into 2% trichlororacetic acid solution; an inexpensive, commercially available SPE column; small amounts of sample (0.5-1 g); microliter volumes of solvents per sample; a traditional, relatively nonhazardous, oxidation of thiamine compounds to

  7. Effectiveness and retention of thiamine and its analogs administered to steelhead and landlocked Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H.G.; Isaacs, G.R.; Robins, J.S.; Lloyd, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of enhancing the reproduction of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in lakes where the consumption of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus and other forage fishes containing thiaminase can cause them to become thiamine deficient and thereby reduce the survival of their fry. We evaluated feeding fingerling steelhead excess thiamine hydrochloride (THCl) for 1 or 2 weeks or equimolar amounts of thiamine mononitrate, thiamine-tetrahydrofurfuryl-disulfide, benfotiamine, or dibenzoyl thiamine (DBT). We found minimal internal reserves of thiamine after 6 months. We also compared the ability of injections of thiamine and its analogs to prevent mortality in thiamine-deficient steelhead and Atlantic salmon sac fry and found all forms to be effective, although benfotiamine was the least effective on an equimolar basis. Further, we injected yearling steelhead and found that DBT was tolerated at approximately 11,200 nmol/g of body weight, about 10 times more than thiamine in any other form. When yearling steelhead were injected with near-maximal doses of thiamine hydrochloride and several analogs and then fed a thiamine-deficient diet, DBT was retained for approximately 2 years - in contrast to other forms, which were retained for less than about 6 months. Therefore, these results suggest that neither feeding nor injecting young hatchery salmonids with DBT is likely to enhance their reproduction for more than 2 years after stocking. However, injecting DBT in nearly mature fish (either cultured fish from hatcheries or wild fish captured in lakes) may provide them with enough thiamine to successfully spawn within 2 years even though they consume mainly thiaminase-containing forage fishes. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  8. Infant botulism: is there an association with thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Ringe, Hannelore; Schuelke, Markus; Weber, Sven; Dorner, Brigitte G; Kirchner, Sebastian; Dorner, Martin B

    2014-11-01

    Infant botulism is an acute life-threatening condition and diagnosis is frequently delayed. Therefore, the best time window to administer specific antibodies, at present the only etiology-based therapy, is often missed, entailing long periods of hospitalization in the PICU. Here we present a 3-month-old boy with infant botulism and respiratory failure, who quickly and favorably responded to thiamine supplementation. From the feces we isolated Clostridium botulinum serotype A2. In addition to producing botulinum neurotoxin A, this strain carried the thiaminase I gene and produced thiaminase I. Accordingly, the child's feces were positive for thiaminase I activity. Because C botulinum group I strains are capable of producing thiaminase I, we speculate that thiamine degradation might further aggravate the paralytic symptoms caused by botulinum neurotoxins in infant botulism. Thus, supportive supplementation with thiamine could be beneficial to speed up recovery and to shorten hospitalization in some patients with infant botulism. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Factors affecting a cyanogen bromide-based assay of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, D T; Lee, M; Hillman, R E

    1989-11-01

    We analyzed extensively a modified thiochrome method for thiamin analysis. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) from potato was superior to either alpha-amylase or acid phosphatase from wheat germ as a dephosphorylating agent. Timing of cyanogen bromide exposure was important, but the assay had good precision and accuracy. The standard curve was linear from 10 to 3000 nmol/L. The within-run and between-run coefficients of variation for total thiamin in whole blood were 3.6% and 7.4%, respectively. Analytical recoveries for low, intermediate, and high additions of thiamin to whole blood were 93-109%. Sample yield was increased by 41% (+/- 29% SD) with pre-assay freezing. Samples were stable for two days at room temperature, for seven days when refrigerated, and for two years when frozen. Previously unreported interference was seen with penicillin derivatives, and with several commonly used diuretic and antiepileptic medications. This assay may be suitable for population screening; 200 samples could be analyzed weekly at a cost of +0.20 per sample.

  10. Thiamine Nutritional Status and Depressive Symptoms Are Inversely Associated among Older Chinese Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng; Ding, Hanqing; Chen, Honglei; Ye, Xingwang; Li, Huaixing; Lin, Xu; Ke, Zunji

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine has been hypothesized to play an important role in mental health; however, few studies have investigated the association between thiamine nutritional status and depression in the general population. Concentrations of free thiamine and its phosphate esters [thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP)] in erythrocytes were measured by HPLC among 1587 Chinese men and women aged 50–70 y. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score of ≥16. The median erythrocyte concentration (nmol/L) was 3.73 for free thiamine, 3.74 for TMP, and 169 for TDP. The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms was 11.3%. Lower concentrations of all 3 erythrocyte thiamine biomarkers were monotonically associated with a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms: the multivariable adjusted ORs comparing the lowest with the highest quartiles were 2.97 (95% CI = 1.87, 4.72; P-trend < 0.001) for free thiamine, 3.46 (95% CI = 1.99, 6.02; P-trend < 0.001) for TMP, and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.22, 3.21; P-trend = 0.002) for TDP. In conclusion, poorer thiamine nutritional status and higher odds of depressive symptoms were associated among older Chinese adults. This finding should be further investigated in prospective or interventional studies. PMID:23173173

  11. Thiamin deficiency on fetal brain development with and without prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Olena; Eskin, N A Michael; Suh, Miyoung

    2018-04-01

    Adequate thiamin levels are crucial for optimal health through maintenance of homeostasis and viability of metabolic enzymes, which require thiamine as a co-factor. Thiamin deficiency occurs during pregnancy when the dietary intake is inadequate or excessive alcohol is consumed. Thiamin deficiency leads to brain dysfunction because thiamin is involved in the synthesis of myelin and neurotransmitters (e.g., acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate), and its deficiency increases oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reducing agents. Thiamin deficiency also leads to neural membrane dysfunction, because thiamin is a structural component of mitochondrial and synaptosomal membranes. Similarly, in-utero exposure to alcohol leads to fetal brain dysfunction, resulting in negative effects such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Thiamin deficiency and prenatal exposure to alcohol could act synergistically to produce negative effects on fetal development; however, this area of research is currently under-studied. This minireview summarizes the evidence for the potential role of thiamin deficiency in fetal brain development, with or without prenatal exposure to alcohol. Such evidence may influence the development of new nutritional strategies for preventing or mitigating the symptoms of FASD.

  12. Thiamine and fatty acid content of walleye tissue from three southern U.S. reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Vandergoot, C.S.; Bettoli, P.W.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Zajicek, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the thiamine concentration in egg, muscle, and liver tissues of walleyes Sander vitreus and the fatty acid content of walleye eggs from three southern U.S. reservoirs. In two Tennessee reservoirs (Dale Hollow and Center Hill), in which there were alewives Alosa pseudoharengus in the forage base, natural recruitment of walleyes was not occurring; by contrast in Lake James Reservoir, North Carolina, where there were no alewives, the walleye population was sustained via natural recruitment. Female walleye tissues were collected and assayed for thiamine (vitamin B1) and fatty acid content. Thiamine pyrophosphate was found to be the predominant form of thiamine in walleye eggs. In 2000, mean total egg thiamine concentrations were similar among Center Hill, Dale Hollow, and Lake James reservoirs (2.13, 3.14, and 2.77 nmol thiamine/g, respectively). Egg thiamine concentration increased as maternal muscle (r 2 = 0.73) and liver (r2 = 0.68) thiamine concentration increased. Walleye egg thiamine does not appear to be connected to poor natural reproduction in Tennessee walleyes. Threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense, which are found in all three reservoirs, had higher thiaminase activity than alewives. Six fatty acids differed among the walleye eggs for the three reservoirs. Two were physiologically important fatty acids, arachidonic acid (20:4[n-6]) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6[n-3]), which are important eicosanoid precursors involved in the regulation of biological functions, such as immune response and reproduction. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  13. Chloride permeability of rat brain membrane vesicles correlates with thiamine triphosphate content.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Hennuy, B; De Clerck, A; Wins, P

    1994-07-25

    Incubation of rat brain homogenates with thiamine or thiamine diphosphate (TDP) leads to a synthesis of thiamine triphosphate (TTP). In membrane vesicles subsequently prepared from the homogenates, increased TTP content correlates with increased 36Cl- uptake. A hyperbolic relationship was obtained with a K0.5 of 0.27 nmol TTP/mg protein. In crude mitochondrial fractions from the brains of animals previously treated with thiamine or sulbutiamine, a positive correlation between 36Cl- uptake and TTP content was found. These results, together with other results previously obtained with the patch-clamp technique, suggest that TTP is an activator of chloride channels having a large unit conductance.

  14. Thiamine nutritional status and depressive symptoms are inversely associated among older Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geng; Ding, Hanqing; Chen, Honglei; Ye, Xingwang; Li, Huaixing; Lin, Xu; Ke, Zunji

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine has been hypothesized to play an important role in mental health; however, few studies have investigated the association between thiamine nutritional status and depression in the general population. Concentrations of free thiamine and its phosphate esters [thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP)] in erythrocytes were measured by HPLC among 1587 Chinese men and women aged 50-70 y. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score of ≥16. The median erythrocyte concentration (nmol/L) was 3.73 for free thiamine, 3.74 for TMP, and 169 for TDP. The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms was 11.3%. Lower concentrations of all 3 erythrocyte thiamine biomarkers were monotonically associated with a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms: the multivariable adjusted ORs comparing the lowest with the highest quartiles were 2.97 (95% CI = 1.87, 4.72; P-trend < 0.001) for free thiamine, 3.46 (95% CI = 1.99, 6.02; P-trend < 0.001) for TMP, and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.22, 3.21; P-trend = 0.002) for TDP. In conclusion, poorer thiamine nutritional status and higher odds of depressive symptoms were associated among older Chinese adults. This finding should be further investigated in prospective or interventional studies.

  15. Thiamine Deficiency Complex Workshop final report: November 6-7, 2008, Ann Arbor, MI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, Dale C.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Riley, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Fry mortality which was first observed in the late 1960s in Great Lakes salmonines and in Baltic Sea salmon in 1974 has now been linked to thiamine deficiency (historically referred to as Early Mortality Syndrome, or EMS and M74, respectively). Over the past 14 years significant strides have been made in our understanding of this perplexing problem. It is now known that thiamine deficiency causes embryonic mortality in these salmonids. Both overt mortality and secondary effects of thiamine deficiency are observed in juvenile and adult animals. Collectively the morbidity and mortality (fry and adult mortality, secondary metabolic and behavior affects in juveniles and adult fish) are referred to as Thiamine Deficiency Complex (TDC). A workshop was held in Ann Arbor, MI on 6-7 November 2008 that brought together 38 federal, state, provincial, tribal and university scientists to share information, present data and discuss the latest observations on thiamine status of aquatic animals with thiamine deficiency and the causative agent, thiaminase. Twenty presentations (13 oral and 7 posters) detailed current knowledge. In Lake Huron, low alewife Alosa pseudoharengus abundance has persisted and egg thiamine concentrations in salmonines continue to increase, along with evidence of natural reproduction in lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake Michigan Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha appear to have a lower thiamine requirement than other salmonids in the lake. Lake Ontario American eel Anguilla rostrata foraging on alewife have approximately one third the muscle thiamine compared to eels not feeding on alewife, suggesting that eels may be suffering from thiamine deficiency. Secondary effects of low thiamine exist in Great Lakes salmonines and should not be ignored. Thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels is extremely high but a connection to TDC has not been made. Thiaminase in net plankton was found more consistently in lakes Michigan and Ontario than other lakes

  16. An exploratory assessment of thiamine status in western Alaska Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, Dale C.; Murphy, James M.; Howard, Katherine G.; Strasburger, Wesley W.; Matz, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the thiamine status of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Egg thiamine levels in Yukon and Kuskokwim River Chinook were examined in 2001 and 2012. Muscle and liver thiamine in Chinook, coho O. kisutch, chum O. keta, and pink O. gorbuscha salmon were measured in northern Bering Sea juveniles and the percentage of the diet containing thiaminase, an enzyme that destroys thiamine, was calculated. Only 23% of the eggs were thiamine replete (> 8.0 nmol·g-1) in 2012. Seventy-four percent of the eggs had thiamine concentrations (1.5–8.0 nmol·g-1) which can lead to mortality from secondary eff ects of thiamine defi ciency. Only 3% of the eggs had < 1.5 nmol·g-1 associated with overt fry mortality. In 2001 egg thiamine in upper Yukon Chinook was 11.7 nmol·g-1 which was higher than that measured in 2012 (6.2 nmol·g-1) and paralleled Chinook productivity. Total thiamine (nmol·g-1) in Bering Sea Chinook muscle (3.8) was similar to coho (4.15), but lower than in chum (8.9) and pink salmon (9.6). Thiaminase-containing prey in Chinook (63%) and coho (36%) stomachs were elevated compared to those of chum (3%) and pink (5%) salmon. These results provide evidence of egg thiamine being less than fully replete. Thiamine deficiency was not observed in juvenile muscle tissue, but differences were present among species reflecting the percentage of diet containing thiaminase. Additional studies are recommended.

  17. Effect of sample handling on thiamine and thiaminolytic activity in alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, G.M.; Brown, S.B.; Brown, L.R.; Moore, K.; Villella, M.; Zajicek, J.L.; Tillitt, D.E.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Honeyfield, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Alewives Alosa pseudoharengus were collected to evaluate handling and processing conditions that may affect the measurement of their thiamine-thiaminase content. Fish were captured by otter trawl, and reference samples of live fish were quick-frozen on dry ice immediately following capture. Other samples were placed on wet ice (4??C) or held in ambient lake water (21.5??C) for periods of up to 5 h before freezing. Total thiamine levels for reference samples averaged 26 nmol/g and consisted of 66, 15, and 19% thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), thiamine monophosphate (TMP), and unphosphorylated thiamine (Th), respectively. After 120 min at either 4??C or 21.5??C, total thiamine concentrations were lower. At 21.5??C, the TPP proportion had decreased by 30 min and the proportion as Th increased after 60 min. In the groups sampled after 5 h, total thiamine concentrations were not altered but the proportion of TPP was lower and that of Th was higher than in reference samples. The stability of thiamine in thawed muscle samples from previously frozen alewives was poor (40% loss by 1 h at 22??C and 30% loss by 2 h at 4??C). Thiaminase activity averaged 5,975 pmol??g wet weight -1??min-1 in reference samples. In fresh-caught alewives, thiaminase activities were remarkably consistent throughout the sampling period. At 4??C, thiaminase activity in muscle tissue from previously frozen alewives was stable for the entire investigation period. At 25??C, the activity initially increased by 40% after 60 min but then decreased to 50% of initial value after 5 h. We conclude that sampling times greater than 25 min could cause some changes in the various thiamine forms and net loss in total thiamine. The thiamine content in previously frozen alewife samples is highly labile, requiring low temperatures during processing for analysis. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. Thiamine deficiency effects on the vision and foraging ability of lake trout fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Zajicek, James L.; Claunch, Rachel; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Fitzsimons, John D.; Brown, Scott B.

    2008-01-01

    The exact causes of the historical recruitment failures of Great Lakes lake trout Salvelinus namaycush are unknown. Thiamine deficiency has been associated with neurological abnormalities in lake trout that lead to early mortality syndrome (EMS) in salmonine swim-up fry, and EMS-related mortality at the swim-up stage is a factor that contributes to the reproductive failure of lake trout populations in the Great Lakes. The potential for adverse effects of thiamine deficiency beyond the swim-up stage is unknown. We investigated the effects of low egg thiamine on behavioral functions in young, post-swim-up lake trout fry. The behavioral endpoints included visual acuity and prey capture rates in the same groups of lake trout fry from each family. Low-thiamine eggs were produced by feeding lake trout broodstock diets entailing thiaminase activity. The thiamine content of the spawned eggs ranged from 0.3 to 26.1 nmol/g. Both visual acuity and prey capture rates were affected by the thiamine content of the eggs. The visual acuity of lake trout was severely affected by low egg thiamine, mainly at thiamine concentrations below the threshold of 0.8 nmol/g but also at higher concentrations in field-collected eggs. Feeding was also reduced with low egg thiamine content. The reduction of prey capture rates was dramatic below 0.8 nmol/g and less dramatic, but still significant, in a portion of the families with egg thiamine concentrations of less than 5.0 nmol/g from both laboratory and field samples. Approximately one-third of the latter families had reduced feeding rates. Deficits in visual acuity may be part of the mechanism leading to decreased feeding rates in these fry. The effects of low egg thiamine on both of the behavioral endpoints studied increase the risk of low recruitment rates in Great Lakes lake trout populations.

  19. Abolition of reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in hearts from thiamine-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando A; Guatimosim, Silvia; Castro, Carlos H; Galan, Diogo T; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Ribeiro, Angela M; Almeida, Alvair P; Cruz, Jader S

    2007-07-01

    Extensive work has been done regarding the impact of thiamine deprivation on the nervous system. In cardiac tissue, chronic thiamine deficiency is described to cause changes in the myocardium that can be associated with arrhythmias. However, compared with the brain, very little is known about the effects of thiamine deficiency on the heart. Thus this study was undertaken to explore whether thiamine deprivation has a role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. We examined hearts isolated from thiamine-deprived and control rats. We measured heart rate, diastolic and systolic tension, and contraction and relaxation rates. Whole cell voltage clamp was performed in rat isolated cardiac myocytes to measure L-type Ca(2+) current. In addition, we investigated the global intracellular calcium transients by using confocal microscopy in the line-scan mode. The hearts from thiamine-deficient rats did not degenerate into ventricular fibrillation during 30 min of reperfusion after 15 min of coronary occlusion. The antiarrhythmogenic effects were characterized by the arrhythmia severity index. Our results suggest that hearts from thiamine-deficient rats did not experience irreversible arrhythmias. There was no change in L-type Ca(2+) current density. Inactivation kinetics of this current in Ca(2+)-buffered cells was retarded in thiamine-deficient cardiac myocytes. The global Ca(2+) release was significantly reduced in thiamine-deficient cardiac myocytes. The amplitude of caffeine-releasable Ca(2+) was lower in thiamine-deficient myocytes. In summary, we have found that thiamine deprivation attenuates the incidence and severity of postischemic arrhythmias, possibly through a mechanism involving a decrease in global Ca(2+) release.

  20. Interaction of 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine-Containing Drugs Including Fedratinib and Trimethoprim with Thiamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Marilyn M; Hao, Jia; Liang, Xiaomin; Chandrasekhar, Jayaraman; Twelves, Jolyn; Whitney, J Andrew; Lepist, Eve-Irene; Ray, Adrian S

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of thiamine transporters has been proposed as a putative mechanism for the observation of Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent termination of clinical development of fedratinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor (JAKi). This study aimed to determine the potential for other JAKi to inhibit thiamine transport using human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) and thiamine transporter (THTR) overexpressing cells and to better elucidate the structural basis for interacting with THTR. Only JAKi containing a 2,4-diaminopyrimidine were observed to inhibit thiamine transporters. Fedratinib inhibited thiamine uptake into Caco-2 cells (IC 50 = 0.940 µM) and THTR-2 (IC 50 = 1.36 µM) and, to a lesser extent, THTR-1 (IC 50 = 7.10 µM) overexpressing cells. Two other JAKi containing this moiety, AZD1480 and cerdulatinib, were weaker inhibitors of the thiamine transporters. Other JAKi-including monoaminopyrimidines, such as momelotinib, and nonaminopyrimidines, such as filgotinib-did not have any inhibitory effects on thiamine transport. A pharmacophore model derived from the minimized structure of thiamine suggests that 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-containing compounds can adopt a conformation matching several key features of thiamine. Further studies with drugs containing a 2,4-diaminopyrimidine resulted in the discovery that the antibiotic trimethoprim also potently inhibits thiamine uptake mediated by THTR-1 (IC 50 = 6.84 µM) and THTR-2 (IC 50 = 5.56 µM). Fedratinib and trimethoprim were also found to be substrates for THTR, a finding with important implications for their disposition in the body. In summary, our results show that not all JAKi have the potential to inhibit thiamine transport and further establish the interaction of these transporters with xenobiotics. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Globally Important Haptophyte Algae Use Exogenous Pyrimidine Compounds More Efficiently than Thiamin

    PubMed Central

    Gutowska, Magdalena A.; Shome, Brateen; Sudek, Sebastian; McRose, Darcy L.; Hamilton, Maria; Giovannoni, Stephen J.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vitamin B1 (thiamin) is a cofactor for critical enzymatic processes and is scarce in surface oceans. Several eukaryotic marine algal species thought to rely on exogenous thiamin are now known to grow equally well on the precursor 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP), including the haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi. Because the thiamin biosynthetic capacities of the diverse and ecologically important haptophyte lineage are otherwise unknown, we investigated the pathway in transcriptomes and two genomes from 30 species representing six taxonomic orders. HMP synthase is missing in data from all studied taxa, but the pathway is otherwise complete, with some enzymatic variations. Experiments on axenic species from three orders demonstrated that equivalent growth rates were supported by 1 µM HMP or thiamin amendment. Cellular thiamin quotas were quantified in the oceanic phytoplankter E. huxleyi using the thiochrome assay. E. huxleyi exhibited luxury storage in standard algal medium [(1.16 ± 0.18) × 10−6 pmol thiamin cell−1], whereas quotas in cultures grown under more environmentally relevant thiamin and HMP supplies [(2.22 ± 0.07) × 10−7 or (1.58 ± 0.14) × 10−7 pmol thiamin cell−1, respectively] were significantly lower than luxury values and prior estimates. HMP and its salvage-related analog 4-amino-5-aminomethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (AmMP) supported higher growth than thiamin under environmentally relevant supply levels. These compounds also sustained growth of the stramenopile alga Pelagomonas calceolata. Together with identification of a salvage protein subfamily (TENA_E) in multiple phytoplankton, the results indicate that salvaged AmMP and exogenously acquired HMP are used by several groups for thiamin production. Our studies highlight the potential importance of thiamin pathway intermediates and their analogs in shaping phytoplankton community structure. PMID:29018119

  2. Enhancement of Thiamine Biosynthesis in Oil Palm Seedlings by Colonization of Endophytic Fungus Hendersonia toruloidea

    PubMed Central

    Kamarudin, Amirah N.; Lai, Kok S.; Lamasudin, Dhilia U.; Idris, Abu S.; Balia Yusof, Zetty N.

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine, or vitamin B1 plays an indispensable role as a cofactor in crucial metabolic reactions including glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in all living organisms. Thiamine has been shown to play a role in plant adaptation toward biotic and abiotic stresses. The modulation of thiamine biosynthetic genes in oil palm seedlings was evaluated in response to root colonization by endophytic Hendersonia toruloidea. Seven-month-old oil palm seedlings were inoculated with H. toruloidea and microscopic analyses were performed to visualize the localization of endophytic H. toruloidea in oil palm roots. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that H. toruloidea colonized cortical cells. The expression of thiamine biosynthetic genes and accumulation of total thiamine in oil palm seedlings were also evaluated. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure transcript abundances of four key thiamine biosynthesis genes (THI4, THIC, TH1, and TPK) on days 1, 7, 15, and 30 in response to H. toruloidea colonization. The results showed an increase of up to 12-fold in the expression of all gene transcripts on day 1 post-inoculation. On days 7, 15, and 30 post-inoculation, the relative expression levels of these genes were shown to be downregulated. Thiamine accumulation was observed on day 7 post-colonization and subsequently decreased until day 30. This work provides the first evidence for the enhancement of thiamine biosynthesis by endophytic colonization in oil palm seedlings. PMID:29089959

  3. In vitro immune functions in thiamine-replete and -depleted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Christopher A; Honeyfield, Dale C; Densmore, Christine L; Iwanowicz, Luke R

    2014-05-01

    In this study we examined the impacts of in vivo thiamine deficiency on lake trout leukocyte function measured in vitro. When compared outside the context of individual-specific thiamine concentrations no significant differences were observed in leukocyte bactericidal activity or in concanavalin A (Con A), and phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) stimulated leukocyte proliferation. Placing immune functions into context with the ratio of in vivo liver thiamine monophosphate (TMP--biologically inactive form) to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP--biologically active form) proved to be the best indicator of thiamine depletion impacts as determined using regression modeling. These observed relationships indicated differential effects on the immune measures with bactericidal activity exhibiting an inverse relationship with TMP to TPP ratios, Con A stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting a positive relationship with TMP to TPP ratios and PHA-P stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting no significant relationships. In addition, these relationships showed considerable complexity which included the consistent observation of a thiamine-replete subgroup with characteristics similar to those seen in the leukocytes from thiamine-depleted fish. When considered together, our observations indicate that lake trout leukocytes experience cell-type specific impacts as well as an altered physiologic environment when confronted with a thiamine-limited state. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. In vitro immune functions in thiamine-replete and -depleted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the impacts of in vivo thiamine deficiency on lake trout leukocyte function measured in vitro. When compared outside the context of individual-specific thiamine concentrations no significant differences were observed in leukocyte bactericidal activity or in concanavalin A (Con A), and phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) stimulated leukocyte proliferation. Placing immune functions into context with the ratio of in vivo liver thiamine monophosphate (TMP – biologically inactive form) to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP – biologically active form) proved to be the best indicator of thiamine depletion impacts as determined using regression modeling. These observed relationships indicated differential effects on the immune measures with bactericidal activity exhibiting an inverse relationship with TMP to TPP ratios, Con A stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting a positive relationship with TMP to TPP ratios and PHA-P stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting no significant relationships. In addition, these relationships showed considerable complexity which included the consistent observation of a thiamine-replete subgroup with characteristics similar to those seen in the leukocytes from thiamine-depleted fish. When considered together, our observations indicate that lake trout leukocytes experience cell-type specific impacts as well as an altered physiologic environment when confronted with a thiamine-limited state.

  5. The effects of thiamin on lead metabolism: organ distribution of lead 203.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J S; Hamilton, D L; Blakley, B R; Rousseaux, C G

    1992-01-01

    The effect of thiamin on the organ distribution of lead was evaluated in CD-1 mice exposed intragastrically or intraperitoneally to a single dose of lead acetate (100 micrograms) containing 100 microCi lead 203. They were treated with either thiamin (25 or 50 mg/kg body weight), calcium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaEDTA) (50 mg/kg body weight), or combinations of thiamin and CaEDTA. The whole body retention and the organ distribution of lead 203 varied depending upon the route of lead administration, dose of thiamin and the specific treatment combination. Thiamin (25 or 50 mg/kg) treatment increased the whole body retention of both intragastric and intraperitoneal lead by approximately 10% in each instance. Calcium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, either alone or in combination with thiamin (50 mg/kg) reduced the whole body retention of lead by as much as 14% regardless of route of lead exposure. The relative retention of lead by the liver, kidney and spleen was greater in mice exposed to lead by the intragastric route. Regardless of route, CaEDTA in the combined treatment reduced the relative retention of lead in both the liver and kidney, whereas thiamin alone only reduced the retention of lead in the kidney. The results of this study indicate that thiamin in combination with CaEDTA alters the distribution and retention of lead in a manner which may have therapeutic application as it relates to chelation therapy. PMID:1423063

  6. Overexpression of Plastid Transketolase in Tobacco Results in a Thiamine Auxotrophic Phenotype[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khozaei, Mahdi; Fisk, Stuart; Lawson, Tracy; Gibon, Yves; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased plastid transketolase on photosynthetic capacity and growth, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with increased levels of transketolase protein were produced. This was achieved using a cassette composed of a full-length Arabidopsis thaliana transketolase cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The results revealed a major and unexpected effect of plastid transketolase overexpression as the transgenic tobacco plants exhibited a slow-growth phenotype and chlorotic phenotype. These phenotypes were complemented by germinating the seeds of transketolase-overexpressing lines in media containing either thiamine pyrophosphate or thiamine. Thiamine levels in the seeds and cotyledons were lower in transketolase-overexpressing lines than in wild-type plants. When transketolase-overexpressing plants were supplemented with thiamine or thiamine pyrophosphate throughout the life cycle, they grew normally and the seed produced from these plants generated plants that did not have a growth or chlorotic phenotype. Our results reveal the crucial importance of the level of transketolase activity to provide the precursor for synthesis of intermediates and to enable plants to produce thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate for growth and development. The mechanism determining transketolase protein levels remains to be elucidated, but the data presented provide evidence that this may contribute to the complex regulatory mechanisms maintaining thiamine homeostasis in plants. PMID:25670766

  7. Thiamin biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Origin of carbon-2 of the thiazole moiety.

    PubMed Central

    White, R L; Spenser, I D

    1979-01-01

    Radioactivity from [2-14C]glycine enters C-2 of the thiazole moiety of thiamin and no other site, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strains A.T.C.C. 24903 and 39916, H.J. Bunker). Radioactivity from L-[Me-14C]methionine or from DL-[2-14C]tyrosine does not enter thiamin. PMID:384994

  8. Enhancement of Thiamine Biosynthesis in Oil Palm Seedlings by Colonization of Endophytic Fungus Hendersonia toruloidea.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Amirah N; Lai, Kok S; Lamasudin, Dhilia U; Idris, Abu S; Balia Yusof, Zetty N

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine, or vitamin B1 plays an indispensable role as a cofactor in crucial metabolic reactions including glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in all living organisms. Thiamine has been shown to play a role in plant adaptation toward biotic and abiotic stresses. The modulation of thiamine biosynthetic genes in oil palm seedlings was evaluated in response to root colonization by endophytic Hendersonia toruloidea . Seven-month-old oil palm seedlings were inoculated with H. toruloidea and microscopic analyses were performed to visualize the localization of endophytic H. toruloidea in oil palm roots. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that H. toruloidea colonized cortical cells. The expression of thiamine biosynthetic genes and accumulation of total thiamine in oil palm seedlings were also evaluated. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure transcript abundances of four key thiamine biosynthesis genes ( THI4 , THIC , TH1 , and TPK ) on days 1, 7, 15, and 30 in response to H. toruloidea colonization. The results showed an increase of up to 12-fold in the expression of all gene transcripts on day 1 post-inoculation. On days 7, 15, and 30 post-inoculation, the relative expression levels of these genes were shown to be downregulated. Thiamine accumulation was observed on day 7 post-colonization and subsequently decreased until day 30. This work provides the first evidence for the enhancement of thiamine biosynthesis by endophytic colonization in oil palm seedlings.

  9. Thiamine and benfotiamine prevent stress-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in mice exposed to predation without affecting brain thiamine diphosphate levels.

    PubMed

    Vignisse, Julie; Sambon, Margaux; Gorlova, Anna; Pavlov, Dmitrii; Caron, Nicolas; Malgrange, Brigitte; Shevtsova, Elena; Svistunov, Andrey; Anthony, Daniel C; Markova, Natalyia; Bazhenova, Natalyia; Coumans, Bernard; Lakaye, Bernard; Wins, Pierre; Strekalova, Tatyana; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2017-07-01

    Thiamine is essential for normal brain function and its deficiency causes metabolic impairment, specific lesions, oxidative damage and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN). Thiamine precursors with increased bioavailability, especially benfotiamine, exert neuroprotective effects not only for thiamine deficiency (TD), but also in mouse models of neurodegeneration. As it is known that AHN is impaired by stress in rodents, we exposed C57BL6/J mice to predator stress for 5 consecutive nights and studied the proliferation (number of Ki67-positive cells) and survival (number of BrdU-positive cells) of newborn immature neurons in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In stressed mice, the number of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells was reduced compared to non-stressed animals. This reduction was prevented when the mice were treated (200mg/kg/day in drinking water for 20days) with thiamine or benfotiamine, that were recently found to prevent stress-induced behavioral changes and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) upregulation in the CNS. Moreover, we show that thiamine and benfotiamine counteract stress-induced bodyweight loss and suppress stress-induced anxiety-like behavior. Both treatments induced a modest increase in the brain content of free thiamine while the level of thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) remained unchanged, suggesting that the beneficial effects observed are not linked to the role of this coenzyme in energy metabolism. Predator stress increased hippocampal protein carbonylation, an indicator of oxidative stress. This effect was antagonized by both thiamine and benfotiamine. Moreover, using cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells, we show that in particular benfotiamine protects against paraquat-induced oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesize that thiamine compounds may act by boosting anti-oxidant cellular defenses, by a mechanism that still remains to be unveiled. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that thiamine and benfotiamine prevent

  10. Treatment of biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease: Open comparative study between the combination of biotin plus thiamine versus thiamine alone.

    PubMed

    Tabarki, Brahim; Alfadhel, Majid; AlShahwan, Saad; Hundallah, Khaled; AlShafi, Shatha; AlHashem, Amel

    2015-09-01

    To compare the combination of biotin plus thiamine to thiamine alone in treating patients with biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease in an open-label prospective, comparative study. twenty patients with genetically proven biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease were enrolled, and received for at least 30 months a combination of biotin plus thiamine or thiamine alone. The outcome measures included duration of the crisis, number of recurrence/admissions, the last neurological examination, the severity of dystonia using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS), and the brain MRI findings during the crisis and after 30 months of follow-up. Ten children with a mean age of 6 years(1/2) were recruited in the biotin plus thiamine group (group 1) and ten children (6 females and 4 males) with a mean age of 6 years and 2 months were recruited in the thiamine group (group 2). After 2 years of follow-up treatment, 6 of 20 children achieved complete remission, 10 had minimal sequelae in the form of mild dystonia and dysarthria (improvement of the BFMDRS, mean: 80%), and 4 had severe neurologic sequelae. All these 4 patients had delayed diagnosis and management. Regarding outcome measures, both groups have a similar outcome regarding the number of recurrences, the neurologic sequelae (mean BFMDS score between the groups, p = 0.84), and the brain MRI findings. The only difference was the duration of the acute crisis: group 1 had faster recovery (2 days), versus 3 days in group 2 (p = 0.005). Our study suggests that over 30 months of treatment, the combination of biotin plus thiamine is not superior to thiamine alone in the treatment of biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disruption of Thiamine Uptake and Growth of Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Ramon; Miller, A. Dusty

    2013-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in domestic cats and some wild cats despite the availability of relatively effective vaccines against the virus. FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A) is transmitted in natural infections, and FeLV subgroups B, C, and T can evolve directly from FeLV-A by mutation and/or recombination with endogenous retroviruses in domestic cats, resulting in a variety of pathogenic outcomes. The cell surface entry receptor for FeLV-A is a putative thiamine transporter (THTR1). Here, we have addressed whether FeLV-A infection might disrupt thiamine uptake into cells and, because thiamine is an essential nutrient, whether this disruption might have pathological consequences. First, we cloned the cat ortholog of the other of the two known thiamine transporters in mammals, THTR2, and we show that feline THTR1 (feTHTR1) and feTHTR2 both mediate thiamine uptake, but feTHTR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-A. We found that feTHTR1 is widely expressed in cat tissues and in cell lines, while expression of feTHTR2 is restricted. Thiamine uptake mediated by feTHTR1 was indeed blocked by FeLV-A infection, and in feline fibroblasts that naturally express feTHTR1 and not feTHTR2, this blockade resulted in a growth arrest at physiological concentrations of extracellular thiamine. The growth arrest was reversed at high extracellular concentrations of thiamine. Our results show that FeLV-A infection can indeed disrupt thiamine uptake with pathological consequences. A prediction of these experiments is that raising the plasma levels of thiamine in FeLV-infected cats may ameliorate the pathogenic effects of infection. PMID:23269813

  12. Disruption of thiamine uptake and growth of cells by feline leukemia virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Ramon; Miller, A Dusty; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in domestic cats and some wild cats despite the availability of relatively effective vaccines against the virus. FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A) is transmitted in natural infections, and FeLV subgroups B, C, and T can evolve directly from FeLV-A by mutation and/or recombination with endogenous retroviruses in domestic cats, resulting in a variety of pathogenic outcomes. The cell surface entry receptor for FeLV-A is a putative thiamine transporter (THTR1). Here, we have addressed whether FeLV-A infection might disrupt thiamine uptake into cells and, because thiamine is an essential nutrient, whether this disruption might have pathological consequences. First, we cloned the cat ortholog of the other of the two known thiamine transporters in mammals, THTR2, and we show that feline THTR1 (feTHTR1) and feTHTR2 both mediate thiamine uptake, but feTHTR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-A. We found that feTHTR1 is widely expressed in cat tissues and in cell lines, while expression of feTHTR2 is restricted. Thiamine uptake mediated by feTHTR1 was indeed blocked by FeLV-A infection, and in feline fibroblasts that naturally express feTHTR1 and not feTHTR2, this blockade resulted in a growth arrest at physiological concentrations of extracellular thiamine. The growth arrest was reversed at high extracellular concentrations of thiamine. Our results show that FeLV-A infection can indeed disrupt thiamine uptake with pathological consequences. A prediction of these experiments is that raising the plasma levels of thiamine in FeLV-infected cats may ameliorate the pathogenic effects of infection.

  13. Impact of thiamine deficiency on T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antibody production in lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2012-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on thiamine-replete and thiamine-depleted diets were evaluated for the effects of thiamine status on in vivo responses to the T-dependent antigen trinitophenol (TNP)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH), the T-independent antigen trinitrophenol-lipolysaccaharide (TNP-LPS), or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS; negative control fish). Plasma antibody concentrations were evaluated for possible differences in total anti-TNP activity as well as differences in response kinetics. Associations between anti-TNP activity and muscle and liver thiamine concentrations as well as ratios of muscle-to-liver thiamine to anti-TNP activity were also examined. Thiamine-depleted lake trout that were injected with TNP-LPS exhibited significantly more anti-TNP activity than thiamine-replete fish. The depleted fish injected with TNP-LPS also exhibited significantly different response kinetics relative to thiamine-replete lake trout. No differences in activity or kinetics were observed between the thiamine-replete and -depleted fish injected with TNP-KLH or in the DPBS negative controls. Anti-TNP activity in thiamine-depleted lake trout injected with TNP-KLH was positively associated with muscle thiamine pyrophosphate (thiamine diphosphate; TPP) concentration. A negative association was observed between the ratio of muscle-to-liver TPP and T-independent responses. No significant associations between anti-TNP activity and tissue thiamine concentration were observed in the thiamine-replete fish. We demonstrated that thiamine deficiency leads to alterations in both T-dependent and T-independent immune responses in lake trout.

  14. Impact of thiamine deficiency on T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antibody production in lake trout.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Christopher A; Honeyfield, Dale C; Densmore, Christine L; Iwanowicz, Luke R

    2012-12-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on thiamine-replete and thiamine-depleted diets were evaluated for the effects of thiamine status on in vivo responses to the T-dependent antigen trinitophenol (TNP)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH), the T-independent antigen trinitrophenol-lipolysaccaharide (TNP-LPS), or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS; negative control fish). Plasma antibody concentrations were evaluated for possible differences in total anti-TNP activity as well as differences in response kinetics. Associations between anti-TNP activity and muscle and liver thiamine concentrations as well as ratios of muscle-to-liver thiamine to anti-TNP activity were also examined. Thiamine-depleted lake trout that were injected with TNP-LPS exhibited significantly more anti-TNP activity than thiamine-replete fish. The depleted fish injected with TNP-LPS also exhibited significantly different response kinetics relative to thiamine-replete lake trout. No differences in activity or kinetics were observed between the thiamine-replete and -depleted fish injected with TNP-KLH or in the DPBS negative controls. Anti-TNP activity in thiamine-depleted lake trout injected with TNP-KLH was positively associated with muscle thiamine pyrophosphate (thiamine diphosphate; TPP) concentration. A negative association was observed between the ratio of muscle-to-liver TPP and T-independent responses. No significant associations between anti-TNP activity and tissue thiamine concentration were observed in the thiamine-replete fish. We demonstrated that thiamine deficiency leads to alterations in both T-dependent and T-independent immune responses in lake trout.

  15. Thiamine supplementation facilitates thiamine transporter expression in the rumen epithelium and attenuates high-grain-induced inflammation in low-yielding dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pan, X H; Yang, L; Beckers, Y; Xue, F G; Tang, Z W; Jiang, L S; Xiong, B H

    2017-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to uncover the effects of increasing dietary grain levels on expression of thiamine transporters in ruminal epithelium, and to assess the protective effects of thiamine against high-grain-induced inflammation in dairy cows. Six rumen-fistulated, lactating Holstein dairy cows (627 ± 16.9 kg of body weight, 180 ± 6 d in milk; mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Three treatments were control (20% dietary starch, dry matter basis), high-grain diet (HG, 33.2% dietary starch, DM basis), and HG diet supplemented with 180 mg of thiamine/kg of dry matter intake. On d 19 and 20 of each period, milk performance was measured. On d 21, ruminal pH, endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and thiamine contents in rumen and blood, and plasma inflammatory cytokines were detected; a rumen papillae biopsy was taken on d 21 to determine the gene and protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways. The HG diet decreased ruminal pH (5.93 vs. 6.49), increased milk yield from 17.9 to 20.2 kg/d, and lowered milk fat and protein from 4.28 to 3.83%, and from 3.38 to 3.11%, respectively. The HG feeding reduced thiamine content in rumen (2.89 vs. 8.97 μg/L) and blood (11.66 vs. 17.63 μg/L), and the relative expression value of thiamine transporter-2 (0.37-fold) and mitochondrial thiamine pyrophosphate transporter (0.33-fold) was downregulated by HG feeding. The HG-fed cows exhibited higher endotoxin LPS in rumen fluid (134,380 vs. 11,815 endotoxin units/mL), and higher plasma concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines when compared with the control group. The gene and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), IL1B, and IL6 in rumen epithelium increased when cows were fed the HG diet, indicating that local inflammation occurred. The depressions in ruminal pH, milk fat, and protein of HG-fed cows were reversed by thiamine

  16. Thiamin and riboflavin vitamers in human milk: effects of lipid-based nutrient supplementation and stage of lactation on vitamer secretion and contributions to total vitamin content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main...

  17. Thiamine Deficiency in Tropical Pediatrics: New Insights into a Neglected but Vital Metabolic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hiffler, Laurent; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Lafferty, Nadia; Martinez Garcia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In humans, thiamine is a micronutrient prone to depletion that may result in severe clinical abnormalities. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge on thiamine deficiency (TD) and bridges the gap between pathophysiology and clinical presentation by integrating thiamine metabolism at subcellular level with its function to vital organs. The broad clinical spectrum of TD is outlined, with emphasis on conditions encountered in tropical pediatric practice. In particular, TD is associated with type B lactic acidosis and classic forms of beriberi in children, but it is often unrecognized. Other severe acute conditions are associated with hypermetabolism, inducing a functional TD. The crucial role of thiamine in infant cognitive development is also highlighted in this review, along with analysis of the potential impact of TD in refeeding syndrome during severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This review aims to increase clinical awareness of TD in tropical settings where access to diagnostic tests is poor, and advocates for an early therapeutic thiamine challenge in resource-limited settings. Moreover, it provides evidence for thiamine as treatment in critical conditions requiring metabolic resuscitation, and gives rationale to the consideration of increased thiamine supplementation in therapeutic foods for malnourished children. PMID:27379239

  18. Acute thiamine deficiency and refeeding syndrome: Similar findings but different pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maiorana, Arianna; Vergine, Gianluca; Coletti, Valentina; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzo, Cristiano; Emma, Francesco; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome can occur in several contexts of relative malnutrition in which an overaggressive nutritional support is started. The consequences are life threatening with multiorgan impairment, and severe electrolyte imbalances. During refeeding, glucose-involved insulin secretion causes abrupt reverse of lipolysis and a switch from catabolism to anabolism. This creates a sudden cellular demand for electrolytes (phosphate, potassium, and magnesium) necessary for synthesis of adenosine triphosphate, glucose transport, and other synthesis reactions, resulting in decreased serum levels. Laboratory findings and multiorgan impairment similar to refeeding syndrome also are observed in acute thiamine deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine whether thiamine deficiency was responsible for the electrolyte imbalance caused by tubular electrolyte losses. We describe two patients with leukemia who developed acute thiamine deficiency with an electrolyte pattern suggestive of refeeding syndrome, severe lactic acidosis, and evidence of proximal renal tubular dysfunction. A single thiamine administration led to rapid resolution of the tubular dysfunction and normalization of acidosis and electrolyte imbalance. This demonstrated that thiamine deficiency was responsible for the electrolyte imbalance, caused by tubular electrolyte losses. Our study indicates that, despite sharing many laboratory similarities, refeeding syndrome and acute thiamine deficiency should be viewed as separate entities in which the electrolyte abnormalities reported in cases of refeeding syndrome with thiamine deficiency and refractory lactic acidosis may be due to renal tubular losses instead of a shifting from extracellular to intracellular compartments. In oncologic and malnourished patients, individuals at particular risk for developing refeeding syndrome, in the presence of these biochemical abnormalities, acute thiamine deficiency should be suspected and treated because it promptly

  19. Preventing the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in Australia: cost-effectiveness of thiamin-supplementation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Connelly, L; Price, J

    1996-04-01

    Alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy has been commonplace in Australia for many years and, as this syndrome is attributed to a deficiency in the diet, it should be preventable. This study employs conventional cost-effectiveness methodology to compare the economic efficiency of several thiamin-supplementation alternatives that have been proposed for the prevention of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A series of rankings of these measures is derived from an estimated cost per case averted for each of the alternatives studied. These rankings identify the least cost-effective thiamin-supplementation alternative as that of enriching bread-making flour with thiamin.

  20. Energy and glucose pathways in thiamine deficient primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ham, D; Karska-Wysocki, B

    2005-12-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) results in lactate acidosis, which is associated with neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate this alteration in primary rat brain endothelia. Spectrophotometric analysis of culture media revealed that only a higher concentration of pyrithiamine, which accelerates the intracellular blocking of thiamine, significantly elevated the lactate level and lactate dehydrogenase activity within 7 days. The medium without pyrithiamine and with a thiamine concentration comparable to pathophysiological plasma levels mildly reduced only the activity of transketolase. This suggests that significant metabolic changes may not occur at the early phase of TD in cerebral capillary cells, while anaerobic glycolysis in capillaries may be mediated during late stage/chronic TD.

  1. Absorption of thiamine and nicotinic acid in the rat intestine during fasting and immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirilyuk, O. G.; Khmelevskiy, Y. V.

    1980-01-01

    By perfusion of isolated sections of intestine with a solution containing thiamine at a concentration of 3.1 micromole, it was established that thiamine absorption in animals fasted for 72 hours decreased by 28 percent, whereas absorption increased by 12 percent in rats after 24 hour immobilization. After immobilization, absorption of label in the intestinal mucosa increased. Na K ATPase activity in the intestinal mucosa decreased by 10 percent during fasting, and it increased with immobilization of the animals. Activity of Na K ATPase in the intestinal mucosa cells determined the absorption rate of thiamine and nicotinic acid at the level of vitamin transport through the plasma membranes of the enterocytes.

  2. A novel thiamine-derived pigment, pyrizepine, formed by the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Igoshi, Asuka; Noda, Kyoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2018-04-26

    To find a Maillard pigment derived from thiamine, a solution containing glucose and thiamine was heated and analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with diode-array detection. As a result, a unique peak showing an absorption maximum at 380 nm was detected. This peak was then isolated from a reaction solution containing glucose, lysine and thiamine, and was identified as 1-(2-methyl-6,9-dihydro-5H-pyrimido[4,5-e][1,4]diazepin-7-yl)ethan-1-one using instrumental analyses. This compound, named pyrizepine, was a novel yellow pigment having a fused ring consisting of pyrimidine and diazepine. Pyrizepine was a major low-molecular-weight pigment in the reaction solution. The structure suggests that pyrizepine is formed by condensation reaction between a degradation product of thiamine and a tetrosone derivative formed from glucose by the Maillard reaction.

  3. Effect of added thiamine on the key odorant compounds and aroma of cooked ham.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Caroline; Mercier, Frédéric; Tournayre, Pascal; Martin, Jean-Luc; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-15

    This study shows that thiamine plays a major role in the formation of three key odorants of cooked ham: 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-methyl-3-methyldithiofuran, and bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulphide. Analyses revealed that under identical cooking conditions, the productions of these three aroma compounds increase in a closely intercorrelated way when the dose of thiamine increases. Using a specific 2-methyl-3-furanthiol extraction-quantification method, it was possible to relate the amounts of thiamine added in model cooked hams to the amounts of 2-methyl-3-furanthiol produced in the cooking process. Sensory analyses highlighted the role of thiamine as a precursor of cooked ham aroma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thiamine deficiency in childhood with attention to genetic causes: Survival and outcome predictors.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza-Escobar, Juan Darío; Alfadhel, Majid; Molero-Luis, Marta; Darin, Niklas; Spiegel, Ronen; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Gerards, Mike; Taylor, Robert W; Artuch, Rafael; Nashabat, Marwan; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Tabarki, Brahim; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén

    2017-09-01

    Primary and secondary conditions leading to thiamine deficiency have overlapping features in children, presenting with acute episodes of encephalopathy, bilateral symmetric brain lesions, and high excretion of organic acids that are specific of thiamine-dependent mitochondrial enzymes, mainly lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and branched chain keto-acids. Undiagnosed and untreated thiamine deficiencies are often fatal or lead to severe sequelae. Herein, we describe the clinical and genetic characterization of 79 patients with inherited thiamine defects causing encephalopathy in childhood, identifying outcome predictors in patients with pathogenic SLC19A3 variants, the most common genetic etiology. We propose diagnostic criteria that will aid clinicians to establish a faster and accurate diagnosis so that early vitamin supplementation is considered. Ann Neurol 2017;82:317-330. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  5. The PLUTO plastidial nucleobase transporter also transports the thiamin precursor hydroxymethylpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Johnson, Timothy S; Hanson, Andrew D

    2018-04-27

    In plants, the hydroxymethylpyrimidine (HMP) and thiazole precursors of thiamin are synthesized and coupled together to form thiamin in plastids. Mutants unable to form HMP can be rescued by exogenous HMP, implying the presence of HMP transporters in the plasma membrane and plastids. Analysis of bacterial genomes revealed a transporter gene that is chromosomally clustered with thiamin biosynthesis and salvage genes. Its closest Arabidopsis homolog, the plastidic nucleobase transporter (PLUTO), is co-expressed with several thiamin biosynthetic enzymes. Heterologous expression of PLUTO in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae increased sensitivity to a toxic HMP analog, and disrupting PLUTO in an HMP-requiring Arabidopsis line reduced root growth at low HMP concentrations. These data implicate PLUTO in plastidial transport and salvage of HMP. © 2018 The Author(s).

  6. The PLUTO plastidial nucleobase transporter also transports the thiamin precursor hydroxymethylpyrimidine

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A.W.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2018-01-01

    In plants, the hydroxymethylpyrimidine (HMP) and thiazole precursors of thiamin are synthesized and coupled together to form thiamin in plastids. Mutants unable to form HMP can be rescued by exogenous HMP, implying the presence of HMP transporters in the plasma membrane and plastids. Analysis of bacterial genomes revealed a transporter gene that is chromosomally clustered with thiamin biosynthesis and salvage genes. Its closest Arabidopsis homolog, the plastidic nucleobase transporter (PLUTO), is co-expressed with several thiamin biosynthetic enzymes. Heterologous expression of PLUTO in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae increased sensitivity to a toxic HMP analog, and disrupting PLUTO in an HMP-requiring Arabidopsis line reduced root growth at low HMP concentrations. These data implicate PLUTO in plastidial transport and salvage of HMP. PMID:29507060

  7. Egg thiamine status of Lake Ontario salmonines 1995-2004 with emphasis on lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, J.D.; Williston, B.; Williston, G.; Brown, L.; El-Shaarawi, A.; Vandenbyllaardt, L.; Honeyfeld, D.; Tillitt, D.; Wolgamood, M.; Brown, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus), the major prey fish for Lake Ontario, contain thiaminase. They are associated with development of a thiamine deficiency in salmonines which greatly increases the potential for developing an early mortality syndrome (EMS). To assess the possible effects of thiamine deficiency on salmonine reproduction we measured egg thiamine concentrations for five species of Lake Ontario salmonines. From this we estimated the proportion of families susceptible to EMS based on whether they were below the ED20, the egg thiamine concentration associated with 20% mortality due to EMS. The ED20s were 1.52, 2.63, and 2.99 nmol/g egg for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), respectively. Based on the proportion of fish having egg thiamine concentrations falling below the ED20, the risk of developing EMS in Lake Ontario was highest for lake trout, followed by coho (O. kisutch), and Chinook salmon, with the least risk for rainbow trout (O. mykiss). For lake trout from western Lake Ontario, mean egg thiamine concentration showed significant annual variability during 1994 to 2003, when the proportion of lake trout at risk of developing EMS based on ED20 ranged between 77 and 100%. Variation in the annual mean egg thiamine concentration for western Lake Ontario lake trout was positively related (p < 0.001, r2 = 0.94) with indices of annual adult alewife biomass. While suggesting the possible involvement of density-dependent changes in alewives, the changes are small relative to egg thiamine concentrations when alewife are not part of the diet and are of insufficient magnitude to allow for natural reproduction by lake trout.

  8. Cardiac structural changes and electrical remodeling in a thiamine-deficiency model in rats.

    PubMed

    Roman-Campos, D; Campos, A C; Gioda, C R; Campos, P P; Medeiros, M A A; Cruz, J S

    2009-06-05

    Thiamine is an important cofactor present in many biochemical reactions, and its deprivation can lead to heart dysfunction. Little is known about the influence of thiamine deprivation on the electrophysiological behavior of the isolated heart cells and information about thiamine deficiency in heart morphology is controversial. Thus, we decided to investigate the major repolarizing conductances and their influence in the action potential (AP) waveform as well as the changes in the heart structure in a set of thiamine deficiency in rats. Using the patch-clamp technique, we investigated inward (I(K1)) and outward K(+) currents (I(to)), T-type and L-type Ca(2+) currents and APs. To evaluate heart morphology we used hematoxylin and eosin in transversal heart sections. Thiamine deficiency caused a marked decrease in left ventricle thickness, cardiomyocyte number, cell length and width, and membrane capacitance. When evaluating I(to) we did not find difference in current amplitude; however an acceleration of I(to) inactivation was observed. I(K1) showed a reduction in the amplitude and slope conductance, which implicated a less negative resting membrane potential in cardiac myocytes isolated from thiamine-deficient rats. We did not find any difference in L-type Ca(2+) current density. T-type Ca(2+) current was not observed. In addition, we did not observe significant changes in AP repolarization. Based on our study we can conclude that thiamine deficiency causes heart hypotrophy and not heart hypertrophy. Moreover, we provided evidence that there is no major electrical remodeling during thiamine deficiency, a feature of heart failure models.

  9. Effect of blood thiamine concentrations on mortality: Influence of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto; Taddei, José Augusto de A C; Paes, Ângela Tavares

    2018-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that low blood thiamine concentrations in malnourished critically ill children are associated with higher risk of 30-d mortality. Prospective cohort study in 202 consecutively admitted children who had whole blood thiamine concentrations assessed on admission and on days 5 and 10 of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. The primary outcome variable was 30-d mortality. Mean blood thiamine concentrations within the first 10 d of ICU stay, age, sex, malnutrition, C-reactive protein concentration, Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, and severe sepsis/septic shock were the main potential exposure variables for outcome. Thiamine deficiency was detected in 61 patients within the first 10 d of ICU stay, 57 cases being diagnosed on admission and 4 new cases on the 5th d. C-reactive protein concentration during ICU stay was independently associated with decreased blood thiamine concentrations (P = 0.003). There was a significant statistical interaction between mean blood thiamine concentrations and malnutrition on the risk of 30-d mortality (P = 0.002). In an adjusted analysis, mean blood thiamine concentrations were associated with a decrease in the mortality risk in malnourished patients (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73-0.98; P = 0.029), whereas no effect was noted for well-nourished patients (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.94-1.13; P = 0.46). Blood thiamine concentration probably has a protective effect on the risk of 30-d mortality in malnourished patients but not in those who were well nourished. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Arabidopsis TH2 Encodes the Orphan Enzyme Thiamin Monophosphate Phosphatase[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Gidda, Satinder K.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Anderson, Erin M.; Brown, Greg; Yakunin, Alexander F.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), plants must first hydrolyze thiamin monophosphate (ThMP) to thiamin, but dedicated enzymes for this hydrolysis step were unknown and widely doubted to exist. The classical thiamin-requiring th2-1 mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was shown to reduce ThDP levels by half and to increase ThMP levels 5-fold, implying that the THIAMIN REQUIRING2 (TH2) gene product could be a dedicated ThMP phosphatase. Genomic and transcriptomic data indicated that TH2 corresponds to At5g32470, encoding a HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) family phosphatase fused to a TenA (thiamin salvage) family protein. Like the th2-1 mutant, an insertional mutant of At5g32470 accumulated ThMP, and the thiamin requirement of the th2-1 mutant was complemented by wild-type At5g32470. Complementation tests in Escherichia coli and enzyme assays with recombinant proteins confirmed that At5g32470 and its maize (Zea mays) orthologs GRMZM2G148896 and GRMZM2G078283 are ThMP-selective phosphatases whose activity resides in the HAD domain and that the At5g32470 TenA domain has the expected thiamin salvage activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that alternative translation start sites direct the At5g32470 protein to the cytosol and potentially also to mitochondria. Our findings establish that plants have a dedicated ThMP phosphatase and indicate that modest (50%) ThDP depletion can produce severe deficiency symptoms. PMID:27677881

  11. Population thiamine status and varying cancer rates between western, Asian and African countries.

    PubMed

    Boros, L G

    2000-01-01

    The role of food supplements in the form of vitamins has not been extensively investigated in relation to varying cancer rates between populations of different geographical regions. New data indicate that thiamine (vitamin B1), a common food supplement in Western food products, is directly involved in nucleic acid ribose synthesis of tumor cells in its biologically activated form through the non-oxidative transketolase catalyzed pentose cycle reaction. Whether thiamine plays a role in increased cancer rates in the Western World by enhancing tumor cell proliferation, while increased consumption of thiaminase rich food limiting thiamine availability protects against common malignancies in Asia and Africa has not been evaluated. In the Western World, thiamine is a popular vitamin supplement in the form of tablets and it is also added to basic food items such as milled flour, cereals, peanut butter, refreshment drinks and pastas. On the contrary, thiaminase, the natural thiamine-degrading enzyme, is abundantly present in raw and fermented fish, certain vegetables and roasted insects consumed primarily in Africa and Asia. Excess thiamine supplementation in common food products may contribute to the increased cancer rates of the Western World.

  12. Detection of vitamin b1 (thiamine) using modified carbon paste electrodes with polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppariqoh, N. M.; Wahyuni, W. T.; Putra, B. R.

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) is oxidized in alkaline medium and can be detected by cyclic voltammetry technique using carbon paste electrode (CPE) as a working electrode. polypyrrole-modified CPE were used in this study to increase sensitivity and selectivity measurement of thiamine. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) of the modified CPE was prepared through electrodeposition of pyrrole. Measurement of thiamine performed in KCl 0.05 M (pH 10, tris buffer) using CPE and the modified CPE gave an optimum condition anodic current of thiamine at 0.3 V, potential range (-1.6_1 V), and scan rate of 100 mV/s. Measurement of thiamine using polypyrrole modified CPE (CPE-MIPpy) showed better result than CPE itself with detection limit of 6.9×10-5 M and quantitation limit 2.1×10-4 M. CPE-MIPpy is selective to vita min B1. In conclusion, CPE-MIPpy as a working electrode showed better performance of thiamine measurement than that of CPE.

  13. Biochemical changes correlated with blood thiamine and its phosphate esters levels in patients with diabetes type 1 (DMT1)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Alharbi, Mohammed; Wani, Kaiser; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Sheshah, Eman; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential enzyme cofactor in most organisms required at several stages of anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism. However, little is known on the positive effects of thiamine in diabetic type 1 (DMT1) patients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the biochemical changes related to thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 outcomes among Saudi adults. We hypothesized that blood thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 manifestations might lead to an increase in metabolic syndrome. A total of 77 patients with DMT1 (age 35.8±5.5) and 81 controls (age 45.0±18.1) (total N = 158) were randomly selected from the Riyadh Cohort Study for inclusion. Saudi adults with diabetes type 1, a significant decrease in systolic (P < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.008) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.02). Moreover, cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides were significantly increased (P 0.001, 0.001 and 0.008, respectively) in patients with diabetes type 1 compared to controls. On the other hand, HDL, TMP, TDP and thiamine, were significantly decreased in patients with diabetes type 1 (P 0.005, 0.002, 0.005, and 0.002), respectively. A strong association between blood thiamine level and diabetes type 1 was detected in our study population. The results confirmed the role of thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters, in preventing metabolic changes and complications of diabetes type 1. The levels of these thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters were correlated with diabetes related biomarkers including HDL, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, as well as microalbuminuria, LDL and urine thiamine. The results support a pivotal role of blood thiamine and its phosphate esters in preventing the biochemical changes and complications in patients with DMT1. PMID:26722561

  14. Biochemical changes correlated with blood thiamine and its phosphate esters levels in patients with diabetes type 1 (DMT1).

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Alharbi, Mohammed; Wani, Kaiser; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Sheshah, Eman; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential enzyme cofactor in most organisms required at several stages of anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism. However, little is known on the positive effects of thiamine in diabetic type 1 (DMT1) patients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the biochemical changes related to thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 outcomes among Saudi adults. We hypothesized that blood thiamine deficiency in patients with DMT1 manifestations might lead to an increase in metabolic syndrome. A total of 77 patients with DMT1 (age 35.8 ± 5.5) and 81 controls (age 45.0 ± 18.1) (total N = 158) were randomly selected from the Riyadh Cohort Study for inclusion. Saudi adults with diabetes type 1, a significant decrease in systolic (P < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.008) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.02). Moreover, cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides were significantly increased (P 0.001, 0.001 and 0.008, respectively) in patients with diabetes type 1 compared to controls. On the other hand, HDL, TMP, TDP and thiamine, were significantly decreased in patients with diabetes type 1 (P 0.005, 0.002, 0.005, and 0.002), respectively. A strong association between blood thiamine level and diabetes type 1 was detected in our study population. The results confirmed the role of thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters, in preventing metabolic changes and complications of diabetes type 1. The levels of these thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters were correlated with diabetes related biomarkers including HDL, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, as well as microalbuminuria, LDL and urine thiamine. The results support a pivotal role of blood thiamine and its phosphate esters in preventing the biochemical changes and complications in patients with DMT1.

  15. Evidence for altered thiamine metabolism in diabetes: Is there a potential to oppose gluco- and lipotoxicity by rational supplementation?

    PubMed Central

    Pácal, Lukáš; Kuricová, Katarína; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Growing prevalence of diabetes (type 2 as well as type 1) and its related morbidity due to vascular complications creates a large burden on medical care worldwide. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of chronic micro-, macro- and avascular complications mediated by hyperglycemia is of crucial importance since novel therapeutic targets can be identified and tested. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and published data suggest that thiamine metabolism in diabetes is deficient. This review aims to point out the physiological role of thiamine in metabolism of glucose and amino acids, to present overview of thiamine metabolism and to describe the consequences of thiamine deficiency (either clinically manifest or latent). Furthermore, we want to explain why thiamine demands are increased in diabetes and to summarise data indicating thiamine mishandling in diabetics (by review of the studies mapping the prevalence and the degree of thiamine deficiency in diabetics). Finally, we would like to summarise the evidence for the beneficial effect of thiamine supplementation in progression of hyperglycemia-related pathology and, therefore, to justify its importance in determining the harmful impact of hyperglycemia in diabetes. Based on the data presented it could be concluded that although experimental studies mostly resulted in beneficial effects, clinical studies of appropriate size and duration focusing on the effect of thiamine supplementation/therapy on hard endpoints are missing at present. Moreover, it is not currently clear which mechanisms contribute to the deficient action of thiamine in diabetes most. Experimental studies on the molecular mechanisms of thiamine deficiency in diabetes are critically needed before clear answer to diabetes community could be given. PMID:24936250

  16. Intravenous thiamine is associated with increased oxygen consumption in critically ill patients with preserved cardiac index.

    PubMed

    Berg, Katherine M; Gautam, Shiva; Salciccioli, Justin D; Giberson, Tyler; Saindon, Brian; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen consumption may be impaired in critically ill patients. To evaluate the effect of intravenous thiamine on oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]o2) in critically ill patients. This was a small, exploratory open-label pilot study conducted in the intensive care units at a tertiary care medical center. Critically ill adults requiring mechanical ventilation were screened for enrollment. Oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]o2) and cardiac index (CI) were recorded continuously for 9 hours. After 3 hours of baseline data collection, 200 mg of intravenous thiamine was administered. The outcome was change in [Formula: see text]o2 after thiamine administration. Twenty patients were enrolled and 3 were excluded because of incomplete [Formula: see text]o2 data, leaving 17 patients for analysis. There was a trend toward increase in [Formula: see text]o2 after thiamine administration (16.3 ml/min, SE 8.5; P = 0.052). After preplanned adjustment for changes in CI in case of a delivery-dependent state in some patients (with exclusion of one additional patient because of missing CI data), this became statistically significant (16.9 ml/min, SE 8.6; P = 0.047). In patients with average CI greater than our cohort's mean value of 3 L/min/m(2), [Formula: see text]o2 increased by 70.9 ml/min (±16; P < 0.0001) after thiamine. Thiamine had no effect in patients with reduced CI (< 2.4 L/min/m(2)). There was no association between initial thiamine level and change in [Formula: see text]o2 after thiamine administration. The administration of a single dose of thiamine was associated with a trend toward increase in [Formula: see text]o2 in critically ill patients. There was a significant increase in [Formula: see text]o2 in those patients with preserved or elevated CI. Further study is needed to better characterize the role of thiamine in oxygen extraction. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01462279).

  17. Increasing thiamine concentrations in lake trout eggs from Lakes Huron and Michigan coincide with low alewife abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Rinchard, Jacques; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Evans, Allison N.; Begnoche, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in the Laurentian Great Lakes suffer from thiamine deficiency as a result of adult lake trout consuming prey containing thiaminase, a thiamine-degrading enzyme. Sufficiently low egg thiamine concentrations result in direct mortality of or sublethal effects on newly hatched lake trout fry. To determine the prevalence and severity of low thiamine in lake trout eggs, we monitored thiamine concentrations in lake trout eggs from 15 sites in Lakes Huron and Michigan from 2001 to 2009. Lake trout egg thiamine concentrations at most sites in both lakes were initially low and increased over time at 11 of 15 sites, and the proportion of females with egg thiamine concentrations lower than the recommended management objective of 4 nmol/g decreased over time at eight sites. Egg thiamine concentrations at five of six sites in Lakes Huron and Michigan were significantly inversely related to site-specific estimates of mean abundance of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus, and successful natural reproduction of lake trout has been observed in Lake Huron since the alewife population crashed. These results support the hypothesis that low egg thiamine in Great Lakes lake trout is associated with increased alewife abundance and that low alewife abundance may currently be a prerequisite for successful reproduction by lake trout in the Great Lakes.

  18. Asymmetric Stetter reactions catalyzed by thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kasparyan, Elena; Richter, Michael; Dresen, Carola; Walter, Lydia S; Fuchs, Georg; Leeper, Finian J; Wacker, Tobias; Andrade, Susana L A; Kolter, Geraldine; Pohl, Martina; Müller, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The intermolecular asymmetric Stetter reaction is an almost unexplored transformation for biocatalysts. Previously reported thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent PigD from Serratia marcescens is the first enzyme identified to catalyze the Stetter reaction of α,β-unsaturated ketones (Michael acceptor substrates) and α-keto acids. PigD is involved in the biosynthesis of the potent cytotoxic agent prodigiosin. Here, we describe the investigation of two new ThDP-dependent enzymes, SeAAS from Saccharopolyspora erythraea and HapD from Hahella chejuensis. Both show a high degree of homology to the amino acid sequence of PigD (39 and 51 %, respectively). The new enzymes were heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, and the yield of soluble protein was enhanced by co-expression of the chaperone genes groEL/ES. SeAAS and HapD catalyze intermolecular Stetter reactions in vitro with high enantioselectivity. The enzymes possess a characteristic substrate range with respect to Michael acceptor substrates. This provides support for a new type of ThDP-dependent enzymatic activity, which is abundant in various species and not restricted to prodigiosin biosynthesis in different strains. Moreover, PigD, SeAAS, and HapD are also able to catalyze asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation reactions of aldehydes and α-keto acids, resulting in 2-hydroxy ketones.

  19. Gizzard shad thiaminase activity and its effect on the thiamine status of captive American alligators Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Ross, J Perran; Honeyfield, Dale C; Brown, Scott B; Brown, Lisa R; Waddle, Amanda Rice; Welker, Michael E; Schoeb, Trenton R

    2009-12-01

    Adult mortality and low egg hatch rate were observed among American alligators Alligator mississippiensis in Lake Griffin, Florida, between 1998 and 2003. Previous studies show that the alligator mortality is due to neurological impairment associated with thiamine (vitamin Bt) deficiency. This study determined the rate of thiaminase activity in gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum, a fish often eaten by alligators, and examined the thiamine status of captive adult alligators fed only gizzard shad. We found that the thiaminase activity of gizzard shad in Lake Griffin is 16,409 +/- 2,121 pmol/g/min (mean +/- 2SEs). This high rate of thiaminase activity was present in most months and across a wide range of shad sizes. Seven alligators were captured in the wild from Lake Griffin and Lake Woodruff, held in captivity, and fed gizzard shad. We monitored blood and muscle thiamine levels throughout the experiment and liver thiamine at the end. Over a period of 6-12 months, all of the alligators maintained weight but blood and muscle thiamine levels decreased to 25-50% of the original (healthy) values. Three animals with the greatest reduction in thiamine died, demonstrating mobility impairment and neural histopathology similar to those seen in wild alligators in Lake Griffin. Two alligators were fed shad for 10 months but then treated with thiamine. These animals showed a reduction in thiamine while eating shad, but treatment restored their thiamine levels to the initial values, which were comparable to those of normal wild Lake Griffin alligators. We demonstrated that thiamine deficiency can be induced by a diet of gizzard shad and cause neurological signs and death in alligators in captivity. We conclude that the thiaminase activity in gizzard shad is high enough to cause thiamine deficiency in wild alligators when shad are a major part of their diet.

  20. Perinatal Consumption of Thiamine-Fortified Fish Sauce in Rural Cambodia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Kyly C; Karakochuk, Crystal D; Kroeun, Hou; Hampel, Daniela; Sokhoing, Ly; Chan, Benny B; Borath, Mam; Sophonneary, Prak; McLean, Judy; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Lynd, Larry D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Kitts, David D; Allen, Lindsay H; Green, Timothy J

    2016-10-03

    Infantile beriberi, a potentially fatal disease caused by thiamine deficiency, remains a public health concern in Cambodia and regions where thiamine-poor white rice is a staple food. Low maternal thiamine intake reduces breast milk thiamine concentrations, placing breastfed infants at risk of beriberi. To determine if consumption of thiamine-fortified fish sauce yields higher erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate concentrations (eTDP) among lactating women and newborn infants and higher breast milk thiamine concentrations compared with a control sauce. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 90 pregnant women were recruited in the Prey Veng province, Cambodia. The study took place between October 2014 and April 2015. Women were randomized to 1 of 3 groups (n = 30) for ad libitum fish sauce consumption for 6 months: control (no thiamine), low-concentration (2 g/L), or high-concentration (8 g/L) fish sauce. Maternal eTDP was assessed at baseline (October 2014) and endline (April 2015). Secondary outcomes, breast milk thiamine concentration and infant eTDP, were measured at endline. Women's mean (SD) age and gestational stage were 26 (5) years and 23 (7) weeks, respectively. April 2015 eTDP was measured among 28 women (93%), 29 women (97%), and 23 women (77%) in the control, low-concentration, and high-concentration groups, respectively. In modified intent-to-treat analysis, mean baseline-adjusted endline eTDP was higher among women in the low-concentration (282nM; 95% CI, 235nM to 310nM) and high-concentration (254nM; 95% CI, 225nM to 284nM) groups compared with the control group (193nM; 95% CI, 164nM to 222M; P < .05); low-concentration and high-concentration groups did not differ (P = .19). Breast milk total thiamine concentrations were 14.4 μg/dL for the control group (95% CI, 12.3 μg/dL to 16.5 μg/dL) (to convert to nanomoles per liter, multiply by 29.6); 20.7 μg/dL for the low-concentration group (95% CI, 18.6 μg/dL to 22.7 μg/dL ); and 17

  1. Serum thiamine concentration and oxidative stress as predictors of mortality in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Costa, Nara Aline; Gut, Ana Lúcia; de Souza Dorna, Mariana; Pimentel, José Alexandre Coelho; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato; Azevedo, Paula Schmidt; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Zornoff, Leonardo Antonio Mamede; de Paiva, Sergio Alberto Rupp; Minicucci, Marcos Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the influence of serum thiamine, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and serum protein carbonyl concentrations in hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. This prospective study included all patients with septic shock on admission or during intensive care unit (ICU) stay, older than 18 years, admitted to 1 of the 3 ICUs of the Botucatu Medical School, from January to August 2012. Demographic information, clinical evaluation, and blood sample were taken within the first 72 hours of the patient's admission or within 72 hours after septic shock diagnosis for serum thiamine, GPx activity, and protein carbonyl determination. One hundred eight consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.5 ± 16.0 years, 63% were male, 54.6% died in the ICU, and 71.3% had thiamine deficiency. Thiamine was not associated with oxidative stress. Neither vitamin B1 levels nor the GPx activity was associated with outcomes in these patients. However, protein carbonyl concentration was associated with increased mortality. In patients with septic shock, oxidative stress was associated with mortality. On the other hand, thiamine was not associated with oxidative stress or mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Presumed primary thiamine deficiency in a young African lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    DiGesualdo, Cynthia L; Hoover, John P; Lorenz, Michael D

    2005-09-01

    A 1-yr-old intact male African lion (Panthera leo) fed only beef muscle meat was evaluated for episodes of hypermetric ataxia, generalized weakness and tonic-clonic front limb movements. A hemogram, biochemical profile, blood lead, electrocardiogram, survey radiographs, and brain computed tomography were normal. Cerebral spinal fluid analyses suggested mild inflammation. Acetylcholine receptor antibody and serologic tests for all infectious agents tested were negative. Clinical signs resolved completely 9 days after instituting oral thiamine (3 mg/kg/day) and a completely nutritional diet. This lion's pretreatment thiamine blood value (11 nmol/L) was markedly lower than that of a healthy lion (191 nmol/L) and a proposed reference range for adult African lions (160-350 nmol/L). The lion remained clinically normal 2 yr later when his blood thiamine value was 340 nmol/L. African lions can develop clinical primary thiamine deficiency and may respond favorably when thiamine treatment and adequate diet are instituted prior to irreversible neuronal necrosis.

  3. A thiamin-utilizing ribozyme decarboxylates a pyruvate-like substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernak, Paul; Sen, Dipankar

    2013-11-01

    Vitamins are hypothesized to be relics of an RNA world, and were probably participants in RNA-mediated primordial metabolism. If catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, could harness vitamin cofactors to aid their function in a manner similar to protein enzymes, it would enable them to catalyse a much larger set of chemical reactions. The cofactor thiamin diphosphate, a derivative of vitamin B1 (thiamin), is used by enzymes to catalyse difficult metabolic reactions, including decarboxylation of stable α-keto acids such as pyruvate. Here, we report a ribozyme that uses free thiamin to decarboxylate a pyruvate-based suicide substrate (LnkPB). Thiamin conjugated to biotin was used to isolate catalytic individuals from a pool of random-sequence RNAs attached to LnkPB. Analysis of a stable guanosine adduct obtained via digestion of an RNA sequence (clone dc4) showed the expected decarboxylation product. The discovery of a prototypic thiamin-utilizing ribozyme has implications for the role of RNA in orchestrating early metabolic cycles.

  4. Abnormal Thiamine-Dependent Processes in Alzheimer’s Disease. Lessons from Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Jordan, Barry D.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. PMID:22982063

  5. Screening of a thiamine-auxotrophic yeast for alpha-ketoglutaric acid overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwen; Zhou, Haiyan; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2010-09-01

    To obtain a thiamine-auxotrophic yeast strain that overproduces alpha-ketoglutaric acid (alpha-KG) from glycerol and to investigate nutrient effects on alpha-KG production. Yeast strain WSH-Z06, a thiamine auxotroph that gave high yields of alpha-KG from glycerol, was obtained by screening for ampicillin/kanamycin resistance and thiamine auxotrophy. The strain was identified as Yarrowia lipolytica based on physiological, chemical, and phylogenetic analysis. The ability of the strain to convert glycerol to alpha-KG was analysed by investigating the effects of nutritional factors, including thiamine, riboflavin, nitrogen sources, and calcium ion. Thiamine and calcium ion concentration had the greatest effect on alpha-KG accumulation. Under optimal conditions, a yield of 39.2 g l(-1)alpha-KG was obtained from 100 g l(-1) glycerol, with 16.84 g l(-1) pyruvate as a by-product. The current work provides a method for screening for an alpha-KG overproducer. Nutrients have a significant impact on alpha-KG production in the yeast strain presented here. The alpha-KG-overproducing yeast strain Y. lipolytica WSH-Z06 is a promising parent strain for further metabolic engineering to lower by-product accumulation and accelerate glycerol utilization.

  6. A Large Outbreak of Thiamine Deficiency Among Illegal Gold Miners in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Mosnier, Emilie; Niemetzky, Florence; Stroot, Juliette; de Santi, Vincent Pommier; Brousse, Paul; Guarmit, Basma; Blanchet, Denis; Ville, Muriel; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Felix; Nacher, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    From September 2013 to July 2014, several gold miners working in the tropical forest consulted the Maripasoula Health Center in French Guiana for edema and findings consistent with right-sided cardiac failure. Of the 42 cases of beriberi that were diagnosed, one patient died. The laboratory and clinical investigation demonstrated vitamin B1 deficiency in most of the patients tested. Furthermore, 30 of 42 patients responded favorably to 500 mg of intravenous or intramuscular thiamine supplementation. In addition, dietary investigation showed insufficient thiamine intake in these patients. We concluded that patients had acquired beriberi because of diet restrictions, hard labor, and infectious diseases, notably malaria. In 2016, cases were still being reported. We recommend screening for compatible symptoms in gold miners, thiamine supplementation, and nutritional intervention. PMID:28500804

  7. Complete recovery from undertreated Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following aggressive thiamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Tzavellas, Elias; Karaiskos, Dimitris; Kouzoupis, Anastasios; Liappas, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a neuropsychiatric condition which results from thiamine deficiency, most commonly due to alcohol abuse. The prognosis of WKS is poor and its outcome depends mainly on prompt treatment. A 52-year-old male with a ten-year history of heavy alcohol abuse was admitted in hospital and treated for WKS. Ataxic and oculomotor symptoms promptly reversed following standard treatment but no change was observed in higher mental functioning. Although the protracted WK symptoms made the patient's improvement unlikely, aggressive treatment with thiamine (600 mg/day orally and 300 mg/day intramuscularly) fully reversed the condition within two months. Even though prolongation of undertreatment of WKS typically precludes significant improvement of symptoms due to irreversible damage of the brain, at least in some cases, higher thiamine doses (over 500 mg/day) for a longer period (at least three months) than usually recommended should be tried.

  8. Relationship between thiamine and subacute ruminal acidosis induced by a high-grain diet in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pan, X H; Yang, L; Xue, F G; Xin, H R; Jiang, L S; Xiong, B H; Beckers, Y

    2016-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to reveal the effects of grain-induced subacute rumen acidosis (SARA) on thiamine status in blood and rumen fluid in dairy cows. In both experiments, 6 multiparous, rumen-fistulated Holstein dairy cows were used in a 2-treatment, 2-period crossover design. Each experimental period consisted of 21d (total of 42d). Experiment 1 was to investigate the effects of SARA on thiamine status in blood and rumen fluid. Treatments were either control (20% starch, dry matter basis) or SARA-inducing diet (SAID, 33.2% starch, dry matter basis). In experiment 2, the effects of dietary thiamine supplementation on attenuating SARA and ruminal fermentation characteristics in dairy cows were studied. All cows received the same SAID diet during the whole experimental period; treatments were with or without thiamine (180mg of thiamine/kg of dry matter intake). In both experiments, rumen fluid samples were collected at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12h after morning feeding on d 21 and 42 of the experiments for measurement of pH, thiamine, volatile fatty acid, and lactate contents. Peripheral blood was also collected at 3h after morning feeding on d 21 and 42 to measure thiamine, carbohydrate metabolites, and enzyme activities. In experiment 1, cows fed the SAID diet had lower ruminal and plasma thiamine concentrations and higher lactate than cows fed the control diet. The ruminal thiamine contents were positively related to pH and the concentrations of acetate in the rumen, and negatively correlated with the lactate contents. Experiment 2 demonstrated that ruminal pH and the concentrations of thiamine, acetate, and total volatile fatty acids in the rumen were increased, whereas ruminal lactate contents were reduced by thiamine supplementation. The concentrations of lactate and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in blood were reduced in the thiamine supplemented group, and the opposite was true for the nonesterified fatty acids and α-ketoneglutarate dehydrogenase

  9. Prevention of delirium in trauma patients: Are we giving thiamine prophylaxis a fair chance?

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Christopher; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Niven, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Ball, Chad G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in injured patients. Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is delirium linked to malnutrition and chronic alcoholism. It is prevented with administration of thiamine. Our primary goal was to evaluate current blood alcohol level (BAL) testing and thiamine prophylaxis in severely injured patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 1000 consecutive severely injured patients admitted to hospital between Mar. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2009. We used the patients’ medical records and the Alberta Trauma Registry. Results Among 1000 patients (mean age 48 yr, male sex 70%, mean injury severity score 23, mortality 10%), 627 underwent BAL testing at admission; 221 (35%) had a BAL greater than 0 mmol/L, and 189 (30%) had a BAL above the legal limit of 17.4 mmol/L. The mean positive BAL was 41.9 mmol/L. More than 4% had a known history of alcohol abuse. More patients were assaulted (20% v. 9%) or hit by motor vehicles (10% v. 6%) when intoxicated (both p < 0.05). Most injuries occurred after falls (37%) and motor vehicle collisions (33%). Overall, 17% of patients received thiamine prophylaxis. Of the 221 patients with elevated BAL, 44% received thiamine prophylaxis. Of those with a history of alcohol abuse, 77% received thiamine prophylaxis. Conclusion Despite the strong link between alcohol abuse, trauma and WE, more than one-third of patients were not screened for alcohol use. Furthermore, a minority of intoxicated patients received adequate prophylaxis against WE. Given the low risk and cost of BAL testing and thiamine prophylaxis and the high cost of delirium, standard protocols for prophylaxis are essential. PMID:24666443

  10. Can long-term thiamine treatment improve the clinical outcomes of myotonic dystrophy type 1?

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonio; Trevi, Erika; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Fancellu, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1, also known as Steinert's disease, is an autosomal dominant disorder with multisystemic clinical features affecting the skeletal and cardiac muscles, the eyes, and the endocrine system. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is a cofactor of fundamental enzymes involved in the energetic cell metabolism; recent studies described its role in oxidative stress, protein processing, peroxisomal function, and gene expression. Thiamine deficiency is critical mainly in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in the muscular cells. Our aim was to investigate the potential therapeutical effects of long-term treatment with thiamine in myotonic dystrophy type 1 in an observational open-label pilot study. We described two patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 treated with intramuscular thiamine 100 mg twice a week for 12 or 11 months. We evaluated the patients using the grading of muscle strength according to Medical Research Council (MRC), the Muscular Impairment Rating Scale (MIRS), and the Modified Barthel index. High-dose thiamine treatment was well tolerated and effective in improving the motor symptomatology, particularly the muscle strength evaluated with the MRC scale, and the patients' activities of daily living using the Modified Barthel Index. At the end of treatment, the MRC score was 5 in the proximal muscles and 2-4 in the distal muscles (the MRC score before the treatment was 3-4 and 1-3, respectively). The MIRS grade improved by 25% compared to baseline for both patients. In patient #1, the Modified Barthel Index improved by 44%, and in patient #2 by 29%. These findings suggest that clinical outcomes are improved by long-term thiamine treatment.

  11. Aminoimidazole Carboxamide Ribotide Exerts Opposing Effects on Thiamine Synthesis in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto, Jannell V.; Heitman, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Salmonella enterica, the thiamine biosynthetic intermediate 5-aminoimidazole ribotide (AIR) can be synthesized de novo independently of the early purine biosynthetic reactions. This secondary route to AIR synthesis is dependent on (i) 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) accumulation, (ii) a functional phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide (SAICAR) synthetase (PurC; EC 6.3.2.6), and (iii) methionine and lysine in the growth medium. Studies presented here show that AICAR is a direct precursor to AIR in vivo. PurC-dependent conversion of AICAR to AIR was recreated in vitro. Physiological studies showed that exogenous nutrients (e.g., methionine and lysine) antagonize the inhibitory effects of AICAR on the ThiC reaction and decreased the cellular thiamine requirement. Finally, genetic results identified multiple loci that impacted the effect of AICAR on thiamine synthesis and implicated cellular aspartate levels in AICAR-dependent AIR synthesis. Together, the data here clarify the mechanism that allows conditional growth of a strain lacking the first five biosynthetic enzymes, and they provide additional insights into the complexity of the metabolic network and its plasticity. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine is derived from aminoimidazole ribotide (AIR), an intermediate in purine biosynthesis. A previous study described conditions under which AIR synthesis is independent of purine biosynthesis. This work is an extension of that previous study and describes a new synthetic pathway to thiamine that depends on a novel thiamine precursor and a secondary activity of the biosynthetic enzyme PurC. These findings provide mechanistic details of redundancy in the synthesis of a metabolite that is essential for nucleotide and coenzyme biosynthesis. Metabolic modifications that allow the new pathway to function or enhance it are also described. PMID:26100042

  12. Effects of thiamine on reproduction of Atlantic salmon and a new hypothesis for their extirpation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H. George; Bowser, Paul R.; Wooster, Gregory A.; Wedge, Leslie R.; Hurst, Steven S.

    2000-01-01

    Previous researchers demonstrated that a mortality in fry (called Cayuga syndrome) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from Cayuga Lake (New York) was associated with low levels of thiamine. They reduced the mortality of fry by bathing or injecting fry with thiamine. We injected four to six gravid female Atlantic salmon with either physiological saline (PS) or PS plus thiamine (7 mg/kg weight) 14–23 d before eggs were stripped, fertilized, and incubated in individual lots. Chemical analyses showed that eggs from control and treated salmon contained 1.1 and 1.6 nmol thiamine/g, respectively. Thiamine injections had no significant effect on the percentage of eggs that hatched. Between 700 and 800 Celius degree-days postfertilization, control fry (saline) showed signs of Cayuga syndrome and a 45% incidence of mortality; in contrast, mortality was only 1.9% for fry that received thiamine. By 1,078 degree-days postfertilization, mean mortality of control fry was 98.6%, whereas that for thiamine-injected salmon was 2.1%. This study showed that thiamine injections of prespawning female salmon from Cayuga Lake increased thiamine content of their eggs and prevented the Cayuga syndrome and subsequent mortality of fry. Historically, overfishing, pollution, and building of dams and barriers to spawning migration were suggested as possible causes of the decline of the Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario and Cayuga Lake. Based on our findings and other reports, we suggest another possible contributing cause of the extirpation of landlocked Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario and some other inland waters of New York: The entrance of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus containing thiaminase, which induced thiamine deficiency in eggs and increased mortality in fry of the predatory salmon.

  13. The connection between maternal thiamine shortcoming and offspring cognitive damage and poverty perpetuation in underprivileged communities across the world.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fernando M V; Silva, Danielle Marra de Freitas; Doyle, Flavia Costa de Proença; Ribeiro, Angela Maria

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of cognitive, sensory-motor and social emotional functions depend on a proper development of the Central Nervous System (CNS). This set of functions, known as intelligence, allows a better adaptation to the environment. In the last decades, an increase in the average of intelligence has been reported. However, such an increase cannot be observed in an equivalent way in economically and social underprivileged regions. Children from those regions are in great risk of being affected by mental retardation or impaired cognitive development. In later life they will, probably, be unable to transform and improve themselves and their communities, perpetuating the poverty of the region. Therefore, knowledge of factors involved in CNS development is a matter of health closely related to social improvement. Malnutrition throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding is clearly identifiable as a cause of damage in CNS development. Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) is a micronutrient important to the growth and maturity of the CNS. Thiamine shortcoming may affect 50% of pregnant women. Thiamine function in cerebral development is still not well known. There is a gap in the literature regarding systematical research about the blood thiamine concentration throughout the periods of gestation and breastfeeding. These studies are relevant in populations with a high level of nutritional vulnerability, because in a follow up offspring cognitive exam they could reveal if the maternal thiamine deficiency is related to child CNS impairment. This paper introduce the hypothesis that thiamine shortcoming during pregnancy and breastfeeding is directly related to cognitive impairment of child. Data about the neurophysiological role of thiamine, consequences of its shortcoming in experimental models, populations under the risk of thiamine shortcoming are presented. The hypothesis that maternal thiamine shortcoming causes damage related to child cognitive development needs to be considered. Thus

  14. Study of pyruvate decarboxylase and thiamine kinase from brewer's yeast by SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, Sergei A.; Chernikevich, Ivan P.; Gachko, Gennedy A.; Kivach, Leonid N.; Strekal, Nataliya D.

    1993-06-01

    The Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectra of holopyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and thiamine kinase (ThK) adsorbed on silver electrode were obtained. In contrast to the Raman, the SERS spectrum of PDC contained no modes of tryptophan residues, it indicates a removal of this moiety from the surface. In the SERS spectrum of ThK the bands belonging to ligands bound to the protein were observed. A correlation between the SERS signal intensity and the enzymatic activity of the ThK separate fraction and found. The influence of amino acids on SERS spectra of thiamine (Th) was studied to determine the possible composition on microsurrounding of coenzyme.

  15. Perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses in rat dams.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2013-03-01

    The current study attempts to determine whether thiamine (B1 vitamin) deficiency and chronic alcohol-related thiamine-deficient (TD) status, disturb maternal behavior towards pups. During gestation and lactation, Wistar rat dams were exposed to the following treatments: (i) prenatal TD dams; (ii) perinatal TD dams; (iii) postnatal TD dams; (iv) 12% alcohol/water drinking mothers; (v) ad libitum control dams. Pair-feeding treatments controlled malnutrition related to thiamine deficiency; (vi) prenatal pair-fed (PF) dams; (vii) perinatal PF dams; (viii) postnatal PF dams and included also the control of alcohol consummation: (ix) PF saccharose dams. Dams were observed for gestation outcome and for apparent disorders of the maternal behavior related to the pups at parturition. From the nine experimental groups studied, only pre- and perinatal TD dams exhibited spontaneous abortion (33.36 and 41.66%, respectively) followed by pups-killing responses where, respectively, 4 dams/7 (57.14%) and 5 dams/7 (71.43%) showed disruption of maternal behavior and appearance of cannibalism towards pups which all were killed within 48 hours after parturition. Spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses were not observed in the dams of any other experimental group, suggesting that perinatal disturbances of hormonal factors underlay these maternal disorders. Previous studies reported that thiamine deficiency-induced degeneration of dopamine neurons may be related to mouse-killing aggression in rats. The present study suggests that perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced alteration of dopaminergic neurons in maternal brain could be a trigger factor of pup-killing responses. Central dopamine and oxytocin have been strongly associated with both the onset and maintenance of maternal behavior and the regulation of maternal aggressiveness as well. Our studies suggest that estrogen control oxytocin levels in brain structures of pregnancy-terminated rats via dopamine transmission. Thiamine

  16. Thiamine for prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in people who abuse alcohol.

    PubMed

    Day, Ed; Bentham, Peter W; Callaghan, Rhiannon; Kuruvilla, Tarun; George, Sanju

    2013-07-01

    Autopsy studies suggest that Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is not a rare disorder, particularly in individuals who abuse alcohol. Thiamine has been established as the treatment of choice for over 50 years, but uncertainty remains about appropriate dosage and duration. Current practice guidelines are based on case reports and clinical experience. This is an update of a review first published in 2004 and last updated in 2008. • To assess the efficacy of thiamine in preventing and treating the manifestations of WKS due to excess alcohol consumption. • To determine the optimum form, dose and duration of thiamine treatment for this indication. ALOIS, the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG), The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and LILACS were searched on 6 September 2012 using the term thiamine OR aneurine. ALOIS contains records from all major health care databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS) as well as from many trial databases and grey literature sources. Any randomised trials comparing thiamine with alternative interventions or comparing different thiamine regimens (varying in formulation, dose or duration of administration). All abstracts were independently inspected by two reviewers (ED and PWB), and relevant articles were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality using criteria provided in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Two studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria, but only one contained sufficient data for quantitative analysis. Ambrose (2001) randomly assigned participants (n = 107) to one of five doses of intramuscular thiamine and measured outcomes after 2 days of treatment. We compared the lowest dose (5 mg/day) with each of the other four doses. A significant difference favoured 200 mg/day compared with the 5-mg/day dose in determining the number of trials needed to meet inclusion criteria

  17. Thiamine primed defense provides reliable alternative to systemic fungicide carbendazim against sheath blight disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Bahuguna, Rajeev Nayan; Joshi, Rohit; Shukla, Alok; Pandey, Mayank; Kumar, J

    2012-08-01

    A novel pathogen defense strategy by thiamine priming was evaluated for its efficacy against sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani AG-1A, of rice and compared with that of systemic fungicide, carbendazim (BCM). Seeds of semidwarf, high yielding, basmati rice variety Vasumati were treated with thiamine (50 mM) and BCM (4 mM). The pot cultured plants were challenge inoculated with R. solani after 40 days of sowing and effect of thiamine and BCM on rice growth and yield traits was examined. Higher hydrogen peroxide content, total phenolics accumulation, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity under thiamine treatment displayed elevated level of systemic resistance, which was further augmented under challenging pathogen infection. High transcript level of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) validated mode of thiamine primed defense. Though minimum disease severity was observed under BCM treatment, thiamine produced comparable results, with 18.12 per cent lower efficacy. Along with fortifying defense components and minor influence on photosynthetic pigments and nitrate reductase (NR) activity, thiamine treatment significantly reduced pathogen-induced loss in photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence, NR activity and NR transcript level. Physiological traits affected under pathogen infection were found signatory for characterizing plant's response under disease and were detectable at early stage of infection. These findings provide a novel paradigm for developing alternative, environmentally safe strategies to control plant diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Thiamine retention as a function of thermal processing conditions: canned salmon].

    PubMed

    Quitral, V; Romero, N; Avila, L; Marín, M E; Nuñez, H; Simpson, R

    2006-03-01

    The present work studied the effect of different treatments at high temperatures on the nutritional properties of thiamine retention and color measurement experimentally. Canned salmon (Salmo salar) was processed under different temperatures and time conditions (110 degrees C for 135 minutes; 114 degrees C for 89 minutes; 118 degrees C for 69 minutes and 121 degrees C for 62 minutes). Thiamine was determined by HPLC before and after the process. Color changes, due to processing conditions, were also measured utilizing a Hunter colorimeter. The canning was prepared in 300 x 407 cans and sterilized until Fo value reached 6 min. The nutritional value or index represented by the B1 vitamin or thiamine was affected by high temperature and time exposition. The lowest loss of thiamine of 19.2% was obtained in the canned salmon sterilized at 114 degrees C for 89 minutes. The color in canned salmon was different from the raw material, with a severe loss of red color and a greater clarity of the meat.

  19. Thiamine content and thiaminase activity of ten freshwater stocks and one marine stock of alewives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, J.D.; Williston, B.; Zajicek, J.L.; Tillitt, D.E.; Brown, S.B.; Brown, L.R.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Warner, D.M.; Rudstam, L. G.; Pearsall, W.

    2005-01-01

    Alewives Alosa pseudoharengus contain thiaminase activity that has been implicated in the development of a thiamine deficiency and associated effects in salmonines of the Great Lakes basin. Little is known about the factors that regulate thiaminase activity in alewives. We sampled alewives of uniform size (60-120 mm) during the summer of 1998 from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, seven of New York's Finger Lakes, one inland lake in Ontario, and two Great Lakes to assess possible relationships among thiamine, lipid content, fish abundance, lake morphometry, lake productivity, freshwater residency, and thiaminase activity. Thiaminase activity varied significantly among the 11 locations but was unrelated to thiamine concentration, which did not vary significantly. Alewife thiaminase activity in the Finger Lakes was negatively related to lipid content and positively related to measures of lake size (e.g., area, volume, and maximum depth). Activity in the one marine stock sampled in the Gulf of St. Lawrence was comparable to the highest values observed in the 10 freshwater stocks examined. Variation in alewife thiaminase activity has the potential to affect the extent of a thiamine deficiency associated with salmonines who feed on alewives as well as the viability of their offspring.

  20. Thiamine deficiency induces oxidative stress and exacerbates the plaque pathology in Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Xu, Hui; Shi, Qingli; Chen, Lian H.; Pedrini, Steve; Pechman, David; Baker, Harriet; Beal, M. Flint; Gandy, Sam E.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and reductions in thiamine-dependent enzymes have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental thiamine deficiency (TD) is an established model for reducing the activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes in brain. TD diminishes thiamine dependent enzymes throughout the brain, but produces a time-dependent selective neuronal loss, glial activation, inflammation, abnormalities in oxidative metabolism and clusters of degenerating neurites in only specific thalamic regions. The present studies tested how TD alters brain pathology in Tg19959 transgenic mice over expressing a double mutant form of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). TD exacerbated amyloid plaque pathology in transgenic mice and enlarged the area occupied by plaques in cortex, hippocampus and thalamus by 50%, 200% and 200%, respectively. TD increased Aβ1–42 levels by about three-fold, β-CTF (C99) levels by 33% and β-secretase (BACE1) protein levels by 43%. TD induced inflammation in areas of plaque formation. Thus, the induction of mild impairment of oxidative metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by TD alters metabolism of APP and/or Aβ and promotes accumulation of plaques independent of neuron loss or neuritic clusters. PMID:18406011

  1. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Thiamine as a Metabolic Resuscitator in Septic Shock: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Tidswell, Mark; Giberson, Tyler; Wolfe, Richard; Moskowitz, Ari; Smithline, Howard; Ngo, Long; Cocchi, Michael N

    2016-02-01

    To determine if intravenous thiamine would reduce lactate in patients with septic shock. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Two US hospitals. Adult patients with septic shock and elevated (> 3 mmol/L) lactate between 2010 and 2014. Thiamine 200 mg or matching placebo twice daily for 7 days or until hospital discharge. The primary outcome was lactate levels 24 hours after the first study dose. Of 715 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 88 patients were enrolled and received study drug. There was no difference in the primary outcome of lactate levels at 24 hours after study start between the thiamine and placebo groups (median: 2.5 mmol/L [1.5, 3.4] vs. 2.6 mmol/L [1.6, 5.1], p = 0.40). There was no difference in secondary outcomes including time to shock reversal, severity of illness and mortality. 35% of the patients were thiamine deficient at baseline. In this predefined subgroup, those in the thiamine treatment group had statistically significantly lower lactate levels at 24 hours (median 2.1 mmol/L [1.4, 2.5] vs. 3.1 [1.9, 8.3], p = 0.03). There was a statistically significant decrease in mortality over time in those receiving thiamine in this subgroup (p = 0.047). Administration of thiamine did not improve lactate levels or other outcomes in the overall group of patients with septic shock and elevated lactate. In those with baseline thiamine deficiency, patients in the thiamine group had significantly lower lactate levels at 24 hours and a possible decrease in mortality over time.

  2. Dynamic Changes in Yeast Phosphatase Families Allow for Specialization in Phosphate and Thiamine Starvation.

    PubMed

    Nahas, John V; Iosue, Christine L; Shaik, Noor F; Selhorst, Kathleen; He, Bin Z; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2018-05-10

    Convergent evolution is often due to selective pressures generating a similar phenotype. We observe relatively recent duplications in a spectrum of Saccharomycetaceae yeast species resulting in multiple phosphatases that are regulated by different nutrient conditions - thiamine and phosphate starvation. This specialization is both transcriptional and at the level of phosphatase substrate specificity. In Candida glabrata , loss of the ancestral phosphatase family was compensated by the co-option of a different histidine phosphatase family with three paralogs. Using RNA-seq and functional assays, we identify one of these paralogs, CgPMU3 , as a thiamine phosphatase. We further determine that the 81% identical paralog CgPMU2 does not encode thiamine phosphatase activity; however, both are capable of cleaving the phosphatase substrate, 1-napthyl-phosphate. We functionally demonstrate that members of this family evolved novel enzymatic functions for phosphate and thiamine starvation, and are regulated transcriptionally by either nutrient condition, and observe similar trends in other yeast species. This independent, parallel evolution involving two different families of histidine phosphatases suggests that there were likely similar selective pressures on multiple yeast species to recycle thiamine and phosphate. In this work, we focused on duplication and specialization, but there is also repeated loss of phosphatases, indicating that the expansion and contraction of the phosphatase family is dynamic in many Ascomycetes. The dynamic evolution of the phosphatase gene families is perhaps just one example of how gene duplication, co-option, and transcriptional and functional specialization together allow species to adapt to their environment with existing genetic resources. Copyright © 2018, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  3. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Eachmore » protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.« less

  4. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed. © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Development of thiamine deficiencies and early mortality syndrome in lake trout by feeding experimental and feral fish diets containing thiaminase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Tillitt, D.E.; Zajicek, J.L.; Brown, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a laboratory investigation on the consequences of feeding predatory salmonids either experimental diets low in thiamine or diets containing alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. In experiment 1, adult lake trout Salvelinus namaycush were fed experimental diets containing bacterial thiaminase. In experiment 2, adult lake trout were fed natural prey species, alewives, and bloaters Coregonus hoyi. The diets consisted of four combinations of alewives and bloaters from Lake Michigan (100% alewives, 65% alewives–35% bloaters, 35% alewives–65% bloaters, and 100% bloaters), alewives from Cayuga Lake, a casein bacterial thiaminase, and a commercial trout diet. We assessed the effects of each diet on egg thiamine concentration and incidence of an embryonic early mortality syndrome (EMS). In experiment 1, incidence of EMS ranged from 0% to 100%. Significant relationships were found between the incidence of EMS and thiamine. In experiment 2, adult lake trout fed 100% alewives from either Lake Michigan or Cayuga Lake or fish fed the casein bacterial thiaminase diet produced eggs with low thiamine and swim-up fry with EMS. At either 35% or 65% alewives in the diet, egg thiamine was significantly lowered. The number of females that produced offspring that died from EMS were low but demonstrated the negative potential if feral lake trout foraged on either 35% or 65% alewives. Depleted egg thiamine and the onset of EMS required diets containing thiaminase for a minimum of 2 years in lake trout initially fully thiamine replete. We conclude that EMS can be caused by extensive feeding on 100% alewives and dietary levels of 35% or greater may prove detrimental to sustainable reproduction of salmonids in the Great Lakes. The data are consistent with that observed in feral lake trout, and it is concluded that EMS is the result of a thiamine deficiency.

  6. GC-MS analysis of the ruminal metabolome response to thiamine supplementation during high grain feeding in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fuguang; Pan, Xiaohua; Jiang, Linshu; Guo, Yuming; Xiong, Benhai

    2018-01-01

    Thiamine is known to attenuate high-concentrate diet induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in dairy cows, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The major objective of this study was to investigate the metabolic mechanisms of thiamine supplementation on high-concentrate diet induced SARA. Six multiparous, rumen-fistulated Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design. The treatments included a control diet (CON; 20% starch, dry matter basis), a SARA-inducing diet (SAID; 33.2% starch, dry matter basis) and SARA-inducing diet supplemented with 180 mg of thiamine/kg of dry matter intake (SAID + T). On d21 of each period, ruminal fluid samples were collected at 3 h post feeding, and GC/MS was used to analyze rumen fluid samples. PCA and OPLS-DA analysis demonstrated that the ruminal metabolite profile were different in three treatments. Compared with CON treatment, SAID feeding significantly decreased rumen pH, acetate, succinic acid, increased propionate, pyruvate, lactate, glycine and biogenic amines including spermidine and putrescine. Thiamine supplementation significantly decreased rumen content of propionate, pyruvate, lactate, glycine and spermidine; increase rumen pH, acetate and some medium-chain fatty acids. The enrichment analysis of different metabolites indicated that thiamine supplementation mainly affected carbohydrates, amino acids, pyruvate and thiamine metabolism compared with SAID treatment. These findings revealed that thiamine supplementation could attenuate high-concentrate diet induced SARA by increasing pyruvate formate-lyase activity to promote pyruvate to generate acetyl-CoA and inhibit lactate generation. Besides, thiamine reduced biogenic amines to alleviate ruminal epithelial inflammatory response.

  7. Thiamine and benfotiamine improve cognition and ameliorate GSK-3β-associated stress-induced behaviours in mice.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nataliia; Bazhenova, Nataliia; Anthony, Daniel C; Vignisse, Julie; Svistunov, Andrey; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Bettendorff, Lucien; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2017-04-03

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the brain has been implicated in the development of dementia and symptoms of depression. Indirect evidence suggests that thiamine may contribute to these pathologies by controlling the activities of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β. While decreased GSK-3β activity appears to impair memory, increased GSK-3β activity is associated with the distressed/depressed state. However, hitherto direct evidence for the effects of thiamine on GSK-3β function has not been reported. Here, we administered thiamine or, the more bioavailable precursor, benfotiamine at 200mg/kg/day for 2weeks to C57BL/6J mice, to determine whether treatment might affect behaviours that are known to be sensitive to GSK-3β activity and whether such administration impacts on GSK-3β expression within the brain. The mice were tested in models of contextual conditioning and extinction, a 5-day rat exposure stress test, and a modified swim test with repeated testing. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (7.5mg/kg/day), was administered as a positive control for the effects of thiamine or benfotiamine. As for imipramine, both compounds inhibited the upregulation of GSK-3β induced by predator stress or repeated swimming, and reduced floating scores and the predator stress-induced behavioural changes in anxiety and exploration. Coincident, thiamine and benfotiamine improved learning and extinction of contextual fear, and the acquisition of the step-down avoidance task. Our data indicate that thiamine and benfotiamine have antidepressant/anti-stress effects in naïve animals that are associated with reduced GSK-3β expression and conditioning of adverse memories. Thus thiamine and benfotiamine may modulate GSK-3β functions in a manner that is dependent on whether the contextual conditioning is adaptive or maladaptive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Limitation of thiamine pyrophosphate supply to growing Escherichia coli switches metabolism to efficient D-lactate formation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kangming; Niu, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoguang; Prior, Bernard A; Zhou, Li; Lu, Fuping; Singh, Suren; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Efficient production of D-lactate by engineered Escherichia coli entails balancing cell growth and product synthesis. To develop a metabolic switch to implement a desirable transition from cell growth to product fermentation, a thiamine auxotroph B0013-080A was constructed in a highly efficient D-lactate producer E. coli strain B0013-070. This was achieved by inactivation of thiE, a gene encoding a thiamine phosphate synthase for biosynthesis of thiamine monophosphate. The resultant mutant B0013-080A failed to grow on the medium in the absence of thiamine yet growth was restored when exogenous thiamine was provided. A linear relationship between cell mass formation and amount of thiamine supplemented was mathematically determined in a shake flask experiment and confirmed in a 7-L bioreactor system. This calculation revealed that ∼ 95-96 thiamine molecules per cell were required to satisfy cell growth. This relationship was employed to develop a novel fermentation process for D-lactate production by using thiamine as a limiting condition. A D-lactate productivity of 4.11 g · L(-1) · h(-1) from glycerol under microaerobic condition and 3.66 g · L(-1) · h(-1) from glucose under anaerobic condition was achieved which is 19.1% and 10.2% higher respectively than the parental strain. These results revealed a convenient and reliable method to control cell growth and improve D-lactate fermentation. This control strategy could be applied to other biotechnological processes that require optimal allocation of carbon between cell growth and product formation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Influence of diet of double-crested cormorants on thiamine, lead, and mineral contents of their eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H. George; Johnson, James H.; Adams, C.M.; Farquhar, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the Great Lakes basin, reproduction of several fish species is impaired by deficiency of thiamine in their eggs, an effect attributed to consumption of thiaminase-containing forage species, primarily alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus.) Because the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nesting on islands in Lake Ontario is known to consume considerable amounts of alewife, we examined cormorant food habits and measured thiamine content in eggs collected in 1999 from six separate nests of cormorants from colonies near Lake Ontario and contrasted them with food habits and eggs of cormorants from Oneida Lake where the alewife is rare. Thiamine concentrations in eggs varied between 4.31 and 11.24 nmoleslg with no significant (P>0.18) difference between mean concentrations for Lake Ontario and Oneida Lake (8.08 vs 8.36 nmoles/g) even though alewife comprised approximately 65 vs 0 % of their diets, respectively. Consumption of other thiaminase-containing species was minor in both lakes. Therefore, consumption of alewife and other thiaminase containing fishes by cormorants on Lake Ontario did not appear to significantly impair the levels of thiamine in their eggs. However, we found that the concentration of thiamine in eggs (T; nmoles/g) was inversely related (P<0.02) to lead (Pb) concentration (μg/g) according to the equation: T = −3.142 Pb + 16.25. This relationship may reflect the known ability of thiamine to chelate lead and increase its excretion.

  10. Influence of diet of double-crested cormorants on thiamine, lead, and mineral contents of their eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H.G.; Johnson, J. H.; Adams, C.M.; Farquhar, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the Great Lakes basin, reproduction of several fish species is impaired by deficiency of thiamine in their eggs, an effect attributed to consumption of thiaminase-containing forage species, primarily alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). Because the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nesting on islands in Lake Ontario is known to consume considerable amounts of alewife, we examined cormorant food habits and measured thiamine content in eggs collected in 1999 from six separate nests of cormorants from colonies near Lake Ontario and contrasted them with food habits and eggs of cormorants from Oneida Lake where the alewife is rare. Thiamine concentrations in eggs varied between 4.31 and 11.24 nmoles/g with no significant (P>0.18) difference between mean concentrations for Lake Ontario and Oneida Lake (8.08 vs 8.36 nmoles/g) even though alewife comprised approximately 65 vs 0 % of their diets, respectively. Consumption of other thiaminase-containing species was minor in both lakes. Therefore, consumption of alewife and other thiaminase containing fishes by cormorants on Lake Ontario did not appear to significantly impair the levels of thiamine in their eggs. However, we found that the concentration of thiamine in eggs (T; nmoles/g) was inversely related (P<0.02) to lead (Pb) concentration (µg/g) according to the equation: T = -3.142 Pb + 16.25. This relationship may reflect the known ability of thiamine to chelate lead and increase its excretion.

  11. Increasing consumption of breakfast cereal improves thiamine status in overweight/obese women following a hypocaloric diet.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rosa M; López-Sobaler, Ana M; Andrés, Pedro; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Bermejo, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the thiamine status in a group of young, overweight/obese women and to analyse the changes in this status produced by two weight-control programmes based on approximating the diet to the theoretical ideal, increasing the relative consumption of vegetables (V) or cereals (C) (especially breakfast cereals). The study subjects were 57 Spanish women with a body mass index (BMI) of 24-35 kg/m(2), all of whom were randomly assigned to one of two slightly hypocaloric diets. Dietetic, anthropometric and biochemical data were collected at the beginning of the study and at 2 and 6 weeks. C and V subjects showed a reduction in their energy intake, body weight and BMI, both at 2 and 6 weeks. Thiamine intake and blood thiamine levels only increased with diet C (both at 2 and 6 weeks). 21.8% cf the women, 21.8% had blood thiamine levels <150 nmol/L at the beginning of the study, but at 6 weeks of intervention only 3.7% of the women in diet C, as compared with 30.8% of the women in diet V, showed blood thiamine levels <150 nmol/L. Although both diet C and diet V induced weight loss and a reduction in BMI, diet C would appear to be more useful in the maintenance of an adequate thiamine status.

  12. Thiamin is decomposed due to Anaphe spp. entomophagy in seasonal ataxia patients in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nishimune, T; Watanabe, Y; Okazaki, H; Akai, H

    2000-06-01

    A fairly high activity of a relatively heat-resistant thiaminase was detected and characterized from the pupae of an African silkworm Anaphe spp. which had been the putative cause of a seasonal ataxia and impaired consciousness in Nigerians. The thiaminase in the buffer extract of Anaphe pupae was type I (thiamin: base 2-methyl-4-aminopyrimidine methyl transferase EC 2.5.1.2), and the optimal temperature and pH were 70 degrees C and 8.0-8.5, respectively. Based on gel filtration chromatography, the molecules were estimated to be 200 kDa. Second substrates which could be utilized by the thiaminase were pyridoxine, amino acids, glutathione, taurine and 4-aminopyridine. Thiamin phosphate esters were inactive as substrates. This is the first report describing an insect thiaminase. Our results indicate the necessity of thorough heat treatment for the detoxification of the African silkworm, making the worm a safe source of high-quality protein.

  13. PKR downregulation prevents neurodegeneration and β-amyloid production in a thiamine-deficient model.

    PubMed

    Mouton-Liger, F; Rebillat, A-S; Gourmaud, S; Paquet, C; Leguen, A; Dumurgier, J; Bernadelli, P; Taupin, V; Pradier, L; Rooney, T; Hugon, J

    2015-01-15

    Brain thiamine homeostasis has an important role in energy metabolism and displays reduced activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thiamine deficiency (TD) induces regionally specific neuronal death in the animal and human brains associated with a mild chronic impairment of oxidative metabolism. These features make the TD model amenable to investigate the cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Once activated by various cellular stresses, including oxidative stress, PKR acts as a pro-apoptotic kinase and negatively controls the protein translation leading to an increase of BACE1 translation. In this study, we used a mouse TD model to assess the involvement of PKR in neuronal death and the molecular mechanisms of AD. Our results showed that the TD model activates the PKR-eIF2α pathway, increases the BACE1 expression levels of Aβ in specific thalamus nuclei and induces motor deficits and neurodegeneration. These effects are reversed by PKR downregulation (using a specific inhibitor or in PKR knockout mice).

  14. PKR downregulation prevents neurodegeneration and β-amyloid production in a thiamine-deficient model

    PubMed Central

    Mouton-Liger, F; Rebillat, A-S; Gourmaud, S; Paquet, C; Leguen, A; Dumurgier, J; Bernadelli, P; Taupin, V; Pradier, L; Rooney, T; Hugon, J

    2015-01-01

    Brain thiamine homeostasis has an important role in energy metabolism and displays reduced activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thiamine deficiency (TD) induces regionally specific neuronal death in the animal and human brains associated with a mild chronic impairment of oxidative metabolism. These features make the TD model amenable to investigate the cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Once activated by various cellular stresses, including oxidative stress, PKR acts as a pro-apoptotic kinase and negatively controls the protein translation leading to an increase of BACE1 translation. In this study, we used a mouse TD model to assess the involvement of PKR in neuronal death and the molecular mechanisms of AD. Our results showed that the TD model activates the PKR-eIF2α pathway, increases the BACE1 expression levels of Aβ in specific thalamus nuclei and induces motor deficits and neurodegeneration. These effects are reversed by PKR downregulation (using a specific inhibitor or in PKR knockout mice). PMID:25590804

  15. The effect of subclinical infantile thiamine deficiency on motor function in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Harel, Yael; Zuk, Luba; Guindy, Michal; Nakar, Orly; Lotan, Dafna; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the long-term implications of infantile thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency on motor function in preschoolers who had been fed during the first 2 years of life with a faulty milk substitute. In this retrospective cohort study, 39 children aged 5-6 years who had been exposed to a thiamine-deficient formula during infancy were compared with 30 age-matched healthy children with unremarkable infant nutritional history. The motor function of the participants was evaluated with The Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) and the Zuk Assessment. Both evaluation tools revealed statistically significant differences between the exposed and unexposed groups for gross and fine motor development (p < .001, ball skills p = .01) and grapho-motor development (p = .004). The differences were especially noteworthy on M-ABC testing for balance control functioning (p < .001, OR 5.4; 95% CI 3.4-7.4) and fine motor skills (p < .001, OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-4.6). In the exposed group, both assessments concurred on the high rate of children exhibiting motor function difficulties in comparison to unexposed group (M-ABC: 56% vs. 10%, Zuk Assessment: 59% vs. 3%, p < .001). Thiamine deficiency in infancy has long-term implications on gross and fine motor function and balance skills in childhood, thiamine having a crucial role in normal motor development. The study emphasizes the importance of proper infant feeding and regulatory control of breast milk substitutes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: a novel SLC19A2 compound heterozygous mutation in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Melis, Daniela; Falco, Mariateresa; Fattorusso, Valentina; Taurisano, Roberta; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Franzese, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes. In some cases, optic atrophy or more rarely retinitis pigmentosa is noted. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, and macrocytic anemia. These features initially suggested a clinical diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome (WS). Therapy with thiamine was initiated which resulted in the resolution of the anemia. The younger sister, who was affected with sensorineural deafness, was referred to our hospital for non-autoimmune diabetes. She was found to have macrocytosis and ocular abnormalities. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started. Sequencing analysis of the SLC19A2 gene identified a compound heterozygous mutation p.Y81X/p.L457X (c.242insA/c.1370delT) in both sisters. Non-autoimmune diabetes associated with deafness and macrocytosis, without anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA. Patients clinically diagnosed with WS with anemia and/or macrocytosis should be reevaluated for TRMA. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Structural genes for thiamine biosynthetic enzymes (thiCEFGH) in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Vander Horn, P B; Backstrom, A D; Stewart, V; Begley, T P

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 synthesizes thiamine pyrophosphate (vitamin B1) de novo. Two precursors [4-methyl-5-(beta-hydroxyethyl)thiazole monophosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate] are coupled to form thiamine monophosphate, which is then phosphorylated to make thiamine pyrophosphate. Previous studies have identified two classes of thi mutations, clustered at 90 min on the genetic map, which result in requirements for the thiazole or the hydroxymethylpryimidine. We report here our initial molecular genetic analysis of the thi cluster. We cloned the thi cluster genes and examined their organization, structure, and function by a combination of phenotypic testing, complementation analysis, polypeptide expression, and DNA sequencing. We found five tightly linked genes, designated thiCEFGH. The thiC gene product is required for the synthesis of the hydroxymethylpyrimidine. The thiE, thiF, thiG, and thiH gene products are required for synthesis of the thiazole. These mutants did not respond to 1-deoxy-D-threo-2-pentulose, indicating that they are blocked in the conversion of this precursor compound to the thiazole itself. Images PMID:8432721

  18. Household Consumption of Thiamin-Fortified Fish Sauce Increases Erythrocyte Thiamin Concentrations among Rural Cambodian Women and Their Children Younger Than 5 Years of Age: A Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Kyly C; Karakochuk, Crystal D; Kroeun, Hou; Sokhoing, Ly; Chan, Benny B; Borath, Mam; Sophonneary, Prak; Moore, Kirsten; Tong, Jeffery K T; McLean, Judy; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Lynd, Larry D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Kitts, David D; Green, Tim J

    2017-02-01

    To assess whether ad libitum consumption of thiamin-fortified fish sauce over 6 months yields higher erythrocyte thiamin diphosphate concentrations (eTDP) among women of childbearing age and their children aged 12-59 months compared with control sauce containing no thiamin. In this double-blind, randomized controlled efficacy trial, 276 nonpregnant, nonlactating women (18-45 years of age) and their families in Prey Veng, Cambodia, were randomized to receive 1 of 3 fish sauce formulations: low thiamin concentration (low, 2 g/L), high thiamin concentration (high, 8 g/L), or a control (no thiamin) fish sauce. Baseline (t = 0) and endline (t = 6 months) eTDP were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. Fish sauce consumption did not differ between treatment groups (P = .19). In intent-to-treat analysis, women's baseline-adjusted endline eTDP (mean; 95% CI) was higher among women in the low (259; 245-274 nmol/L) and high (257; 237-276 nmol/L) groups compared with control (184; 169-198 nmol/L; P < .001); low and high groups did not differ (P = .83). Similarly, children's baseline-adjusted eTDP was higher in the low (259; 246-271 nmol/L) and high (257; 243-270 nmol/L) groups compared with control (213; 202-224 nmol/L; P < .001). Fortified fish sauce appears to be an efficacious means of improving biochemical thiamin status in nonpregnant, nonlactating women and their children (1-5 years of age) living in rural Cambodia. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02221063. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Downbeat nystagmus caused by thiamine deficiency: an unusual presentation of CNS localization of large cell anaplastic CD 30-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mulder, A H; Raemaekers, J M; Boerman, R H; Mattijssen, V

    1999-02-01

    A 24-year-old woman with a large cell anaplastic CD 30-positive T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) developed downbeat nystagmus, anisocoria, and oscillopsia. Prior to overt cerebral invasion by NHL, she had a thiamine deficiency with very low thiamine concentrations in the CSF, probably caused by protracted vomiting and increased vitamin B1 consumption by intrathecal tumor cells. We believe that her neurologic symptoms were caused -- at least partly -- by thiamine deficiency, as she reacted well to thiamine supplementation at the beginning of treatment.

  20. Thiamine preserves mitochondrial function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury, preventing inactivation of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Mkrtchyan, Garik V; Üçal, Muammer; Müllebner, Andrea; Dumitrescu, Sergiu; Kames, Martina; Moldzio, Rudolf; Molcanyi, Marek; Schaefer, Samuel; Weidinger, Adelheid; Schaefer, Ute; Hescheler, Juergen; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Redl, Heinz; Bunik, Victoria I; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2018-05-16

    Based on the fact that traumatic brain injury is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction we aimed at localization of mitochondrial defect and attempted to correct it by thiamine. Interventional controlled experimental animal study was used. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to lateral fluid percussion traumatic brain injury. Thiamine was administered 1 h prior to trauma; cortex was extracted for analysis 4 h and 3 d after trauma. Increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) by 4 h was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial respiration with glutamate but neither with pyruvate nor succinate. Assays of TCA cycle flux-limiting 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) and functionally linked enzymes (glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme) indicated that only OGDHC activity was decreased. Application of the OGDHC coenzyme precursor thiamine rescued the activity of OGDHC and restored mitochondrial respiration. These effects were not mediated by changes in the expression of the OGDHC sub-units (E1k and E3), suggesting post-translational mechanism of thiamine effects. By the third day after TBI, thiamine treatment also decreased expression of TNF-R1. Specific markers of unfolded protein response did not change in response to thiamine. Our data point to OGDHC as a major site of damage in mitochondria upon traumatic brain injury, which is associated with neuroinflammation and can be corrected by thiamine. Further studies are required to evaluate the pathological impact of these findings in clinical settings. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Linking egg thiamine and fatty acid concentrations of Lake Michigan lake trout with early life stage mortality.

    PubMed

    Czesny, Sergiusz; Dettmers, John M; Rinchard, Jacques; Dabrowski, Konrad

    2009-12-01

    The natural reproduction of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Michigan is thought to be compromised by nutritional deficiency associated with inadequate levels of thiamine (vitamin B1) in their eggs. However, mortality driven by thiamine deficiency (commonly referred to as early mortality syndrome [EMS]) is not the only significant cause of low lake trout survival at early life stages. In this study, we sought to better understand the combined effects of variable levels of thiamine and fatty acids in lake trout eggs on prehatch, posthatch, and swim-up-stage mortality. We sampled the eggs of 29 lake trout females from southwestern Lake Michigan. The concentrations of free thiamine and its vitamers (e.g., thiamine monophosphate [TMP] and thiamine pyrophosphate [TPP]) as well as fatty acid profiles were determined in sampled eggs. Fertilized eggs and embryos were monitored through the advanced swim-up stage (1,000 degree-days). Three distinct periods of mortality were identified: prehatch (0-400 degree-days), immediately posthatch (401-600 degree-days), and swim-up (601-1,000 degree-days). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed (1) that cis-7-hexadecenoic acid in both neutral lipids (NL) and phospholipids (PL) correlated with prehatch mortality, (2) that docosapentaenoic acid in PL and docosahexaenoic acid in NL correlated with posthatch mortality, and (3) that total lipids, TPP, and palmitoleic acid in NL, linoleic acid, and palmitic acid in PL correlated with the frequency of EMS. These results indicate the complexity of early life stage mortality in lake trout and suggest that inadequate levels of key fatty acids in eggs, along with variable thiamine content, contribute to the low survival of lake trout progeny in Lake Michigan.

  2. Biochemically and histopathologically comparative review of thiamine’s and thiamine pyrophosphate’s oxidative stress effects generated with methotrexate in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Demiryilmaz, Ismail; Sener, Ebru; Cetin, Nihal; Altuner, Durdu; Suleyman, Bahadir; Albayrak, Fatih; Akcay, Fatih; Suleyman, Halis

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative liver injury occurring with methotrexate restricts its use in the desired dose. Therefore, whether or not thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate, whose antioxidant activity is known, have protective effects on oxidative liver injury generated with methotrexate was comparatively researched in rats using biochemical and histopathological approaches. Material/Methods Thiamine pyrophosphate+methotrexate, thiamine+methotrexate, and methotrexate were injected intraperitoneally in rats for 7 days. After this period, all animals’ livers were excised, killing them with high-dose anesthesia, and histopathologic and biochemical investigations were made. Result Biochemical results demonstrated a significant elevation in level of oxidant parameters such as MDA and MPO, and a reduction in antioxidant parameters such as GSH and SOD in the liver tissue of the methotrexate group. Also, the quantity of 8-OHdG/dG, a DNA injury product, was higher in the methotrexate group with high oxidant levels and low antioxidant levels, and the quantity of 8-OHdG/dG was in the thiamine pyrophosphate group with low oxidant levels and high antioxidant levels. In the thiamine and control groups, the 8-OHdG/dG rate was 1.48±0.35 pmol/L (P>0.05) and 0.55±0.1 pmol/L (P<0.0001). Thiamine pyrophosphate significantly decreased blood AST, ALT and LDH, but methotrexate and thiamine did not decrease the blood levels of AST, ALT and LDH. Histopathologically, although centrilobular necrosis, apoptotic bodies and inflammation were monitored in the methotrexate group, the findings in the thiamine pyrophosphate group were almost the same as in the control group. Conclusions Thiamine pyrophosphate was found to be effective in methotrexate hepatotoxicity, but thiamine was ineffective. PMID:23197226

  3. Increase in lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron following the collapse of alewife: Relief from thiamine deficiency or larval predation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, J.D.; Brown, S.; Brown, L.; Honeyfield, D.; He, J.; Johnson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    In the Great Lakes there is still uncertainty as to the population level effects of a thiamine deficiency on salmonines caused by high consumption of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus. A resurgence of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush reproduction in Lake Huron following the crash of alewife stocks between 2002 and 2004 provided an opportunity to evaluate the relative effects of this crash on reproduction through relief from either alewife mediated thiamine deficiency or alewife predation on larval lake trout relative to possible changes in the size of the lake trout spawning stock. Changes in mean lake trout egg thiamine concentration post crash at one spawning reef in Parry Sound, where mean thiamine concentration increased by almost two-fold, were consistent with diet switching from alewives to rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, the next most abundant prey fish in Lake Huron. Although thiamine levels for lake trout collected at a second reef in Parry Sound did not change post-crash, levels both pre- and post-crash were consistent with a rainbow smelt diet. A reef specific fry emergence index was found to be positively related to reef specific egg thiamine concentration but negatively related to reef specific occurrence of EMS, a thiamine deficiency related mortality syndrome. We found little evidence for overlap between the timing of spring shoreward migration of alewives and lake trout emergence, suggesting that relief from alewife predation effects had relatively little effect on the observed increase in lake trout recruitment. Numbers of spawners in the north, north-central, and southern zones of the lake increased from 2000 onwards. Overall the abundance post-2003 was higher than from pre-2004, suggesting that spawner abundance may also have contributed to increased lake trout reproduction. However, predicted numbers of spawners and measured abundance of wild recruits in assessment gear were poorly correlated suggesting that the increase in reproduction was not totally

  4. Long-Distance Transport of Thiamine (Vitamin B1) Is Concomitant with That of Polyamines1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Martinis, Jacopo; Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Szydlowski, Nicolas; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Gisler, Alexandra; Bürkle, Lukas; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B.

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is ubiquitous and essential for cell energy supply in all organisms as a vital metabolic cofactor, known for over a century. In plants, it is established that biosynthesis de novo is taking place predominantly in green tissues and is furthermore limited to plastids. Therefore, transport mechanisms are required to mediate the movement of this polar metabolite from source to sink tissue to activate key enzymes in cellular energy generating pathways but are currently unknown. Similar to thiamine, polyamines are an essential set of charged molecules required for diverse aspects of growth and development, the homeostasis of which necessitates long-distance transport processes that have remained elusive. Here, a yeast-based screen allowed us to identify Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PUT3 as a thiamine transporter. A combination of biochemical, physiological, and genetic approaches permitted us to show that PUT3 mediates phloem transport of both thiamine and polyamines. Loss of function of PUT3 demonstrated that the tissue distribution of these metabolites is altered with growth and developmental consequences. The pivotal role of PUT3 mediated thiamine and polyamine homeostasis in plants, and its importance for plant fitness is revealed through these findings. PMID:27006489

  5. Structure of a Clostridium botulinum C143S thiaminase I/thiamin complex reveals active site architecture .

    PubMed

    Sikowitz, Megan D; Shome, Brateen; Zhang, Yang; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2013-11-05

    Thiaminases are responsible for the degradation of thiamin and its metabolites. Two classes of thiaminases have been identified based on their three-dimensional structures and their requirements for a nucleophilic second substrate. Although the reactions of several thiaminases have been characterized, the physiological role of thiamin degradation is not fully understood. We have determined the three-dimensional X-ray structure of an inactive C143S mutant of Clostridium botulinum (Cb) thiaminase I with bound thiamin at 2.2 Å resolution. The C143S/thiamin complex provides atomic level details of the orientation of thiamin upon binding to Cb-thiaminase I and the identity of active site residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The specific roles of active site residues were probed by using site directed mutagenesis and kinetic analyses, leading to a detailed mechanism for Cb-thiaminase I. The structure of Cb-thiaminase I is also compared to the functionally similar but structurally distinct thiaminase II.

  6. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate, is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production. In alpha (sub 2) beta (sub 2)-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha) -C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites has not yet been understood. To understand the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95-Angstrom resolution. We propose a model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through a concerted approximately 2-Angstrom shuttle-like motion of its heterodimers. Similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase with functionally related enzymes suggests that this newly defined shuttle-like motion of domains is common to the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  7. An exponential model equation for thiamin loss in irradiated ground pork as a function of dose and temperature of irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. B.; Thayer, D. W.; Phillips, J. G.

    The effect of low dose γ-irradiation on the thiamin content of ground pork was studied in the range of 0-14 kGy at 2°C and at radiation doses from 0.5 to 7 kGy at temperatures -20, 10, 0, 10 and 20°C. The detailed study at 2°C showed that loss of thiamin was exponential down to 0kGy. An exponential expression was derived for the effect of radiation dose and temperature of irradiation on thiamin loss, and compared with a previously derived general linear expression. Both models were accurate depictions of the data, but the exponential expression showed a significant decrease in the rate of loss between 0 and -10°C. This is the range over which water in meat freezes, the decrease being due to the immobolization of reactive radiolytic products of water in ice crystals.

  8. Thiamine content of eggs and lengths of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to abundance of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) in eastern Lake ontario, 2003 to 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H.G.; Rinchard, J.; O'Gorman, R.; Begnoche, L.J.; Bishop, D.L.; Greulich, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    Early mortality syndrome in fry of Great Lakes salmonines is linked to reduced levels of thiamine in eggs, which reflects maternal consumption of forage fishes such as alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) that contain thiaminase, an enzyme that destroys thiamine. We assessed annual variations in abundance and condition of alewives and thiamine status of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Lake Ontario. We analyzed total thiamine in eggs of 20 coho salmon collected annually between 2003 and 2006 at the Salmon River Hatchery on the Salmon River, New York. Alewife abundance was assessed annually in southern and eastern Lake Ontario with bottom trawls during late April and early May. Mean thiamine concentration in eggs varied annually, with those collected in 2003 (2.5 nmol/g) being significantly higher than those collected in 2004 to 2006 (1.5 to 1.7 nmol/g). Although we did not test survival of fry, if reported threshold levels of thiamine for preventing mortality of Lake Michigan coho salmon fry apply, then many or most Lake Ontario coho salmon produced fry were likely to incur thiamine-deficiency mortality, especially during years 2004 to 2006. Comparison to indices of annual abundance of alewife in Lake Ontario with thiamine concentration in coho salmon eggs failed to show any significant correlations (P > 0.05). However, total length of female spawning coho salmon was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with increasing condition and estimated energy content of adult alewives in the previous spring. These results suggest that growth of coho salmon in Lake Ontario was first limited by energy intake, whereas the amount of thiamine provided by alewives was sufficient for growth (in length) but not for producing thiamine-adequate eggs.

  9. Radiation damage in vitamin B 1: An endor study of an x-irradiated single crystal of thiamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, M.; Reddy, M. V. V. S.; Lambelet, P.; Horman, I.

    A single crystal of thiamine chloride hydrochloride has been x-irradiated at room temperature and studied by 1H-ENDOR spectroscopy at 110 K. It is shown that at least two radical species are trapped in the crystal. Several 1H-hyperfine tensors have been determined for each radical; they indicate that one species is due to cleavage of the thiamine molecule into its pyrimidine and thiazole moieties while the other species is due to hydrogen addition onto the pyrimidine ring.

  10. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Metamizole, Thiamin and Pyridoxin Using UV-Spectroscopy in Combination with Multivariate Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Chotimah, Chusnul; Sudjadi; Riyanto, Sugeng; Rohman, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of drugs in multicomponent system officially is carried out using chromatographic technique, however, this technique is too laborious and involving sophisticated instrument. Therefore, UV-VIS spectrophotometry coupled with multivariate calibration of partial least square (PLS) for quantitative analysis of metamizole, thiamin and pyridoxin is developed in the presence of cyanocobalamine without any separation step. Methods: The calibration and validation samples are prepared. The calibration model is prepared by developing a series of sample mixture consisting these drugs in certain proportion. Cross validation of calibration sample using leave one out technique is used to identify the smaller set of components that provide the greatest predictive ability. The evaluation of calibration model was based on the coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC). Results: The results showed that the coefficient of determination (R2) for the relationship between actual values and predicted values for all studied drugs was higher than 0.99 indicating good accuracy. The RMSEC values obtained were relatively low, indicating good precision. The accuracy and presision results of developed method showed no significant difference compared to those obtained by official method of HPLC. Conclusion: The developed method (UV-VIS spectrophotometry in combination with PLS) was succesfully used for analysis of metamizole, thiamin and pyridoxin in tablet dosage form. PMID:26819934

  12. Effect of thiamine hydrochloride on the redox reactions of iron at pyrite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.; Oliver, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation is a part of our studies on the electro chemical aspects of pyrite bioleaching involving Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Previously (1,2) we have examined the effect of T. ferrooxidans and their metabolic products on the redox reactions of Fe[sup 2+]/Fe[sup 3+] couple at the pyrite surface. Results obtained suggest that beyond 1. 5 days during their growth in a batch fermenter, the bacteria and their metabolic products completely cover the pyrite surface and shut down all electron transfer across the electrode-solution interface. In addition, it has been observed that the bacteria serve as the nucleation site for jarosite formation,more » which is found detrimental to bioleaching. In the present work we have focussed on the effect of the presence of vitamins on the redox chemistry of iron. Our examination of the effect of the presence of thiamine hydrochloride in the redox behavior of Fe[sup 2+]/Fe[sup 3+] at the pyrite surface has revealed that thiamine hydrochloride does not undergo chemical interaction with ferrous or ferric iron. However, it may adsorb onto the pyrite surface causing polarization of the pyrite electrode.« less

  13. Prevalence of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in Australia: has thiamine fortification made a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Clive G; Sheedy, Donna L; Lara, Ana I; Garrick, Therese M; Hilton, John M; Raisanen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Australia and compare this with previous studies. Design and setting Prospective autopsy study at the New South Wales Institute of Forensic Medicine, 1996-1997. Methods Brains of deceased people (aged over 15 years) derived from 2212 sequential autopsies performed between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 1997 were studied macroscopically and microscopically to identify cases of WKS. Main outcome measures Standard histological criteria for WKS and any available clinical data. Results Twenty-five cases of WKS were identified (prevalence, 1.1%), mostly among the 5.9% of the 2212 people who had a history suggestive of alcohol abuse. Only four cases (16%) had been diagnosed during life. Conclusions There has been a significant reduction in the prevalence of WKS in Australia since the introduction of thiamine enrichment of bread flour. While the prevalence is still higher than in most other Western countries, further research is needed before adding thiamine to alcoholic beverages can be recommended. PMID:9640303

  14. Identification of the thiamin pyrophosphokinase gene in rainbow trout: Characteristic structure and expression of seven splice variants in tissues and cell lines and during embryo development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuge, Shinya; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Nicks, Diane; Saloka, Stephanie K.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Li, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK) converts thiamin to its active form, thiamin diphosphate. In humans, TPK expression is down-regulated in some thiamin deficiency related syndrome, and enhanced during pregnancy. Rainbow trout are also vulnerable to thiamin deficiency in wild life and are useful models for thiamin metabolism research. We identified the tpk gene transcript including seven splice variants in the rainbow trout. Almost all cell lines and tissues examined showed co-expression of several tpk splice variants including a potentially major one at both mRNA and protein levels. However, relative to other tissues, the longest variant mRNA expression was predominant in the ovary and abundant in embryos. During embryogenesis, total tpk transcripts increased abruptly in early development, and decreased to about half of the peak shortly after hatching. In rainbow trout, the tpk transcript complex is ubiquitously expressed for all tissues and cells examined, and its increase in expression could be important in the early-middle embryonic stages. Moreover, decimated tpk expression in a hepatoma cell line relative to hepatic and gonadal cell lines appears to be consistent with previously reported down-regulation of thiamin metabolism in cancer.

  15. Chronic alcoholism in rats induces a compensatory response, preserving brain thiamine diphosphate, but the brain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases are inactivated despite unchanged coenzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Yulia M; Kudryavtsev, Pavel A; Pylypchuk, Svetlana Yu; Chekhivska, Lilia I; Stepanenko, Svetlana P; Sergiichuk, Andrej A; Bunik, Victoria I

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine-dependent changes in alcoholic brain were studied using a rat model. Brain thiamine and its mono- and diphosphates were not reduced after 20 weeks of alcohol exposure. However, alcoholism increased both synaptosomal thiamine uptake and thiamine diphosphate synthesis in brain, pointing to mechanisms preserving thiamine diphosphate in the alcoholic brain. In spite of the unchanged level of the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate, activities of the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes decreased in alcoholic brain. The inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was caused by its increased phosphorylation. The inactivation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) correlated with a decrease in free thiols resulting from an elevation of reactive oxygen species. Abstinence from alcohol following exposure to alcohol reactivated OGDHC along with restoration of the free thiol content. However, restoration of enzyme activity occurred before normalization of reactive oxygen species levels. Hence, the redox status of cellular thiols mediates the action of oxidative stress on OGDHC in alcoholic brain. As a result, upon chronic alcohol consumption, physiological mechanisms to counteract the thiamine deficiency and silence pyruvate dehydrogenase are activated in rat brain, whereas OGDHC is inactivated due to impaired antioxidant ability. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Deletion of SLC19A2, the high affinity thiamine transporter, causes selective inner hair cell loss and an auditory neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M C; Tartaglini, E; Fleming, J C; Neufeld, E J

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the high-affinity thiamine transporter Slc19a2 underlie the clinical syndrome known as thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) characterized by anemia, diabetes, and sensorineural hearing loss. To create a mouse model of this disease, a mutant line was created with targeted disruption of the gene. Cochlear function is normal in these mutants when maintained on a high-thiamine diet. When challenged with a low-thiamine diet, Slc19a2-null mice showed 40-60 dB threshold elevations by auditory brainstem response (ABR), but only 10-20 dB elevation by otoacoustic emission (OAE) measures. Wild-type mice retain normal hearing on either diet. Cochlear histological analysis showed a pattern uncommon for sensorineural hearing loss: selective loss of inner hair cells after 1-2 weeks on low thiamine and significantly greater inner than outer hair cell loss after longer low-thiamine challenges. Such a pattern is consistent with the observed discrepancy between ABR and OAE threshold shifts. The possible role of thiamine transport in other reported cases of selective inner hair cell loss is considered.

  17. Unexpected tautomeric equilibria of the carbanion-enamine intermediate in pyruvate oxidase highlight unrecognized chemical versatility of thiamin

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Danilo; Neumann, Piotr; Koers, Eline; Sjuts, Hanno; Lüdtke, Stefan; Sheldrick, George M.; Ficner, Ralf; Tittmann, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate, the vitamin B1 coenzyme, plays critical roles in fundamental metabolic pathways that require acyl carbanion equivalents. Studies on chemical models and enzymes had suggested that these carbanions are resonance-stabilized as enamines. A crystal structure of this intermediate in pyruvate oxidase at 1.1 Å resolution now challenges this paradigm by revealing that the enamine does not accumulate. Instead, the intermediate samples between the ketone and the carbanion both interlocked in a tautomeric equilibrium. Formation of the keto tautomer is associated with a loss of aromaticity of the cofactor. The alternate confinement of electrons to neighboring atoms rather than π-conjugation seems to be of importance for the enzyme-catalyzed, redox-coupled acyl transfer to phosphate, which requires a dramatic inversion of polarity of the reacting substrate carbon in two subsequent catalytic steps. The ability to oscillate between a nucleophilic (carbanion) and an electrophilic (ketone) substrate center highlights a hitherto unrecognized versatility of the thiamin cofactor. It remains to be studied whether formation of the keto tautomer is a general feature of all thiamin enzymes, as it could provide for stable storage of the carbanion state, or whether this feature represents a specific trait of thiamin oxidases. In addition, the protonation state of the two-electron reduced flavin cofactor can be fully assigned, demonstrating the power of high-resolution cryocrystallography for elucidation of enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:22730460

  18. Quantitation of plasma thiamine, related metabolites and plasma protein oxidative damage markers in children with autism spectrum disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Attia; Marini, Marina; Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Bolotta, Alessandra; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Visconti, Paola; Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila

    2016-11-01

    To assess thiamine and related metabolite status by analysis of plasma and urine in autistic children and healthy controls, correlations to clinical characteristics and link to plasma protein markers of oxidative damage. 27 children with autism (21 males and 6 females) and 21 (15 males and 6 females) age-matched healthy control children were recruited. The concentration of thiamine and related phosphorylated metabolites in plasma and urine and plasma protein content of dityrosine, N-formylkynurenine and 3-nitrotyrosine was determined. Plasma thiamine and thiamine monophosphate concentrations were similar in both study groups (median [lower-upper quartile]): autistic children - 6.60 nM (4.48-8.91) and 7.00 nM (5.51-8.55), and healthy controls - 6.82 nM (4.47-7.02) and 6.82 nM (5.84-8.91), respectively. Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) was decreased 24% in autistic children compared to healthy controls: 6.82 nM (5.81-8.52) versus 9.00 nM (8.41-10.71), p < .01. Urinary excretion of thiamine and fractional renal clearance of thiamine did not change between the groups. No correlation was observed between clinical markers and the plasma and urine thiamine concentration. Plasma protein dityrosine content was increased 88% in ASD. Other oxidative markers were unchanged. Autistic children had normal plasma and urinary thiamine levels whereas plasma TPP concentration was decreased. The latter may be linked to abnormal tissue handling and/or absorption from gut microbiota of TPP which warrants further investigation. Increased plasma protein dityrosine may reflect increased dual oxidase activity in response to change in mucosal immunity and host-microbe homeostasis.

  19. Organochlorine pesticides and thiamine in eggs of largemouth bass and American alligators and their relationship with early life-stage mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Wiebe, J.J.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Johnson, W.E.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been linked to early mortality syndrome in salmonids in the Great Lakes. This study was conducted to compare thiamine concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) eggs from sites with high embryo mortality and high exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Lakes Apopka and Griffin, and Emeralda Marsh, Florida, USA) to those from sites that have historically exhibited low embryo mortality and low OCPs (Lakes Woodruff and Orange, Florida). During June-July 2000, 20 alligator clutches were collected from these sites, artificially incubated, and monitored for embryo mortality. Thiamine and OCPs were measured in one egg/clutch. During February 2002, 10 adult female bass were collected from Emeralda Marsh and Lake Woodruff and mature ovaries analyzed for thiamine and OCP concentrations. Although ovaries from the Emeralda Marsh bass contained almost 1,000-fold more OCPs compared with the reference site, Lake Woodruff, there were no differences in thiamine concentrations between sites (11,710 vs. 11,857 pmol/g). In contrast, alligator eggs from the reference site had five times the amount of thiamine compared with the contaminated sites (3,123 vs. 617 pmol/g). Similarly, clutches with > 55% hatch rates had significantly higher concentrations of thiamine compared with clutches with <54% hatch rates (1,119 vs. 201 pmol/g). These results suggest that thiamine deficiency might be playing an important role in alligator embryo survival but not in reproductive failure and recruitment of largemouth bass. The cause(s) of this thiamine deficiency are unknown but might be related to differences in the nutritional value of prey items across the sites studied and/or to the presence of high concentration of contaminants in eggs. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2004.

  20. Organochlorine pesticides and thiamine in eggs of largemouth bass and American alligators and their relationship with early life-stage mortality.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria S; Wiebe, Jon J; Honeyfield, Dale C; Rauschenberger, Heath R; Hinterkopf, Joy P; Johnson, William E; Gross, Timothy S

    2004-10-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been linked to early mortality syndrome in salmonids in the Great Lakes. This study was conducted to compare thiamine concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) eggs from sites with high embryo mortality and high exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Lakes Apopka and Griffin, and Emeralda Marsh, Florida, USA) to those from sites that have historically exhibited low embryo mortality and low OCPs (Lakes Woodruff and Orange, Florida). During June-July 2000, 20 alligator clutches were collected from these sites, artificially incubated, and monitored for embryo mortality. Thiamine and OCPs were measured in one egg/clutch. During February 2002, 10 adult female bass were collected from Emeralda Marsh and Lake Woodruff and mature ovaries analyzed for thiamine and OCP concentrations. Although ovaries from the Emeralda Marsh bass contained almost 1,000-fold more OCPs compared with the reference site, Lake Woodruff, there were no differences in thiamine concentrations between sites (11,710 vs. 11,857 pmol/g). In contrast, alligator eggs from the reference site had five times the amount of thiamine compared with the contaminated sites (3,123 vs. 617 pmol/g). Similarly, clutches with >55% hatch rates had significantly higher concentrations of thiamine compared with clutches with <54% hatch rates (1,119 vs. 201 pmol/g). These results suggest that thiamine deficiency might be playing an important role in alligator embryo survival but not in reproductive failure and recruitment of largemouth bass. The cause(s) of this thiamine deficiency are unknown but might be related to differences in the nutritional value of prey items across the sites studied and/or to the presence of high concentration of contaminants in eggs.

  1. Thiamine losses during storage of pasteurised and sterilized model systems of minced chicken meat with addition of fresh and oxidized fat, and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Szymandera-Buszka, Krystyna; Hęś, Marzanna; Waszkowiak, Katarzyna; Jędrusek-Golińska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of pasteurisation and sterilization of model systems of minced chicken meat in the presence of low or high-oxidised pork lard, soy and sunflower oil, as well as casein hydrolysate and rosemary extract, on losses of thiamine in model systems. In the samples, the thiamine content was analysed periodically by thiochromium method, as well as rate of lipid oxidation based on measurement of peroxide value (PV) by iodometric method and p-anisidine value (AV) by spectrophotometric method. It was observed that the thiamine losses in model systems of minced chicken after pasteurisation (61-71%) were higher than after sterilization (57-67%). Introduction of high-oxidised fat increased the total thiamine losses both during thermal processing and storage of meat samples (to 23%). A strong relationship was established between thiamine losses and rate of fat oxidation. The lowest total thiamine losses were observed in the samples with low-oxidised pork lard. Antioxidant addition (rosemary extract or casein hydrolysate) into meat samples limited the thiamine losses. However, the effect depended on oxidation of fat that was mixed with meat. In the samples with low-oxidised fat, higher protective effect was found for rosemary extract (7-11%). In the samples with high-oxidised fat, casein hydrolysate was superior to rosemary extract (14%). In order to increase the stability of thiamine in pasteurized or sterilized meat products with fats, the influence of fat type and its oxidative stability should be taken under consideration. Moreover, the addition of rosemary extract or casein hydrolysate has impact on the thiamine losses since it slows down lipid oxidation to a significant extent.

  2. Tryptophan, thiamine and indole-3-acetic acid exchange between Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Oskar A; Gomez-Anduro, Gracia; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    During synthetic mutualistic interactions between the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense, mutual exchange of resources involved in producing and releasing the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by the bacterium, using tryptophan and thiamine released by the microalga, were measured. Although increased activities of tryptophan synthase in C. sorokiniana and indole pyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) in A. brasilense were observed, we could not detect tryptophan or IAA in the culture medium when both organisms were co-immobilized. This indicates that no extra tryptophan or IAA is produced, apart from the quantities required to sustain the interaction. Over-expression of the ipdC gene occurs at different incubation times: after 48 h, when A. brasilense was immobilized alone and grown in exudates of C. sorokiniana and at 96 h, when A. brasilense was co-immobilized with the microalga. When A. brasilense was cultured in exudates of C. sorokiniana, increased expression of the ipdC gene, corresponding increase in activity of IPDC encoded by the ipdC gene, and increase in IAA production were measured during the first 48 h of incubation. IAA production and release by A. brasilense was found only when tryptophan and thiamine were present in a synthetic growth medium (SGM). The absence of thiamine in SGM yielded no detectable IAA. In summary, this study demonstrates that C. sorokiniana can exude sufficient tryptophan and thiamine to allow IAA production by a PGPB during their interaction. Thiamine is essential for IAA production by A. brasilense and these three metabolites are part of a communication between the two microorganisms. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A simple turn on fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of thiamine using coconut water derived luminescent carbon dots.

    PubMed

    Purbia, Rahul; Paria, Santanu

    2016-05-15

    In this study microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was used to prepare highly luminescent carbon dots (1-6 nm size) within a minute from tender coconut (Cocos nucifera) water. The synthesized carbon dots (C-dots) exhibit emission of blue and green lights while excited at 390 and 450 nm wavelengths, respectively. As an application, these C-dots were tested for a simple "turn on" fluorescent sensor for rapid detection of thiamine (vitamin B1). The detection of thiamine in human body is very important to prevent various diseases such as beriberi, neurological disorders, optic neuropathy, etc. The fluorescence emission intensity of C-dots quenches after addition of Cu(2+) ion and then again increases selectively (turn on) after the addition of thiamine. The fluorescence emission intensity enhancement of Cu(2+) ion modified C-dots in the presence of thiamine exhibits a linear relationship within the thiamine concentration range of 10-50 μM. The limit of detection was found to be 280 nM from this study. The selectivity of the detection was also tested in the presence of different organic molecules and inorganic ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NO3(-)) which are present in blood serum and urine and found to be almost no interference in the detection. Finally, to see the applicability in real samples a commercial vitamin capsule was tested and found less than 3% error in the detected concentration. The C-dots were also used for bioimaging of fungus and the results show they are also suitable for this application too. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thiamin and Riboflavin in Human Milk: Effects of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplementation and Stage of Lactation on Vitamer Secretion and Contributions to Total Vitamin Content

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Adair, Linda S.; Bentley, Margaret E.; Flax, Valerie L.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S.; Kamwendo, Debbie; Allen, Lindsay H.

    2016-01-01

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main contributors to total riboflavin. We analyzed milk collected at 2 (n = 258) or 6 (n = 104), and 24 weeks (n = 362) from HIV-infected Malawian mothers within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study, randomly assigned at delivery to lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a control group, to investigate each vitamer’s contribution to total milk vitamin content and the effects of supplementation on the different thiamin and riboflavin vitamers at early and later stages of lactation, and obtain insight into the transport and distribution of these vitamers in human milk. Thiamin vitamers were derivatized into thiochrome-esters and analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography-fluorescence-detection (HPLC-FLD). Riboflavin and FAD were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry (ULPC-MS/MS). Thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP), identified here for the first time in breast milk, contributed 1.9–4.5% to total thiamin. Free thiamin increased significantly from 2/6 to 24 weeks regardless of treatment indicating an active transport of this vitamer in milk. LNS significantly increased TMP and free thiamin only at 2 weeks compared to the control: median 170 versus 151μg/L (TMP), 13.3 versus 10.5μg/L (free thiamin, p<0.05 for both, suggesting an up-regulated active mechanism for TMP and free thiamin accumulation at early stages of lactation. Free riboflavin was consistently and significantly increased with LNS (range: 14.8–19.6μg/L (LNS) versus 5.0–7.4μg/L (control), p<0.001), shifting FAD:riboflavin relative amounts from 92–94:6–8% to 85:15%, indicating a preferred secretion of the free form into breast milk. The

  5. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography findings in thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ach, Thomas; Kardorff, Rüdiger; Rohrschneider, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    To report ophthalmologic fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA). A 13-year-old girl with genetically proven TRMA was ophthalmologically (visual acuity, funduscopy, perimetry, electroretinogram) followed up over >5 years. Fundus imaging also included autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. During a 5-year follow-up, visual acuity and visual field decreased, despite a special TRMA diet. Funduscopy revealed bull's eye appearance, whereas fundus autofluorescence showed central and peripheral hyperfluorescence and perifoveal hypofluorescence. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed affected inner segment ellipsoid band and irregularities in the retinal pigment epithelium and choroidea. Autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with TRMA show retinitis pigmentosa-like retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid alterations. These findings might progress even under special TRMA diet, indispensable to life. Ophthalmologist should consider TRMA in patients with deafness and ophthalmologic disorders.

  6. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Michael K; Mehta, Angad P; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  7. Electron density reactivity indexes of the tautomeric/ionization forms of thiamin diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Jaña, Gonzalo A; Delgado, Eduardo J

    2013-09-01

    The generation of the highly reactive ylide in thiamin diphosphate catalysis is analyzed in terms of the nucleophilicity of key atoms, by means of density functional calculations at X3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. The Fukui functions of all tautomeric/ionization forms are calculated in order to assess their reactivity. The results allow to conclude that the highly conserved glutamic residue does not protonate the N1' atom of the pyrimidyl ring, but it participates in a strong hydrogen bonding, stabilizing the eventual negative charge on the nitrogen, in all forms involved in the ylide generation. This condition provides the necessary reactivity on key atoms, N4' and C2, to carry out the formation of the ylide required to initiate the catalytic cycle of ThDP-dependent enzymes. This study represents a new approach for the ylide formation in ThDP catalysis.

  8. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest thatmore » His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.« less

  9. Thalamic Proteome Changes and Behavioral Impairments in Thiamine-deficient Rats.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Polliana Toledo; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Rezende, Cristiana Perdigão; Figueiredo, Henrique César Pereira; Ribeiro, Angela Maria

    2018-06-09

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) has been used as an experimental model in rodents to study the molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration and its association with behavioral changes. The aims of the present study were to investigate the spatial cognitive performance of pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) in adult male rats and disclose the thalamic proteome alterations caused by a severe TD episode. After the onset of the neurological signs, such as seizure and/or loss of righting reflex, the TD treatment was interrupted. Following 15 days of recovery, all rats were submitted to the spatial cognitive tasks in the Morris Water Maze (MWM). The results show that the PTD rats exhibited deficits during the learning process, which was reverted by repeated training. However, despite the spatial cognitive recovery, some protein changes were not reversible. The proteomic analysis, using label-free quantification, revealed deregulation of 183 thalamic proteins. Using bioinformatic tools, these proteins were categorized according to Gene Ontology functional annotation and metabolic pathways. We show that a severe TD affects proteins involved in different biological processes, such as, oxidative stress, neurotransmitter synthesis and synaptic vesicle cycle. These could explain the outcome in neurotransmitter release changes caused by TD, previously observed by our group and by other authors. These findings disclose the role of key proteins and metabolic pathways probably involved in the neurodegeneration process induced by TD. These proteins represent relevant molecular targets for future studies focusing also on the molecular basis of selective vulnerability of some brain areas to TD insult. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment with thiamine hydrochloride and astaxanthine for the prevention of yolk-sac mortality in Baltic salmon fry (M74 syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koski, P; Pakarinen, M; Nakari, T; Soivio, A; Hartikainen, K

    1999-09-14

    Two practical methods are reported for treating feral Baltic salmon with thiamine hydrochloride against M74 syndrome (abnormally high yolk-sac fry mortality of the Baltic salmon). Both bathing of the yolk-sac fry in thiamine hydrochloride (1000 mg l-1, 1 h) and a single intraperitoneal injection given to the female brood fish (100 mg kg-1 fish) during the summer 3 mo before stripping were shown to elevate the whole body total thiamine concentration in the fry. Both treatments were also shown to be effective in preventing mortality due to M74 syndrome. The effect of bathing the yolk-sac fry was shown to be dose-dependent. The results support the view that there is a causal relationship between the thiamine status of the yolk-sac fry and M74 mortality. An intraperitoneal injection of astaxanthine suspension administered to the female brood fish (11 mg kg-1 fish) in the summer 3 mo before stripping elevated the astaxanthine concentration in the eggs but did not affect mortality due to M74 syndrome. An interaction between astaxanthine and thiamine may occur in the developing embryo or yolk-sac fry, however. No association could be demonstrated between the various thiamine hydrochloride treatment practices and hepatic cytochrome P450 dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in the yolk-sac fry. An injection of thiamine hydrochloride into the peritoneal cavity of wild Baltic salmon females could be used to raise thiamine concentrations in their offspring in the rivers. The effect on smolt production in Finnish Baltic salmon rivers needs to be investigated further, however.

  11. Amorphization of thiamine chloride hydrochloride: A study of the crystallization inhibitor properties of different polymers in thiamine chloride hydrochloride amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Arioglu-Tuncil, Seda; Bhardwaj, Vivekanand; Taylor, Lynne S; Mauer, Lisa J

    2017-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions of thiamine chloride hydrochloride (THCl) were created using a variety of polymers with different physicochemical properties in order to investigate how effective the various polymers were as THCl crystallization inhibitors. THCl:polymer dispersions were prepared by lyophilizing solutions of THCl and amorphous polymers (guar gum, pectin, κ-carrageenan, gelatin, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)). These dispersions were stored at select temperature (25 and 40°C) and relative humidity (0, 23, 32, 54, 75, and 85% RH) conditions and monitored at different time points using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Moisture sorption isotherms of all samples were also obtained. Initially amorphous THCl was produced in the presence of ≥40% w/w pectin, κ-carrageenan, gelatin, and guar gum or ≥60% w/w PVP. Trends in polymer THCl crystallization inhibition (pectin≥κ-carrageenan>gelatin>guar gum≫PVP) were primarily based on the ability of the polymer to interact with THCl via hydrogen bonding and/or ionic interactions. The onset of THCl crystallization from the amorphous dispersions was also related to storage conditions. THCl remained amorphous at low RH conditions (0 and 23% RH) in all 1:1 dispersions except THCl:PVP. THCl crystallized in some dispersions below the glass transition temperature (T g ) but remained amorphous in others at T~T g . At high RHs (75 and 85% RH), THCl crystallized within one day in all samples. Given the ease of THCl amorphization in the presence of a variety of polymers, even at higher vitamin concentrations than would be found in foods, it is likely that THCl is amorphous in many low moisture foods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polioencephalomalacia and Heart Failure Secondary to Presumptive Thiamine Deficiency, Hepatic Lipidosis, and Starvation in 2 Abandoned Siamese Cats.

    PubMed

    Anholt, H; Himsworth, C; Britton, A

    2016-07-01

    Two 4-year-old spayed female Siamese cats were seized by the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals after confinement to an abandoned housing unit without food for 9 weeks. One cat was found dead, and the second was euthanized within 24 hours due to neurologic deterioration despite therapy. Polioencephalomalacia of the caudal colliculus, hepatic lipidosis, cachexia, and congestive heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy were identified in both cats through postmortem examination and attributed to a prolonged period of starvation. Brain lesions were likely the result of thiamine deficiency (Chastek paralysis), which can be associated with both malnutrition and liver disease. This case highlights the importance of thiamine supplementation during realimentation of cats with hepatic lipidosis. Heart failure resulting from cachexia may have contributed to the death of the first cat and the morbidity of the second cat. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. [Effect of heat transfer in the packages on the stability of thiamine nitrate under uncontrolled temperature conditions].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    To accurately predict the stability of thiamine nitrate as a model drug in pharmaceutical products under uncontrolled temperature conditions, the average reaction rate constant was determined, taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product. The stability tests of thiamine nitrate in the three packages with different heat transfers were performed under non-isothermal conditions. The stability data observed were compared with the predictions based on a newly developed method, showing that the stability was well predicted by the method involving the heat transfer. By contrast, there were some deviations observed from the predicted data, without considering heat transfer in the packages with low heat transfer. The above-mentioned result clearly shows that heat transfer should be considered to ensure accurate prediction of the stability of commercial pharmaceutical products under non-isothermal atmospheres.

  14. Can diet-dependent factors help explain fish-to-fish variation in thiamine-dependent early mortality syndrome?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.B.; Arts, M.T.; Brown, L.R.; Brown, M.; Moore, K.; Villella, M.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.; Zajicek, J.L.; Wolgamood, M.; Hnath, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    To provide insight into the reasons why offspring of certain salmonine females exhibit early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the Great Lakes whereas others do not, we measured the egg concentrations of potential biochemical markers (stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon, fatty acid signatures, and lipid-soluble carotenoids and vitamins) that are indicative of differing food web and trophic structure. To corroborate the presence of EMS, we also measured the egg content of thiamine vitamers. For all the stocks of coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch and Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha we studied, there was a very high correspondence between EMS and low concentrations of unphosphorylated thiamine in unfertilized eggs. For salmonine stocks in the Platte River, Thompson Creek, and the Swan River, Michigan, small but significant shifts occurred in measures of egg carotenoids, retinoids, ??15N depletion, and fatty acid profiles of fish producing normal offspring relative to those exhibiting EMS. Egg thiamine concentrations in Chinook salmon from the Little Manistee River, Michigan, in the low-EMS group were only marginally above the threshold for EMS induction. Along with this small thiamine differential, there was no evidence of differing food web or dietary factors between EMS-positive and normal Chinook salmon from the Little Manistee River. Further investigations are required to determine the potential dietary sources for the observed differences in biochemical markers between EMS-positive and normal fish. These findings are generally consistent with the hypothesis that a more diverse forage base may help to limit overall dietary content of species that contain thiaminase, such as alewives Alosa pseudoharengus, and may lead to improved embryonic survival for feral salmonids. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  15. Simultaneous in situ derivatization and ultrasound-assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase extraction for thiamine determination by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Tarigh, Ghazale Daneshvar; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2014-06-01

    A simple and rapid method for the simultaneous in situ derivatizaion, preconcentration and extraction of thiamine (vitamin B1) as a model analyte was developed by a novel quantitative method, namely ultrasound-assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase extraction spectrofluorimetry (USA-DMSPE-FL) from different real samples. This method consists of sample preparation, in situ derivatization, exhaustive extraction and clean up by a single process. High extraction efficiency and in situ derivatization in a short period of time is the main advantages of this procedure. For this purpose, the reusable magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of thiamine. Thiamine was, simultaneously, in situ derivatized as thiochrome by potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) and adsorbed on MMWCNT in an ultrasonic water bath. The MMWCNTs were then collected using an external magnetic field. Subsequently, the extracted thiochrome was washed from the surface of the adsorbent and determined by spectrofluorimetry. The developed method, which has been analytically characterized under its optimal operating conditions, allows the detection of the analyte in the samples with method detection limits of 0.37 µg L(-1). The repeatability of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD, n=6), varies between 2.0% and 4.8% in different real samples, while the enhancement factor is 197. The proposed procedure has been applied for the determination of thiamine in biological (serum and urine), pharmaceutical (multivitamin tablet and B complex syrup) and foodstuff samples (cereal, wheat flour, banana and honey) with the good recoveries in the range from 90% to 105%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonalcoholic Thiamine-Related Encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome) Among Inpatients With Cancer: A Series of 18 Cases.

    PubMed

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Alici, Yesne; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Nelson, Christian; Breitbart, William

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by thiamine deficiency. Cancer predisposes to thiamine deficiency through various mechanisms. Although many case reports exist on nonalcoholic WKS in cancer, larger qualitative studies are lacking. Retrospective study of patients admitted to a cancer hospital and diagnosed with WKS during routine care on a psychiatric consultation service. Only patients with at least 1 additional supporting feature (magnetic resonance imaging findings, low serum thiamine concentrations, or response to treatment) were included. Data pertaining to demographics, risk factors, phenomenology, and outcomes were abstracted from medical records by chart review. In all, 18 patients were included. All patients developed WKS during cancer treatment. Hematologic malignancy, gastrointestinal tract tumors, low oral intake, and weight loss were common risk factors. All patients presented with cognitive dysfunction, most commonly impaired alertness, attention, and short-term memory. All were diagnosed by operational criteria proposed by Caine et al., 1997 (where 2 of the following are required: nutritional deficiency, ocular signs, cerebellar signs, and either altered mental status or mild memory impairment). Few exhibited Wernicke's classic triad. Diagnostic and treatment delay were common. Only 3 patients recovered fully. Nonalcoholic WKS can occur during cancer treatment and manifests clinically as delirium. Diagnosis should be made using operational criteria, not Wernicke's triad. Most patients were not underweight and had normal serum concentration of vitamin B12 and folate. A variety of mechanisms might predispose to thiamine deficiency and WKS in cancer. Given the high frequency of residual morbidity, studies should focus on decreasing diagnostic and treatment delay. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonalcoholic Thiamine-Related Encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome) Among Inpatients With Cancer: A Series of 18 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Alici, Yesne; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Nelson, Christian; Breitbart, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by thiamine deficiency. Cancer predisposes to thiamine deficiency through various mechanisms. Although many case reports exist on nonalcoholic WKS in cancer, larger qualitative studies are lacking. Method Retrospective study of patients admitted to a cancer hospital and diagnosed with WKS during routine care on a psychiatric consultation service. Only patients with at least 1 additional supporting feature (magnetic resonance imaging findings, low serum thiamine concentrations, or response to treatment) were included. Data pertaining to demographics, risk factors, phenomenology, and outcomes were abstracted from medical records by chart review. Results In all, 18 patients were included. All patients developed WKS during cancer treatment. Hematologic malignancy, gastrointestinal tract tumors, low oral intake, and weight loss were common risk factors. All patients presented with cognitive dysfunction, most commonly impaired alertness, attention, and short-term memory. All were diagnosed by operational criteria proposed by Caine et al., 1997 (where 2 of the following are required: nutritional deficiency, ocular signs, cerebellar signs, and either altered mental status or mild memory impairment). Few exhibited Wernicke’s classic triad. Diagnostic and treatment delay were common. Only 3 patients recovered fully. Conclusion Nonalcoholic WKS can occur during cancer treatment and manifests clinically as delirium. Diagnosis should be made using operational criteria, not Wernicke’s triad. Most patients were not underweight and had normal serum concentration of vitamin B12 and folate. A variety of mechanisms might predispose to thiamine deficiency and WKS in cancer. Given the high frequency of residual morbidity, studies should focus on decreasing diagnostic and treatment delay. PMID:26791514

  18. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  19. Pathological and behavioral manifestations of the “Cayuga syndrome,” a thiamine deficiency in larval landlocked Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Jeffrey P.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Iamonte, Tina; Little, Edward E.; DeLonay, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    The “Cayuga syndrome” is a maternally transmitted, naturally occurring thiamine deficiency that causes 100% mortality of larval landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in several of New York's Finger Lakes, Results of multiyear studies to qualify and quantify the neurobehavioral and gross pathological signs of this condition are described, Affected sac fry became weak and ataxic and responded atypically to stimuli 1–2 weeks before death. Quantitative assays of stimulus-provoked swimming revealed a significant neuropathy whereby the sac fry exhibited abnormal thigmotactic and phototactic behaviors. Gross lesions observed in Cayuga sac fry included yolk-sac opacities, subcutaneous edema, vitelline hemorrhage or congestion, pericardial edema, retrobulbar edema, branchial congestion, foreshortened maxillae, hydrocephalus, and occasional caudal fin deformities, Lesion frequency in progeny differed significantly between dam source. Yolk conversion efficiency was decreased at least 1 week before death, suggesting that the bioenergetics of the fish was compromised and thereby supporting the thiamine residue and treatment data reported elsewhere, Comparisons with coagulated-yolk, blue-sac and swim-up syndromes are presented, The pathological signs of the Cayuga syndrome represent a unique departure from the lesions induced by toxicants or pathogens in other piscine models, and for the first time profile the profound effects of thiamine deficiency on cardiovascular and neurological systems of larval fish.

  20. Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus is not the cause of thiamine deficiency impeding lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) recruitment in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Evans, Allison N.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Zajicek, James L.; Heppell, Scott A.; Riley, Stephen C.; Krueger, Charles C.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency is a global concern affecting wildlife, livestock, and humans. In Great Lakes salmonines, thiamine deficiency causes embryo mortality and is an impediment to restoration of native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) stocks. Thiamine deficiency in fish may result from a diet of prey with high levels of thiaminase I. The discoveries that the bacterial species Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus produces thiaminase I, is found in viscera of thiaminase-containing prey fish, and causes mortality when fed to lake trout in the laboratory provided circumstantial evidence implicating P. thiaminolyticus. This study quantified the contribution of P. thiaminolyticus to the total thiaminase I activity in multiple trophic levels of Great Lakes food webs. Unexpectedly, no relationship between thiaminase activity and either the amount of P. thiaminolyticus thiaminase I protein or the abundance of P. thiaminolyticus cells was found. These results demonstrate that P. thiaminolyticus is not the primary source of thiaminase activity affecting Great Lakes salmonines and calls into question the long-standing assumption that P. thiaminolyticus is the source of thiaminase in other wild and domestic animals.

  1. Effect of flour extraction rate and baking on thiamine and riboflavin content and antioxidant capacity of traditional rye bread.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villaluenga, C; Michalska, A; Frias, J; Piskula, M K; Vidal-Valverde, C; Zieliński, H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of rye flour extraction rates and baking on thiamine and riboflavin content, and antioxidant capacity of traditional rye bread were studied and compared with white wheat flour. The content of thiamine was higher (10.9%) in rye dough formulated with dark rye flour (F-100%; extraction rate of 100%) than in rye dough formulated with brown rye flour (F-92%; extraction rate of 92%) that was similar to dough made with wheat flour. The riboflavin content in rye dough made from flour F-100% was also higher (16%) than in dough formulated with flour F-92%, and both provided larger riboflavin content than wheat dough. Baking led to reductions in thiamine of 56% for wheat bread and of 20% for both rye breads; however, this process caused only a 10% decrease in riboflavin for wheat bread and a 30% decrease for rye breads. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and Folin-Ciocalteu reducing capacity were higher in rye than in wheat dough and bread. Baking process produced slight changes in antioxidant activity, except for Superoxide Dismutase-like activity where a sharp decrease was observed. Our findings showed that rye breads are an important source of B vitamins and rye breads formulated with dark and brown flours showed better antioxidant properties than wheat bread. Therefore, rye breads should be more widely recommended in human nutrition.

  2. Biotin and Thiamine Responsive Basal Ganglia Disease--A vital differential diagnosis in infants with severe encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ygberg, Sofia; Naess, Karin; Eriksson, Mats; Stranneheim, Henrik; Lesko, Nicole; Barbaro, Michela; Wibom, Rolf; Wang, Chen; Wedell, Anna; Wickström, Ronny

    2016-05-01

    We report two siblings of Swedish origin with infantile Biotin and Thiamine Responsive Basal Ganglia Disease (BTRBG). Initial symptoms were in both cases lethargia, with reduced contact and poor feeding from the age of 5 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed altered signal in the basal ganglia, along with grey and white matter abnormalities. The diagnosis BTRBG was not recognized in the first sibling who died at the age of 8 weeks. The second sibling was started on biotin and thiamine immediately upon development of symptoms, leading to clinical improvement and partial reversion of the magnetic resonance imaging findings. Genetic analysis of the SLC19A3 gene identified two mutations, c.74dupT and c.1403delA, carried in compound heterozygous form in both boys, each inherited from one parent. The first mutation has previously been described in children with BTRBG, and the second mutation is novel. Although the clinical picture in BTRGB is very severe it is also rather unspecific and the diagnosis may be missed. This report highlights the importance of considering biotin and thiamine treatment also in a European infant born to non-consanguineous parents, who presents with symptoms of acute/subacute encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  4. Concomitants of alcoholism: differential effects of thiamine deficiency, liver damage, and food deprivation on the rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Natalie M; Sullivan, Edith V; Rohlfing, Torsten; Mayer, Dirk; Collins, Amy M; Luong, Richard; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2016-07-01

    Serious neurological concomitants of alcoholism include Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This study was conducted in animal models to determine neuroradiological signatures associated with liver damage caused by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), thiamine deficiency caused by pyrithiamine treatment, and nonspecific nutritional deficiency caused by food deprivation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were used to evaluate brains of wild-type Wistar rats at baseline and following treatment. Similar to observations in ethanol (EtOH) exposure models, thiamine deficiency caused enlargement of the lateral ventricles. Liver damage was not associated with effects on cerebrospinal fluid volumes, whereas food deprivation caused modest enlargement of the cisterns. In contrast to what has repeatedly been shown in EtOH exposure models, in which levels of choline-containing compounds (Cho) measured by MRS are elevated, Cho levels in treated animals in all three experiments (i.e., liver damage, thiamine deficiency, and food deprivation) were lower than those in baseline or controls. These results add to the growing body of literature suggesting that MRS-detectable Cho is labile and can depend on a number of variables that are not often considered in human experiments. These results also suggest that reductions in Cho observed in humans with alcohol use disorder (AUD) may well be due to mild manifestations of concomitants of AUD such as liver damage or nutritional deficiencies and not necessarily to alcohol consumption per se.

  5. Metformin Is a Substrate and Inhibitor of the Human Thiamine Transporter, THTR-2 (SLC19A3).

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaomin; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Yee, Sook Wah; Giacomini, Marilyn M; Chen, Eugene C; Piao, Meiling; Hao, Jia; Twelves, Jolyn; Lepist, Eve-Irene; Ray, Adrian S; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2015-12-07

    The biguanide metformin is widely used as first-line therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Predominately a cation at physiological pH's, metformin is transported by membrane transporters, which play major roles in its absorption and disposition. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated that organic cation transporter 1, OCT1, the major hepatic uptake transporter for metformin, was also the primary hepatic uptake transporter for thiamine, vitamin B1. In this study, we tested the reverse, i.e., that metformin is a substrate of thiamine transporters (THTR-1, SLC19A2, and THTR-2, SLC19A3). Our study demonstrated that human THTR-2 (hTHTR-2), SLC19A3, which is highly expressed in the small intestine, but not hTHTR-1, transports metformin (Km = 1.15 ± 0.2 mM) and other cationic compounds (MPP(+) and famotidine). The uptake mechanism for hTHTR-2 was pH and electrochemical gradient sensitive. Furthermore, metformin as well as other drugs including phenformin, chloroquine, verapamil, famotidine, and amprolium inhibited hTHTR-2 mediated uptake of both thiamine and metformin. Species differences in the substrate specificity of THTR-2 between human and mouse orthologues were observed. Taken together, our data suggest that hTHTR-2 may play a role in the intestinal absorption and tissue distribution of metformin and other organic cations and that the transporter may be a target for drug-drug and drug-nutrient interactions.

  6. Structural Model for the Flip-Flop Action in Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1 thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production, including (i) decarboxylation of alpha-keto acids followed by (ii) transketolation. These enzymes have shown a common mechanism of TPP activation by imposing an active V-conformation of this coenzyme that brings the N4 atom of the aminopyrimidine ring to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H N hydrogen-bonding with the C2- atom of the thiazolium ring. The reactive C2 atom of TPP is the nucleophile that attacks the carbonyl carbon of different substrates used by the TPP-dependent enzymes. The structure of the heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase (Elp) recently determined in our laboratory (1) revealed the association pattern of the subunits and the specifics of two chemically equivalent cofactor binding sites. Dynamic nonequivalence of these two cofactor sites directs the flip-flop action of this enzyme, depending upon which two active sites effect each other (2). The crystal structure derived from the holo-form of Elp provided the basis for the model of the flip-flop action of Elp in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the two cofactor sites at any given moment, where these steps are governed by the concerted shuttle-like motion of the subunits. It is further proposed that balancing a hydrogen-bond network and related cofactor geometry determine the continuity of catalytic events.

  7. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    DOE PAGES

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; ...

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active sitemore » metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.« less

  8. Crystal morphology optimization of thiamine hydrochloride in solvent system: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Han, Dandan; Du, Shichao; Wu, Songgu; Gong, Junbo

    2018-01-01

    Thiamine hydrochloride (THCL) was produced in methanol accompanied with agglomeration in industry, the plate like morphology of THCL in methanol was not deserve to have a good quality. Selecting a suitable solvent should be considered because solvent could be one of the essential factors to impact morphology. Methanol and methanol/ethyl acetate solvent (0.2 vol fraction of methanol) was selected as the solvent system in reactive crystallization of THCL. The experiment results show the THCL crystal morphology in methanol/ethyl acetate solvent system was granular and more regular than that in methanol. In order to explicate the different crystal morphology in different solvents, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was introduced to simulate crystal morphology in different solvents. The attachment energy (AE) model was employed to investigate the morphology of THCL under vacuum conditions, methanol and methanol/ethyl acetate solvent conditions, respectively. The simulation crystal morphology was in a good agreement with that of experimented. The particle of THCL in methanol/ethyl acetate solvent has less tendency to agglomeration, and then it is favorable to the downstream process, such as filtration, storage and transportation.

  9. Phase transformation in thiamine hydrochloride tablets: Influence on tablet microstructure, physical properties, and performance.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Paroma; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Govindarajan, Ramprakash

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this article was to monitor phase transformation in thiamine hydrochloride, from a nonstoichiometric hydrate (NSH) to a hemihydrate (HH), in stored tablets, prepared both by direct compression and wet granulation, and to relate the storage-induced phase transformation with changes in tablet microstructure, physical properties, and performance. Raman spectroscopy revealed complete NSH → HH transformation in tablets, within 30 h of storage at 40°C/75% relative humidity. When the tablets were prepared by wet granulation of NSH alone, there was a marked increase in both tablet volume and hardness on storage. However, when microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was included in granulation, the resulting stored tablets also exhibited a pronounced increase in disintegration time. In contrast, tablets prepared by dry processing via compression of a NSH-MCC physical mixture did not exhibit any changes in properties, despite the in situ solid form conversion. Scanning electron microscopy revealed growth of needle-like HH crystals in all stored tablets and mercury porosimetry revealed considerable changes in the pore size distribution during storage. Longer storage led to crystal growth (Ostwald ripening), causing further gradual but less dramatic changes in properties. The phase transformation and the complex interparticulate associations in the tablet influenced the changes in tablet microstructure, compact physical properties, and product behavior. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intensification of ion exchange desorption of thiamine diphosphate by low-powered ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pinchukova, Natalia A; Voloshko, Alexander Y; Merko, Maria A; Bondarenko, Yana A; Chebanov, Valentin A

    2018-03-01

    The process of ultrasound-assisted ion-exchange desorption of cocarboxylase (thiamine diphosphate (TDP)) from a strong acidic cation resin was studied. Kinetics studies revealed that ultrasound accelerates TDP desorption by 3 times. The optimal desorption parameters, viz. US power input, sonication time, eluent/resin ratio and the eluent (ammonium acetate buffer) concentration were established which were 15mW/cm 3 , 20min, 1:1 and 1M, respectively. The resin stability studies showed that the optimal ultrasonic power was less by the order than the resin degradation threshold which ensures durable and efficient resin exploitation during production. The resin sorption capacity remained unchanged even after 20 cycles of TDP sorption, ultrasonic desorption and resin regeneration. The recovery ratio of TDP was shown to increase non-linearly with decreasing the resin saturation factor, which can be attributed to diffusion limitations occurring during desorption. The optimal resin loading corresponding to more than 90 per cent of TDP recovery was found to be at the level of 10 per cent of the maximal sorption capacity. The study revealed 4-5-fold increase in concentrations of the recovered solutions, which together with process times shortening should result in considerable energy saving in downstream operations on production scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Consideration of alternative causes of lactic acidosis: Thiamine deficiency in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Ryan K; Subedi, Rogin; Gill, Dalvir; Nat, Amitpal

    2017-08-01

    Lactic acidosis is a common metabolic acidosis characterized by increased serum lactate and is usually associated with a decreased blood pH. Lactic acidosis has many different causes but has been differentiated into type A, hypoxic causes, and type B, non-hypoxic causes. Tissue hypoxia, type A, is the most common cause, usually secondary to processes such as sepsis and multi-organ failure. Type A must be differentiated from type B in the correct clinical setting as treatments are vastly different. Type B causes may include drug side-effects, toxins, enzymatic defects, inherited or acquired, any of which may lead to overproduction or underutilization of lactate. However, as most clinicians are more familiar, and likely more initially concerned with hypoxic etiologies, evaluation is directed toward finding the source of hypoperfusion or hypoxia, and thus generally leading to a delay in discovering a type B cause (or mixed type A and type B). Here we describe a case of lactic acidosis in the setting of thiamine deficiency thought to be secondary to advanced lung cancer. The purpose of this paper is to bring awareness to the clinician to consider other causes of lactic acidosis when evaluating a patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multi-spectroscopic and voltammetric evidences for binding, conformational changes of bovine serum albumin with thiamine.

    PubMed

    Bagoji, Atmanand M; Gowda, Jayant I; Gokavi, Naveen M; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between thiamine hydrochloride (TA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence, FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltammetric techniques under optimised physiological condition. The fluorescence intensity of BSA is gradually decreased upon addition of TA due to the formation of a BSA-TA complex. The binding parameters were evaluated and their behaviour at different temperatures was analysed. The quenching constants (K sv ) obtained were 2.6 × 10 4 , 2.2 × 10 4 and 2.0 × 10 4  L mol -1 at 288, 298 and 308 K, respectively. The binding mechanism was static-type quenching. The values of ΔH° and ΔS° were found to be 26.87 kJ mol -1 and 21.3 J K -1  mol -1 , and indicated that electrostatic interaction was the principal intermolecular force. The changes in the secondary structure of BSA upon interaction with TA were confirmed by synchronous and 3-D spectral results. Site probe studies reveal that TA is located in site I of BSA. The effects of some common metal ions on binding of BSA-TA complex were also investigated.

  13. Benzaldehyde lyase, a novel thiamine PPi-requiring enzyme, from Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I.

    PubMed Central

    González, B; Vicuña, R

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I can grow on benzoin as the sole carbon and energy source. This ability is due to benzaldehyde lyase, a new type of enzyme that irreversibly cleaves the acyloin linkage of benzoin, producing two molecules of benzaldehyde. Benzaldehyde lyase was purified 70-fold and found to require catalytic amounts of thiamine PPi (TPP) and a divalent cation as cofactors. Optimal activity was obtained with a 1.0 mM concentration of Mn2+, Mg2+, or Ca2+. Gel permeation chromatography indicated a native molecular weight of 80,000, whereas the enzyme migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels as a single polypeptide with a molecular weight of 53,000. Benzaldehyde lyase is highly specific; of a variety of structurally related compounds tested, only benzoin and anisoin (4,4'-dimethoxybenzoin) acted as substrates, their apparent Kms being 9.0 x 10(-3) and 3.25 x 10(-2) mM, respectively. A catalytic mechanism for the enzyme is proposed. Images PMID:2496105

  14. On the organocatalytic activity of N-heterocyclic carbenes: role of sulfur in thiamine.

    PubMed

    Hollóczki, Oldamur; Kelemen, Zsolt; Nyulászi, László

    2012-07-20

    The reaction energy profiles of the benzoin condensation from three aldehydes catalyzed by imidazol-2-ylidene, triazol-3-ylidene, and thiazol-2-ylidene have been investigated computationally. The barriers for all steps of all investigated reactions have been found to be low enough to indicate the viability of the mechanism proposed by Breslow in the 1950s. The most remarkable difference in the catalytic cycles has been the increased stability of the Breslow intermediate in case of thiazol-2-ylidene (by ca. 10 kcal/mol) compared to the other two carbenes, which results in lower energy for the coupling of the second aldehyde molecule, thus, increasing the reversibility of the reaction. Since the analogous transketolase reaction, being involved in the carbohydrate metabolism of many organisms, requires an initial decoupling-a reverse benzoin condensation-this difference provides a reasonable explanation for the presence of a thiazolium ring in thiamine instead of the otherwise generally more available imidazole derivatives. The "resting intermediate" found by Berkessel and co-workers for a triazole-based catalyst was found more stable than the Breslow intermediate for all of the systems investigated. The (gas phase) proton affinities of several carbenes were compared, the relative trends being in agreement with the available (in aqueous solution) data. The hydrolytic ring-opening reaction of the thiazole-based carbene was shown to be different from that of imidazole-2-ylidenes.

  15. High-resolution structures of Lactobacillus salivarius transketolase in the presence and absence of thiamine pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lukacik, Petra; Lobley, Carina M C; Bumann, Mario; Arena de Souza, Victoria; Owens, Raymond J; O'Toole, Paul W; Walsh, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacterial strains have been shown to enhance the health of the host through a range of mechanisms including colonization, resistance against pathogens, secretion of antimicrobial compounds and modulation of the activity of the innate immune system. Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 is a well characterized probiotic strain which survives intestinal transit and has many desirable host-interaction properties. Probiotic bacteria display a wide range of catabolic activities, which determine their competitiveness in vivo. Some lactobacilli are heterofermentative and can metabolize pentoses, using a pathway in which transketolase and transaldolase are key enzymes. L. salivarius UCC118 is capable of pentose utilization because it encodes the key enzymes on a megaplasmid. The crystal structures of the megaplasmid-encoded transketolase with and without the enzyme cofactor thiamine pyrophosphate have been determined. Comparisons with other known transketolase structures reveal a high degree of structural conservation in both the catalytic site and the overall conformation. This work extends structural knowledge of the transketolases to the industrially and commercially important Lactobacillus genus.

  16. Investigation of thiamine and PCB association with early life stage fry mortality in lake trout from northwestern Lake Michigan in 1996-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, Dale C.; Beltman, Dong; Holey, Mark; Edsall, Carol C.

    2005-01-01

    Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) eggs were collected from 72 females near Sturgeon Bay, WI in northwestern Lake Michigan from 1996, 1997, and 1998 to determine the relationships between egg thiamine and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations with egg fertilization and hatch, prevalence of abnormal fry, and fry mortality. Fry mortality consistent with early mortality syndrome (EMS) was observed in eggs from 33% of the females in 1996, 25% in 1997, and 28% in 1998. Among egg lots exhibiting EMS, fry mortality averaged 95% in 1996, 63% in 1997 and 77% in 1998 compared to 2% or less in lots that did not exhibit EMS. Expression of EMS was strongly correlated with egg thiamine concentrations; egg lots with less than approximately 1 nmol/g total thiamine consistently exhibited high rates of EMS, whereas egg batches with greater than 1.5 nmol/g showed little or no incidence of EMS among swim-up fry. Egg thiamine concentration was not related to fertilization rate, egg hatch, or the prevalence of abnormal fry. There was no relationship between egg concentrations of PCBs or tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalents (from PCBs, dioxins, and furans) and any of the egg or fry viability measurements, including EMS. We concluded that fry mortality observed in Lake Michigan lake trout in 1996-1998 was not caused by the toxicity of PCBs, dioxins, and furans, but is due to low egg thiamine concentrations.

  17. Thiamine Deficiency Increases Ca2+ Current and CaV1.2 L-type Ca2+ Channel Levels in Cerebellum Granular Neurons.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Lobo, Daniel C; Cruz, Jader S; Silva, Flavia R; Ribeiro, Fabíola M; Kushmerick, Christopher; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2017-04-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is co-factor for three pivotal enzymes for glycolytic metabolism: pyruvate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and transketolase. Thiamine deficiency leads to neurodegeneration of several brain regions, especially the cerebellum. In addition, several neurodegenerative diseases are associated with impairments of glycolytic metabolism, including Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, understanding the link between dysfunction of the glycolytic pathway and neuronal death will be an important step to comprehend the mechanism and progression of neuronal degeneration as well as the development of new treatment for neurodegenerative states. Here, using an in vitro model to study the effects of thiamine deficiency on cerebellum granule neurons, we show an increase in Ca 2+ current density and Ca V 1.2 expression. These results indicate a link between alterations in glycolytic metabolism and changes to Ca 2+ dynamics, two factors that have been implicated in neurodegeneration.

  18. Conservation of Fold and Topology of Functional Elements in Thiamin Pyrophosphate Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a highly divergent family of proteins binding both TPP and metal ions. They perform decarboxylation-hydroxyaldehydes. Prior -ketoacids and of a common - (O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of to knowledge of three-dimensional structures of these enzmes, the GDGY25-30NN sequence was used to identify these enzymes. Subsequently, a number of structural studies on those enzymes revealed multi-subunit organization and the features of the two duplicate cofactor binding sites. Analyzing the structures of 44 structurally known enzymes, we found that the common structure of these enzymes is reduced to 180-220 amino acid long fragments of two PP and two PYR domains that form the [PP:PYR]2 binding center of two cofactor molecules. The structures of PP and PYR are arranged in a similar fold-sheet with triplets of helices on both sides.Dconsisting of a six-stranded Residues surrounding the cofactors are not strictly conserved, but they provide the same interatomic contacts required for the catalytic functions that these enzymes perform while maintaining interactive structural integrity. These structural and functional amino acids are topological counterparts located in the same positions of the conserved fold of sets of PP and PYR domains. Additional parallels include short fragments of sequences that link these amino acids to the fold and function. This report on the structural commonalities amongst TPP dependent enzymes is thought to contribute new approaches to annotation that may assist in advancing the functional proteomics of TPP dependent enzymes, and trace their complexity within evolutionary context.

  19. Effect of thiamine concentration on animal health, feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations in lambs fed diets based on 60% distillers dried grains plus solubles.

    PubMed

    Neville, B W; Schauer, C S; Karges, K; Gibson, M L; Thompson, M M; Kirschten, L A; Dyer, N W; Berg, P T; Lardy, G P

    2010-07-01

    Limited data are available regarding the influence of thiamine supplementation on the incidence of polioencephalomalacia (PEM) in lambs fed diets containing increased concentrations of S in the diet (>0.7%). Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the influence of thiamine supplementation on feedlot performance, carcass quality, ruminal hydrogen sulfide gas concentrations, and incidence of PEM in lambs fed a finishing diet containing 60% distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; DM basis). Two studies were conducted using completely randomized designs to evaluate the influence of concentration of thiamine supplementation. Study 1 used 240 lambs fed in 16 pens, whereas study 2 used 55 individually fed lambs. Lamb finishing diets contained 60% DDGS, which resulted in a dietary S concentration of 0.73% (DM basis). Treatments diets were based on the amount of supplemental thiamine provided: 1) no supplemental thiamine (CON), 2) 50 mg/animal per day (LO), 3) 100 mg/animal per day (MED), or 4) 150 mg/animal per day (HI). Additionally, in study 2, a fifth treatment was included, which contained 0.87% S (DM basis; increased S provided by addition of dilute sulfuric acid) and provided 150 mg of thiamine/animal per day (HI+S). In study 1, ADG decreased quadratically (P = 0.04), with lambs fed the CON, LO, and MED diets gaining BW at a greater rate than lambs fed the HI diet. In study 1, DMI responded quadratically (P < 0.01), whereas G:F tended to differ linearly (P = 0.08) to concentration of thiamine supplementation, with MED lambs having greater DMI and decreased G:F. No differences (P > or = 0.17) in lamb performance were observed in study 2. In both studies, most carcass characteristics were unaffected, with the exception of a tendency for decreased carcass conformation (study 1; P = 0.09) and greater flank streaking (study 2; P = 0.03). No differences in ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentration (P > 0.05) among treatments were apparent until d 10, at which point

  20. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase deficiency causes a Leigh Disease like phenotype in a sibling pair: identification through whole exome sequencing and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Jamie L; Vanderver, Adeline; Yang, Sandra; Chang, Taeun; Cramp, Laura; Vezina, Gilbert; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina P; Smpokou, Patroula; Chapman, Kimberly A; Zand, Dina J

    2014-01-01

    We present a sibling pair with Leigh-like disease, progressive hypotonia, regression, and chronic encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing in the younger sibling demonstrated a homozygous thiamine pyrophosphokinase (TPK) mutation. Initiation of high dose thiamine, niacin, biotin, α-lipoic acid and ketogenic diet in this child demonstrated improvement in neurologic function and re-attainment of previously lost milestones. The diagnosis of TPK deficiency was difficult due to inconsistent biochemical and diagnostic parameters, rapidity of clinical demise and would not have been made in a timely manner without the use of whole exome sequencing. Molecular diagnosis allowed for attempt at dietary modification with cofactor supplementation which resulted in an improved clinical course.

  1. Signs of preclinical Wernicke's encephalopathy and thiamine levels as predictors of neuropsychological deficits in alcoholism without Korsakoff's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pitel, Anne-Lise; Zahr, Natalie M; Jackson, Karen; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether meeting historical criteria for unsuspected Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), largely under-diagnosed in vivo, explains why some alcoholics have severe neuropsychological deficits, whereas others, with a similar drinking history, exhibit preserved performance. Demographic, clinical, alcohol related, and neuropsychological measures were collected in 56 abstinent alcoholics and 38 non-alcohol-dependent volunteers. Alcoholics were classified using the clinical criteria established by Caine et al (1997) and validated in their neuropathological study of alcoholic cases. Our alcoholics who met a single criterion were considered 'at risk for WE' and those with two or more criteria with 'signs of WE'. Whole blood thiamine was also measured in 22 of the comparison group and 28 alcoholics. Of the alcoholics examined, 27% met no criteria, 57% were at risk for WE, and 16% had signs of WE. Neuropsychological performance of the alcoholic subgroups was graded, with those meeting zero criteria not differing from controls, those meeting one criterion presenting mild-to-moderate deficits on some of the functional domains, and those meeting two or more criteria having the most severe deficits on each of the domains examined. Thiamine levels were selectively related to memory performance in the alcoholics. Preclinical signs of WE can be diagnosed in vivo, enabling the identification of ostensibly 'uncomplicated' alcoholics who are at risk for neuropsychological complications. The graded effects in neuropsychological performance suggest that the presence of signs of WE explains, at least partially, the heterogeneity of alcoholism-related cognitive and motor deficits.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of ternary mixtures of thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxal in pharmaceutical and human plasma by least-squares support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Ali; Zolgharnein, Javad; Afiuni-Zadeh, Somaie

    2007-11-01

    Ternary mixtures of thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxal have been simultaneously determined in synthetic and real samples by applications of spectrophotometric and least-squares support vector machines. The calibration graphs were linear in the ranges of 1.0 - 20.0, 1.0 - 10.0 and 1.0 - 20.0 microg ml(-1) with detection limits of 0.6, 0.5 and 0.7 microg ml(-1) for thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxal, respectively. The experimental calibration matrix was designed with 21 mixtures of these chemicals. The concentrations were varied between calibration graph concentrations of vitamins. The simultaneous determination of these vitamin mixtures by using spectrophotometric methods is a difficult problem, due to spectral interferences. The partial least squares (PLS) modeling and least-squares support vector machines were used for the multivariate calibration of the spectrophotometric data. An excellent model was built using LS-SVM, with low prediction errors and superior performance in relation to PLS. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxal with PLS and LS-SVM were 0.6926, 0.3755, 0.4322 and 0.0421, 0.0318, 0.0457, respectively. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied to the rapid simultaneous determination of thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxal in commercial pharmaceutical preparations and human plasma samples.

  3. Delayed Influence of Spinal Cord Injury on the Amino Acids of NO• Metabolism in Rat Cerebral Cortex Is Attenuated by Thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Alexandra; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Ryabov, Sergey; Baratova, Lyudmila; Graf, Anastasia; Bunik, Victoria

    2018-01-01

    Severe spinal cord injuries (SCIs) result in chronic neuroinflammation in the brain, associated with the development of cognitive and behavioral impairments. Nitric oxide (NO•) is a gaseous messenger involved in neuronal signaling and inflammation, contributing to nitrosative stress under dysregulated production of reactive nitrogen species. In this work, biochemical changes induced in the cerebral cortex of rats 8 weeks after SCI are assessed by quantification of the levels of amino acids participating in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. The contribution of the injury-induced neurodegeneration is revealed by comparison of the SCI- and laminectomy (LE)-subjected animals. Effects of the operative interventions are assessed by comparison of the operated (LE/SCI) and non-operated animals. Lower ratios of citrulline (Cit) to arginine (Arg) or Cit to ornithine and a more profound decrease in the ratio of lysine to glycine distinguish SCI animals from those after LE. The data suggest decreased NO• production from both Arg and homoarginine in the cortex 8 weeks after SCI. Both LE and SCI groups show a strong decrease in the level of cortex glutathione. The neurotropic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant actions of thiamine (vitamin B1) prompted us to study the thiamine effects on the SCI-induced changes in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. A thiamine injection (400 mg/kg intraperitoneally) within 24 h after SCI abrogates the changes in the cerebral cortex amino acids related to NO•. Thiamine-induced normalization of the brain glutathione levels after LE and SCI may involve increased supply of glutamate for glutathione biosynthesis. Thus, thiamine protects from sequelae of SCI on NO•-related amino acids and glutathione in cerebral cortex. PMID:29379782

  4. Normal and reverse flow injection–spectrophotometric determination of thiamine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations using diazotized metoclopramide

    PubMed Central

    Al Abachi, Mouayed Q.; Hadi, Hind

    2012-01-01

    Simple and sensitive normal and reverse flow injection methods for spectrophotometric determination of thiamine hydrochloride (THC) at the microgram level were proposed and optimized. Both methods are based on the reaction between THC and diazotized metoclopramide in alkaline medium. Beer’s law was obeyed over the range of 10–300 and 2–90 μg/mL, the limits of detection were 2.118 and 0.839 μg/mL and the sampling rates were 80 and 95 injections per hour for normal and reverse flow injection methods respectively. The application of both methods to commercially available pharmaceuticals produced acceptable results. The flow system is suitable for application in quality control processes. PMID:29403765

  5. Hydrocortisone, Vitamin C, and Thiamine for the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Retrospective Before-After Study.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Khangoora, Vikramjit; Rivera, Racquel; Hooper, Michael H; Catravas, John

    2017-06-01

    The global burden of sepsis is estimated as 15 to 19 million cases annually, with a mortality rate approaching 60% in low-income countries. In this retrospective before-after clinical study, we compared the outcome and clinical course of consecutive septic patients treated with intravenous vitamin C, hydrocortisone, and thiamine during a 7-month period (treatment group) with a control group treated in our ICU during the preceding 7 months. The primary outcome was hospital survival. A propensity score was generated to adjust the primary outcome. There were 47 patients in both treatment and control groups, with no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The hospital mortality was 8.5% (4 of 47) in the treatment group compared with 40.4% (19 of 47) in the control group (P < .001). The propensity adjusted odds of mortality in the patients treated with the vitamin C protocol was 0.13 (95% CI, 0.04-0.48; P = .002). The Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment score decreased in all patients in the treatment group, with none developing progressive organ failure. All patients in the treatment group were weaned off vasopressors, a mean of 18.3 ± 9.8 h after starting treatment with the vitamin C protocol. The mean duration of vasopressor use was 54.9 ± 28.4 h in the control group (P < .001). Our results suggest that the early use of intravenous vitamin C, together with corticosteroids and thiamine, are effective in preventing progressive organ dysfunction, including acute kidney injury, and in reducing the mortality of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Additional studies are required to confirm these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thiamine deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency (TD) plays a major role in the etiology of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) which is a severe neurological disorder. TD induces selective neuronal cell death, neuroinflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress in the brain which are commonly observed in many aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The progress in this line of research is hindered due to the lack of appropriate in vitro models. The neurons derived for the human induced pluripotent stemmore » cells (hiPSCs) provide a relevant and powerful tool for the research in pharmaceutical and environmental neurotoxicity. In this study, we for the first time used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-derived neurons (iCell neurons) to investigate the mechanisms of TD-induced neurodegeneration. We showed that TD caused a concentration- and duration-dependent death of iCell neurons. TD induced ER stress which was evident by the increase in ER stress markers, such as GRP78, XBP-1, CHOP, ATF-6, phosphorylated eIF2α, and cleaved caspase-12. TD also triggered oxidative stress which was shown by the increase in the expression 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). ER stress inhibitors (STF-083010 and salubrinal) and antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) were effective in alleviating TD-induced death of iCell neurons, supporting the involvement of ER stress and oxidative stress. It establishes that the iCell neurons are a novel tool to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms for TD-induced neurodegeneration. - Highlights: • Thiamine deficiency (TD) causes death of human neurons in culture. • TD induces both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress. • Alleviating ER stress and oxidative stress reduces TD

  7. Recovered insulin production after thiamine administration in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus with a novel solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) mutation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengjun; Pei, Zhou; Zhang, Miaoying; Sun, Bijun; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Zhuhui; Cheng, Ruoqian; Luo, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    Solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) gene deficiency is one of the causes of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and can be effectively managed by thiamine supplementation. Herein we report on a male patient with a novel SLC19A2 mutation and summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with SLC19A2 deficiency. The genetic diagnosis of the patient with PNDM was made by sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The clinical characteristics of PNDM were summarized on the basis of a systematic review of the literature. The patient with PNDM had c.848G>A (p.W283X) homozygous mutation in SLC19A2. His father had a wild-type SLC19A2 (c.848G) and his mother was c.848G/A heterozygous. The patient and his father both had a diploid genotype (c.848A/A and c.848G/G). After oral thiamine administration, the patient's fasting C-peptide levels increased gradually, and there was a marked decrease in insulin requirements. A search of the literature revealed that thiamine treatment was effective and improved diabetes in 63% of patients with SLC19A2 deficiency. A novel SLC19A2 mutation (c.848G>A; p.W283X) was identified, which was most likely inherited as segmental uniparental isodisomy. Insulin insufficiency in PNDM caused by SLC19A2 deficiency can be corrected by thiamine supplementation. The differential diagnosis of SLC19A2 deficiency should be considered in children with PNDM accompanied by anemia or hearing defects to allow for early treatment. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Biochemical and molecular analysis of an X-linked case of Leigh syndrome associated with thiamin-responsive pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Naito, E; Ito, M; Yokota, I; Saijo, T; Matsuda, J; Osaka, H; Kimura, S; Kuroda, Y

    1997-08-01

    We report molecular analysis of thiamin-responsive pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) deficiency in a patient with an X-linked form of Leigh syndrome. PDHC activity in cultured lymphoblastoid cells of this patient and his asymptomatic mother were normal in the presence of a high thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) concentration (0.4 mmol/L). However, in the presence of a low concentration (1 x 10(-4) mmol/L) of TPP, the activity was significantly decreased, indicating that PDHC deficiency in this patient was due to decreased affinity of PDHC for TPP. The patient's older brother also was diagnosed as PDHC deficiency with Leigh syndrome, suggesting that PDHC deficiency in these two brothers was not a de novo mutation. Sequencing of the X-linked PDHC E1 alpha subunit revealed a C-->G point mutation at nucleotide 787, resulting in a substitution of glycine for arginine 263. Restriction enzyme analysis of the E1 alpha gene revealed that the mother was a heterozygote, indicating that thiamin-responsive PDHC deficiency associated with Leigh syndrome due to this mutation is transmitted by X-linked inheritance.

  9. Thiamine Deprivation Produces a Liver ATP Deficit and Metabolic and Genomic Effects in Mice: Findings Are Parallel to Those of Biotin Deficiency and Have Implications for Energy Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vazquez, Alain de J; Garcia-Sanchez, Josue Andres; Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; Salvador-Adriano, Ana; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Velazquez-Arellano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine is one of several essential cofactors for ATP generation. Its deficiency, like in beriberi and in the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, has been studied for many decades. However, its mechanism of action is still not completely understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Since it acts as a coenzyme for dehydrogenases of pyruvate, branched-chain keto acids, and ketoglutarate, its nutritional privation is partly a phenocopy of inborn errors of metabolism, among them maple syrup urine disease. In the present paper, we report metabolic and genomic findings in mice deprived of thiamine. They are similar to the ones we have previously found in biotin deficiency, another ATP generation cofactor. Here we show that thiamine deficiency substantially reduced the energy state in the liver and activated the energy sensor AMP-activated kinase. With this vitamin deficiency, several metabolic parameters changed: blood glucose was diminished and serum lactate was increased, but insulin, triglycerides, and cholesterol, as well as liver glycogen, were reduced. These results indicate a severe change in the energy status of the whole organism. Our findings were associated with modified hepatic levels of the mRNAs of several carbon metabolism genes: a reduction of transcripts for liver glucokinase and fatty acid synthase and augmentation of those for carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase as markers for glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, beta-oxidation, and gluconeogenesis, respectively. Glucose tolerance was initially increased, suggesting augmented insulin sensitivity, as we had found in biotin deficiency; however, in the case of thiamine, it was diminished from the 3rd week on, when the deficient animals became undernourished, and paralleled the changes in AKT and mTOR, 2 main proteins in the insulin signaling pathway. Since many of the metabolic and gene expression effects on mice deprived of thiamine are similar to those in biotin deficiency

  10. The Conservation of Structure and Mechanism of Catalytic Action in a Family of Thiamin Pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a divergent family of TPP and metal ion binding proteins that perform a wide range of functions with the common decarboxylation steps of a -(O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of alpha-ketoacids and alpha- hydroxyaldehydes. To determine how structure and catalytic action are conserved in the context of large sequence differences existing within this family of enzymes, we have carried out an analysis of TPP-dependent enzymes of known structures. The common structure of TPP-dependent enzymes is formed at the interface of four alpha/beta domains from at least two subunits, which provide for two metal and TPP-binding sites. Residues around these catalytic sites are conserved for functional purpose, while those further away from TPP are conserved for structural reasons. Together they provide a network of contacts required for flip-flop catalytic action within TPP-dependent enzymes. Thus our analysis defines a TPP-action motif that is proposed for annotating TPP-dependent enzymes for advancing functional proteomics.

  11. Characterisation of a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Proteus mirabilis JN458.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biying; Bai, Yajun; Fan, Taiping; Zheng, Xiaohui; Cai, Yujie

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-keto acid decarboxylases can convert keto acids to their corresponding aldehydes, which are often volatile aroma compounds. The gene encoding α-keto acid decarboxylase in Proteus mirabilis JN458 was cloned, and the enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), purified in high yield, and characterised. The molecular weight is 62.291kDa by MALDI-TOF MS, and optimum activity at pH 6.0 and 40-50°C. The enzyme is a typical decarboxylase, dependent on thiamine diphosphate and Mg 2+ as cofactors. For the decarboxylation reaction, the enzyme displayed a broad substrate range. Kinetic parameters were determined using 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid, phenyl pyruvate and 3-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid as substrates. K m and k cat values for phenyl pyruvate were 0.62mM and 77.38s -1 , respectively, and the k cat /K m value was 124.81mM -1 s -1 . The enzyme properties suggest it may act effectively under cheese ripening conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Thiamine pyrophosphate requirement for o-succinylbenzoic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli and evidence for an intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Meganathan, R; Bentley, R

    1983-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of various strains of Escherichia coli synthesize the menaquinone biosynthetic intermediate o-succinylbenzoic acid (OSB) when supplied with chorismic acid, 2-ketoglutaric acid, and thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). To assay for OSB synthesis, 2-[U-14C]ketoglutaric acid was used as substrate, and the synthesized OSB was examined by radiogas chromatography (as the dimethyl ester). [U-14C]Shikimic acid also gave rise to radioactive OSB if the cofactors necessary for enzymatic conversion to chorismic acid were added. Use of 2-[1-14C]ketoglutaric acid does not give rise to labeled OSB. In the absence of TPP during the incubations, OSB synthesis was much reduced; these observations are consistent with the proposed role for the succinic semialdehyde-TPP anion as the reagent adding to chorismic acid. Extracts of cells from menC and menD mutants did not form OSB separately, but did so in combination. There was evidence for formation of a product, X, by extracts of a menC mutant incubated with chorismic acid, TPP, and 2-ketoglutaric acid; X was converted to OSB by extracts of a menD mutant. It appears that the intermediate, X, is formed by one gene product and converted to OSB by the second gene product. PMID:6337125

  13. Whole cell immobilized amperometric biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for selective determination of vitamin B1 (thiamine).

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Yaşa, Ihsan; Dinçkaya, Erhan

    2006-07-01

    A new amperometric whole cell biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in gelatin was developed for selective determination of vitamin B1 (thiamine). The biosensor was constructed by using gelatin and crosslinking agent glutaraldehyde to immobilize S. cerevisiae cells on the Teflon membrane of dissolved oxygen (DO) probe used as the basic electrode system combined with a digital oxygen meter. The cells were induced by vitamin B1 in the culture medium, and the cells used it as a carbon source in the absence of glucose. So, when the vitamin B1 solution is injected into the whole cell biosensor system, an increase in respiration activity of the cells results from the metabolic activity and causes a decrease in the DO concentration of interval surface of DO probe related to vitamin B1 concentration. The response time of the biosensor is 3 min, and the optimal working conditions of the biosensor were carried out as pH 7.0, 50mM Tris-HCl, and 30 degrees C. A linear relationship was obtained between the DO concentration decrease and vitamin B1 concentration between 5.0 x 10(-3) and 10(-1) microM. In the application studies of the biosensor, sensitive determination of vitamin B1 in the vitamin tablets was investigated.

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on the thiamine, riboflavin and vitamin B 6 content in two varieties of Brazilian beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, A. L. C. H. A. L. C. H.; Mancini-Filho, J. J.; Delincée, H. H.; Bognár, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of 60Co gamma rays on the content of several B-vitamins in two varieties of Brazilian beans has been studied. Carioca ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Carioca) and Macaçar beans ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp, var. Macaçar) were irradiated at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy, and subsequently stored at ambient temperature for 6 months. The content of vitamin B 1, B 2 and B 6 was analysed by HPLC. In addition, the optimum cooking time was established for each dose and bean variety. A taste panel evaluated sensory properties. Only slight changes were measured for thiamine and riboflavin, whereas a dose-dependent decrease was noted for pyridoxine, which, however, was significant only at the highest doses of 5 and 10 kGy. Cooking time was considerably reduced with increasing radiation dose, but accompanied by a loss of the sensory quality. However, at the disinfestation dose up to 1 kGy, acceptable ratings were obtained for the sensory evaluation. In conclusion, for insect disinfestation of Brazilian beans radiation processing is a promising technology.

  15. Thiamine deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A; Ke, Zun-Ji; Luo, Jia

    2017-04-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency (TD) plays a major role in the etiology of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) which is a severe neurological disorder. TD induces selective neuronal cell death, neuroinflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress in the brain which are commonly observed in many aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The progress in this line of research is hindered due to the lack of appropriate in vitro models. The neurons derived for the human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide a relevant and powerful tool for the research in pharmaceutical and environmental neurotoxicity. In this study, we for the first time used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-derived neurons (iCell neurons) to investigate the mechanisms of TD-induced neurodegeneration. We showed that TD caused a concentration- and duration-dependent death of iCell neurons. TD induced ER stress which was evident by the increase in ER stress markers, such as GRP78, XBP-1, CHOP, ATF-6, phosphorylated eIF2α, and cleaved caspase-12. TD also triggered oxidative stress which was shown by the increase in the expression 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). ER stress inhibitors (STF-083010 and salubrinal) and antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) were effective in alleviating TD-induced death of iCell neurons, supporting the involvement of ER stress and oxidative stress. It establishes that the iCell neurons are a novel tool to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms for TD-induced neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced activities of thiamine-dependent and cytochrome c oxidase enzymes in cerebral cortex of cattle affected by sulfur-induced polioencephalomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Amat, Samat; Hendrick, Steve; Moshynskyy, Igor; Simko, Elemir

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-induced polioencephalomalacia (PEM) is an important disease affecting cattle in certain geographical regions. However, the pathogenesis of brain damage is not completely understood. We previously observed that excess dietary sulfur may influence thiamine status and altered thiamine metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of sulfur-induced PEM in cattle. In this study, we evaluated the activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes [α-ketogluterate dehydrogenase (α-KGDH) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)] and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in the cerebral cortex of sulfur-induced PEM-affected cattle (n = 9) and clinically normal cattle (n = 8, each group) exposed to low or high dietary sulfur [LS = 0.30% versus HS = 0.67% sulfur on a dry matter (DM) basis]. Enzyme activities in PEM brains were measured from the brain tissue regions and examined using ultraviolent (UV) light illumination to show fluorescence or non-fluorescence regions. No gross changes under regular or UV light, or histopathological changes indicative of PEM were detected in the brains of cattle exposed to LS or HS diets. The PDH, α-KGDH, and COX activities did not differ between LS and HS brains, but all enzymes showed significantly lower (P < 0.05) activities in UV-positive region of PEM brains compared with LS and HS brains. The UV-negative regions of PEM brain had similar PDH activities to LS and HS brains, but the activities of α-KGDH and COX were significantly lower than in LS and HS brains. The results of this study suggest that reduced enzyme activities of brain PHD, α-KGDH, and COX are associated with the pathogenesis of sulfur-induced PEM. PMID:29081580

  17. Structural determinants of enzyme binding affinity: the E1 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli in complex with the inhibitor thiamin thiazolone diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Nemeria, Natalia; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2004-03-09

    Thiamin thiazolone diphosphate (ThTDP), a potent inhibitor of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), binds to the enzyme with greater affinity than does the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). To identify what determines this difference, the crystal structure of the apo PDHc E1 component complex with ThTDP and Mg(2+) has been determined at 2.1 A and compared to the known structure of the native holoenzyme, PDHc E1-ThDP-Mg(2+) complex. When ThTDP replaces ThDP, reorganization occurs in the protein structure in the vicinity of the active site involving positional and conformational changes in some amino acid residues, a change in the V coenzyme conformation, addition of new hydration sites, and elimination of others. These changes culminate in an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds to the protein, explaining the greater affinity of the apoenzyme for ThTDP. The observed hydrogen bonding pattern is not an invariant feature of ThDP-dependent enzymes but rather specific to this enzyme since the extra hydrogen bonds are made with nonconserved residues. Accordingly, these sequence-related hydrogen bonding differences likewise explain the wide variation in the affinities of different thiamin-dependent enzymes for ThTDP and ThDP. The sequence of each enzyme determines its ability to form hydrogen bonds to the inhibitor or cofactor. Mechanistic roles are suggested for the aforementioned reorganization and its reversal in PDHc E1 catalysis: to promote substrate binding and product release. This study also provides additional insight into the role of water in enzyme inhibition and catalysis.

  18. Measurement of serum, liver, and brain cytokine induction, thiamine levels, and hepatopathology in rats exposed to a 4-day alcohol binge protocol.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Natalie M; Luong, Richard; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-11-01

     In rodent and human studies, ethanol (EtOH) exposure is associated with elevated brain levels of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signal representing choline-containing compounds (Cho). One interpretation of elevated brain Cho is that it is a marker of neuroinflammation, and some evidence suggests that EtOH exposure promotes neuroinflammation. This study aimed to determine whether binge EtOH exposure (intragastric 3 g/kg 25% EtOH every 8 hours for 4 days) would induce the expression of certain cytokines in blood, liver, or brain, thereby supporting the neuroinflammation hypothesis of elevated Cho. Ten of 18 wild-type male Wistar rats (~322 g at baseline) were exposed to EtOH and attained average blood alcohol levels of ~315 mg/dl across 4 days. Blood for cytokine immunoassays was collected at baseline, after 5 doses of EtOH (binge), and immediately preceding euthanasia either 4 or 24 hours after the last dose of EtOH. Blood was additionally assayed for the levels of thiamine and liver enzymes; liver histopathology was performed postmortem; and tissue from liver and 6 brain regions was assayed for the potential induction of 7 cytokines. There were no group effects on the levels of thiamine or its phosphate derivatives, thiamine monophosphate or thiamine diphosphate. ANOVAs of liver enzyme levels indicated that only alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were higher in the EtOH group than in control group at binge; ALP elevations, however, are difficult to explain in the absence of changes in the levels of additional liver enzymes. Postmortem liver pathology provided evidence for minimal microvesicular lipidosis and portocentric fibrosis in the EtOH group. Group effects on the levels of the measured cytokines in the blood (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and GRO/CXCL1) were not significant. Similarly, postmortem evaluation of liver cytokines did not reveal group effects. Postmortem evaluation of the 7 cytokines in 6 brain regions (anterior

  19. Soybeans vs. textured soy proteins as meat extenders. Cooking losses, palatability, and thiamin content of freshly cooked and frozen meat loaves.

    PubMed

    Ali, F S; Perry, A K; Van Duyne, F O

    1982-10-01

    The effects of replacing 30 percent of the ground beef in meat loaves with boiled ground soybeans or textured soy protein (TSP) were studied. The substitutions were equally effective in increasing yields of freshly cooked, raw frozen and cooked, and cooked, frozen, and reheated meat loaves. Scores for several palatability characteristics, including general desirability, were higher for meat loaves containing soybeans than for loaves containing TSP. The mixtures and loaves contained similar amounts of protein and thiamin. Cooking losses and mean palatability scores indicated advantages for freezing raw loaf mixtures rather than cooked loaves.

  20. Effect of thiamine hydrochloride on the redox reactions of iron at pyrite surface. [Fourth quarterly techical progress report, September 1990--November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.; Oliver, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The present investigation is a part of our studies on the electro chemical aspects of pyrite bioleaching involving Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Previously (1,2) we have examined the effect of T. ferrooxidans and their metabolic products on the redox reactions of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} couple at the pyrite surface. Results obtained suggest that beyond 1. 5 days during their growth in a batch fermenter, the bacteria and their metabolic products completely cover the pyrite surface and shut down all electron transfer across the electrode-solution interface. In addition, it has been observed that the bacteria serve as the nucleation site for jarosite formation,more » which is found detrimental to bioleaching. In the present work we have focussed on the effect of the presence of vitamins on the redox chemistry of iron. Our examination of the effect of the presence of thiamine hydrochloride in the redox behavior of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} at the pyrite surface has revealed that thiamine hydrochloride does not undergo chemical interaction with ferrous or ferric iron. However, it may adsorb onto the pyrite surface causing polarization of the pyrite electrode.« less

  1. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of vitamin BI, is a cofactor of enzymes catalyzing reactions involving the cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond adjacent to an oxo group. TPP-dependent enzymes show a common mechanism of TPP activation by: (1) forming the ionic N-H...O(sup -) hydrogen bonding between the N1' atom of the aminopirymidine ring of the coenzyme and intrinsic gamma-carboxylate group of glutamate and (2) imposing an "active" V-conformation that brings the N4' atom of the aminopirymidine to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H.. .N hydrogen bonding with the thiazolium C2 atom. Within these two hydrogen bonds that rapidly exchange protons, protonation of the N1' atom is strictly coordinated with the deprotonation of the 4' -amino group and eventually abstraction of the proton from C2. The human pyruvate dehydrogenase Elp, component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of the pyruvate followed by the reductive acetylation of the lipoyl group of dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase. Elp is alpha(sub 2)beta(sub2)-heterotetrameric with a molecular mass of I54 kDa, which has two catalytic sites, each providing TPP and magnesium ion as cofactors and each formed on the interface between the PP and PYR domains. The dynamic nonequivalence of two otherwise chemically equivalent catalytic sites has been observed and the flip-flop mechanism was suggested, according to which two active sites affect each other and in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the sites at any given moment. Based on specific futures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase including rigid and flexible connections between domains that bind the cofactor we propose a mechanistic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme. We postulate that the dynamic protein environment drives the exchange of tautomers in the 4' -aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor through a concerted shuttl-like motion of

  2. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  3. The Long-Term Cost to the UK NHS and Social Services of Different Durations of IV Thiamine (Vitamin B1) for Chronic Alcohol Misusers with Symptoms of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Presenting at the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Edward C F; Stanley, George; Mirza, Zulfiquar

    2016-04-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neuropsychiatric condition caused by depleted intracellular thiamine, most commonly arising in chronic alcohol misusers, who may present to emergency departments (EDs) for a variety of reasons. Guidelines recommend a minimum 5-day course of intravenous (IV) thiamine in at-risk patients unless WE can be excluded. To estimate the cost impact on the UK public sector (NHS and social services) of a 5-day course of IV thiamine, vs a 2- and 10-day course, in harmful or dependent drinkers presenting to EDs. A Markov chain model compared expected prognosis of patients under alternative admission strategies over 35 years. Model inputs were derived from a prospective cohort study, expert opinion via structured elicitation and NHS costing databases. Costs (2012/2013 price year) were discounted at 3.5 %. Increasing treatment from 2 to 5 days increased acute care costs but reduced the probability of disease progression and thus reduced the expected net costs by GBP87,000 per patient (95 % confidence interval GBP19,300 to GBP172,300) over 35 years. Increasing length of stay to optimize IV thiamine replacement will place additional strain on acute care but has potential UK public sector cost savings. Social services and the NHS should explore collaborations to realise both the health benefits to patients and savings to the public purse.

  4. Five Herbs Plus Thiamine Reduce Pain and Improve Functional Mobility in Patients With Pain: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hedaya, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Context • Five herbs-Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), Boswellia serrata, Equisetum arvense, Allium sativum, and Apium graveolens-have been demonstrated to have activity at several anti-inflammatory pathways and have analgesic properties that are effective in treating chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives • The study intended to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a proprietary blend of U dioica, B serrata, E arvense, A sativum, A graveolens, and thiamine (vitamin B1), or "the blend," in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods • The research team performed a prospective case study. Setting • The study took place at the National Center for Whole Psychiatry in Chevy Chase, MD, USA. Participants were patients who had experienced baseline persistent musculoskeletal pain for at least 4 mo in ≥1 body parts without relief from traditional treatments. Intervention • Participants were provided with a 14-d supply of the study's medication. Two 350-mg capsules were administered 2 ×/d with food. The participants were instructed not to alter or add any therapies for their pain-associated condition for the 14 d of the study. Outcome Measures • The primary outcome measure was the change on a subjectively scored visual analogue scale (VAS), similar to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The VAS was used to assess pain and the impact of motion and mobility at each location with pain. Each patient was administered the VAS rating scale to assess physical function and pain status at baseline and at the end of 14 d or postintervention. Patients were seen for follow-up at a minimum of 2 wk and underwent an interview, with the VAS rating scale being readministered. Results • A total of 13 patients, involving 27 pain sites, qualified for the study, 5 males and 8 females with a median age of 58 y. The primary sites of pain were (1) the knees-5 sites (18.5%), (2) the shoulders-6 sites (16.6%), and (3) the back (sciatica)-5

  5. Human 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Forms a Thiamin-derived Radical by Aerobic Oxidation of the Enamine Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Ambrus, Attila; Patel, Hetalben; Gerfen, Gary; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Tretter, Laszlo; Zhou, Jieyu; Wang, Junjie; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Herein are reported unique properties of the human 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (OGDHc), a rate-limiting enzyme in the Krebs (citric acid) cycle. (a) Functionally competent 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1o-h) and dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase components have been expressed according to kinetic and spectroscopic evidence. (b) A stable free radical, consistent with the C2-(C2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) cation radical was detected by electron spin resonance upon reaction of the E1o-h with 2-oxoglutarate (OG) by itself or when assembled from individual components into OGDHc. (c) An unusual stability of the E1o-h-bound C2-(2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (the “ThDP-enamine”/C2α-carbanion, the first postdecarboxylation intermediate) was observed, probably stabilized by the 5-carboxyl group of OG, not reported before. (d) The reaction of OG with the E1o-h gave rise to superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (reactive oxygen species (ROS)). (e) The relatively stable enzyme-bound enamine is the likely substrate for oxidation by O2, leading to the superoxide anion radical (in d) and the radical (in b). (f) The specific activity assessed for ROS formation compared with the NADH (overall complex) activity, as well as the fraction of radical intermediate occupying active centers of E1o-h are consistent with each other and indicate that radical/ROS formation is an “off-pathway” side reaction comprising less than 1% of the “on-pathway” reactivity. However, the nearly ubiquitous presence of OGDHc in human tissues, including the brain, makes these findings of considerable importance in human metabolism and perhaps disease. PMID:25210035

  6. E. coli o157:H7 population reduction from alfalfa seeds with malic acid and thiamine dilauryl sulfate and quality evaluation of the resulting sprouts.

    PubMed

    Fransisca, Lilia; Park, Hee Kyung; Feng, Hao

    2012-02-01

    It has been reported that washing seeds with a 20000 ppm Ca(OCl)(2) solution as recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is unable to eliminate E. coli cells attached to seed surfaces, and the bacterial cells that have survived a sanitation wash can proliferate during sprouting to a high population. The objectives of this research were to examine the efficacy of malic acid (MA) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) combined treatments on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on alfalfa seeds, to study the growth of the remaining E. coli cells during sprouting, and to evaluate the sprout quality. When 10 g of inoculated alfalfa seeds were washed in a 10% MA-1% TDS solution, a complete elimination of E. coli was achieved. The same result was observed by washing the seeds in a 20000 ppm Ca(OCl)(2) solution. However, when the seed size was increased to 50 g while maintaining the same seed-to-sanitizer ratio, both the MA + TDS and the 20000 ppm chlorine washes failed to completely inactivate the E. coli cells on the seeds. Nevertheless, the 10% MA-1% TDS solution was significantly more effective in E. coli count reduction compared to the 20000 ppm chlorine wash. The E. coli O157:H7 cells remaining on the seeds after treatments with both sanitizers grew up to 7 to 8 log CFU/g sprout after 96 h of sprouting. Under the treatment conditions used in this study, none of the treatments resulted in significant differences in germination rate, yield, or quality of the sprouts. The malic acid (MA) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) combined treatment may provide a new solution to secure the microbial safety of seeds and sprouts. An important finding of this study is that seed sample size has a significant impact on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on alfalfa seeds. The microbial inactivation results obtained in a laboratory set-up cannot be directly applied to a large scale operation. A validation test on the large scale has to be performed to evaluate the efficacy of

  7. Chronic administration of thiamine pyrophosphate decreases age-related histological atrophic testicular changes and improves sexual behavior in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Montiel, H L; Vásquez López, C M; González-Loyola, J G; Vega-Anaya, G C; Villagrán-Herrera, M E; Gallegos-Corona, M A; Saldaña, C; Ramos Gómez, M; García Horshman, P; García Solís, P; Solís-S, J C; Robles-Osorio, M L; Ávila Morales, J; Varela-Echavarría, A; Paredes Guerrero, R

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a multifactorial universal process and constitutes the most important risk factor for chronic-degenerative diseases. Although it is a natural process, pathological aging arises when these changes occur quickly and the body is not able to adapt. This is often associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and a decrease in the endogenous antioxidant systems, constituting a physiopathological state commonly found in chronic-degenerative diseases. At the testicular level, aging is associated with tissue atrophy, decreased steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis, and sexual behavior disorders. This situation, in addition to the elevated generation of ROS in the testicular steroidogenesis, provides a critical cellular environment causing oxidative damage at diverse cellular levels. To assess the effects of a reduction in the levels of ROS, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) was chronically administered in senile Wistar rats. TPP causes an activation of intermediate metabolism routes, enhancing cellular respiration and decreasing the generation of ROS. Our results show an overall decrease of atrophic histological changes linked to aging, with higher levels of serum testosterone, sexual activity, and an increase in the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes in TPP-treated animals. These results suggest that TPP chronic administration decreases the progression of age-related atrophic changes by improving the intermediate metabolism, and by increasing the levels of antioxidant enzymes.

  8. Determination of thiamine HCl and pyridoxine HCl in pharmaceutical preparations using UV-visible spectrophotometry and genetic algorithm based multivariate calibration methods.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Durmus; Dinc, Erdal

    2004-07-01

    Simultaneous determination of binary mixtures pyridoxine hydrochloride and thiamine hydrochloride in a vitamin combination using UV-visible spectrophotometry and classical least squares (CLS) and three newly developed genetic algorithm (GA) based multivariate calibration methods was demonstrated. The three genetic multivariate calibration methods are Genetic Classical Least Squares (GCLS), Genetic Inverse Least Squares (GILS) and Genetic Regression (GR). The sample data set contains the UV-visible spectra of 30 synthetic mixtures (8 to 40 microg/ml) of these vitamins and 10 tablets containing 250 mg from each vitamin. The spectra cover the range from 200 to 330 nm in 0.1 nm intervals. Several calibration models were built with the four methods for the two components. Overall, the standard error of calibration (SEC) and the standard error of prediction (SEP) for the synthetic data were in the range of <0.01 and 0.43 microg/ml for all the four methods. The SEP values for the tablets were in the range of 2.91 and 11.51 mg/tablets. A comparison of genetic algorithm selected wavelengths for each component using GR method was also included.

  9. Stability of Atenolol, Clonazepam, Dexamethasone, Diclofenac Sodium, Diltiazem, Enalapril Maleate, Ketoprofen, Lamotrigine, Penicillamine-D, and Thiamine in SyrSpend SF PH4 Oral Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Polonini, Hudson C; Loures, Sharlene; Lima, Luis Claudio; Ferreira, Anderson O; Brandão, Marcos Antônio F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of 10 commonly used active pharmaceutical ingredients compounded in oral suspensions using SyrSpend SF PH4 (atenolol 1.0 and 5.0 mg/mL, clonazepam 0.2 mg/mL, dexamethasone 1.0 mg/mL, diclofenac sodium 5.0 mg/mL, diltiazem 12.0 mg/mL, enalapril maleate 1.0 mg/mL, ketoprofen 20.0 mg/mL, lamotrigine 1.0 mg/mL, penicillamine-D 50.0 mg/mL, thiamine 100 mg/m) and stored both at controlled refrigerated (2°C to 8°C) and room temperature (20°C to 25°C). Stability was assessed by means of measuring percent recovery at varying time points throughout a 90-day period. The quantification of the active pharmaceutical ingredients was performed by a stability-indicating, high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The beyond-use date of the products was found to be at least 90 days for all suspensions (except atenolol 1 mg/mL, which was stable up to 60 days), both for controlled refrigerated temperature and room temperature. This confirms that SyrSpend SF PH4 is a stable suspending vehicle for compounding with a broad range of different active pharmaceutical ingredients.

  10. The impact of raw materials and baking conditions on Maillard reaction products, thiamine, folate, phytic acid and minerals in white bread.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Robert, Nathalie; Branlard, Gérard; Thebault, Jacques; Librere, Sarah; Jacquot, Sylvain; Mardon, Julie; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès; Chapron, Sophie; Chatillon, Antoine; Niquet-Léridon, Céline; Tessier, Frédéric J

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a white bread with improved nutrient contents and reduced levels of potentially harmful Maillard reaction products such as N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Assays were carried out through a full factorial experimental design allowing the simultaneous analysis of four factors at two levels: (1) wheat flour extraction rates (ash content: 0.60%-0.72%), (2) leavening agents (bakers' yeast - bakers' yeast and sourdough), (3) prebaking and (4) baking conditions (different sets of time and temperature). The baking conditions affected HMF and CML as well as certain mineral contents. A reduced baking temperature along with a prolonged heat treatment was found to be favourable for reducing both the CML (up to 20%) and HMF concentrations (up to 96%). The presence of sourdough decreased the formation of CML (up to 28%), and increased the apparent amounts of calcium (up to 8%) and manganese (up to 17.5%) probably through acidification of the dough. The extraction rate of flours as well as interactions between multiple factors also affected certain mineral content. However, compounds like folate, thiamine, copper, zinc, iron and phytic acid were not affected by any of the factors studied.

  11. Part I: RNA hydrolysis catalyzed by imidazole compounds. Part II. Hydrophobic acceleration of reactions and mimics of thiamin-dependent enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    Catalysts modeled after the active site groups of the enzyme Ribonuclease A were synthesized and tested for catalysis of the hydrolysis of poly(rU), using a quantitative assay. The most effective of all the catalysts is N,N{prime}-bis-imidazolylmethane, which gave a four-fold rate enhancement as compared to N-methyl-imidazole. The structure/activity relationships are discussed in light of the ribonuclease mechanism. Also examined were reactions catalyzed by the coenzyme thiamine. In an investigation of the effects of restricting conformational freedom, a thiazolium salt was attached in two positions to {beta}-cyclodextrin. Since the catalyst gave about the same rate for tritium exchange from benzaldehyde asmore » singly-attached catalysts, we surmise that any rate enhancement due to the restriction of bond rotations has been lost by forcing the structure into less productive conformations. The benzoin condensation catalyzed by cyanide was also investigated. The reaction was shown to be faster in water than in most organic solvents. Kinetic salt effects and the effects of added {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrin were measured in water; salting-out ions and {gamma}-cyclodextrin increase the rate, while salting-in ions and {beta}-cyclodextrin decrease it. Negative salt effects were observed in formamide, ethylene glycol, and DMSO. All these media effects are discussed in relation to the compact, hydrophobic transition state for the reaction.« less

  12. ZIO impregnation and cytochemical localization of thiamine pyrophosphatase and acid phosphatase activities in small granule-containing (SGC) cells of rat superior cervical ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Y P; Lu, K S

    1994-10-01

    Cytochemical relationship between Golgi complex and dense-cored granules (DCGs) of small granule-containing (SGC) cells in rat superior cervical ganglia was examined in electron microscopy by zinc-iodide-osmium tetroxide (ZIO) method and by enzyme cytochemistry for thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase) and acid phosphatase (ACPase). After ZIO impregnation, all the saccules of Golgi apparatus and some of tubular rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were stained. DCGs in periphery of SGC cells were not stained, but varying degrees of dense deposits occurred in the DCGs in vicinity of Golgi trans-saccules. Both TPPase and ACPase activities were localized in one or two stacked layers of saccules on the trans side of the Golgi complex. No reaction products were demonstrated in the DCGs. From these results, we suggest that the DCGs of SGC cells in rat superior cervical ganglia are derived from the Golgi complex, and that lysosomal cleavage of protein contents in the DCGs may occur in the trans Golgi saccules.

  13. Medical treatment with thiamine, coenzyme Q, vitamins E and C, and carnitine improved obstructive sleep apnea in an adult case of Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    Mermigkis, Charalampos; Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Plaitakis, Andreas; Alogdianakis, Vangelis; Siafakas, Nikolaos; Schiza, Sophia

    2013-12-01

    The multi-organ involvement of mitochondrial diseases means that patients are likely to be more vulnerable to sleep disturbances. We aimed to assess if early recognition and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with Leigh disease may influence primary disease outcome. We describe a case of adult-onset Leigh disease presenting as severe brainstem encephalopathy of subacute onset. Based on the clinical symptoms that developed after the appearance of the neurological disease, an attended overnight polysomnography examination was performed. A marked clinical recovery was seen after administration of high doses of thiamine, coenzyme Q, L-carnitine, and vitamins C and E, combined with effective treatment with continuous positive airway pressure for the underlying severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The latter condition was diagnosed on the basis of suggestive symptoms that appeared a few weeks before the establishment of the neurological disease. The improvement in the neurological disease (based on clinical and brain MRI features) with the appropriate medical treatment also resulted in a significant improvement in the OSA. Early recognition and treatment of sleep apnea may not only improve sleep and overall quality of life but also ameliorate the deleterious effects of nocturnal desaturations on the neurological features. This may be crucial for disease outcome when added to the generally advised pharmacological therapy.

  14. Severe Infections are Common in Thiamine Deficiency and May be Related to Cognitive Outcomes: A Cohort Study of 68 Patients With Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; van Gool, Willem A; Wierdsma, André I; Bresser, Esmay L; Bakker, Jan; van de Wiel, Albert; Mulder, Cornelis L

    Wernicke encephalopathy can have different clinical outcomes. Although infections may precipitate the encephalopathy itself, it is unknown whether infections also modify the long-term outcome in patients developing Korsakoff syndrome. To determine whether markers of infection, such as white blood cell (WBC) counts and absolute neutrophil counts in the Wernicke phase, are associated with cognitive outcomes in the end-stage Korsakoff syndrome. Retrospective, descriptive study of patients admitted to Slingedael Korsakoff Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Hospital discharge letters of patients with Wernicke encephalopathy were searched for relevant data on infections present upon hospital admission. Patients were selected for further analysis if data were available on WBC counts in the Wernicke phase and at least 1 of 6 predefined neuropsychological tests on follow-up. Infections were reported in 35 of 68 patients during the acute phase of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome-meningitis (1), pneumonia (14), urinary tract infections (9), acute abdominal infections (4), sepsis (5) empyema, (1) and infection "of unknown origin" (4). The neuropsychological test results showed significant lower scores on the Cambridge Cognitive Examination nonmemory section with increasing white blood cell counts (Spearman rank correlation, ρ = -0.34; 95% CI: -0.57 to -0.06; 44 patients) and on the "key search test" of the behavioral assessment of the dysexecutive syndrome with increasing absolute neutrophil counts (ρ= -0.85; 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.42; 9 patients). Infections may be the presenting manifestation of thiamine deficiency. Patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome who suffered from an infection during the acute phase are at risk of worse neuropsychological outcomes on follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate deficiency is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia regardless of antioxidant, thiamine, riboflavin, cobalamine, and folate status in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Molina-López, Jorge; Florea, Daniela; Quintero-Osso, Bartolomé; de la Cruz, Antonio Pérez; Rodríguez-Elvira, Manuel; Del Pozo, Elena Planells

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill patients develop severe stress, inflammation and a clinical state that may raise the utilization and metabolic replacement of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decreasing their body reserves. This study was designed to assess the nutritional pyridoxal-5'-phosphate status in critical care patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, comparing them with a group of healthy people, and studying it's association with factors involved in the pyridoxine and other B vitamins metabolism, as the total antioxidant capacity and Hcy as cardiovascular risk biomarker. Prospective, multicentre, comparative, observational and analytic study. One hundred and three critically ill patients from different hospitals, and eighty four healthy subjects from Granada, Spain, all with informed consent. Data from daily nutritional assessment, ICU severity scores, clinical and nutritional parameters, antioxidant status and homocysteine levels was taken at admission and at the seventh day of the ICU stay. Thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine and folate status proved deficient in a large number of patients, being significantly lower in comparison with control group, and significantly decreased at 7th day of ICU stay. Higher homocysteine was observed in patients compared with control group (p < 0.05) where 31.5 and 26.8 percent of subjects presented hyperhomocysteinemia at initial and final of study, respectively. Antioxidant status was lower than control group in two periods analysed, and decreased at 7th day of ICU stay (p < 0.05) being associated with PLP deficiency. PLP deficiency was also correlated with hyperhomocysteinemia at two times measured (r. -0.73, p < 0.001; r. -0.69, p < 0.001, respectively), showing at day 7 an odds ratio of 6.62 in our multivariate model. Critically ill patients with SIRS show deficient B vitamin and low antioxidant statuses. Despite association found between PLP deficiency and low antioxidant status in critically ill patients, PLP deficiency

  16. Reactions of fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)3]+ with nucleoside diphosphates and thiamine diphosphate in aqueous solution investigated by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kristie M; Marzilli, Patricia A; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2007-10-29

    Products formed between monoester diphosphates (MDPs) and fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)3]OTf at pH 3.6 were examined. Such adducts of the fac-[Re(CO)3]+ moiety have an uncommon combination of properties for an "inert" metal center in that sharp NMR signals can be observed, yet the products are equilibrating at rates allowing NMR EXSY cross-peaks to be observed. Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (5'-UDP) form 1:1 bidentate {Palpha,Pbeta} chelates, in which the MDP binds Re(I) via Palpha and Pbeta phosphate groups. Asymmetric centers are created at Re(I) (RRe/SRe) and Palpha (Delta/Lambda), leading to four diastereomers. The two mirror pairs of diastereomers (RReDelta/SReLambda) and (RReLambda/SReDelta) for TDP (no ribose) and for all four diastereomers (RReDelta, RReLambda, SReDelta, SReLambda) for 5'-UDP (asymmetric ribose) gave two and four sets of NMR signals for the bound MDP, respectively. 31Palpha-31Palpha EXSY cross-peaks indicate that the fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)({Palpha,Pbeta}MDP)]- isomers interchange slowly on the NMR time scale, with an average k approximately equal to 0.8 s(-1) at 32 degrees C; the EXSY cross-peaks could arise from chirality changes at only Re(I) or at only Palpha. Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (5'-GDP), with a ribose moiety and a Re(I)-binding base, formed both possible diastereomers (RRe and SRe) of the fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)({N7,Pbeta}GDP)]- macrochelate, with one slightly more abundant diastereomer suggested to be RRe by Mn2+ ion 1H NMR signal line-broadening combined with distances from molecular models. Interchange of the diastereomers requires that the coordination site of either N7 or Pbeta move to the H2O site. 31Palpha-31Palpha EXSY cross-peaks indicate a k approximately equal to 0.5 s(-1) at 32 degrees C for RRe-to-SRe interchange. The similarity of the rate constants for interchange of fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)({Palpha,Pbeta}MDP)]- and fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)({N7,Pbeta}GDP)]- adducts suggest strongly that interchange of Pbeta and H2O coordination

  17. Focal Thalamic Degeneration from Ethanol and Thiamine Deficiency is Associated with Neuroimmune Gene Induction, Microglial Activation, and Lack of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liya; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Background Wernicke's encephalopathy-Korsakoff syndrome (WE-KS) is common in alcoholics, caused by thiamine deficiency (TD; vitamin B1) and associated with lesions to the thalamus (THAL). Although TD alone can cause WE, the high incidence in alcoholism suggests that TD and ethanol (EtOH) interact. Methods Mice in control, TD, or EtOH groups alone or combined were studied after 5 or 10 days of treatment. THAL and entorhinal cortex (ENT) histochemistry and mRNA were assessed. Results Combined EtOH-TD treatment for 5 days (EtOH-TD5) showed activated microglia, proinflammatory gene induction and THAL neurodegeneration that was greater than that found with TD alone (TD5), whereas 10 days resulted in marked THAL degeneration and microglial-neuroimmune activation in both groups. In contrast, 10 days of TD did not cause ENT degeneration. Interestingly, in ENT, TD10 activated microglia and astrocytes more than EtOH-TD10. In THAL, multiple astrocytic markers were lost consistent with glial cell loss. TD blocks glucose metabolism more than acetate. Acetate derived from hepatic EtOH metabolism is transported by monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT) into both neurons and astrocytes that use acetyl-CoA synthetase (AcCoAS) to generate cellular energy from acetate. MCT and AcCoAS expression in THAL is lower than ENT prompting the hypothesis that focal THAL degeneration is related to insufficient MCT and AcCoAS in THAL. To test this hypothesis, we administered glycerin triacetate (GTA) to increase blood acetate and found it protected the THAL from TD-induced degeneration. Conclusions Our findings suggest that EtOH potentiates TD-induced THAL degeneration through neuroimmune gene induction. The findings support the hypothesis that TD deficiency inhibits global glucose metabolism and that a reduced ability to process acetate for cellular energy results in THAL focal degeneration in alcoholics contributing to the high incidence of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in alcoholism. PMID

  18. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon–carbon bond cleavage during α-oxidation of 3-methyl-branched fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Foulon, Veerle; Antonenkov, Vasily D.; Croes, Kathleen; Waelkens, Etienne; Mannaerts, Guy P.; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Casteels, Minne

    1999-01-01

    In the third step of the α-oxidation of 3-methyl-branched fatty acids such as phytanic acid, a 2-hydroxy-3-methylacyl-CoA is cleaved into formyl-CoA and a 2-methyl-branched fatty aldehyde. The cleavage enzyme was purified from the matrix protein fraction of rat liver peroxisomes and identified as a protein made up of four identical subunits of 63 kDa. Its activity proved to depend on Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate, a hitherto unrecognized cofactor of α-oxidation. Formyl-CoA and 2-methylpentadecanal were identified as reaction products when the purified enzyme was incubated with 2-hydroxy-3-methylhexadecanoyl-CoA as the substrate. Hence the enzyme catalyzes a carbon–carbon cleavage, and we propose calling it 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA lyase. Sequences derived from tryptic peptides of the purified rat protein were used as queries to recover human expressed sequence tags from the databases. The composite cDNA sequence of the human lyase contained an ORF of 1,734 bases that encodes a polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 63,732 Da. Recombinant human protein, expressed in mammalian cells, exhibited lyase activity. The lyase displayed homology to a putative Caenorhabditis elegans protein that resembles bacterial oxalyl-CoA decarboxylases. Similarly to the decarboxylases, a thiamine pyrophosphate-binding consensus domain was present in the C-terminal part of the lyase. Although no peroxisome targeting signal, neither 1 nor 2, was apparent, transfection experiments with constructs encoding green fluorescent protein fused to the full-length lyase or its C-terminal pentapeptide indicated that the C terminus of the lyase represents a peroxisome targeting signal 1 variant. PMID:10468558

  19. Structure-function characterization of the human mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (hMTPPT; SLC25A19): Important roles for Ile(33), Ser(34), Asp(37), His(137) and Lys(291).

    PubMed

    Sabui, Subrata; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Kapadia, Rubina; Said, Hamid M

    2016-08-01

    Thiamin plays a critical role in cellular energy metabolism. Mammalian cells obtain the vitamin from their surroundings, converted it to thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) in the cytoplasm, followed by uptake of TPP by mitochondria via a carrier-mediated process that involves the MTPPT (product of the SLC25A19 gene). Previous studies have characterized different physiological/biological aspects of the human MTPPT (hMTPPT), but less is known about structural features that are important for its function. Here, we used a protein-docking model ("Phyre2" and "DockingServer") to predict residues that may be important for function (substrate recognition) of the hMTPPT; we also examined the role of conserved positively-charged residues predicted ("PRALINE") to be in the trans-membrane domains (TMDs) in uptake of the negatively-charged TPP. Among the six residues predicted by the docking model (i.e., Thr(29), Arg(30), Ile(33), Ser(34), Asp(37) and Phe(298)), only Ile(33), Ser(34) and Asp(37) were found to be critical for function. While no change in translational efficiency/protein stability of the Ser(34) mutant was observed, both the Ile(33) and Asp(37) mutants showed a decrease in this parameter(s); there was also a decrease in the expression of the latter two mutants in mitochondria. A need for a polar residue at position 34 of the hMTPPT was evident. Our findings with the positively-charged residues (i.e., His(82), His(137), Lys(231) and Lys(291)) predicted in the TMD showed that His(137) and Lys(291) are important for function (via a role in proper delivery of the protein to mitochondria). These investigations provide important information about the structure-function relationship of the hMTPPT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-02

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important.

  1. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers EVIDENCE FOR A DIRECT PATHWAY BETWEEN THE 4′-AMINOPYRIMIDINE N1′ ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy

    2010-11-03

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4{prime}-aminopyrimidine N1{prime} atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu{sup 571}, Glu{sup 235}, and Glu{sup 237}) and Arg{sup 606} resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. (1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding inmore » the second active center was affected. (2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. (3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. (4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu{sup 235} makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu{sup 571} residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.« less

  2. Rapid determination of thiamine, riboflavin, niacinamide, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, folic acid and ascorbic acid in Vitamins with Minerals Tablets by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Xia, Lufeng; Li, Zheng; Che, Ning; Zou, Ding; Hu, Xin

    2012-11-01

    A simple, isocratic, and stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the rapid determination of thiamine (VB(1)), niacinamide (VB(3)), pyridoxine (VB(6)), ascorbic acid (VC), pantothenic acid (VB(5)), riboflavin (VB(2)) and folic acid (VB(9)) in Vitamins with Minerals Tablets (VMT). An Alltima C(18) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) was used for the separation at ambient temperature, with 50mM ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (adjusting with phosphoric acid to pH 3.0) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.5 ml min(-1). VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC and VB(5) were extracted with a solution containing 0.05% phosphoric acid (v/v) and 0.3% sodium thiosulfate (w/v), and were then simultaneously analyzed by using the mobile phase of phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (95:5, v/v), while VB(2) and VB(9) were extracted with a solution containing 0.5% ammonium hydroxide solution (v/v), and were then simultaneously analyzed by using the mobile phase of phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (85:15, v/v). The detection wavelengths were 275 nm for VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC, 210 nm for VB(5), and 282 nm for VB(2) and VB(9). The method showed good system suitability, sensitivity, linearity, specificity, precision, stability and accuracy. All the seven water-soluble vitamins were well separated from other ingredients and degradation products. Method comparison indicated good concordance between the developed method and the USP method. The developed method was reliable and convenient for the rapid determination of VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC, VB(5), VB(2) and VB(9) in VMT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bifunctionality of the thiamin diphosphate cofactor: assignment of tautomeric/ionization states of the 4′-aminopyrimidine ring when various intermediates occupy the active sites during the catalysis of yeast pyruvate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Anand; Gao, Yuhong; Moorjani, Prerna; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Tittmann, Kai; Jordan, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzymes perform crucial C-C bond forming and breaking reactions in sugar and amino acid metabolism and in biosynthetic pathways via a sequence of ThDP-bound covalent intermediates. A member of this superfamily, yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (YPDC) carries out the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and is mechanistically a simpler ThDP enzyme. YPDC variants created by substitution at the active center (D28A, E51X, E477Q) and on the substrate activation pathway (E91D and C221E) display varying activity, suggesting that they stabilize different covalent intermediates. To test the role of both rings of ThDP in YPDC catalysis (the 4′-aminopyrimidine as acid-base, and thiazolium as electrophilic covalent catalyst), we applied a combination of steady state and time-resolved circular dichroism experiments (assessing the state of ionization and tautomerization of enzyme-bound ThDP-related intermediates), and chemical quench of enzymatic reaction mixtures followed by NMR characterization of the ThDP-bound intermediates released from YPDC (assessing occupancy of active centers by these intermediates and rate-limiting steps). Results suggest that: (1) Pyruvate and analogs induce active site asymmetry in YPDC and variants. (2) The rare 1′,4′-iminopyrimidine ThDP tautomer participates in formation of ThDP-bound intermediates. (3) Propionylphosphinate also binds at the regulatory site and its binding is reflected by catalytic events at the active site 20Å away. (4) YPDC stabilizes an electrostatic model for the 4′-aminopyrimidinium ionization state, an important contribution of the protein to catalysis. The combination of tools used provides time-resolved details about individual events during ThDP catalysis; the methods are transferable to other ThDP superfamily members. PMID:22300533

  4. Thiamine deficiency: a viable hypothesis for paralytic syndrome in Baltic birds. Commentary on Sonne et al., 2012. A review of the factors causing paralysis in wild birds: implications for the paralytic syndrome observed in the Baltic Sea. Science of the Total Environment 416:32-39

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Kraft, Clifford E.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Fitzsimons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent assessment of hypotheses presented by Balk et al. (2009) regarding the etiology of a paralytic disease inflicting bird populations in Northern Europe, Sonne et al. (2012) “call for a major coordinated effort on research…” to “… integrate clinical, physiological, ecological and demographic investigations at all levels to better dissect the causes, the effects on ecosystems and potential impact on affected populations.” Further, they offer, “This should be undertaken before thiamine deficiency can be considered to constitute a serious problem to e.g. the Baltic ecosystems.” While we agree that holistic approaches to environmental research and management are essential, our experience suggests that waiting for definitive results from long-term research and monitoring programs prior to “consideration” of thiamine deficiency as a major factor in the paralytic disease observed in wild bird populations would hinder the ability of natural resource managers to understand and mitigate declining trends in avian population abundance.

  5. Beyond Thiamine: Treatment for Cognitive Impairment in Korsakoff's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin M; Fox, Valerie

    2018-03-27

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a condition whose treatment many consultation-liaison psychiatrists know quite well. Less clear, however, is the treatment of its dementia disorder descendent, the Korsakoff's syndrome (KS). This article seeks to review treatment options and provide recommendations for consultation-liaison psychiatrists treating cognitive impairment in KS. In this nonsystematic review, we reviewed PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and Google Scholar for published reports and studies regarding treatment of KS. The literature revealed case reports and placebo-controlled trials of various medications for treatment of KS, though the samples sizes were small and were mostly case reports. There is more attention devoted toward medications used in other dementia disorders, such as donepezil and memantine. The literature revealed more studies around behavioral interventions recommended for treatment of memory impairment in KS and they focused on cognitive remediation and environmental adaptation, such as the use of PDAs or alarms. There is no single, well-studied intervention proven effective as a primary treatment for cognitive impairment in KS. An approach of using environmental modifications in a well-structured living environment, combined with various cognitive interventions, such as pictorial associations, and perhaps a trial of donepezil or memantine, likely represents the best strategy for treating long-term cognitive impairment in KS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Study on fluorescence spectra of thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Xuesong; Hu, Lan; Lv, Caofang; Yin, Zhangkun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of vitamin B1, B2 and B6 measured with 3D fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Three strong fluorescence areas of vitamin B2 locate at λex/λem=270/525nm, 370/525nm and 450/525nm, one fluorescence areas of vitamin B1 locates at λex/λem=370/460nm, two fluorescence areas of vitamin B6 locate at λex/λem=250/370nm and 325/370nm were found. The influence of pH of solution to the fluorescence profile was also discussed. Using the PARAFAC algorithm, 10 vitamin B1, B2 and B6 mixed solutions were successfully decomposed, and the emission profiles, excitation profiles, central wavelengths and the concentration of the three components were retrieved precisely through about 5 iteration times.

  7. Thiamine Deficiency in Self-Induced Refeeding Syndrome, an Undetected and Potentially Lethal Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hershkowitz, Einat; Reshef, Alon; Munich, Olga; Yosefi, Bracha; Markel, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid restoration of nutrients and electrolytes after prolonged starvation could result in a life threatening condition characterized by sensory and neurological dysfunction and severe metabolic imbalance that has been designated as refeeding syndrome. Its diagnosis is frequently missed resulting in severe complications and even death. We describe a 25-years-old female patient with mental disorders and severe malnutrition who developed severe clinical manifestations and biochemical abnormalities characteristic of the refeeding syndrome, after restarting oral feeding on her own. Schizophrenia was later diagnosed. Increased awareness of this condition and its complications is necessary to prevent its detrimental complications. PMID:25614745

  8. Catalytic Activity of the Anaerobic Tyrosine Lyase Required for Thiamine Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Challand, Martin R.; Martins, Filipa T.; Roach, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thiazole synthase in Escherichia coli is an αβ heterodimer of ThiG and ThiH. ThiH is a tyrosine lyase that cleaves the Cα–Cβ bond of tyrosine, generating p-cresol as a by-product, to form dehydroglycine. This reactive intermediate acts as one of three substrates for the thiazole cyclization reaction catalyzed by ThiG. ThiH is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzyme that utilizes a [4Fe-4S]+ cluster to reductively cleave AdoMet, forming methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical. Analysis of the time-dependent formation of the reaction products 5′-deoxyadenosine (DOA) and p-cresol has demonstrated catalytic behavior of the tyrosine lyase. The kinetics of product formation showed a pre-steady state burst phase, and the involvement of DOA in product inhibition was identified by the addition of 5′-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase to activity assays. This hydrolyzed the DOA and changed the rate-determining step but, in addition, substantially increased the uncoupled turnover of AdoMet. Addition of glyoxylate and ammonium inhibited the tyrosine cleavage reaction, but the reductive cleavage of AdoMet continued in an uncoupled manner. Tyrosine analogues were incubated with ThiGH, which showed a strong preference for phenolic substrates. 4-Hydroxyphenylpropionic acid analogues allowed uncoupled AdoMet cleavage but did not result in further reaction (Cα–Cβ bond cleavage). The results of the substrate analogue studies and the product inhibition can be explained by a mechanistic hypothesis involving two reaction pathways, a product-forming pathway and a futile cycle. PMID:19923213

  9. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by palmitic, stearic and oleic acid sophorolipids and thiamine dilauryl sulfate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of th...

  10. Chemical stability study of vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine and ascorbic acid in parenteral nutrition for neonatal use

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this work was to study the vitamins B1, B2, B6 and C stability in a pediatric formulation containing high amounts of calcium in the presence of organic phosphate, amino acids, glucose, sodium chloride, magnesium sulfate, pediatric vitamins and trace elements under different conditions using developed and validated analytical methods. Methods The study was carried out during 72 h with formulations packaged in recommended storage temperature (4°C) and 25°C, with and without photoprotection. Results The results showed that the methodologies used for assessing the chemical stability of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and C in the formulation were selective, linear, precise and accurate. The vitamins could be considered stable in the formulation during the three days of study if stored at 4°C. When stored at 25°C vitamin C presented instability after 48 h. Conclusion The pediatric formulation containing high amount of calcium in the presence of organic phosphate, amino acids, glucose, sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, pediatric vitamins and trace elements packaged in bag-type trilaminate presented a shelf life of the 72 h, when maintained under refrigeration, between 2°C and 8°C. This shelf life was measured considering the vitamins studied. Further studies are needed including all the vitamins present in this formulation. PMID:21569609

  11. Vitamin B1 content in potato: effect of genotype, tuber enlargement, and storage, and estimation of stability and broad-sense heritability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient in the human diet, and is often referred as the energy vitamin. Potato contains modest amounts of thiamine. However, genetic variation of thiamine concentrations in potato has never been investigated. In this study, we determined thiamine ...

  12. Biotransformation of nitroso aromatic compounds and 2-oxo acids to N-hydroxy-N-arylacylamides by thiamine-dependent enzymes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, T; Uematsu, T

    1998-07-01

    The formation of N-hydroxy-N-arylacylamides from nitroso aromatic compounds and 2-oxo acids was investigated using rat liver subcellular fractions. Activities were found in both mitochondria and cytosol, except for activities for phenylpyruvate and glyoxylate; the former did not produce N-hydroxy-N-phenylphenylacetamide and the latter nonenzymatically produced N-hydroxy-N-phenylformamide with nitrosobenzene (NOB). The cytosolic activity of N-hydroxy-N-phenylglycolamide formation was indicated to be due to transketolase, which utilized hydroxypyruvate as a glycolic aldehyde donor to NOB. With mitochondria, 2-oxo acids (including hydroxypyruvate) served as substrates for the biotransformation of NOB to the corresponding N-hydroxy-N-phenylacylamides. The substrate preference was 2-oxobutyrate > pyruvate > 2-oxoisovalerate > 2-oxoisocaproate > 2-oxovalerate > 2-oxo-3-methylvalerate, judging from Vmax/half-saturating concentration for mitochondria values. The half-saturating concentrations for NOB were nearly constant. The mitochondrial activity was due to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex (BCDHC). By using partially purified BCDHC, pyruvate and 2-oxobutyrate were found to be common substrates for both of the enzymes, and 2-oxoisovalerate was shown to be the most effective substrate for BCDHC. Analysis by the Taft equation indicated that the polar effects, rather than the steric effects, of the alkyl groups of 2-oxo acids are important for BCDHC-catalyzed formation of N-hydroxy-N-phenylacylamides. A positive Hammett constant obtained for the formation of N-hydroxy-N-arylisobutyramides indicates that an electron-withdrawing substituent makes the nitroso compounds susceptible to BCDHC-catalyzed biotransformation.

  13. Surface modified SiO2 nanoparticles by thiamine and ultrasonication synthesis of PCL/SiO2-VB1 NCs: Morphology, thermal, mechanical and bioactivity investigations.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Khani, Zahra

    2018-03-01

    The influence of silica (SiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) on the properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) was investigated. Due to the intense tendency of SiO 2 NPs to aggregation and their high surface energy, the surface of SiO 2 NPs was treatment via Vitamin B 1 (VB 1 ) as a biosafe coupling agent. Novel PCL/SiO 2 -VB 1 nanocomposites (NC) films by variety of percentage of SiO 2 -VB 1 NPs were prepared under ultrasonic irradiation as an eco-friendly and fast procedure following by casting method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis exposed the presence of SiO 2 NPs into the polymer matrix. A good distribution of the silica into the polymer matrix was detected by microscopic observations and EDX testing. According to the UV-Vis spectra, the absorption of prepared NCs was improved via increasing the amount of SiO 2 NPs. PCL/SiO 2 -VB 1 NCs showed more thermal stability compared to the pure polymer. The tensile test was investigated and good arrangement among the experimental data and the predicted flexibility of NCs was obtained. Moreover, PCL/SiO 2 -VB 1 6wt% had noticeable increase values for tensile strength. Finally, in vitro bioactivity investigation designated that by rising SiO 2 contents in the NCs, the amount of the hydroxyapatite formed was increased and NC films are bioactive and have a potential to be utilized in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Extended reaction scope of thiamine diphosphate dependent cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase: from C-C bond cleavage to C-C bond ligation.

    PubMed

    Loschonsky, Sabrina; Wacker, Tobias; Waltzer, Simon; Giovannini, Pier Paolo; McLeish, Michael J; Andrade, Susana L A; Müller, Michael

    2014-12-22

    ThDP-dependent cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) catalyzes the CC bond cleavage of cyclohexane-1,2-dione to 6-oxohexanoate, and the asymmetric benzoin condensation between benzaldehyde and pyruvate. One of the two reactivities of CDH was selectively knocked down by mutation experiments. CDH-H28A is much less able to catalyze the CC bond formation, while the ability for CC bond cleavage is still intact. The double variant CDH-H28A/N484A shows the opposite behavior and catalyzes the addition of pyruvate to cyclohexane-1,2-dione, resulting in the formation of a tertiary alcohol. Several acyloins of tertiary alcohols are formed with 54-94 % enantiomeric excess. In addition to pyruvate, methyl pyruvate and butane-2,3-dione are alternative donor substrates for CC bond formation. Thus, the very rare aldehyde-ketone cross-benzoin reaction has been solved by design of an enzyme variant. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. STUDIES ON CHEMICAL PROTECTION AGAINST X-RAY INJURIES. I. EFFECT OF VIT. B$sub 1$ AND THIAMINE PROPYL DISULPHIDE (ALINAMIN)

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.

    F/sub 1/ (ddms x C/sub 57/Bl/6) mice were given x irradiation of 800 r (LD/sub 100/) and 680 r (LD/sub 50/) and the protective effect of vit. B/sub 1/ and alinamin on the irradiation injuries was observed in mice on a vit. B /sub 1/ -deficent diet and in those receiving a temporary overdosage of alinanmin. Mice of the /sub 1/ strain had the advantages of hereditary homogeneity, prolificity, small dispersion. good growth,and low mortality under various external stresses. A difference in x-ray sensitivity between the two sexes was noted. Mice of the same age must be used for themore » experiment. Their x-ray sensitiviaty was increased by vit. B/sub 1/ deficiency; this increase was even more marked when a vit. B/ sub 1/-deficient diet was fed after the irradiation. The protective effect of vit. B/sub/1 depended on the method of administration. In mice given a 2 mg of vit. B/sub 1/ after irradiation, the survival rate was l00%. The effectiveness seemed to be due to the supplementation of vit. B/sub 1/ destruction. co- carboxylase function, and the supplying of an SH radical in the oxidationreduction system, which is produced by intrahepatic activation of the S an vit. B/sub 1/. X-ray sensitivity was increased in mice receiving a transitory overdose of alinamin. It may be that transformed alinamin increased the indirect action of x-rays. as an oxidizing agent. (Abstr. Japan Med, 1; No. l2. l96l)« less

  16. Use of the Pyrithiamine-Induced Thiamine Deficient Animal Model of Korsakoff’s Syndrome for Exploratory Research Activities in Undergraduate Physiological Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Robert W.; Hill, Jonathan E.; Sandusky, Leslie A.; Marino, Christina L.

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate neuroscience laboratory activities frequently focus on exercises that build student’s wet/dry laboratory skills, foster critical thinking, and provide opportunities for hands-on experiences. Such activities are, without a doubt, extremely important, but sometimes fall short of modeling actual research and often lack the ‘unknown’ hypothetical nature accompanying empirical studies. In this article we report a series of research activities using an animal model of Korsakoff’s syndrome in a Physiological Psychology course. The activities involve testing hypotheses regarding performance of animals with experimentally-induced Korsakoff’s syndrome and the effectiveness of glucose as a memory-enhancer in this model. Students were given a set of 24 articles for use in answering a series of laboratory report questions regarding the activities. At the conclusion of the course, students were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess the effectiveness of the laboratory activities. Results of the laboratory exercises indicated that locomotor activity, environmental habituation, and anxiety were unaffected in the Korsakoff condition, and glucose had no effect. Results of performance in the T-maze indicated that Korsakoff animals had significantly fewer spontaneous alternations than controls, but Korsakoff animals given glucose did not reveal this difference. Results of the student assessments indicated that the activities were considered educational, challenging, and more interesting than standard laboratory activities designed to reproduce reliable phenomena. PMID:23494173

  17. Vitamin B1 Functions as an Activator of Plant Disease Resistance1

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Il-Pyung; Kim, Soonok; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) is an essential nutrient for humans. Vitamin B1 deficiency causes beriberi, which disturbs the central nervous and circulatory systems. In countries in which rice (Oryza sativa) is a major food, thiamine deficiency is prevalent because polishing of rice removes most of the thiamine in the grain. We demonstrate here that thiamine, in addition to its nutritional value, induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Thiamine-treated rice, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and vegetable crop plants showed resistance to fungal, bacterial, and viral infections. Thiamine treatment induces the transient expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in rice and other plants. In addition, thiamine treatment potentiates stronger and more rapid PR gene expression and the up-regulation of protein kinase C activity. The effects of thiamine on disease resistance and defense-related gene expression mobilize systemically throughout the plant and last for more than 15 d after treatment. Treatment of Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia-0 plants with thiamine resulted in the activation of PR-1 but not PDF1.2. Furthermore, thiamine prevented bacterial infection in Arabidopsis mutants insensitive to jasmonic acid or ethylene but not in mutants impaired in the SAR transduction pathway. These results clearly demonstrate that thiamine induces SAR in plants through the salicylic acid and Ca2+-related signaling pathways. The findings provide a novel paradigm for developing alternative strategies for the control of plant diseases. PMID:15980201

  18. Reappearance of beriberi heart disease in Japan. A study of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Kawai, C; Wakabayashi, A; Matsumura, T; Yui, Y

    1980-09-01

    Twenty-three Japanese patients with beriberi heart disease, 17 of them teenagers, were studied. The recent tendency for teenagers to take excessive sweet carbonated soft drinks, instant noodles and powermill-polished rice readily induces relative thiamine deficiency. A sudden increase in thiamine requirements due to strenuous exercise can result in overt beriberi heart disease. Alcohol had nothing to do with the development of the disease. Characteristic features commonly seen in teenage patients include peripheral edema, low peripheral vascular resistance, increased venous pressure enlarged heart, T wave abnormalities, hyperkinetic circulatory state and increased circulating blood volume. Thiamine deficiency was confirmed by a decrease in blood thiamine concentration, a decrease in erythrocyte transketolase activity and an increase in thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) effect. Improvement was rapidly achieved with thiamine administration, balanced nutrition and rest, especially in the teenage patients. Increased circulating blood volume was useful in differentiating beriberi heart disease from hyperthyroidism.

  19. Natural Versus Synthetic Vitamin B Complexes in Human

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-12

    Healthy; Thiamine and Niacin Deficiency States; Pyridoxine Deficiency; Folic Acid Deficiency Anemia, Dietary; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Peroxidase; Defect; Polyphenols; Oxidative Stress; Homocystine; Metabolic Disorder

  20. Alcohol and B1 vitamin deficiency-related stillbirths.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2009-05-01

    The present study attempts to determine whether prenatal thiamine (B1 vitamin) deficiency and prenatal alcohol exposure are risk factors for stillbirths. From conception to parturition, Wistar rat dams were exposed to the following treatments: (1) Rat dams consuming a thiamine-deficient diet; (2) 12% alcohol/water drinking mothers; (3) mothers drinking 12% alcohol/water + thiamine hydrochloride mixture. Appropriate pair-fed controls and ad libitum controls were assessed. Gestation outcome and fetal parameters, including spontaneous abortion, still-born fetuses, litter size and birth weight, were assessed from the dams of each experimental group. Both alcohol and thiamine deficiency during pregnancy increased fetal death (48.26%vs. 84.47%), reduced litter size (44.54%vs. 72.7%), respectively, and lowered birth weight. Thiamine administration reversed the effects of alcohol-induced fetal death, suggesting that a part of deleterious actions of alcohol on fetal death was mediated by thiamine deficiency. Prenatal thiamine deficiency increased singularly spontaneous abortion with abundant bleeding (40%), rising the occurrence of stillbirth. Such a pathology was not observed in alcohol group. The results indexed thiamine deficiency as a potent risk factor for stillbirths. The vitamin supply during pregnancy prevents stillbirths related to chronic alcoholism and different facets of malnutrition.

  1. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; McKinney, Elizabeth; Kim, Tehryung

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  2. [Effects of excess vitamin B1 or vitamin B2 on growth and urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in weaning rats].

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Kuzuya, Mako; Satoh, Shiori; Shibata, Katsumi

    2009-04-01

    To determine the tolerable upper intake levels of vitamin B(1) and vitamin B(2) in humans, we investigated the effects of excess thiamin or riboflavin administration on body weight gain, food intake, tissue weights, and urinary excretion of B-group vitamins in weaning rats. The weaning rats were freely fed ordinary diet containing 0.0006% thiamin-HCl or the same diet with 0.006%, 0.03%, 0.18% or 1.0% thiamin-HCl for 30 days, or the diet containing 0.0006% riboflavin or the same diet with 0.1%, 0.5 or 1.0% riboflavin for 22 days. Mild diarrhea was seen only in the rats fed with 1.0% thiamin-HCl diet. Excess thiamin-HCl or riboflavin did not affect body weight gains, food intake or tissue weights. The urinary excretions of water-soluble vitamins also did not differ among the diets. These results clearly showed that feeding a diet containing up to 1.0% thiamin-HCl or 1.0% riboflavin did not induce apparent adverse effects, and the no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (NOAELs) for thiamin-HCl and riboflavin in rats might be 1.0% in diet, corresponding to 900 mg/kg body weight/day.

  3. Shoshin beriberi induced by long-term administration of diuretics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Misumida, Naoki; Umeda, Hisashi; Iwase, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that diuretic therapy for heart failure may lead to thiamine deficiency due to the increased urinary thiamine excretion. Herein, we present the case of a 61-year-old man with shoshin beriberi, a fulminant form of wet beriberi, induced by long-term diuretic therapy. The patient had a history of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and was receiving furosemide and trichlormethiazide therapy. He presented with worsening exertional dyspnea and was admitted for heart failure exacerbation. His condition failed to improve even after intensive treatment. A hemodynamic evaluation with the Swan-Ganz catheter revealed high-output heart failure with low peripheral vascular resistance. Thiamine was administered for suspected shoshin beriberi; his hemodynamic status improved dramatically within the next six hours. The serum thiamine level was below the normal range; the patient was therefore diagnosed with shoshin beriberi. The common causes of thiamine deficiency were not identified. Long-term diuretic therapy with furosemide and thiazide was thought to have played a major role in the development of thiamine deficiency. This case illustrates the importance of considering wet beriberi as a possible cause of heart failure exacerbation in patients taking diuretics, even when the common thiamine deficiency causes are not identified with history-taking.

  4. Hyperemesis gravidarum complicated by Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Spruill, Steven C; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2002-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is usually associated with alcohol abuse, but can also occur with hyperemesis gravidarum. The effect of delay in thiamine replacement on fetal outcomes is unknown. We present a case of this complication. A primipara with hyperemesis was admitted for mental status changes in her 14th week of pregnancy. Physical examination revealed a lethargic patient with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and hyporeflexia. Parenteral thiamine therapy was started. The patient improved rapidly although the ataxia persisted. A spontaneous abortion occurred 2 weeks later. Wernicke's encephalopathy can complicate hyperemesis gravidarum. Early thiamine replacement may decrease the chances of spontaneous abortion.

  5. Brain and Behavioral Pathology in an Animal Model of Wernicke’s Encephalopathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Ramos, Raddy L.; Anzalone, Steven; Savage, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models provide the opportunity for in-depth and experimental investigation into the anatomical and physiological underpinnings of human neurological disorders. Rodent models of thiamine deficiency have yielded significant insight into the structural, neurochemical and cognitive deficits associated with thiamine deficiency as well as proven useful toward greater understanding of memory function in the intact brain. In this review, we discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and behavioral changes that occur during the acute and chronic phases of thiamine deficiency and describe how rodent models of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome aid in developing a more detailed picture of brain structures involved in learning and memory. PMID:22192411

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coordinating Committees CounterACT Rigor & Transparency Scientific Resources Animal Models Cell/Tissue/DNA Clinical and Translational Resources Gene ... modulation of certain nerve cells in a rodent model of amnesia produced by by thiamine deficiency. The ...

  7. Physical-chemical quality of onion analyzed under drying temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaeni, M.; Arifin, U. F.; Sasongko, S. B.

    2017-03-01

    Drying is one of conventional processes to enhance shelf life of onion. However, the active compounds such as vitamin and anthocyanin (represented in red color), degraded due to the introduction of heat during the process. The objective of this research was to evaluate thiamine content as well as color in onion drying under different temperature. As an indicator, the thiamine and color was observed every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Results showed that thiamine content and color were sensitvely influenced by the temperature change. For example, at 50°C for 2 hours drying process, the thiamine degradation was 55.37 %, whereas, at 60°C with same drying time, the degradation was 74.01%. The quality degradation also increased by prolonging drying time.

  8. Horsetail

    MedlinePlus

    ... palustre. This plant contains chemicals that can poison cattle, but toxicity in people has not been proven. ... contains thiaminase, a chemical that breaks down thiamine. Cattle that eat a lot of horsetail have developed ...

  9. Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with self-neglect associated with severe depression

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency and commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, but we describe the first case report resulting from self-neglect associated with depression. PMID:25057374

  10. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with self-neglect associated with severe depression.

    PubMed

    Cocksedge, Karen A; Flynn, Adrian

    2014-02-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency and commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, but we describe the first case report resulting from self-neglect associated with depression.

  11. The Effects of Caloric Density of the Food on Running Endurance and General Condition of Rats and Hamsters Restricted in Food Intake or Fed Ad Libitum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    I.U.; alpha-tocopherol, 80; menadione , 0.30; thiamine.HCl, 6.0; riboflavin, 5.0; pyridoxine.HCl, 3.0; nlacin, 30; Ca-pantothenate, 16; choline (as...alpha-tocopherol, 100; menadione , 0.30; thiamine.HCl, 10.0; riboflavin, 6.0; pyridoxine.HCl, 5.0; niacin, 40; Ca-pantorher.ate, 40; choline, 705

  12. Simultaneous Determination of Underivatized Vitamin B1 and B6 in Whole Blood by Reversed Phase Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Puts, Johan; de Groot, Monique; Haex, Martin; Jakobs, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin B1 (thiamine-diphosphate) and B6 (pyridoxal-5’phosphate) are micronutrients. Analysis of these micronutrients is important to diagnose potential deficiency which often occurs in elderly people due to malnutrition, in severe alcoholism and in gastrointestinal compromise due to bypass surgery or disease. Existing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) based methods include the need for derivatization and long analysis time. We developed an Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) assay with internal standards for simultaneous measurement of underivatized thiamine-diphosphate and pyridoxal-5’phosphate without use of ion pairing reagent. Methods Whole blood, deproteinized with perchloric acid, containing deuterium labelled internal standards thiamine-diphosphate(thiazole-methyl-D3) and pyridoxal-5’phosphate(methyl-D3), was analyzed by UHPLC-MS/MS. The method was validated for imprecision, linearity, recovery and limit of quantification. Alternate (quantitative) method comparisons of the new versus currently used routine HPLC methods were established with Deming regression. Results Thiamine-diphosphate and pyridoxal-5’phosphate were measured within 2.5 minutes instrumental run time. Limits of detection were 2.8 nmol/L and 7.8 nmol/L for thiamine-diphosphate and pyridoxal-5’phosphate respectively. Limit of quantification was 9.4 nmol/L for thiamine-diphosphate and 25.9 nmol/L for pyridoxal-5’phosphate. The total imprecision ranged from 3.5–7.7% for thiamine-diphosphate (44–157 nmol/L) and 6.0–10.4% for pyridoxal-5’phosphate (30–130 nmol/L). Extraction recoveries were 101–102% ± 2.5% (thiamine-diphosphate) and 98–100% ± 5% (pyridoxal-5’phosphate). Deming regression yielded slopes of 0.926 and 0.990 in patient samples (n = 282) and national proficiency testing samples (n = 12) respectively, intercepts of +3.5 and +3 for thiamine-diphosphate (n = 282 and n = 12) and slopes of

  13. Alcohol-related amnesia and dementia: Animal models have revealed the contributions of different etiological factors on neuropathology, neurochemical dysfunction and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Hall, Joseph M.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with impaired cognitive functioning. Over 75% of autopsied chronic alcoholics have significant brain damage and over 50% of detoxified alcoholics display some degree of learning and memory impairment. However, the relative contributions of different etiological factors to the development of alcohol-related neuropathology and cognitive impairment are questioned. One reason for this quandary is that both alcohol toxicity and thiamine deficiency result in brain damage and cognitive problems. Two alcohol-related neurological disorders, alcohol-associated dementia and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome have been modeled in rodents. These pre-clinical models have elucidated the relative contributions of ethanol toxicity and thiamine deficiency to the development of dementia and amnesia. What is observed in these models—from repeated and chronic ethanol exposure to thiamine deficiency—is a progression of both neural and cognitive dysregulation. Repeated binge exposure to ethanol leads to changes in neural plasticity by reducing GABAergic inhibition and facilitating glutamatergic excitation, long-term chronic ethanol exposure results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss as well as reduced hippocampal neurotrophin protein content critical for neural survival, and thiamine deficiency results in gross pathological lesions in the diencephalon, reduced neurotrophic protein levels, and neurotransmitters levels in the hippocampus and cortex. Behaviorally, after recovery from repeated or chronic ethanol exposure there is impairment in working or episodic memory that can recover with prolonged abstinence. In contrast, after thiamine deficiency there is severe and persistent spatial memory impairments and increased perseverative behavior. The interaction between ethanol and thiamine deficiency does not produce more behavioral or neural pathology, with the exception of reduction of white matter, than long-term thiamine deficiency alone. PMID:21256970

  14. The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a reappraisal in Queensland with special reference to prevention.

    PubMed

    Price, J; Kerr, R; Hicks, M; Nixon, P F

    The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome occurs most frequently in alcoholic patients when they become thiamin deficient. First admissions to psychiatric units with the chronic component of this syndrome, Korsakoff's psychosis, peaked in Queensland in 1975-1976. The fall in hospital admission rates since this time could relate to a decline in per-capita alcohol consumption in Australia, or to more awareness of the thiamin needs of drinkers. Alternatively, the improvement may be illusory: although many cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy are being diagnosed, many of these patients are not receiving psychiatric assessment and treatment, perhaps because admission to psychiatric hospital beds is more difficult than it was formerly. Patients who are diagnosed as having Korsakoff's psychosis fare badly in the community, and have a greatly increased mortality rate than do such patients in hospital. Optimal care for such patients is necessarily costly of medical resources. Of available preventive measures, evidence is presented to support the fortification of beer with thiamin and the provision of community educational programmes. The fortification of flour with thiamin may have little impact on the thiamin-deficiency syndromes that arise in problem drinkers in Queensland.

  15. [Subtractive gene cloning and gene-disruption for elucidation of pseudohyphal formation in Candida tropicalis].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito

    2003-01-01

    The dimorphic transition from yeast to pseudohyphae in the petroleum-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis occurs following the addition of ethanol to glucose semi-defined medium. Subtractive gene cloning was performed on the cDNA from the yeast-growing control culture and on that from the ethanol-supplemented one (the ethanol culture). A homologue of Schizosaccharomyces pombe nmt1+ or Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI5 was isolated from the cDNA fraction as a preferentially expressed gene for the ethanol culture. This homologue was tentatively called Ctnmt1+, since exogenous thiamine repressed its expression in C. tropicalis growth media. The ethanol culture showed a biphasic pattern of growth phases and the expression of Ctnmt1+ occurred at the first growth phase. The supplementation of thiamine to the ethanol culture at the first phase was followed by repression of Ctnmt1+ expression and also delay of pseudohyphal growth: filamentous growth was inhibited and chains of yeast cells were formed. A Ctnmt1+ disruptant of this organism did not show thiamine auxotrophy and produced pseudohyphal filaments even in the control culture. The supplementation of oxythiamine, an analog of thiamine, to the control culture was followed by the appearance of pseudohyphal filaments, indicating the participation of thiamine during the process of pseudohyphal growth in this organism.

  16. Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome: under-recognized and under-treated.

    PubMed

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Kutner, Haley E; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a well described syndrome of neurological and cognitive problems that comprises both Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) and Korsakoff syndrome (KS). WE is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine deficiency. KS is a chronic consequence of thiamine deficiency with prominent impairment in memory formation. The authors review the literature on the pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of WKS, focusing on the acute identification and treatment of WE. Most cases of WE are missed by clinicians, likely because patients do not present with the classic signs associated with the condition. Attaining high serum levels of thiamine during treatment may be important to restore cognitive function as quickly as possible, though the exact dosing and route needed for effective treatment is unknown. Data indicates that the administration of intravenous (IV) thiamine has little risk. In order to prevent this potentially devastating disease, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for WKS and dose thiamine accordingly. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cooking rice in excess water reduces both arsenic and enriched vitamins in the cooked grain.

    PubMed

    Gray, Patrick J; Conklin, Sean D; Todorov, Todor I; Kasko, Sasha M

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of rinsing rice and cooking it in variable amounts of water on total arsenic, inorganic arsenic, iron, cadmium, manganese, folate, thiamin and niacin in the cooked grain. We prepared multiple rice varietals both rinsed and unrinsed and with varying amounts of cooking water. Rinsing rice before cooking has a minimal effect on the arsenic (As) content of the cooked grain, but washes enriched iron, folate, thiamin and niacin from polished and parboiled rice. Cooking rice in excess water efficiently reduces the amount of As in the cooked grain. Excess water cooking reduces average inorganic As by 40% from long grain polished, 60% from parboiled and 50% from brown rice. Iron, folate, niacin and thiamin are reduced by 50-70% for enriched polished and parboiled rice, but significantly less so for brown rice, which is not enriched.

  18. Brain and behavioral pathology in an animal model of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Ramos, Raddy L; Anzalone, Steven; Savage, Lisa M

    2012-02-03

    Animal models provide the opportunity for in-depth and experimental investigation into the anatomical and physiological underpinnings of human neurological disorders. Rodent models of thiamine deficiency have yielded significant insight into the structural, neurochemical and cognitive deficits associated with thiamine deficiency as well as proven useful toward greater understanding of memory function in the intact brain. In this review, we discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and behavioral changes that occur during the acute and chronic phases of thiamine deficiency and describe how rodent models of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome aid in developing a more detailed picture of brain structures involved in learning and memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alternatives to vitamin B 1 uptake revealed with discovery of riboswitches in multiple marine eukaryotic lineages

    SciTech Connect

    McRose, Darcy; Guo, Jian; Monier, Adam

    Here, vitamin B 1 (thiamine pyrophosphate, TPP) is essential to all life but scarce in ocean surface waters. In many bacteria and a few eukaryotic groups thiamine biosynthesis genes are controlled by metabolite-sensing mRNA-based gene regulators known as riboswitches. Using available genome sequences and transcriptomes generated from ecologically important marine phytoplankton, we identified 31 new eukaryotic riboswitches. These were found in alveolate, cryptophyte, haptophyte and rhizarian phytoplankton as well as taxa from two lineages previously known to have riboswitches (green algae and stramenopiles). The predicted secondary structures bear hallmarks of TPP-sensing riboswitches. Surprisingly, most of the identified riboswitches are affiliatedmore » with genes of unknown function, rather than characterized thiamine biosynthesis genes. Using qPCR and growth experiments involving two prasinophyte algae, we show that expression of these genes increases significantly under vitamin B 1-deplete conditions relative to controls. Pathway analyses show that several algae harboring the uncharacterized genes lack one or more enzymes in the known TPP biosynthesis pathway. We demonstrate that one such alga, the major primary producer Emiliania huxleyi, grows on 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (a thiamine precursor moiety) alone, although long thought dependent on exogenous sources of thiamine. Thus, overall, we have identified riboswitches in major eukaryotic lineages not known to undergo this form of gene regulation. In these phytoplankton groups, riboswitches are often affiliated with widespread thiamine-responsive genes with as yet uncertain roles in TPP pathways. Further, taxa with ‘incomplete’ TPP biosynthesis pathways do not necessarily require exogenous vitamin B 1, making vitamin control of phytoplankton blooms more complex than the current paradigm suggests.« less

  20. Alternatives to vitamin B 1 uptake revealed with discovery of riboswitches in multiple marine eukaryotic lineages

    DOE PAGES

    McRose, Darcy; Guo, Jian; Monier, Adam; ...

    2014-08-29

    Here, vitamin B 1 (thiamine pyrophosphate, TPP) is essential to all life but scarce in ocean surface waters. In many bacteria and a few eukaryotic groups thiamine biosynthesis genes are controlled by metabolite-sensing mRNA-based gene regulators known as riboswitches. Using available genome sequences and transcriptomes generated from ecologically important marine phytoplankton, we identified 31 new eukaryotic riboswitches. These were found in alveolate, cryptophyte, haptophyte and rhizarian phytoplankton as well as taxa from two lineages previously known to have riboswitches (green algae and stramenopiles). The predicted secondary structures bear hallmarks of TPP-sensing riboswitches. Surprisingly, most of the identified riboswitches are affiliatedmore » with genes of unknown function, rather than characterized thiamine biosynthesis genes. Using qPCR and growth experiments involving two prasinophyte algae, we show that expression of these genes increases significantly under vitamin B 1-deplete conditions relative to controls. Pathway analyses show that several algae harboring the uncharacterized genes lack one or more enzymes in the known TPP biosynthesis pathway. We demonstrate that one such alga, the major primary producer Emiliania huxleyi, grows on 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (a thiamine precursor moiety) alone, although long thought dependent on exogenous sources of thiamine. Thus, overall, we have identified riboswitches in major eukaryotic lineages not known to undergo this form of gene regulation. In these phytoplankton groups, riboswitches are often affiliated with widespread thiamine-responsive genes with as yet uncertain roles in TPP pathways. Further, taxa with ‘incomplete’ TPP biosynthesis pathways do not necessarily require exogenous vitamin B 1, making vitamin control of phytoplankton blooms more complex than the current paradigm suggests.« less

  1. Malnutrition-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy following a water-only fasting diet.

    PubMed

    Hutcheon, Deborah A

    2015-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a critical condition of neurological dysfunction resulting from a deficiency in thiamine. Chronic alcoholism is recognized as the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, but other causes, including fasting/starvation and malnutrition, have been documented within the scientific literature. These causes may not be readily recognized by healthcare professionals and may lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy being overlooked as a diagnosis when a nonalcoholic patient presents with classic signs and symptoms of the disorder. A narrative review of thiamine and its relationship to the development, diagnosis, and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy is presented based on a review of evidence-based guidelines and published research. To heighten awareness of the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy in fasted/starved and malnourished patients and to contribute to the scientific body of knowledge for the identification and management of Wernicke's encephalopathy in these patients, the clinical course and treatment of an adult woman who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy following a 40-day water-only fasting diet is outlined. Clinical suspicion was required to identify the patient's condition and initiate immediate intervention through parenteral thiamine administration. Oral thiamine supplementation of 100 to 800 mg per day for 6 months was required to aid recovery. The patient's clinical course and response to treatment illustrate the necessity for clinical awareness and suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy among healthcare professionals, timely and adequate parenteral thiamine administration, and oral thiamine supplementation at therapeutic doses to correct the nutrient deficiency, halt the progression of Wernicke's encephalopathy, and promote recovery. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment of Wernicke Encephalopathy: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Infante, Maria Teresa; Fancellu, Roberto; Murialdo, Alessandra; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio; Serrati, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency caused by thiamine deficiency, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and cognitive disturbances that may progress to Korsakoff amnesia. We describe 2 patients with WE who needed high-dose and long-term treatment with thiamine to obtain neurological improvement and recovery. The first patient was a woman diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. After a gastrointestinal infection, she developed depression, memory loss, disorientation, behavioral changes, and ataxic paraplegia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral alterations in thalamic, frontal, and periaqueductal regions, suggestive of WE. The second patient was a man who lost 10 kg after surgical gastrectomy; he developed diplopia, ophthalmoplegia, cerebellar ataxia, lower limb paresthesias, and amnesia. A brain MRI demonstrated contrast enhancement of mammillary bodies, compatible with WE. The patients were treated with intramuscular (IM) thiamine (1200 mg/d for 2 months and 900 mg/d for a month, respectively) with gradual cognitive and behavioral improvement and brain MRI normalization, while ataxia and oculomotion improved in following months. In both patients, thiamine was gradually reduced to IM 200 mg/d and continued for a year, without clinical relapses. There is no consensus about dosage, frequency, route, and duration of thiamine administration in WE treatment. Based on our cases, we recommend treating patients with WE with higher doses of IM thiamine for a longer time than suggested (900-1200 mg/d for 1-2 months, in our cases) and to gradually reduce dosage after clinical and radiological improvement, maintaining IM 200 mg/d dosage for at least 1 year. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Cholinergic parameters and the retrieval of learned and re-learned spatial information: a study using a model of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rita G W; Pereira, Silvia R C; Oliveira-Silva, Ieda F; Franco, Glaura C; Ribeiro, Angela M

    2005-07-01

    This is a factorial (2 x 2 x 2) spatial memory and cholinergic parameters study in which the factors are chronic ethanol, thiamine deficiency and naivety in Morris water maze task. Both learning and retention of the spatial version of the water maze were assessed. To assess retrograde retention of spatial information, half of the rats were pre-trained on the maze before the treatment manipulations of pyrithiamine (PT)-induced thiamine deficiency and post-tested after treatment (pre-trained group). The other half of the animals was only trained after treatment to assess anterograde amnesia (post-trained group). Thiamine deficiency, associated to chronic ethanol treatment, had a significant deleterious effect on spatial memory performance of post-trained animals. The biochemical data revealed that chronic ethanol treatment reduced acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the hippocampus while leaving the neocortex unchanged, whereas thiamine deficiency reduced both cortical and hippocampal AChE activity. Regarding basal and stimulated cortical acetylcholine (ACh) release, both chronic ethanol and thiamine deficiency treatments had significant main effects. Significant correlations were found between both cortical and hippocampal AChE activity and behaviour parameters for pre-trained but not for post-trained animals. Also for ACh release, the correlation found was significant only for pre-trained animals. These biochemical parameters were decreased by thiamine deficiency and chronic ethanol treatment, both in pre-trained and post-trained animals. But the correlation with the behavioural parameters was observed only for pre-trained animals, that is, those that were retrained and assessed for retrograde retention.

  4. Schizophrenia-like symptoms in a patient with Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satogami, Kazumi; Takahashi, Shun; Kose, Asami; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Leigh syndrome is a mitochondrial disease characterized by subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. Almost all cases of Leigh syndrome develop at infancy or early childhood and die within several years due to rapidly progressive muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Here, we present a rare case of a patient who developed Leigh syndrome associated with thiamine-responsive pyruvate dehydrogenase-complex deficiency at 2 years of age and has survived to adolescence through effective high dose thiamin therapy. At 15 years of age, the patient presented persecutory delusions and auditory hallucinations, suggesting an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and schizophrenia-like psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Diagnostics and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome patients with an alcohol abuse].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Sonne, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a condition with high morbidity and mortality and occurs as a consequence of thiamine deficiency. Clinical symptoms are often ambiguous and post-mortem examinations show that the syndrome is underdiagnosed and probably undertreated. There is sparse clinical evidence concerning optimal dosage and duration of treatment. This article reviews the current literature and concludes that all patients with a history of alcohol abuse should be treated with high dosage IV thiamine for an extended period of time, albeit further research is needed.

  6. Correlation between phosphorylation level of a hippocampal 86kDa protein and extinction of a behaviour in a model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rita G W; Pereira, Sílvia R C; Carvalho, Fabiana M; Oliveira-Silva, Ieda F; Ferraz, Vany P; Ribeiro, Angela M

    2007-06-04

    The effects of chronic ethanol and thiamine deficiency, alone or associated, on hippocampal protein phosphorylation profiles ranging in molecular weight from 30 to 250kDa molecular weight, in stimulated (high K(+) concentration) and unstimulated (basal) conditions were investigated. These treatments significantly changed the phosphorylation level of an 86kDa phosphoprotein. Thiamine deficiency, but not chronic ethanol, induced a decrease in a behavioural extinction index, which is significantly correlated to the phosphorylation level of the p86 protein. These data add to and extend previous findings by our laboratory implicating the involvement of hippocampal neurotransmission components in extinction of a behaviour which involves learning of environmental spatial cues.

  7. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zubaran, C.; Fernandes, J. G.; Rodnight, R.

    1997-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in treatment planning. Treatment is based on restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article, the literature concerning Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is reviewed. Images p31-a PMID:9039406

  8. 21 CFR 106.100 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... stage. Such records shall include, but are not limited to, testing results for vitamins A, B1 (thiamine... audits need not be made available. (k) The manufacturer shall maintain procedures describing how all... maintained at one facility, as provided in § 106.100(k)(6), if all required records are readily available at...

  9. Diet Quality and Adequacy of Nutrients in Preschool Children: Should Rice Fortified with Micronutrients Be Included in School Meals?

    PubMed Central

    Della Lucia, Ceres M.; Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina C.; Rodrigues, Vivian Cristina C.; Santos, Laura Luiza M.; Cardoso, Leandro M.; Martino, Hércia S. D.; Franceschini, Sylvia C. C.; Pinheiro-Sant’Ana, Helena Maria

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is indicative of the nutritional status of children, however micronutrient deficiency is common in this age group. We evaluated the impact of inclusion of rice (Ultra Rice® (UR®)) fortified with iron, zinc, thiamin and folic acid on laboratory measurements and the nutrient intake of children. Ninety-nine preschoolers (2–6 years; 42.6% male) from two preschools participated, one of which received UR® added to polished rice as part of school meals (test preschool) and the other received only polished rice (control preschool). Biochemical evaluations were performed before and after four months of intervention. Feeding was assessed by direct weighing of food, complemented by 24-h recalls, and the diet was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) adapted to the Brazilian reality. The fortified rice improved the levels of zinc (p < 0.001), thiamine (p < 0.001), folic acid (p = 0.003), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p < 0.001) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.001). The inadequacy percentages of thiamine, folic acid and iron were lower among preschoolers from the test preschool. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using UR® on laboratory measurements of children. The inadequate intake of thiamine, folic acid and iron was also reduced, making the fortified rice an interesting strategy in school feeding programs. PMID:27187464

  10. Working in a hot environment; perspiration loss; a drink for persons working under hot conditions, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzel, H.

    1978-01-01

    Losses of various nutrients through sweat of persons working under hot conditions were considered. On the basis of these considerations a supplemental drink was formulated consisting of 1 liter of water per hour containing salt, potassium chloride, iron, thiamine and ascorbic acid.

  11. A history of the isolation and identification of vitamin B(6)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the 1930s, Rudolf Peters showed that young rats kept on a semi-synthetic diet with added thiamin and riboflavin but no other supplement developed 'rat acrodynia', a condition characterized by severe cutaneous lesions. In 1934, Paul György showed that the factor which cured 'rat acrodynia' was vit...

  12. A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction to enhance volatile flavor in Chinese marinated chicken.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiuli; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Chunhui; Li, Xia; Wang, Jinzhi; Li, Hai; Tang, Chunhong

    2017-02-01

    A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction was investigated by adding d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine to the marinated brine of quantitative marinating, which was expected to enhance the volatile flavor of Chinese marinated chicken. Response surface methodology was used to optimize parameters, in which response was sensory evaluation scores of marinated chicken. A Box-Behnken center design was applied to the optimized added contents. The optimized contents were d-xylose (1-5‰), l-cysteine (1-5‰) and thiamine (1-3‰). Analysis of variance indicated that a second-order polynomial equation could predict the experimental data well (R 2  = 0.94), and sensory evaluation scores were significantly affected by the added amount of d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine. The optimal conditions that maximized the sensory evaluation score of Chinese marinated chicken were found to be 4.96‰ d-xylose, 2.28‰ l-cysteine and 2.66‰ thiamine (w/w). Given these optimal conditions, a number of meat-like flavor compounds such as 2-pentyl-furan, benzothiazole and 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol were identified by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Our results suggested that a combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction might be a promising method to enhance the volatile flavor, especially meat-like flavor, of Chinese marinated chicken. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Australian Defence Force Nutritional Requirements in the 21st Century (Version 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    vegetables 240 1200 15 High starch 2 Tortilla bread, Instant beef noodles 100 1500 60 Bf Cereal 1 Fruit muesli mix (with milk powder) 70 1000 40...the thiamin in a wet dish (canned chicken and vegetables) and a dry food (beef noodle soup powder) had been degraded following two years storage at

  14. Multiple Forms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Animals: Structural Determinants and Physiological Implications.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria; Artiukhov, Artem; Aleshin, Vasily; Mkrtchyan, Garik

    2016-12-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) of animal cells is usually considered to be a mitochondrial enzyme. However, this enzyme has recently been reported to be also present in nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. These extramitochondrial localizations are associated with moonlighting functions of GDH, which include acting as a serine protease or an ATP-dependent tubulin-binding protein. Here, we review the published data on kinetics and localization of multiple forms of animal GDH taking into account the splice variants, post-translational modifications and GDH isoenzymes, found in humans and apes. The kinetic properties of human GLUD1 and GLUD2 isoenzymes are shown to be similar to those published for GDH1 and GDH2 from bovine brain. Increased functional diversity and specific regulation of GDH isoforms due to alternative splicing and post-translational modifications are also considered. In particular, these structural differences may affect the well-known regulation of GDH by nucleotides which is related to recent identification of thiamine derivatives as novel GDH modulators. The thiamine-dependent regulation of GDH is in good agreement with the fact that the non-coenzyme forms of thiamine, i.e., thiamine triphosphate and its adenylated form are generated in response to amino acid and carbon starvation.

  15. Impact of iron source and concentration on rice flavor using a simulated rice kernel micronutrient delivery system.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An extruded grain designed to look like a rice kernel fortified with one of two sources of iron (elemental iron and ferrous sulfate), with and without multiple fortificant (zinc, thiamin and folic acid) was mixed with milled Calrose rice at low (1:200), medium (1:100) and high (1:50) concentrations....

  16. TanA: a fluorogenic probe for thiaminase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Wanjun; Zajicek, James L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Glass, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorogenic thiamine analogue is presented as a fluorescent probe for thiaminase activity. The emission of the fluorophore is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer (PET) to the N-substituted pyridinium portion of the probe. Action of the enzyme releases the free pyridine group causing a substantial increase in fluorescence.

  17. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  18. Single Lab Validation of a LC/UV/FLD/MS Method for Simultaneous Determination of Water-soluble Vitamins in Multi-Vitamin Dietary Supplements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Single-Lab Validated Method using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with different detectors (diode array detector - DAD, fluorescence detector - FLD, and mass spectrometer - MS) for determination of seven B-complex vitamins (B1 - thiamin, B2 – ...

  19. Nutritional significance and acceptance of solar-dried foods of rural Leyte Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Training in solar dryer construction and food preservation was provided to villagers in three barangays in rural Leyte, Philippines. A 24 hour dietary recall assessed dietary status of the women prior to the solar dried food intervention. Nutrients of greatest dietary concern were thiamine, vitamin A, riboflavin, iron and energy.

  20. A degenerative encephalomyelopathy in 7 Kuvasz puppies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Seven Kuvasz puppies from 2 same-parentage litters developed weakness and ataxia. Six necropsied dogs had lesions in caudate nucleus, cerebellar nuclei and folia, and spinal cord. Lesions seen were felt to be familial or due to the effects of an amprolium-induced thiamine deficiency on the developing brains of these puppies. PMID:16018562

  1. Multiple Forms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Animals: Structural Determinants and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bunik, Victoria; Artiukhov, Artem; Aleshin, Vasily; Mkrtchyan, Garik

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) of animal cells is usually considered to be a mitochondrial enzyme. However, this enzyme has recently been reported to be also present in nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. These extramitochondrial localizations are associated with moonlighting functions of GDH, which include acting as a serine protease or an ATP-dependent tubulin-binding protein. Here, we review the published data on kinetics and localization of multiple forms of animal GDH taking into account the splice variants, post-translational modifications and GDH isoenzymes, found in humans and apes. The kinetic properties of human GLUD1 and GLUD2 isoenzymes are shown to be similar to those published for GDH1 and GDH2 from bovine brain. Increased functional diversity and specific regulation of GDH isoforms due to alternative splicing and post-translational modifications are also considered. In particular, these structural differences may affect the well-known regulation of GDH by nucleotides which is related to recent identification of thiamine derivatives as novel GDH modulators. The thiamine-dependent regulation of GDH is in good agreement with the fact that the non-coenzyme forms of thiamine, i.e., thiamine triphosphate and its adenylated form are generated in response to amino acid and carbon starvation. PMID:27983623

  2. Probing the Active Center of Benzaldehyde Lyase with Substitutions and the Pseudosubstrate Analogue Benzoylphosphonic Acid Methyl Ester

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2008-07-28

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg{sup 2+} as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these types of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analogue of benzoylformic acid, is used tomore » probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 {angstrom} (Protein Data Bank entry 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase.« less

  3. Probing the active center of benzaldehyde lyase with substitutions and the pseudo-substrate analog benzoylphosphonic acid methyl ester

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J.; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg2+ as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these type of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analog of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 Å (PDB ID: 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase. PMID:18570438

  4. BDNF Regains Function in Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation Deficits Caused by Diencephalic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Lindsey C.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD), commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, leads to diencephalic damage, hippocampal dysfunction, and spatial learning and memory deficits. We show a decrease in the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at CA3-CA1 synapses, independent of sex, following diencephalic damage…

  5. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus - Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  6. What can go wrong in hyperemesis gravidarum: Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nhari, Fiona T; Dzvanga, Narcisious B T

    2018-05-01

    We report two cases of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Oral thiamine was administered (intravenous unavailable locally). However, both the patient's condition improved in the first 48 h and progressively over a month. Initially, WKS is missed due to rare feature of full classical triad of symptoms, especially in nonalcoholics.

  7. Increased central immunoreactive beta-endorphin content in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and in alcoholics.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, J A; Pullan, P T; Kril, J J; Harper, C G

    1991-01-01

    beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotrophin, and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone were measured by radioimmunoassay in three areas of human brain at necropsy in seven subjects with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and in 52 controls. Thiamin concentration in six brain areas was also measured. Mamillary body beta-endorphin concentrations were significantly increased in those with the syndrome compared with controls, and those controls with high alcohol intake showed increased mamillary body beta-endorphin compared with controls with low alcohol intake. Brain thiamin concentration was similar in both groups, with the exception of the brainstem, where it was reduced in subjects with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Thalamic beta-endorphin in controls was inversely correlated with thiamin in frontal white matter, frontal cortex, parietal white matter and parietal cortex, while beta-endorphin in the hypothalamus of patients was inversely correlated with thiamin in frontal cortex, parietal white matter, thalamus and brainstem. These results suggest that there is a disturbance of the endorphinergic system in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome which may be related to alcohol intake. PMID:1650797

  8. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome complicated by subacute beriberi neuropathy in an alcoholic patient.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Salvatore; Pilati, Laura; Brighina, Filippo; Fierro, Brigida; Cosentino, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency is a common condition in alcohol abusers, which can lead to damage of both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Here we describe the case of an alcoholic patient who presented with acute onset of ataxia, severe weakness of the four limbs, and hypoesthesia and dysesthesia of the distal portion of the upper and lower extremities. The clinical picture also included mental confusion and amnesia. A diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was made based on clinical symptoms and brain RMI findings. Electromyography and electroneurography revealed signs of subacute axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy that were compatible with a rare acute presentation of beriberi. Patient immediately received parenteral thiamine administration, which resulted in rapid clinical amelioration of ataxia and confusion and also in a significant improvement of motor and sensory deficits. The association between Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and acute axonal polyneuropathy is a very rare condition that could make less recognizable the clinical picture of a thiamine deficiency. However, the diagnosis of thiamine deficiency should be suspected in every alcoholic patient presenting with acute onset symptoms of central and/or peripheral nervous system involvement. This because the immediate replacement treatment can be life-saving and reverse the clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A pilot study into a possible relationship between diet and stuttering.

    PubMed

    Hum, Jean; Rietveld, Toni; Wiedijk, Piet; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    There are theoretical and empirical reasons to consider a potential role for copper metabolism in the brain in how it could influence stuttering. However, a link between stuttering and dietary intake has never been researched in a systematic way. This pilot study therefore aimed to explore a possible association between ingested amounts of copper and thiamine (vitamin B1) with stuttering frequency using a double blind cross-over longitudinal paradigm. 19 adults who stutter between 20 and 51 years old filled out an online survey for 9 consecutive weeks. The survey consisted of self-assessed fluency and mood state scales, as well as food journals. After 4 weeks, the participants consumed either copper or thiamine supplements for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week washout period, and another period of two weeks taking the other supplement. Formal speech assessments were done pre/post baseline and at the end of each supplement intake. Participants were not informed about the nature of the supplements during the experiment and the investigators were blinded to the order of the supplements. The results demonstrated that copper and thiamine had no measurable effect on the amount of stuttering (self and formal assessments) but there was a moderate, significant correlation between mood state and fluency. The findings do not support notions of dietary influences of ingested copper or thiamine on stuttering but do provide modest support for a relationship between variations in stuttering and self-perceived anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Apparent ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows fed diets with different forage-to-concentrate ratios.

    PubMed

    Seck, M; Linton, J A Voelker; Allen, M S; Castagnino, D S; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2017-03-01

    Effects of the forage-to-concentrate ratio on apparent ruminal synthesis of thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B 6 , folates, and vitamin B 12 were evaluated in an experiment using 14 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows. The experiment was a crossover design with two 15-d treatment periods and a 14-d preliminary period in which cows were fed a diet intermediate in composition between the treatment diets. Treatments were diets containing low-forage (44.8% forage, 32.8% starch, 24.4% neutral detergent fiber) or high-forage (61.4% forage, 22.5% starch, 30.7% neutral detergent fiber) concentrations. Both diets were formulated with different proportions of the same ingredients. Concentrations of B vitamins were analyzed in feed and duodenal digesta. Apparent ruminal synthesis of each B vitamin was calculated as the duodenal flow minus the intake. The high-forage diet had the highest concentrations of riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B 6 , and folates, whereas the low-forage diet had the highest thiamine concentration. Vitamin B 12 in the diets was under the level of detection. Consequently, despite a reduction in dry matter intake when the cows were fed the high-forage diet, increasing dietary forage concentration increased or tended to increase intakes of riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B 6 but reduced thiamine and folate intakes. Increasing dietary forage concentration reduced apparent ruminal degradation of thiamine and apparent ruminal synthesis of riboflavin, niacin, and folates and increased ruminal degradation of vitamin B 6 , but had no effect on ruminal synthesis of vitamin B 12 . As a consequence, increasing the forage-to-concentrate ratio had no effect on the amounts of thiamine, riboflavin, and vitamin B 12 reaching the small intestine but decreased the amounts of niacin, vitamin B 6 , and folates available for absorption. Apparent ruminal syntheses of riboflavin, niacin, folates, and vitamin B 12 were correlated positively with the amount of

  11. Early mortality syndrome in Great Lakes salmonines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, Dale C.; Brown, Scott B.; Fitzsimons, John D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2005-01-01

    Early mortality syndrome (EMS) is the termused to describe an embryonic mortality affectingthe offspring of salmonines (coho salmonOnco-rhynchus kisutch, Chinook salmonOncorhynchustshawytscha, steelhead [anadromous rainbow troutOncorhynchus mykiss], brown troutSalmo trutta,and lake trout,Salvelinus namaycush) in LakesMichigan and Ontario and, to a lesser extent, LakesHuron and Erie (Marcquenski and Brown 1997).Clinical signs of EMS include loss of equilibrium,a spiral swimming pattern, lethargy, hyperexcit-ability, hemorrhage, and death between hatch andfirst feeding. Early mortality syndrome was ob-served as far back as the 1960s in Great Lakessalmonines (Marcquenski and Brown 1997; Fitz-simons et al. 1999) and is of concern because mor-tality has been high in recent years (Wolgamoodet al. 2005; all 2005 citations are this issue). Stocksof Atlantic salmonSalmo salarfrom the FingerLakes and the Baltic Sea also exhibit a similarearly life stage mortality, called Cayuga syndrome(Fisher et al. 1995) and M74 (Bo ̈ rjeson and Norr-gren 1997), respectively. Low egg thiamine levelsand enhanced survival following thiamine treat-ments are common characteristics of EMS, CayugaSyndrome, and M74 (Fitzsimons et al. 1999). Be-cause the deficiency does not appear to be the re-sult of inadequate dietary thiamine (Fitzsimons and Brown 1998), investigators have hypothesizedthat the presence of some thiaminolytic factors inthe diet may reduce the bioavailability of thiamine,either by destroying it or converting it to an in-active analog or thiamine antagonist (Fisher et al.1996; Fitzsimons et al. 1999).

  12. Antiretroviral therapy provided to HIV-infected Malawian women in a randomized trial diminishes the positive effects of lipid-based nutrient supplements on breast-milk B vitamins.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H; Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; York, Emily R; Adair, Linda S; Flax, Valerie L; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Jamieson, Denise J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2015-12-01

    Little information is available on B vitamin concentrations in human milk or on how they are affected by maternal B vitamin deficiencies, antiretroviral therapy, or maternal supplementation. The objective was to evaluate the effects of antiretroviral therapy and/or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) on B vitamin concentrations in breast milk from HIV-infected women in Malawi. Breast milk was collected from 537 women recruited within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study at 2 or 6 wk and 24 wk postpartum. Women were assigned to receive antiretrovirals and LNSs, antiretrovirals only, LNSs only, or a control. Antiretrovirals and LNSs were given to the mothers from weeks 0 to 28. The antiretrovirals were zidovudine/lamivudine and nelfinavir or lopinavir/ritonavir. LNSs provided 93-118% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, and vitamin B-12. Infants were exclusively breastfed. LNSs increased milk concentrations of all vitamins except thiamin, whereas antiretrovirals lowered concentrations of nicotinamide, pyridoxal, and vitamin B-12. Although antiretrovirals alone had no significant effect on riboflavin concentrations, they negatively affected the LNS-induced increase in this vitamin. Thiamin was not influenced by the study interventions. Concentrations of all B vitamins were much lower than usually accepted values. All B vitamins were low in milk, and all but thiamin were increased by maternal supplementation with LNSs. Antiretrovirals alone decreased concentrations of some B vitamins in milk. When LNS was given in addition to antiretrovirals, the negative effect of antiretrovirals offset the positive effect of LNSs for all vitamins except thiamin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00164762. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Comparison of dietary histories and seven-day food records in a nutritional assessment of older adults.

    PubMed

    Mahalko, J R; Johnson, L K; Gallagher, S K; Milne, D B

    1985-09-01

    Dietary histories and seven-day food records were obtained for 54 apparently healthy older adults. The two dietary methods correlated for most nutrients, but mean differences were significant for several nutrients. Intakes below recommended levels occurred most frequently for energy, calcium, and zinc. Biochemical evidence of thiamin and riboflavin deficiency was unexpectedly frequent. Using food records, dietary iron correlated with serum ferritin. Using dietary histories, dietary protein correlated with serum albumin, and dietary zinc correlated with plasma zinc. Using either dietary method, plasma ascorbate was associated positively with both dietary ascorbate and ascorbate supplements, and negatively with cigarette smoking. Use of thiamin- or folate-containing supplements was associated with improved biochemical status for the respective vitamin. Though neither dietary histories nor food records give precise intake data for individuals, either method may be useful for epidemiologic studies with appropriate sample sizes.

  14. DNA damage during glycation of lysine by methylglyoxal: assessment of vitamins in preventing damage.

    PubMed

    Suji, G; Sivakami, S

    2007-11-01

    Amino acids react with methylglyoxal to form advanced glycation end products. This reaction is known to produce free radicals. In this study, cleavage to plasmid DNA was induced by the glycation of lysine with methylglyoxal in the presence of iron(III). This system was found to produce superoxide as well as hydroxyl radicals. The abilities of various vitamins to prevent damage to plasmid DNA were evaluated. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate showed maximum protection, while pyridoxamine showed no protection. The protective abilities could be directly correlated to inhibition of production of hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate exhibited low radical scavenging ability as evaluated by its TEAC, but showed maximum protection probably by interfering in free radical production. Pyridoxamine did not inhibit free radical production. Thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate, both showed protective effects albeit to different extents. Tetrahydrofolic acid showed better antioxidant activity than folic acid but was found to damage DNA by itself probably by superoxide generation.

  15. Wernicke’s encephalopathy associated with liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Garg, Vipul

    2017-07-31

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, characterised by ocular motor dysfunction, ataxia and impairment in consciousness. It predominantly affects brain regions with a high metabolic rate such as mammillary bodies, medial thalamic nuclei, the tectal region and the cerebellum. Although chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, various other conditions not related to alcohol consumption such as bariatric surgery, acute pancreatitis, hyperemesis gravidarum, prolonged fasting and gastrointestinal surgery have been implicated in its aetiology. We report the case of a patient who underwent surgery for liver abscess and subsequently developed Wernicke's encephalopathy; he showed a positive response to thiamine supplementation. This is the first report describing liver abscess as the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  17. Diagnostic Clues to Human Herpesvirus 6 Encephalitis and Wernicke’s Encephalopathy after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sadighi, Zsila; Sabin, Noah D.; Hayden, Randall; Stewart, Elizabeth; Pillai, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) encephalitis and Wernicke’s encephalopathy are treatable yet frequently undiagnosed causes of encephalopathy in pediatric recipients of allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. Here we review representative cases of both conditions to highlight specific and relevant neurologic features which prompted effective diagnosis and treatment. Two patients with confusion accompanied by seizures, memory changes, or specific visual hallucinations and HHV6 detectable by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid had improvement in viral load with ganciclovir or foscarnet treatment. Two patients had confusion, ataxia, or ocular changes and low serum thiamine levels, which resolved with parenteral thiamine. In all cases, definitive diagnosis and treatment were facilitated by a high index of suspicion and search for specific pathognomonic neurologic deficits accompanying the confusional state. It is critical to clinically differentiate these two conditions from other common neurologic syndromes occurring after transplant, allowing potentially improved patient outcomes by prompt diagnosis, and effective treatment. PMID:25564483

  18. Industrial fuel ethanol yeasts contain adaptive copy number changes in genes involved in vitamin B1 and B6 biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stambuk, Boris U; Dunn, Barbara; Alves, Sergio L; Duval, Eduarda H; Sherlock, Gavin

    2009-12-01

    Fuel ethanol is now a global energy commodity that is competitive with gasoline. Using microarray-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), we have determined gene copy number variations (CNVs) common to five industrially important fuel ethanol Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains responsible for the production of billions of gallons of fuel ethanol per year from sugarcane. These strains have significant amplifications of the telomeric SNO and SNZ genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of vitamins B6 (pyridoxine) and B1 (thiamin). We show that increased copy number of these genes confers the ability to grow more efficiently under the repressing effects of thiamin, especially in medium lacking pyridoxine and with high sugar concentrations. These genetic changes have likely been adaptive and selected for in the industrial environment, and may be required for the efficient utilization of biomass-derived sugars from other renewable feedstocks.

  19. Industrial fuel ethanol yeasts contain adaptive copy number changes in genes involved in vitamin B1 and B6 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stambuk, Boris U.; Dunn, Barbara; Alves, Sergio L.; Duval, Eduarda H.; Sherlock, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Fuel ethanol is now a global energy commodity that is competitive with gasoline. Using microarray-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), we have determined gene copy number variations (CNVs) common to five industrially important fuel ethanol Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains responsible for the production of billions of gallons of fuel ethanol per year from sugarcane. These strains have significant amplifications of the telomeric SNO and SNZ genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of vitamins B6 (pyridoxine) and B1 (thiamin). We show that increased copy number of these genes confers the ability to grow more efficiently under the repressing effects of thiamin, especially in medium lacking pyridoxine and with high sugar concentrations. These genetic changes have likely been adaptive and selected for in the industrial environment, and may be required for the efficient utilization of biomass-derived sugars from other renewable feedstocks. PMID:19897511

  20. Scurvy in an alcoholic patient treated with intravenous vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Ong, John; Randhawa, Rabinder

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries but there is an increased prevalence in chronic alcohol abusers. In the UK, it is common practice to treat patients with chronic alcoholism who are admitted to hospital with intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 2–3 days, followed by oral thiamine and vitamin B-compound tablets. This is a case of a 57-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism and chronic obstructive lung disease who was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia requiring ventilatory support. He was given high doses of intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 3 days then oral thiamine and vitamin B compound tablets but developed scurvy 4 days later. He was restarted on oral vitamin C supplementation and showed signs of improvement within 3 days of treatment. PMID:24728889

  1. No Camphor Toxicity in Cambodian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Casey R.; Porter, Samuel G.; Coats, Debra; Whitfield, Kyly C.; Mengkheang, Khin; Topazian, Mark D.; Fischer, Philip R.

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency and beriberi are prevalent in Cambodia, although most infants with nonspecific clinical symptoms of beriberi, including tachypnea, lack echocardiographic evidence diagnostic of the disease. Camphor activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), a nonselective ion channel expressed in the medial preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus and thought to be important for thermo-sensitivity. Because camphorated ointments are used commonly among Cambodian infants, we hypothesized that topical camphor modulates thermoregulatory behaviors, causing beriberi-simulating tachypnea, separate from any influence of thiamine deficiency. We assessed 9 tachypneic and 10 healthy infants for Tiger Balm use and for presence of camphor in whole blood. However, no camphor was found in blood from any infants, indicating that camphor is unrelated to tachypneic illness in Cambodian infants. PMID:28491925

  2. Impact of stressors on transmission potential of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Winton, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) affecting several species of Pacific salmon.  The severity of BKD can range from a chronic infection to overt disease with high mortality as in the case of large losses of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Great Lakes during late 1980s. The goal of this study was to empirically evaluate how environmental stressors relevant to the Great Lakes impact R. salmoninarum disease progression and bacterial shedding, the latter parameter being a proxy of horizontal transmission. In the first study (Aim 1), we focused on how endogenous host thiamine levels and dietary fatty acids impacted resistance of Chinook salmon to R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were fed one of four experimental diets, including a (1) thiamine replete diet formulated with fish oil, (2) thiamine deplete diet formulated with fish oil, (3) thiamine replete diet formulated with soybean oil, and (4) thiamine deplete diet formulated with soybean oil, before being challenged with buffer or R. salmoninarum. We observed significantly higher mortality in the R. salmoninarum infected groups relative to the corresponding mock controls in only the thiamine replete diet groups. We also observed a significant effect of time and diet on kidney bacterial load and bacterial shedding, with a significant trend towards higher shedding and bacterial load in the fish oil – thiamine replete diet group. However, during the course of the study, unexpected mortality occurred in all groups attributed to the myxozoan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Since the fish were dually-infected with C. shasta, we evaluated parasite DNA levels (parasitic load) in the kidney of sampled fish. We found that parasite load varied across time points but there was no significant effect of diet. However, parasite load did differ significantly between the mock and R. salmoninarum challenge groups with a trend towards longer persistence of C. shasta

  3. [Neurotropic effect of B vitamins in the complex treatment of pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Shavlovskaya, O A

    Combined vitamin preparations in therapeutic doses are used, along with simple analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), muscle and epidural blockade, for the relief of acute pain. It is recommended to use the B vitamin preparation neuromultivit. The tablet form of this preparation contains vitamin thiamine hydrochloride (100 mg), pyridoxine hydrochloride (200 mg), cyanocobalamin (0.2 mg), and injectable form includes thiamine hydrochloride (100mg), pyridoxine hydrochloride (100 mg), cyanocobalamin (1 mg). The efficacy of neuromultivit in a two stage scheme (intramuscular injections of 2 ml daily for 5-10 days with further injections 2-3 times a week for 2-3 weeks at the initial stage and 1 tablet 3 times a day for 4 weeks at the second stage) was shown.

  4. Severe dysphagia as the presenting symptom of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a non-alcoholic man.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2008-02-01

    We present the case of a non-alcoholic man, who, following severe malnutrition, presented with dysphagia that necessitated gastrostomy tube placement. The patient subsequently developed encephalopathy, at which point thiamine deficiency was suspected and thiamine supplementation initiated. The encephalopathy and the dysphagia resolved, but the patient was left with a dense amnestic deficit consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. MRI at the time of the encephalopathy revealed lesions consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This case represents a remarkable example of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that for a prolonged time period had as its sole manifestation severe dysphagia. To our knowledge, there is only one similar case reported in the literature. This case serves to alert neurologists that isolated dysphagia may be the presenting symptom of this classic neurological syndrome even in the absence of alcoholism.

  5. Wernicke-korsakoff syndrome in primary peritoneal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hyang

    2013-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease.

  6. Clinical signs in the Wernicke-Korsakoff complex: a retrospective analysis of 131 cases diagnosed at necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, C G; Giles, M; Finlay-Jones, R

    1986-01-01

    A recent necropsy study has shown that 80% of patients with the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome were not diagnosed as such during life. Review of the clinical signs of these cases revealed that only 16% had the classical clinical triad and 19% had no documented clinical signs. The incidence of clinical signs in this and other retrospective pathological studies is very different from that of prospective clinical studies. This discrepancy may relate to "missed" clinical signs but the magnitude of the difference suggests that at least some cases of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome may be the end result of repeated subclinical episodes of vitamin B1 deficiency. In order to make the diagnosis, clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion in the "at risk" group of patients, particularly alcoholics. Investigations of thiamine status may be helpful and if the diagnosis is suspected, parenteral thiamine should be given. PMID:3701343

  7. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hyang

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease. PMID:24474922

  8. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in the course of thyrotoxicosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka-Chmiel, Joanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Sędziak, Ryszard; Marek, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (also called Wernicke's encephalopathy) is a potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome caused most frequently by thiamine deficiency. The three classic symptoms found together are confusion, ataxia and eyeball manifestations. Memory disturbances can also be symptoms. Wernicke's encephalopathy mainly results from alcohol abuse, but also from malnutrition, cancer, chronic dialysis, thyrotoxicosis and, in well-founded cases, encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD). The coexistence of many factors makes a proper diagnosis difficult, delays appropriate treatment and consequently reduces the chance of complete recovery. We present the case of a 53 year-old female with Wernicke's encephalopathy caused by chronic malnutrition, surgical operation, as well as thyrotoxicosis. She received treatment with intravenous thiamine administration and also anti-thyroid treatment which caused satisfactory regression of her neurological symptoms.

  9. Nutrition and the brain.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2010-02-01

    Severe nutritional deficiencies, such as protein energy malnutrition and deficiency of nicotinamide, vitamin B(12), folate, and thiamine, have long been recognized to cause severe confusion. Lesser vitamin deficiencies have been linked to the pathogenesis of delirium. Hypo- and hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia can cause cognitive deficits. Epidemiologic and animal studies have linked several other nutrients (omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, alpha-lipoic acid, and the Mediterranean diet) to cognitive performance and the prevention of dementia.

  10. The growth of Paracoccus halodenitrificans in a defined medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic medium, consisting of inorganic salts and any of a number of carbon sources, supported the aerobic growth of Paracoccus halodenitrificans when supplemented with thiamine. The same medium plus a nitrogenous oxide supported anaerobic growth when additionally supplemented with methionine. The observation that vitamin B12 or betaine replaced methionine suggested that P. halodenitrificans had a defect in the cobalamin dependent pathway for methionine biosynthesis, as well as the inability to synthesize betanine when growing anaerobically.

  11. [Life-threatening complication of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Felix, O; Felleiter, P; Sturzenegger, M

    2012-01-18

    The Wernicke Encephalopathy (WE) as a result of a (sub)acute thiamine deficiency remains, unfortunately, still under-diagnosed, especially among non-alcoholics. It should be considered in each occurrence of delirium as well as in any ocular motor disorder and ataxia, in particular if there is a history of weight loss with or without gastrointestinal symptoms. In cases with suspected WE an immediate intravenous substitution of 3×200 mg/d is recommended.

  12. Experimente ueber den Einflusse von Metaboliten und Antimetaboliten am Modell von Trichomonas Vaginalis. VI. (Experiments on the Influence of Metabolites and Antimetabolites on the Model of Trichomonas Vaginalis. VI. Communication: Effect of Vitamins and Vitamin-Like Substances),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A number of substances (folic acid, axerophtol, tokopherol and others) stimulate the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis and, therefore, are very well...group of vitamins (thiamine, lactoflavin, pyridoxine and others) are without recognizeable effect upon the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis . The third...inhibiting effect upon the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis . Further investigations with these substances within a combined inhibition system seem to be important. (Modified author abstract)

  13. Summary of Operational Rations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    fortification of instant coffee with ascorbic acid; of cocoa beverag.e powder and enriched sweet chocolate with vitamin A, ascorbic acid, thiamin and...and ice cream mix Staples such as flour, sugar, rice, macaroni, and shortening Instant puddings Salt, pepper, and other spices 14 MEAL, COMBAT...Turkey Loaf Fruit, Enriched Sweet Chocolate, Crackers, and Cheese Spread *All menus include instant coffee, dry, nondairy cream substitute

  14. Comparison of Wood Preservatives in Stake Tests (1981 Progress Report).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    infected with Trichoderma mold, plus other selected species such as oak, Douglas-fir, and Engelmann spruce. Southern pine untreated control stakes...acetylated wood, cyanoethylated wood, that with thiamine destroyed, chemically modified wood, wood infected with Trichoderma mold, embedded fiberboard (western...14 toA4 41U(4 a ...- 44- Table 31.--Condition of southern pine stakes (2 x 4 in. nominal x 18 in.) of uninfected and Trichoderma mcid-infected wood

  15. Vitamin B1 diversity and characterization of biosynthesis genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Mangel, Nathalie; Fudge, Jared B; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2017-06-15

    Vitamin B1, which consists of the vitamers thiamin and its phosphorylated derivatives, is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms because it is required as a metabolic cofactor in several enzymatic reactions. Genetic diversity of vitamin B1 biosynthesis and accumulation has not been investigated in major crop species other than rice and potato. We analyzed cassava germplasm for accumulation of B1 vitamers. Vitamin B1 content in leaves and roots of 41 cassava accessions showed significant variation between accessions. HPLC analyses of B1 vitamers revealed distinct profiles in cassava leaves and storage roots, with nearly equal relative levels of thiamin pyrophosphate and thiamin monophosphate in leaves, but mostly thiamin pyrophosphate in storage roots. Unusually, the cassava genome has two genes encoding the 4-amino-2-methyl-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine phosphate synthase, THIC (MeTHIC1 and MeTHIC2), both of which carry a riboswitch in the 3'-UTR, as well as the adenylated thiazole synthase, THI1 (MeTHI1a and MeTHI1b). The THIC and THI1 genes are expressed at very low levels in storage roots compared with the accumulation of vitamin B1, indicating only limited biosynthesis de novo therein. In leaves, vitamin B1 content is negatively correlated with THIC and THI1 expression levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of THIC by the riboswitch present in the 3'-UTR of the THIC mRNA and regulation of THI1 by promoter activity or alternative post-transcriptional mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Nutritional Assessment of U.S. Military Academy Cadets at West Point: Part 2. Assessment of Nutritional Intake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-06

    1975) was also used to determine cooked yields from raw ingredients and appropriate USDA processing codes were selected from the CAN System to estimate...be assumed that there were some losses of the heat labile vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamin C). While the USDA processing codes provided for...cups Li 1-2 cups Li Less than 1 cup Li Don’t know 29. I consume... H Coffee H Decaffeinated Coffee L Kool-Aid Cola - Diet Cola Decaffeinated Cola

  17. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Haloperidol Midaz. Ca+ gluc. cefazolin clinda. someprazol fent. gent. glucose peg. Insulin Mg+ phenobarb.someprazol gent. cefalozin clinda. propofol...Phenytoin Senna Thiamine Haloperidol 0 0 Etom Roc 0 Amiodaro Midaz. Fent. Nafcillin T. Dap 0 0 fent. midaz. 0 0 Lido Midaz 1500 Phenytoin Fent. Propofol...odium bicarodium phos mannitol Ca+Cl- docusate Cefepime someprazolonduparinuLevofloxacin Mg+ Mannitol MVI K+ Haloperidol Midaz. henylephrine peg

  18. 21 CFR 104.47 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 104.5(b), shall contain at least the following three components: (1) One or more sources of protein... selected so that one or more of the listed protein sources of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, excluding... 150.00 520.0 Thiamine, mg .05 .2 Riboflavin, mg .06 .2 Niacin, mg .99 3.4 Pantothenic acid, mg .32 1.1...

  19. 21 CFR 104.47 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 104.5(b), shall contain at least the following three components: (1) One or more sources of protein... selected so that one or more of the listed protein sources of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, excluding... 150.00 520.0 Thiamine, mg .05 .2 Riboflavin, mg .06 .2 Niacin, mg .99 3.4 Pantothenic acid, mg .32 1.1...

  20. 21 CFR 104.47 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 104.5(b), shall contain at least the following three components: (1) One or more sources of protein... selected so that one or more of the listed protein sources of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, excluding... 150.00 520.0 Thiamine, mg .05 .2 Riboflavin, mg .06 .2 Niacin, mg .99 3.4 Pantothenic acid, mg .32 1.1...

  1. 21 CFR 104.47 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 104.5(b), shall contain at least the following three components: (1) One or more sources of protein... selected so that one or more of the listed protein sources of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, excluding... 150.00 520.0 Thiamine, mg .05 .2 Riboflavin, mg .06 .2 Niacin, mg .99 3.4 Pantothenic acid, mg .32 1.1...

  2. 21 CFR 104.47 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 104.5(b), shall contain at least the following three components: (1) One or more sources of protein... selected so that one or more of the listed protein sources of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, excluding... 150.00 520.0 Thiamine, mg .05 .2 Riboflavin, mg .06 .2 Niacin, mg .99 3.4 Pantothenic acid, mg .32 1.1...

  3. Outbreak of beriberi among African Union troops in Mogadishu, Somalia.

    PubMed

    Watson, John T; El Bushra, Hassan; Lebo, Emmaculate J; Bwire, Godfrey; Kiyengo, James; Emukule, Gideon; Omballa, Victor; Tole, John; Zuberi, Muvunyi; Breiman, Robert F; Katz, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    In July 2009, WHO and partners were notified of a large outbreak of unknown illness, including deaths, among African Union (AU) soldiers in Mogadishu. Illnesses were characterized by peripheral edema, dyspnea, palpitations, and fever. Our objectives were to determine the cause of the outbreak, and to design and recommend control strategies. The illness was defined as acute onset of lower limb edema, with dyspnea, chest pain, palpitations, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or headache. Investigations in Nairobi and Mogadishu included clinical, epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory studies. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for illness. From April 26, 2009 to May 1, 2010, 241 AU soldiers had lower limb edema and at least one additional symptom; four patients died. At least 52 soldiers were airlifted to hospitals in Kenya and Uganda. Four of 31 hospitalized patients in Kenya had right-sided heart failure with pulmonary hypertension. Initial laboratory investigations did not reveal hematologic, metabolic, infectious or toxicological abnormalities. Illness was associated with exclusive consumption of food provided to troops (not eating locally acquired foods) and a high level of insecurity (e.g., being exposed to enemy fire on a daily basis). Because the syndrome was clinically compatible with wet beriberi, thiamine was administered to ill soldiers, resulting in rapid and dramatic resolution. Blood samples taken from 16 cases prior to treatment showed increased levels of erythrocyte transketolase activation coefficient, consistent with thiamine deficiency. With mass thiamine supplementation for healthy troops, the number of subsequent beriberi cases decreased with no further deaths reported. An outbreak of wet beriberi caused by thiamine deficiency due to restricted diet occurred among soldiers in a modern, well-equipped army. Vigilance to ensure adequate micronutrient intake must be a priority in populations completely dependent upon

  4. The growth of paracoccus halodenitrificans in a defined medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    A synthetic medium, consisting of inorganic salts and any of a number of carbon sources, supported the aerobic growth of Paracoccus halodenitrificans when supplemented with thiamine. The same medium plus a nitrogenous oxide supported anaerobic growth when additionally supplemented with methionine. The observation that vitamin B12 or betaine replaced methionine suggested that P. halodenitrificans had a defect in the cobalamin dependent pathway for methionine biosynthesis, as well as the inability to synthesize betaine when growing anaerobically.

  5. Atypical case of Wolfram syndrome revealed through targeted exome sequencing in a patient with suspected mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial diseases comprise a diverse set of clinical disorders that affect multiple organ systems with varying severity and age of onset. Due to their clinical and genetic heterogeneity, these diseases are difficult to diagnose. We have developed a targeted exome sequencing approach to improve our ability to properly diagnose mitochondrial diseases and apply it here to an individual patient. Our method targets mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the exons of 1,600 nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biology or Mendelian disorders with multi-system phenotypes, thereby allowing for simultaneous evaluation of multiple disease loci. Case Presentation Targeted exome sequencing was performed on a patient initially suspected to have a mitochondrial disorder. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, diffuse brain atrophy, autonomic neuropathy, optic nerve atrophy, and a severe amnestic syndrome. Further work-up revealed multiple heteroplasmic mtDNA deletions as well as profound thiamine deficiency without a clear nutritional cause. Targeted exome sequencing revealed a homozygous c.1672C > T (p.R558C) missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 that has previously been reported in a patient with Wolfram syndrome. Conclusion This case demonstrates how clinical application of next-generation sequencing technology can enhance the diagnosis of patients suspected to have rare genetic disorders. Furthermore, the finding of unexplained thiamine deficiency in a patient with Wolfram syndrome suggests a potential link between WFS1 biology and thiamine metabolism that has implications for the clinical management of Wolfram syndrome patients. PMID:22226368

  6. Wernicke encephalopathy without delirium that appeared as agitation in a patient with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Takahashi, Takao; Taji, Yoshitada; Ikebuchi, Kenji; Furuya, Daisuke; Uchida, Nozomu; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-05-11

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, and is sometimes overlooked because of the diversity of clinical symptoms. From a series of WE patients with cancer, we report a lung cancer patient who developed WE, the main symptom of which was agitation.ResultA 50-year-old woman with lung cancer was referred to our psycho-oncology clinic because of agitation lasting for three days. No laboratory findings or drugs explaining her agitation were identified. Although the patient did not develop delirium, ophthalmoplegia, or ataxia, WE was suspected because she experienced a loss of appetite loss lasting 5 weeks. This diagnosis was supported by abnormal serum thiamine and disappearance of agitation one hour after intravenous thiamine administration.Significance of resultsThis report emphasizes the clinical diversity of WE and indicates the limits of the ability to diagnose WE from typical clinical symptoms. The presence of a loss of appetite for more than two weeks may be the key to the accurate diagnosis of WE.

  7. B-vitamins, carotenoids and α-/γ-tocopherol in raw and roasted nuts.

    PubMed

    Stuetz, Wolfgang; Schlörmann, Wiebke; Glei, Michael

    2017-04-15

    The concentrations of B-vitamins, carotenoids and tocopherols in nuts may differ between species and might be influenced by roasting. Thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and α-/γ-tocopherol were determined in different varieties of raw and roasted nuts using HPLC (fluorescence/UV-vis detection). The analysis revealed remarkable concentrations of thiamine and pyridoxine in pistachios (57%, 79% of the recommended daily intake/100g (RDI), respectively) and riboflavin in almonds (119% of the RDI). Pistachios were rich in lutein/zeaxanthin and contained highest β-carotene levels among nuts. Almonds and hazelnuts were abundant in α-tocopherol (>4-fold the RDI for tocopherol equivalents) while pistachios and walnuts were rich in γ-tocopherol. Roasting had a diminishing effect on thiamine, carotenoids and tocopherols especially in almonds and walnuts. Nuts could make a valuable contribution to a healthy diet in regard to B-vitamins, lutein/zeaxanthin and tocopherols. A reduction in micronutrient content by roasting is reliant on the nut variety and specific micronutrient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of oral contraceptive agents on nutrients: II. Vitamins.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Oberleas, D; Moghissi, K S; Stryker, J C; Lei, K Y

    1975-04-01

    Clinical, biochemical and nutritional data were collected from a large population of women using oral contraceptive agents. Higher incidence of abnormal clinical signs related to malnutrition were observed in the lower (B) as compared to the higher (A) socioeconomic groups, and also in the nonsupplemented groups as compared to the supplemented groups in the B subjects. As a rule the intake of oral contraceptive agent subjects of vitamin A, C, B6 and folic acid did not differ from that of the controls As expected, subjects from the supplemented groups had higher intake of vitamin A, C, B6, thiamin, riboflavin and folic acid, and A groups had higher intake of vitamin C, B6, riboflavin and folic acid. Increased plasma vitamin A and decreased carotene levels were observed in oral contraceptive agent users. In general oral contraceptive agents had little or no effect on plasma ascorbic acid. Urinary excretion of both thiamin and riboflavin in subjects using oral contraceptive agents were lower in A groups. Erythrocyte folate and plasma pyridoxal phosphate was decreased in A groups due to oral contraceptive agents. Subjects who took supplements had higher levels of plasma vitamin A, ascorbic acid and folate. But urinary thiamin and riboflavin were higher only in group A subjects who took supplements.

  9. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  10. Postnatal development of bitter taste avoidance behavior in mice is associated with ACTIN-dependent localization of bitter taste receptors to the microvilli of taste cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsuko; Kondo, Kaori; Kunishima, Yoshimi; Iseki, Sachiko; Kondo, Takashi; Ota, Masato S

    2018-01-22

    Bitter taste avoidance behavior (BAB) plays a fundamental role in the avoidance of toxic substances with a bitter taste. However, the molecular basis underlying the development of BAB is unknown. To study critical developmental events by which taste buds turn into functional organs with BAB, we investigated the early phase development of BAB in postnatal mice in response to bitter-tasting compounds, such as quinine and thiamine. Postnatal mice started to exhibit BAB for thiamine and quinine at postnatal day 5 (PD5) and PD7, respectively. Histological analyses of taste buds revealed the formation of microvilli in the taste pores starting at PD5 and the localization of type 2 taste receptor 119 (TAS2R119) at the microvilli at PD6. Treatment of the tongue epithelium with cytochalasin D (CytD), which disturbs ACTIN polymerization in the microvilli, resulted in the loss of TAS2R119 localization at the microvilli and the loss of BAB for quinine and thiamine. The release of ATP from the circumvallate papillae tissue due to taste stimuli was also declined following CytD treatment. These results suggest that the localization of TAS2R119 at the microvilli of taste pores is critical for the initiation of BAB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Control Efficacies of Vitamin Treatments against Bacterial Wilt and Grey Mould Diseases in Tomato Plants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yang, Hye Ji; Kim, Do Hoon; Sung, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang-Jin; Chang, Seog Won

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial wilt and grey mould in tomato plants are economically destructive bacterial and fungal diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum and Botrytis cinerea , respectively. Various approaches including chemical and biological controls have been attempted to arrest the tomato diseases so far. In this study, in vitro growths of bacterial R. solanacearum and fungal B. cinerea were evaluated using four different vitamins including thiamine (vitamin B1), niacin (vitamin B3), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), and menadione (vitamin K3). In planta efficacies of the four vitamin treatments on tomato protection against both diseases were also demonstrated. All four vitamins showed different in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in dose-dependent manners. However, treatment with 2 mM thiamine was only effective in reducing bacterial wilt of detached tomato leaves without phytotoxicity under lower disease pressure (10 6 colony-forming unit [cfu]/ml). Treatment with the vitamins also differentially reduced in vitro conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea . The four vitamins slightly reduced the conidial germination, and thiamine, pyridoxine and menadione inhibited the mycelial growth of B. cinerea . Menadione began to drastically suppress the conidial germination and mycelial growth by 5 and 0.5 mM, respectively. Grey mould symptoms on the inoculated tomato leaves were significantly reduced by pyridoxine and menadione pretreatments one day prior to the fungal challenge inoculation. These findings suggest that disease-specific vitamin treatment will be integrated for eco-friendly management of tomato bacterial wilt and grey mould.

  12. [Nutritional value of daily diets prepared in several regions of the country. Part V. Value of group b vitamins].

    PubMed

    Nadolna, I; Wiśniewska, W; Kunachowicz, H

    1991-01-01

    Studies of the content of group B vitamins: thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and vitamin b6 in daily diets of manual and mental workers with medium income were carried on. The diets were prepared for five regions of the country (Warszawa, Lublin, Olsztyn, Poznań, Wrocław) under laboratory conditions. These diets contained respectively: thiamin 1.17 and 1.11 mg, riboflavin 1.48 and 1.55 mg; niacin 11.3 and 10.2 mg and vitamin B6 1.50 and 1.21 mg per day. According to the studies the realization of daily requirements by these diets for thiamin were met 82 and 98%, for niacin 62 and 65%, and for vitamin B6 79 and 64%. The comparison of the presently studied diets with the ones from 1973, 1980 and 1981 showed that the content of niacin and vitamin B6 intakes systematically decrease. There were no considerable differences in the contents of group B vitamins between diets prepared in all five regions of Poland.

  13. A woman with thyrotoxicosis- and hyperemesis gravidarum-associated Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Anaforoğlu, İnan; Yildiz, Bülent; İnceçayir, Ömer; Algün, Ekrem

    2012-01-01

    Although hyperthyroidism arising from primary thyroid disease is rare in pregnancy, transient gestational hyperthyroidism is not uncommon. This condition can be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), and Wernicke's encephalopathy. We present the case of a woman with toxic nodular goiter complicating HG-associated Wernicke's encephalopathy. A 38-year-old Caucasian woman, who had received a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and HG early in her pregnancy, had intrauterine fetal death at Week 16 of gestation. One day after undergoing therapeutic abortion, she was admitted to our clinic with persistent thyrotoxicosis, nausea, and vomiting. A toxic thyroid nodule was detected. She was given antithyroid medication, total parenteral nutrition. On Day 10 of hospitalization, she developed ataxia, aphasia, and somnolence. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed increased bilateral thalamic signalization. She was given a diagnosis of Wernicke's metabolic encephalopathy, for which she received thiamine and multivitamin preparations. She responded dramatically on the second day of thiamine therapy. Her consciousness improved rapidly and she began to speak. Her muscle tone was slightly weak and she had paresthesias in both legs. Absorption of thiamine may be particularly impaired in pregnant women with hyperemesis and hyperthyroid disease. Wernicke's encephalopathy should be considered in hyperthyroid women with HG who develop neurological abnormalities.

  14. [Pharmacological treatment of Korsakoff's psychosis: a review of the literature and experience in two cases].

    PubMed

    Casadevall-Codina, T; Pascual-Millán, L F; Fernández-Turrado, T; Escalza-Cortina, I; Navas-Vinagre, I; Fanlo-Meroño, C; Morales-Asín, F

    Korsakoff s psychosis (KP) is a relatively frequent pathological condition in our community that has been infradiagnosed. The most common cause is chronic alcohol consumption, although it can be brought about by other aetiologies accompanied by vitamin deficiencies. The lack of thiamine entails an alteration in the synthesis of neurotransmitters, which provides the neurochemical foundation for the specific cognitive impairment that defines the syndrome. To evaluate the application of pharmacological treatments, in accordance with the neurochemical disorders described in the literature, and report our experience in two cases treated with anticholinesterases. 1) Female aged 47, with a history of addiction to alcohol. Following Wernicke s encephalopathy, which improved with parenteral thiamine, she presented a memory disorder compatible with KP. After two months treatment with donepezil, a cognitive improvement was observed in the neuropsychological tests. 2) Male aged 77, who presented KP a month after being diagnosed and treated for a post encephalitic vasculitis caused be varicella zoster virus. His cognitive and functional condition improved after 3 months treatment with donepezil. There are not enough studies in the literature with representative samples that consider the effects of thiamine or of other forms of treatment on cognitive impairment in KP. Noradrenaline, serotonin, glutamate and acetylcholine have been proposed in the pathogeny of the syndrome. Based on experiences gained in cholinergic disorders, two cases responded to treatment with donepezil. Effective treatment must be based on a combination of aetiological and pharmacological treatment, and cognitive rehabilitation.

  15. Egg fatty acid composition from lake trout fed two Lake Michigan prey fish species.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Tillitt, D.E.; Brown, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that there were significant differences in the egg thiamine content in lake trout Salvelinus namaycush fed two Lake Michigan prey fish (alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and bloater Coregonus hoyi). Lake trout fed alewives produced eggs low in thiamine, but it was unknown whether the consumption of alewives affected other nutritionally important components. In this study we investigated the fatty acid composition of lake trout eggs when females were fed diets that resulted in different egg thiamine concentrations. For 2 years, adult lake trout were fed diets consisting of four combinations of captured alewives and bloaters (100% alewives; 65% alewives, 35% bloaters; 35% alewives, 65% bloaters; and 100% bloaters). The alewife fatty acid profile had higher concentrations of arachidonic acid and total omega-6 fatty acids than the bloater profile. The concentrations of four fatty acids (cis-13, 16-docosadienoic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids) were higher in bloaters than in alewives. Although six fatty acid components were higher in lake trout eggs in 2001 than in 2000 and eight fatty acids were lower, diet had no effect on any fatty acid concentration measured in lake trout eggs in this study. Based on these results, it appears that egg fatty acid concentrations differ between years but that the egg fatty acid profile does not reflect the alewife-bloater mix in the diet of adults. The essential fatty acid content of lake trout eggs from females fed alewives and bloaters appears to be physiologically regulated and adequate to meet the requirements of developing embryos.

  16. Impact of Food Rations and Supplements on Micronutrient Status by Trimester of Pregnancy: Cross-Sectional Studies in the Maela Refugee Camp in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Stuetz, Wolfgang; Carrara, Verena I; Mc Gready, Rose; Lee, Sue J; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Po, Basi; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Grune, Tilman; Biesalski, Hans K; Nosten, François H

    2016-01-26

    Micronutrient fortified flour (MFF), supplementary food rations and micronutrient (MN) supplements may prevent deficiencies among pregnant women. Objectives of cross-sectional surveys in 2004 (n = 533) and 2006 (n = 515) were to assess the impact of new food rations (flour, oil) and supplements on MN status by trimester of pregnancy in the Maela refugee camp. Hemoglobin, iron status, zinc, retinol, β-carotene and tryptophan decreased, while α-/γ-tocopherol and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) increased from first to third trimester. In 2006, mean zinc and α-tocopherol for each trimester was significantly higher than in 2004. The weeks of supplemented thiamine and folic acid were positively correlated with thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and 5-MTHF, but not for ferrous sulfate as iron deficiency was observed in 38.5% of third-trimester women. Frequent consumption of fish paste and owning a garden or animal were associated with significantly higher iron status, retinol, β-carotene, and 5-MTHF. In conclusion, MFF and supplementary oil were most likely to explain improved zinc and α-tocopherol status, while thiamine and folate supplements ensured high TDP and 5-MTHF in late pregnancy. MN supplements, MN-rich staple food, small gardens, and programs to improve iron compliance are promising strategies to prevent MN deficiencies during pregnancy in vulnerable populations.

  17. Physical and intellectual development in Philippine children fed five different dietary staples.

    PubMed

    Guzman, V B; Guthrie, H A; Guthrie, G M

    1976-11-01

    Assessments of dietary intake, intelligence, physical growth, and clinical signs of malnutrition were made on 600 children from five Philippine communities. Five boys and five girls each at ages 8,9, and 10 from poor and less poor families drawn from town and rural schools in each community were examined. Dietary staples were rice, fish, corn, coconuts, and sweet potatoes, respectively, at the five sites. Analyses of variance indicated marked differences among communities in nutrient intake based on 24-hr recall, in intellectual and anthropometric measures and in clinical signs of malnutrition. There were few significant F ratios for urban-rural residence, socioeconomic status, sec, or age. There were positive correlations of approximately 0.20 between intake of calories and carbohydrates and intelligence; between calories and carbohydrates and anthropometric measures; and between intelligence and anthropometric measures. Clinical signs in the eye and on the skin showed low correlations of about-0.20 with dietary intake of protein, fat, thiamin, and riboflavin but not with vitamin A. In all communities energy intake was low reflecting limited fat consumption. Where rice or corn was the staple, thiamin and riboflavin were also frequent deficiencies; with fish, ascorbic acid; with sweet potatoes and coconuts, calcium, riboflavin, and thiamin. A very high incidence of eye changes, suggestive of a vitamin A deficiency, was found even where vitamin A intake seemed adequate.

  18. Development of three-layered rumen escapable capsules for cattle

    PubMed Central

    SEYAMA, Tomohiro; HIRAYASU, Hirofumi; YAMAWAKI, Kenji; ADACHI, Takuhiko; SUGIMOTO, Takayuki; KASAI, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A new rumen escapable tool is presented for cattle in prospect of developing medical treatment or supplementing trace elements for disease prevention. This tool consists of a three-layered capsule that dissolves in the lower digestive tract, but not in the rumen. The capsule was manufactured by capsule-forming techniques through the use of liquid surface tension. This method does not involve high-temperature treatment, so the capsule can contain not only lipophilic substances but also hydrophilic or heat-sensitive substances. Furthermore, the capsule has a specific gravity of 1.3 and diameter of 6.0 mm, which were previously shown to be appropriate to avoid rumination. The objective of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of the capsule pertinent to rumen escaping. In order to validate rumen escape, capsules containing 30 g of water-soluble vitamin (thiamine hydrochloride) per head were administered to four lactating cows assigned in a crossover trial. In the group administered encapsulated thiamine hydrochloride, blood thiamine levels increased from 12.4 ± 1.03 ng/ml before administration to 54.8 ± 2.21 ng/ml at 6 hr following administration, whereas the level remained at 13.3 ± 2.05 ng/ml in the control group administered via aqueous solution. This indicates that the three-layered capsules passed through the rumen and dissolved in the lower digestive tract, thus functioning as a rumen escapable tool. PMID:27546371

  19. Dietary intake of the water-soluble vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12 and C in 10 countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Olsen, A; Halkjaer, J; van Gils, C H; Buijsse, B; Verhagen, H; Jenab, M; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Ericson, U; Ocké, M C; Peeters, P H M; Touvier, M; Niravong, M; Waaseth, M; Skeie, G; Khaw, K T; Travis, R; Ferrari, P; Sanchez, M J; Agudo, A; Overvad, K; Linseisen, J; Weikert, C; Sacerdote, C; Evangelista, A; Zylis, D; Tsiotas, K; Manjer, J; van Guelpen, B; Riboli, E; Slimani, N; Bingham, S

    2009-11-01

    To describe the intake of vitamins thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cobalamine) and C (ascorbic acid) and their food sources among 27 centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons aged between 35 and 74 years were administered a standardized 24-h dietary recall using a computerized interview software programme (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes of the four B vitamins and vitamin C were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database (ENDB). Mean intakes were adjusted for age and weighted by season and day of recall. Intake of B vitamins did not vary considerably between centres, except in the UK health-conscious cohort, in which substantially higher intakes of thiamine and lower intakes of vitamin B12 were reported compared with other centres. Overall, meat was the most important contributor to the B vitamins in all centres except in the UK health-conscious group. Vitamin C showed a clear geographical gradient, with higher intakes in the southern centres as compared with the northern ones; this was more pronounced in men than in women. Vegetables and fruits were major contributors to vitamin C in all centres, but juices and potatoes were also important sources in the northern centres. This study showed no major differences across centres in the mean intakes of B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, B6, B12), whereas a tendency towards a north-south gradient was observed for vitamin C.

  20. Primary CNS lymphoma as a cause of Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory; Voll, Chris; Macaulay, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Korsakoff syndrome presents with memory dysfunction with retrograde amnesia, anterograde amnesia, limited insight into dysfunction, and confabulation. The most common etiology of Korsakoff syndrome is thiamine deficiency secondary to alcoholism. There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. A 46-year-old male with a long history of alcoholism presented with a history of confusion, amnesia, and confabulation with no localizing features on neurological examination. The patient showed no clinical change with intravenous thiamine. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a heterogenous, enhancing mass lesion centered within the third ventricle, with other lesions found throughout cortical and subcortical regions. The patient was given dexamethasone i.v. without noticeable clinical improvement but with marked radiological improvement with mass reduction. Stereotactic biopsy revealed a diagnosis of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Most patients presenting with Korsakoff syndrome have thiamine deficiency; however, mass lesions can produce an identical clinical picture. This is the first case report of a patient with primary CNS lymphoma presenting as Korsakoff syndrome.

  1. Biomarkers of delirium as a clue to diagnosis and pathogenesis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, J W; Oudman, E

    2013-12-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) and Korsakoff's syndrome are considered to be different stages of the same disorder due to thiamine deficiency, which is called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). The earliest biochemical change is the decrease of α-ketoglutarate-dehydrogenase activity in astrocytes. According to autopsy-based series, mental status changes are present in 82% of WE cases. The objective of the present review is to identify possible underlying mechanisms relating the occurrence of delirium to WKS. Studies involving delirium in WKS, however, are rare. Therefore, first, a search was done for candidate biomarkers of delirium irrespective of the clinical setting. Secondly, the results were focused on identification of these biomarkers in reports on WKS. In various settings, 10 biochemical and/or genetic biomarkers showed strong associations with the occurrence of delirium. For WKS three of these candidate biomarkers were identified, namely brain tissue cell counts of CD68 positive cells as a marker of microglial activation, high cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels, and MHPG, a metabolite of norepinephrine. Based on current literature, markers of microglial activation may present an interesting patho-etiological relationship between thiamine deficiency and delirium in WKS. In WKS cases, changes in astroglia and microglial proliferation were reported. The possible loss-of-function mechanisms following thiamine deficiency in WKS are proposed to come from microglial activation, resulting in a delirium in the initial phase of WKS. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  2. Differential Control Efficacies of Vitamin Treatments against Bacterial Wilt and Grey Mould Diseases in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yang, Hye Ji; Kim, Do Hoon; Sung, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang-Jin; Chang, Seog Won

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial wilt and grey mould in tomato plants are economically destructive bacterial and fungal diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum and Botrytis cinerea, respectively. Various approaches including chemical and biological controls have been attempted to arrest the tomato diseases so far. In this study, in vitro growths of bacterial R. solanacearum and fungal B. cinerea were evaluated using four different vitamins including thiamine (vitamin B1), niacin (vitamin B3), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), and menadione (vitamin K3). In planta efficacies of the four vitamin treatments on tomato protection against both diseases were also demonstrated. All four vitamins showed different in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in dose-dependent manners. However, treatment with 2 mM thiamine was only effective in reducing bacterial wilt of detached tomato leaves without phytotoxicity under lower disease pressure (106 colony-forming unit [cfu]/ml). Treatment with the vitamins also differentially reduced in vitro conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The four vitamins slightly reduced the conidial germination, and thiamine, pyridoxine and menadione inhibited the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Menadione began to drastically suppress the conidial germination and mycelial growth by 5 and 0.5 mM, respectively. Grey mould symptoms on the inoculated tomato leaves were significantly reduced by pyridoxine and menadione pretreatments one day prior to the fungal challenge inoculation. These findings suggest that disease-specific vitamin treatment will be integrated for eco-friendly management of tomato bacterial wilt and grey mould. PMID:27721697

  3. Interactions of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria Ca2+ stores with capacitative calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Chen, Huan-Lian; Gibson, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Thiamine dependent enzymes are diminished in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thiamine deficiency in vitro and in rodents is a useful model of this reduction. Thiamine interacts with cellular calcium stores. To directly test the relevance of the thiamine dependent changes to dynamic processes in AD, the interactions must be studied in cells from patients with AD. These studies employed fibroblasts. Mitochondrial dysfunction including reductions in thiamine dependent enzymes and abnormalities in calcium homeostasis and oxidative processes occur in fibroblasts from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients. Bombesin-releasable calcium stores (BRCS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are exaggerated in fibroblasts from patients with AD bearing a presenilin-1 (PS-1) mutation and in control fibroblasts treated with oxidants. ER calcium regulates calcium entry into the cell through capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which is reduced in fibroblasts and neurons from mice bearing PS-1 mutations. Under physiological conditions, mitochondria and ER play important and interactive roles in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, the interactions of mitochondria and oxidants with CCE were tested. Inhibition of ER Ca2+-ATPase by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) stimulates CCE. CPA-induced CCE was diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ export (−60%) or import (−40%). Different aspects of mitochondrial Ca2+ coupled to CPA-induced-CCE were sensitive to select oxidants. The effects were very different when CCE was examined in the presence of InsP3, a physiological regulator of ER calcium release, and subsequent CCE. CCE under these conditions was only mildly reduced (20–25%) by inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ export, and inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake exaggerated CCE (+53%). However, t-BHP reversed both abnormalities. The results suggest that in the presence of InsP3, mitochondria buffer the local Ca2+ released from ER following rapid activation of InsP3R and serve as a

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a novel Moroccan founder mutation in SLC19A3 as a new cause of early-childhood fatal Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerards, Mike; Kamps, Rick; van Oevelen, Jo; Boesten, Iris; Jongen, Eveline; de Koning, Bart; Scholte, Hans R; de Angst, Isabel; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ratbi, Ilham; Coppieters, Wouter; Karim, Latifa; de Coo, René; van den Bosch, Bianca; Smeets, Hubert

    2013-03-01

    Leigh syndrome is an early onset, often fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Until now, mutations in more than 35 genes have been reported to cause Leigh syndrome, indicating an extreme genetic heterogeneity for this disorder, but still only explaining part of the cases. The possibility of whole exome sequencing enables not only mutation detection in known candidate genes, but also the identification of new genes associated with Leigh syndrome in small families and isolated cases. Exome sequencing was combined with homozygosity mapping to identify the genetic defect in a Moroccan family with fatal Leigh syndrome in early childhood and specific magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in the brain. We detected a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.20C>A; p.Ser7Ter) in the thiamine transporter SLC19A3. In vivo overexpression of wild-type SLC19A3 showed an increased thiamine uptake, whereas overexpression of mutant SLC19A3 did not, confirming that the mutation results in an absent or non-functional protein. Seventeen additional patients with Leigh syndrome were screened for mutations in SLC19A3 using conventional Sanger sequencing. Two unrelated patients, both from Moroccan origin and one from consanguineous parents, were homozygous for the same p.Ser7Ter mutation. One of these patients showed the same MRI abnormalities as the patients from the first family. Strikingly, patients receiving thiamine had an improved life-expectancy. One patient in the third family deteriorated upon interruption of the thiamine treatment and recovered after reinitiating. Although unrelated, all patients came from the province Al Hoceima in Northern Morocco. Based on the recombination events the mutation was estimated to have occurred 1250-1750 years ago. Our data shows that SLC19A3 is a new candidate for mutation screening in patients with Leigh syndrome, who might benefit from high doses of thiamine and/or biotin. Especially

  5. The nutritional status of women in the first trimester of pregnancy attending an inner-city antenatal department in the UK.

    PubMed

    Rees, Gail; Brooke, Zoe; Doyle, Wendy; Costeloe, Kate

    2005-09-01

    We have previously found high rates of poor iron and folate status in women who had delivered a low birthweight baby (LBW) in an ethnically diverse inner-city area of the UK. However, little was known of the nutritional status in the local general obstetric population. We therefore investigated biochemical measures of nutritional status in the first trimester of the first pregnancy. Routine blood samples collected at the antenatal booking clinic were analysed for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, red cell folate (RCF) (n = 100) and erythrocyte transketolase activation coefficient (ETKAC) for thiamin status (n = 90). We found 9% of women in our sample had a low Hb level, 10% had a low serum ferritin and only one had a low RCF. This is a substantially lower number of women with biochemical deficiencies than we found previously in women three months after delivering a LBW baby. However, 34% had low thiamin status. Thiamin status was negatively correlated with gestational age at birth (r = -0.407, p < 0.001). Differences in nutritional status were observed between ethnic and socio-economic groups. Hb levels differed between ethnic (p = 0.001) and socio-economic groups (p = 0.02), with Africans and women in manual occupations/unwaged having the lowest Hb levels. RCF levels also differed between groups (p < 0.001) with Caucasians and those in non-manual occupations having highest levels. ETKAC also differed between ethnic groups (p = 0.008) with Africans having the highest level indicating a poorer status. The study highlights the need to improve nutrition particularly in ethnic minorities and low income groups who are most at risk of adverse birth outcomes such as LBW.

  6. Enhanced Production of Bovine Chymosin by Autophagy Deficiency in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae has been utilized as a host for heterologous protein production because of its high protein secretory capacity and food-safety properties. However, A. oryzae often produces lower-than-expected yields of target heterologous proteins due to various underlying mechanisms, including degradation processes such as autophagy, which may be a significant bottleneck for protein production. In the present study, we examined the production of heterologous protein in several autophagy (Aoatg) gene disruptants of A. oryzae. We transformed A. oryzae gene disruptants of Aoatg1, Aoatg13, Aoatg4, Aoatg8, or Aoatg15, with a bovine chymosin (CHY) expression construct and found that the production levels of CHY increased up to three fold compared to the control strain. Notably, however, conidia formation by the Aoatg gene disruptants was significantly reduced. As large amounts of conidia are necessary for inoculating large-scale cultures, we also constructed Aoatg gene-conditional expression strains in which the promoter region of the Aoatg gene was replaced with the thiamine-controllable thiA promoter. Conidiation by the resultant transformants was clearly enhanced in the absence of thiamine, while autophagy remained repressed in the presence of thiamine. Moreover, these transformants displayed increased CHY productivity, which was comparable to that of the Aoatg gene disruptants. Consequently, we succeeded in the construction of A. oryzae strains capable of producing high levels of CHY due to defects in autophagy. Our finding suggests that the conditional regulation of autophagy is an effective method for increasing heterologous protein production in A. oryzae. PMID:23658635

  7. Comparative genome analysis of the Flavobacteriales bacterium strain UJ101, isolated from the gut of Atergatis reticulatus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jhung-Ahn; Yang, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Junghee; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Oh, Hyun-Myung

    2017-07-01

    Here we report the comparative genomic analysis of strain UJ101 with 15 strains from the family Flavobacteriaceae, using the CGExplorer program. Flavobacteriales bacterium strain UJ101 was isolated from a xanthid crab, Atergatis reticulatus, from the East Sea near Korea. The complete genome of strain UJ101 is a 3,074,209 bp, single, circular chromosome with 30.74% GC content. While the UJ101 genome contains a number of annotated genes for many metabolic pathways, such as the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the glyoxylate cycle, genes for the Entner-Douddoroff pathway are not found in the UJ101 genome. Overall, carbon fixation processes were absent but nitrate reduction and denitrification pathways were conserved. The UJ101 genome was compared to genomes from other marine animals (three invertebrate strains and 5 fish strains) and other marine animal- derived genera. Notable results by genome comparisons showed that UJ101 is capable of denitrification and nitrate reduction, and that biotin-thiamine pathway participation varies among marine bacteria; fish-dwelling bacteria, freeliving bacteria, invertebrate-dwelling bacteria, and strain UJ101. Pan-genome analysis of the 16 strains in this study included 7,220 non-redundant genes that covered 62% of the pan-genome. A core-genome of 994 genes was present and consisted of 8% of the genes from the pan-genome. Strain UJ101 is a symbiotic hetero-organotroph isolated from xanthid crab, and is a metabolic generalist with nitrate-reducing abilities but without the ability to synthesize biotin. There is a general tendency of UJ101 and some fish pathogens to prefer thiamine-dependent glycolysis to gluconeogenesis. Biotin and thiamine auxotrophy or prototrophy may be used as important markers in microbial community studies.

  8. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of the NiaP family uncover nicotinate transporters from bacteria, plants, and mammals.

    PubMed

    Jeanguenin, Linda; Lara-Núñez, Aurora; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Osterman, Andrei L; Komarova, Nataliya Y; Rentsch, Doris; Gregory, Jesse F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2012-03-01

    The transporter(s) that mediate uptake of nicotinate and its N-methyl derivative trigonelline are not known in plants, and certain mammalian nicotinate transporters also remain unidentified. Potential candidates for these missing transporters include proteins from the ubiquitous NiaP family. In bacteria, niaP genes often belong to NAD-related regulons, and genetic evidence supports a role for Bacillus subtilis and Acinetobacter baumannii NiaP proteins in uptake of nicotinate or nicotinamide. Other bacterial niaP genes are, however, not in NAD-related regulons but cluster on the chromosome with choline-related (e.g., Ralstonia solanacearum and Burkholderia xenovorans) or thiamin-related (e.g., Thermus thermophilus) genes, implying that they might encode transporters for these compounds. Radiometric uptake assays using Lactococcus lactis cells expressing NiaP proteins showed that B. subtilis, R. solanacearum, and B. xenovorans NiaP transport nicotinate via an energy-dependent mechanism. Likewise, NiaP proteins from maize (GRMZM2G381453, GRMZM2G066801, and GRMZM2G081774), Arabidopsis (At3g13050), and mouse (SVOP) transported nicotinate; the Arabidopsis protein also transported trigonelline. In contrast, T. thermophilus NiaP transported only thiamin. None of the proteins tested transported choline or the thiazole and pyrimidine products of thiamin breakdown. The maize and Arabidopsis NiaP proteins are the first nicotinate transporters reported in plants, the Arabidopsis protein is the first trigonelline transporter, and mouse SVOP appears to represent a novel type of mammalian nicotinate transporter. More generally, these results indicate that specificity for nicotinate is conserved widely, but not absolutely, among pro- and eukaryotic NiaP family proteins.

  9. High-concentrate diets based on forages harvested at different maturity stages affect ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Castagnino, D S; Kammes, K L; Allen, M S; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2017-04-01

    Effects of plant maturity on apparent ruminal synthesis and post-ruminal supply of B vitamins were evaluated in two feeding trials. Diets containing alfalfa (Trial 1) or orchardgrass (Trial 2) silages harvested either (1) early cut, less mature (EC) or (2) late cut, more mature (LC) as the sole forage were offered to ruminally and duodenally cannulated lactating Holstein cows in crossover design experiments. In Trial 1, conducted with 16 cows (569±43 kg of empty BW (ruminal content removed) and 43.7±8.6 kg/day of 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield; mean±SD) in two 17-day treatment periods, both diets provided ~22% forage NDF and 27% total NDF, and the forage-to-concentrate ratios were 53 : 47 and 42 : 58 for EC and LC, respectively. In Trial 2, conducted with 13 cows (588±55 kg of empty BW and 43.7±7.7 kg/day of 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield; mean±SD) in two 18-day treatment periods, both diets provided ~25% forage NDF and 31% total NDF; the forage-to-concentrate ratios were 58 : 42 and 46 : 54 for EC and LC, respectively. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates and vitamin B12 were measured in feed and duodenal content. Apparent ruminal synthesis was calculated as the duodenal flow minus the intake. Diets based on EC alfalfa decreased the amounts of thiamin, niacin and folates reaching the duodenum, whereas diets based on EC orchardgrass increased riboflavin duodenal flow. Daily apparent ruminal synthesis of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and vitamin B6 were correlated negatively with their intake, suggesting a microbial regulation of their concentration in the rumen. Vitamin B12 apparent ruminal synthesis was correlated negatively with total volatile fatty acids concentration, but positively with ruminal pH and microbial N duodenal flow.

  10. Effects of forage family on apparent ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Castagnino, D S; Seck, M; Beaudet, V; Kammes, K L; Linton, J A Voelker; Allen, M S; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2016-03-01

    Effects of forage family (legume vs. grass) on apparent ruminal synthesis (ARS) and postruminal supply of B vitamins were evaluated in 2 experiments. Diets containing either alfalfa (AL) or orchardgrass (OG) silages as the sole forage were offered to ruminally and duodenally cannulated lactating Holstein cows in crossover design experiments. Experiment 1 compared diets containing AL and OG [~23% forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and ~27% total NDF] offered to 8 cows in two 15-d treatment periods. Experiment 2 compared diets containing AL and OG (~25% forage NDF and ~30% total NDF) offered to 13 cows in two 18-d treatment periods. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were analyzed in feeds and duodenal digesta. Apparent ruminal synthesis was calculated as the duodenal flow of each vitamin minus its intake. Forage family affected B vitamin intakes, duodenal flow, and ARS. In both experiments, AL diets increased vitamin B6 and decreased folate intakes. In experiment 1, riboflavin and niacin intakes were greater with the OG diet, whereas in experiment 2 thiamin intake was greater but riboflavin intake was smaller with the OG diet. In spite of the low contribution of either silage to the dietary folate content, folate intake was greater with OG diets than AL due to the difference in soybean meal contribution between diets. Niacin and folate ARS were not affected by the forage family. Duodenal microbial nitrogen flow was positively correlated with ARS of riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12, but tended to be negatively correlated with thiamin ARS. Apparent ruminal synthesis of folates and vitamin B12 appear to be related to microbial biomass activity. Changes in nutrient composition of the diets likely affected the microbial population in the rumen and their B vitamin metabolism. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of thiaminase activity in fish using the radiometric and 4-nitrothiophenol colorimetric methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Hanes, J.W.; Brown, L.; Kraft, C.E.; Begley, T.P.

    2010-01-01

    Thiaminase induced thiamine deficiency occurs in fish, humans, livestock and wild animals. A non-radioactive thiaminase assay was described in 2007, but a direct comparison with the radioactive 14C-thiamine method which has been in use for more than 30years has not been reported. The objective was to measure thiaminase activity in forage fish (alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus) consumed by predators that manifest thiamine deficiency using both methods. Modifications were made to the colorimetric assay to improve repeatability. Modification included a change in assay pH, enhanced sample clean-up, constant assay temperature (37??C), increase in the concentration of 4-nitrothiophenol (4NTP) and use of a spectrophotometer fitted with a 0.2cm cell. A strong relationship between the two assays was found for 51 alewife (R2=0.85), 36 smelt (R2=0.87) and 20 sculpin (R2=0.82). Thiaminase activity in the colorimetric assay was about 1000 times higher than activity measured by the radioactive method. Application of the assay to fish species from which no thiaminase activity has previously been reported resulted in no 4NTP thiaminase activity being found in bloater Coregonus hoyi, lake trout Salvelinus namaycusch, steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss or Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. In species previously reported to contain thiaminase, 4NTP thiaminase activity was measured in bacteria Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus, gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum, bracken fern Pteridium aquilinum, quagga mussel Dreissena bugensis and zebra mussels D. polymorpha. ?? 2010.

  12. How may a shift towards a more sustainable food consumption pattern affect nutrient intakes of Dutch children?

    PubMed

    Temme, Elisabeth H M; Bakker, Helena M E; Seves, S Marije; Verkaik-Kloosterman, Janneke; Dekkers, Arnold L; van Raaij, Joop M A; Ocké, Marga C

    2015-09-01

    Food has a considerable environmental impact. Diets with less meat and dairy reduce environmental impact but may pose nutritional challenges for children. The current modelling study investigates the impact of diets with less or no meat and dairy products on nutrient intakes. Energy and nutrient intakes were assessed for observed consumption patterns (reference) and two replacement scenarios with data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey - Young Children (2005-2006). In the replacement scenarios, 30 % or 100 % of the consumed dairy and meat (in grams) was replaced by plant-derived foods with similar use. The Netherlands. Children (n 1279) aged 2-6 years. Partial and full replacement of meat and dairy foods by plant-derived foods reduced SFA intake by 9 % and 26 %, respectively, while fibre intake was 8 % and 29 % higher. With partial replacement, micronutrient intakes were similar, except for lower vitamin B12 intake. After full meat and dairy replacement, mean intakes of Ca, Zn and thiamin decreased by 5-13 %, and vitamin B12 intake by 49 %, while total intake of Fe was higher but of lower bioavailability. With full replacement, the proportion of girls aged 4-6 years with intakes below recommendations was 15 % for thiamin, 10 % for vitamin B12 and 6 % for Zn. Partial replacement of meat and dairy by plant-derived foods is beneficial for children's health by lowering SFA intake, increasing fibre content and maintaining similar micronutrient intakes. When full replacements are made, attention is recommended to ensure adequate thiamin, vitamin B12 and Zn intakes.

  13. Determination of B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical formulations by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Junior, Benedito Roberto Alvarenga; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Durango, Luis Guillermo Cuadrado; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2018-01-05

    The aim of this work was to quantify B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical samples by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy technique using gold colloid substrate. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed according to an adapted Turkevich method. Initial essays were able to suggest the orientation of molecules on gold nanoparticles surface. Central Composite design was performed to obtain the highest SERS signal for nicotinamide and riboflavin. The evaluated parameters in the experimental design were volume of AuNPs, concentration of vitamins and sodium chloride concentration. The best condition for nicotinamide was NaCl 2.3×10 -3 molL -1 and 700μL of AuNPs colloid and this same condition showed to be adequate to quantify thiamine. The experimental design for riboflavin shows the best condition at NaCl 1.15×10 -2 molL -1 and 2.8mL of AuNPs colloid. It was possible to quantify thiamine and nicotinamide in presence of others vitamins and excipients in two solid multivitamin formulations using the standard addition procedure. The standard addition curve presented a R 2 higher than 0.96 for both nicotinamide and thiamine, at orders of magnitude 10 -7 and 10 -8 molL -1 , respectively. The nicotinamide content in a cosmetic gel sample was also quantified by direct analysis presenting R 2 0.98. The t-student test presented no significant difference regarding HPLC method. Despite the experimental design performed for riboflavin, it was not possible its quantification in the commercial samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High-Throughput Screening of Small Molecules Identifies Hepcidin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Eileen; Sugianto, Priscilla; Hsu, Jason; Damoiseaux, Robert; Ganz, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is common in patients with infection, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. Unless the underlying condition can be reversed, treatment options are limited to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents with or without intravenous iron therapy, modalities that are not always effective and can cause serious adverse effects. Hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone, has been identified as a pathogenic factor in the development of AI. To explore new therapeutic options for AI and other iron-related disorders caused by hepcidin excess, we developed a cell-based screen to identify hepcidin antagonists. Of the 70,000 small molecules in the library, we identified 14 compounds that antagonized the hepcidin effect on ferroportin. One of these was fursultiamine, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved thiamine derivative. Fursultiamine directly interfered with hepcidin binding to its receptor, ferroportin, by blocking ferroportin C326 thiol residue essential for hepcidin binding. Consequently, fursultiamine prevented hepcidin-induced ferroportin ubiquitination, endocytosis, and degradation in vitro and allowed continuous cellular iron export despite the presence of hepcidin, with IC50 in the submicromolar range. Thiamine, the fursultiamine metabolite, and benfotiamine, another thiamine derivative, did not interfere with the effect of hepcidin on ferroportin. Other FDA-approved thiol-reactive compounds were at least 1000-fold less potent than fursultiamine in antagonizing hepcidin. In vivo, fursultiamine did not reproducibly antagonize the effect of hepcidin on serum iron, likely because of its rapid conversion to inactive metabolites. Fursultiamine is a unique antagonist of hepcidin in vitro that could serve as a template for the development of drug candidates that inhibit the hepcidin-ferroportin interaction. PMID:23292796

  15. Development of complementary feeding recommendations for 12-23-month-old children from low and middle socio-economic status in West Java, Indonesia: contribution of fortified foods towards meeting the nutrient requirement.

    PubMed

    Fahmida, Umi; Santika, Otte

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate nutrient intake as part of a complementary feeding diet is attributable to poor feeding practices and poor access to nutritious foods. Household socio-economic situation (SES) has an influence on food expenditure and access to locally available, nutrient-dense foods and fortified foods. This study aimed to develop and compare complementary feeding recommendations (CFR) for 12-23-month-old children in different SES and evaluate the contribution of fortified foods in meeting nutrient requirements. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in low and medium SES households (n 114/group) in urban Bandung district, West Java province, Indonesia. Food pattern, portion size and affordability were assessed, and CFR were developed for the low SES (LSES) and middle SES (MSES) using a linear programming (LP) approach; two models - with and without fortified foods - were run using LP, and the contribution of fortified foods in the final CFR was identified. Milk products, fortified biscuits and manufactured infant cereals were the most locally available and consumed fortified foods in the market. With the inclusion of fortified foods, problem nutrients were thiamin in LSES and folate and thiamin in MSES groups. Without fortified foods, more problem nutrients were identified in LSES, that is, Ca, Fe, Zn, niacin and thiamin. As MSES consumed more fortified foods, removing fortified foods was not possible, because most of the micronutrient-dense foods were removed from their food basket. There were comparable nutrient adequacy and problem nutrients between LSES and MSES when fortified foods were included. Exclusion of fortified foods in LSES was associated with more problem nutrients in the complementary feeding diet.

  16. Determination of B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical formulations by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Benedito Roberto Alvarenga; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Durango, Luis Guillermo Cuadrado; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify B-complex vitamins in pharmaceutical samples by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy technique using gold colloid substrate. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed according to an adapted Turkevich method. Initial essays were able to suggest the orientation of molecules on gold nanoparticles surface. Central Composite design was performed to obtain the highest SERS signal for nicotinamide and riboflavin. The evaluated parameters in the experimental design were volume of AuNPs, concentration of vitamins and sodium chloride concentration. The best condition for nicotinamide was NaCl 2.3 × 10- 3 mol L- 1 and 700 μL of AuNPs colloid and this same condition showed to be adequate to quantify thiamine. The experimental design for riboflavin shows the best condition at NaCl 1.15 × 10- 2 mol L- 1 and 2.8 mL of AuNPs colloid. It was possible to quantify thiamine and nicotinamide in presence of others vitamins and excipients in two solid multivitamin formulations using the standard addition procedure. The standard addition curve presented a R2 higher than 0.96 for both nicotinamide and thiamine, at orders of magnitude 10- 7 and 10- 8 mol L- 1, respectively. The nicotinamide content in a cosmetic gel sample was also quantified by direct analysis presenting R2 0.98. The t-student test presented no significant difference regarding HPLC method. Despite the experimental design performed for riboflavin, it was not possible its quantification in the commercial samples.

  17. Change in psychiatric symptomatology after benfotiamine treatment in males is related to lifetime alcoholism severity.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Pendleton, Tiffany; Poje, Albert; Penick, Elizabeth C; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-07-01

    Severe alcoholism can be associated with significant nutritional and vitamin deficiency, especially vitamin B1 (thiamine) which is associated with neurological deficits impacting mood and cognition. Alcohol consumption was reduced among female but not male alcoholics after supplementation with the high potency thiamine analog benfotiamine (BF). We examined the relationship between lifetime alcoholism severity, psychiatric symptoms and response to BF among the alcohol dependent men from this cohort. Eighty-five adult men (mean age=48±8 years) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a current alcohol use disorder who were abstinent <30days participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 600mg BF vs placebo (PL) for 6 months. Psychometric testing included a derived Lifetime Alcoholism Severity Score (AS), Symptom Checklist 90R (SCL-90R), and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) at baseline and at 6 months. Baseline SCL-90-R scale scores for men with high alcoholism severity (AS≥24; N=46 HAS) were significantly greater than for men with low alcoholism severity (AS<24; N=39 LAS), but BIS scores did not differ. MANOVA modeling at follow-up (N=50 completed subjects) identified a significant treatment effect (F=2.5, df=10, p<0.03) and treatment×alcoholism severity level interaction (F=2.5, dfnum=10, dfden=30, p<0.03) indicating reduced SCL-90-R scores among BF treated, HAS males. Above normal plasma thiamine levels at follow-up predicted reduced depression scores in a BF-treated subset (F=3.2, p<0.09, N=26). BF appears to reduce psychiatric distress and may facilitate recovery in severely affected males with a lifetime alcohol use disorder and should be considered for adjuvant therapy in alcohol rehabilitation. #NCT00680121 High Dose Vitamin B1 to Reduce Abusive Alcohol Use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of fasting on the urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Erina; Takahashi, Kei; Shibata, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies showed that the urinary excretion of the water-soluble vitamins can be useful as a nutritional index. To determine how fasting affects urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins, a human study and an animal experiment were conducted. In the human study, the 24-h urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in 12 healthy Japanese adults fasting for a day was measured. One-day fasting drastically decreased urinary thiamin content to 30%, and increased urinary riboflavin content by 3-fold. Other water-soluble vitamin contents did not show significant change by fasting. To further investigate the alterations of water-soluble vitamin status by starvation, rats were starved for 3 d, and water-soluble vitamin contents in the liver, blood and urine were measured during starvation. Urinary excretion of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B(6) metabolite 4-pyridoxic acid, nicotinamide metabolites and folate decreased during starvation, but that of vitamin B(12), pantothenic acid and biotin did not. As for blood vitamin levels, only blood vitamin B(1), plasma PLP and plasma folate levels decreased with starvation. All water-soluble vitamin contents in the liver decreased during starvation, whereas vitamin concentrations in the liver did not decrease. Starvation decreased only concentrations of vitamin B(12) and folate in the skeletal muscle. These results suggest that water-soluble vitamins were released from the liver, and supplied to the peripheral tissues to maintain vitamin nutrition. Our human study also suggested that the effect of fasting should be taken into consideration for subjects showing low urinary thiamin and high urinary riboflavin.

  19. Spectrofluorimetric determination of some water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Abdel-Maaboud I; Mohamed, Horria A; Abdel-Latif, Niveen M; Mohamed, Marwa R

    2011-01-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric methods were developed for determination of three water-soluble vitamins (B1, B2, and B6) in mixtures in the presence of cyanocobalamin. The first one was for thiamine determination, which depends on the oxidation of thiamine HCl to thiochrome by iodine in an alkaline medium. The method was applied accurately to determine thiamine in binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures with pyridoxine HCl, riboflavin, and cyanocobalamin without interference. In the second method, riboflavin and pyridoxine HCl were determined fluorimetrically in acetate buffer, pH 6. The three water-soluble vitamins (B1, B2, and B6) were determined spectrofluorimetrically in binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures in the presence of cyanocobalamin. All variables were studied in order to optimize the reaction conditions. Linear relationship was obeyed for all studied vitamins by the proposed methods at their corresponding lambda(exc) or lambda(em). The linear calibration curves were obtained from 10 to 500 ng/mL; the correlation ranged from 0.9991 to 0.9999. The suggested procedures were applied to the analysis of the investigated vitamins in their laboratory-prepared mixtures and pharmaceutical dosage forms from different manufacturers. The RSD range was 0.46-1.02%, which indicates good precision. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical additives. Good recoveries (97.6 +/- 0.7-101.2 +/- 0.8%) were obtained. Statistical comparison of the results with reported methods shows excellent agreement and indicates no significant difference in accuracy and precision.

  20. Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly under-diagnosed, and failure to promptly identify and adequately treat the condition can lead to death or to the chronic form of the encephalopathy - Korsakoff's syndrome. Wernicke's encephalopathy has traditionally been associated with alcoholism but, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of clinical settings in which the disorder is observed. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who arrived at the emergency room presenting signs of marked malnutrition and mental confusion, ataxic gait and ophthalmoplegia. Main laboratory test findings included low serum magnesium and megaloblastic anemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal in the supratentorial paraventricular region, the medial regions of the thalamus and the central and periaqueductal midbrain. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made at once and immediate reposition of thiamine and magnesium was started. The patient had a long history of recurrent thoughts of being overweight, severe self-imposed diet restrictions and self-induced vomiting. She had also been drinking gin on a daily basis for the last eight years. One day after admittance the acute global confusional state resolved, but she presented severe memory deficits and confabulation. After six months of outpatient follow-up, memory deficits remained unaltered. Conclusion In this case, self-imposed long-lasting nutritional deprivation is thought to be the main cause of thiamine deficiency and subsequent encephalopathy, but adjunct factors, such as magnesium depletion and chronic alcohol misuse, might have played an important role, especially in the development of Korsakoff's syndrome. The co-morbidity between eating disorders and substance abuse disorders has emerged as a significant health issue for

  1. Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura; Silva, Luiz Fal; Banzato, Claudio Em; Dantas, Clarissa R; Garcia, Celso

    2010-07-20

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly under-diagnosed, and failure to promptly identify and adequately treat the condition can lead to death or to the chronic form of the encephalopathy - Korsakoff's syndrome. Wernicke's encephalopathy has traditionally been associated with alcoholism but, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of clinical settings in which the disorder is observed. We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who arrived at the emergency room presenting signs of marked malnutrition and mental confusion, ataxic gait and ophthalmoplegia. Main laboratory test findings included low serum magnesium and megaloblastic anemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal in the supratentorial paraventricular region, the medial regions of the thalamus and the central and periaqueductal midbrain. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made at once and immediate reposition of thiamine and magnesium was started. The patient had a long history of recurrent thoughts of being overweight, severe self-imposed diet restrictions and self-induced vomiting. She had also been drinking gin on a daily basis for the last eight years. One day after admittance the acute global confusional state resolved, but she presented severe memory deficits and confabulation. After six months of outpatient follow-up, memory deficits remained unaltered. In this case, self-imposed long-lasting nutritional deprivation is thought to be the main cause of thiamine deficiency and subsequent encephalopathy, but adjunct factors, such as magnesium depletion and chronic alcohol misuse, might have played an important role, especially in the development of Korsakoff's syndrome. The co-morbidity between eating disorders and substance abuse disorders has emerged as a significant health issue for women, and the subgroup of patients with

  2. Stage-dependent alterations of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Klintsova, Anna; Savage, Lisa M

    2011-05-19

    Alcohol-induced Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) culminates in bilateral diencephalic lesion and severe amnesia. Using the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) animal paradigm of WKS, our laboratory has demonstrated hippocampal dysfunction in the absence of gross anatomical pathology. Extensive literature has revealed reduced hippocampal neurogenesis following a neuropathological insult, which might contribute to hippocampus-based learning and memory impairments. Thus, the current investigation was conducted to determine whether PTD treatment altered hippocampal neurogenesis in a stage-dependent fashion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of 4 stages of thiamine deficiency based on behavioral symptoms: pre-symptomatic stage, ataxic stage, early post-opisthotonus stage, or the late post-opisthotonus stage. The S-phase mitotic marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered at the conclusion of each stage following thiamine restoration and subjects were perfused 24 hours or 28 days after BrdU to assess cellular proliferation or neurogenesis and survival, respectively. Dorsal hippocampal sections were immunostained for BrdU (proliferating cell marker), NeuN (neurons), GFAP (astrocytes), Iba-1 (microglia), and O4 (oligodendrocytes). The PTD treatment increased progenitor cell proliferation and survival during the early post-opisthotonus stage. However, levels of neurogenesis were reduced during this stage as well as the late post-opisthotonus stage where there was also an increase in astrocytogenesis. The diminished numbers of newly generated neurons (BrdU/NeuN co-localization) was paralleled by increased BrdU cells that did not co-localize with any of the phenotypic markers during these later stages. These data demonstrate that long-term alterations in neurogenesis and gliogenesis might contribute to the observed hippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model and human WKS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Stage-dependent alterations of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Klintsova, Anna; Savage, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol-induced Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) culminates in bilateral diencephalic lesion and severe amnesia. Using the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) animal paradigm of WKS, our laboratory has demonstrated hippocampal dysfunction in the absence of gross anatomical pathology. Extensive literature has revealed reduced hippocampal neurogenesis following a neuropathological insult, which might contribute to hippocampus-based learning and memory impairments. Thus, the current investigation was conducted to determine whether PTD treatment altered hippocampal neurogenesis in a stage-dependent fashion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of 4 stages of thiamine deficiency based on behavioral symptoms: pre-symptomatic stage, ataxic stage, early post-opisthotonus stage, or the late post-opisthotonus stage. The S-phase mitotic marker 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered at the conclusion of each stage following thiamine restoration and subjects were perfused 24-hours or 28-days after BrdU to assess cellular proliferation or neurogenesis and survival, respectively. Dorsal hippocampal sections were immunostained for BrdU (proliferating cell marker), NeuN (neurons), GFAP (astrocytes), Iba-1 (microglia), and O4 (oligodendrocytes). The PTD treatment increased progenitor cell proliferation and survival during the early post-opisthotonus stage. However, levels of neurogenesis were reduced during this stage as well as the late post-opisthotonus stage where there was also an increase in astrocytogenesis. The diminished numbers of newly generated neurons (BrdU/NeuN co-localization) was paralleled by increased BrdU cells that did not co-localize with any of the phenotypic markers during these later stages. These data demonstrate that long-term alterations in neurogenesis and gliogenesis might contribute to the observed hippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model and human WKS. PMID:21440532

  4. Dietary micronutrient intake and atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourdudoss, C; Elkan, A-C; Hafström, I; Jogestrand, T; Gustafsson, T; van Vollenhoven, R; Frostegård, J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of dietary micronutrient intake in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study included 111 SLE patients and 118 age and gender-matched controls. Data on diet (food frequency questionnaires) were linked with data on Systemic Lupus Activity Measure, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and carotid atherosclerotic/echolucent plaque (B-mode ultrasound). Dietary micronutrient intake were compared between SLE patients and controls and in relation to lupus activity and atherosclerosis in SLE. Associations between micronutrient intake and plaque were analyzed through logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Micronutrient intake did not differ between patients and controls, and between lower and higher lupus activity, apart from the fact that phosphorus was associated with SLEDAI > 6. In SLE patients, some micronutrients were associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side. Lower intake of riboflavin and phosphorus was associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side (odds ratio (OR) 3.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-8.40 and OR 4.36, 95% CI 1.53-12.39, respectively). Higher intake of selenium and thiamin was inversely associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.89 and OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.08-0.80, respectively). In addition, higher intake of thiamin was inversely associated with echolucent plaque, left side (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.06-0.84). Lower intake of folate was inversely associated with bilateral echolucent plaque (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.99). SLE patients did not have different dietary micronutrient intake compared to controls. Phosphorus was associated with lupus activity. Riboflavin, phosphorus, selenium and thiamin were inversely associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side in SLE patients, but not in controls. Dietary micronutrients may play a role in atherosclerosis in SLE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Gynecology: select topics.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Mohamad; Campbell, James

    2002-06-01

    Menopause, premenstrual syndrome, dysmenorrhea, female fertility, and mastalgia are common problems not easily treated by conventional medicine. Women often seek alternative therapies to help address these conditions. Some evidence points to the efficacy of black cohosh, exercise, and possibly Kava and St. John's wort, in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Clinical trials indicate that symptoms of premenstrual syndrome may be alleviated with calcium, magnesium, vitamin E. Thiamine, omega-3 fatty acids, the Japanese herbal concoction, TSS, and calcium have proved useful in treating women with dysmenorrhea. Symptoms of mastalgia may be attenuated by evening primrose oil, chaste tree and flaxseed oil may be helpful.

  6. The human Krebs cycle 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex creates an additional source of superoxide/hydrogen peroxide from 2-oxoadipate as alternative substrate.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Gerfen, Gary; Guevara, Elena; Nareddy, Pradeep Reddy; Szostak, Michal; Jordan, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Recently, we reported that the human 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (hE1o) component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHc) could produce the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (detected by chemical means) from its substrate 2-oxoglutarate (OG), most likely concurrently with one-electron oxidation by dioxygen of the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-derived enamine intermediate to a C2α-centered radical (detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) [Nemeria et al., 2014 [17]; Ambrus et al. 2015 [18

  7. The Neurological Complications of Nutritional Deficiency following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Danielle A.; Balcer, Laura J.; Galetta, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery have become increasingly recognized with the rising numbers of procedures and the increasing prevalence of obesity in the US. Deficits are most commonly seen with thiamine, vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies. The neurological findings observed with these nutritional deficiencies are variable and include encephalopathy, optic neuropathy, myelopathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and polyneuropathy. We review the neurological complications of bariatric surgery and emphasize that these findings may vary based on the specific type of bariatric surgery and time elapsed from the procedure. PMID:22970351

  8. B vitamins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bender, D A

    1984-01-01

    The coenzyme functions of the B vitamins in intermediatry metabolism are well established; nevertheless, for none of them is it possible to determine precisely the connection between the biochemical lesions associated with deficiency and the neurological consequences. Although there is convincing evidence of a neurospecific role for thiamin and other B vitamins, in no case has this role been adequately described. Similarly, the neurochemical sequelae of intoxication by massive amounts of vitamins (so-called mega-vitamin therapy or orthomolecular medicine) remain largely unexplained.

  9. Nutritional status of men attending a soup kitchen: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Laven, G T; Brown, K C

    1985-01-01

    Nutritional status and socioeconomic characteristics of 49 men attending a soup kitchen in a residential neighborhood of Birmingham, Alabama were determined by interview, anthropometry and laboratory assays. Laboratory or anthropometric evidence of nutrient deficiency was present in 94 per cent of the subjects. Deficiency of ascorbate (63 per cent), folate (35 per cent), and thiamin (29 per cent) was higher in these men than in either patients or presumably healthy adults. Since soup kitchen meals provided insufficient vitamin C and folate, additional sources of these nutrients should be provided. PMID:4040716

  10. In Vitro Selection for Small-Molecule-Triggered Strand Displacement and Riboswitch Activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, Laura; Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Milligan, John N; Forlin, Michele; Ellington, Andrew D; Mansy, Sheref S

    2015-10-16

    An in vitro selection method for ligand-responsive RNA sensors was developed that exploited strand displacement reactions. The RNA library was based on the thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch, and RNA sequences capable of hybridizing to a target duplex DNA in a TPP regulated manner were identified. After three rounds of selection, RNA molecules that mediated a strand exchange reaction upon TPP binding were enriched. The enriched sequences also showed riboswitch activity. Our results demonstrated that small-molecule-responsive nucleic acid sensors can be selected to control the activity of target nucleic acid circuitry.

  11. Particle length of silages affects apparent ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Castagnino, D S; Kammes, K L; Allen, M S; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2016-08-01

    Effects of particle length of silages on apparent ruminal synthesis (ARS) and postruminal supply of B vitamins were evaluated in 2 feeding trials. Diets containing alfalfa (trial 1) or orchardgrass (trial 2) silages, chopped to either 19mm (long cut, LC) or 10mm (short cut, SC) theoretical particle length, as the sole forage were offered to ruminally and duodenally cannulated lactating Holstein cows in crossover design experiments. Forages chopped to a theoretical particle length of 19 and 10mm had mean particles sizes of 14.1 and 8.1mm, respectively, in trial 1, and 15.3 and 11.3mm, respectively, in trial 2. Trial 1 was conducted with 13 multiparous cows in two 19-d treatment periods; both diets contained approximately 20% forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF), 25% total NDF, and forage-to-concentrate ratios were approximately 47:53. Trial 2 was conducted with 15 cows in two 18-d treatment periods; both diets contained approximately 23% forage NDF, 28% total NDF, and had a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 50:50. Thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were measured in feed and duodenal content. Daily ARS was calculated as the duodenal flow minus the intake. In trial 1, daily intake of individual B vitamins was increased with the LC diet, but ARS of thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folates was reduced. In trial 2, except for folates, intakes of the other B vitamins were decreased with the LC diets, whereas ARS of riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6 was increased. Daily ARS of thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were correlated negatively with their intake, suggesting that ruminal bacteria reduced their synthesis when dietary supply increased. Microbial activity could have also reduced degradation of thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, which is supported by (1) the negative correlation between ARS of these vitamins and ruminal pH or microbial N duodenal flow; and (2) the positive correlation between ARS and ruminal concentrations

  12. An unusual variant of Trichophyton tonsurans var. sulfureum.

    PubMed

    Padhye, A A; Weitzman, I; Domenech, E

    1994-01-01

    A fungus, recovered from a skin lesion of a patient, produced velvety to powdery, white to deep yellow colonies on Sabouraud glucose agar. Microscopically, it produced a large number of cylindric, smooth-walled, three- to eight-celled macroconidia but failed to produce microconidia on a variety of nutritional media such as rice grains, cornmeal dextrose, potato dextrose, Sabouraud glucose, oatmeal and lactrimel agars. It hydrolysed urea in 7 days, perforated hair in vitro and required thiamine for growth. This isolate represents an atypical variant of Trichophyton tonsurans var. sufureum subvar. perforans.

  13. Genome sequence of Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi, endosymbiont of chimpanzee lice, and genomic comparison of recently acquired endosymbionts from human and chimpanzee lice.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Bret M; Allen, Julie M; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Reed, David L

    2014-09-11

    The obligate-heritable endosymbionts of insects possess some of the smallest known bacterial genomes. This is likely due to loss of genomic material during symbiosis. The mode and rate of this erosion may change over evolutionary time: faster in newly formed associations and slower in long-established ones. The endosymbionts of human and anthropoid primate lice present a unique opportunity to study genome erosion in newly established (or young) symbionts. This is because we have a detailed phylogenetic history of these endosymbionts with divergence dates for closely related species. This allows for genome evolution to be studied in detail and rates of change to be estimated in a phylogenetic framework. Here, we sequenced the genome of the chimpanzee louse endosymbiont (Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi) and compared it with the closely related genome of the human body louse endosymbiont. From this comparison, we found evidence for recent genome erosion leading to gene loss in these endosymbionts. Although gene loss was detected, it was not significantly greater than in older endosymbionts from aphids and ants. Additionally, we searched for genes associated with B-vitamin synthesis in the two louse endosymbiont genomes because these endosymbionts are believed to synthesize essential B vitamins absent in the louse's diet. All of the expected genes were present, except those involved in thiamin synthesis. We failed to find genes encoding for proteins involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin or any complete exogenous means of salvaging thiamin, suggesting there is an undescribed mechanism for the salvage of thiamin. Finally, genes encoding for the pantothenate de novo biosynthesis pathway were located on a plasmid in both taxa along with a heat shock protein. Movement of these genes onto a plasmid may be functionally and evolutionarily significant, potentially increasing production and guarding against the deleterious effects of mutation. These data add to a growing

  14. [Actual vitamin and main foodstuffs consumption by recovered patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kasanova, G M; Tutel'ian, A V

    2011-01-01

    Actual consumption of vitamins A, E, beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, thiamin, pyridoxine and main foodstuffs by recovered patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome has been given. Frequency analysis of foodstuffs consumption was used to study actual nourishment of recovered patients. Surplus consumption of fat mainly due to the use of saturated fatty acids, deficiency of poly unsaturated fatty acids, surplus sugar consumption and predominance of proteins of animal origin over proteins of vegetable origin in ration has been revealed. Deficiency of water soluble vitamins equals to 41,6-78,7% of all examined patients, deficiency of fat water soluble vitamins is lower (21,4-38,3%).

  15. The comparison of approaches to the solid-state NMR-based structural refinement of vitamin B1 hydrochloride and of its monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Pawlak, Tomasz; Potrzebowski, Marek J.; Brus, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The 13C and 15N CPMAS SSNMR measurements were accompanied by the proper theoretical description of the solid-phase environment, as provided by the density functional theory in the pseudopotential plane-wave scheme, and employed in refining the atomic coordinates of the crystal structures of thiamine chloride hydrochloride and of its monohydrate. Thus, using the DFT functionals PBE, PW91 and RPBE, the SSNMR-consistent solid-phase structures of these compounds are derived from the geometrical optimization, which is followed by an assessment of the fits of the GIPAW-predicted values of the chemical shielding parameters to their experimental counterparts.

  16. [The refeeding syndrome in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Iman Badr; Hussain, Alia Arif; Sjögren, Jan Magnus

    2018-04-30

    The refeeding syndrome (RFS) is a potentially fatal condition involving fluid and electrolyte imbalances after refeeding in patients with anorexia nervosa. Low-calorie diet added thiamine and minerals is the standard approach to prevent RFS. In a recent systematic review starting with a higher calorie amount than earlier has been recommended, and in another review, it is proposed that a restriction in the amount of carbohydrates may allow for a higher calorie intake early on to enable a safe and faster weight gain. There are still many unanswered questions, but these studies may point to a future change in the guidelines.

  17. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding.

  18. In Situ Dechlorination of Solvents in Saturated Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    riboflavin 0.025 nicotinic acid 0.025 DL-calcium pantothenate 0.025 vitamin B12 0.025 p-aminobenzoic acid 0.025 lipoic acid 0.025 yeast extract...contaminated core materials collected from the Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, MI. Four fatty acids and three alcohols were tested for their...EXTRACT CONCENTRATIONS Vitamin/Yeast Extract Concentration (mg/L) d-biotin 0.01 folic acid 0.01 pyridoxine hydrochloride 0.05 thiamin hydrochloride 0.025

  19. Heterokaryosis in Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    PubMed

    Weigl, E; Hejtmánek, M

    1976-01-01

    Heterokaryosis was demonstrated in the dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Ten biochemical mutants of this fungus, requiring, tryptophan, histidine, methionine, arginine and thiamine, were used in the experiments. Six mutant pairs with different biochemical markers formed the heterokaryotic mycelium (trp + his, trp + met arg, trp + thi, his + met arg). The heterokaryotic constitution was determined by ths dissociation of a heterokaryon into auxotrophic components in microconidial spreads and by the isolation of the hyphal tips from which the prototrophic colonies grew out. The heterokaryotic constitution was expressed by the complementation of nutritional requirements and morphologically.

  20. [Gayet-Wernicke's encephalopathy. A study of 13 cases observed in a refugee population hospitalized at the Conakry Teaching Hospital].

    PubMed

    Cissé, A F; Camara, N; Diallo, L L; Morel, Y; Koné, S; Camara, M I; Koumbassa, M L; Tafsir, D; Soumah, D; Djigué, B S; Camara, O B; Barry, M; Bangoura, S A; Kourouma, S; Da Silva, L; Cissé, A

    2008-12-01

    The authors report 13 cases of Gayet-Wernicke's encephalopathy observed in 13 patients of a refugee population. 11 presented the classical triad: oculomotor signs, cerebral ataxia and state of confusion and in 2 patients, only 2 symptoms were noted. The etiological factors: chronic alcoholism, malnutrition, uncontrollable vomiting, HIV and tuberculosis were identified. The outcome was evaluated on the basis of the disappearance of symptoms after treatment with 500 mg of thiamine in 7 patients, 1 death and 5 patients progressed toward Korsakoff amnesic syndrome.

  1. Improved purification, crystallization and primary structure of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Plaga, W; Lottspeich, F; Oesterhelt, D

    1992-04-01

    An improved purification procedure, including nickel chelate affinity chromatography, is reported which resulted in a crystallizable pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase preparation from Halobacterium halobium. Crystals of the enzyme were obtained using potassium citrate as the precipitant. The genes coding for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were cloned and their nucleotide sequences determined. The genes of both subunits were adjacent to one another on the halobacterial genome. The derived amino acid sequences were confirmed by partial primary structure analysis of the purified protein. The structural motif of thiamin-diphosphate-binding enzymes was unequivocally located in the deduced amino acid sequence of the small subunit.

  2. New Methods for the Analysis of Water-Soluble Vitamins in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritionals.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frederic; Giménez, Ester Campos; Konings, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Water-soluble vitamins (WSVs) are a group of organic compounds which are essential micronutrients. WSVs could be divided between the B complex group and vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid). Within the B complex group, eight vitamins are recognized: vitamins B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin or niacinamide), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, or pyridoxamine), B7 (biotin), B9 (folic acid), and B12 (various cobalamins). This paper reviews the new methods for the analysis of these vitamins, with a focus on infant formula and adult nutritionals.

  3. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chung, So Won; Park, Shin Who; Seo, Young Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Chan Ho; Lim, Jong Youb

    2017-02-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  4. Neuroimaging of the Wernicke–Korsakoff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Presented is the neuroradiological signature of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), derived from different types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. WE results from thiamine depletion, and its most typical antecedent is chronic alcohol dependence. Brain regions observed with in vivo MRI affected in acute WE include the mammillary bodies, periaqueductal and periventricular gray matter, collicular bodies and thalamus. These affected areas are usually edematous and are best visualized and quantified with MRI sequences that highlight such tissue. Following the acute WE phase and resolution of edema and inflammation of affected brain tissue, WE, if not adequately treated with thiamine repletion, can herald Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), with its symptomatic hallmark of global amnesia, that is, the inability to commit newly encountered (episodic) information to memory for later recall or recognition. Methods: Neuropathology of KS detectable with MRI has a different neuroradiological signature from the acute stage and can be observed as tissue shrinkage or atrophy of selective brain structures, including the mammillary bodies and thalamus and ventricular expansion, probably indicative of atrophy of surrounding gray matter nuclei. Quantification of these and additional gray matter structures known to underlie global amnesia reveal substantial bilateral volume deficits in the hippocampus, in addition to the mammillary bodies and thalamus, and modest deficits in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca. The infratentorium is also affected, exhibiting volume deficits in cerebellar hemispheres, anterior superior vermis and pons, contributing to ataxia of gait and stance. Results: Consideration of WKS structural brain changes in the context of the neuropathology of non-WKS alcoholism revealed a graded pattern of volume deficits, from mild in non-WKS alcoholics to moderate or severe in WKS, in the mammillary bodies, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum and pons. The

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. PMID:28289650

  6. Neuroimaging of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    Presented is the neuroradiological signature of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), derived from different types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. WE results from thiamine depletion, and its most typical antecedent is chronic alcohol dependence. Brain regions observed with in vivo MRI affected in acute WE include the mammillary bodies, periaqueductal and periventricular gray matter, collicular bodies and thalamus. These affected areas are usually edematous and are best visualized and quantified with MRI sequences that highlight such tissue. Following the acute WE phase and resolution of edema and inflammation of affected brain tissue, WE, if not adequately treated with thiamine repletion, can herald Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), with its symptomatic hallmark of global amnesia, that is, the inability to commit newly encountered (episodic) information to memory for later recall or recognition. Neuropathology of KS detectable with MRI has a different neuroradiological signature from the acute stage and can be observed as tissue shrinkage or atrophy of selective brain structures, including the mammillary bodies and thalamus and ventricular expansion, probably indicative of atrophy of surrounding gray matter nuclei. Quantification of these and additional gray matter structures known to underlie global amnesia reveal substantial bilateral volume deficits in the hippocampus, in addition to the mammillary bodies and thalamus, and modest deficits in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca. The infratentorium is also affected, exhibiting volume deficits in cerebellar hemispheres, anterior superior vermis and pons, contributing to ataxia of gait and stance. Consideration of WKS structural brain changes in the context of the neuropathology of non-WKS alcoholism revealed a graded pattern of volume deficits, from mild in non-WKS alcoholics to moderate or severe in WKS, in the mammillary bodies, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum and pons. The development and

  7. The prevalence of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in Sydney, Australia: a prospective necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, C; Gold, J; Rodriguez, M; Perdices, M

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective necropsy study, the prevalence of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Sydney, Australia was 2.1% of adults over the age of 15 years. The population studied encompassed a wide spectrum of socio-economic and cultural backgrounds. Abuse of alcohol appeared to be the major predisposing factor to the development of the WKS in cases which were adequately documented. This high prevalence rate is in line with other clinical and pathological Australian studies and provides additional support for the idea of prevention of the WKS by the use of thiamin supplements in the Australian diet in flour, bread and perhaps alcoholic beverages. PMID:2784828

  8. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome as a Consequence of Delusional Food Refusal: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, David D; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-12-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, typically resulting from malnutrition secondary to chronic alcohol abuse. Less often, other conditions can lead to malnutrition and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with a typical neurologic and neuropsychological presentation after somatic delusions led him to refuse to eat. Cases like his serve to heighten awareness of the interplay between psychiatric and neurologic conditions, their sometimes atypical pathogenesis, and the value to primary care providers of consulting with psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists when managing patients with possible Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  9. Bioactive compounds in cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale L.) kernels: effect of different shelling methods.

    PubMed

    Trox, Jennifer; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Vetter, Walter; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Scherbaum, Veronika; Gola, Ute; Nohr, Donatus; Biesalski, Hans Konrad

    2010-05-12

    In the present study, the effects of various conventional shelling methods (oil-bath roasting, direct steam roasting, drying, and open pan roasting) as well as a novel "Flores" hand-cracking method on the levels of bioactive compounds of cashew nut kernels were investigated. The raw cashew nut kernels were found to possess appreciable levels of certain bioactive compounds such as beta-carotene (9.57 microg/100 g of DM), lutein (30.29 microg/100 g of DM), zeaxanthin (0.56 microg/100 g of DM), alpha-tocopherol (0.29 mg/100 g of DM), gamma-tocopherol (1.10 mg/100 g of DM), thiamin (1.08 mg/100 g of DM), stearic acid (4.96 g/100 g of DM), oleic acid (21.87 g/100 g of DM), and linoleic acid (5.55 g/100 g of DM). All of the conventional shelling methods including oil-bath roasting, steam roasting, drying, and open pan roasting revealed a significant reduction, whereas the Flores hand-cracking method exhibited similar levels of carotenoids, thiamin, and unsaturated fatty acids in cashew nuts when compared to raw unprocessed samples.

  10. Consumption of ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) among Malaysian children and association with socio-demographics and nutrient intakes - findings from the MyBreakfast study.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, Mohd Taib; Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Norimah, A Karim; Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Tan, Sue Yee; Appukutty, Mahenderan; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Ong, Moi Kim; Ning, Celia; Tee, E Siong

    2017-01-01

    Background : The association between different types of breakfast meals and nutrient intakes has been studied to a lesser extent. Objective : This study compared nutrient intakes at breakfast and throughout the day between Malaysian children who consumed ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) and those who did not. Methods : Anthropometric and dietary data for 1955 children aged 6-12 years from the MyBreakfast study were used in the analysis. Results : Overall, 18% of the children consumed RTEC at breakfast on at least one of the recall days. RTEC consumption was associated with younger age, urban areas, higher income and education level of parents. Among consumers, RTEC contributed 10% and 15% to daily intakes of calcium and iron respectively and ≥20% to daily intakes of vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin. RTEC consumers had significantly higher mean intakes of vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron and sugar but lower intakes of fat and sodium than non-RTEC consumers at breakfast and for the total day. Conclusion : Consumption of fortified RTEC at breakfast was associated with lower fat and sodium intakes and higher intakes of several micronutrients both at breakfast and for the total day. However, total sugar intakes appeared to be higher.

  11. Methylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier for reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Shau; Danielson, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Although alkylammonium ionic liquids such as ethylammonium nitrate and ethylammonium formate have been used as mobile phase “solvents” for liquid chromatography (LC), we have shown that methylammonium formate (MAF), in part because of its lower viscosity, can be an effective replacement for methanol (MeOH) in reversed-phase LC. Plots of log retention factor versus the fraction of MeOH and MAF in the mobile phase indicate quite comparable solvent strength slope values of 2.50 and 2.05, respectively. Using a polar endcapped C18 column, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin using 20% MAF-80% water could be separated in 22 min but no baseline separation was possible using MeOH as the modifier, even down to 10%. Suppression of silanol peak broadening effects by MAF is important permitting a baseline separation of pyridoxine, thiamine, and nicotinamide using 5% MAF-95% water at 0.7 mL/min. Using 5% MeOH-95% water, severe peak broadening for thiamine is evident. The compatibility of MAF as a mobile phase modifer for LC with mass spectrometry detection of water soluble vitamins is also shown. PMID:18849044

  12. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  13. Effect of Water Activity and Packaging Material on the Quality of Dehydrated Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) Slices during Accelerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, L. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of dehydrated taro slices in accelerated storage (45°C and 75% RH) was determined as a function of initial water activity (a w) and package type. Color, rehydration capacity, thiamin content, and α-tocopherol content were monitored during 34 weeks of storage in polyethylene and foil laminate packaging at initial storage a w of 0.35 to 0.71. Initial a w at or below 0.54 resulted in less browning and higher rehydration capacity, but not in significantly higher α-tocopherol retention. Foil laminate pouches resulted in a higher rehydration capacity and increased thiamin retention compared to polyethylene bags. Type of packaging had no effect on the color of the samples. Product stability was highest when stored in foil laminate pouches at 0.4a w. Sensory panels were held to determine the acceptability of rehydrated taro slices using samples representative of the taro used in the analytical tests. A hedonic test on rehydrated taro's acceptability was conducted in Fiji, with panelists rating the product an average of 7.2 ± 1.5 on a discrete 9-point scale. Using a modified Weibull analysis (with 50% probability of product failure), it was determined that the shelf life of dehydrated taro stored at 45°C was 38.3 weeks. PMID:27891508

  14. Sensory-motor polyneuropathy occurring in variant maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Harty, S; King, M D; McCoy, B; Costigan, D; Treacy, E P

    2008-12-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD; OMIM 248600) results from an inherited deficiency of the branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex. Approximately 20% of patients with BCKD deficiency are non-classic variants of MSUD with differing clinical severity. Outcomes for this cohort are generally favourable; episodes of metabolic decompensation do not appear to correlate with adverse events if acute management is promptly provided. A case of predominantly axonal sensory-motor neuropathy following metabolic decompensation which persisted for a number of months is presented in an adolescent girl with variant (intermediate type) MSUD. EMG and nerve conduction studies suggested a pre-existent asymptomatic chronic neuropathy, exacerbated by the acute decompensation. Peak leucine concentration at decompensation was 1083 μmol/L. The patient had laboratory signs of secondary mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction at presentation. She had been on a moderate dose of thiamine prior to decompensation; thiamine and pyridoxine blood concentrations were normal. This, to our knowledge, is the first report of a neuropathy presenting in a patient with a decompensation of variant MSUD. We propose that this presentation resembles the intermittent neuropathy observed in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and may reflect secondary inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity by MSUD metabolites.

  15. MRI and clinical features of maple syrup urine disease: preliminary results in 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ailan; Han, Lianshu; Feng, Yun; Li, Huimin; Yao, Rong; Wang, Dengbin; Jin, Biao

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). This retrospective study consisted of 10 MSUD patients confirmed by genetic testing. All patients underwent brain MRI. Phenotype, genotype, and areas of brain injury on MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Six patients (60%) had the classic form of MSUD with BCKDHB mutation, three patients (30%) had the intermittent form (two with BCKDHA mutations and one with DBT mutation), and one patient (10%) had the thiamine-responsive form with DBT mutation. On diffusion-weighted imaging, nine cases presented restricted diffusion in myelinated areas, and one intermittent case with DBT mutation was normal. The classic form of MSUD involved the basal ganglia in six cases; the cerebellum, mesencephalon, pons, and supratentorial area in five cases; and the thalamus in four cases, respectively. The intermittent form involved the cerebellum, pons, and supratentorial area in two cases. The thiamine-responsive form involved the basal ganglia and supratentorial area. Our preliminary results indicate that patients with MSUD presented more commonly in classic form with BCKDHB mutation and displayed extensive brain injury on MRI.

  16. MRI and clinical features of maple syrup urine disease: preliminary results in 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ailan; Han, Lianshu; Feng, Yun; Li, Huimin; Yao, Rong; Wang, Dengbin; Jin, Biao

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). METHODS This retrospective study consisted of 10 MSUD patients confirmed by genetic testing. All patients underwent brain MRI. Phenotype, genotype, and areas of brain injury on MRI were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Six patients (60%) had the classic form of MSUD with BCKDHB mutation, three patients (30%) had the intermittent form (two with BCKDHA mutations and one with DBT mutation), and one patient (10%) had the thiamine-responsive form with DBT mutation. On diffusion-weighted imaging, nine cases presented restricted diffusion in myelinated areas, and one intermittent case with DBT mutation was normal. The classic form of MSUD involved the basal ganglia in six cases; the cerebellum, mesencephalon, pons, and supratentorial area in five cases; and the thalamus in four cases, respectively. The intermittent form involved the cerebellum, pons, and supratentorial area in two cases. The thiamine-responsive form involved the basal ganglia and supratentorial area. CONCLUSION Our preliminary results indicate that patients with MSUD presented more commonly in classic form with BCKDHB mutation and displayed extensive brain injury on MRI. PMID:28830848

  17. [Investigation on nutritional intakes for hospitalized children with blood disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zi-Liang; Wu, Yun-Tang; Sun, Zhong; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Rui; Li, Hong-Qiang; Qi, Yu-Mei; Song, Ji-Chang; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the diet and nutritional status of hospitalized children with blood disease in order to provide nutritional guidelines. The patients' daily dietary intakes, including breakfast, lunch, dinner and additional meals, were recorded in detail for seven consecutive days. The intake amount of various nutrients was calculated using the dietary database. The majority of children with blood disease showed inadequate intakes of calories [mean 1825.81 kCal/d, 73.62% of the recommended intake (RNI)] and protein (mean 67.68 g/d, 81.34% of RNI). Intakes of vitamin E and riboflavin were adequate, but intakes of vitamin A, thiamine and vitamin C (66.67%, 77.78% and 69.89% of RNI, respectively) were inadequate. Iron and selenium intakes were adequate, but calcium and zinc intakes (41.11% and 56.21% of RNI, respectively) were grossly inadequate. Hospitalized children with blood disease had decreased dietary intakes of calories, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, calcium and zinc. The dietary pattern and nutritional intake need to be improved.

  18. Redistribution of carbon flux in Torulopsis glabrata by altering vitamin and calcium level.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming; Li, Yin; Zhu, Yang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Manipulation of cofactor (thiamine, biotin and Ca(2+)) levels as a potential tool to redistribute carbon flux was studied in Torulopsis glabrata. With sub-optimization of vitamin in fermentation medium, the carbon flux was blocked at the key node of pyruvate, and 69 g/L pyruvate was accumulated. Increasing the concentrations of thiamine and biotin could selectively open the valve of carbon flux from pyruvate to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pyruvate carboxylase (PC) pathway and the channel into the TCA cycle, leading to the over-production of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, the activity of PC was enhanced with Ca(2+) present in fermentation medium. By combining high concentration's vitamins and CaCO(3) as the pH buffer, a batch culture was conducted in a 7-L fermentor, with the pyruvate concentration decreased to 21.8 g/L while alpha-ketoglutarate concentration increased to 43.7 g/L. Our study indicated that the metabolic flux could be redistributed to overproduce desired metabolites with manipulating the cofactor levels. Furthermore, the manipulation of vitamin level provided an alternative tool to realize metabolic engineering goals.

  19. Induction of bovine polioencephalomalacia with a feeding system based on molasses and urea.

    PubMed Central

    Mella, C M; Perez-Oliva, O; Loew, F M

    1976-01-01

    Polioencephalomalacia (PEM), a disease first described in the United States and related to intensive beef production, appeared in Cuba coincident with the use of a new, molasses-urea-based diet to fatten bulls. Because the only experimental means so far of reproducing PEM has been with amprolium, a structural analog of thiamin, the present study attempted to induce the disease using the molasses-urea-based diet. Six Holstein bulls (200-300 kg) were studied during consumption of three successive diets: 1) commercial molasses-urea-restricted forage diet of Cuban feedlots, 2) a period in which forage was gradually withdrawn and 3) a forage-free diet composed only of molasses, urea and fish meal. PEM was reproduced in this way. At ten-day intervals, blood concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and urea were measured, as well as when clinical signs of PEM appeared. The signs, clinical course and lesions of the experimentally induced disease were comparable to those of field cases. The biochemical results suggested a block in pyruvate oxidation as in PEM elsewhere in the world. No evidence existed of urea intoxication. In addition, brain and liver concentration of total thiamin from field cases and normal animals were found to be similar. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1000370

  20. [Korsakoff amnesia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Verstichel, P

    2000-10-14

    PATHOLOGY CORRELATIONS: The Korsakoff syndrome results from cerebral lesions due to thiamine depletion, usually of alcoholic etiology. Other nutritional, or genetic factors, could be implicated. Exceptionally, it results from thalamic disease or a tumor of the third ventricle floor. Anterograde and retrograde aspects of episodic memory are principally impaired, contrasting with the preservation of semantic and procedural memory. Opposition between explicit (impaired) and implicit (unimpaired) memory is one of the main cognitive features of this syndrome. Several cerebral structures, components of various memory systems, are simultaneously damaged. Critical lesion sites for anterograde amnesia involve the memillary bodies, the mamillotalamic tract and the anterior thalamus. Retrograde amnesia is dependent on function abnormalities of a circuit between the dorso-median thalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Impairment of retrieval and chronological disorganization of memories contribute to this extensive retrograde amnesia, probably because of frontal dysfunction. Confabulations and false recognitions are produced in the initial stage of the disease. They are, in the same way, interpreted as the consequence of frontal desafferentation due to dorso-median thalamus damage. The impact of diencephalic destruction on the frontal lobes is evidenced clinically by behavioral changes and dysexecutive syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of the brain show a decreased regional metabolic ration in the frontal areas. Korsakoff syndrome is a serious disorder, responsible for cognitive handicap. There is no curative treatment. Preventive measures, consisting in systematic prescription of thiamine in alcoholics, is the main effective measure.

  1. Impact of storage under ambient conditions on the vitamin content of dehydrated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Peñas, Elena; Sidro, Beatiz; Ullate, Mónica; Vidal-Valverde, Concepción; Frias, Juana

    2013-04-01

    The consumption of dehydrated vegetables, which provides an important source of vitamins, is increasing worldwide. Dehydrated vegetables are located on non-refrigerated shelves in food shops and, therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the modifications that take place in the content of these labile micronutrients at the ambient conditions currently found in food shops. The present study discusses the effect of storage for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months on the content of thiamin and vitamin C in different commercial and pilot plant dehydrated garlic, onions, potatoes and carrots in darkness at room temperature under vacuum conditions. The content of β-carotene under these conditions was also studied in dehydrated carrots. Thiamin remained stable over the first 3 months of storage (∼90% retention), while long-term storage led to larger losses (retention of 85% in garlic and 45% in commercial carrots after 12 months of storage). The content of vitamin C drastically decreased during the storage period and even disappeared in some dried onions and carrots following 12 months of storage. Storage for 6 months at ambient conditions preserved 80-90% of the β-carotene content in dehydrated vegetables, while long-term storage led to significant β-carotene degradation (retentions between 43 and 81%). These results suggest that vitamins are gradually lost during storage at the practical conditions in food shops and will thus provide relevant information concerning dried vegetables, so manufacturers may calculate shelf life under established storage conditions.

  2. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew J.; Bruce, Alexandra M.; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T. Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori. Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4′-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile. Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:27090174

  3. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Bruce, Alexandra M; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4'-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Are more environmentally sustainable diets with less meat and dairy nutritionally adequate?

    PubMed

    Seves, S Marije; Verkaik-Kloosterman, Janneke; Biesbroek, Sander; Temme, Elisabeth Hm

    2017-08-01

    Our current food consumption patterns, and in particular our meat and dairy intakes, cause high environmental pressure. The present modelling study investigates the impact of diets with less or no meat and dairy foods on nutrient intakes and assesses nutritional adequacy by comparing these diets with dietary reference intakes. Environmental impact and nutrient intakes were assessed for the observed consumption pattern (reference) and two replacement scenarios. For the replacement scenarios, 30 % or 100 % of meat and dairy consumption (in grams) was replaced with plant-based alternatives and nutrient intakes, greenhouse gas emissions and land use were calculated. The Netherlands. Dutch adults (n 2102) aged 19-69 years. Replacing 30 % of meat and dairy with plant-based alternatives did not substantially alter percentages below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for all studied nutrients. In the 100 % replacement scenario, SFA intake decreased on average by ~35 % and Na intake by ~8 %. Median Ca intakes were below the Adequate Intake. Estimated habitual fibre, Fe and vitamin D intakes were higher; however, non-haem Fe had lower bioavailability. For Zn, thiamin and vitamin B12, 10-31 % and for vitamin A, 60 % of adults had intakes below the EAR. Diets with all meat and dairy replaced with plant-based foods lowered environmental impacts by >40 %. Estimated intakes of Zn, thiamin, vitamins A and B12, and probably Ca, were below recommendations. Replacing 30 % was beneficial for SFA, Na, fibre and vitamin D intakes, neutral for other nutrients, while reducing environmental impacts by 14 %.

  5. Blocking GABA-A receptors in the Medial Septum Enhances Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release and Behavior in a Rat Model of Diencephalic Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Jessica J.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a form of diencephalic amnesia caused by thiamine deficiency, results in severe anterograde memory loss. Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD), an animal model of WKS, produces cholinergic abnormalities including decreased functional hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) release and poor spatial memory. Increasing hippocampal ACh levels has increased performance in PTD animals. Intraseptal bicuculline (GABAA antagonist) augments hippocampal ACh release in normal animals and we found it (0.50μg/μl & 0.75μg/μl) also increased in-vivo hippocampal ACh release in PTD animals. However, the 0.75 μg/μl dose produced a greater change in hippocampal ACh release in control animals. The 0.50μg/μl dose of bicuculline was then selected to determine if it could enhance spontaneous alternation performance in PTD animals. This dose of bicuculline significantly increased hippocampal ACh levels above baseline in both PTD and control rats and resulted in complete behavioral recovery in PTD animals, without altering performance in control rats. This suggests that balancing ACh-GABA interactions in the septohippocampal circuit may be an effective therapeutic approach in certain amnestic syndromes. PMID:19463263

  6. Consumption of ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) among Malaysian children and association with socio-demographics and nutrient intakes – findings from the MyBreakfast study

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nasir, Mohd Taib; Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Norimah, A. Karim; Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan B.; Tan, Sue Yee; Appukutty, Mahenderan; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Ong, Moi Kim; Ning, Celia; Tee, E. Siong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The association between different types of breakfast meals and nutrient intakes has been studied to a lesser extent. Objective: This study compared nutrient intakes at breakfast and throughout the day between Malaysian children who consumed ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) and those who did not. Methods: Anthropometric and dietary data for 1955 children aged 6–12 years from the MyBreakfast study were used in the analysis. Results: Overall, 18% of the children consumed RTEC at breakfast on at least one of the recall days. RTEC consumption was associated with younger age, urban areas, higher income and education level of parents. Among consumers, RTEC contributed 10% and 15% to daily intakes of calcium and iron respectively and ≥20% to daily intakes of vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin. RTEC consumers had significantly higher mean intakes of vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron and sugar but lower intakes of fat and sodium than non-RTEC consumers at breakfast and for the total day. Conclusion: Consumption of fortified RTEC at breakfast was associated with lower fat and sodium intakes and higher intakes of several micronutrients both at breakfast and for the total day. However, total sugar intakes appeared to be higher. PMID:28469545

  7. Thirty Days without a Bite: Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Mélanie; Doré, Marie-Claire; Laforce, Robert

    2014-09-25

    Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a preventable neurologic condition characterized by altered mental status, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Although historically associated with alcoholism, a few authors have described WE in patients with non-alcohol related psychiatric disorders. We report herein the case of a 36-year-old young man with paranoid schizophrenia who was brought to hospital for confusion and difficulties with his vision. His roommate said he had gone about thirty days without eating '…because he was on a slimming cure'. History and physical examination suggested WE as a result of isolation and poor diet leading to nutritional deficiency. This was confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic, mammillary bodies and brainstem lesions. Of note, his cognitive profile was far more heterogeneous than what had classically been described in the literature and involved both cortical and subcortical pathology, generating memory but also significant executive deficits. Intravenous treatment with thiamine was given and our patient showed mild improvements in visual acuity and nystagmus. However, persistent cognitive and physical disabilities consistent with Korsakoff syndrome remained, and he now lives in a supervised home. This case illustrates the tragic consequences of nutritional deficiencies in a patient with paranoid schizophrenia. The threshold to suspect WE in schizophrenic patients should be lowered and in doubt prophylactic parenteral thiamine should be administered.

  8. Neuropathology of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in structural changes to the brain. In alcoholics without coexisting thiamine deficiency or liver disease this is largely restricted to a loss of white-matter volume. When it occurs, neuronal loss is limited in anatomic distribution and only detected with quantitative techniques. This relative paucity of neurodegeneration is reflected in studies of gene and protein expression in postmortem brain where findings are subtle and discordant between studies. In alcoholics with coexisting pathologies, neuronal loss is more marked and affects a wider range of anatomic regions, especially subcortical nuclei. Although this more widespread damage may reflect a more severe drinking history, there is evidence linking thiamine deficiency and the consequences of liver disease to the pathogenesis of alcohol-related brain damage. Furthermore, a range of other factors, such as cigarette smoking and mood disorders, that are common in alcoholics, have the potential to influence studies of brain pathology and should be considered in further studies of the neuropathology of alcoholism. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Vitamin-responsive disorders: cobalamin, folate, biotin, vitamins B1 and E.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic properties of many enzymes depend on the participation of vitamins as obligatory cofactors. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) and folic acid (folate) deficiencies in infants and children classically present with megaloblastic anemia and are often accompanied by neurological signs. A number of rare inborn errors of cobalamin and folate absorption, transport, cellular uptake, and intracellular metabolism have been delineated and identification of disease-causing mutations has improved our ability to diagnose and treat many of these conditions. Two inherited defects in biotin metabolism are known, holocarboxylase synthetase and biotinidase deficiency. Both lead to multiple carboxylase deficiency manifesting with metabolic acidosis, neurological abnormalities, and skin rash. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, non-type I diabetes, and sensorineural deafness that responds to pharmacological doses of thiamine (vitamin B1). Individuals affected with inherited vitamin E deficiencies including ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia present with a spinocerebellar syndrome similar to patients with Friedreich's ataxia. If started early, treatment of these defects by oral or parenteral administration of the relevant vitamin often results in correction of the metabolic defect and reversal of the signs of disease, stressing the importance of early and correct diagnosis in these treatable conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  11. Elucidating the functions of brain GSK3α: Possible synergy with GSK3β upregulation and reversal by antidepressant treatment in a mouse model of depressive-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Dmitrii; Markova, Nataliia; Bettendorff, Lucien; Chekhonin, Vladimir; Pomytkin, Igor; Lioudyno, Viktoria; Svistunov, Andrei; Ponomarev, Eugene; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2017-09-29

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) has been linked to the mechanisms of stress, mood regulation, and the effects of antidepressants. The functions of the GSK3β isoform have been extensively investigated, but little is known about the α-isoform, although they may functionally related. In a recently established modified swim test with a third delayed swim exposure, brain GSK3β mRNA expression positively correlated with floating behaviour on the third test. A two-week-long pretreatment regime with imipramine (7.5mg/kg/day) or thiamine (200mg/kg/day), which is known to have antidepressant properties, reduced the GSK3β over-expression and decreased floating behaviour on Day 5. GSK3α mRNA levels were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex on Days 1, 2 and 5. GSK3α expression was decreased in the prefrontal cortex on Day 2 and increased on Day 5. In this model, GSK3α mRNA changes were prevented by imipramine or thiamine treatment. There was a significant correlation between the expression of the two isoforms in the prefrontal cortex on Day 2 in untreated group. These results provide the first evidence for the potential involvement of GSK3α in depressive-like behaviours and as a target of anti-depressant therapy. Furthermore, the correlations suggest some cross-talk may exist between the two GSK3 isoforms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Contribution of sulfur-containing compounds to the colour-inhibiting effect and improved antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products of soybean protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meigui; Liu, Ping; Song, Shiqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hayat, Khizar; Xia, Shuqin; Jia, Chengsheng; Gu, Fenglin

    2011-03-15

    Light-coloured and savoury-tasting flavour enhancers are attractive to both consumers and food producers. The aim of this study was to investigate the colour-inhibiting effect of L-cysteine and thiamine during the Maillard reaction of soybean peptide and D-xylose. The correlation between volatile compounds and antioxidant activity of the corresponding products was also studied. Colour formation was markedly suppressed by cysteine. Compared with peptide/xylose (PX), the taste profile of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from peptide/xylose/cysteine (PXC) and peptide/xylose/cysteine/thiamine (PXCT) was stronger, including umami, mouthfulness, continuity, meaty and overall acceptance. PXC and PXCT also exihibited distinctly higher antioxidant activity. Principal component analysis was applied to investigate the correlation between antioxidant activity and volatile compounds. Of 88 volatile compounds identified, 55 were significantly correlated with antioxidant activity by two principal components (accounting for 85.05% of the total variance). Effective colour control of the Maillard reaction by L-cysteine may allow the production of healthier (higher antioxidant activity) and tastier foods to satisfy consumers' and food producers' demands. Light-coloured products might be used as functional flavour enhancers in various food systems. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Comprehensive understanding of acetohydroxyacid synthase inhibition by different herbicide families.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario D; Nouwens, Amanda; Lonhienne, Thierry G; Guddat, Luke W

    2017-02-14

    Five commercial herbicide families inhibit acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, E.C. 2.2.1.6), which is the first enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway. The popularity of these herbicides is due to their low application rates, high crop vs. weed selectivity, and low toxicity in animals. Here, we have determined the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS in complex with two members of the pyrimidinyl-benzoate (PYB) and two members of the sulfonylamino-carbonyl-triazolinone (SCT) herbicide families, revealing the structural basis for their inhibitory activity. Bispyribac, a member of the PYBs, possesses three aromatic rings and these adopt a twisted "S"-shaped conformation when bound to A. thaliana AHAS ( At AHAS) with the pyrimidinyl group inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. The SCTs bind such that the triazolinone ring is inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. Both compound classes fill the channel that leads to the active site, thus preventing substrate binding. The crystal structures and mass spectrometry also show that when these herbicides bind, thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) is modified. When the PYBs bind, the thiazolium ring is cleaved, but when the SCTs bind, ThDP is modified to thiamine 2-thiazolone diphosphate. Kinetic studies show that these compounds not only trigger reversible accumulative inhibition of AHAS, but also can induce inhibition linked with ThDP degradation. Here, we describe the features that contribute to the extraordinarily powerful herbicidal activity exhibited by four classes of AHAS inhibitors.

  14. Sulbutiamine in sports.

    PubMed

    Sobolevsky, Tim; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2010-01-01

    Sulbutiamine (isobutyryl thiamine disulfide) is a lipophilic derivative of thiamine used for the treatment of asthenia and other related pathological conditions. It is available over-the-counter in several countries either as a component of nutritional supplements or as a pharmaceutical preparation. The presence of sulbutiamine in urinary doping control samples was monitored to evaluate the relevance of its use in sports. As one of the sulbutiamine metabolites has very close retention time and the same characteristic ion (m/z 194) as the main boldenone metabolite, the raw data files generated from the screening for anabolic steroids were automatically reprocessed to identify the samples containing sulbutiamine. It was found that of ca. 16 000 samples analyzed in the Russian laboratory during 2009, about 100 samples contained sulbutiamine. It is important to note that most of these samples were collected in-competition, and sulbutiamine concentration was estimated to be greater than 500 ng/ml. This may indicate that sulbutiamine was intentionally administered for its ergogenic and mild stimulating properties. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Phylogenetic and ecological characteristics associated with thiaminase activity in Laurentian Great Lakes fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency complex (TDC) causes mortality and sublethal effects in Great Lakes salmonines and results from low concentrations of egg thiamine that are thought to be caused by thiaminolytic enzymes (i.e., thiaminase) present in the diet. This complex has the potential to undermine efforts to restore lake trout Salvelinus namaycush and severely restrict salmonid production in the Great Lakes. Although thiaminase has been found in a variety of Great Lakes fishes, the ultimate source of thiaminase in Great Lakes fishes is currently unknown. We used logistic regression analysis to investigate relationships between thiaminase activity and phylogenetic or ecological characteristics of 39 Great Lakes fish species. The taxonomically more ancestral species were more likely to show thiaminase activity than the more derived species. Species that feed at lower trophic levels and occupy benthic habitats also appeared to be more likely to show thiaminase activity; these variables were correlated with taxonomy, which was the most important predictor of thiaminase activity. Further analyses of the relationship between quantitative measures of thiaminase activity and ecological characteristics of Great Lakes fish species would provide greater insight into potential sources and pathways of thiaminase in Great Lakes food webs. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  16. Ion-pair cloud-point extraction: a new method for the determination of water-soluble vitamins in plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Elyasi, Najmeh S

    2014-10-01

    A novel, simple, and effective ion-pair cloud-point extraction coupled with a gradient high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for determination of thiamine (vitamin B1 ), niacinamide (vitamin B3 ), pyridoxine (vitamin B6 ), and riboflavin (vitamin B2 ) in plasma and urine samples. The extraction and separation of vitamins were achieved based on an ion-pair formation approach between these ionizable analytes and 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pairing agent. Influential variables on the ion-pair cloud-point extraction efficiency, such as the ion-pairing agent concentration, ionic strength, pH, volume of Triton X-100, extraction temperature, and incubation time have been fully evaluated and optimized. Water-soluble vitamins were successfully extracted by 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt (0.2% w/v) as ion-pairing agent with Triton X-100 (4% w/v) as surfactant phase at 50°C for 10 min. The calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.9916) and precision in the concentration ranges of 1-50 μg/mL for thiamine and niacinamide, 5-100 μg/mL for pyridoxine, and 0.5-20 μg/mL for riboflavin. The recoveries were in the range of 78.0-88.0% with relative standard deviations ranging from 6.2 to 8.2%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A method for measuring total thiaminase activity in fish tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, James L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Brown, Scott B.; Fitzsimons, John D.

    2005-01-01

    An accurate, quantitative, and rapid method for the measurement of thiaminase activity in fish samples is required to provide sufficient information to characterize the role of dietary thiaminase in the onset of thiamine deficiency in Great Lakes salmonines. A radiometric method that uses 14C-thiamine was optimized for substrate and co-substrate (nicotinic acid) concentrations, incubation time, and sample dilution. Total thiaminase activity was successfully determined in extracts of selected Great Lakes fishes and invertebrates. Samples included whole-body and selected tissues of forage fishes. Positive control material prepared from frozen alewives Alosa pseudoharengus collected in Lake Michigan enhanced the development and application of the method. The method allowed improved discrimination of thiaminolytic activity among forage fish species and their tissues. The temperature dependence of the thiaminase activity observed in crude extracts of Lake Michigan alewives followed a Q10 = 2 relationship for the 1-37??C temperature range, which is consistent with the bacterial-derived thiaminase I protein. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. Effect of ethanolic flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) extracts on lipid oxidation and changes in nutritive value of frozen-stored meat products.

    PubMed

    Waszkowiak, Katarzyna; Szymandera-Buszka, Krystyna; Hęś, Marzanna

    2014-01-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important source of phenolic compounds, mainly lignans. Antioxidant capacities of flaxseed extracts that contain the compounds have been reported earlier. However, there is a lack of accessible information about their activity against lipid oxidation in meat products. Therefore, the effect of ethanolic flaxseed extracts (EFEs) on lipid stability and changes in nutritive value of frozen-stored meat products (pork meatballs and burgers) was determined. EFEs from three Polish flax varieties (Szafir, Oliwin, Jantarol) were applied in the study. During 150-day storage of meat products, the lipid oxidation (peroxide and TBARS value) and thiamine retention were periodically monitored, alongside with methionine and lysine availability and protein digestibility. The addition of EFEs significantly limited lipid oxidation in stored meatballs and burgers. EFE from brown seeds of Szafir var. was superior to the others from golden seeds of Jantarol and Oliwin. Moreover, the extracts reduced changes in thiamine and available lysine content, as well as protein digestibility, during storage time. The effect of EFE addition on available methionine retention was limited. The ethanolic flaxseed extracts exhibit antioxidant activity during frozen storage of meat products. They can be utilized to prolong shelf-life of the products by protecting them against lipid oxidation and deterioration of their nutritional quality. However, antioxidant efficiency of the extracts seems to depend on chemical composition of raw material (flax variety). Further investigations should be carried on to explain the issue.

  19. Optimization of media components for laccase production by litter dwelling fungal isolate Fusarium incarnatum LD-3.

    PubMed

    Chhaya, Urvish; Gupte, Akshaya

    2010-02-01

    Laccase production by solid state fermentation (SSF) using an indigenously isolated litter dwelling fungus Fusarium incarnatum LD-3 was optimized. Fourteen medium components were screened by the initial screening method of Plackett-Burman. Each of the components was screened on the basis of 'p' (probability value) which was above 95% confidence level. Ortho-dianisidine, thiamine HCl and CuSO(4) . 5 H(2)O were identified as significant components for laccase production. The Central Composite Design response surface methodology was then applied to further optimize the laccase production. The optimal concentration of these three medium components for higher laccase production were (g/l): CuSO(4) . 5 H(2)O, 0.01; thiamine HCl, 0.0136 and ortho-dianisidine, 0.388 mM served as an inducer. Wheat straw, 5.0 g was used as a solid substrate. Using this statistical optimization method the laccase production was found to increase from 40 U/g to 650 U/g of wheat straw, which was sixteen times higher than non optimized medium. This is the first report on statistical optimization of laccase production from Fusarium incarnatum LD-3.

  20. Inadequacy of nutrients intake among pregnant women in the deep south of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sukchan, Phnom; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Songwathana, Praneed; Sornsrivichai, Vosasit; Kuning, Metta

    2010-09-24

    The deep south of Thailand is an area which has been affected by violence since 2004, yet the concurrent coverage of antenatal care has remained at over 90%. Our study aimed to describe the prevalence of nutrient inadequacy among pregnant women who attended antenatal care clinics in hospitals in the study area and assess factors associated with nutrient inadequacy. Pregnant women from four participating hospitals located in lower southern Thailand were surveyed during January-December 2008. Nutrient intake was estimated based on information provided by the women on the amount, type and frequency of various foods eaten. Logistic regression was used to assess individual and community factors associated with inadequate nutrient intake, defined as less than two thirds of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA). The prevalence of carbohydrate, protein, fat, calories, calcium, phosphorus, iron, thiamine, riboflavin, retinol, niacin, vitamin C, folic acid and iodine inadequacy was 86.8%, 59.2%, 78.0%, 83.5%, 55.0%, 29.5%, 45.2%, 85.0%, 19.2%, 3.8%, 43.2%, 0.8%, 0.0% and 0.8%, respectively. Maternal age, education level, gestational age at enrollment and pre-pregnancy body mass index and level of violence in the district were significantly associated with inadequacy of carbohydrate, protein, phosphorus, iron, thiamine and niacin intake. Nutrient intake inadequacy among pregnant women was common in this area. Increasing levels of violence was associated with nutrient inadequacy in addition to individual factors.

  1. Beyond alcoholism: Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Laurie M; Buchanan, Judith R; Onwuameze, Obiora E; Pierson, Ronald K; Paradiso, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome (the combined disorder is named Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome [WKS]) are preventable, life-threatening neuropsychiatric syndromes resulting from thiamine deficiency. WKS has historically been associated with alcoholism; more recently, it has been recognized in patients who have anorexia nervosa or have undergone bariatric surgery for obesity. However, patients with nutritional deficiencies of any origin are at risk for WKS. We present clinical histories and neuroimaging data on 2 young adults with underlying psychiatric disorders who became malnourished and developed WKS. A young woman with bipolar disorder and somatization disorder was hospitalized for intractable vomiting. A young man with chronic paranoid schizophrenia developed delusions that food and water were harmful, and was hospitalized after subsisting for 4 months on soda pop. Acute, life-threatening Wernicke encephalopathy was confirmed in both patients by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic injury. The patients were left with persistent cognitive and physical disabilities that were consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. Failure to suspect a vitamin deficiency led to permanent cognitive and physical disabilities that may necessitate lifelong care for these patients. The neuropsychiatric consequences could have been prevented by prompt recognition of their thiamine deficiency.

  2. Persistence of disturbed thalamic glucose metabolism in a case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Scheurich, Armin; Siessmeier, Thomas; Schmidt, Lutz G; Bartenstein, Peter

    2003-10-30

    We report the case of a 40-year-old alcoholic male patient, hospitalized with an acute ataxia of stance and gait, ocular muscle weakness with nystagmus and a global apathetic-confusional state. After admission, an amnestic syndrome with confabulation was also observed and diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was made. Under treatment with intravenous thiamine, the patient recovered completely from gaze weakness and ataxia, whereas a severe amnestic syndrome persisted. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) showed bilateral thalamic and severe bilateral temporal-parietal hypometabolism resembling a pattern typical for Alzheimer's disease. Longitudinal assessment of the alcohol-abstinent and thiamine-substituted patient revealed improvements of clinical state and neuropsychological performance that were paralleled by recovered cerebral glucose metabolism. In contrast to metabolic rates that increased between 7.1% (anterior cingulate, left) and 23.5% (parietal, left) in cortical areas during a 9-month remission period, thalamic glucose metabolism remained severely disturbed over time (change: left +0.2%, right +0.3%).

  3. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation. PMID:27576603

  4. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  5. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kotov, S V; Lobakov, A I; Isakova, E V; Stashuk, G A; Volchenkova, T V

    To study the diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Eight patients (5 men and 3 women), mean age 38,9±1,4 years, with WKS developed due to acute gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disease (3 patients), the exacerbation of chronic GIT disease with malabsorption (2 patients) and after surgery on the upper GIT (3 patients) were included in the study. The disease manifested with consciousness disturbance, symptoms of ataxia, eye movement disorders and bulbar syndrome that developed after 24-48 h. Treatment resistant tonic-clonic seizures were developed in 1 patient. MRI revealed hyper intensive signals on T2-weighted images in the hypothalamus, mamillar bodies, brain stem, hippocampus as well as contrast accumulation in the mamillar bodies. Treatment with vitamin B complex (neurobion) and thiamine exerted a positive effect. Patients with GIT disease with malabsorption are at risk of WKS. Consciousness disturbance, symptoms of ataxia, eye movement disorders indicate the necessity of treatment with thiamine that allows to prevent the development of stable cognitive deficit.

  6. Beyond Alcoholism: Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Laurie M.; Buchanan, Judith R.; Onwuameze, Obiora E.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Paradiso, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objective Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome (the combined disorder is named Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome [WKS]) are preventable, life-threatening neuropsychiatric syndromes resulting from thiamine deficiency. WKS has historically been associated with alcoholism; more recently, it has been recognized in patients who have anorexia nervosa or have undergone bariatric surgery for obesity. However, patients with nutritional deficiencies of any origin are at risk for WKS. We present clinical histories and neuroimaging data on 2 young adults with underlying psychiatric disorders who became malnourished and developed WKS. Methods A young woman with bipolar disorder and somatization disorder was hospitalized for intractable vomiting. A young man with chronic paranoid schizophrenia developed delusions that food and water were harmful, and was hospitalized after subsisting for 4 months on soda pop. Results Acute, life-threatening Wernicke encephalopathy was confirmed in both patients by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic injury. The patients were left with persistent cognitive and physical disabilities that were consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. Conclusions Failure to suspect a vitamin deficiency led to permanent cognitive and physical disabilities that may necessitate lifelong care for these patients. The neuropsychiatric consequences could have been prevented by prompt recognition of their thiamine deficiency. PMID:22134191

  7. Dreissenid mussels from the Great Lakes contain elevated thiaminase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.; Nichols, S.J.; Zajicek, J.L.; Rinchard, J.; Richter, C.A.; Krueger, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at different depths and seasons, and from various locations in Lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Huron. Here we present evidence that two dreissenid mussel species (Dreissena bugensis and D. polymorpha) contain thiaminase activity that is 5-100 fold greater than observed in Great Lakes fishes. Thiaminase activity in zebra mussels ranged from 10,600 to 47,900??pmol g- 1??min- 1 and activities in quagga mussels ranged from 19,500 to 223,800??pmol g- 1??min- 1. Activity in the mussels was greatest in spring, less in summer, and least in fall. Additionally, we observed greater thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at shallow depths compared to mussels collected at deeper depths. Dreissenids constitute a significant and previously unknown pool of thiaminase in the Great Lakes food web compared to other known sources of this thiamine (vitamin B1)-degrading enzyme. Thiaminase in forage fish of the Great Lakes has been causally linked to thiamine deficiency in salmonines. We currently do not know whether linkages exist between thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids and the thiaminase activities in higher trophic levels of the Great Lakes food web. However, the extreme thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids from the Great Lakes may represent a serious unanticipated negative effect of these exotic species on Great Lakes ecosystems.

  8. Sulbutiamine shows promising results in reducing fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Serhan; Kaleağası, Hakan; Taşdelen, Bahar

    2017-08-01

    Fatigue is the most frequent and often debilitating symptom for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). There are no available effective therapies for fatigue associated with MS, and it is unclear whether a successful therapy of MS leads to clinical improvement. Sulbutiamine is a lipophilic compound that crosses the blood-brain barrier more readily than thiamine and increases the levels of thiamine and thiamine phosphate esters in the brain. Whereas several clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of sulbutiamine in patients with asthenia, there have been no reports on the effects of sulbutiamine on fatigue in patients with MS. Our study was designed to evaluate the short-term effects of sulbutiamine on fatigue in patients with MS. Patients were included if fatigue was one of their three predominant symptoms. They were required to have a total score on the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) of >20, and on the Beck Depression Inventory of <17, and no relapse in the last 3 months prior to onset of the study. Patients were advised to receive 400mg orally of sulbutiamine once daily for two months. The outcome of the study was in the changes of FIS. Twenty-six patients with MS (18 females and 8 males) were selected. The patients were 18-57 years of age (mean:37,2). The average score of Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of the patients was 2,71. A significant number of the subjects who were on some kind of disease modifying treatment (DMT) demonstrated obvious improvement in their total FIS scores, whereas none of the subjects who were not on any DMT improved (13/23 vs. 0/5). The average fatigue score was 77 (SD:30,5) at the baseline and 60,5 (SD:29,7) on Day 60, respectively. Sulbutiamine intake resulted in a significant reduction on the total score of FIS and on all three subscales assessing physical, cognitive, and psychosocial functioning (all p-values < 0,01). There were no serious adverse events. Sulbutiamin appears to be effective in treating fatigue

  9. Impact of Experimental Conditions on the Evaluation of Interactions between Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Proteins and Candidate Drugs.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian; Ishiguro, Naoki; Fukuhara, Ayano; Shimizu, Hidetada; Ohtsu, Naoko; Takatani, Masahito; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Washio, Ikumi; Yamamura, Norio; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATEs) have a determining influence on the pharmacokinetic profiles of many drugs and are involved in several clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Cellular uptake assays with recombinant cells expressing human MATE1 or MATE2-K are widely used to investigate MATE-mediated transport for DDI assessment; however, the experimental conditions and used test substrates vary among laboratories. We therefore initially examined the impact of three assay conditions that have been applied for MATE substrate and inhibitor profiling in the literature. One of the tested conditions resulted in significantly higher uptake rates of the three test substrates, [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, and [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), but IC50 values of four tested MATE inhibitors varied only slightly among the three conditions (<2.5-fold difference). Subsequently, we investigated the uptake characteristics of the five MATE substrates: [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, [(3)H]MPP(+), [(3)H]estrone-3-sulfate (E3S), and rhodamine 123, as well as the impact of the used test substrate on the inhibition profiles of 10 MATE inhibitors at one selected assay condition. [(3)H]E3S showed atypical uptake characteristics compared with those observed with the other four substrates. IC50 values of the tested inhibitors were in a similar range (<4-fold difference) when [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, [(3)H]MPP(+), or [(3)H]E3S were used as substrates but were considerably higher with rhodamine 123 (9.8-fold and 4.1-fold differences compared with [(14)C]metformin with MATE1 and MATE2-K, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time that the impact of assay conditions on IC50 determination is negligible, that kinetic characteristics differ among used test substrates, and that substrate-dependent inhibition exists for MATE1 and MATE2-K, giving valuable insight into the assessment of clinically relevant MATE-mediated DDIs in vitro

  10. Nutritional and environmental studies on an ocean-going oil tanker. 4. The diet of seamen

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, T. P.; Wheeler, Erica F.; Stock, Anne L.

    1971-01-01

    Eddy, T. P., Wheeler, Erica F., and Stock, Anne L. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 342-352. Nutritional and environmental studies on an ocean-going oil tanker. 4. The diet of seamen. Previous reports by Collins and his colleagues (1971a, b) and Eddy, Stock, and Wheeler (1971) have described energy and nutrient balances measured during a voyage of the oil tanker S.S. Esso Newcastle to the Persian Gulf in July and August 1967. This study of the diet of seamen during the voyage describes inter-relationships of the energy-yielding constituents of the diet, particularly the relationship of alcohol to other constituents, and vitamin intakes. For the whole ship's crew the percentages of energy derived from the main constituents were from protein 12%, fat 35%, carbohydrate 40%, and alcohol 13%. The intakes of six subjects studied in detail showed relatively little variation in protein, 13·9 ± 0·4 Joules%; but greater variation in fat (33·0 ± 1·6%), carbohydrate (42·7 ± 1·4%), and alcohol (10·4 ± 1·3%). There were high negative correlations, r=-0·75, between energy percentages derived from alcohol and those derived from protein and fat respectively. Flour purchased for the ship in a foreign port was deficient in thiamine and niacin. There was a negative correlation between energy and thiamine intake, and with unfortified white flour thiamine intake would fall below the recommended allowance at intakes above 14·5 MJ (3500 kcal). The unwitting substitution of unfortified flours in place of fortified British flour is a potential cause of deficiency. The estimated intake of riboflavine decreased when fresh milk supplies were exhausted following the 10th day out, and would have fallen below the recommended intake of 0·5 mg/1000 kcal (4·186 MJ) but for the consumption of beer. The intake of ascorbic acid was not affected by the duration of the voyage. It averaged 70mg/man/day and was derived chiefly from citrus fruits and potatoes. The Statutory Scale of

  11. Effect of iodine status and other nutritional factors on psychomotor and cognitive performance of Filipino schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Amarra, Ma Sofia V; Bongga, Demetria C; Peñano-Ho, Leticia; Cruz, Federico B; Solis, José S; Barrios, Erniel B

    2007-03-01

    was explained by dietary intakes that met > or = 80% of the RDA for energy, protein, thiamin, and riboflavin; the use of iodized salt; child's iodine status; and stunting (R2 = .520, p = .0016). Higher class median UIE was associated with better psychomotor and cognitive performance in children who were tested. Factors that contributed to better performance include higher intakes of energy, protein, thiamin, and riboflavin; household use of iodized salt; normal iodine status; and absence of stunting or chronic malnutrition. Salt iodization, accompanied by adequate intakes of energy, protein, and foods rich in thiamin and riboflavin, can contribute to improved mental performance in Filipino schoolchildren. Longer-term factors that can contribute to improved performance are achievement of normal iodine status and elimination of protein-energy malnutrition.

  12. Dietary B Vitamin Intake Is Associated with Lower Urinary Monomethyl Arsenic and Oxidative Stress Marker 15-F2t-Isoprostane among New Hampshire Adults.

    PubMed

    Howe, Caitlin G; Li, Zhigang; Zens, Michael S; Palys, Thomas; Chen, Yu; Channon, Jacqueline Y; Karagas, Margaret R; Farzan, Shohreh F

    2017-12-01

    Background: Arsenic exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Growing evidence suggests that B vitamins facilitate arsenic metabolism and may protect against arsenic toxicity. However, to our knowledge, few studies have evaluated this in US populations. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether higher B vitamin intake is associated with enhanced arsenic metabolism and lower concentrations of preclinical markers of CVD among New Hampshire adults. Methods: We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to evaluate the collective impact of 6 dietary B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) on 1 ) the proportion of arsenic metabolites in urine and 2 ) 6 CVD-related markers [including urinary 15-F 2t -isoprostane (15-F 2t -IsoP)] among 418 participants (26-75 y of age) from the New Hampshire Health Study. Contributions of arsenic metabolites to B vitamin-CVD marker associations were also explored in structural equation models. Results: In WQS models, the weighted sum of B vitamin intakes from food sources was inversely associated with the proportion of monomethyl arsenic species in urine (uMMA) (β: -1.03; 95% CI: -1.91, -0.15; P = 0.02). Thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 contributed the most to this association, whereas riboflavin had a negligible effect. Higher overall B vitamin intake was also inversely associated with 15-F 2t -IsoP (β: -0.21; 95% CI: -0.32, -0.11; P < 0.01), with equal contributions from the 6 B vitamins, which was partially explained by differences in the proportion of uMMA (indirect effect β: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.00). Conclusions: Among New Hampshire adults, higher intakes of certain B vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 from food sources) may reduce the proportion of uMMA, an intermediate of arsenic metabolism that has been associated with an increased risk of CVD. Higher overall B vitamin intake may also reduce urinary 15-F 2t -IsoP, a

  13. Vitamin profile of cooked foods: how healthy is the practice of ready-to-eat foods?

    PubMed

    Agte, Vaishali; Tarwadi, Kirtan; Mengale, Sangeeta; Hinge, Ashwini; Chiplonkar, Shashi

    2002-05-01

    During recent years importance of B complex vitamins, beta-carotene and vitamin C has been realised in terms of their antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. Fruits and vegetables are the rich sources of these vitamins. However, there are considerable cooking losses of vitamins, and information on vitamin contents of cooked foods is essential for assessing the adequacy of vitamin intakes. Secondly, there is a growing trend to consume ready-to-eat foods such as stuffed pancakes (samosa, patties), pastries, French fries; replacing traditional foods for lunch or dinner like roti, vegetable curry, bread, non-vegetarian items. Ready-to-eat foods are considered to give empty calories rather than a balanced diet. A study was undertaken to estimate ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, thiamine and beta-carotene of 263 cooked food samples and 260 meals representing dietary patterns of Asia, Africa, Europe, USA and Latin America by spectrophotometry and photoflurometry. A broad range of beta-carotene (84-2038 mcg%), riboflavin (0.01-0.48 mg%), thiamine (0.04-0.36 mg%), vitamin C (1-28 mg%) and folate (26-111 mcg%) was observed in individual foods. Bakery products and sweets were found to be poor sources and green leafy vegetables and fruits were good sources of these five vitamins. The differences between ready-to-eat foods and meals consumed during lunch or dinner were prominent for beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin and folic acid (P < 0.05). The cooking losses were 34.6, 30, 52.2, 45.9 and 32.2% in case of ascorbic acid, thiamine, riboflavin, beta-carotene and folic acid respectively. Irrespective of whether it is ready-to-eat or a lunch/dinner food item, the contribution of vegetables in the preparations was found to make a marked impact on the vitamin profile. While results justify the concept of a food pyramid, emphasis needs to be given to types of fruits and vegetables rich in vitamins; preferably in their uncooked form, rather than considering their

  14. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  15. Implicit Memory in Korsakoff’s Syndrome: A Review of Procedural Learning and Priming Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Scott M.; Fortier, Catherine B.; Levine, Andrea; Milberg, William P.; McGlinchey, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) is characterized by dense anterograde amnesia resulting from damage to the diencephalon region, typically resulting from chronic alcohol abuse and thiamine deficiency. This review assesses the integrity of the implicit memory system in KS, focusing on studies of procedural learning and priming. KS patients are impaired on several measures of procedural memory, most likely due to impairment in cognitive functions associated with alcohol-related neural damage outside of the diencephalon. The pattern of performance on tasks of implicit priming suggests reliance on a residual, non-flexible memory operating more or less in an automatic fashion. Our review concludes that whether measures of implicit memory reveal intact or impaired performance in individuals with KS depends heavily on specific task parameters and demands, including timing between stimuli, the specific nature of the stimuli used in a task, and the integrity of supportive cognitive functions necessary for performance. PMID:22592661

  16. [Evaluation of dietary pattern and nutritional status of residents in southeast coastal area].

    PubMed

    Lü, Na; Shen, Minghao; Huang, Yixiang; Lu, Lijuan; Zheng, Shangpin; Chen, Kai

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the dietary pattern and nutritional status of urban residents in southeast coastal area. A dietary survey concerning 1332 persons aged 18 and over was carried out with dietary inquiry and 24-hour recall methods from August to December in 2009. The intakes of cereal, meat, eggs, seafood were enough. The consumption of milk and dairy products, vegetables, fruits was insufficient while the amount of oil was too high. Among them, the intake of milk and dairy products was only 1/3 of suggested values in Dietary Guideline and Balanced Diet Pagoda for Chinese Residents. The intakes of protein, retinol, iron and selenium were sufficient, while those of calcium, thiamine, riboflavin, ascorbic acid were too less than the dietary reference intakes (DRIs). The dietary pattern of urban residents in Ningbo was not reasonable. Nutrition education should be strengthened to guide residents for planning reasonable and balanced diets.

  17. Growth and characterization of organic layers deposited on porous-patterned Si surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbach, Tamara Ya.; Smertenko, Petro S.; Olkhovik, G. P.; Wisz, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    The organic layers with the thickness from a few nanometers up to few micrometers have been deposited from the chemical solution at room temperature on porous patterned Si surfaces using two medical solutions: thiamine diphosphide (pH=1÷2) and metamizole sodium (pH=6÷7). Based on evolution of morphology, structural and compositional features obtained by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, reflectance high energy electron diffraction the grown mechanisms in thin organic layers are discussed in the terms of terrace-step-kink model whereas self-organized assemblies evaluated more thick layers. Transport mechanism features and possible photovoltaic properties are discussed on the base of differential current-voltage characteristics.

  18. Nutrition attributes and health effects of pistachio nuts.

    PubMed

    Bulló, M; Juanola-Falgarona, M; Hernández-Alonso, P; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological and/or clinical trials have suggested that nut consumption has a beneficial impact on health outcomes such as hypertension, diabetes, CVD, cancer, other inflammatory conditions and total mortality. Nuts are nutrient-dense foods with a healthy fatty acid profile, as well as provide other bioactive compounds with recognised health benefits. Among nuts, pistachios have a lower fat and energy content and the highest levels of K, γ-tocopherol, vitamin K, phytosterols, xanthophyll carotenoids, certain minerals (Cu, Fe and Mg), vitamin B₆ and thiamin. Pistachios have a high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential. The aforementioned characteristics and nutrient mix probably contribute to the growing body of evidence that consumption of pistachios improves health. The present review examines the potential health effects of nutrients and phytochemicals in pistachios, as well as epidemiological and clinical evidence supporting these health benefits.

  19. Cytochemical localization of phosphatases in the germ- and Sertoli cells of Odontophrynus cultripes (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A P; Báo, S N

    1998-08-01

    Ultrastructural cytochemical techniques were used for the localization of phosphatases in spermatid and spermatozoon, as well as in Sertoli cells of Odontophrynus cultripes (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae). Acid phosphatase was found in the acrosome. Thiamine pyrophosphatase was observed in the Golgi cisternae and in the tail spermatozoon surface. Glucose-6-phosphatase was located in the membrane complex of the acrosomal region. Already, in the Sertoli cells acid phosphatase was located in the lysosomes and glucose-6-phosphatase was observed in association with the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. These observations support the idea that various phosphatases may play some role in spermatid differentiation and in the interactions germ cells--Sertoli cells during spermiogenesis process.

  20. Precursors of chicken flavor. II. Identification of key flavor precursors using sensory methods.

    PubMed

    Aliani, Michel; Farmer, Linda J

    2005-08-10

    Sensory evaluation was used to identify flavor precursors that are critical for flavor development in cooked chicken. Among the potential flavor precursors studied (thiamin, inosine 5'-monophosphate, ribose, ribose-5-phosphate, glucose, and glucose-6-phosphate), ribose appears most important for chicken aroma. An elevated concentration (added or natural) of only 2-4-fold the natural concentration gives an increase in the selected aroma and flavor attributes of cooked chicken meat. Assessment of the volatile odor compounds by gas chromatography-odor assessment and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that ribose increased odors described as "roasted" and "chicken" and that the changes in odor due to additional ribose are probably caused by elevated concentrations of compounds such as 2-furanmethanethiol, 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, and 3-methylthiopropanal.

  1. A plasmid collection for PCR-based gene targeting in the filamentous ascomycete Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Andreas

    2009-08-01

    PCR-based gene targeting with heterologous markers is an efficient method to delete genes, generate gene fusions, and modulate gene expression. For the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, several plasmid collections are available covering a wide range of tags and markers. For several reasons, many of these cassettes cannot be used in the filamentous ascomycete Ashbya gossypii. This article describes the construction of 93 heterologous modules for C- and N-terminal tagging and promoter replacements in A. gossypii. The performance of 12 different fluorescent tags was evaluated by monitoring their brightness, detectability, and photostability when fused to the myosin light-chain protein Mlc2. Furthermore, the thiamine-repressible S. cerevisiae THI13 promoter was established to regulate gene expression in A. gossypii. This collection will help accelerate analysis of gene function in A. gossypii and in other ascomycetes where S. cerevisiae promoter elements are functional.

  2. Transient bradycardia induced by thiopentone sodium: a unique challenge in the management of refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushma; Nair, Pradeep P; Murgai, Aditya; Selvaraj, Raja J

    2013-10-15

    Thiopentone sodium is one of the important drugs in the armamentarium for terminating refractory status